WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioreactors current practices

  1. Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators

  2. Bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaleddine, E. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Bioresource Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Composting is once again gaining interest among ecological engineers in view of greener industrial and residential activities. Uniform composting is needed to ensure decomposition and to keep the whole system at the same composting stage. A homogeneous temperature must be maintained throughout the media. A bioreactor design consisting of a heater core made of copper tubing was designed and tested. Two four-inch holes were made at the top and bottom of the barrel to allow air to flow through the system and promote aerobic composting. Once composting began and temperature increased, the water began to flow through the copper piping and the core heat was distributed throughout the medium. Three thermocouples were inserted at different heights on a 200 litre plastic barrel fitted with the aforementioned apparatus. Temperature variations were found to be considerably lower when the apparatus was operated with the heat redistribution system, enabling uniform composting, accelerating the process and reducing the risks of pathogenic or other contaminants remaining active in the barrels.

  3. STATE OF THE PRACTICE FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - SUMMARY OF USEPA WORKSHOP ON BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: SUMMARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a summary of the Workshop on Landfill Bioreactors, held 9/6-7/2000 in Arlington, VA. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum to EPA, state and local governments, solid waste industry, and academic research representatives to exchange information and ideas on b...

  4. Current practice for pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toru Satoh

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current practice of pulmonary hypertension including current epidemiology,diagnosis and treatment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection Articles with high level of evidence or current best evidence in each issue were selected to be reviewed.Results Overall prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 0.3% to 6% with left heart disease occupying the most proportion,followed by pulmonary disease,pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.In diagnosis,a flow diagram of diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension,differential diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and how to determine the severity of pulmonary hypertension are explained including recent development of magnetic resonance imaging and gene abnormality study on bone morphogenetic protein receptor Ⅱ.In treatment,newlydeveloped pulmonary vasodilators and the way to use them are shown to treat pulmonary hypertension.Conclusion Safer and more effective treatment algorithm and basic researches and clinical trials are warranted to be explored.

  5. A review of practical tools for rapid monitoring of membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, E; Verheyen, V; Brook-Carter, P

    2016-10-01

    The production of high quality effluent from membrane bioreactors (MBRs) arguably requires less supervision than conventional activated sludge (CAS) processes. Nevertheless, the use of membranes brings additional issues of activated sludge filterability, cake layer formation and membrane fouling. From a practical standpoint, process engineers and operators require simple tools which offer timely information about the biological health and filterability of the mixed liquor as well as risks of membrane fouling. To this end, a range of analytical tools and biological assays are critically reviewed from this perspective. This review recommends that Capillary Suction Time (CST) analysis along with Total Suspended and Volatile Solids (TSS/VSS) analysis is used daily. For broad characterisation, total carbon and nitrogen analysis offer significant advantages over the commonly used chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD/BOD) analyses. Of the technologies for determining the vitality of the microbial biomass the most robust and reproducible, are the second generation adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) test kits. Extracellular polymer concentrations are best monitored by measurement of turbidity after centrifugation. Taken collectively these tools can be used routinely to ensure timely intervention and smoother operation of MBR systems. PMID:27362445

  6. Comparison of different bioreactors in a pilot plant and first experiences in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological treatment of ground-water rests today on the physical-chemical processes such as adsorption by activated carbon or tripping of the water and exhausting the ground-air. The utilization of these processes is, however, under ecological reflection, very doubtful; among other reasons, because of the atmospheric pollution and high energy consumption. Parallel investigations were carried out with various bioreactors on a pilot-scale, whereby a series of chlorinated hydrocarbons were purely biological degraded up to a few microgrammes per litre at detention periods in the reactor of under 20 minutes. In this report experiences with stationary bed-bioreactors with various base materials under aerobic conditions are summarized and a first biological high-capacity facility is pointed out which has proved to be of very attractive economy. (orig.)

  7. Overview of current chelation practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Aydinok

    2011-12-01

    , should provide long-term survival and quality of life for patients with iron loading anemias. The goal of this review is to summarize current concepts in iron chelation therapies based on the considerable amount of prospective data obtained by clinical studies. 去铁胺 (DFO)是自20世纪80年以来输血引起铁过载的参考标准疗法。 虽然它是一种高效的铁螯合剂,但是去铁胺皮下给药的遵从性问题依旧是主要问题。 口服螯合剂去铁酮(DFP)在北美没有销售许可证,但是,它在1994年获得印度许可,1999年欧洲联盟(EU)批准授予去铁酮销售许可证,特别是当去铁胺不足、无法忍受或无法接受时,去铁酮可用于重型地中海贫血患者。 还可获得关于在6岁至10岁之间的儿童身上使用去铁酮的有限数据,但是没有关于在6岁以下儿童身上使用去铁酮的数据。 随后美国食品和药品管理局(FDA)和欧洲药品管理局(EMA)分别在2005年和2006年批准口服螯合剂去铁酮作为第一疗法来治疗2岁以上输血引起铁过载的患者。 铁螯合的主要目的是将身体铁维持在安全水平,但一旦铁累积起来,铁螯合的目标是把组织铁降低到安全级别,这是一个缓慢的过程。 确定螯合剂的螯合方案、剂量和频率管理的主要依据是身体铁负担、心肌铁的状态和输血铁负载速率。 适当监控螯合对测量特殊方案的反应速率和提供计量调整来加强螯合效果和避免毒效尤其重要。 由于一些因素,诸如:螯合剂的吸收和代谢,螯合方案的效果可能呈现个别变化。 耐受性和遵从性也是影响螯合反应的个别变量。 了解螯合剂的优点和局限性,准确确定铁过载患者的螯合需求以及设计毒效更小但效果更优的个性化螯合方案,可以向铁过载贫血患者提供长期的生存和生活质量。 此次调研的目的是在临床研究获得的相当数

  8. Current practice in tailings ponds risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Pytel, Witold

    2010-01-01

    Current practice for risk assessment posed by surface tailings/waste storage facilities is presented. This involves current legislation and regulations applied in EU countries and over the world and the basics concerned with tailings impoundments design as well. It was proved that a current activity at the existing tailings impoundment structures is presently confined rather to field measurements, monitoring and surveillance understood as a basic source for a “real time risk assessment”.

  9. Current economic trends in equine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew R

    2009-12-01

    Current economic trends in equine practice are trends of weakness. Most practices, after a decade of double-digit growth, have migrated to survival mode within a few months. Understanding that all regions and disciplines are affected differently, using the Porter five forces model, we can identify changes that must be made in our business models first to survive and then to position ourselves to prosper when the recession ends. If we are to avoid long-term damage to our practices, we must use cost control and work efficiency in addition to price concessions. PMID:19945636

  10. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  11. Teaching Math Online: Current Practices in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Omur

    2011-01-01

    Changing nature of student population, developments in technology, and insufficient number of traditional universities have made online courses popular around the globe. This study was designed to investigate the current practices of teaching mathematics online in Turkish Universities through a qualitative inquiry. The snowball sampling method was…

  12. Modelling current voltage characteristics of practical superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on recent experimental results, and in the light of fundamental physical properties of the magnetic flux in type-II superconductors, we introduce a practical expression for the material law to be applied in numerical modelling of superconducting applications. Focusing on the computational side, in this paper, previous theory is worked out, so as to take the celebrated form of a power-law-like dependence for the current voltage characteristic. However, contrary to the common approach in numerical studies, this proposal suits the general situation of current density flow with components either parallel or perpendicular to the local magnetic field, and different constraints applying on each component. Mathematically, the theory is generated from an elliptic locus defined in terms of the current density vector components. From the physical side, this contour establishes the boundary for the onset of entropy production related to overcritical current flow in different conditions. The electric field is obtained by partial differentiation and points perpendicular to the ellipse. Some numerical examples, inspired by the geometry of a two-layer helical counter-wound cable are provided. Corrections to the widespread use of the implicit isotropic assumption (physical properties only depend on the modulus of the current density vector) are discussed, and essentially indicate that the current carrying capacity of practical systems may be underestimated by using such simplification. (paper)

  13. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Close-up view of the interior of a NASA Bioreactor shows the plastic plumbing and valves (cylinders at center) to control fluid flow. A fresh nutrient bag is installed at top; a flattened waste bag behind it will fill as the nutrients are consumed during the course of operation. The drive chain and gears for the rotating wall vessel are visible at bottom center center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  14. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The heart of the bioreactor is the rotating wall vessel, shown without its support equipment. Volume is about 125 mL. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  15. Bioreactor principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Cells cultured on Earth (left) typically settle quickly on the bottom of culture vessels due to gravity. In microgravity (right), cells remain suspended and aggregate to form three-dimensional tissue. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. Progress in bioreactors of bioartiifcial livers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Bo Yu; Xiao-Ping Pan; Lan-Juan Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bioartiifcial liver support systems are becoming an effective therapy for hepatic failure. Bioreactors, as key devices in these systems, can provide a favorable growth and metabolic environment, mass exchange, and immunological isolation as a platform. Currently, stagnancy in bioreactor research is the main factor restricting the development of bioartiifcial liver support systems. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed database search of English-language literature was performed to identify relevant articles using the keywords "bioreactor", "bioartiifcial liver", "hepatocyte", and "liver failure". More than 40 articles related to the bioreactors of bioartiifcial livers were reviewed. RESULTS: Some progress has been made in the improvement of structures, functions, and modiifed macromolecular materials related to bioreactors in recent years. The current data on the improvement of bioreactor conifgurations for bioartiifcial livers or on the potential of the use of certain scaffold materials in bioreactors, combined with the clinical efifcacy and safety evaluation of cultured hepatocytesin vitro, indicate that the AMC (Academic Medical Center) BAL bioreactor and MELS (modular extracorporeal liver support) BAL bioreactor system can partly replace the synthetic and metabolic functions of the liver in phaseⅠ clinical studies. In addition, it has been indicated that the microlfuidic PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) bioreactor, or SlideBioreactor, and the microfabricated grooved bioreactor are appropriate for hepatocyte culture, which is also promising for bioartiifcial livers. Similarly, modiifed scaffolds can promote the adhesion, growth, and function of hepatocytes, and provide reliable materials for bioreactors.CONCLUSIONS: Bioreactors, as key devices in bioartiifcial livers, play an important role in the therapy for liver failure both now and in the future. Bioreactor conifgurations are indispensable for the development of bioartiifcial livers used for liver

  17. Massive transfusion protocols: current best practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yen-Michael S Hsu,1 Thorsten Haas,2 Melissa M Cushing1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs are established to provide rapid blood replacement in a setting of severe hemorrhage. Early optimal blood transfusion is essential to sustain organ perfusion and oxygenation. There are many variables to consider when establishing an MTP, and studies have prospectively evaluated different scenarios and patient populations to establish the best practices to attain improved patient outcomes. The establishment and utilization of an optimal MTP is challenging given the ever-changing patient status during resuscitation efforts. Much of the MTP literature comes from the trauma population, due to the fact that massive hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable trauma-related death. As we come to further understand the positive and negative clinical impacts of transfusion-related factors, massive transfusion practice can be further refined. This article will first discuss specific MTPs targeting different patient populations and current relevant international guidelines. Then, we will examine a wide selection of therapeutic products to support MTPs, including newly available products and the most suitable of the traditional products. Lastly, we will discuss the best design for an MTP, including ratio-based MTPs and MTPs based on the use of point-of-care coagulation diagnostic tools. Keywords: hemorrhage, MTP, antifibrinolytics, coagulopathy, trauma, ratio, logistics, guidelines, hemostatic

  18. 21 CFR 110.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 110.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD General Provisions § 110.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria...

  19. 21 CFR 226.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 226.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES General Provisions § 226.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria in §§ 226.10 through 226.115,...

  20. 21 CFR 225.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 225.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS General Provisions § 225.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Section 501(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  1. 21 CFR 129.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 129.1 Section... Current good manufacturing practice. The applicable criteria in part 110 of this chapter, as well as the... manufacturing practice to assure that bottled drinking water is safe and that it has been processed,...

  2. Bioreactor landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; XING Kai; Anthony Adzomani

    2004-01-01

    Following the population expansion, there is a growing threat brought by municipal solid waste (MSW) against environment and human health. Sanitary landfill is the most important method of MSW disposal in China. In contrast to the conventional landfill, this paper introduces a new technique named bioreactor landfill (BL). Mechanisms, operation conditions as well as the advantages and disadvantages of BL are also discussed in this paper.

  3. Current operating practices of nuclear insurance pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the nuclear pooling system and co-operation between the pools, present practice and capacity, with a breakdown of the limits for third party liability and material damage. The author also describes the relationship between the pools and the nuclear operators (the policyholders), and concludes that the nuclear pools have been successful in serving the interests of their member companies, their policyholders and the governments as they have provided a stable insurance market by making available capacity in amounts that had never before been assembled and placed at risk in a single location. 2 tabs

  4. 21 CFR 120.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 120.5 Section 120.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 120.5 Current good manufacturing practice. Part 110 of this chapter applies in...

  5. 21 CFR 113.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 113.5 Section 113.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... CONTAINERS General Provisions § 113.5 Current good manufacturing practice. The criteria in §§ 113.10,...

  6. Czech Accounting Academia and Practice: Historical Roots and Current Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Jindrichovska; Dana Kubickova

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the development of Czech accounting research and education and their links to current practice. The paper uses the autoethnography method and deals with some of the main issues arising in current university research management practices. To this aim we apply our own experience and combine personal perspectives and existing literature (research papers on historical and contemporary academic environment and the current debates regarding management o...

  7. Telehealth: current practices and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yadin B.

    1996-02-01

    When we review the positive impact that the integration of ostensibly independent patient-care services have on the efficient management of quality care, education, and collaborative research, it is not surprising that telehealth deployment is on the rise. The forces that drive this phenomenon include: the need to manage the entire disease episode; the desire for wider geographically-distributed quality health care; the escalation of customer expectations; globalization of healthcare and its support services; an increase in patient and provider convenience; and the acceptance of the present technological community. At the Telehealth Center at the Texas Children's Hospital, current classifications of clinical applications are listed: (1) initial urgent evaluation of patients, (2) triage decisions and pretransfer arrangements, (3) medical and surgical follow-up and medication review, (4) consultation for primary care encounters, (5) real-time subspecialty care consultation and planning, (6) management of chronic diseases and conditions, (7) extended diagnostic work-ups, (8) review of diagnostic images, and (9) preventive medicine and patient education. The delivery of such services is associated with challenges and opportunities. As we move forward from limited data processing to an integrated communication system, from centralized main frame functions to personalized and location-independent workstations, and from hospitals to clinics and homecare, an increase in the minimum features provided by the equipment and the communication systems must accompany the widening variety of clinical applications. Future expansion of telehealth systems stands to revolutionize the delivery of services to the benefits of providers' networks, our economy, and patients through integration.

  8. Overview of current and alternative slaughter practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troeger K.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional cattle slaughtering process includes some critical stages where a dissemination of Specified Risk Material (SRM: brain, spinal cord within or onto the carcass and within the slaughterhouse environment can occur. These processes are captive bolt stunning, removal of the head and first of all carcass splitting (sawing the spine lengthways. Captive bolt (CB stunning results in massive brain tissue damage with bleeding, and in some cases brain tissue also emerges from the CB hole. As the heart is still functioning, there is a risk of brain tissue particles being transferred v i a the blood flow to heart and lungs or even in the whole carcass. This contamination risk is actually assessed to be low, but a continuing leakage of Central Nervous System (CNS material from the captive bolt aperture in the further slaughter process may lead to direct and indirect contamination of carcass, meat and equipment. Therefore alternative stunning methods like electrical stunning or concussion stunning are discussed. A further critical point is the treatment of the head. When the head is removed, the spinal cord is cut with a knife. There is a danger of cross contamination due to spinal protein that may adhere to the knife and because of liquid cerebralis, which leaks from the foramen occipitale magnum. Further head cleaning with hand-held hoses following skinning also includes the danger of cross contamination from cleaning water or aerosol. Therefore measures regarding the safe handling of head and harvesting of head meat are proposed. The most critical point in terms of contamination of the meat surface with SRM is the currently common practise of sawing the spine vertically in the middle with hand-guided belt-type saws. A m i x t u r e of sawing residues and rinsing water (“sawing sludge” collects in the housing of the saw, and if it contains infectious material this leads to contamination of the subsequent carcasses. The most promising

  9. Aptamer therapeutics: A review of current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    meet the criteria for robust, generic drug discovery technology and open new horizons for the development of future radiopharmaceuticals. We have shown that aptamers directed against the MUC1 antigen, a tumour marker previously extensively used in tumour imaging and therapy, demonstrated high specificity and uniform penetration in tumour xenografts. The future strategy will be to manipulate the molecular weight of the molecules to achieve an optimum balance between the low immunogenicity and excellent tumour penetration for diagnostic imaging and targeted therapy. In this way, a balance can be achieved between the rapid renal clearance and adequate tumour uptake required for diagnostic imaging and targeted therapy. The current work and future prospects for aptamer therapeutics will be described. (author)

  10. Current Best Practice for Research Data Management Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Hodson, Simon; Molloy, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Report on Current Best Practice for Research Data Management Policies commissioned from CODATA by the Danish e-Infrastructure Cooperation and the Danish Digital Library and submitted in May 2014.

  11. 21 CFR 123.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 123.5 Section 123.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... manufacturing practice. (a) Part 110 of this chapter applies in determining whether the facilities,...

  12. Current Practices in the Delivery of Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michele M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify current practices for the delivery of exercise physiology content at the undergraduate level. An anonymous 22-item survey was sent to instructors of exercise physiology to collect information concerning the structure of course offerings and instructional practices. One hundred ten instructors responded to…

  13. 21 CFR 114.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 114.5 Section 114.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION ACIDIFIED FOODS General Provisions § 114.5 Current good...

  14. Denitrification using immersed membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    McAdam, Ewan J.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate is practically ubiquitous in waters abstracted for municipal potable water production in Europe due to decades of intensive agricultural practice. Ion exchange is principally selected to target abstracted waters with elevated nitrate concentrations. However, the cost associated with disposal of the waste stream has re-ignited interest in destructive rather concentrative technologies. This thesis explores the potential of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology for the remo...

  15. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor develop...

  16. Bioreactor technology for herbal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants have been an important source of medicine for thousands of years and herbs are hot currency in the world today. During the last decade, popularity of alternative medicine increased significantly worldwide with noticeable trend. This in turn accelerated the global trade of herbal raw materials and herbal products and created greater scope for Asian countries that possess the major supply of herbal raw materials within their highly diversified tropical rain forest. As such, advanced bioreactor culture system possesses a great potential for large scale production than the traditional tissue culture system. Bioreactor cultures have many advantages over conventional cultures. Plant cells in bioreactors can grow fast and vigorously in shorter period as the culture conditions in bioreactor such as temperature, pH, concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide and nutrients can be optimised by on-line manipulation. Nutrient uptake can also be enhanced by continuous medium circulation, which ultimately increased cell proliferation rate. Consequently, production period and cost are substantially reduced, product quality is controlled and standardized as well as free of pesticide contamination and production of raw material can be conducted all year round. Taking all these into consideration, current research efforts were focused on varying several parameters such as inoculation density, air flow, medium formulation, PGRs etc. for increased production of cell and organ cultures of high market demand herbal and medicinal plants, particularly Eurycoma longifolia, Panax ginseng and Labisia pumila. At present, the production of cell and organ culture of these medicinal plants have also been applied in airlift bioreactor with different working volumes. It is hope that the investment of research efforts into this advanced bioreactor technology will open up a bright future for the modernization of agriculture and commercialisation of natural product. (author)

  17. Operation of landfill bioreactors, or leachate recirculation landfills in cold climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettiaratchi, J.P.A.; Stein, V.B.; Pokhrel, D.; Chandrakanthi, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The major difference between conventional landfills and bioreactor landfills is that the latter are designed, constructed, and operated to promote rapid waste degradation. This paper presents a critical review of the current design and operation practices of landfill bioreactors in relation to leachate management and gas management. The features of the two concepts were also compared. A variety of methods of mixing leachate with waste are required in leachate recirculation, some of which cannot be applied in cold climates. It is imperative to possess an excellent understanding of leachate hydrology within the waste matrix to avoid generating problems associated with leachate ponding, leachate leakage from side-walls or landfill instability during leachate recirculation. The authors pointed out that gas recovery systems in bioreactors should be designed and installed by carefully considering settlement issues and time-dependent changes to gas permeability from changes to waste density and moisture content. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Human Factors Engineering: Current Practices and Development Needs in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes initial findings from a study concerning the practices and development needs of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in Finland. HFE is increasing in importance as the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority Finland (STUK) is renewing the regulatory guidelines and the intention is to include requirements concerning HFE. The motivation for the paper is to discover how HFE is conducted currently in order to envision what should be aimed at when modifying requirements for design practices. In an interview with STUK it was discovered that current HFE practices encompass mainly activities related to control room modifications and as such namely verification and validation of new designs. The adoption of the entire HFE process in design and modification projects requires changes that include better integration of technical and Human Factors Engineering approaches. Boundary objects that mediate between different design disciplines are needed in order to enforce the stronger integration. Concept of operations (CONOPS) is suggested as a such boundary object

  19. Human Factors Engineering: Current Practices and Development Needs in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savioja, Paula; Norros, Leena; Liinasuo, Marja; Laarni, Jari [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland (Finland)

    2011-08-15

    This paper describes initial findings from a study concerning the practices and development needs of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in Finland. HFE is increasing in importance as the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority Finland (STUK) is renewing the regulatory guidelines and the intention is to include requirements concerning HFE. The motivation for the paper is to discover how HFE is conducted currently in order to envision what should be aimed at when modifying requirements for design practices. In an interview with STUK it was discovered that current HFE practices encompass mainly activities related to control room modifications and as such namely verification and validation of new designs. The adoption of the entire HFE process in design and modification projects requires changes that include better integration of technical and Human Factors Engineering approaches. Boundary objects that mediate between different design disciplines are needed in order to enforce the stronger integration. Concept of operations (CONOPS) is suggested as a such boundary object.

  20. Sustainable purchasing practices: An investigation into current industry awareness and practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Palisi, Francis X

    2012-01-01

    This research study illustrates the growing importance of sustainable purchasing practices and answers two important questions: what is the current awareness of U.S. organizations on sustainable purchasing practices with regards to evaluating, selecting, and retaining suppliers and to what extent are these practices being implemented? The research conducted is based upon an in-depth literature review of green purchasing and sustainability initiatives. With an ever increasing global economy wi...

  1. On the Current Measurement Practices in Agile Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghi Javdani Gandomani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Agile software development (ASD methods were introduced as a reaction to traditional software development methods. Principles of these methods are different from traditional methods and so there are some different processes and activities in agile methods comparing to traditional methods. Thus ASD methods require different measurement practices comparing to traditional methods. Agile teams often do their projects in the simplest and most effective way so, measurement practices in agile methods are more important than traditional methods, because lack of appropriate and effective measurement practices, will increase risk of project. The aims of this paper are investigation on current measurement practices in ASD methods, collecting them together in one study and also reviewing agile version of Common Software Measurement International Consortium (COSMIC publication.

  2. Denitrification in Membrane Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Anabela Duarte

    1999-01-01

    Three membrane bioreactors, a low flux filter (LFF), a diafilter (DF), and an ion-exchange (IE) membrane bioreactor were used to treat water polluted with 50 ppm-N nitrate. The three systems were compared in terms of removal efficiency of nitrate, operational complexity, and overall quality of the treated water. In the low flux filter (LFF) membrane bioreactor an hemo-dialysis hollow fiber module was used and operated continuously for 29 days with a constant flux of permeate. The perform...

  3. Insights into current practices in auditing environmental matters

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate insights into current practices in auditing “environmental matters” in accordance with Audit Guidance Statement 1010: The Consideration of Environmental Matters in the Audit of Financial Reports, which was introduced by the New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants in 2001. Design/methodology/approach – The approach to gathering evidence for this study is qualitative semi-structured in-depth personal interviews with 27 auditors: 18 fi...

  4. Information Security Incident Management : An Empirical Study of Current Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hove, Cathrine; Tårnes, Marte

    2013-01-01

    An increasing use of digital solutions suggests that organizations today are more exposed to attacks than before. Recent reports show that attacks get more advanced and that attackers choose their targets more wisely. Despite preventive measures being implemented, incidents occur occasionally. This calls for effective and efficient information security incident management. Several standards and guidelines addressing incident management exist. However, few studies of current practices have bee...

  5. Geropsychology Mentoring: A Survey of Current Practices and Perceived Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Fiske, Amy; Zimmerman, Jennifer A.; Scogin, Forrest

    2011-01-01

    The need for clinical geropsychologists currently exceeds the availability, and this imbalance is expected to worsen along with the impending growth in the older adult population. Effective geropsychology mentoring may be helpful in meeting this challenge. However, little is known about mentoring within clinical geropsychology. The present paper reports on a survey of mentoring practices and needs. Findings indicate that a large majority of clinical geropsychology trainees and professionals a...

  6. Figures in clinical trial reports: current practice & scope for improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Travison Thomas G; Pocock Stuart J; Wruck Lisa M

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Most clinical trial publications include figures, but there is little guidance on what results should be displayed as figures and how. Purpose To evaluate the current use of figures in Trial reports, and to make constructive suggestions for future practice. Methods We surveyed all 77 reports of randomised controlled trials in five general medical journals during November 2006 to January 2007. The numbers and types of figures were determined, and then each Figure was assess...

  7. Current clinical practices in stroke rehabilitation: regional pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Oelschlager, Ashley; Agah, Arvin; Pohl, Patricia S; Ahmad, S Omar; Liu, Wen

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the current physical and occupational therapy practices in stroke rehabilitation in the Midwest. The insights gained from this pilot study will be used in a future study aimed at understanding stroke rehabilitation practices across the nation. Researchers and clinicians in the field of stroke rehabilitation were interviewed, and past studies in the literature were analyzed. Through these activities, we developed a 37-item questionnaire that was sent to occupational and physical therapists practicing in Kansas and Missouri who focus on the care of people who have had a stroke (n = 320). A total of 107 respondents returned a com pleted questionnaire, which gives a response rate of about 36%. The majority of respondents had more than 12 years of experience treating patients with stroke. Consensus of 70% or more was found for 80% of the items. The preferred approaches for the rehabilitation of people who have had a stroke are the Bobath and Brunnstrom methods, which are being used by 93% and 85% of the physical and occupational therapists, respectively. Even though some variability existed in certain parts of the survey, in general clinicians agreed on different treatment approaches in issues dealing with muscle tone, weakness, and limited range of motion in stroke rehabilitation. Some newer treatment approaches that have been proven to be effective are practiced only by a minority of clinicians. The uncertainty among clinicians in some sections of the survey reveals that more evidence on clinical approaches is needed to ensure efficacious treatments. PMID:19009470

  8. NASA Bioreactor Demonstration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  9. 76 FR 47593 - Guidance for Small Business Entities on Current Good Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... a guidance for small business entities entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice... entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP); Small Entity Compliance Guide.'' This... Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  10. Neuroimaging in refractory epilepsy. Current practice and evolving trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, N. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (Malaysia); Rahmat, K., E-mail: katt_xr2000@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (Malaysia); Lim, K.S.; Tan, C.T. [Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Neuroimaging is imperative in diagnostic work up and therapeutic assessment of refractory epilepsy. • Identification of epileptogenic zone on EEG, MRI and functional imaging improves the success of surgery. • High performance MRI greatly enhanced metabolic information and elucidate brain functions. • Optimisation of epilepsy protocols in structural and functional MRI are presented in this article. - Abstract: Identification of the epileptogenic zone is of paramount importance in refractory epilepsy as the success of surgical treatment depends on complete resection of the epileptogenic zone. Imaging plays an important role in the locating and defining anatomic epileptogenic abnormalities in patients with medically refractory epilepsy. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the current MRI sequences used in epilepsy imaging with special emphasis of lesion seen in our practices. Optimisation of epilepsy imaging protocols are addressed and current trends in functional MRI sequences including MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and fusion MR with PET and SPECT are discussed.

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: current clinical practice, coding, and reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Kolovos, Nikoleta S; Boyd, Kayla V; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2008-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a technique for providing life support for patients experiencing both pulmonary and cardiac failure by maintaining oxygenation and perfusion until native organ function is restored. ECMO is used routinely at many specialized hospitals for infants and less commonly for children with respiratory or cardiac failure from a variety of causes. Its usage is more controversial in adults, but select medical centers have reported favorable findings in patients with ARDS and other causes of severe pulmonary failure. ECMO is also rarely used as a rescue therapy in a small subset of adult patients with cardiac failure. This article will review the current uses and techniques of ECMO in the critical care setting as well as the evidence supporting its usage. In addition, current practice management related to coding and reimbursement for this intensive therapy will be discussed. PMID:18628221

  12. Neuroimaging in refractory epilepsy. Current practice and evolving trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Neuroimaging is imperative in diagnostic work up and therapeutic assessment of refractory epilepsy. • Identification of epileptogenic zone on EEG, MRI and functional imaging improves the success of surgery. • High performance MRI greatly enhanced metabolic information and elucidate brain functions. • Optimisation of epilepsy protocols in structural and functional MRI are presented in this article. - Abstract: Identification of the epileptogenic zone is of paramount importance in refractory epilepsy as the success of surgical treatment depends on complete resection of the epileptogenic zone. Imaging plays an important role in the locating and defining anatomic epileptogenic abnormalities in patients with medically refractory epilepsy. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the current MRI sequences used in epilepsy imaging with special emphasis of lesion seen in our practices. Optimisation of epilepsy imaging protocols are addressed and current trends in functional MRI sequences including MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and fusion MR with PET and SPECT are discussed

  13. Figures in clinical trial reports: current practice & scope for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travison Thomas G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most clinical trial publications include figures, but there is little guidance on what results should be displayed as figures and how. Purpose To evaluate the current use of figures in Trial reports, and to make constructive suggestions for future practice. Methods We surveyed all 77 reports of randomised controlled trials in five general medical journals during November 2006 to January 2007. The numbers and types of figures were determined, and then each Figure was assessed for its style, content, clarity and suitability. As a consequence, guidelines are developed for presenting figures, both in general and for each specific common type of Figure. Results Most trial reports contained one to three figures, mean 2.3 per article. The four main types were flow diagram, Kaplan Meier plot, Forest plot (for subgroup analyses and repeated measures over time: these accounted for 92% of all figures published. For each type of figure there is a considerable diversity of practice in both style and content which we illustrate with selected examples of both good and bad practice. Some pointers on what to do, and what to avoid, are derived from our critical evaluation of these articles' use of figures. Conclusion There is considerable scope for authors to improve their use of figures in clinical trial reports, as regards which figures to choose, their style of presentation and labelling, and their specific content. Particular improvements are needed for the four main types of figures commonly used.

  14. Stem Cell Expansion and Differentiation in Microcarrier-Based Bioreactors for Large Scale Production

    OpenAIRE

    Sart, Sébastien; Agathos, Spiros N.; Li, Yan; Annual meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)

    2013-01-01

    Microcarriers have been widely used for various biotechnology applications because of their high scale-up potential, high reproducibility on regulating cellular behaviors, and their compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). Recently, microcarriers have been investigated for stem cell expansion and differentiation, enabling potential scale-up of stem cell-derived products in large bioreactors. This presentation summarizes recent advances of using microcarriers for mesenchyma...

  15. 75 FR 78715 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Current Good Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Packaging...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Small Entity Compliance Guide: Current Good Manufacturing...) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled ``Current Good Manufacturing Practice in... 34752), FDA issued a final rule establishing current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations...

  16. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  17. Current Clinical Practice Scenario of Osteoporosis Management in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Shailesh; Upashani, Tejas; Bhadauria, Jitendra; Patel, Kamlesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Various osteoporosis guidelines are available for practice. Aim To understand the current clinical practice scenario from the perspective of Indian orthopaedicians, especially about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, approach to diagnosis and management and patient compliance patterns to long term treatment. Materials and Methods A pre-validated structured questionnaire containing questions (mostly objective, some open-ended) catering to various objectives of the study was circulated amongst orthopaedic surgeons across India by means of post/courier, after giving a brief overview of the study telephonically. Data was extracted from the completed questionnaires, and analysed using Microsoft Excel software. Results The questionnaire was filled by a total of 84 orthopaedicians throughout India. The prevalence of osteoporosis in India according to the orthopaedic surgeons was 38.4% and there was a female preponderance. Most of the respondents felt out of every 100 osteoporosis patients in India, less than 20 patients are actually diagnosed and treated for osteoporosis. The most common initial presenting feature of established osteoporosis cases was general symptoms. Most respondents preferred Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) as the initial investigation for the diagnosis of osteoporosis in a patient presenting with typical features. While most respondents preferred once-a-month oral over intravenous (IV) bisphosphonates, they agreed that IV administration had advantages such as lower gastrointestinal side effects and improved compliance. The average duration of therapy of oral bisphosphonates was the longest (27.04 months) among the other anti- osteoporosis therapies that they used. On an average, the patient compliance rate in osteoporosis management was around 64%. IV Zoledronic acid (ZA) and intranasal calcitonin were infrequently used than other anti- osteoporosis therapies. While concerns about cost and availability deterred more frequent

  18. Soil Quality Impacts of Current South American Agricultural Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Wingeyer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global demand for oil seeds and cereals during the past 50 years has caused an expansion in the cultivated areas and resulted in major soil management and crop production changes throughout Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina and southern Brazil. Unprecedented adoption of no-tillage as well as improved soil fertility and plant genetics have increased yields, but the use of purchased inputs, monocropping i.e., continuous soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr., and marginal land cultivation have also increased. These changes have significantly altered the global food and feed supply role of these countries, but they have also resulted in various levels of soil degradation through wind and water erosion, soil compaction, soil organic matter (SOM depletion, and nutrient losses. Sustainability is dependent upon local interactions between soil, climate, landscape characteristics, and production systems. This review examines the region’s current soil and crop conditions and summarizes several research studies designed to reduce or prevent soil degradation. Although the region has both environmental and soil resources that can sustain current agricultural production levels, increasing population, greater urbanization, and more available income will continue to increase the pressure on South American croplands. A better understanding of regional soil differences and quantifying potential consequences of current production practices on various soil resources is needed to ensure that scientific, educational, and regulatory programs result in land management recommendations that support intensification of agriculture without additional soil degradation or other unintended environmental consequences.

  19. Current Practices in Defining Seismic Input for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been written in the framework of seismic subgroup of the OECD/NEA CSNI Working Group on Integrity and Ageing of Components and Structures (WGIAGE) to provide a brief review of current practices regarding the definition of the seismic input for design and reevaluation of nuclear power plants. It is taken for granted that, prior to conducting the seismic design of a nuclear facility, a seismic hazard analysis (SHA) has been conducted for the site where the facility is located. This provides some reference motions for defining those that will later be used as input for the dynamic analyses of the facility. The objective of the report is to clarify the current practices in various OECD Member States for defining the seismic input to be used in the dynamic calculations of NPPs, once the SHA results are already at hand. Current practices have been summarized for Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, United Kingdom and United States. The main findings of the report are: a) The approaches followed by the regulatory bodies of OECD Member States differ substantially, certainly in relation with the consideration of site effects, but also in the probability level of the event that a nuclear facility should be required to withstand. b) In many countries a probabilistic approach is adopted for the design, in some cases combined with a deterministic one; in other cases, like France, Japan or South Korea, a deterministic approach is followed. c) The US and Japan have the more complete guidelines in relation with site effects. The former provide specific approaches for definition of the seismic input. The latter clearly recognizes the need to propagate the bedrock motion to foundation level, thereby introducing the site effect in some way. d) The definition of bedrock is very heterogeneous in the various countries, although this should not constitute a serious problem if the starting

  20. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies. PMID:26416797

  1. Current practice for diagnosis and management of silent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobreanu, Dan; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Lewalter, Thorsten;

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that silent atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with morbidity and mortality rates similar to those of symptomatic AF, no specific strategy for screening and management of this form of AF has been advocated. The purpose of this survey was to identify current practices...... for the diagnosis and management of silent AF. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network partners. Responses were received from 33 centres in 16 countries. The preferred screening methods for silent AF in patients with rhythm...... approach for such patients. Most responders preferred rate control over rhythm control in patients with silent AF, although some favoured pulmonary vein isolation in young patients. However, oral anticoagulant therapy in patients at high thromboembolic risk was considered mandatory by most, provided that...

  2. Current practices and options for confinement of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, which took place in Stockholm from 4 to 6 June 1972, national governments were asked to explore, with the International Atomic Energy Agency and other appropriate international organizations, international co-operation on radioactive waste matters including those of mining and tailings disposal. Since that time the IAEA has been active in the field of uranium and thorium mill tailings management. As part of this activity, the present report describes current practices and options for confinement of uranium mill tailings. It is addressed to technical and administrative personnel who are involved in planning and implementing national and industrial programmes on the management of such tailings. In 1974 and 1975 the IAEA convened meetings of experts to review matters of interest and importance in the management of uranium and thorium mine and mill tailings. These activities led to the publication in 1976 of Management of Wastes from the Mining and Milling of Uranium and Thorium Ores, a Code of Practice and Guide to the Code, IAEA Safety Series No. 44. As a continuation of this activity, the IAEA is here dealing more specifically with the design and siting considerations for the management of uranium mill tailings

  3. REVIEW OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A.Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Characterization and monitoring are important parts of environmental remediation of contaminated sites by the Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The actual remediation process often cannot begin or even be planned until characterization is complete. Monitoring is essential to verify the progress of remediation and of the waste stream. However, some contaminated sites are difficult, costly, or have a high exposure risk to personnel to characterize or monitor using the baseline technology or current practice. Therefore, development of new characterization and monitoring technologies is time-critical to remediate these sites. The main task of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to develop and deploy innovative characterization and monitoring technologies that improve performance and reduce personnel exposure, cost, and detection limits. However, to evaluate different proposals for new technologies to decide which ones to develop or deploy, it is necessary to compare their cost and performance to the baseline technology. The goal of this project is to facilitate the direct comparison of new technologies to the baseline technology by documenting the current practices for site characterization and monitoring at DOE sites and by presenting the information in an easy-to-use, concise database. The database will assist the CMST-CP and others in evaluating or designing new technologies by identifying the baseline technologies and describing their performance and cost. The purpose of this document is to report on the completion of this project and to describe the database. Section 2.0 describes the data assessment methodology. Section 3.0 presents the database and serves as a user manual. Section 4.0 lists the references used for each baseline technology in the database. The full references can be found in the Appendix.

  4. REVIEW OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization and monitoring are important parts of environmental remediation of contaminated sites by the Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The actual remediation process often cannot begin or even be planned until characterization is complete. Monitoring is essential to verify the progress of remediation and of the waste stream. However, some contaminated sites are difficult, costly, or have a high exposure risk to personnel to characterize or monitor using the baseline technology or current practice. Therefore, development of new characterization and monitoring technologies is time-critical to remediate these sites. The main task of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to develop and deploy innovative characterization and monitoring technologies that improve performance and reduce personnel exposure, cost, and detection limits. However, to evaluate different proposals for new technologies to decide which ones to develop or deploy, it is necessary to compare their cost and performance to the baseline technology. The goal of this project is to facilitate the direct comparison of new technologies to the baseline technology by documenting the current practices for site characterization and monitoring at DOE sites and by presenting the information in an easy-to-use, concise database. The database will assist the CMST-CP and others in evaluating or designing new technologies by identifying the baseline technologies and describing their performance and cost. The purpose of this document is to report on the completion of this project and to describe the database. Section 2.0 describes the data assessment methodology. Section 3.0 presents the database and serves as a user manual. Section 4.0 lists the references used for each baseline technology in the database. The full references can be found in the Appendix

  5. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  6. Practical application High-Tc SQUID beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the DC current of heavy-ion beams non-destructively at high resolution, we have developed a high critical temperature (HTc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) beam current monitor for use in the radioactive isotope beam factory (RIBF) at RIKEN. Unlike at other existing facilities, a low vibration, pulse-tube refrigerator cools the HTc fabrications including the SQUID in such a way that the size of the system is reduced and the running costs are lowered. Last year, the magnetic shielding system has been greatly reinforced. The new strong magnetic shielding system can attenuate the external magnetic noise to 10-10. Aiming at its practical use for acceleration operation, the prototype HTc SQUID monitor was disassembled, exchange the improved parts and re-assembled. Beginning this year, we have installed the HTc SQUID monitor in the beam transport line in the RIBF. Here we report the present details of the developed HTc SQUID monitor system and the results of the beam measurement. (author)

  7. Is dosimetry still a necessity in current dental practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S S; Rakesh, N; Chauhan, Pallavi; Clint, Joseph Ben; Sharma, Shivani

    2015-12-01

    Today, dentists have a wide range of imaging modalities to choose from, the film based techniques, digital techniques, and the recent introduction of 3D volumetric or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The inherent design features of the new generation dental x-ray equipment has significantly improved over the years with no evidence of substandard x-ray units in operation. In dental facilities radiological workload is comparatively low, newer radiation equipments and accessories follow safety guidelines and employ better radiation protection measures for the patient and the operator. Dentists' knowledge and expertise in radiation protection measures is good, enabling them to carry out riskfree radiation procedures in their practice. Therefore, the present study is aimed at assessing the need for dosimeters in current dental scenario. 'Is there currently a significant risk from dental radiography to merit the use of personal dosimetery in dental practice. 'Dental health professionals (Oral radiologists) and radiographic assistants of fourteen dental colleges in Karnataka state participated in this questionnaire study. The questionnaire consisted of the following questions--the make, type, year of manufacture of radiographic machines used in their setup, number of radiographs made per day in the institution, type of receptors used, number of personnel at risk for radiation exposure, radiation protection measures used, regular monitoring by personal dosimeters, equivalent dosage readings for the past 12 months and whether the reading of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for any personnel had exceeded the recommended exposure value in the last 3 years. Dosimetry records of the radiology staff in the last three years shows doses no more than 1.50 mSv per year. The various institutions' dose (person mSv) was in the range of 3.70 mSv-3.90 mSv. Personal monitoring for Dentists can be omitted in the dental colleges since the estimated dose of oral radiologists

  8. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Chan Chong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562 of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6% and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%. The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses’ (RNs needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  9. Life cycle assessment part 2: current impact assessment practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, D W; Potting, J; Finnveden, G; Lindeijer, E; Jolliet, O; Rydberg, T; Rebitzer, G

    2004-07-01

    Providing our society with goods and services contributes to a wide range of environmental impacts. Waste generation, emissions and the consumption of resources occur at many stages in a product's life cycle-from raw material extraction, energy acquisition, production and manufacturing, use, reuse, recycling, through to ultimate disposal. These all contribute to impacts such as climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, photooxidant formation (smog), eutrophication, acidification, toxicological stress on human health and ecosystems, the depletion of resources and noise-among others. The need exists to address these product-related contributions more holistically and in an integrated manner, providing complimentary insights to those of regulatory/process-oriented methodologies. A previous article (Part 1, Rebitzer et al., 2004) outlined how to define and model a product's life cycle in current practice, as well as the methods and tools that are available for compiling the associated waste, emissions and resource consumption data into a life cycle inventory. This article highlights how practitioners and researchers from many domains have come together to provide indicators for the different impacts attributable to products in the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) phase of life cycle assessment (LCA). PMID:15051247

  10. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  11. 21 CFR 210.1 - Status of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Status of current good manufacturing practice... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.1 Status of current good manufacturing practice...

  12. 21 CFR 212.2 - What is current good manufacturing practice for PET drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is current good manufacturing practice for... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS (Eff. 12-12-2011) General Provisions § 212.2 What is current good manufacturing practice...

  13. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    availability of (68)Ge-(68)Ga generators is increasing and studies involving prostate-specific membrane antigen or DOTA-chelated peptides or both are performed in at least seven countries. Although therapeutic radionuclide agents are mostly imported from outside the region, this does not limit the availability of therapies with (90)Y, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (131)I, (188)Re, and (89)Sr. Nevertheless, therapies based on alpha particle emitters are still largely not available in the region and are currently only available in Israel and Turkey. Regarding human resources, according to the data provided there are 1157 NM physicians, 1953 technologists, 586 medical physicists, and 173 radiopharmacists or radiochemists in the region. Approximately half of all available human resources are accounted for by Turkey. The region has great potential for expanding the applications of NM; this becomes especially important in view of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Further increasing awareness of the clinical applications of NM in healthcare and strengthening technical and human capacities including the establishment of training programs for all professionals and disciplines in the field are recognized as key components in advancing the practice of NM in the Middle East. PMID:27237437

  14. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  15. NASA Bioreactor Schematic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The schematic depicts the major elements and flow patterns inside the NASA Bioreactor system. Waste and fresh medium are contained in plastic bags placed side-by-side so the waste bag fills as the fresh medium bag is depleted. The compliance vessel contains a bladder to accommodate pressure transients that might damage the system. A peristolic pump moves fluid by squeezing the plastic tubing, thus avoiding potential contamination. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. Assessing competency in Evidence Based Practice: strengths and limitations of current tools in practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilic Dragan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence Based Practice (EBP involves making clinical decisions informed by the most relevant and valid evidence available. Competence can broadly be defined as a concept that incorporates a variety of domains including knowledge, skills and attitudes. Adopting an evidence-based approach to practice requires differing competencies across various domains including literature searching, critical appraisal and communication. This paper examines the current tools available to assess EBP competence and compares their applicability to existing assessment techniques used in medicine, nursing and health sciences. Discussion Only two validated assessment tools have been developed to specifically assess all aspects of EBP competence. Of the two tools (Berlin and Fresno tools, only the Fresno tool comprehensively assesses EBP competency across all relevant domains. However, both tools focus on assessing EBP competency in medical students; therefore neither can be used for assessing EBP competency across different health disciplines. The Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE has been demonstrated as a reliable and versatile tool to assess clinical competencies, practical and communication skills. The OSCE has scope as an alternate method for assessing EBP competency, since it combines assessment of cognitive skills including knowledge, reasoning and communication. However, further research is needed to develop the OSCE as a viable method for assessing EBP competency. Summary Demonstrating EBP competence is a complex task – therefore no single assessment method can adequately provide all of the necessary data to assess complete EBP competence. There is a need for further research to explore how EBP competence is best assessed; be it in written formats, such as the Fresno tool, or another format, such as the OSCE. Future tools must also incorporate measures of assessing how EBP competence affects clinician behaviour and attitudes as

  17. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals. PMID:27322258

  18. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals. PMID:27322258

  19. 78 FR 4307 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice Requirements for Combination Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 4 Current Good Manufacturing Practice... good manufacturing practice requirements apply to my combination product? (Sec. 4.3) E. How can I comply with these current good manufacturing practice requirements for a co-packaged or...

  20. Current professional practice in brazilian mental healthcare services

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mental health reform in Brazil presupposes mental health becoming integrated into the Brazilian health system, involving multidisciplinary teams whose professional practice has yet to be defined. The present study forms part of a project aimed at understanding human resources practices in Brazilian mental healthcare services.Methods This was a descriptive, exploratory study using a sample of highly qualified practitioners involved in the Ribeirao Preto/SP public mental health networ...

  1. On the Current Measurement Practices in Agile Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Taghi Javdani Gandomani; Hazura Zulzalil; Abdul Azim Abd. Ghani; Abu Bakar Md Sultan

    2012-01-01

    Agile software development (ASD) methods were introduced as a reaction to traditional software development methods. Principles of these methods are different from traditional methods and so there are some different processes and activities in agile methods comparing to traditional methods. Thus ASD methods require different measurement practices comparing to traditional methods. Agile teams often do their projects in the simplest and most effective way so, measurement practices in agile metho...

  2. On the Current Measurement Practices in Agile Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Javdani, Taghi; Zulzalil, Hazura; Ghani, Abdul Azim Abd.; Sultan, Abu Bakar Md; Parizi, Reza Meimandi

    2013-01-01

    Agile software development (ASD) methods were introduced as a reaction to traditional software development methods. Principles of these methods are different from traditional methods and so there are some different processes and activities in agile methods comparing to traditional methods. Thus ASD methods require different measurement practices comparing to traditional methods. Agile teams often do their projects in the simplest and most effective way so, measurement practices in agile metho...

  3. Forensic Occupational Therapy in Canada: The Current State of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Adora L Y; Wong, Chantal Isabelle; Maraj, Sara A; Fry, Danielle; Jecker, Justine; Jung, Bonny

    2016-09-01

    Although occupational therapists have been practicing in forensic settings for many years, there is a paucity of literature regarding the nature of this practice in Canada. The purpose of this study was to describe the practices of Canadian occupational therapists in forensic mental health. An online survey was designed based on the Canadian Practice Process Framework. Following purposive and snowball sampling, responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and content analysis. Twenty-seven clinicians responded (56% response rate). Respondents indicated commonalities in workplaces, client caseloads and practice challenges. The outstanding need in Canada to demonstrate client outcomes through the use of evaluation instruments reflects those practice gaps identified internationally. Education, advocacy and research are critical areas for the development of Canadian forensic occupational therapy. Although findings heavily reflect one provincial context and may not be generalizable to nonhospital settings, a number of priority areas were identified. Future efforts should clarify the role of forensic occupational therapy to stakeholders, and validate their contributions through research that evaluates intervention efficacy and meaningful outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26890357

  4. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  5. Cost estimation for decommissioning: a review of current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    inventory, decontamination and waste disposal. Several countries look for cost reduction possibilities through waste minimization processes. Consideration should be given to developing upgraded decommissioning management systems to deal with latest developments, data quality, completeness and safety, while offering flexibility in data processing and cost calculations. Regular interaction between system developers and users is necessary to develop the inventory and maintain user friendliness. Current good practices include the use of a standardised list of decommissioning activities, a strong quality-assurance programme, use of a dedicated decommissioning core group during the planning phase of decommissioning, and involvement of regulators and stakeholders in the drafting of decommissioning plans

  6. Management of tinnitus in English NHS audiology departments: an evaluation of current practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoare, Derek J.; Gander, Phillip E; Collins, Luke; Smith, Sandra; Hall, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale, aim and objective In 2009, the UK Department of Health formalized recommended National Health Service practices for the management of tinnitus from primary care onwards. It is timely therefore to evaluate the perceived practicality, utility and impact of those guidelines in the context of current practice. Methods We surveyed current practice by posting a 36-item questionnaire to all audiology and hearing therapy staff that we were able to identify as being involved in tinnitus pat...

  7. Family Counseling in Malaysia: Current Issues and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Norhayati Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    The study is carried out to explore the issues and practices in family counselling among the family counsellors at few counseling centres in Malaysia. Qualitative approach of single case embedded units was used for the study. Data collection was done using in-depth interview, observation and document analysis with 12 family counsellors. The data…

  8. Membrane Bioreactors: Past, Present and Future?

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanowicz, Slav W

    2011-01-01

    A brief description of membrane bioreactor (MBR) historical evolution has been presented with emphasis on continual decline of treatment costs and energy requirements. Although MBR can operate at biomass (MLSS) concentrations 5 to 10 times higher than activated sludge these concentrations are limited in practice by increasing biomass suspension viscosity that in turn increases “reversible” membrane fouling and decreases oxygen transfer rates. “Irreversible” fouling is a major operational chal...

  9. Current marketing practices in the nursing home sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Judith G; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Hearld, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    Marketing is widely recognized as an essential business function across all industries, including healthcare. While many long-term care facilities adopted basic healthcare marketing practices and hired marketing staff by the early 1990s, a paucity of research on nursing home marketing exists in the literature. This study examines the extent to which nursing homes have developed more formulated marketing and related communication and promotional strategies as market competition has increased in this sector during the past two decades. In addition, we explored managers' perceptions of their control over marketing decision making, the impact of competition on the use of marketing practices, and areas for enhanced competitive positioning. Administrators from 230 nursing homes in 18 Southeastern Michigan counties were surveyed regarding (1) the adoption level of approximately 40 literature-based, best-practice marketing strategies; (2) the types of staff involved with the marketing function; and (3) their perception of their level of control over marketing functions and of local competition. Results from 101 (44 percent) survey participants revealed that although respondents viewed their markets as highly competitive, their marketing practices remained focused on traditional and relatively constrained practices. In relation to the importance of customer relationship management, the majority of the administrators reported intensive efforts being focused on residents and their families, referrers, and staff, with minimal efforts being extended to insurers and other types of payers. A significant positive relation was found between the intensity of marketing initiatives and the size of the facility (number of beds), whereas significant negative correlations were revealed in relation to occupancy and the perceived level of control over the function. PMID:16770906

  10. Engineering skeletal muscle tissue in bioreactor systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Yang; Li Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To give a concise review of the current state of the art in tissue engineering (TE) related to skeletal muscle and kinds of bioreactor environment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection A total of 106 articles were selected from several hundred original articles or reviews.The content of selected articles is in accordance with our purpose and the authors are authorized scientists in the study of engineered muscle tissue in bioreactor.Results Skeletal muscle TE is a promising interdisciplinary field which aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss.Although numerous studies have indicated that engineering skeletal muscle tissue may be of great importance in medicine in the near future,this technique still represents a limited degree of success.Since tissue-engineered muscle constructs require an adequate connection to the vascular system for efficient transport of oxygen,carbon dioxide,nutrients and waste products.Moreover,functional and clinically applicable muscle constructs depend on adequate neuromuscular junctions with neural calls.Third,in order to engineer muscle tissue successfully,it may be beneficial to mimic the in vivo environment of muscle through association with adequate stimuli from bioreactors.Conclusion Vascular system and bioreactors are necessary for development and maintenance of engineered muscle in order to provide circulation within the construct.

  11. Electrical stimulation: a reflection on current clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoti, D B

    2000-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basic principles of several clinical applications of electrical stimulation for therapeutic purposes. It is intended to facilitate the integration of electrical stimulation into routine clinical practice by clarifying the terminology and standard conventions of the field, explaining the delivery capabilities of common electrical stimulators commercially available for clinical use, summarizing several examples of evidence-based therapeutic applications, and providing guidelines for selection of most commonly used treatment parameters. Rather than an exhaustive survey of the field, the presentation touches broadly on guidelines for use of transcutaneous electrical stimulation employing surface electrodes for the purposes of analgesia (TENS), drug delivery (iontophoresis), or neuromuscular rehabilitation (NMES), as well as other selected clinical applications. The paper is a general review of common clinical practices of electrotherapy and should serve as an introduction to the important factors for clinicians to consider when contemplating electrical stimulation as a treatment option. PMID:11067575

  12. Gender relations and health research: a review of current practices

    OpenAIRE

    Bottorff Joan L; Oliffe John L; Robinson Carole A; Carey Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The importance of gender in understanding health practices and illness experiences is increasingly recognized, and key to this work is a better understanding of the application of gender relations. The influence of masculinities and femininities, and the interplay within and between them manifests within relations and interactions among couples, family members and peers to influence health behaviours and outcomes. Methods To explore how conceptualizations of gender relat...

  13. Current Credit Risk Management Practices in Chinese Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hao

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bank loans can be characterized as the engine of the Chinese economy as the economy is almost financed by bank loans. As a result, Credit risk management in Chinese banks is not only the issue to those banks, but it is also essential to the stability of the whole economy. Inadequate credit risk management practices can create an unforeseeable disaster to China in the future, especially with a significant increase in credit expansion. In the last decade, the government has tried ha...

  14. An Australian survey of current practice regarding radiation treatment records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty one Radiation Oncology Departments were surveyed to assess the structure and content of their external photon beam treatment sheets. A master index of standard data items was compiled from previously published recommendations and the frequency of recording these items was tabulated. A wide variation in practice was observed. The data highlights the need for agreed common data recording for quality assurance, outcome analysis and participation in clinical trials. 4 tabs

  15. Overview of robotic colorectal surgery: Current and future practical developments

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Sudipta; Evans, Charles,

    2016-01-01

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionised colorectal surgery by offering reduced morbidity and mortality over open surgery, while maintaining oncological and functional outcomes with the disadvantage of additional practical challenges. Robotic surgery aids the surgeon in overcoming these challenges. Uptake of robotic assistance has been relatively slow, mainly because of the high initial and ongoing costs of equipment but also because of limited evidence of improved patient outcomes. Advances...

  16. Current Practices on Model-based Context-aware Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Genaro Motti, Vivian; Raggett, Dave; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Workshop on Context-Aware Adaptation of Service Front-Ends 2013 CASFE'2013

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community has already investigated in depth the benefits of combining model-based approaches for implementing context-aware adaptation. As benefits, it can be highlighted: lower development costs, faster time to market, higher usability levels, optimal usage of the resources available and a better user interaction. Although these benefits are claimed, for practitioners it may be not always evident that they actually compensate for the costs of incorporating such practices into ...

  17. Current problems of foreign practice-related educational psychology

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Andreeva; E.E. Danilova; A.M. Prihozhan

    2012-01-01

    The article regards the questions of scientific-methodological provision of psychologist’s activity in an educational settlement which are urgent for the activity of practical educational psychologist in Russia as well. The presented information concerns the psychologist’s particular strands of work which can be both developing (development of ABM) and psycho-correcting (reasons and forms of school phobias, bullying displays, lying). The ethical problems of psychologist’s work with families ...

  18. Dermatologists wearing white coats on practice websites: current trends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan G. Gamble

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Physicians wearing white coats are perceived as having more authority, being more friendly and being more attractive than those not wearing white coats, and patients report that they prefer their dermatologist to wear a white coat. The aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of dermatologists wearing white coats on practice websites. We searched Google for dermatology practice websites in six states representing distinct geographic regions in the United States. The first one hundred search results were evaluated, and photographs of dermatologists on these websites were examined for the presence or absence of white coats. Most (77% of dermatologists did not wear white coats. The highest prevalence was in the eastern states of Massachusetts and South Carolina, with 29% and 39%, respectively. Colorado had the lowest rate at 13%. Rates were essentially equal when segmented by gender. Although patients report that they prefer their dermatologist to wear a white coat, dermatologists often do not wear a white coat on their practice websites.

  19. Self-Assessment in Librarianship: Current Practices and Future Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ania Dymarz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The authors of this qualitative study set out to investigate self-assessment practices within the library profession. The researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of nine librarians coming from a range of library settings and possessing a diversity of library experience. Interviews were then transcribed and coded in NVIVO to identify emergent themes. This paper details some of the results of that study, highlighting motivations, limitations, and strategies with regard to self-assessment. The findings present a summary of a range of approaches to the practice of assessment as reported by the interviewees. One area of possible growth for our profession, as highlighted by the findings, is in the development of peer networks as a support for the individual practice of self-assessment. While the results of this small case study cannot be generalized, the authors hope these preliminary findings can open up the conversation around self-assessment both for individual librarians and for those librarians and managers working to shape their workplace culture.

  20. Production of bacterial cellulose membranes in a modified airlift bioreactor by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Chi; Li, Meng-Hsun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a novel bioreactor for producing bacterial cellulose (BC) is proposed. Traditional BC production uses static culture conditions and produces a gelatinous membrane. The potential for using various types of bioreactor, including a stirred tank, conventional airlift, and modified airlift with a rectangular wire-mesh draft tube, in large-scale production has been investigated. The BC obtained from these bioreactors is fibrous or in pellet form. Our proposed airlift bioreactor produces a membrane-type BC from Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the water-holding capacity of which is greater than that of cellulose types produced using static cultivation methods. The Young's modulus of the product can be manipulated by varying the number of net plates in the modified airlift bioreactor. The BC membrane produced using the proposed bioreactor exhibits potential for practical application. PMID:25823854

  1. Intraosseous ganglion cysts of the carpus: current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osagie, Liza; Gallivan, Samantha; Wickham, Neil; Umarji, Shamim

    2015-12-01

    Intraosseous cysts of the carpal bones are an infrequent cause of chronic wrist pain. The main body of work has investigated their occurrence in the proximal carpus, with limited incidence in the distal row. We review the current literature on the treatment of symptomatic carpal cysts following the report of a 17-year-old male with a 12-month history of progressive right wrist pain due to an intraosseous ganglion of the trapezoid. This review explores the pathology of carpal cysts, their varying presentation and current treatments. PMID:26568710

  2. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    OpenAIRE

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and th...

  3. Current problems of foreign practice-related educational psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Andreeva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article regards the questions of scientific-methodological provision of psychologist’s activity in an educational settlement which are urgent for the activity of practical educational psychologist in Russia as well. The presented information concerns the psychologist’s particular strands of work which can be both developing (development of ABM and psycho-correcting (reasons and forms of school phobias, bullying displays, lying. The ethical problems of psychologist’s work with families namely in case of the parent-child conflicts is also reviewed in the article.

  4. Membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Reij, M W

    1997-01-01

    SummaryThis thesis describes the design and testing of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) for removal of organic pollutants from air. In such a bioreactor for biological gas treatment pollutants are degraded by micro-organisms. The membrane bioreactor is an alternative to other types of bioreactors for waste gas treatment, such as compost biofilters and bioscrubbers. Propene was used as a model pollutant to study the membrane bioreactor.A membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment consists of a gas...

  5. A Preliminary Investigation of Current Practices in American Youth Theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, F. Scott

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey of youth theatres on (1) theatre goals; (2) staff training and courses offered; (3) organization and funds; and (4) teachers' knowledge of actor training, child and adolescent psychology, playwriting trends in children's theatre, and current theoretical writings. (PD)

  6. Current HRD trends in the Netherlands : conceptualizing and practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, C.H.E.; Streumer, J.N.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Wognum, A.A.M.; Zolingen, S.J. van

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution, we first report on a literature study aimed at describing current HRD developments. The resulting literature report was presented to a group of experts in the field of HRD. The participants were asked to sketch their vision as to the relevance of the HRD developments for their

  7. Credentialing in radiology: Current practice and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Adam; McCoubrie, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Radiology has changed significantly in recent years. The volume of work has increased dramatically as has its complexity. Future radiologists need an adequate training and expertise in conventional practice as well as new techniques. This comes at a time when other stakeholders outside of radiology are voicing their own concerns. The rightly justified increasing focus on patient safety has placed even more emphasis on the demonstration of competent practice by all health care professionals. Credentialing has been put forward as a way to ensure a doctor is competent in specific areas. Credentialing may be an alien concept to many radiology trainees but moves are afoot in the United Kingdom to bring it to the forefront of its postgraduate medical training. Credentialing began in 20th century North America where it was linked to the process of privileging. It subsequently garnered a strong patient safety focus and has become a part of the international healthcare agenda. Not everyone agrees with credentialing, it has many criticisms including the risk of speciality “turf wars” and the stifling of medical excellence to name just a couple. Is credentialing in radiology here to stay or will it pass by quietly? This paper reviews the global credentialing movement and discusses how this may impact on future radiology training, using the United Kingdom as its case example. PMID:27247716

  8. Modelling across bioreactor scales: methods, challenges and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Scale-up and scale-down of bioreactors are very important in industrial biotechnology, especially with the currently available knowledge on the occurrence of gradients in industrial-scale bioreactors. Moreover, it becomes increasingly appealing to model such industrial scale systems, considering...... that it is challenging and expensive to acquire experimental data of good quality that can be used for characterizing gradients occurring inside a large industrial scale bioreactor. But which model building methods are available? And how can one ensure that the parameters in such a model are properly...... estimated? And what are the limitations of different types of mod - els? This paper will provide examples of models that have been published in the literature for use across bioreactor scales, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance models. Furthermore, the importance of good...

  9. Practical Application of Eddy Currents Generated by Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirba, I.; Kleperis, J.

    2011-06-01

    When a conductive material is subjected to time-varying magnetic fluxes, eddy (Foucault) currents are generated in it and magnetic field of opposite polarity as the applied one arises. Due to the internal resistance of the conductive material, the eddy currents will be dissipated into heat (Joule heating). Conventional domestic water heaters utilize gas burners or electric resistance heating elements to heat the water in the tank and substantial part of the energy to use for it is wasted. In this paper the origin of electromagnetic induction heat generated by wind turbine in special heat exchange camera connected to water boiler is discussed and material evaluation performed using mathematical modelling (comparing the 2D finite element model with analytical and numerical calculation results).

  10. Practical Application of Eddy Currents Generated by Wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a conductive material is subjected to time-varying magnetic fluxes, eddy (Foucault) currents are generated in it and magnetic field of opposite polarity as the applied one arises. Due to the internal resistance of the conductive material, the eddy currents will be dissipated into heat (Joule heating). Conventional domestic water heaters utilize gas burners or electric resistance heating elements to heat the water in the tank and substantial part of the energy to use for it is wasted. In this paper the origin of electromagnetic induction heat generated by wind turbine in special heat exchange camera connected to water boiler is discussed and material evaluation performed using mathematical modelling (comparing the 2D finite element model with analytical and numerical calculation results).

  11. Treatment of myasthenia gravis: current practice and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciafaloni, Emma; Sanders, Donald B

    2002-09-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the best understood of the autoimmune diseases and a number of treatments are currently used to produce clinical improvement. However, due to the scarcity of evidence-based and comparative data, there is still no consensus on many therapeutic issues. Even a widely accepted treatment like thymectomy has never been proven effective by a well-designed trial. These are just some of the unanswered questions: What is the best treatment algorithm and safest long-term management of myasthenia gravis? What patients are likely to benefit from thymectomy? How long should myasthenia gravis patients be treated? Is it possible to discontinue immunotherapy once remission has been achieved? What are the risks associated with long-term immunosuppression? In this article, we review current therapeutic strategies and these unresolved questions about myasthenia gravis treatment. PMID:19810991

  12. Practical Application of Eddy Currents Generated by Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirba, I; Kleperis, J, E-mail: imants.dirba@gmail.com [Institute of Solid State Physics of University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga, LV-1063 (Latvia)

    2011-06-23

    When a conductive material is subjected to time-varying magnetic fluxes, eddy (Foucault) currents are generated in it and magnetic field of opposite polarity as the applied one arises. Due to the internal resistance of the conductive material, the eddy currents will be dissipated into heat (Joule heating). Conventional domestic water heaters utilize gas burners or electric resistance heating elements to heat the water in the tank and substantial part of the energy to use for it is wasted. In this paper the origin of electromagnetic induction heat generated by wind turbine in special heat exchange camera connected to water boiler is discussed and material evaluation performed using mathematical modelling (comparing the 2D finite element model with analytical and numerical calculation results).

  13. CURRENT PRACTICES AND REGULATIONS REGARDING OPEN DATING OF FOOD PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Labuza, Theodore P.; Szybist, Lynn M.

    1999-01-01

    A federally regulated open dating system on food products, instead of the current somewhat random and non-uniform state mandated system, would most likely benefit today's consumers, retailers, and government agencies. Consumers have indicated a strong desire for open dates; it would enhance their ability to make educated choices about the freshness of the foods they consume. A mandatory/uniform system would also assist retail grocers with stock rotation, so that customers can be provided with...

  14. Informal Online Decision Making: Current Practices and Support System Design

    OpenAIRE

    André, Paul; Drucker, Steven; schraefel, m.c.

    2007-01-01

    Existing group decision support systems are too complex to support lightweight, informal decision making made popular by the amount of information available on the Web. From an examination of related work, an online survey and a formative study to examine how people currently use the Web for decision support, we present a set of design recommendations towards the development of an informal Web decision support tool.

  15. The practical analysis on participators of current Chinese POF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Current Chinese POF industry is still short of comprehensive legislation. Thus, the cooperative relationship between participants involved in account management model POF and trust plan model POF is quite unsteady and risky before the promulgation of new PBL. Furthermore, the conflict between Chinese Company Law and the new PBL had restrained the scope of development of limited partnership POF. A more systematic legal platform is to be established urgently.

  16. 77 FR 16158 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Processing, Packing, or Holding of Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Administration (FDA) is amending the packaging and labeling control provisions of the current good manufacturing..., 21 CFR part 211 is amended as follows: PART 211--CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED... Manufacturing Practice in Manufacturing, Processing, Packing, or Holding of Drugs; Revision of Certain...

  17. Small Wind Turbine Applications: Current Practice in Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous small wind turbines are being used by homeowners in Colorado. Some of these installations are quite recent while others date back to the federal tax-credit era of the early 1980s. Through visits with small wind turbine owners in Colorado, I have developed case studies of six small wind energy applications focusing on the wind turbine technology, wind turbine siting, the power systems and electric loads, regulatory issues, and motivations about wind energy. These case studies offer a glimpse into the current state-of-the-art of small-scale wind energy and provide some insight into issues affecting development of a wider market

  18. Brachytherapy in Europe: philosophies, current practice and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Five months sabbatical leave provided an opportunity to visit six radiotherapy centres in France, Holland and England. While brachytherapy philosophies and practices within each country were similar, there were considerable differences in attitudes between countries. The Institute Gustave Roussy, home of the Paris System and host for the French sector confirmed that the Paris System is still very much the preferred dosimetry method in this part of the world. Though their preference for low dose rate brachytherapy is still evident, high dose rate brachytherapy has found some applications but the rules of the Paris System are never far away and the words 'what about the hyperdose sleeve' are firmly implanted into this visitor's brain. The use of real time dosimetry for I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Institute Curie (Paris) provided an interesting contrast to the standard pre and post implant dosimetry techniques commonly employed elsewhere. The two Dutch centres on the itinerary, in stark contrast to the traditional techniques seen in France, have applied the power of computers to investigate optimisation of the classic dosimetry systems and called on the analysis techniques (DVH, NTCP, TCP etc) now familiar to us all in external beam therapy. The Cookridge Hospital in England fitted somewhere between the French and Dutch centres. This centre showed how both modern and traditional techniques could be applied in an efficient way for a large variety of treatment sites. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  19. Enteral nutrition formula selection: current evidence and implications for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Britta; Roehl, Kelly; Betz, Melanie

    2015-02-01

    Many new enteral nutrition (EN) formulas have been created over the past several decades with a variety of intended uses. Although each is intended to promote improved outcomes, research is often unclear and, in many cases, conflicting. It is important to note that EN products are considered medical foods by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and therefore do not have to complete premarket review or approval and are not regulated to the same extent as pharmaceuticals. While standard EN formulas are designed to meet the basic macro- and micronutrient requirements of individuals who cannot meet nutrition needs orally, specialty EN products have been developed to exhibit pharmacologic properties, such as immune-enhancing formulas containing arginine, glutamine, nucleotides, and ω-3 fatty acids. With the vast number of products available, rising costs of healthcare, and the drive toward evidence-based practice, it is imperative that clinicians carefully consider research regarding use of specialty formulas, paying close attention to the quality, patient population, clinical end points, and cost to patient and/or facility. PMID:25516537

  20. Current Developments and Best Practice in Open and Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Rocha Trinidade

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Through the many documents regularly emitted by those dedicated to this activity, it is comparatively easy to describe factual developments in the field of open and distance education in different places in the world. However, it is much more difficult to produce judgements of value about their quality. Quality is a subjective rather than an absolute concept and may be examined from different analytical perspectives: consumers' satisfaction level, intrinsic value of scientific and technical content of learning materials, soundness of learning strategies, efficiency of organisation and procedures, adequate use of advanced technologies, reliability of student support mechanisms, etc.These parameters should be put into the context of specific objectives, nature of target populations and availability of different kinds of resources. In a specific geographic, social, economic and cultural situation a given set of solutions might be judged as adequate and deserving the qualification of "good practice," while in a different context it could be considered of rather poor quality.The selection of examples in this article is the sole responsibility of the authors: neither should the chosen cases be considered as clearly better than any other one, nor missing cases be interpreted as lack of appreciation or a negative judgement.Finally, the authors are aware of the risks of interpreting trends and trying to extrapolate them into the near future: readers should use their own judgement in accepting (or forcefully rejecting these projections.

  1. Overview of robotic colorectal surgery: Current and future practical developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudipta; Evans, Charles

    2016-02-27

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionised colorectal surgery by offering reduced morbidity and mortality over open surgery, while maintaining oncological and functional outcomes with the disadvantage of additional practical challenges. Robotic surgery aids the surgeon in overcoming these challenges. Uptake of robotic assistance has been relatively slow, mainly because of the high initial and ongoing costs of equipment but also because of limited evidence of improved patient outcomes. Advances in robotic colorectal surgery will aim to widen the scope of minimal access surgery to allow larger and more complex surgery through smaller access and natural orifices and also to make the technology more economical, allowing wider dispersal and uptake of robotic technology. Advances in robotic endoscopy will yield self-advancing endoscopes and a widening role for capsule endoscopy including the development of motile and steerable capsules able to deliver localised drug therapy and insufflation as well as being recharged from an extracorporeal power source to allow great longevity. Ultimately robotic technology may advance to the point where many conventional surgical interventions are no longer required. With respect to nanotechnology, surgery may eventually become obsolete. PMID:26981188

  2. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  3. Self-monitoring dietary intake: current and future practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lora E; Warziski, Melanie; Starrett, Terry; Choo, Jina; Music, Edvin; Sereika, Susan; Stark, Susan; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2005-07-01

    This article reviews the literature on the use of paper diaries for self-monitoring food intake, identifies the strengths and limitations of paper-and-pencil diaries and their new counterpart, the electronic diary or personal digital assistant (PDA), and reports how participants were trained to use a PDA with dietary software in two pilot studies--one with hemodialysis patients and the other with participants in a weight loss study. The report of the pilot studies focuses on the practical issues encountered in training participants in the use of a PDA and addresses the pros and cons of different dietary software programs. Six hemodialysis patients were trained in the first study and seven participants attempting to lose or maintain their weight were trained in the second pilot study. The training focused on how to use a PDA and how to navigate the dietary software to self-monitor food intake. The goals of using the PDA were to improve adherence to the therapeutic diets and to self-monitoring. Lessons learned from the pilot studies are shared. PMID:16007557

  4. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite training, physicians sub-optimally practice EBM due to multiple factors. Education may mitigate these factors and improve EBM practice. However, there is limited knowledge on how is EBM practiced ...

  5. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  6. China's spent nuclear fuel management: Current practices and future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although China's nuclear power industry is relatively young and the management of its spent nuclear fuel is not yet a concern, China's commitment to nuclear energy and its rapid pace of development require detailed analyses of its future spent fuel management policies. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy, and to suggest strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program. The study is broken into four sections. The first reviews China's current nuclear fuel cycle program and facilities. The second discusses China's current spent fuel management methods and the storage capability of China's 13 operational nuclear power plants. The third estimates China's total accumulated spent fuel, its required spent fuel storage from present day until 2035, when China expects its first commercialized fast neutron reactors to be operational, and its likely demand for uranium resources. The fourth examines several spent fuel management scenarios for the present period up until 2035; the financial cost and proliferation risk of each scenario is evaluated. The study concludes that China can and should maintain a reprocessing operation to meet its R and D activities before its fast reactor program is further developed. - Highlights: → This study provides an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy.→ This study suggests strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program.→ China will experience no pressure to lessen the burden of spent fuel storage in the next 30 years.→ China should maintain sufficient reprocessing operations to meet its demands for R and D activities.→ China should actively invest on R and D activities of both fuel cycling and fast reactor programs.

  7. 21 CFR 210.2 - Applicability of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of current good manufacturing... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, PACKING, OR HOLDING OF DRUGS; GENERAL § 210.2 Applicability of current good...

  8. Simplified protocol for clinical-grade tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte manufacturing with use of the Wave bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Larsen, Signe Møllebæk; Met, Ozcan;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS: The high level of complexity of current Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant methods of manufacturing hampers rapid and broad application of treatment with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). METHODS: To ensure higher applicability of TIL production to laboratory routine......, a practical and simple protocol of TIL manufacturing with the use of a closed-system bioreactor was developed and implemented at our institution. RESULTS: This protocol enabled significant work load reduction during the most labor-intense step of TIL expansion, and allowed generation of high-quality TIL...

  9. Current State of Environmental Education in Mexico: A Study on Practices, Audiences, Settings, and Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Iga, Jose; Shaw, William

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education in Mexico takes many forms and plays a wide variety of roles. Through an online survey, we addressed the need to present a wider picture on the current state of environmental education practices in Mexico: Who is engaging in environmental education practices, how important is it for their organization, who are they…

  10. Globalization of Gerontology Education: Current Practices and Perceptions for Graduate Gerontology Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Samuel M.; Yamashita, Takashi; Ewen, Heidi H.; Manning, Lydia K.; Kunkel, Suzanne R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document current practices and understandings about globalization of gerontology education in the United States. Better understanding of aging requires international perspectives in global communities. However, little is known about how globalization of gerontology education is practiced in U.S. graduate-level…

  11. European audit of current practice in diagnosis and treatment of childhood growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Bernasconi, Sergio; Clayton, Peter E;

    2002-01-01

    The present survey among members of the ESPE on current practice in diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is of great clinical relevance and importance in the light of the recently published guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD by the Growth Hormone Research Soc...... Society. We have found much conformity but also numerous discrepancies between the recommendations of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the current practice in Europe....

  12. Feline transfusion practice in South Africa : current status and practical solutions : continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dippenaar

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion therapy is often under-utilised in feline practice in South Africa. However, it is a technique that can be safely and effectively introduced in practice. Cats have naturally occurring allo-antibodies against the blood type that they lack, which makes blood typing, or alternatively cross-matching, essential before transfusions. Feline blood donors must be carefully selected, be disease free and should be sedated before blood collection. The preferred anticoagulant for feline blood collection is citrate-phosphatedextrose-adenine. Blood can either be administered intravenously or into the medullary cavity, with the transfusion rate depending on the cat's hydration status and cardiac function. Transfusion reactions can be immediate or delayed and they are classified as immunological or non-immunological. Indications, methods and techniques to do feline blood transfusions in a safe and economical way are highlighted.

  13. Sensing in tissue bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, P.

    2006-03-01

    Specialized sensing and measurement instruments are under development to aid the controlled culture of cells in bioreactors for the fabrication of biological tissues. Precisely defined physical and chemical conditions are needed for the correct culture of the many cell-tissue types now being studied, including chondrocytes (cartilage), vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (blood vessels), fibroblasts, hepatocytes (liver) and receptor neurones. Cell and tissue culture processes are dynamic and therefore, optimal control requires monitoring of the key process variables. Chemical and physical sensing is approached in this paper with the aim of enabling automatic optimal control, based on classical cell growth models, to be achieved. Non-invasive sensing is performed via the bioreactor wall, invasive sensing with probes placed inside the cell culture chamber and indirect monitoring using analysis within a shunt or a sampling chamber. Electroanalytical and photonics-based systems are described. Chemical sensing for gases, ions, metabolites, certain hormones and proteins, is under development. Spectroscopic analysis of the culture medium is used for measurement of glucose and for proteins that are markers of cell biosynthetic behaviour. Optical interrogation of cells and tissues is also investigated for structural analysis based on scatter.

  14. Microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbut, Warakorn; Loyprasert, Suchera; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Limsakul, Chusak; Wongkittisuksa, Booncharoen; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2007-06-15

    A microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor has been developed. Enzyme was immobilized in the microfluidic channel on poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface via covalent binding method. The detection unit consisted of two gold electrodes and a laboratory-built conductimetric transducer to monitor the increase in the conductivity of the solution due to the change of the charges generated by the enzyme-substrate catalytic reaction. Urea-urease was used as a representative analyte-enzyme system. Under optimum conditions urea could be determined with a detection limit of 0.09 mM and linearity in the range of 0.1-10 mM (r=0.9944). The immobilized urease on the microchannel chip provided good stability (>30 days of operation time) and good repeatability with an R.S.D. lower than 2.3%. Good agreement was obtained when urea concentrations of human serum samples determined by the microfluidic flow injection conductimetric bioreactor system were compared to those obtained using the Berthelot reaction (P<0.05). After prolong use the immobilized enzyme could be removed from the PDMS microchannel chip enabling new active enzyme to be immobilized and the chip to be reused. PMID:17289366

  15. Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research%Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; WU Yu-feng; LI Xiao-jun

    2012-01-01

    How to measure the quality of conceptual models is an important issue in the IS field and related research. This paper conducts a review of research in measuring conceptual model quality and identifies the major theoretical and practical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. We review current classification frameworks for conceptual model quality and practice of measuring conceptual model quality. Based on the review, challenges for studies of measuring the quality of conceptual models are proposed and these challenges are also research points which should be strengthened in future studies.

  16. Cells growing in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    For 5 days on the STS-70 mission, a bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells, which grew to 30 times the volume of control specimens grown on Earth. This significant result was reproduced on STS-85 which grew mature structures that more closely match what are found in tumors in humans. Shown here, clusters of cells slowly spin inside a bioreactor. On Earth, the cells continually fall through the buffer medium and never hit bottom. In space, they are naturally suspended. Rotation ensures gentle stirring so waste is removed and fresh nutrient and oxygen are supplied. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. Degradation of Refuse in Hybrid Bioreactor Landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN LONG; Yu-YANG LONG; HAI-CHUN LIU; DONG-SHENG SHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objectivess To explore the process of refuse decomposition in hybrid bioreactor landfill. Methods The bioreactor landfill was operated in sequencing of facultative-anaerobic and aerobic conditions with leachate recireulation, pH, COD, and ammonia in the leachate and pH, biodegradable organic matter (BDM), and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in refuse were detected. Results CEC increased gradually with the degradation of refuse, which was negatively correlad, With BDM. COD and ammonia in the leachate was declined to 399.2 mg L-1 and 20.6 mg N L-1, respectively, during the 357-day operation. The respective concentrations of ammonia and COD were below the second and the third levels of current discharge standards in China. Conclusion The refuse is relatively stable at the end of hybrid bioreactor landfill operation. Most of the readily biodegradable organic matter is mineralized in the initial phase of refuse degradation, whereas the hard-biodegradable organic matter is mainly humidified in the maturity phase of refuse degradation.

  18. Analyzing matrices of meta-analytic correlations: current practices and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zitong; Kong, Wenmo; Cortina, Jose M; Hou, Shuofei

    2016-06-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in conducting analyses on meta-analytic correlation matrices. Methodologists have provided guidance and recommended practices for the application of this technique. The purpose of this article is to review current practices regarding analyzing meta-analytic correlation matrices, to identify the gaps between current and best practices, and to offer a comprehensive set of recommendations regarding the planning, collection, analysis, and interpretation of studies that utilize meta-analytic correlation matrices. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27286903

  19. Current Web Application Development and Measurement Practices for Small Software Firms

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Faudziah; Husni, Moath

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses issues on current development and measurement practices that were identified from a pilot study conducted on Jordanian small software firms. The study was to investigate whether developers follow development and measurement best practices in web applications development. The analysis was conducted in two stages: first, grouping the development and measurement practices using variable clustering, and second, identifying the acceptance degree. Mean interval was used to determine the degree of acceptance. Hierarchal clustering was used to group the development and measurement practices. The actual findings of this survey will be used for building a new methodology for developing web applications in small software firms.

  20. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections in general practice: Current practice and drivers for change in a French study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gignon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The fight against Healthcare-associated infections is a public health priority and a major challenge for the safety and quality of care. The objective was to assess hygiene in general practitioners′ (GPs′ office and identify barriers to and drivers for better practice. Materials and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected, representative sample of 800 GPs. We used a self-administered questionnaire. The first part assessed current practice and the second part focused on barriers and motivating factors for better practice. We performed a descriptive statistical analysis of the responses to closed questions and a qualitative analysis of the responses to open-ended questions. Results: Only a third of the GPs were aware of the current guidelines. Disposable equipment was used by 31% of the GPs. For the remainder, only 38% complied with the recommended procedures for sterilisation or disinfection. Seventy-two percent of the GPs washed their hands between consultations in the office. A significant minority of physicians disregarded the guidelines by never wearing gloves to perform sutures (11%, treat wounds (10%, fit intrauterine devices (18% or perform injections (18%. The main barriers to good practice were the high cost of modifications and lack of time/space. Two third of the GPs did not intend to change their practices. The drivers for change were pressure from patients (4.8 on a scale of 1 to 7, inspection by the health authorities (4.8 and the fear of legal action (4.4. Conclusions: Our results show that there are significant differences between current practice and laid-down professional guidelines. Policies for improvement of hygiene must take into account barriers and motivating factors.

  1. Membrane bioreactors for enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose; Idrolisi enzimatica del lattosio con bioreattori a membrana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzichini, M.; Pilloton, R. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione; Pontecorvo, M.; Mignogna, G.; Fortunato, A.; Beone, F.

    1993-03-01

    Bioreactor systems obtained by cell or enzyme immobilization offer many advantages compared with native enzyme, intact cell systems or other biocatalysts. Thus, many attempts have been made to design and use new types of bioreactor systems in order to improve performance, enhance productivity and reduce environmental impacts. Membrane bioreactors, obtained by physical immobilization of biocatalysts, in polymeric membrane support, offer such practical advantages as: a continuous separation and transformation process with low product inhibition and suitable hydraulic configuration (backflushing recycling, ultrafiltrating). Specific membrane modules (Amicon VitaFiber), for bioreactor applications are being commercialized. Beta-galctosidase enzyme has successfully been immobilized in a hollow fiber and in ceramic modules to hydrolyze lactose in waste whey. This technical report presents the general properties and performances (permeability, washing procedures, hydraulic configurations, physical and chemical properties) of both, polymeric and ceramic supports, enzyme kinetics, physical and covalent immobilization, mathematical model of the bioreactor and on-line process monitoring.

  2. Improving Transitions to High School: A Review of Current Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvaas, Trina; McKevitt, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    This article synthesizes the current research in the area of school transitions for all students from junior high to high school and the effect of the transitions on students. The authors discuss current common high school transition practices and make recommendations for high school transition programming. The authors present a case study…

  3. 78 FR 22887 - Guidance for Industry on Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam Drugs: A Current Good Manufacturing Practices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Current Good Manufacturing Practices Framework for Preventing Cross- Contamination; Availability AGENCY... health risks associated with cross-reactivity. Although the existing current good manufacturing practices (CGMP) regulations require separation of manufacturing facilities to avoid cross-contamination, the...

  4. Spiral vane bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spiral vane bioreactor of a perfusion type is described in which a vertical chamber, intended for use in a microgravity condition, has a central rotating filter assembly and has flexible membranes disposed to rotate annularly about the filter assembly. The flexible members have end portions disposed angularly with respect to one another. A fluid replenishment medium is input from a closed loop liquid system to a completely liquid filled chamber containing microcarrier beads, cells and a fluid medium. Output of spent medium is to the closed loop. In the closed loop, the output and input parameters are sensed by sensors. A manifold permits recharging of the nutrients and pH adjustment. Oxygen is supplied and carbon dioxide and bubbles are removed and the system is monitored and controlled by a microprocessor.

  5. The sulfide oxidation in an electrolytic sulfide oxidizing bioreactor using graphite anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the present research was the direct conversion of sulfide (an important contaminant in various industrial wastewaters) to sulfate, whose discharge limits are much less stringent than those for sulfide. The electrolysis of sodium sulfide was investigated under different conditions such as: ph, current density and working area etc. along with cyclic voltammetry. By the use of a graphite anode, we achieved near-quantitative electrochemical conversion of sulfide ions to sulfate with current efficiency of 88%. Kinetically, the reaction is first order in current density. The experimental results revealed that the sulfide removal rate of more than 88% could be achieved under the conditions T=30 deg. C, ph = 7, current density of 1 mA/cm/sup 2/ at anode area of 225 cm/sup 2/.The process can be practically coupled with bioreactor for an effective sulfide removal. (author)

  6. Biofilm development in membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Savnik, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of biofilm development and its removal has crucial meaning in membrane reactor. Biofilm causes pore blocking on membranes, which causes a drop in efficiency of mixed liquor filtration and consequently deteriorates the efficiency of whole membrane bioreactor. This thesis deals with factors that affect biofilm development in membrane bioreactors. Structure and growth of biofilm are presented from its initial attachment of individual particles, their parameters of adhesion, hydrodynam...

  7. Membrane Bioreactor With Pressure Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiou, George S.; Shuler, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Improved class of multilayer membrane bioreactors uses convention forced by differences in pressure to overcome some of diffusional limitations of prior bioreactors. In reactor of new class, flow of nutrient solution reduces adverse gradients of concentration, keeps cells supplied with fresh nutrient, and sweeps away products faster than diffusion alone. As result, overall yield and rate of reaction increased. Pressures in sweeping gas and nutrient alternated to force nutrient liquid into and out of biocatalyst layer through hyrophilic membrane.

  8. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  9. Addressing Prediabetes in Childhood Obesity Treatment Programs: Support from Research and Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, H. Mollie; Fernandez, Cristina; Lukasiewicz, Gloria J.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Shaffer, Laura A.; Sweeney, Brooke; Woolford, Susan J.; Estrada, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and prediabetes have increased in prevalence among overweight and obese children, with significant implications for long-term health. There is little published evidence on the best approaches to care of prediabetes among overweight youth or the current practices used across pediatric weight management programs. Methods: This article reviews the literature and summarizes current practices for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of prediabetes at childhood obesity treatment centers. Findings regarding current practice were based on responses to an online survey from 28 pediatric weight management programs at 25 children's hospitals in 2012. Based on the literature reviewed, and empiric data, consensus support statements on prediabetes care and T2DM prevention were developed among representatives of these 25 children's hospitals' obesity clinics. Results: The evidence reviewed demonstrates that current T2DM and prediabetes diagnostic parameters are derived from adult-based studies with little understanding of clinical outcomes among youth. Very limited evidence exists on preventing progression of prediabetes. Some evidence suggests that a significant proportion of obese youth with prediabetes will revert to normoglycemia without pharmacological management. Evidence supports lifestyle modification for children with prediabetes, but further study of specific lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatments is needed. Conclusion: Evidence to guide management of prediabetes in children is limited. Current practice patterns of pediatric weight management programs show areas of variability in practice, reflecting the limited evidence base. More research is needed to guide clinical care for overweight youth with prediabetes. PMID:25055134

  10. 78 FR 64735 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... 16, 225, 500 et al. Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive... Administration 21 CFR Parts 16, 225, 500, 507, and 579 RIN 0910-AG10 Current Good Manufacturing Practice and..., and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) to establish requirements for current good manufacturing practice...

  11. 78 FR 17142 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... correcting the January 16, 2013 (78 FR 3646), proposed rule entitled ``Current Good Manufacturing Practice..., and 211 RIN 0910-AG36 Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk- Based... regulation for current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, packing, or holding human food...

  12. Three Hours a Day: Understanding Current Teen Practices of Smartphone Application Use

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, Frank; Church, Karen; Harrison, Beverly; Lyons, Kent; Rafalow, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Teens are using mobile devices for an increasing number of activities. Smartphones and a variety of mobile apps for communication, entertainment, and productivity have become an integral part of their lives. This mobile phone use has evolved rapidly as technology has changed and thus studies from even 2 or 3 years ago may not reflect new patterns and practices as smartphones have become more sophisticated. In order to understand current teen's practices around smartphone use, we conducted a t...

  13. Current and previous eating practices among women recovered from anorexia nervosa: a qualitative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Dimitrov Ulian; Ramiro Fernandez Unsain; Priscila de Morais Sato; Patrícia da Rocha Pereira; Isis de Carvalho Stelmo; Fernanda Sabatini; Fernanda Baeza Scagliusi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze qualitatively how women, who have recovered from anorexia nervosa, perceive and describe their current eating practices, as well as the ones developed during the eating disorder period. METHODS: Seven women were interviewed individually with the objective of investigating their eating practices, transition phases and all relevant aspects that somewhat contributed to the habit-forming; experiences, feelings and perceptions related to mealtime and...

  14. Current Trends in Malaysian Higher Education and the Effect on Education Policy and Practice: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Selvaraj Grapragasem; Anbalagan Krishnan; Azlin Norhaini Mansor

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia has evolved from a production-based to knowledge-based economy in order to stay relevant and compete in the global marketplace. Thus, the purpose of this article is to discuss current trends in Malaysian higher education and how these affect education policies and practices. Four main trends are discussed in this study: Globalization, Teaching and Learning, Governance, and the Knowledge-Based Society. These are followed by four elements that affect education policy and practices: Emp...

  15. Extensive Reading in EFL Classroom at Secondary Schools in Bangladesh: Current Practices and Future Possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Zulfeqar Haider; Elina Akhter

    2012-01-01

    Extensive reading is being practiced in many EFL and ESL classrooms as an effective means for developing learners’ reading as well as other related skills. This paper is based on a small-scale study that explores the current practices and future possibilities of using extensive reading in the EFL classrooms at the junior secondary schools in Bangladesh. The study reports the responses of 100 secondary English teachers on different aspects of using extensive reading tasks in the EFL classrooms...

  16. Monitoring entry-level practice: keeping the national council licensure examination for registered nurses current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Anne; Kenny, Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    The National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses assesses whether a candidate has the ability to provide safe and effective nursing care upon entry into practice. It is essential that this assessment be current and relevant to nursing practice. The authors discuss methods that are used to provide evidence to support the 2007 NCLEX-RN Test Plan and to maintain the currency of the examination. PMID:17496823

  17. The current state of abortion law and practice in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Pauline; Campbell, Patricia; Clinton, Alison

    This paper reviews current abortion law and practice in Northern Ireland (NI). It explores the origins of NI's abortion law and its complexity in relation to current practice. It reviews issues relating to women seeking terminations in NI and Great Britain and reviews attempts by the Family Planning Association in NI to require the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety NI to clarify the current legal basis for termination of pregnancy and to provide guidance for health professionals engaged in this practice. The paper also discusses some of the issues surrounding abortion in NI and seeks to explain why this subject is causing controversy and debate, especially following a judicial review in February and Marie Stopes opening a termination service in Belfast. PMID:23901450

  18. Assessment of current cybersecurity practices in the public domain : cyber indications and warnings domain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

    2010-09-01

    This report assesses current public domain cyber security practices with respect to cyber indications and warnings. It describes cybersecurity industry and government activities, including cybersecurity tools, methods, practices, and international and government-wide initiatives known to be impacting current practice. Of particular note are the U.S. Government's Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) and 'Einstein' programs, which are serving to consolidate the Government's internet access points and to provide some capability to monitor and mitigate cyber attacks. Next, this report catalogs activities undertaken by various industry and government entities. In addition, it assesses the benchmarks of HPC capability and other HPC attributes that may lend themselves to assist in the solution of this problem. This report draws few conclusions, as it is intended to assess current practice in preparation for future work, however, no explicit references to HPC usage for the purpose of analyzing cyber infrastructure in near-real-time were found in the current practice. This report and a related SAND2010-4766 National Cyber Defense High Performance Computing and Analysis: Concepts, Planning and Roadmap report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

  19. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  20. Platelet bioreactor-on-a-chip

    OpenAIRE

    Thon, Jonathan N.; Mazutis, Linas; Wu, Stephen; Sylman, Joanna L.; Ehrlicher, Allen; Machlus, Kellie R.; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Shijiang; Lanza, Robert; Neeves, Keith B.; Weitz, David A; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a biomimetic microfluidic platelet bioreactor that recapitulates bone marrow and blood vessel microenvironments.Application of shear stress in this bioreactor triggers physiological proplatelet production, and platelet release.

  1. Modern dental imaging: a review of the current technology and clinical applications in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of modern imaging techniques commonly used in dental practice and their clinical applications is presented. The current dental examinations consist of intraoral imaging with digital indirect and direct receptors, while extraoral imaging is divided into traditional tomographic/panoramic imaging and the more recently introduced cone beam computed tomography. Applications, limitations and current trends of these dental ''in-office'' radiographic techniques are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Modern dental imaging: a review of the current technology and clinical applications in dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, Bart; Jacobs, Reinhilde [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Oral Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, Hilde [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Radiology Section, Department of Medical Diagnostic Sciences, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-11-15

    A review of modern imaging techniques commonly used in dental practice and their clinical applications is presented. The current dental examinations consist of intraoral imaging with digital indirect and direct receptors, while extraoral imaging is divided into traditional tomographic/panoramic imaging and the more recently introduced cone beam computed tomography. Applications, limitations and current trends of these dental ''in-office'' radiographic techniques are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Open Source Software to Control Bioflo Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Burdge, David A.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed...

  4. Vitamin D status of dairy cattle: Outcomes of current practices in the dairy industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for vitamin D supplementation of dairy cattle has been known for the better part of the last century and is well-appreciated by dairy producers and nutritionists. Whether current recommendations and practices for supplemental vitamin D are meeting the needs of dairy cattle, however, is not...

  5. European audit of current practice in diagnosis and treatment of childhood growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Bernasconi, Sergio; Clayton, Peter E; Kiess, Wieland; DeMuinck-Keizer Schrama, Sabine

    2002-01-01

    The present survey among members of the ESPE on current practice in diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is of great clinical relevance and importance in the light of the recently published guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD by the Growth Hormone Research Soc...

  6. Employability and Employment Approaches: Currently Practiced in Independent Living Programs. A Resource Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Bob; And Others

    This document provides descriptions of employment interventions as a resource for use in initiating or expanding employment services for individuals with disabilities. The document presents abstracts of 40 employability/employment interventions and practices currently in use by independent living programs throughout the United States. The…

  7. Interpersonal Relationships, Motivation, Engagement, and Achievement: Yields for Theory, Current Issues, and Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Dowson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we scope the role of interpersonal relationships in students' academic motivation, engagement, and achievement. We argue that achievement motivation theory, current issues, and educational practice can be conceptualized in relational terms. Influential theorizing, including attribution theory, expectancy-value theory, goal theory,…

  8. Examining Current Beliefs, Practices and Barriers about Technology Integration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pi-Sui

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to examine the current beliefs, practices and barriers concerning technology integration of Kindergarten through Grade Six teachers in the midwestern United States. The three data collection methods were online surveys with 152 teachers as well as interviews and observations with 8 teachers. The findings…

  9. Current Trends in Malaysian Higher Education and the Effect on Education Policy and Practice: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapragasem, Selvaraj; Krishnan, Anbalagan; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia has evolved from a production-based to knowledge-based economy in order to stay relevant and compete in the global marketplace. Thus, the purpose of this article is to discuss current trends in Malaysian higher education and how these affect education policies and practices. Four main trends are discussed in this study: Globalization,…

  10. Clinical skills training in obstetrics - a descriptive survey of current practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathilde Maagaard; Johansen, Marianne; Lottrup, Pernille;

    2012-01-01

    The Danish National Board of Health has recommended that labor wards establish regular obstetric emergency skills training programs. The aim of this study was to describe current practice in Denmark. A questionnaire was sent to all obstetric departments in Denmark in 2008. All responded. Simulation...

  11. Cultural landscapes as heritage in Malaysia: Potentials, threats, and current practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, R.

    2013-01-01

    The rural cultural landscape in Malaysia is relatively under-researched. The current heritage practices focus on built heritage as national heritage, which implies the everyday landscapes of the rural areas have been neglected as potential heritage and have received little attention from politicians

  12. Current sedation and monitoring practice for colonoscopy: an International Observational Study (EPAGE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froehlich, F; Harris, JK; Wietlisbach, V; Burnand, B; Vader, JP; Gonvers, JJ

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varies between centers and over time. Knowledge of current practice is needed to ensure quality of care and help focus future research. The objective of this study was to examine sedation and monitoring practice in...... endoscopy centers internationally. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient. RESULTS: 6004 patients were...... centers. Oxygen desaturation (LT /= 85 %) occurred in 5 % of patients, of whom 80 % were moderately sedated. On average, three staff members were involved in procedures. An anesthesiologist was present during 27 % of colonoscopies, and during 85 % of colonoscopies using deep sedation. CONCLUSIONS...

  13. Tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  14. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C. PMID:25022362

  15. Theoretical and practical program in the non-destructive testing by eddy currents - the first level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing using eddy currents is one of the non-destructive tests that use electromagnetic property as a basis for testing procedures, and there are many other ways to use this principle, including Remote Field Testing and the Magnetic Flux Leakage test. Eddy currents are electrical currents moving in a circular path, and took the name eddy of eddies that form when a liquid or gas is moving in a circular path because of objection obstacles to its track. They are generated in the material using a variable magnetic field. Non-destructive testing by eddy currents is a technique used for the detection of defects and interruptions in a material and it is a process that relies on the generation of small eddy currents in the material of the part to be examined, provided that this part is of an electrically conducting material. This technique and its scientific basis are explained in this book. Also the devices used in this technique and how to use these devices in details are explained. The book contains Twelve chapters: Introduction to non destructive testing - Engineering materials and its mechanical characteristics - Electrical and magnetic characteristics of engineering materials - Introduction to testing by eddy currents - Factors affecting eddy currents - Basis of electrical circuits used in eddy currents testing devices - Probes of eddy currents testing - Eddy currents testing devices (Theoretical) - Analysis of the examination results of testing by eddy currents: techniques and applications - Applications of testing by eddy currents - Eddy currents testing devices (Application) - Practical lessons for the first level in testing by eddy currents.

  16. Current practice of radioiodine treatment in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective, observational study of a cohort of thyroid cancer patients in Germany focusses on the ''real-world'' practice in the management of thyroid cancer patients. This report includes data from 2376 patients with primary differentiated thyroid carcinoma first diagnosed in the year 1996. The study reveals considerable differences in actual practice concerning surgery and radioiodine treatment. The results indicate that consensus is lacking with respect to the multimodality treatment approach for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Our analysis represents the most current and comprehensive national assessment of presenting patient characteristics, diagnostic tests, treatment and complications for thyroid cancer. (orig.)

  17. Some process control/design considerations in the development of a microgravity mammalian cell bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goochee, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to review some of the physical/metabolic factors which must be considered in the development of an operating strategy for a mammalian cell bioreactor. Emphasis is placed on the dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements of growing mammalian epithelial cells. Literature reviews concerning oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements are discussed. A preliminary, dynamic model which encompasses the current features of the NASA bioreactor is presented. The implications of the literature survey and modeling effort on the design and operation of the NASA bioreactor are discussed.

  18. Standard practice for characterization of coatings using conformable Eddy-Current sensors without coating reference standards

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the use of conformable eddy-current sensors for nondestructive characterization of coatings without standardization on coated reference parts. It includes the following: (1) thickness measurement of a conductive coating on a conductive substrate, (2) detection and characterization of local regions of increased porosity of a conductive coating, and (3) measurement of thickness for nonconductive coatings on a conductive substrate or on a conductive coating. This practice includes only nonmagnetic coatings on either magnetic (μ ≠ μ0) or nonmagnetic (μ = μ0) substrates. This practice can also be used to measure the effective thickness of a process-affected zone (for example, shot peened layer for aluminum alloys, alpha case for titanium alloys). For specific types of coated parts, the user may need a more specific procedure tailored to a specific application.

  19. Large-Eddy Simulation: Current Capabilities, Recommended Practices, and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rizzetta, Donald P.; Fureby, Christer

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an activity by the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Working Group of the AIAA Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee to (1) address the current capabilities of LES, (2) outline recommended practices and key considerations for using LES, and (3) identify future research needs to advance the capabilities and reliability of LES for analysis of turbulent flows. To address the current capabilities and future needs, a survey comprised of eleven questions was posed to LES Working Group members to assemble a broad range of perspectives on important topics related to LES. The responses to these survey questions are summarized with the intent not to be a comprehensive dictate on LES, but rather the perspective of one group on some important issues. A list of recommended practices is also provided, which does not treat all aspects of a LES, but provides guidance on some of the key areas that should be considered.

  20. A postmodern, sociological exploration of current dream-related discourses and practices / Hermann Werner Nell

    OpenAIRE

    Nell, Hermann Werner

    2005-01-01

    The study was prompted by the lack of existing research with regard to what people locally think and believe about dreams. The study aimed to uncover, explore, and describe current, local dream related beliefs, discourses, and practices (in the Vaal-Triangle area of South-Africa), using a postmodern, social constructivist, as well as a generally sociological approach. In support of this aim, a literature review of various religious, cultural, and psychological dream related discourses was exe...

  1. Subfascial endoscopic perforator vein surgery (SEPS): current practice among British surgeons.

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteley, M. S.; Smith, J. J.; Galland, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Subfascial endoscopic perforator vein surgery (SEPS) has recently caused considerable interest among British surgeons. There are no data indicating which, if any, patients benefit from SEPS. A series of 47 British surgeons, identified as having taken up SEPS, were sent a questionnaire asking about their current practice; 26 were returned completed (55% response rate). Of those surgeons replying, 22 (85%) had performed their first SEPS procedure within the previous 21 months, 18 (69%) within t...

  2. Current practice and regulatory infrastructure aspects on radioactive waste management in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Malaysia, radioactive materials are mostly used in the industrial, medical, research and educational sectors which will inevitably generate radioactive wastes. As a major tin mining nation Malaysia has been generating radioactive wastes that are now known as Technologically Enhanced Radioactive Materials (TENORM). In this paper, the role and responsibilities of the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) is discussed with attention given to current practice and regulatory infrastructure aspects on radioactive waste management in Malaysia. (author)

  3. Lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: current methods and interpretation criteria in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Hrastnik, Damjana; Fettich, Jure; Grmek, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Background In current clinical practice lung scintigraphy is mainly used to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). Modified diagnostic criteria for planar lung scintigraphy are considered, as newer scitigraphic methods, especially single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are becoming more popular. Patients and methods. Data of 98 outpatients who underwent planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy and 49 outpatients who underwent V/Q SPECT from the emergency department (ED) were retr...

  4. Current good manufacturing practice in plant automation of biological production processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dorresteijn, R. C.; Wieten, G.; van Santen, P. T. E.; Philippi, M. C.; de Gooijer, C. D.; Tramper, J.; Beuvery, E.C.

    1997-01-01

    The production of biologicals is subject to strict governmental regulations. These are drawn up in current good manufacturing practices (cGMP), a.o. by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To implement cGMP in a production facility, plant automation becomes an essential tool. For this purpose Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) have been developed that control all operations inside a production facility. The introduction of these recipe-driven control systems that follow ISA S88 standards...

  5. Current practices in the use of sildenafil for pulmonary arterial hypertension in Brazilian hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral Lucio M; de Souza Ana HA; Huf Gisele

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sildenafil is a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor used for treating pulmonary hypertension. Although the use of sildenafil in patients under 18 years old is off-label, this inhibitor has been widely prescribed for children treatment at hospitals in Brazil. In this work we evaluated the current practices in using sildenafil in the three main reference hospitals of Rio de Janeiro to design a clinical trial. Then we analyzed the content of ...

  6. Current practices and guidelines for clinical next-generation sequencing oncology testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel P. Strom

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been rapidly integrated into molecular pathology, dramatically increasing the breadth genomic of information available to oncologists and their patients. This review will explore the ways in which this new technology is currently applied to bolster care for patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies, focusing on practices and guidelines for assessing the technical validity and clinical utility of DNA variants identified during clinical NGS oncology testing.

  7. Cultural landscapes as heritage in Malaysia: Potentials, threats, and current practices

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, R.

    2013-01-01

    The rural cultural landscape in Malaysia is relatively under-researched. The current heritage practices focus on built heritage as national heritage, which implies the everyday landscapes of the rural areas have been neglected as potential heritage and have received little attention from politicians and policy makers. The goals of the study were two-fold: [1] To identify and select rural cultural landscapes in Peninsular Malaysia that have heritage value, which may also considered worthwhile ...

  8. Stress testing and contingency funding plans: an analysis of current practices in the Luxembourg banking sector

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Stragiotti

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the current practices adopted by a sample of Luxembourg banks on liquidity stress testing and contingency funding plans. The paper covers four main topics: liquidity stress testing coverage, scenario design, policy issues and contingency funding plans. We compare, when relevant, these results to a larger sample of EU peer banks. The results, collected through a questionnaire addressed to forty-seven banking groups, are analyzed by the means of the principal component techn...

  9. Mammalian cell retention devices for stirred perfusion bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Woodside, Steven M.; Bowen, Bruce D.; Piret, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Within the spectrum of current applications for cell culture technologies, efficient large-scale mammalian cell production processes are typically carried out in stirred fed-batch or perfusion bioreactors. The specific aspects of each individual process that can be considered when determining the method of choice are presented. A major challenge for perfusion reactor design and operation is the reliability of the cell retention device. Current retention systems include cross-flow membrane fil...

  10. LTCC based bioreactors for cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H.; Welker, T.; Welker, K.; Witte, H.; Müller, J.

    2016-01-01

    LTCC multilayers offer a wide range of structural options and flexibility of connections not available in standard thin film technology. Therefore they are considered as material base for cell culture reactors. The integration of microfluidic handling systems and features for optical and electrical capturing of indicators for cell culture growth offers the platform for an open system concept. The present paper assesses different approaches for the creation of microfluidic channels in LTCC multilayers. Basic functions required for the fluid management in bioreactors include temperature and flow control. Both features can be realized with integrated heaters and temperature sensors in LTCC multilayers. Technological conditions for the integration of such elements into bioreactors are analysed. The temperature regulation for the system makes use of NTC thermistor sensors which serve as real value input for the control of the heater. It allows the adjustment of the fluid temperature with an accuracy of 0.2 K. The tempered fluid flows through the cell culture chamber. Inside of this chamber a thick film electrode array monitors the impedance as an indicator for the growth process of 3-dimensional cell cultures. At the system output a flow sensor is arranged to monitor the continual flow. For this purpose a calorimetric sensor is implemented, and its crucial design parameters are discussed. Thus, the work presented gives an overview on the current status of LTCC based fluid management for cell culture reactors, which provides a promising base for the automation of cell culture processes.

  11. High retention membrane bioreactors: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-09-01

    Extensive research has focussed on the development of novel high retention membrane bioreactor (HR-MBR) systems for wastewater reclamation in recent years. HR-MBR integrates high rejection membrane separation with conventional biological treatment in a single step. High rejection membrane separation processes currently used in HR-MBR applications include nanofiltration, forward osmosis, and membrane distillation. In these HR-MBR systems, organic contaminants can be effectively retained, prolonging their retention time in the bioreactor and thus enhancing their biodegradation. Therefore, HR-MBR can offer a reliable and elegant solution to produce high quality effluent. However, there are several technological challenges associated with the development of HR-MBR, including salinity build-up, low permeate flux, and membrane degradation. This paper provides a critical review on these challenges and potential opportunities of HR-MBR for wastewater treatment and water reclamation, and aims to guide and inform future research on HR-MBR for fast commercialisation of this innovative technology. PMID:24996563

  12. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P.; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N.; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O’Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-01-01

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education. PMID:27170809

  13. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-04-25

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education. PMID:27170809

  14. The effect of practice on random number generation task: a transcranial direct current stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Fioravante; Capone, Gianluca; Ranieri, Federico; Di Pino, Giovanni; Oricchio, Gianluca; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-10-01

    Random number generation (RNG) is a procedurally-simple task related to specific executive functions, such as updating and monitoring of information and inhibition of automatic responses. The effect of practice on executive functions has been widely investigated, however little is known on the impact of practice on RNG. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) allows to modulate, non-invasively, brain activity and to enhance the effects of training on executive functions. Hence, this study aims to investigate the effect of practice on RNG and to explore the possibility to influence it by tDCS applied over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Twenty-six healthy volunteers have been evaluated within single session and between different sessions of RNG using several measures of randomness, which are informative of separable cognitive components servicing random behavior. We found that repetition measures significantly change within single session, seriation measures significantly change both within and between sessions, while cycling measures are not affected by practice. tDCS does not produce any additional effect, however a sub-analysis limited to the first session revealed an increasing trend in seriation measure after anodal compared to cathodal stimulation. Our findings support the hypothesis that practice selectively and consistently influences specific cognitive components related to random behavior, while tDCS transiently affects RNG performance. PMID:24811195

  15. The role of community pharmacy-based vaccination in the USA: current practice and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach AT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Albert T Bach, Jeffery A Goad School of Pharmacy, Chapman University, Irvine, California, USA Abstract: Community pharmacy-based provision of immunizations in the USA has become commonplace in the last few decades, with success in increasing rates of immunizations. Community pharmacy-based vaccination services are provided by pharmacists educated in the practice of immunization delivery and provide a convenient and accessible option for receiving immunizations. The pharmacist's role in immunization practice has been described as serving in the roles of educator, facilitator, and immunizer. With a majority of pharmacist-provided vaccinations occurring in the community pharmacy setting, there are many examples of community pharmacists serving in these immunization roles with successful outcomes. Different community pharmacies employ a number of different models and workflow practices that usually consist of a year-round in-house service staffed by their own immunizing pharmacist. Challenges that currently exist in this setting are variability in scopes of immunization practice for pharmacists across states, inconsistent reimbursement mechanisms, and barriers in technology. Many of these challenges can be alleviated by continual education; working with legislators, state boards of pharmacy, stakeholders, and payers to standardize laws; and reimbursement design. Other challenges that may need to be addressed are improvements in communication and continuity of care between community pharmacists and the patient centered medical home. Keywords: immunization, pharmacy practice, pharmacists, continuity of care 

  16. The Current Landscape of Transitions of Care Practice Models: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester-Eyeguokan, Charmaine D; Pincus, Kathleen J; Patel, Roshni S; Reitz, Shirley J

    2016-01-01

    Transitions of care (TOC) are a set of actions to ensure patient coordination and continuity of care as patients transfer between different locations or levels. During transitions associated with chronic or acute illness, vulnerable patients may be placed at risk with fragmented systems compromising their health and safety. In addition, poor care transitions also have an enormous impact on health care spending. The primary objective of this scoping review is to summarize the current landscape of practice models that deliver TOC services in the United States. The secondary objective is to use the information to characterize the current state of best practice models. A search of the PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, National Center for Biotechnology Information at the U.S. National Library of Medicine, and Cochrane Library databases (January 1, 2000-April 13, 2015) for articles pertaining to TOC models, limited to U.S. studies published in the English language with human subjects, gleaned 1362 articles. An additional 26 articles were added from the gray literature. Articles meeting inclusion criteria underwent a second review and were categorized into four groups: background information, original TOC research articles not evaluating practice model interventions, original TOC research articles describing practice models, and systematic or Cochrane reviews. The reviewers met weekly to discuss the challenges and resolve disagreements regarding literature reviews with consensus before progressing. A total of 188 articles describing TOC practice models met the inclusion criteria. Despite the strengths of several quality TOC models, none satisfied all the components recommended by leading experts. Multimodal interventions by multidisciplinary teams appear to represent a best practice model for TOC to improve patient outcomes and reduce readmissions, but one size does not fit all

  17. Cultivation of Mammalian Cells Using a Single-use Pneumatic Bioreactor System

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina M. Obom; Cummings, Patrick J.; Ciafardoni, Janelle A.; Hashimura, Yasunori; Giroux, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mammalian, insect, and stem cell cultivation and scale-up have created tremendous opportunities for new therapeutics and personalized medicine innovations. However, translating these advances into therapeutic applications will require in vitro systems that allow for robust, flexible, and cost effective bioreactor systems. There are several bioreactor systems currently utilized in research and commercial settings; however, many of these systems are not optimal for establishi...

  18. A revisit on the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR in the Malaysian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Suhaimi Mohd Danuri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The current dispute resolution procedures available in the Malaysian construction industry are mainly litigation and arbitration. In addition, the alternative dispute resolutions (ADR, namely mediation and adjudication, have also been introduced as the other methods for resolving disputes. The objective of this study is to examine the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR available in the Malaysian construction industry. The aim of this paper is two-fold: to report the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR, and identify the attributes of successful implementation of both mechanisms based on the perceptions of the Malaysian construction industry players. From the jurisprudence point of view, this study looks into the law as it is, in relation to the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR, by showing how those findings can be used to explain why improvement is needed to promote a successful and well received dispute resolution and ADR, and what lessons can be learnt, towards the formulation of a more viable methods for the Malaysian construction industry. NVivo software has been used to manage and organise the complete interview transcripts and facilitate the data analysis process for this study. Literature review reveals a continuous development of dispute resolution and ADR in the Malaysian construction industry, while, globally the industry has not only embraced ADR but also spearheaded the development of innovative forms of dispute avoidance mechanism. The findings of interviews show that locally, apart from litigation, the common types of ADR are arbitration, mediation and ad hoc mechanism. The findings also lead to the discovery of the following attributes: faster, less procedural, cost effective and enforceable; regulation and government's support; professionalism and ethic; training; and facility, that may promote a successful implementation of dispute resolution and ADR in Malaysia.

  19. Improving medical students' knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolyniak MJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Wolyniak,1 Lynne T Bemis,2 Amy J Prunuske2 1Department of Biology, Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, VA, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA Abstract: Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These advances favor a more experience-based education focused primarily on developing student's critical thinking skills. In this review, we examine the current state of genetics education at both the preclinical and clinical levels and the ways in which medical and pedagogical research have guided reforms to current and emerging teaching practices in genetics. We discover exciting trends taking place in which genetics is integrated with other scientific disciplines both horizontally and vertically across medical curricula to emphasize training in scientific critical thinking skills among students via the evaluation of clinical evidence and consultation of online databases. These trends will produce future health professionals with the skills and confidence necessary to embrace the new tools of medical practice that have emerged from scientific advances in genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. Keywords: genetics education, medical genetics, pedagogical practice, active learning, problem-based learning

  20. 78 FR 3646 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... safe manufacturing, processing, packing, and holding of LACF (44 FR 16209, March 16, 1979). The second..., and 211 RIN 0910-AG36 Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk- Based..., Subpart A) D. Proposed Revisions to Current Good Manufacturing Practice Requirements of Part 110...

  1. Current and previous eating practices among women recovered from anorexia nervosa: a qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Dimitrov Ulian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze qualitatively how women, who have recovered from anorexia nervosa, perceive and describe their current eating practices, as well as the ones developed during the eating disorder period. METHODS: Seven women were interviewed individually with the objective of investigating their eating practices, transition phases and all relevant aspects that somewhat contributed to the habit-forming; experiences, feelings and perceptions related to mealtime and the influence that food has had over the present subjects' life. The interviews were analyzed by the discourse of the collective subject method. RESULTS: The results brought up the following topics: a control; b concerns and feelings; c deprivation d beauty dictatorship; e eating competence; f importance of food; g food cacophony. CONCLUSIONS: What stands out is a multiplicity of eating practices, which during the eating disorder were similar to and characterized by restriction; however, after recovery, part of the subjects seem to have developed a higher eating competence, whereas others show a practice similar to the one acquired during the anorexia nervosa, such as the difficulty in realizing when they are satisfied and a feeling of discomfort when facing social interactions.

  2. Emergency nurses' current practices and understanding of family presence during CPR.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madden, Eilis

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To examine emergency nurses\\' current practices and understanding of family presence during CPR in the emergency department, Cork University Hospital, Republic of Ireland. METHOD: A quantitative descriptive design was used in the study. A questionnaire developed by ENA was distributed to emergency nurses working in a level I trauma emergency department at Cork University Hospital. The total sample number was 90, including all emergency nurses with at least 6 months\\' emergency nursing experience. RESULTS: Emergency nurses often took families to the bedside during resuscitation efforts (58.9%) or would do so if the opportunity arose (17.8%). A high percentage (74.4%) of respondents would prefer a written policy allowing the option of family presence during CPR. The most significant barrier to family witnessed resuscitation (FWR) was conflicts occurring within the emergency team. The most significant facilitator to FWR was a greater understanding of health care professionals on the benefits of FWR to patients and families, indicating the need for educational development. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study and previously published studies indicate the need for development of written polices and guidelines on the practice to meet the needs of patients, families, and staff by providing consistent, safe, and caring practices for all involved in the resuscitation process. Recommendations of the study include the development of a written policy and an educational programme on the safe implementation and practices of FWR.

  3. Addiction Medicine: Current Status of Certification, Maintenance of Certification, Training, and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Kevin; Wiegand, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Addiction medicine (ADM) is an emerging medical field. It will soon be recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties as a multispecialty subspecialty, sponsored by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Certification and maintenance of certification in ADM are available currently through the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). There is an urgent need for trained and certified ADM physicians to serve the needs of patients and society. Thirty-seven addiction medicine fellowships of 12 months duration are now available, and their number is increasing. Physicians specializing in medical toxicology have educational, training, and practice overlap with addiction medicine. Medical toxicology physicians usually meet ADM examination eligibility requirements, based on clinical practice experience and continuing medical education activities. Those with fellowship training or in a fellowship bring training experience which has commonalities to ADM fellowship training, and therefore are particularly prepared for examination and practice in ADM. There are opportunities for partnerships in training, practice, and leadership between addiction medicine and medical toxicology. PMID:26597980

  4. Gender trends in dental practice patterns. A review of current U.S. literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, T A

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews three recent reports of national gender trends in dental practice patterns. Although the three independent cross-sectional studies were conducted at different points in time, used different sampling strategies, and used similar but independent survey instruments, findings were consistent across studies. In summary: Women dentists are less likely to be married and have fewer children. Women are more likely to assume child rearing and household responsibilities. Women are less likely to be practice owners. Women worked slightly fewer hours per week and weeks per year, and were more likely to take a leave of absence for illness or child rearing. However, women dentists demonstrate a far greater professional work commitment than was previously reported in the literature. Women earn significantly less income from the practice of dentistry, even after controlling for age, practice ownership, hours worked per week, and other personal characteristics. The most current "Gender Wage Gap" estimates range from 57.7% for specialists to 75.4% for general practitioners (8). delta. PMID:1960294

  5. Status and current spent fuel storage practices in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief discussions are presented on the history and state of spent fuel generation by utilities that comprise the United States commercial nuclear power industry, the current situation regarding the Federal government's nuclear waste policy, and evolving spent fuel storage practices. These evolving spent fuel storage practices are the result of private sector initiatives, but appear to be influenced by various external factors. The paper is not intended to provide a comprehensive appraisal of the storage initiatives being conducted by the private sector. The focus, instead, is on the Federal government's role and activities related to spent fuel management. Although the Federal government has adopted a policy calling for deep geological disposal of spent fuel, the US Congress has recently begun to consider expanding that policy to include a centralized interim storage facility. In the absence of such an expanded policy, the Department of Energy has performed some preliminary activities that would expedite development of a centralized interim storage facility, if Congress were to enact such a policy. The Department's current activities with regard to developing a centralized interim storage facility, which are consistent with the current policy, are described in the paper. The paper also describes two important technical development activities that have been conducted by the Department of Energy to support improved efficiency in spent fuel management. The Department's activities regarding development of a burnup credit methodology, and a dry transfer system are summarized. (author)

  6. Neonatal survival interventions in humanitarian emergencies: a survey of current practices and programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Jennifer O

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal deaths account for over 40% of all deaths in children younger than five years of age and neonatal mortality rates are highest in areas affected by humanitarian emergencies. Of the ten countries with the highest neonatal mortality rates globally, six are currently or recently affected by a humanitarian emergency. Yet, little is known about newborn care in crisis settings. Understanding current policies and practices for the care of newborns used by humanitarian aid organizations will inform efforts to improve care in these challenging settings. Methods Between August 18 and September 25, 2009, 56 respondents that work in humanitarian emergencies completed a web-based survey either in English or French. A snow ball sampling technique was used to identify organizations that provide health services during humanitarian emergencies to gather information on current practices for maternal and newborn care in these settings. Information was collected about continuum-of-care services for maternal, newborn and child health, referral services, training and capacity development, health information systems, policies and guidelines, and organizational priorities. Data were entered into MS Excel and frequencies and percentages were calculated. Results The majority of responding organizations reported implementing components of neonatal and maternal health interventions. However, multiple barriers exist in providing comprehensive care, including: funding shortages (63.3%, gaps in training (51.0% and staff shortages and turnover (44.9%. Conclusions Neonatal care is provided by most of the responding humanitarian organizations; however, the quality, breadth and consistency of this care are limited.

  7. [Methodology for the development and update of practice guidelines: current state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Cruz, Antonio; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Torres-Arreola, Laura Pilar; Dávila-Torres, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The current scenario of health services in Mexico reveals as a priority the implementation of strategies that allow us to better respond to the needs and expectations of individuals and society as a whole, through the provision of efficient and effective alternatives for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In this context, clinical practice guidelines constitute an element of management in the health care system, whose objective is to establish a national bechmark for encouraging clinical and management decision making, based on recommendations from the best available evidence, in order to contribute to the quality and effectiveness of health care. The purpose of this document is to show the methodology used for the development and updating of clinical practice guidelines that the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social has developed in line with the sectorial model in order to serve the user of these guidelines. PMID:26820209

  8. Current best practice in the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Rosemary; O'Brien, Patrick; Khalil, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a potentially serious complication of pregnancy with increasing significance worldwide. Preeclampsia is the cause of 9%-26% of global maternal mortality and a significant proportion of preterm delivery, and maternal and neonatal morbidity. Incidence is increasing in keeping with the increase in obesity, maternal age, and women with medical comorbidities entering pregnancy. Recent developments in the understanding of the pathophysiology of preeclampsia have opened new avenues for prevention, screening, and management of this condition. In addition it is known that preeclampsia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in both the mother and the child and presents an opportunity for early preventative measures. New tools for early detection, prevention, and management of preeclampsia have the potential to revolutionize practice in the coming years. This review presents the current best practice in diagnosis and management of preeclampsia and the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. PMID:27555797

  9. Trends in Dental Practice Sales and Associateships in the Current Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Steven Wolff

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiences would suggest that there is a significant discrepancy in the number of doctors retiring and transitioning their practices and the number of younger practitioners wishing to assume ownership and build a career. Peaks and valleys in dental school enrollment over the last forty years should have produced an abundance of retirement aged doctors wishing to place their practices on the market to a smaller pool of buyers. Such is currently not the case. Doctors in their sixties have experienced recent stock market downturns in 2000 and 2008, the “9-11” tragedy and a drop in both the value and liquidity of the housing market. The ready access to refinance or second mortgage funds may even find some doctors upside down on personal, vacation and investment real estate. All of this combined has had considerable negative impact on their net worth. Health care costs continue to increase and most dentists are personally responsible for their premiums. Combine all of this with the current low level of secure returns on invested capital along with a significant increase in life expectancy over the last two generations and many decide they are simply unable to retire as planned. The fear of running out of money is stronger than their will to pursue retirement. This article examines in some detail the reasons for this imbalance and the effects they are having on practice transitions, practice values and the market for associate employment. We will also explore what the future may hold for both retiring and new career doctors.

  10. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor under extreme conditions (poster)

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz Sierra, J.D.; De Kreuk, M.K.; Spanjers, H.; van Lier, J B

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors ensure biomass retention by the application of micro or ultrafiltration processes. This allows operation at high sludge concentrations. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an efficient way to retain specialist microorganisms for treating wastewaters from different industries such as coke, textile, food, and chemical. However, few research has been found into the use of membrane bioreactors for anaerobic treatment of wastewater under extreme ...

  11. Practical hybrid fiber optic current sensor on a high-voltage power line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Chen, Zhan; Liu, Feng; Lu, Xin; Guo, Yanhui; Zheng, Shengxuan

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, the disadvantages of the traditional Current Transformer (CT) on high voltage power line are described. A new method to measure the high-voltage current is studied. A Practical Hybrid Fiber Optic Sensor for High-Voltage Current is developed and the result of the experiment and the errors are analyzed. This design consists of two parts. One is in the air attached with the high voltage power line and the other one is on the ground. In the upper part, a Rogowaski Loop is used to transform the current signal into voltage one, then a V/F converter is applied to change this voltage signal into frequency. After processed, the resulted frequency signal is fed to the LED, which turns the electrical signal into light one. Then, the light signal is lead along the optic fiber down to the ground. Here, the optic fiber is used for insulation purpose. On the ground the light signal is converted back into electrical signal with a photoelectric cell. After amplified and regulated, the electrical signal is fed to a F/V converter, which changes the frequency signal back into the original current signal.

  12. Review of nonconventional bioreactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.E.; Mcllwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Biotechnology will significantly affect many industrial sectors in the future. Industrial sectors that will be affected include pharmaceutical, chemical, fuel, agricultural, and environmental remediation. Future research is needed to improve bioprocessing efficiency and cost-effectiveness in order to compete with traditional technologies. This report describes recent advances in bioprocess technologies and bioreactor designs and relates them to problems encountered in many industrial bioprocessing operations. The primary focus is directed towards increasing gas and vapor transfer for enhanced bioprocess kinetics as well as unproved by-product separation and removal. The advantages and disadvantages of various conceptual designs such as hollow-fiber, gas-phase, hyperbaric/hypobaric, and electrochemical bioreactors are also discussed. Specific applications that are intended for improved bioprocesses include coal desulfurization, coal liquefaction, soil bioremediation, biomass conversion to marketable chemicals, biomining, and biohydrometallurgy as well as bioprocessing of gases and vapors.

  13. Closeout of uranium mines and mills: A review of current practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report is a first step in gathering information on the assessment and control of the long term (over a few centuries) impact of uranium mining and milling waste. Its intention is to outline several examples of worldwide experience. It contains summaries of current closeout practices which have not previously been presented in a singly publication. It is expected to provide necessary information to Member States to formulate meaningful decisions for adequately controlling impacts resulting from uranium mines and mills waste materials. The information contained herein may also be valuable as background material for developing relevant guidance in this subject area, for example within the IAEA Safety Standards Programme. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Assessment of current practices in creating and using passwords as a control mechanism for information access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Wessels

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the critical issues in managing information within an organization is to ensure that proper controls exist and are applied in allowing people access to information. Passwords are used extensively as the main control mechanism to identify users wanting access to systems, applications, data files, network servers or personal information. In this article, the issues involved in selecting and using passwords are discussed and the current practices employed by users in creating and storing passwords to gain access to sensitive information are assessed. The results of this survey conclude that information managers cannot rely only on users to employ proper password control in order to protect sensitive information.

  15. Current Research and Classroom Practice: Toward More Inclusive Approaches to Literacy Development in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Booth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers an exploration of current research and related practice in boys’ literacy development, interprets key findings in the literature, and further explores some of the complex dilemmas and debates related to the ‘gender gap’ – i.e., differences between the achievement of boys and girls in this area. In conclusion, the authors suggest that governments, policy-makers, administrators, teachers and parents all need to closely examine and consider available research-based strategies and classroom interventions that can effectively support both boys and girls in their literacy development. 

  16. Study on practical of eddy current testing of core and core support graphite components in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core and core support graphite components in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) are mainly made of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphites. Nondestructive inspection with Eddy Current Testing (ECT) is planned to be applied to these components. The method of ECT has been already established for metallic components, however, cannot be applied directly to the graphite ones, because the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from those of metals. Therefore, ECT method and condition were studied for the application of the ECT to the graphite components. This paper describes the study on practical method and conditions of ECT for above mentioned graphite structures. (author)

  17. Optimizing of Culture Conditionin Horizontal Rotating Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionBioreactor is the most important equipment in tissue engineering. It can mimic the micro-environment of cell growth in vitro. At present, horizontal rotating bioreactor is the most advanced equipment for cell culture in the world. 2 Rotating bioreactors2.1 Working principleThere are two kinds of horizontal rotating bioreactor: HARV(high aspect ratio vessel) and RCCS (rotary cell culture system). It is drived by step motor with horizontal rotation, the culture medium and cell is filled between ...

  18. Prostate tumor grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  19. Perspectives on anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of domestic wastewater: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam L; Stadler, Lauren B; Love, Nancy G; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-10-01

    Interest in increasing the sustainability of water management is leading to a reevaluation of domestic wastewater (DWW) treatment practices. A central goal is to reduce energy demands and environmental impacts while recovering resources. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) have the ability to produce a similar quality effluent to aerobic treatment, while generating useful energy and producing substantially less residuals. This review focuses on operational considerations that require further research to allow implementation of AnMBR DWW treatment. Specific topics include membrane fouling, the lower limits of hydraulic retention time and temperature allowing for adequate treatment, complications with methane recovery, and nutrient removal options. Based on the current literature, future research efforts should focus on increasing the likelihood of net energy recovery through advancements in fouling control and development of efficient methods for dissolved methane recovery. Furthermore, assessing the sustainability of AnMBR treatment requires establishment of a quantitative environmental and economic evaluation framework. PMID:22608937

  20. Filtration characteristics in membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Evenblij, H.

    2006-01-01

    Causes of and remedies for membrane fouling in Membrane Bioreactors for wastewater treatment are only poorly understood and described in scientific literature. A Filtration Characterisation Installation and a measurement protocol were developed with the aim of a) unequivocally determination and quantification of the filterability of an activated sludge and b) carrying out short term experiments at labscale to determine foulants and/or fouling propensity determining factors. The installation w...

  1. Image Analysis and Multiphase Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, E. C.; Mota, M.; Pons, M.N.

    2001-01-01

    The applications of visualisation and image analysis to bioreactors can be found in two main areas: the characterisation of biomass (fungi, bacteria, yeasts, animal and plant cells, etc), in terms of size, morphology and physiology, that is the far most developed, and the characterisation of the multiphase behaviour of the reactors (flow patterns, velocity fields, bubble size and shape distribution, foaming), that may require sophisticated visualisation techniques.

  2. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Na Yan; Chengming Fan; Yuhong Chen; Zanmin Hu

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving incr...

  3. Current practice in software development for computational neuroscience and how to improve it.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Oliver Gewaltig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all research work in computational neuroscience involves software. As researchers try to understand ever more complex systems, there is a continual need for software with new capabilities. Because of the wide range of questions being investigated, new software is often developed rapidly by individuals or small groups. In these cases, it can be hard to demonstrate that the software gives the right results. Software developers are often open about the code they produce and willing to share it, but there is little appreciation among potential users of the great diversity of software development practices and end results, and how this affects the suitability of software tools for use in research projects. To help clarify these issues, we have reviewed a range of software tools and asked how the culture and practice of software development affects their validity and trustworthiness. We identified four key questions that can be used to categorize software projects and correlate them with the type of product that results. The first question addresses what is being produced. The other three concern why, how, and by whom the work is done. The answers to these questions show strong correlations with the nature of the software being produced, and its suitability for particular purposes. Based on our findings, we suggest ways in which current software development practice in computational neuroscience can be improved and propose checklists to help developers, reviewers, and scientists to assess the quality of software and whether particular pieces of software are ready for use in research.

  4. Eye dosimetry in interventional radiology and cardiology: current challenges and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Rehani, M M

    2014-12-01

    Interventional radiology and cardiology are areas with high potential for risk to eye lens. Accurate assessment of eye dose is one of the most important aspects of correlating doses with observed lens opacities among workers in interventional suites and ascertaining compliance with regulatory limits. The purpose of this paper is to review current approaches and opportunities in eye dosimetry and assess challenges in particular in accuracy and practicality. The possible approaches include practical dosimetry using passive dosemeters or active dosemeters with obvious advantage of active dosimetry. When neither of these is available, other approaches are based on either retrospective dose assessment using scatter radiation dose levels or correlations between patient dose indices and eye doses to the operators. In spite of all uncertainties and variations, estimation of eye dose from patient dose can be accepted as a compromise. Future challenges include development of practical methods for regular monitoring of individual eye doses and development of better techniques to estimate eye dose from measurements at some reference points. PMID:24262928

  5. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  6. Eye dosimetry in interventional radiology and cardiology: current challenges and practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology and cardiology are areas with high potential for risk to eye lens. Accurate assessment of eye dose is one of the most important aspects of correlating doses with observed lens opacities among workers in interventional suites and ascertaining compliance with regulatory limits. The purpose of this paper is to review current approaches and opportunities in eye dosimetry and assess challenges in particular in accuracy and practicality. The possible approaches include practical dosimetry using passive dosemeters or active dosemeters with obvious advantage of active dosimetry. When neither of these is available, other approaches are based on either retrospective dose assessment using scatter radiation dose levels or correlations between patient dose indices and eye doses to the operators. In spite of all uncertainties and variations, estimation of eye dose from patient dose can be accepted as a compromise. Future challenges include development of practical methods for regular monitoring of individual eye doses and development of better techniques to estimate eye dose from measurements at some reference points. (authors)

  7. Improving medical students' knowledge of genetic disease: a review of current and emerging pedagogical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolyniak, Michael J; Bemis, Lynne T; Prunuske, Amy J

    2015-01-01

    Genetics is an essential subject to be mastered by health professional students of all types. However, technological advances in genomics and recent pedagogical research have changed the way in which many medical training programs teach genetics to their students. These advances favor a more experience-based education focused primarily on developing student's critical thinking skills. In this review, we examine the current state of genetics education at both the preclinical and clinical levels and the ways in which medical and pedagogical research have guided reforms to current and emerging teaching practices in genetics. We discover exciting trends taking place in which genetics is integrated with other scientific disciplines both horizontally and vertically across medical curricula to emphasize training in scientific critical thinking skills among students via the evaluation of clinical evidence and consultation of online databases. These trends will produce future health professionals with the skills and confidence necessary to embrace the new tools of medical practice that have emerged from scientific advances in genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. PMID:26604852

  8. Analysis of the current rib support practices and techniques in U.S. coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Khaled M.; Murphy Michael M.; Lawson Heather E.; Klemetti Ted

    2016-01-01

    Design of rib support systems in U.S. coal mines is based primarily on local practices and experience. A better understanding of current rib support practices in U.S. coal mines is crucial for developing a sound engineering rib support design tool. The objective of this paper is to analyze the current practices of rib control in U.S. coal mines. Twenty underground coal mines were studied representing various coal basins, coal seams, geology, loading conditions, and rib control strategies. The key findings are:(1) any rib design guideline or tool should take into account external rib support as well as internal bolting;(2) rib bolts on their own cannot contain rib spall, especially in soft ribs subjected to significant load—external rib control devices such as mesh are required in such cases to contain rib sloughing;(3) the majority of the studied mines follow the overburden depth and entry height thresholds recommended by the Program Information Bulletin 11-29 issued by the Mine Safety and Health Administration;(4) potential rib insta-bility occurred when certain geological features prevailed—these include draw slate and/or bone coal near the rib/roof line, claystone partings, and soft coal bench overlain by rock strata;(5) 47%of the stud-ied rib spall was classified as blocky—this could indicate a high potential of rib hazards;and (6) rib injury rates of the studied mines for the last three years emphasize the need for more rib control management for mines operating at overburden depths between 152.4 m and 304.8 m.

  9. Mechanism for the uniaxial strain dependence of the critical current in practical REBCO tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osamura, Kozo; Machiya, Shutaro; Hampshire, Damian P.

    2016-06-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of uniaxial strain on the critical current of practical REBCO tapes (REBa2Cu3O7‑d , RE = Y and Gd) fabricated by Superpower and SuNAM, two types of critical current measurements were carried out. In the first, the tape sample was attached directly to a universal testing machine and pulled under a tensile load. In the second, the tape was soldered to a Cu–Be springboard and then attached to the testing machine and then pushed or pulled in order to apply both tensile and compressive strains to the tape sample. An inverse parabolic behaviour was observed for the uniaxial strain dependence of the critical current of both tapes. Using synchrotron radiation, the local strain exerted on the REBCO layer was measured at room temperature under the conditions used for the two techniques for making I c measurements. On the basis of these room temperature data, the local strain exerted on the REBCO layer at 77 K was numerically evaluated. A one-dimensional chain model for current flow in the REBCO material with fractional lengths of A-domains and B-domains oriented along the uniaxial strain direction is proposed. The model can explain the parabolic strain behaviour of the critical current and shows that the strain at which the peak in I c occurs, is not only determined by pre-compression or pre-tension on the superconductor at the operating temperature, but also by the ratio of the fractional amounts of the two domains.

  10. Mechanobiologic Research in a Microgravity Environment Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, A.; Dubini, G.; Tominetti, F.; Raimondi, M.

    A current problem in tissue culturing technology is the unavailability of an effective Bioreactor for the in vitro cultivation of cells and explants. It has, in fact, proved extremely difficult to promote the high-density three-dimensional in vitro growth of human tissues that have been removed from the body and deprived of their normal in vivo vascular sources of nutrients and gas exchange. A variety of tissue explants can be maintained for a short period of time on a supportive collagen matrix surrounded by culture medium. But this system provides only limited mass transfer of nutrients and wastes through the tissue, and gravity-induced sedimentation prevents complete three- dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Several devices presently on the market have been used with only limited success since each has limitations, which restrict usefulness and versatility. Further, no Bioreactor or culture vessel is known that will allow for unimpeded growth of three dimensional cellular aggregates or tissue. Extensive research on the effect of mechanical stimuli on cell metabolism suggests that tissues may respond to mechanical stimulation via loading-induced flow of the interstitial fluids. During the culture, cells are subject to a flow of culture medium. Flow properties such as flow field, flow regime (e.g. turbulent or laminar), flow pattern (e.g. circular), entity and distribution of the shear stress acting on the cells greatly influence fundamental aspects of cell function, such as regulation and gene expression. This has been demonstrated for endothelial cells and significant research efforts are underway to elucidate these mechanisms in various other biological systems. Local fluid dynamics is also responsible of the mass transfer of nutrients and catabolites as well as oxygenation through the tissue. Most of the attempts to culture tissue-engineered constructs in vitro have utilized either stationary cultures or systems generating relatively small

  11. The importance of imaging in the current practice of pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years childhood cancer mortality has shown a persistent and satisfying decline. At the same time the quality of life of our patients has received appropriate emphasis. Suitable treatment nowadays must not only be capable of eradicating disease but must consider the acute and long-term side effects. The performance of accurate and efficient imaging has an important role in terms of diagnosis, determining extent of disease, and monitoring tumor status in order that appropriate and specific therapy may be given for each individual patient. In this book the current status and future directions of the various imaging modalities are described and analyzed in detail. Individual disease entities and also organ systems are carefully reviewed, and most of the currently available information on the subject is presented. It is of value, however, to reflect on the general principles of imaging in the current practice of pediatric oncology and its contribution to continuing advances in the field. In the paragraphs to follow, some of these considerations are briefly discussed

  12. The trouble with triplets in biodiversity informatics: a data-driven case against current identifier practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Guralnick

    Full Text Available The biodiversity informatics community has discussed aspirations and approaches for assigning globally unique identifiers (GUIDs to biocollections for nearly a decade. During that time, and despite misgivings, the de facto standard identifier has become the "Darwin Core Triplet", which is a concatenation of values for institution code, collection code, and catalog number associated with biocollections material. Our aim is not to rehash the challenging discussions regarding which GUID system in theory best supports the biodiversity informatics use case of discovering and linking digital data across the Internet, but how well we can link those data together at this moment, utilizing the current identifier schemes that have already been deployed. We gathered Darwin Core Triplets from a subset of VertNet records, along with vertebrate records from GenBank and the Barcode of Life Data System, in order to determine how Darwin Core Triplets are deployed "in the wild". We asked if those triplets follow the recommended structure and whether they provide an easy and unambiguous means to track from specimen records to genetic sequence records. We show that Darwin Core Triplets are often riddled with semantic and syntactic errors when deployed and curated in practice, despite specifications about how to construct them. Our results strongly suggest that Darwin Core Triplets that have not been carefully curated are not currently serving a useful role for relinking data. We briefly consider needed next steps to overcome current limitations.

  13. Following an Optimal Batch Bioreactor Operations Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra-Junquera, V.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Virgen-Ortíz, J.J.;

    2012-01-01

    The problem of following an optimal batch operation model for a bioreactor in the presence of uncertainties is studied. The optimal batch bioreactor operation model (OBBOM) refers to the bioreactor trajectory for nominal cultivation to be optimal. A multiple-variable dynamic optimization of fed-batch...... reactor for biomass production is studied using a differential geometry approach. The maximization problem is solved by handling both the optimal filling policy and substrate concentration in the inlet stream. In order to follow the OBBOM, a master–slave synchronization is used. The OBBOM is considered as...... the master system which includes the optimal cultivation trajectory for the feed flow rate and the substrate concentration. The “real” bioreactor, the one with unknown dynamics and perturbations, is considered as the slave system. Finally, the controller is designed such that the real bioreactor is...

  14. European Communication Monitor: Current developments, issues and tendencies of the professional practice of public relations in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Moreno; A. Zerfass; R. Tench; D. Verčič; P. Verhoeven

    2009-01-01

    The European Communication Monitor (ECM) research explores the current developments for communications disciplines, practices and instruments. It is an extensive research project to monitor trends in communication management, analyse the changing framework for the profession driven by European integ

  15. REVIEW OF SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN JORDAN: CURRENT PRACTICES, CHALLENGES, AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza MAHMUD SULEIMAN AL SHOURA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will try to provide an overview on Jordan’s special education programs for children with disabilities. Specifically, this paper will describe the emergence and development of special education services and the providers of these services within the context of Jordanian society. The key issues relevant to special teacher education, early childhood intervention, inclusive education and challenges faced by children with disabilities are also presented. The findings indicate that there are many challenges, including funding and support, inadequate instructional resources and techniques, shortage of pertinent knowledge and training, limited cooperation, and sparse data on children and youth with disabilities. This paper uses secondary data gathered from relevant reports, studies, and the understanding and experience of the author. Implications to improve the current special education practices for these students are discussed in this paper.

  16. Biodiversity in environmental assessment-current practice and tools for prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity. Environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment are essential instruments used in physical planning to address such problems. Yet there are no well-developed methods for quantifying and predicting impacts of fragmentation on biodiversity. In this study, a literature review was conducted on GIS-based ecological models that have potential as prediction tools for biodiversity assessment. Further, a review of environmental impact statements for road and railway projects from four European countries was performed, to study how impact prediction concerning biodiversity issues was addressed. The results of the study showed the existing gap between research in GIS-based ecological modelling and current practice in biodiversity assessment within environmental assessment

  17. Practical Framework for an Electron Beam Induced Current Technique Based on a Numerical Optimization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hideshi; Soeda, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    A practical framework for an electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique has been established for conductive materials based on a numerical optimization approach. Although the conventional EBIC technique is useful for evaluating the distributions of dopants or crystal defects in semiconductor transistors, issues related to the reproducibility and quantitative capability of measurements using this technique persist. For instance, it is difficult to acquire high-quality EBIC images throughout continuous tests due to variation in operator skill or test environment. Recently, due to the evaluation of EBIC equipment performance and the numerical optimization of equipment items, the constant acquisition of high contrast images has become possible, improving the reproducibility as well as yield regardless of operator skill or test environment. The technique proposed herein is even more sensitive and quantitative than scanning probe microscopy, an imaging technique that can possibly damage the sample. The new technique is expected to benefit the electrical evaluation of fragile or soft materials along with LSI materials.

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus in Europe: prevalence, current screening practice and barriers to screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, B S; Harreiter, J; Damm, P;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus is a potentially serious condition that affects many pregnancies and its prevalence is increasing. Evidence suggests early detection and treatment improves outcomes, but this is hampered by continued disagreement and inconsistency regarding many aspects of...... its diagnosis. Methods: The Vitamin D and Lifestyle Intervention for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Prevention (DALI) research programme aims to promote pan-European standards in the detection and diagnosis of gestational diabetes and to develop effective preventive interventions. To provide an...... overview of the context within which the programme will be conducted and its findings interpreted, systematic searching and narrative synthesis have been used to identify and review the best available European evidence relating to the prevalence of gestational diabetes, current screening practices and...

  19. Screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip: current practices in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Grady, M J

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the current approach to screen for developmental dysplasia of the hip in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: Two-pronged prospective and retrospective study. (1) Postal questionnaire to consultant paediatricians responsible for the routine neonatal care of infants in the Irish Republic in June 2006. (2) Retrospective database review to identify infants undergoing radiological follow-up and their outcome. RESULTS: All maternity units surveyed responded. Most units (84%) were dependent on radiographs at 4-6 months for imaging hips, only two units primarily used ultrasound (10.5%). We estimate that neonatal hip examination is performed by an experienced examiner in less than 30% of routine newborn examinations. On retrospective analysis, 94% of radiographs performed were normal. CONCLUSIONS: The most effective interventions, selective ultrasound and examination by an experienced clinician are not widely practiced. There is a need for the development of national guidelines based on available resources.

  20. Role of current good manufacturing practices in establishment of quality assurance for in-house radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate goal in any facility involved in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals should be the production of products that are as safe and effective as possible. Following Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMPs) is the best way to assure the final product quality, even for in-house preparation and for those facilities operating under Nuclear Pharmacy auspices. In some facilities this places the chemist in a unique role of not only being responsible for R ampersand D, but for designing quality into all levels of product planning, including targetry, synthesis, purification, and quality control. The incorporation of certain minimum standards into the establishment of QA is discussed in general and is illustrated using the preparation of cyclotron-produced products, particularly 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose(FDG) and high purity Indium-111 chloride

  1. Myocardial perfusion imaging in Denmark: activity from 1997 to 2001 and current practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Claus Leth; Kjaer, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to all departments of nuclear medicine in Denmark (n=20) asking for details of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), including the number of patients examined each year from 1997 to 2001 and the current clinical and technical practice. All (100%) departments replied, and the...... survey thus covers all MPI performed in Denmark during the period in question. The number of MPI studies (examined patients) was 2,531 in 1997 (0.47 MPI/1,000/year) and 4,961 (0.93 MPI/1,000/year) in 2001, which is a doubling in activity in 5 years. Nineteen (95%) of the Danish departments performed MPI...... in 2001, and 14 (74%) of these reported that activity had increased over the past 5 years. MPI activity was unevenly distributed between hospitals and regions. In 2001, the university hospitals in the central Copenhagen region (capital) accounted for the highest MPI activity (2.00/1,000/year), while...

  2. Relationship Between Current Substance Use and Unhealthy Weight Loss Practices Among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidot, Denise C; Messiah, Sarah E; Prado, Guillermo; Hlaing, WayWay M

    2016-04-01

    Objectives To determine the relationship between current substance use and unhealthy weight loss practices (UWLP) among 12-to-18 year olds. Methods Participants were 12-to-18 year olds who completed the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in Florida (N = 5620). Current alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use was self-reported based on last 30-day use. UWLP was defined based on self-report of at least one of three methods to lose weight in last 30-days: (1) ≥24 h of fasting, (2) diet pill use, and (3) laxative use/purging. The reference group included those with no reported UWLP. Logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, academic performance, age-sex-specific body mass index percentiles, and perceived weight status were fitted to assess relationships between UWLP and current substance use. Results About 15 and 41 % of adolescents reported ≥1 UWLP and use of ≥1 substance in the last 30-days, respectively. Over half (60.1 %) of adolescents who reported substance use engaged in UWLP (p marijuana (31.9 %), tobacco (19.7 %), and cocaine (10.5 %) use. Adolescents who reported current tobacco [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.1-3.6], alcohol (AOR 2.2, 95 % CI 1.9-2.6), or marijuana (AOR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.7-2.5) use had significantly higher odds of UWLP compared to their non-user counterparts. Conclusions This cross-sectional study shows that substance use and UWLP behaviors are likely to co-exist in adolescents. Further studies are necessary to determine the temporal relationship between substance use and UWLP. It is recommended that intervention programs for youth consider targeting these multiple health risk behaviors. PMID:26649881

  3. Gestational diabetes mellitus in Europe: prevalence, current screening practice and barriers to screening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, B S

    2011-12-12

    Background:  Gestational diabetes mellitus is a potentially serious condition that affects many pregnancies and its prevalence is increasing. Evidence suggests early detection and treatment improves outcomes, but this is hampered by continued disagreement and inconsistency regarding many aspects of its diagnosis. Methods:  The Vitamin D and Lifestyle Intervention for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Prevention (DALI) research programme aims to promote pan-European standards in the detection and diagnosis of gestational diabetes and to develop effective preventive interventions. To provide an overview of the context within which the programme will be conducted and its findings interpreted, systematic searching and narrative synthesis have been used to identify and review the best available European evidence relating to the prevalence of gestational diabetes, current screening practices and barriers to screening. Results:  Prevalence is most often reported as 2-6% of pregnancies. Prevalence may be lower towards the Northern Atlantic seaboard of Europe and higher in the Southern Mediterranean seaboard. Screening practice and policy is inconsistent across Europe, hampered by lack of consensus on testing methods, diagnostic glycaemic thresholds and the value of routine screening. Poor clinician awareness of gestational diabetes, its diagnosis and local clinical guidelines further undermine detection of gestational diabetes. Conclusions:  Europe-wide agreement on screening approaches and diagnostic standards for gestational diabetes could lead to better detection and treatment, improved outcomes for women and children and a strengthened evidence base. There is an urgent need for well-designed research that can inform decisions on best practice in gestational diabetes mellitus screening and diagnosis. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine© 2011 Diabetes UK.

  4. A survey of current clinical practice of permanent prostate brachytherapy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To help establish standards of care for transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) by obtaining data regarding current clinical practice among the most experienced TIPPB brachytherapists in the United States. Methods and Materials: The 70 brachytherapists who performed the greatest number of TIPPB cases in 1995 in the U.S. were surveyed. Each received a comprehensive four page questionnaire that included sections on training and experience, patient and isotope selection criteria, manpower, technique, and follow-up. Thirty-five (50%) surveys were ultimately returned after three mailings and follow-up phone calls. The cumulative experience of the 35 respondents represented approximately 45% of the total TIPPB volume in the U.S. for 1995. Respondents included 29 from the private sector and six from academic programs. Results: The median physician experience with TIPPB was reported as 4.9 years. Each performed an average of 73 TIPPB procedures in 1995 (range 40-300). This represented an increase in volume for most (74%) of the respondents. Sixty-three percent of the respondents attended a formal training course, 54% had TIPPB-specific residency training, and 31% had been proctored (16 had received two or more types of training experience). The most commonly reported selection criteria for implant alone was on Gleason score ≤7, PSA 125I prescribed to 120 Gy (75%) or 103Pd to 90 Gy (50%). Sixty percent reported using a Mick applicator, 46% prefer using preloaded needles, and (11%) use both techniques. Real-time imaging was usually performed with ultrasound (94%); most included fluoroscopy (60%). Definitions of PSA control varied widely. Conclusions: TIPPB clinical practice in the U.S. demonstrates similarities in technique, but differences in patient selection and definitions of biochemical control. It is, therefore, incumbent on those beginning TIPPB programs to carefully review the specific practice details of those institutions with

  5. Coliform Bacteria Monitoring in Fish Systems: Current Practices in Public Aquaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Erin E; Clayton, Leigh A; Hadfield, Catherine A; Arnold, Jill E; Bourbon, Holly M

    2016-06-01

    Public aquaria evaluate coliform indicator bacteria levels in fish systems, but the purpose of testing, testing methods, and management responses are not standardized, unlike with the coliform bacteria testing for marine mammal enclosures required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. An online survey was sent to selected aquaria to document current testing and management practices in fish systems without marine mammals. The information collected included indicator bacteria species, the size and type of systems monitored, the primary purpose of testing, sampling frequency, test methods, the criteria for interpreting results, corrective actions, and management changes to limit human exposure. Of the 25 institutions to which surveys were sent, 19 (76%) responded. Fourteen reported testing for fecal indicator bacteria in fish systems. The most commonly tested indicator species were total (86%) and fecal (79%) coliform bacteria, which were detected by means of the membrane filtration method (64%). Multiple types and sizes of systems were tested, and the guidelines for testing and corrective actions were highly variable. Only three institutions performed additional tests to confirm the identification of indicator organisms. The results from this study can be used to compare bacterial monitoring practices and protocols in fish systems, as an aid to discussions relating to the accuracy and reliability of test results, and to help implement appropriate management responses. Received August 23, 2015; accepted December 29, 2015. PMID:27168340

  6. Current best practice in the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townsend R

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rosemary Townsend,1 Patrick O'Brien,2 Asma Khalil1 1Fetal Medicine Unit, St George's University of London, London, UK; 2Institute for Women's Health, University College London, London, UK Abstract: Preeclampsia is a potentially serious complication of pregnancy with increasing significance worldwide. Preeclampsia is the cause of 9%–26% of global maternal mortality and a significant proportion of preterm delivery, and maternal and neonatal morbidity. Incidence is increasing in keeping with the increase in obesity, maternal age, and women with medical comorbidities entering pregnancy. Recent developments in the understanding of the pathophysiology of preeclampsia have opened new avenues for prevention, screening, and management of this condition. In addition it is known that preeclampsia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in both the mother and the child and presents an opportunity for early preventative measures. New tools for early detection, prevention, and management of preeclampsia have the potential to revolutionize practice in the coming years. This review presents the current best practice in diagnosis and management of preeclampsia and the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Keywords: preeclampsia, eclampsia, gestational hypertension, blood pressure, pregnancy screening, management, treatment, outcome

  7. Current Trends in the Studies of Allelochemicals for Their Application in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsen V.Viter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The allelochemicals have been largely used in agriculture, forestry, landscape design and ornamental plant growing for many decades. However, there is a lack of the comprehensive studies, where existing publications are analyzed and synthesized with regards to the theoretic aspects for such usage. The objective of this paper was to systemize the advances in the research on allelochemicals’ application in practice. Numerous novel methodological propositions have risen recently. We classified them into the physical, chemical, biological, biotechnological and cropgrowing approaches. The allelochemicals consist of the wide diversity of the substances according to their chemical nature. Among these substances we outlined, firstly, the unidentified plant exudates and the products of green manuring, secondly, the chemically characterized or purified substances, which include alcohols, organic acids, aliphatic compounds, aromatic, alicyclic and nitrogen-contain organic compounds. Several groups of the biotic sources of allelochemicals were described: dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants, particularly under their colonization by non-pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum, marine flora and fungi, which exhibit the herbicidal activity. Different targets of the allelochemical application were listed in the paper and they were categorized into several groups: higher flora, animals, unicellular and multi-cellular fungi. We concluded that there is lack of the modern multifaceted knowledge bases for the information about the allelochemical application. Those knowledge bases must be useful in order to choose the appropriate biological method for solving each particular problem of plant cultivation. To that end we systemized the results of current investigation about the usage of allelochemicals in practice.

  8. Anaesthetic specialist registrars in Ireland: current teaching practices and perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Teaching is an important responsibility of non-consultant hospital doctors. In Ireland, specialist registrars (SpRs) in anaesthesia are contractually obliged to teach medical students, other doctors and nurses. Both medical students and fellow non-consultant hospital doctors attribute between 30 and 40% of their knowledge gain to non-consultant hospital doctors. METHODS: We carried out a confidential telephone survey of anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland regarding their current teaching practices and the perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers. All the SpRs currently working in clinical practice in Ireland were eligible. RESULTS: Fifty-five of the 79 (70%) SpRs responded to the questionnaire. Only 7 (12.7%) of the respondents said they had been well trained as a teacher. The majority of the respondents stated that they would attend a learning-to-teach course\\/workshop if one was available, and felt that such a course would improve their ability as a teacher. Only 8 (14.5%) agreed that adequate emphasis is placed on commitment to teaching in the assessment of SpRs, both by individual departments and by the College of Anaesthetists. Anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland spend a considerable amount of time each day teaching undergraduate medical students, the majority (68.9%) stated that they had inadequate time to prepare for teaching. CONCLUSION: The majority of the respondents stated that they enjoy teaching, feel that they play an important role in undergraduate teaching but have inadequate time to prepare for teaching. An adequate emphasis is not placed on their commitment to teaching.

  9. A review of current surgical practice in the operative treatment of proximal humeral fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. D.; Palmer, A. J. R.; Macnair, R. D.; Brewer, P. E.; Jayadev, C.; Wheelton, A. N.; Ball, D. E. J.; Nandra, R. S.; Aujla, R. S.; Sykes, A. E.; Carr, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The PROximal Fracture of the Humerus: Evaluation by Randomisation (PROFHER) trial has recently demonstrated that surgery is non-superior to non-operative treatment in the management of displaced proximal humeral fractures. The objective of this study was to assess current surgical practice in the context of the PROFHER trial in terms of patient demographics, injury characteristics and the nature of the surgical treatment. Methods A total of ten consecutive patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of a proximal humeral fracture from each of 11 United Kingdom hospitals were retrospectively identified over a 15 month period between January 2014 and March 2015. Data gathered for the 110 patients included patient demographics, injury characteristics, mode of surgical fixation, the grade of operating surgeon and the cost of the surgical implants. Results A majority of the patients were female (66%, 73 of 110). The mean patient age was 62 years (range 18 to 89). A majority of patients met the inclusion criteria for the PROFHER trial (75%, 83 of 110). Plate fixation was the most common mode of surgery (68%, 75 patients), followed by intramedullary fixation (12%, 13 patients), reverse shoulder arthroplasty (10%, 11 patients) and hemiarthroplasty (7%, eight patients). The consultant was either the primary operating surgeon or supervising the operating surgeon in a large majority of cases (91%, 100 patients). Implant costs for plate fixation were significantly less than both hemiarthroplasty (p managed non-operatively. Cite this article: Mr B. J. F. Dean. A review of current surgical practice in the operative treatment of proximal humeral fractures: Does the PROFHER trial demonstrate a need for change? Bone Joint Res 2016;5:178–184. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.2000596. PMID:27179004

  10. A survey of current practices in management of Hirschsprung′s disease in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed A. Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are several modalities of treatment for Hirschsprung′s disease (HD, there are presently no clear guidelines on treatment of the condition by paediatric surgeons in Nigeria. This survey determines the current approach to treatment among Nigerian paediatric surgeons and should help in establishing a consensus and guidelines for care in this and similar setting. Materials and Methods: An online questionnaire was designed using survey Monkey ® to determine current clinical and operative management of patients with HD by consultant paediatric surgeons practicing in the Nigeria. The paediatric surgeons were notified by E-mail, which included a link to the survey on survey Monkey ® . The survey was also administered at the 12 th annual meeting of Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria in September, 2013, to capture those who did not complete the online survey. Thirty-one paediatric surgeons from 21 different tertiary paediatric surgery centres completed the survey. Results: Sixteen (52% respondents see up to 20% of their patients with HD in the neonatal period. Twenty-six (84% respondents do routine barium enema. Twenty six (84% respondents do full thickness rectal biopsy under general anaesthesia (GA. There was no consistency in operative techniques, with transabominal Swenson′s operation being practiced by 17 (57% respondents and 11 (37% transanal endorectal pull through. 14 (45% do pull through at any age. 12 (39% respondents do more than half of their patient as primary pull through. Conclusion: Full thickness rectal biopsy under GA is still the vogue with variations in the surgical technique for management of Hirshsprung′s disease in Nigeria. Primary pull through procedures is becoming increasingly popular. There′s a need for Paediatric Surgeons in Nigeria to come up with a guideline on management of HD, to guide trainees and other surgeons in the care of these patients.

  11. Report to Congress: Summary Report of the Assessment of Current State Practices in Title XX Funded Day Care Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    In 1980 the federal government mandated that assistance be given states to conduct systematic assessment of current practices in Title XX funded day care programs and that a summary report of this assessment be provided to Congress. Assessment findings are given in this document. Overall, provider practices exceeded state licensing standards and…

  12. Detection and location of leaks in district heating steam systems: Survey and review of current technology and practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Lanham, R.N.

    1992-03-01

    This report presents the results of a survey undertaken to identify and characterize current practices for detecting and locating leaks in district heating systems, particular steam systems. Currently used technology and practices are reviewed. In addition, the survey was used to gather information that may be important for the application of acoustic leak detection. A few examples of attempts to locate leaks in steam and hot water pipes by correlation of acoustic signals generated by the leaks are also discussed.

  13. Bioreactors for tissue engineering--a new role for perfusionists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistino, Joseph J

    2003-09-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new area of medicine with rapid growth and expansion over the last decade. It has the potential to have a profound impact on the practice of medicine and influence the economic development in the industry of biotechnology. In almost every specialty of medicine, the ability to generate replacement cells and develop tissues will change the focus from artificial organs and transplantation to growing replacement organs from the patient's own stem cells. Once these organs are at a size that requires perfusion to maintain oxygen and nutrient delivery, then automated perfusion systems termed "bioreactors" will be necessary to sustain the organ until harvesting. The design of these "bioreactors" will have a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular function throughout the growth period. The perfusion schemes necessary to determine the optimal conditions have not been well elucidated and will undergo extensive research over the next decade. The key to progress in this endeavor will development of long-term perfusion techniques and identifying the ideal pressures, flow rates, type of flow (pulsatile/nonpulsatile), and perfusate solution. Perfusionists are considered experts in the field of whole body perfusion, and it is possible that they can participate in the development and operation of these "bioreactors." Additional education of perfusionists in the area of tissue engineering is necessary in order for them to become integral parts of this exciting new area of medicine. PMID:14653420

  14. Current issues in dental practice management. Part 1. The importance of shared values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Philip R H

    2003-04-01

    There can be few who would argue with the notion that the nature of dental practice in the United Kingdom has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. A variety of factors, including new clinical techniques, growing consumerism, a much greater awareness of health-related and well-being issues in the public at large, as well as a marked deregulation within the dental profession, the development of vocational training and recently mandatory lifelong learning, the growing number of females working in the profession, and an increasing reluctance of young dentists to finance dental practices have all combined to create an environment which has enabled and encouraged a move away from traditional forms of dental care delivery. Instead, there has been considerable growth in independently-funded practice and a commensurate growth in the number of practices operating under a corporate body umbrella of one form or another. Currently there are 27 corporate bodies registered with the General Dental Council (GDC) with the likelihood of more in the future given the proposed GDC review. This will no doubt take into consideration European law, under which the restriction within the Dentist's Act on the number of corporate bodies is likely to be untenable. Although they still have only a small share of the dental market--with 4% of all dentists in the UK in 1999--they have expanded rapidly from a small base. The data available at the time the paper was written indicate that the global total of fees earned from dentistry in the UK in the financial year 2001/2002 was almost 3 billion Pounds, of which 1.9 billion Pounds (64%) came from NHS fees and 1.1 billion Pounds (36%) from private fees. Of this 1.9 billion Pounds received in NHS fees in 2001/2002, 0.55 billion Pounds were paid by patients who were not exempt from charges, bringing the total amount actually paid out of patients' pockets for dental treatment to 1.65 billion Pounds. Compare these figures with 1996

  15. Measuring Water in Bioreactor Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B.; Gallagher, V. N.; Imhoff, P. T.; Yazdani, R.; Chiu, P.

    2004-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. Maintaining optimal moisture conditions for waste degradation is perhaps the most important operational parameter in bioreactor landfills. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, methods are required to measure water within solid waste. However, there is no reliable method that can measure moisture content simply and accurately in the heterogeneous environment typical of landfills. While well drilling and analysis of solid waste samples is sometimes used to determine moisture content, this is an expensive, time-consuming, and destructive procedure. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone --- the partitioning tracer test (PTT) --- was evaluated for measuring water in solid waste in a full-scale bioreactor landfill in Yolo County, CA. Two field tests were conducted in different regions of an aerobic bioreactor landfill, with each test measuring water in ≈ 250 ft3 of solid waste. Tracers were injected through existing tubes inserted in the landfill, and tracer breakthrough curves were measured through time from the landfill's gas collection system. Gas samples were analyzed on site using a field-portable gas chromatograph and shipped offsite for more accurate laboratory analysis. In the center of the landfill, PTT measurements indicated that the fraction of the pore space filled with water

  16. A practical solution in delineating thin conducting structures and suppression problem in direct current resistivity sounding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shashi Prakash Sharma; Arkoprovo Biswas

    2013-08-01

    In hard rock areas, conventional apparent resistivity measurement using Schlumberger resistivity sounding fails to detect thin conducting structures (2-D and 3-D fractures filled with groundwater and mineral aggregate) concealed at a large depth. In the present study, an attempt is made to way-out the detection problem of deep seated thin conducting layer. It is proposed to study the apparent conductance simultaneously with resistivity sounding to detect such conductive zones qualitatively. Apparent conductance is defined as the magnitude of current flowing in the subsurface for a unit applied voltage through current electrodes. Even though such measurement is of qualitative importance, it gives extremely valuable information for the presence of conductive zones at depth in challenging hard rock terrain. It has been observed that apparent conductance increases significantly when groundwater bearing fractures and conductive bodies are encountered in the subsurface. Field data from different locations are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of such measurement. The measurement assists to the conventional resistivity sounding for successful prediction of groundwater zones at large depth in different hard rock areas and is of enormous importance. The approach is also used for possible solution of suppression problem in the DC resistivity sounding when intermediate layer is not reflected in the resistivity sounding curve. Finally, the approach can be used together with resistivity sounding to solve many practical problems.

  17. Safeguarding reprocessing plants: Principles, past experience, current practice and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under Article 6(c) of all comprehensive International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards agreements, verification procedures are to concentrate on those stages in the nuclear fuel cycle involving the production, processing, use or storage of nuclear material from which nuclear weapons could readily be made. In that context, the most intensive IAEA safeguards are applied at chemical processing plants and other facilities at which separated plutonium is stored, processed or used. The principles underlying the design, implementation and evaluation of IAEA safeguards at chemical reprocessing plant are explored in this paper. The interrelation between the elements of the safeguards approach for such plants is examined, including design verification, extensive use of containment and surveillance, including operations monitoring in certain of the process areas, near-real-time accountancy and conventional accountancy measures. Reference is made to IAEA experience, and current practice is examined at length. New reprocessing plants of large throughput and/or having novel design features are under construction, and the measures currently in use will require extensive effort to provide effective and efficient safeguards implementation

  18. Shared Decision-Making in Oncology - A Qualitative Analysis of Healthcare Providers' Views on Current Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Frerichs

    Full Text Available Despite an increased awareness of shared decision-making (SDM and its prominent position on the health policy agenda, its implementation in routine care remains a challenge in Germany. In order to overcome this challenge, it is important to understand healthcare providers' views regarding SDM and to take their perspectives and opinions into account in the development of an implementation program. The present study aimed at exploring a the attitudes of different healthcare providers regarding SDM in oncology and b their experiences with treatment decisions in daily practice.A qualitative study was conducted using focus groups and individual interviews with different healthcare providers at the University Cancer Center Hamburg, Germany. Focus groups and interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using conventional content analysis and descriptive statistics.N = 4 focus groups with a total of N = 25 participants and N = 17 individual interviews were conducted. Attitudes regarding SDM varied greatly between the different participants, especially concerning the definition of SDM, the attitude towards the degree of patient involvement in decision-making and assumptions about when SDM should take place. Experiences on how treatment decisions are currently made varied. Negative experiences included time and structural constraints, and a lack of (multidisciplinary communication. Positive experiences comprised informed patients, involvement of relatives and a good physician-patient relationship.The results show that German healthcare providers in oncology have a range of attitudes that currently function as barriers towards the implementation of SDM. Also, their experiences on how decision-making is currently done reveal difficulties in actively involving patients in decision-making processes. It will be crucial to take these attitudes and experiences seriously and to subsequently disentangle existing misconceptions in future implementation

  19. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    For 5 days on the STS-70 mission, a bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells, such as the culture section shown here, which grew to 30 times the volume of control specimens grown on Earth. This significant result was reproduced on STS-85 which grew mature structures that more closely match what are found in tumors in humans. The two white circles within the tumor are part of a plastic lattice that helped the cells associate. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  20. A discussion of current issues and concepts in the practice of skull-photo/craniofacial superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, G M; Steyn, M

    2016-05-01

    A recent review paper on cranio-facial superimposition (CFS) stated that "there have been specific conceptual variances" from the original methods used in the practice of skull-photo superimposition, leading to poor results as far as accuracy is concerned. It was argued that the deviations in the practice of the technique have resulted in the reduced accuracies (for both failure to include and failure to exclude) that are noted in several recent studies. This paper aims to present the results from recent research to highlight the advancement of skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition, and to discuss some of the issues raised regarding deviations from original techniques. The evolving methodology of CFS is clarified in context with the advancement of technology, forensic science and specifically within the field of forensic anthropology. Developments in the skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition techniques have largely focused on testing reliability and accuracy objectively. Techniques now being employed by forensic anthropologists must conform to rigorous scientific testing and methodologies. Skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition is constantly undergoing accuracy and repeatability testing which is in line with the principles of the scientific method and additionally allows for advancement in the field. Much of the research has indicated that CFS is useful in exclusion which is consistent with the concept of Popperian falsifiability - a hypothesis and experimental design which is falsifiable. As the hypothesis is disproved or falsified, another evolves to replace it and explain the new observations. Current and future studies employing different methods to test the accuracy and reliability of skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition will enable researchers to establish the contribution the technique can have for identification purposes. PMID:26970657

  1. Denitrification 'Woodchip' Bioreactors for Productive and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, L. E.; Summerfelt, S.; Sharrer, K.; Lepine, C.; Helmers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Growing alarm about negative cascading effects of reactive nitrogen in the environment has led to multifaceted efforts to address elevated nitrate-nitrogen levels in water bodies worldwide. The best way to mitigate N-related impacts, such as hypoxic zones and human health concerns, is to convert nitrate to stable, non-reactive dinitrogen gas through the natural process of denitrification. This means denitrification technologies need to be one of our major strategies for tackling the grand challenge of managing human-induced changes to our global nitrogen cycle. While denitrification technologies have historically been focused on wastewater treatment, there is great interest in new lower-tech options for treating effluent and drainage water from one of our largest reactive nitrogen emitters -- agriculture. Denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactors are able to enhance this natural N-conversion via addition of a solid carbon source (e.g., woodchips) and through designs that facilitate development of anoxic conditions required for denitrification. Wood-based denitrification technologies such as woodchip bioreactors and 'sawdust' walls for groundwater have been shown to be effective at reducing nitrate loads in agricultural settings around the world. Designing these systems to be low-maintenance and to avoid removing land from agricultural production has been a primary focus of this "farmer-friendly" technology. This presentation provides a background on woodchip bioreactors including design considerations, N-removal performance, and current research worldwide. Woodchip bioreactors for the agricultural sector are an accessible new option to address society's interest in improving water quality while simultaneously allowing highly productive agricultural systems to continue to provide food in the face of increasing demand, changing global diets, and fluctuating weather.

  2. Informed Consent for Interventional Radiology Procedures: A Survey Detailing Current European Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Official recommendations for obtaining informed consent for interventional radiology procedures are that the patient gives their consent to the operator more than 24 hr prior to the procedure. This has significant implications for interventional radiology practice. The purpose of this study was to identify the proportion of European interventional radiologists who conform to these guidelines. Methods: A questionnaire was designed consisting of 12 questions on current working practice and opinions regarding informed consent. These questions related to where, when and by whom consent was obtained from the patient. Questions also related to the use of formal consent forms and written patient information leaflets. Respondents were asked whether they felt patients received adequate explanation regarding indications for intervention,the procedure, alternative treatment options and complications. The questionnaire was distributed to 786 European interventional radiologists who were members of interventional societies. The anonymous replies were then entered into a database and analyzed. Results: Two hundred and fifty-four (32.3%) questionnaires were returned. Institutions were classified as academic (56.7%),non-academic (40.5%) or private (2.8%). Depending on the procedure,in a significant proportion of patients consent was obtained in the outpatient department (22%), on the ward (65%) and in the radiology day case ward (25%), but in over half (56%) of patients consent or re-consent was obtained in the interventional suite. Fifty percent of respondents indicated that they obtain consent more than 24 hr before some procedures, in 42.9% consent is obtained on the morning of the procedure and 48.8% indicated that in some patients consent is obtained immediately before the procedure. We found that junior medical staff obtained consent in 58% of cases. Eighty-two percent of respondents do not use specific consent forms and 61% have patient information leaflets. The

  3. Development of Fundamental Technologies for Micro Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiichi; Kitamori, Takehiko

    This chapter reviews the development of fundamental technologies required for microchip-based bioreactors utilizing living mammalian cells and pressure driven flow. The most important factor in the bioreactor is the cell culture. For proper cell culturing, continuous medium supply from a microfluidic channel and appropriate modification of the channel surface to accommodate cell attachment is required. Moreover, the medium flow rate should be chosen carefully, because shear stress affects cell activity. The techniques presented here could be applied to the development of micro bioreactors such as microlivers, pigment production by plant cells, and artificial insemination.

  4. Spatial Experiment Technologies Suitable for Unreturnable Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Weibo; Tong, Guanghui

    2016-07-01

    The system composition and main function of the bioreactor piggybacked on TZ cargo transport spacecraft are introduced briefly in the paper.The spatial experiment technologies which are suitable for unreturnable bioreactor are described in detail,including multi-channel liquid transportion and management,multi-type animal cells circuit testing,dynamic targets microscopic observation in situ etc..The feasibility and effectiveness of these technologies which will be used in space experiment in bioreactor are verified in tests and experiments on the ground.

  5. Connecting Professional Development to Current Practices: An Examination of Implementation of Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlovsky, Kelly R.

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a basic qualitative research design to uncover and understand how early childhood teachers apply developmentally appropriate practices and what successes and barriers they encounter. The new knowledge produced might help professional development practitioners by increasing their understanding of how developmentally appropriate…

  6. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: I. LEACHATE HYDROLOGY AND WASTE SETTLEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    An assessment of state-of-the-practice at five full-scale North American landfills operating as bioreactors is presented in this two-paper set. This paper focuses on effectiveness of liners and leachate collection systems, leachate generation rates, leachate recirculation practi...

  7. Energy Consumption Related to Shear Stress for Membrane Bioreactors Used for Wastewater Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Bérube, P.R.;

    2011-01-01

    The main drawback of membrane bioreactors (MBR) systems is the fouling of the membrane, which is decrease and/or prevented through gas sparging. However, gas sparging practices are based on rules of thumb or a trial-and-error approaches which are tedious, very timeconsuming, do not necessarily pr...

  8. Biological variation in musculoskeletal injuries: current knowledge, future research and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V; Posthumus, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from familial and genetic association studies have reported that DNA sequence variants play an important role, together with non-genetic factors, in the aetiology of both exercise-associated and occupational-associated acute and chronic musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. The associated variants, which have been identified to date, may contribute to the interindividual variation in the structure and, by implication, mechanical properties of the collagen fibril and surrounding matrix within musculoskeletal soft tissues, as well as their response to mechanical loading and other stimuli. Future work should focus on the establishment of multidisciplinary international consortia for the identification of biologically relevant variants involved in modulating injury risk. These consortia will improve the limitations of the published hypothesis-driven genetic association studies, since they will allow resources to be pooled in recruiting large well-characterised cohorts required for whole-genome screening. Finally, clinicians and coaches need to be aware that many direct-to-consumer companies are currently marketing genetic tests directly to athletes without it being requested by an appropriately qualified healthcare professional, and without interpretation alongside other clinical indicators or lifestyle factors. These specific genetic tests are premature and are not necessarily required to evaluate susceptibility to musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Current practice should rather consider susceptibility through known risk factors such as a positive family history of a specific injury, a history of other tendon and/or ligament injuries and participation in activities associated with the specific musculoskeletal injuries. Potential susceptible athletes may then be individually managed to reduce their risk profile. PMID:26504180

  9. Current Good Manufacturing Practice Production of an Oncolytic Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Viral Vector for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseck, M.; Derecho, I.; Lopez, P.; Knoblauch, C.; McMahon, R.; Anderson, J.; Dunphy, N.; Quezada, V.; Khan, R.; Huang, P.; Dang, W.; Luo, M.; Hsu, D.; Woo, S.L.C.; Couture, L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 109 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 1010 PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 1013 PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:21083425

  10. Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia do Carmo Silva Parreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Is Kinesio Taping more effective than a sham taping/placebo, no treatment or other interventions in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Is the addition of Kinesio Taping to other interventions more effective than other interventions alone in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal conditions. Intervention: Kinesio Taping was compared with sham taping/placebo, no treatment, exercises, manual therapy and conventional physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Pain intensity, disability, quality of life, return to work, and global impression of recovery. Results: Twelve randomised trials involving 495 participants were included in the review. The effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping was tested in participants with: shoulder pain in two trials; knee pain in three trials; chronic low back pain in two trials; neck pain in three trials; plantar fasciitis in one trial; and multiple musculoskeletal conditions in one trial. The methodological quality of eligible trials was moderate, with a mean of 6.1 points on the 10-point PEDro Scale score. Overall, Kinesio Taping was no better than sham taping/placebo and active comparison groups. In all comparisons where Kinesio Taping was better than an active or a sham control group, the effect sizes were small and probably not clinically significant or the trials were of low quality. Conclusion: This review provides the most updated evidence on the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping for musculoskeletal conditions. The current evidence does not support the use of this intervention in these clinical populations. PROSPERO registration: CRD42012003436. [Parreira PdCS, Costa LdCM, Hespanhol Junior LC, Lopes AD, Costa LOP (2014 Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 31–39

  11. Current practices for maintaining occupational exposures ALARA at low-level waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlock, D.E.; Herrington, W.N.; Hooker, C.D.; Murphy, D.W.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of occupationally exposed individuals.

  12. Coronary CT Angiography: Current Applications in Clinical Practice Promise for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wann

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of computed tomography for cardiac diagno-sis has a long history. CT was first used experimentally to measure myocardial perfusion and to detect infarcation nearly 25 years ago, but poor temporal resolution and high radiation dosage pre-cluded its use in clinical medicine. Later electron beam computed tomography provided sufficiently high temporal resolution to precisely measure cal-cium depositions in the coronary arteries as a marker of coronary atherosclerosis. Large epidemiologic stud-ies have now shown that the coronary artery calcium score gives incremental predictive power to conven-tional risk factor analysis such as the Framinghan score. While its temporal resolution is unchallenged, electron beam CT lacks the spatial resolution to per-form clinically useful coronary angiography. The re-cent development of multi-detector computed tomo-graphy (MDCT has enabled non-invasive coronary angiography, capturing the excitement and enthusi-asm of clinicians around the world. This lecture will briefly review the technology underlying MDCT, dis-cussing limitations related to radiation dosimetry, calcium and gating, as well as other fundamental dif-ferences from conventional angiography. Current clinical indications and appropriate application of MDCT will be discussed, with an emphasis on evi-dence based practice. MDCT is a rapidly evolving field. Areas of research and technical development will be described.

  13. On the Need for Rethinking Current Practice that Highlights Goal Achievement Risk in an Enterprise Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aven, Eyvind; Aven, Terje

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses the issue of how performance and risk management can complement each other in order to enhance the management of an enterprise. Often, we see that risk management focuses on goal achievements and not the enterprise risk related to its activities in the value chain. The statement "no goal, no risk" is a common misconception. The main aim of the article is to present a normative model for describing the links between performance and risk, and to use this model to give recommendations on how to best structure and plan the management of an enterprise in situations involving risk and uncertainties. The model, which has several novel features, is based on the interaction between different types of risk management (enterprise risk management, task risk management, and personal risk management) and a structure where the enterprise risk management overrules both the task and personal risk management. To illustrate the model we use the metaphor of a ship, where the ship is loaded with cash-generating activities and has a direction over time determined by the overall strategic objectives. Compared to the current enterprise risk management practice, the model and related analysis are founded on a new perspective on risk, highlighting knowledge and uncertainties beyond probabilities. PMID:25930689

  14. Communication of Energy Efficiency Information to Remodelers: Lessons From Current Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaukus, C.

    2012-10-01

    The effective communication of energy efficiency and building science information to remodeling contractors is achieved through varying formats, timelines, and modes depending on who is delivering the information, who is intended to receive it, and what technical, intellectual,and time resources the recipients have at their disposal. Determining what type of communication is effective does not lend itself to a clearly quantifiable test but rather a qualitative one. That qualitative judgment can be supported by the research of current practices deemed effective for one or more of the following reasons: it has led to the successful completion of a certifying test or other evaluation, it has been widely used for the remodeling industry, it has been considered effective by a sampling of remodeling contractors, and/or it has proven effective in the field for the BARA team. These criteria were used to create a select list of communications to be further analyzed to determine why they are effective and how less successful formats or strategies can be revised for greater effectiveness.

  15. Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors: Consequences of Current Design Practices for LED's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2013-09-17

    Synopsis: Light loss factors are used to help lighting systems meet quantitative design criteria throughout the life of the installation, but they also influence energy use. As the light sources currently being specified continue to evolve, it is necessary to reevaluate the methods used in calculating light loss factors, as well as carefully consider the consequences of different product performance attributes. Because of the unique operating characteristics of LEDs and lack of a comprehensive lifetime rating—as well as the problematic relationship between lifetime and lumen maintenance—determining an appropriate lamp lumen depreciation (LLD) factor for LED products is difficult. As a result, a unique solution has been advocated: when quantity of light is an important design consideration, the IES recommends using an LLD of not greater than 0.70. This method deviates from the typical practice for conventional sources of using the ratio of mean to initial lumen output, and can misrepresent actual performance, increase energy use, and inhibit comparisons between products. This paper discusses the complications related to LLD and LEDs, compares the performance of conventional and LED products, and examines alternatives to a maximum LLD of 0.70 for LEDs.

  16. Collection development and outsourcing in academic health sciences libraries: a survey of current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, D D; Hollander, S; Lanier, D

    1999-04-01

    Academic health sciences libraries in the United States and Canada were surveyed regarding collection development trends, including their effect on approval plan and blanket order use, and use of outsourcing over the past four years. Results of the survey indicate that serials market forces, budgetary constraints, and growth in electronic resources purchasing have resulted in a decline in the acquisition of print items. As a result, approval plan use is being curtailed in many academic health sciences libraries. Although use of blanket orders is more stable, fewer than one-third of academic health sciences libraries report using them currently. The decline of print collections suggests that libraries should explore cooperative collection development of print materials to ensure access and preservation. The decline of approval plan use and the need for cooperative collection development may require additional effort for sound collection development. Libraries were also surveyed about their use of outsourcing. Some libraries reported outsourcing cataloging and shelf preparation of books, but none reported using outsourcing for resource selection. The reason given most often for outsourcing was that it resulted in cost savings. As expected, economic factors are driving both collection development and outsourcing practices. PMID:10219477

  17. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections in general practice: Current practice and drivers for change in a French study

    OpenAIRE

    Gignon, M; S Farcy; Schmit, J. L.; Ganry, O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The fight against Healthcare-associated infections is a public health priority and a major challenge for the safety and quality of care. The objective was to assess hygiene in general practitioners′ (GPs′) office and identify barriers to and drivers for better practice. Materials and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected, representative sample of 800 GPs. We used a self-administered questionnaire. The first part assesse...

  18. Immobilized yeast in bioreactor for alcohol fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed using a Co-60 source. Cells were immobilized onto sterile, channeled alumina beads and packed into bioreactor column under controlled temperature. Feedstocks containing substrate and nutrients were fed into the bioreactor at specific rates. Beads with greatest porosity and surface area produced the most ethanol. Factors affecting ethanol productivity included: temperature, pH, flow rate, nutrients and substrate in the feedstock

  19. Aeration and hydrodynamics in submerged membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Braak, Etienne; Alliet-Gaubert, Marion; Schetrite, Sylvie; Albasi, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) is already a well-developed wastewater treatment process for both municipal and industrial applications. Nonetheless, membrane fouling remains a significant problem for its wider development. In the case of submerged membrane bioreactors (SMBRs), one of the most efficient strategies to limit fouling is the use of a gas/liquid two-phase flow to enhance the mass transfer. However, the effect of aeration still remains incompletely understood. The complexity ...

  20. New bioreactors systems for pharmacological screening

    OpenAIRE

    Vozzi, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Bioreactors, biotechnological devices for in vitro cell cultures with dynamic conditions, have the potential to provide information on local cell behavior and function. The development of bioreactors could lead to a multitude of applications from drug testing and development, tissue engineering and basic research to the identification of new and alternative therapies for many disorders. High quality, reliable, in vitro data also provide a shift in focus from large scale animal testing to the ...

  1. Heart tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Lisa Freed and Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, both of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have taken the first steps toward engineering heart muscle tissue that could one day be used to patch damaged human hearts. Cells isolated from very young animals are attached to a three-dimensional polymer scaffold, then placed in a NASA bioreactor. The cells do not divide, but after about a week start to cornect to form a functional piece of tissue. Here, a transmission electron micrograph of engineered tissue shows a number of important landmarks present in functional heart tissue: (A) well-organized myofilaments (Mfl), z-lines (Z), and abundant glycogen granules (Gly); and (D) intercalcated disc (ID) and desmosomes (DES). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: MIT

  2. Simplified Bioreactor For Growing Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.

    1995-01-01

    Improved bioreactor for growing mammalian cell cultures developed. Designed to support growth of dense volumes of mammalian cells by providing ample, well-distributed flows of nutrient solution with minimal turbulence. Cells relatively delicate and, unlike bacteria, cannot withstand shear forces present in turbulent flows. Bioreactor vessel readily made in larger sizes to accommodate greater cell production quantities. Molding equipment presently used makes cylinders up to 30 centimeters long. Alternative sintered plastic techniques used to vary pore size and quantity, as necessary.

  3. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  4. The Database of the Catalogue of Clinical Practice Guidelines Published via Internet in the Czech Language -The Current State

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvolský, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 83-89. ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : internet * World Wide Web * database * clinical practice guideline * clinical practice * evidence-based medicine * formalisation * GLIF (Guideline Inerchange Format) * doctor of medicine, * decision support systems Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/63-en-the-database-of-the-catalogue-of-clinical-practice-guidelines-published-via-internet-in-the-czech-language-the-current-state.html

  5. MDO and Cross-Disciplinary Practice in R&D: A Portrait of Principles and Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas McGowan, Anna-Maria; Papalambros, Panos Y.; Baker, Wayne E.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) has served an important role in aerospace engineering by incorporating physics based disciplinary models into integrated system or sub-system models for use in research, development, (R&D) and design. This paper examines MDO's role in facilitating the integration of the researchers from different single disciplines during R&D and early design of large-scale complex engineered systems (LaCES) such as aerospace systems. The findings in this paper are summarized from a larger study on interdisciplinary practices and perspectives that included considerable empirical data from surveys, interviews, and ethnography. The synthesized findings were derived by integrating the data with theories from organization science and engineering. The over-arching finding is that issues related to cognition, organization, and social interrelations mostly dominate interactions across disciplines. Engineering issues, such as the integration of hardware or physics-based models, are not as significant. Correspondingly, the data showed that MDO is not the primary integrator of researchers working across disciplines during R&D and early design of LaCES. Cognitive focus such as analysis versus design, organizational challenges such as incentives, and social opportunities such as personal networks often drove the human interactive practices among researchers from different disciplines. Facilitation of the inherent confusion, argument, and learning in crossdisciplinary research was identified as one of several needed elements of enabling successful research across disciplines.

  6. Training Load and Player Monitoring in High-Level Football: Current Practice and Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akenhead, Richard; Nassis, George P

    2016-07-01

    Training load (TL) is monitored with the aim of making evidence-based decisions on appropriate loading schemes to reduce injuries and enhance team performance. However, little is known in detail about the variables of load and methods of analysis used in high-level football. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide information on the practices and practitioners' perceptions of monitoring in professional clubs. Eighty-two high-level football clubs from Europe, the United States, and Australia were invited to answer questions relating to how TL is quantified, how players' responses are monitored, and their perceptions of the effectiveness of monitoring. Forty-one responses were received. All teams used GPS and heart-rate monitors during all training sessions, and 28 used rating of perceived exertion. The top-5-ranking TL variables were acceleration (various thresholds), total distance, distance covered above 5.5 m/s, estimated metabolic power, and heart-rate exertion. Players' responses to training are monitored using questionnaires (68% of clubs) and submaximal exercise protocols (41%). Differences in expected vs actual effectiveness of monitoring were 23% and 20% for injury prevention and performance enhancement, respectively (P human resources scored highest, followed by coach buy-in. The discrepancy between expected and actual effectiveness appears to be due to suboptimal integration with coaches, insufficient human resources, and concerns over the reliability of assessment tools. Future approaches should critically evaluate the usefulness of current monitoring tools and explore methods of reducing the identified barriers to effectiveness. PMID:26456711

  7. Current practices for the management and confinement of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the current practices used in the design siting, construction and closeout of impoundment facilities for uranium mill tailings. The objective is to present an integrated overview of the technological, safety and radiation protection aspects of these topics in order to ensure that the potential radiological and non-radiological risks associated with the management of uranium mill tailings are minimized now and in the future. The report: identifies the nature and source of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants in uranium mill tailings; identifies the important mechanisms by which pollutants can be released from the tailings impoundment; reviews radiation protection aspects of these mechanisms; describes the pathways by which the pollutants may reach humans; describes some of the site selection and design options and considerations for final stabilization and rehabilitation of tailings impoundments; describes the methods of assessing closure strategies; describes long term responsibilities for tailings management and financial assurance to ensure these responsibilities; and reviews the magnitude and probability of occurrence of the hazards arising, with the aim of ensuring that the risks presented are acceptable. Because of the complexity of the pollutant release mechanisms and the site specific nature of the design and management controls that can be used, it is not possible for a report of this nature to be either exhaustive or detailed in all respects. The methods of confinement employed for any particular tailings impoundment will depend on the country, its climate, demography and its site specific performance criteria which should be defined by the relevant competent authorities. Both operating and post-operating conditions are considered. After shutdown of the mill and stabilization of the tailings, continuing surveillance and maintenance should be considered until the integrity and durability of the tailings impoundment have been

  8. Qualification Practices in Nuclear Industry: Steam Generator Eddy Current Probe Qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through history of nuclear power plant operation, a large number of nuclear power plant forced outages related to tube failures occurred. It resulted with large amount of repair and outage costs, what initiated implementation of regulated practice of periodical tube examination and tube condition monitoring. Purpose of examinations is to detect existing or potential tube degradations that could affect tube integrity and therefore result in forced outages and unwanted costs related to emergency repair activities and loss of ability for electrical power production. With increased examination activities, additional information about steam generator tube condition became available and additional methods for ensuring tube integrity became available. As the number of examination solutions increased, need for validation and assessment of examination methods occurred. For that purpose, a large number of standards and guidelines with its requirements were implemented in nuclear industry regulatory requirements to ensure that adequately validated examinations are applied. With this purpose, qualification requirements for inspection activities were implemented with other requirements. With progress of technology, progress was also achieved in examination methods and more advanced examination methods and advanced inspection systems were developed. This advancement is accompanied by advancement in regulatory requirements regarding inspection and monitoring of tube integrity and condition. Ultimate goal of implementation of qualification processes and its requirements in all aspects of nuclear industry is to achieve minimal rate of forced outages, which would ensure maximum electrical power production capabilities and maximum optimization of operational costs while maintaining safe operation in accordance with environmental policies. This article will focus on qualification of steam generator eddy current bobbin probe.(author).

  9. Current practices for risk zoning around nuclear power plants in comparison to other industry sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the background and current status of the information basis leading to the definition of risk and emergency zones around nuclear power plants (NPPs) in different countries in Europe and beyond. Although dependable plant-specific probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of level 2 and/or level 3 could in principle provide sufficiently detailed input to define the geographical dimension of a NPP's risk and emergency zones, the analysis of the status in some European and other countries shows that other, 'deterministic' approaches using a reference accident are actually used in practice. Regarding use of level 2 PSA for emergency planning, the approach so far has been to use the level 2 PSA information retrospectively to provide the justification for the choice of reference accident(s) used to define the emergency plans and emergency planning zones (EPZs). There are significant differences in the EPZs that are defined in different countries, ranging from a few up to 80km. There is a striking contrast in the extent of using probabilistic information to define emergency zones between the nuclear and other high risk industry sectors, such as the chemical process industry, and the reasons for these differences are not entirely clear, since the risk of chemical industry is similar as that of the nuclear sector. The differences seem to be more related to risk perception than to the actual risk potential. Therefore, there is a strong need to be able to communicate risk information to the Public both before and following an accident. In addition, there is a need to educate the Public so that they can understand risk information in a comparative sense. Finally, based on the consensus discussions at a recent JRC/OECD International Seminar on Risk and Emergency Zoning around NPPs, a set of recommendations is given in the areas of - a more comprehensive use of the available risk information for risk zoning purposes, - risk communication; - comparative (energy

  10. Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

    2004-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular

  11. Prevention and management of ventilator-associated pneumonia: A survey on current practices by intensivists practicing in the Indian subcontinent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deven Juneja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of evidence-based guidelines to prevent and manage ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP in the clinical setting may not be adequate. We aimed to assess the implementation of selected VAP prevention strategies, and to learn how VAP is managed by the intensivists practicing in the Indian Subcontinent. Three hundred 10-point questionnaires were distributed during an International Critical Care Conferenceheld at New Delhi in 2009. A total of 126 (42% questionnaires distributed among delegates from India, Nepal and Sri Lanka were analyzed. Majority (96.8% reported using VAP bundles with a high proportion including head elevation (98.4%, chlorhexidine mouthcare (83.3%, stress ulcer prophylaxis (96.8%, heat and moisture exchangers (HME, 92.9%, early weaning (94.4%, and hand washing (97.6% as part of their VAP bundle. Use of subglottic secretion drainage (SSD, 45.2% and closed suction systems (CSS, 74.6% was also reported by many intensivists, whereas use of selective gut decontamination was reported by only 22.2%. Commonest method for sampling was endotracheal suction by 68.3%. Gram negative organisms were reported to be the most commonly isolated. Majority (39.7% reported using proton pump inhibitors for stress ulcer prophylaxis and 84.1% believed that VAP contributed to increased mortality. De-escalating therapy was considered in patients responding to treatment by 57.9% and 65.9% considered adding empirical methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSAcoverage, while 63.5% considered adding nebulized antibiotics in certain high-risk patients. There was good concordance regarding VAP prophylaxis among the intensivists with a majority adhering to evidence-based guidelines. We could identify certain issues like the choice of agent for stress ulcer prophylaxis, use of HME filters, SSD and CSS, where there still exists some practice variability and opportunities for improvement.

  12. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-05-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment.

  13. Evaluating the Motivational Impact of CALL Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Stephen; Cucchiarini, Catia; Strik, Helmer; van Hout, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    A major aim of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is to create computer environments that facilitate students' second language (L2) acquisition. To achieve this aim, CALL employs technological innovations to create novel types of language practice. Evaluations of the new practice types serve the important role of distinguishing effective…

  14. Strength-based Supervision: Frameworks, Current Practice, and Future Directions A Wu-wei Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jeffrey K.; Chen, Mei-Whei

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a method of counseling supervision similar to the wu-wei practice in Zen and Taoism. Suggests that this strength-based method and an understanding of isomorphy in supervisory relationships are the preferred practice for the supervision of family counselors. States that this model of supervision potentiates the person-of-the-counselor.…

  15. Current Practices in Special Education Service Delivery and Differences between Instructional Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Marguerite D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite nationwide advances in special education service delivery practices, disparities exist between the educational outcomes of students with disabilities versus students without disabilities. There is often disparity in teachers' roles and instructional practices in coteaching classrooms, as well as in their pullout resource classroom…

  16. Entrepreneurship Education in Malaysia's Public Institutions of Higher Learning--A Review of the Current Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Yusoff, Mohd Nor Hakimin; Zainol, Fakhrul Anwar; Bin Ibrahim, Mohamed Dahlan

    2015-01-01

    The need for a practical and applicable model for entrepreneurial learning is becoming critical. In this study, we aimed to collect data related to entrepreneurship education practices by all institutes of higher learning (IHLs) in Malaysia as well as challenges faced, facilities, and supports offered by the universities. Given the important role…

  17. Membrane Distillation Bioreactor (MDBR) - A lower Green-House-Gas (GHG) option for industrial wastewater reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shuwen; Zhang, Jinsong; Liu, Yu; Fane, Anthony G

    2015-12-01

    A high-retention membrane bioreactor system, the Membrane Distillation Bioreactor (MDBR) is a wastewater reclamation process which has the potential to tap on waste heat generated in industries to produce high quality product water. There are a few key factors which could make MDBR an attractive advanced treatment option, namely tightening legal requirements due to increasing concerns on the micropollutants in industrial wastewater effluents as well as concerns over the electrical requirement of pressurized advanced treatment processes and greenhouse gas emissions associated with wastewater reclamation. This paper aims to provide a consolidated review on the current state of research for the MDBR system and to evaluate the system as a possible lower Green House Gas (GHG) emission option for wastewater reclamation using the membrane bioreactor-reverse osmosis (MBR-RO) system as a baseline for comparison. The areas for potential applications and possible configurations for MDBR applications are discussed. PMID:25262945

  18. Comparing the value of bioproducts from different stages of anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y W; Zhou, J L; Zhang, J; Liang, S; Ni, B J; Zhang, X B; Wang, J

    2016-08-01

    The anaerobic digestion process in anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an effective way for waste management, energy sustainability and pollution control in the environment. This digestion process basically involves the production of volatile fatty acids and biohydrogen as intermediate products and methane as a final product. This paper compares the value of bioproducts from different stages of anaerobic membrane bioreactors through a thorough assessment. The value was assessed in terms of technical feasibility, economic assessment, environmental impact and impact on society. Even though the current research objective is more inclined to optimize the production of methane, the intermediate products could also be considered as economically attractive and environment friendly options. Hence, this is the first review study to correlate the idea into an anaerobic membrane bioreactor which is expected to guide future research pathways regarding anaerobic process and its bioproducts. PMID:27233838

  19. On the Anglocentricities of Current Reading Research and Practice: The Perils of Overreliance on an "Outlier" Orthography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, David L.

    2008-01-01

    In this critique of current reading research and practice, the author contends that the extreme ambiguity of English spelling-sound correspondence has confined reading science to an insular, Anglocentric research agenda addressing theoretical and applied issues with limited relevance for a universal science of reading. The unique problems posed by…

  20. The Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching and Assessing: Current Practices at Polytechnics in Bangladesh and Its Effects in Developing Students' Competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haolader, Faruque A.; Ali, Md Ramjan; Foysol, Khan Md

    2015-01-01

    Polytechnics in Bangladesh endeavour to produce quality graduates for national and international job markets. The quality of graduates depends on several factors. This study examines the implementation process of the polytechnic curriculum with the objectives of determining the current level of practices in learning/teaching material design, in…

  1. Teaching Intercultural Communication in a Basic Technical Writing Course: A Survey of Our Current Practices and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, Natalia

    2008-01-01

    This research article reports the results of an online survey distributed among technical writing instructors in 2006. The survey aimed to examine how we teach intercultural communication in basic technical writing courses: our current practices and methods. The article discusses three major challenges that instructors may face when teaching about…

  2. 78 FR 11611 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ..., 2013 (78 FR 3646), is extended. Submit either electronic or written comments by May 16, 2013. ADDRESSES... INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of January 16, 2013 (78 FR 3646), FDA published a proposed..., and 211 RIN 0910-AG36 Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-...

  3. Towards sustainable food systems: the concept of agroecology and how it questions current research practices. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatt, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiple environmental and socio-economic indicators show that our current agriculture and the organization of the food system need to be revised. Agroecology has been proposed as a promising concept for achieving greater sustainability. This paper offers an overview and discussion of the concept based on existing literature and case studies, and explores the way it questions our current research approaches and education paradigms. Literature. In order to improve the sustainability of agriculture, the use of external and chemical inputs needs to be minimized. Agroecological farming practices seek to optimize ecological processes, thus minimizing the need for external inputs by providing an array of ecosystem services. Implementing such practices challenges the current structure of the food system, which has been criticized for its lack of social relevance and economic viability. An agroecological approach includes all stakeholders, from field to fork, in the discussion, design and development of future food systems. This inclusion of various disciplines and stakeholders raises issues about scientists and their research practices, as well as about the education of the next generation of scientists. Conclusions. Agroecology is based on the concept that agricultural practices and food systems cannot be dissociated because they belong to the same natural and socio-economic context. Clearly, agroecology is not a silver-bullet, but its principles can serve as avenues for rethinking the current approaches towards achieving greater sustainability. Adapting research approaches in line with indicators that promote inter- and transdisciplinary research is essential if progress is to be made.

  4. A Focus Group Study of Child Nutrition Professionals' Attitudes about Food Allergies and Current Training Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Ming; Kwon, Junehee; Sauer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore child nutrition professionals' (CNPs) attitudes about food allergies, current practices of food allergy training, and operational issues related to food allergy training in school foodservice operations. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 CNPs with managerial…

  5. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A National Survey of Training and Current Assessment Practices in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDemaray, Michelle Kilpatrick; Schaefer, Katherine; DeLong, Lauren K.

    2003-01-01

    Surveys school psychologists to investigate their training and current assessment practices for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the schools. The respondents reported receiving adequate training in the assessment of ADHD. Results confirmed a substantial caseload of ADHD referrals. In the assessment of ADHD, the results indicated…

  6. RECONCILING ON-SITE STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE (BMP) EFFECTIVENESS AND PERFORMANCE WITH CURRENT HYDROLOGIC AND ECONOMIC PERCEPTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is currently a dearth of data characterizing best management practice impacts on runoff production at the parcel-level. This data is of critical importance insofar as judging the effectiveness and reliability of on-site stormwater BMPs, with significant implications for bot...

  7. Physiotherapy management of patients with coronary artery disease: a report on current practice in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Roos

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a worldwide health problem with  an  increased  prevalence  in  sub-Saharan  Africa.  Physiotherapists  inter-nationally  are  involved  in  the  care  of  these  patients  from  the  acute  stage following  a  cardiac  event  until  phase  III  cardiac  rehabilitation  is  completed.  The  purpose  of  this  study  was  to  determine  the  current  physiotherapy management  of  patients  with  CAD  in  South  Africa.  An  observational  cross-sectional  study  was  conducted  over  two  months  with  a  questionnaire  that  was  sent  to  the  government  and  private  health  care  sectors.  Results  showed  that  more  cardiopulmonary  physiotherapists  provided  care  (62%  than  those who  didn’t  (38%.  Care  was  mostly  provided  in  a  hospital  setting  (81%  and  out- patient phase III cardiac rehabilitation was lacking (11%. In-hospital physiotherapy treatment was mostly provided once daily. Deep breathing exercises (99%, circulatory exercises (95% and manual chest clearance techniques (88% were mostly used during physiotherapy. Evidence based practice was consistent regarding early mobilization but was inconsistent with regards to the use of manual chest clearance techniques.

  8. Lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: current methods and interpretation criteria in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In current clinical practice lung scintigraphy is mainly used to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). Modified diagnostic criteria for planar lung scintigraphy are considered, as newer scitigraphic methods, especially single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are becoming more popular. Data of 98 outpatients who underwent planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy and 49 outpatients who underwent V/Q SPECT from the emergency department (ED) were retrospectively collected. Planar V/Q images were interpreted according to 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II criteria and perfusion scans according to PISA-PED criteria. V/Q SPECT images were interpreted according to the criteria suggested in EANM guidelines. Final diagnosis of PE was based on the clinical decision of an attending physician and evaluation of a 12 months follow-up period. Using 0.5 segment mismatch criteria and revised PIOPED II, planar V/Q scans were diagnostic in 93% and 84% of cases, respectively. Among the diagnostic planar scans readings specificity for 0.5 segment mismatch criteria was 98%, and 99% for revised PIOPED II criteria. V/Q SPECT showed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%, without any non-diagnostic cases. In patients with low pretest probability for PE, planar V/Q scans assessed by 0.5 segment mismatch criteria were diagnostic in 92%, and in 85% using revised PIOPED II criteria, while perfusion scintigraphy without ventilation scans was diagnostic in 80%. Lung scintigraphy yielded diagnostically definitive results and is reliable in ruling out PE in patients from ED. V/Q SPECT has excellent specificity and sensitivity without any non-diagnostic results. Percentage of non-diagnostic results in planar lung scintigraphy is considerably smaller when 0.5 segment mismatch criteria instead of revised PIOPED II criteria are used. Diagnostic value of perfusion scintigraphy according to PISA-PED criteria is inferior to combined V/Q scintigraphy; the difference is

  9. Myocardial perfusion imaging in Denmark: activity from 1997 to 2001 and current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A questionnaire was sent to all departments of nuclear medicine in Denmark (n=20) asking for details of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), including the number of patients examined each year from 1997 to 2001 and the current clinical and technical practice. All (100%) departments replied, and the survey thus covers all MPI performed in Denmark during the period in question. The number of MPI studies (examined patients) was 2,531 in 1997 (0.47 MPI/1,000/year) and 4,961 (0.93 MPI/1,000/year) in 2001, which is a doubling in activity in 5 years. Nineteen (95%) of the Danish departments performed MPI in 2001, and 14 (74%) of these reported that activity had increased over the past 5 years. MPI activity was unevenly distributed between hospitals and regions. In 2001, the university hospitals in the central Copenhagen region (capital) accounted for the highest MPI activity (2.00/1,000/year), while the non-university hospitals in general had the lowest activity rate (0.73/1,000/year). The most pronounced increment found in the period was observed in the university hospitals outside Copenhagen, where activity increased by 300% from 0.44/1,000/year in 1997 to 1.33/1,000/year in 2001. All departments providing MPI used tomographic acquisition technique and all departments used technetium tracers. The more sophisticated techniques of MPI - gated acquisition, attenuation correction and iterative reconstruction - were used in 74%, 32% and 42% of departments, respectively. The stress mode in perfusion studies was dipyridamole/adenosine in 76%, exercise in 18% and dobutamine in 6%. Despite these encouraging figures, MPI activity for 2001 remained well below what is recommended by other national and international societies. The anticipated further increase in nuclear cardiology is encouraging, but the nuclear medicine community needs to address the issues that prevent it from keeping up with demand. In general, the restricted camera time and the limited number of trained personnel

  10. Good Practices In Instructional Process Among Current Educational Programs For Basic Education In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens Kaluge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Comparing the good practices in the area of teaching learning improvement, several points are raised here. The five programs covering teaching learning improvement component are MBE, CLCC, NTT-PEP, SEQIP, and CTL. Through a survey in seven provinces, data were collected from various bureaucrats, school practitioners, students, and their parents. Within the component of the teaching learning improvement there are several elements which are commonly available among the projects. Those elements are preparation of good teachers, provision and development of resources, and practice teaching learning activities are considered to be good practices.

  11. Brain imaging in lung cancer patients without symptoms of brain metastases: a national survey of current practice in England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine current practice regarding brain imaging for newly diagnosed lung cancer patients without symptoms of brain metastases. Materials and methods: A survey questionnaire was sent by e-mail to all the lung cancer lead clinicians in England currently on the National Cancer Intelligence Network database. The survey asked whether brain imaging was used in new lung cancer patients without symptoms or signs to suggest brain metastases; and if so, which patient subgroups were imaged according to cell type, stage of disease, and intention to treat, and which techniques were used to image these patients. Responses were received between February and May 2014. Results: Fifty-nine of 154 centres replied to the survey (38%). Thirty of the 59 centres (51%) did not image the brain in these patients. Twenty-nine of the 59 (49%) centres imaged the brain in at least certain subgroups. Of those centres that did image the brain 21 (72%) used CT as the first-line imaging technique and six (20%) used MRI. Twenty-five of 59 (42%) centres stated that the 2011 NICE guidelines had led to a change in their practice. Conclusion: There is wide variation in practice regarding brain imaging in this patient group in England, with no brain imaging at all in approximately half of centres and a spectrum of imaging in the other half. When the brain is imaged, CT is the technique most commonly used. The 2011 NICE guidelines have led to some change in practice but not to national uniformity. - Highlights: • Ascertain current practice in brain imaging for staging asymptomatic lung cancer patients. • Survey questionnaire sent to all the lung cancer lead clinicians in England. • Wide variation in practice with regard to brain imaging in this patient group. • No brain imaging at all in approximately half of centres and a spectrum of imaging in the other half • The 2011 NICE guidelines have led to some change in practice but not to national uniformity

  12. Optimizing of Culture Condition in Horizontal Rotating Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Fang ZHANG; Huai-Qing CHEN; Hua HUANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Bioreactor is the most important equipment in tissue engineering. It can mimic the micro-environment of cell growth in vitro. At present, horizontal rotating bioreactor is the most advanced equipment for cell culture in the world.

  13. Payment of research participants: current practice and policies of Irish research ethics committees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Payment of research participants helps to increase recruitment for research studies, but can pose ethical dilemmas. Research ethics committees (RECs) have a centrally important role in guiding this practice, but standardisation of the ethical approval process in Ireland is lacking.

  14. Assessing and managing breast cancer risk: clinicians' current practice and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ian M; Steel, Emma; Mann, G Bruce; Emery, Jon D; Bickerstaffe, Adrian; Trainer, Alison; Butow, Phyllis; Pirotta, Marie; Antoniou, Antonis C; Cuzick, Jack; Hopper, John; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Keogh, Louise A

    2014-10-01

    Decision support tools for the assessment and management of breast cancer risk may improve uptake of prevention strategies. End-user input in the design of such tools is critical to increase clinical use. Before developing such a computerized tool, we examined clinicians' practice and future needs. Twelve breast surgeons, 12 primary care physicians and 5 practice nurses participated in 4 focus groups. These were recorded, coded, and analyzed to identify key themes. Participants identified difficulties assessing risk, including a lack of available tools to standardize practice. Most expressed confidence identifying women at potentially high risk, but not moderate risk. Participants felt a tool could especially reassure young women at average risk. Desirable features included: evidence-based, accessible (e.g. web-based), and displaying absolute (not relative) risks in multiple formats. The potential to create anxiety was a concern. Development of future tools should address these issues to optimize translation of knowledge into clinical practice. PMID:24998452

  15. For the Heirs of Revolution: Current Educational Practices in North Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-chan

    1981-01-01

    Based on a 10-day visit to North Korean educational establishments by the author, this article discusses educational philosophy, curriculum, teaching methods, educational system organization, and educational practices at all levels from primary school through higher education institutions. (DB)

  16. Innovative methods in logistics and supply chain management : current issues and emerging practices

    OpenAIRE

    Hamburg International Conference of Logistics (HICL)

    2014-01-01

    Innovation is increasingly considered as an enabler of business competitive advantage. More and more organizations focus on satisfying their consumer’s demand of innovative and qualitative products and services by applying both technology-supported and non technology-supported innovative methods in their supply chain practices. Due to its very characteristic i.e. novelty, innovation is double-edged sword; capturing value from innovative methods in supply chain practices has been one of the im...

  17. "Current Good Manufacturing Practices" and the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Beth F.

    1995-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (hereinafter, FDA) regulates food, drugs, and cosmetics in order to ensure that these products are safe and truthfully labelled. As part of its responsibilities under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (hereinafter, Act), the FDA monitors the manufacturing practices of companies involved in the production of food, drugs, and medical devices. The manufacturing practices used by these companies must comply with certain standards, identified in the Act as "...

  18. Contamination of a high-cell-density continuous bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues, Lucília; Lima, Nelson; Teixeira, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Continuous fermentations were carried out with a recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain in an airlift bioreactor. Once operating under steady state at a dilution rate of 0.45 h−1, the bioreactor was contaminated with Escherichia coli cells. The faster growing E. coli strain was washed out of the bioreactor and the recombinant, slower growing flocculating S. cerevisiae strain remained as the only species detected in the bioreactor. Flocculation, besides ...

  19. Bioreactor design and optimization – a future perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    Bioreactor design and optimisation are essential in translating the experience gained from lab or pilot scale experiments to efficient production processes in industrial scale bioreactors. This article gives a future perspective on bioreactor design and optimisation, where it is foreseen that technologies including mechanistic models, process simulation and advanced model analysis will play an increasingly important role.

  20. Bioreactor design and optimization – a future perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Bioreactor design and optimisation are essential in translating the experience gained from lab or pilot scale experiments to efficient production processes in industrial scale bioreactors. This article gives a future perspective on bioreactor design and optimisation, where it is foreseen that...

  1. Current Hale ROA Voice and Control Communication Practices and Performance: White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this white paper is to help achieve the ACCESS 5 goal by sharing the UNITE members knowledge of current HALE ROA communication systems with other ACCESS 5 participants so that all interested parties start from a common understanding as we begin the clarification of requirements for voice and C2 communication. This white paper is also intended to describe the point of departure for any future developments that need to be realized to achieve the long term ACCESS 5 goal. Although this white paper describes the current systems, the functional and performance requirements that are also being developed under ACCESS 5 may not require the same levels of functionality and performance as currently exist. The paper addresses the following: 1) A description of a typical current HALE ROA communications system, 2) HALE ROA communications systems performance metrics, 3) HALE ROA communications systems performance, and 5) A comparison of current HALE ROA communications systems with current regulations.

  2. Investigation of the current requirements engineering practices among software developers at the Universiti Utara Malaysia Information Technology (UUMIT) centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Abdullah, Inam

    2016-08-01

    Requirements Engineering (RE) is a systemic and integrated process of eliciting, elaborating, negotiating, validating and managing of the requirements of a system in a software development project. UUM has been supported by various systems developed and maintained by the UUM Information Technology (UUMIT) Centre. The aim of this study was to assess the current requirements engineering practices at UUMIT. The main problem that prompted this research is the lack of studies that support software development activities at the UUMIT. The study is geared at helping UUMIT produce quality but time and cost saving software products by implementing cutting edge and state of the art requirements engineering practices. Also, the study contributes to UUM by identifying the activities needed for software development so that the management will be able to allocate budget to provide adequate and precise training for the software developers. Three variables were investigated: Requirement Description, Requirements Development (comprising: Requirements Elicitation, Requirements Analysis and Negotiation, Requirements Validation), and Requirement Management. The results from the study showed that the current practice of requirement engineering in UUMIT is encouraging, but still need further development and improvement because a few RE practices were seldom practiced.

  3. Comparison of the theory and the practice of rf current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of rf-driven plasma currents is applied to the lower-hybrid experiments on the PLT tokamak. Particular emphasis is placed on those experiments in which the plasma current was varying. The comparison between theory and experiment is made with respect to the efficiency with which rf energy was converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. Good agreement is found irrespective of whether the current was increasing, constant, or decreasing

  4. Seismic Hazard Assessment and Uncertainties Treatment: Discussion on the current French regulation, practices and open issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Safety Authority. These studies performed by nuclear operators, leading to propose a 'Hard Core' of materials and organizational arrangements to ensure the control of crucial safety functions in extreme situations. The difficulties inherent in the definition of 'extreme situation' in a moderate seismically country as the French metropolitan area will be illustrated and discussed. This presentation gives the current practice of seismic risk management in France for nuclear safety. The regulation is composed by two coherent and complementary references the RFS 2001-01 and the Guide ASN/2/01. We point out the key steps of the seismic hazard assessment following the RFS 2001-01 methodology which is scenario based. We particularly highlight the sensitivity and the influences of seismic parameters choices in their uncertainty domains and their impact on the final hazard. The Tohoku 2011 mega-quake and the Fukushima associated accident resulted in the Complementary Safety Studies in the Nuclear field. The review of the French complementary studies by the ENSREG made the recommendation to complete the scenario based approach by a probabilistic hazard assessment. The presentation then exhibits the specificities and common aspects of a PSHA and DSHA. We underline that these two approaches are strictly founded on common databases and knowledge level: The epistemic uncertainties can be accounted by both PSHA and DSHA through logic trees (see [37] for DSHA). However they clearly differ by two points: - the PSHA accounts for the whole seismic catalogue with its occurrence rate, where the DSHA selects specific scenarios with consideration of occurrence level, - the aleatory variability is differently treated in scenario approach and in probabilistic approach. Finally, performing probabilistic seismic hazard assessment requires defining crucial parameters (i) the safety level target which corresponds a return period value of the hazard curve and (ii) its confidence level. In

  5. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part II: Current practice and new horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. The principles described in Part I are used to explain current practices in radiation oncology and as a basis for new initiatives. The multifraction regimens used in conventional radiotherapy were developed empirically, but can be understood in terms of radiobiological principles. Dividing the dose into many fractions reduces biological effectiveness due to repair of sublethal damage; this occurs in both tumors and normal tissues. Fractionation allows re-oxygenation to occur in tumors and so increases the effectiveness of a given total dose. Fractionation also leads to sensitization by reassortment of cycling tumor cells into radiosensitive phases of the cycle. Laboratory research also provides a rationale for modifications of existing fractionation protocols. The dose response relationship for late responding tissues is more 'curved' than for acute or early effects. Consequently the use of multiple fractions allows a greater separation of early and late effects in normal tissues. This has led to the introduction of hyperfractionation and accelerated treatment. Both involve two treatments per day (BID) but based on quite different rationales. The limitation of protraction is cell proliferation in the tumor, which may be accelerated as the tumor shrinks. Measurements of cell kinetics can identify fast growing tumors that may benefit from accelerated treatment. Hypoxia was early identified as a cause of resistance to cell killing by x-rays. This led to the development of electron affinic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells. The new trend is the development of bioreductive drugs that are specifically cytotoxic to hypoxic cells i.e. hypoxic cytotoxins, but which still need to be combined with radiation. Fast neutrons were initially introduced, too, in an attempt to overcome the perceived problems of hypoxia, but clinical trials now are based on the premise

  6. Evolution of Bioreactors for Extracorporeal Liver Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilkova Е.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of effective extracorporeal liver support systems in acute and chronic hepatic failure for transplantology purposes and in toxic injuries is a promising direction in modern biomedical studies. Widely used techniques are based on physicochemical interactions of biological molecules, and able to perform a detoxification function only (hemodialysis, hemofiltration, hemodiafiltration, sorption, albumin dialysis, plasmapheresis. However, support systems combining both blood/plasma perfusion and cellular technologies to maintain metabolic, synthetic and regulatory hepatic functions — “artificial liver” systems — are being extensively developed in recent decades. The review describes the main types of cell lines cultured to occupy bioreactors, various technological concepts for bioreactor design (dynamic, static, scaffold-carriers as part of bioreactors (structure, biochemical composition. The study gives metabolic characteristics of a cellular component of “bioartificial liver”: nourishment, oxygen saturation. Various types of existing extracorporeal support systems, their evolution, and preclinical and clinical test results are presented.

  7. Common Ground of Two Paradigms: Incorporating Critical Theory into Current Art Therapy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Clinical art therapy and studio-based community art therapy represent two major paradigms in art therapy practice. This viewpoint explores how critical theory can be incorporated into both paradigms and result in common ground between them. Critical theory encompasses an understanding of oppression in psychological, social, and cultural contexts…

  8. Management Communication in Non-U.S. MBA Programs: Current Trends and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Melinda

    2005-01-01

    A study of top-ranked, full-time, global MBA programs suggests that management communication is indeed both an important focus and component in the curriculum. The methods of delivery, however, do not seem to follow any particular model, such as the common U.S. practice of a separate program or department. Required courses are found at 10 of the…

  9. Trying to Get Ahead of the Curve: Raising and Understanding Current Themes in New Literacies Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Dana

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the following questions: What impact does using the theoretical framework of new literacies have on understanding language, literacy, and learning practices today as technologies are constantly being developed and used? What is the state of research in this area? What are some new directions the field might take in order to…

  10. 76 FR 38399 - Assessing the Current Research, Policy, and Practice Environment in Public Health Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ..., infectious, environmental, and occupational diseases. OPHG's efforts focus on conducting population-based ] genomic research, assessing the role of family health history in disease risk and prevention, supporting a... Practice Environment in Public Health Genomics AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  11. Using Time-Compression to Make Multimedia Learning More Efficient: Current Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Raymond; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2015-01-01

    It is now common practice for instructional designers to incorporate digitally recorded lectures for Podcasts (e.g., iTunes University), voice-over presentations (e.g., PowerPoint), animated screen captures with narration (e.g., Camtasia), and other various learning objects with digital audio in the instructional method. As a result, learners are…

  12. Being good neighbours : Current practices, barriers, and opportunities for community engagement in Australian plantation forestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, Melissa; Schirmer, Jacki; Lockwood, Michael; Vanclay, Frank; Hanson, Dallas

    2013-01-01

    Although community engagement (CE) is widely recognised as an essential element of sustainable management, few studies have evaluated CE at an industry-wide scale, i.e. in terms of the specific CE needs and best practice methods needed when addressing engagement issues that apply across more than on

  13. Occupational Safety and Health: A View of Current Practices in Agricultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threeton, Mark D.; Ewing, John C.; Evanoski, Danielle C.

    2015-01-01

    Providing safe and secure teaching and learning environments within schools is an ongoing process which requires a significant amount of attention. Therefore, this study sought to: 1) explore safety and health practices within secondary Agricultural Mechanics Education; and 2) identify the perceived obstacles which appear to hinder implementation…

  14. Sustainability of current agriculture practices, community perception, and implications for ecosystem health: an Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Atanu; Patil, Shantagouda; Hugar, Lingappa B; vanLoon, Gary

    2011-12-01

    In order to support agribusiness and to attain food security for ever-increasing populations, most countries in the world have embraced modern agricultural technologies. Ecological consequences of the technocentric approaches, and their sustainability and impacts on human health have, however, not received adequate attention particularly in developing countries. India is one country that has undergone a rapid transformation in the field of agriculture by adopting strategies of the Green Revolution. This article provides a comparative analysis of the effects of older and newer paradigms of agricultural practices on ecosystem and human health within the larger context of sustainability. The study was conducted in three closely situated areas where different agricultural practices were followed: (a) the head-end of a modern canal-irrigated area, (b) an adjacent dryland, and (c) an area (the ancient area) that has been provided with irrigation for some 800 years. Data were collected by in-depth interviews of individual farmers, focus-group discussions, participatory observations, and from secondary sources. The dryland, receiving limited rainfall, continues to practice diverse cropping centered to a large extent on traditional coarse cereals and uses only small amounts of chemical inputs. On the other hand, modern agriculture in the head-end emphasizes continuous cropping of rice supported by extensive and indiscriminate use of agrochemicals. Market forces have, to a significant degree, influenced the ancient area to abandon much of its early practices of organic farming and to take up aspects of modern agricultural practice. Rice cultivation in the irrigated parts has changed the local landscape and vegetation and has augmented the mosquito population, which is a potential vector for malaria, Japanese encephalitis and other diseases. Nevertheless, despite these problems, perceptions of adverse environmental effects are lowest in the heavily irrigated area. PMID

  15. From Research to Practice: Increasing Ability of Practitioners to Relate Family-of-Origin Communicative Techniques to Current Marital Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Kimberly

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown a connection between family-of-origin communicative techniques and later marital satisfaction. However, little has been done to see how this information can be incorporated in family life education settings. The purpose of this study is to make a connection between research and practice by testing the validity of easy-to-use measurements informing this relationship. The results of a survey from 649 married individuals about the communicative practices within their family-of-origin and in their current marriage support the ability of practitioners to understand techniques utilized in marriage by interpreting those used in childhood. By associating the literature between family-of-origin communication and marital dynamics in a practical way, practitioners and educators will be better able to assess and assist married couples in therapeutic or educational settings.

  16. Bioreactor and methods for producing synchronous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstetter, Charles E. (Inventor); Thornton, Maureen (Inventor); Gonda, Steve (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are directed to a perfusion culture system in which a rotating bioreactor is used to grow cells in a liquid culture medium, while these cells are attached to an adhesive-treated porous surface. As a result of this arrangement and its rotation, the attached cells divide, with one cell remaining attached to the substrate, while the other cell, a newborn cell is released. These newborn cells are of approximately the same age, that are collected upon leaving the bioreactor. The populations of newborn cells collected are of synchronous and are minimally, if at all, disturbed metabolically.

  17. Breast-feeding: Current knowledge, attitudes and practices of paediatricians and obstetricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Videlefsky

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Doctors, as part of the healthcare team, can have a significant impact on the successful initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding. There is a need for ongoing education and intervention programmes to update current knowledge on breastfeeding management.

  18. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Ibrahim, MD

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours.

  19. Seismic hazard analysis of nuclear installations in France. Current practice and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadioun, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1997-03-01

    The methodology put into practice in France for the evaluation of seismic hazard on the sites of nuclear facilities is founded on data assembled country-wide over the past 15 years, in geology, geophysics and seismology. It is appropriate to the regional seismotectonic context (interplate), characterized notably by diffuse seismicity. Extensive use is made of information drawn from historical seismicity. The regulatory practice described in the RFS I.2.c is reexamined periodically and is subject to up-dating so as to take advantage of new earthquake data and of the results gained from research work. Acquisition of the basic data, such as the identification of active faults and the quantification of site effect, which will be needed to achieve improved preparedness versus severe earthquake hazard in the 21st century, will necessarily be the fruit of close international cooperation and collaboration, which should accordingly be actively promoted. (J.P.N.)

  20. NATO Blood Panel perspectives on changes to military prehospital resuscitation policies: current and future practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Tom; Badloe, John; Bohonek, Milos; Taylor, Audra L; Erik Heier, Hans; Doughty, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Blood Panel exists to promote interoperability of transfusion practice between NATO partners. However, it has served as an important forum for the development of prehospital transfusion and transfusion in the austere environment. There are synergies with the trauma hemostasis and oxygen research community especially in the areas of innovation and research. Four presentations are summarized together with a review of some scientific principles. The past decade has already seen significant changes in early transfusion support. Sometimes practice has preceded the evidence and has stretched regulatory and logistic constraints. Ethical and philosophical issues are also important and require us to question "should we" and not just "could we." The challenge for the combined communities is to continue to optimize transfusion support underpinned by evidence-based excellence. PMID:27100759

  1. A critique of current practice for the use of expert opinions in probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper critically reviews and evaluates the elicitation and use of expert opinion in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of nuclear power plants in light of the available empirical and theoretical results on expert opinion use. PRA practice is represented by four case studies selected to represent a variety of aspects of the problem. These are assessments of component failure rates and maintenance data, an assessment of seismic hazard rates, assessments of containment phenomenology, and accident precursor studies. The review has yielded mixed results. On the negative side, there appears to be little reliance on normative expertise in structuring the process of expert opinion elicitation and use; most applications instead rely primarily on the common sense of the experts involved in the analysis, which is not always an adequate guide. On the positive side, however, there is evidence that expert opinions can, in fact, be used well in practical settings. (author)

  2. Managing the Service Supply Chain in the Department of Defense: An Empirical Study of Current Management Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Apte, Aruna U.; Rendon, Rene G.; Uday M. Apte

    2008-01-01

    Sponsored Report (for Acquisition Research Program) This paper presents the results of our ongoing research on the management of services acquisition in the Department of Defense. In this empirical study we developed and used a web-based survey to collect data on the acquisition strategy, procurement methods, and contract types used at Air Force and Navy installations. Specifically, we studied the current management practices in such areas as life cycle approach, project management, orga...

  3. Faculty Member's Views, Attitude and Current Practice As Regards International Committee of Medical Journal Editors Criteria for Authorship.

    OpenAIRE

    Masood Jawaid; Shaukat Ali Jawaid

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and views of faculty members on criteria for authorship by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), their current practice of choosing the authors, views on gift authorship and problems they had faced concerning authorship. Methods It was a cross sectional survey from January 2011 to July 2011 among faculty members of various private and public sector medical institutions of Pakistan through a self-...

  4. Current practice of glucocorticoid replacement therapy and patient-perceived health outcomes in adrenal insufficiency - a worldwide patient survey

    OpenAIRE

    Forss M; Batcheller G; Skrtic S; Johannsson G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim was to survey current practice in glucocorticoid replacement therapy and self-perceived health outcomes in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Methods Participants were recruited via patient organizations to respond anonymously to a web-based survey developed by clinical experts. Unique entries were set up for each patient organization enabling geographical localization of the entries. Results 1245 participants responded (primary adrenal insufficiency: 84%; second...

  5. Which medical error to disclose to patients and by whom? Public preference and perceptions of norm and current practice

    OpenAIRE

    Al Qadire Mohammad; Attalah Sahar; Hammami Muhammad M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Disclosure of near miss medical error (ME) and who should disclose ME to patients continue to be controversial. Further, available recommendations on disclosure of ME have emerged largely in Western culture; their suitability to Islamic/Arabic culture is not known. Methods We surveyed 902 individuals attending the outpatient's clinics of a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia. Personal preference and perceptions of norm and current practice regarding which ME to be discl...

  6. Current good manufacturing practices, quality control procedures, quality factors, notification requirements, and records and reports, for infant formula. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that adopts, with some modifications, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled "Current Good Manufacturing Practices, Quality Control Procedures, Quality Factors, Notification Requirements, and Records and Reports, for Infant Formula'' (February 10, 2014). This final rule affirms the IFR's changes to FDA's regulations and provides additional modifications and clarifications. The final rule also responds to certain comments submitted in response to the request for comments in the IFR. PMID:24922980

  7. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    OpenAIRE

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01

    Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to man...

  8. Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics: Viewpoints on the Current Status and Applications in Nutrition Research and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Fenech, Michael; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Cahill, Leah; Ferguson, Lynnette R.; French, Tapaeru-Ariki C.; Tai, E Shyong; Milner, John; Koh, Woon-Puay; Xie, Lin; Zucker, Michelle; Buckley, Michael; Cosgrove, Leah; Lockett, Trevor; Fung, Kim Y. C.; Head, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics hold much promise for providing better nutritional advice to the public generally, genetic subgroups and individuals. Because nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics require a deep understanding of nutrition, genetics and biochemistry and ever new ‘omic’ technologies, it is often difficult, even for educated professionals, to appreciate their relevance to the practice of preventive approaches for optimising health, delaying onset of disease and diminishing its severity...

  9. Fast track anesthesia for liver transplantation: Review of the current practice

    OpenAIRE

    Aniskevich, Stephen; Pai, Sher-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Historically, patients undergoing liver transplantation were left intubated and extubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after a period of recovery. Proponents of this practice argued that these patients were critically ill and need time to be properly optimized from a physiological and pain standpoint prior to extubation. Recently, there has been a growing movement toward early extubation in transplant centers worldwide. Initially fueled by research into early extubation following cardiac ...

  10. A survey of stress tests and current practice at major financial institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bank for International Settlements

    2001-01-01

    Preface The Committee on the Global Financial System (CGFS), known until 1999 as the Euro-Currency Standing Committee, serves as a discussion forum for the central bank community on financial stability questions. The CGFS has frequently been asked to examine the potential implications of innovations in global financial market practices. Recent projects by CGFS subgroups have concerned the functioning of international interbank markets, financial derivatives and the systemic consequences of st...

  11. Current knowledge, attitudes and practices of women on breast cancer and mammography at Mulago Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, Kawooya G; Nakatudde Rebecca; Rosemary, Byanyima K; Muyinda Zeridah; Mubuuke A. Gonzaga; Businge Francis; Kiguli-Malwadde Elsie

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the third commonest cancer in Ugandan women. Women present late for breast cancer management which leads to high mortality rates. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of Ugandan women concerning breast cancer and mammography.METHODS: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study where 100 women reporting to the Radiology department were interviewed. We used consecutive sampling. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were...

  12. What is a pilot or feasibility study?:a review of current practice and editorial policy

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper Cindy L; Campbell Michael J; Arain Mubashir; Lancaster Gillian A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2004, a review of pilot studies published in seven major medical journals during 2000-01 recommended that the statistical analysis of such studies should be either mainly descriptive or focus on sample size estimation, while results from hypothesis testing must be interpreted with caution. We revisited these journals to see whether the subsequent recommendations have changed the practice of reporting pilot studies. We also conducted a survey to identify the methodologic...

  13. Evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology. Current status and further developments

    OpenAIRE

    Maricutoiu, Laurentiu P.; Florin A. Sava

    2012-01-01

    The present paper discusses the status of evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology (OHP). After several searches on large online databases, we have found that OHP papers that discuss interventions are less than 10% of the overall literature. Furthermore, quantitative reviews research that reports interventions on major OHP topics are generally absent. In the last part of the paper, we formulate some reccomendations for increasing the number of papers relevant for evidence-bas...

  14. Current Practices in Constructing and Evaluating Assurance Cases With Applications to Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, David J.; Knight, John C.; Rowanhill, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces and provides an overview of assurance cases including theory, practice, and evaluation. This report includes a section that introduces the principles, terminology, and history of assurance cases. The core of the report presents twelve example uses of assurance cases from a range of domains, using a novel classification scheme. The report also reviews the state of the art in assurance case evaluation methods.

  15. Bringing trauma-informed practice to domestic violence programs: A qualitative analysis of current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joshua M; Fauci, Jenny E; Goodman, Lisa A

    2015-11-01

    Three out of 10 women and 1 out of 10 men in the United States experience violence at the hands of an intimate partner-often with devastating costs. In response, hundreds of residential and community-based organizations have sprung up to support survivors. Over the last decade, many of these organizations have joined other human service systems in adopting trauma-informed care (TIC), an approach to working with survivors that responds directly to the effects of trauma. Although there have been various efforts to describe TIC in domestic violence (DV) programs, there is a need to further synthesize this discourse on trauma-informed approaches to better understand specific applications and practices for DV programs. This study aimed to address this gap. The authors of this study systematically identified key documents that describe trauma-informed approaches in DV services and then conducted a qualitative content analysis to identify core themes. Results yielded 6 principles (Establishing emotional safety, Restoring choice and control, Facilitating connection, Supporting coping, Responding to identity and context, and Building strengths), each of which comprised a set of concrete practices. Despite the common themes articulated across descriptions of DV-specific trauma-informed practices (TIP), we also found critical differences, with some publications focusing narrowly on individual healing and others emphasizing the broader community and social contexts of violence and oppression. Implications for future research and evaluation are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26594925

  16. The role of the pharmacist in patient-centered medical home practices: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis NJW

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nancy JW Lewis,1 Leslie A Shimp,2 Stuart Rockafellow,2 Jeffrey M Tingen,2 Hae Mi Choe,3 Marie A Marcelino21Private consultancy practice, Rochester Hills, MI, USA; 2Clinical, Social and Administrative Department, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs are the centerpiece of primary care transformation in the US. They are intended to improve care coordination and communication, enhance health care quality and patient experiences, and lower health care costs by linking patients to a physician-led interdisciplinary health care team. PCMHs are widely supported by health care associations, payers, and employers. Health care accreditation organizations have created performance measures that promote the adoption of PCMH core attributes. Public and private payers are increasingly providing incentives and bonuses related to performance measure status. Evidence-based prescription, medication adherence, medication use coordination, and systems to support medication safety are all necessary components of PCMHs. Pharmacists have unique knowledge and skills that can complement the care provided by other PCMH team members. Their experience in drug therapy assessments, medication therapy management, and population health has documented benefits, both in terms of patient health outcomes and health care costs. Through collaborative care, pharmacists can assist physicians and other prescribers in medication management and thus improve prescriber productivity and patient access to care. Pharmacists are engaged in PCMHs through both employment and contractual arrangements. While some pharmacists serve a unique PCMH, others work within practice networks that serve practices within a geographical area. Financial support for pharmacist-provided services includes university funding, external grant funding

  17. How current Clinical Practice Guidelines for low back pain reflect Traditional Medicine in East Asian Countries: a systematic review of Clinical Practice Guidelines and systematic reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Woo Cho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate whether there is a gap between evidence of traditional medicine (TM interventions in East-Asian countries from the current Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs and evidence from current systematic reviews and meta-analyses (SR-MAs and to analyze the impact of this gap on present CPGs. METHODS: We examined 5 representative TM interventions in the health care systems of East-Asian countries. We searched seven relevant databases for CPGs to identify whether core CPGs included evidence of TM interventions, and we searched 11 databases for SR-MAs to re-evaluate current evidence on TM interventions. We then compared the gap between the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs. RESULTS: Thirteen CPGs and 22 SR-MAs met our inclusion criteria. Of the 13 CPGs, 7 CPGs (54% mentioned TM interventions, and all were for acupuncture (only one was for both acupuncture and acupressure. However, the CPGs did not recommend acupuncture (or acupressure. Of 22 SR-MAs, 16 were for acupuncture, 5 for manual therapy, 1 for cupping, and none for moxibustion and herbal medicine. Comparing the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs, an underestimation or omission of evidence for acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy in current CPGs was detected. Thus, applying the results from the SR-MAs, we moderately recommend acupuncture for chronic LBP, but we inconclusively recommend acupuncture for (subacute LBP due to the limited current evidence. Furthermore, we weakly recommend cupping and manual therapy for both (subacute and chronic LBP. We cannot provide recommendations for moxibustion and herbal medicine due to a lack of evidence. CONCLUSIONS: The current CPGs did not fully reflect the evidence for TM interventions. As relevant studies such as SR-MAs are conducted and evidence increases, the current evidence on acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy should be rigorously considered in the process of developing or updating the CPG system.

  18. Biogas production enhancement using semi-aerobic pre-aeration in a hybrid bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Raffaello; Morello, Luca; Raga, Roberto; Cerminara, Giulia

    2016-09-01

    Landfilling continues to be one of the main methods used in managing Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Although in many countries national legislation aims to reduce this practice as much as possible, landfill is a necessary and unavoidable step in closing the material cycle. The need for innovative waste management techniques to improve landfill management and minimize the adverse environmental impact produced has resulted in an increasing interest in innovative systems capable of accelerating waste stabilization. Landfill bioreactors allow decomposition kinetics to be increased and post-operational phase to be shortened; in particular, hybrid bioreactors combine the benefits afforded by both aerobic and anaerobic processes. Six bioreactor simulators were used in the present study: four managed as hybrid, with an initial semi-aerobic phase and a second anaerobic phase, and two as anaerobic control bioreactors. The main goal of the first aerated phase is to reduce Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA) in order to increase pH and enhance methane production during the anaerobic phase; for this reason, air injection was stopped only when these parameters reached the optimum range for methanogenic bacteria. Biogas and leachate were constantly monitored throughout the entire methanogenic phase with the aim of calibrating a Gompertz Model and evaluating the effects of pre-aeration on subsequent methane production. The results showed that moderate and intermittent pre-aeration produces a positive effect both on methane potential and in the kinetics of reaction. PMID:26531047

  19. Reversible stress and strain limits of the critical current of practical REBCO and BSCCO wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osamura, K.; Machiya, S.; Nishijima, G.

    2016-09-01

    Practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 tape-shaped wires are now manufactured on an industrial scale. They are a typical composite material consisting of superconducting layer/filaments together with functional components. These functional components affect directly the stress and strain dependences of the critical current. When applying an external stress R, the critical current I c was measured. Then the external stress was reduced to R = 0 and the recovered critical current I cr was again measured. The tensile stress and strain dependences of both normalized critical currents divided by the original value, I c/I c0 and I cr/I c0 were investigated. In general I cr/I c0 recovered close to unity when the applied stress was low, but its recovering level decreased gradually with increasing applied stress. The definition of the reversible stress and strain limits was investigated and its validity was proved using the cyclic loading test. The original definition of reversible stress and strain limits of critical current relates to: (1) when releasing the applied stress and strain, the I c shall recover to the original value, and (2) when applying the cyclic stresses, the I c shall keep the original value. Here, as a practical definition for the reversible stress and strain limits, the tensile stress and strain at 99% recovery of I c have been proposed. On the other hand, it was made clear that the stress and strain at I c 95% retention are not valid for use commonly as a criterion of reversible stress and strain limits for both practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 wires.

  20. Practicing radiation oncology in the current health care environment - Part II: Designing a radiation oncology department and setting up a clinical practice program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Identify the business practices necessary to develop a successful radiation oncology department in the current health care environment. Course content will be of interest to new practitioners establishing first time programs or joining existing groups as well as experienced radiation oncologists who are challenged with redesigning programs to be competitive. Course Content: During this session, the following topics will be discussed: 1) Space planning and equipment selection 2) Personnel; creating efficiencies while promoting productivity 3) Professional and Technical Billing; establishing proper fee structures and coding procedures 4) Utilizing benchmarking as a tool to improve operations 5) Information technology in radiation oncology 6) Current and Future Trends: a) Oncology networks b) Reimbursement: managed care and capitation c) Downsizing d) Relative Value Units

  1. Accounting Practices Regarding the Non-Current Assets Held for Sale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Manea

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally the non-current assets, and especially the tangible assets, are held by the entity (as it results from their very definition in order to be used in the production of goods or for services, to be rented to the thirds or to be used for administrative purposes during several periods. For the time interval that a non-current asset is not classified as being held for sale, its recognition and implicitly its assessment will be done in accordance with the provisions of the applicable International Financial Reporting Standards; after the classification of the respective asset as being held with the intention of subsequent sale there will be applicable the provisions of the contemporary IFRS norm 5 “Non-current assets held for sale and discontinued activities”.

  2. Adrenal lesions encountered in current medical practice − a review of their radiological imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesha Naidu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern radiological technology has transformed the way that adrenal lesions are currently investigated. The contemporary radiologist has been catapulted to the forefront in the management of adrenal disease. With the increasing use of cross-sectional imaging, adrenal lesions are being serendipitously discovered in radiological studies undertaken for non-adrenal-related conditions – the so-called adrenal ‘incidentaloma’. This review discusses the imaging modalities available for characterising these lesions, highlighting current concepts and controversies in differentiating benign from malignant pathology. The article also provides a brief overview of the spectrum of adrenal pathology commonly encountered in the adult population.

  3. Life cycle thinking in impact assessment—Current practice and LCA gains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been advocated that life cycle thinking (LCT) should be applied in impact assessment (IA) to a greater extent, since some development proposals pose a risk of significant impacts throughout the interconnected activities of product systems. Multiple authors have proposed the usage of life cycle assessment (LCA) for such analytical advancement, but little to no research on this tool application has been founded in IA practice so far. The aim of this article is to elaborate further on the gains assigned to application of LCA. The research builds on a review of 85 Danish IA reports, which were analysed for analytical appropriateness and application of LCT. Through a focus on the non-technical summary, the conclusion and the use of specific search words, passages containing LCT were searched for in each IA report. These passages were then analysed with a generic framework. The results reveal that LCT is appropriate for most of the IAs, but that LCA is rarely applied to provide such a perspective. Without LCA, the IAs show mixed performance in regard to LCT. Most IAs do consider the product provision of development proposals, but they rarely relate impacts to this function explicitly. Many IAs do consider downstream impacts, but assessments of upstream, distant impacts are generally absent. It is concluded that multiple analytical gains can be attributed to greater application of LCA in IA practice, though some level of LCT already exists. - Highlights: • Life cycle thinking is appropriate across the types and topics of impact assessment. • Yet, life cycle assessment is rarely used for adding such perspective. • Impact assessment practice does apply some degree of life cycle thinking. • However, application of life cycle assessment could bring analytical gains

  4. Life cycle thinking in impact assessment—Current practice and LCA gains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidstrup, Morten, E-mail: Bidstrup@plan.aau.dk

    2015-09-15

    It has been advocated that life cycle thinking (LCT) should be applied in impact assessment (IA) to a greater extent, since some development proposals pose a risk of significant impacts throughout the interconnected activities of product systems. Multiple authors have proposed the usage of life cycle assessment (LCA) for such analytical advancement, but little to no research on this tool application has been founded in IA practice so far. The aim of this article is to elaborate further on the gains assigned to application of LCA. The research builds on a review of 85 Danish IA reports, which were analysed for analytical appropriateness and application of LCT. Through a focus on the non-technical summary, the conclusion and the use of specific search words, passages containing LCT were searched for in each IA report. These passages were then analysed with a generic framework. The results reveal that LCT is appropriate for most of the IAs, but that LCA is rarely applied to provide such a perspective. Without LCA, the IAs show mixed performance in regard to LCT. Most IAs do consider the product provision of development proposals, but they rarely relate impacts to this function explicitly. Many IAs do consider downstream impacts, but assessments of upstream, distant impacts are generally absent. It is concluded that multiple analytical gains can be attributed to greater application of LCA in IA practice, though some level of LCT already exists. - Highlights: • Life cycle thinking is appropriate across the types and topics of impact assessment. • Yet, life cycle assessment is rarely used for adding such perspective. • Impact assessment practice does apply some degree of life cycle thinking. • However, application of life cycle assessment could bring analytical gains.

  5. Which medical error to disclose to patients and by whom? Public preference and perceptions of norm and current practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Qadire Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disclosure of near miss medical error (ME and who should disclose ME to patients continue to be controversial. Further, available recommendations on disclosure of ME have emerged largely in Western culture; their suitability to Islamic/Arabic culture is not known. Methods We surveyed 902 individuals attending the outpatient's clinics of a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia. Personal preference and perceptions of norm and current practice regarding which ME to be disclosed (5 options: don't disclose; disclose if associated with major, moderate, or minor harm; disclose near miss and by whom (6 options: any employee, any physician, at-fault-physician, manager of at-fault-physician, medical director, or chief executive director were explored. Results Mean (SD age of respondents was 33.9 (10 year, 47% were males, 90% Saudis, 37% patients, 49% employed, and 61% with college or higher education. The percentage (95% confidence interval of respondents who preferred to be informed of harmful ME, of near miss ME, or by at-fault physician were 60.0% (56.8 to 63.2, 35.5% (32.4 to 38.6, and 59.7% (56.5 to 63.0, respectively. Respectively, 68.2% (65.2 to 71.2 and 17.3% (14.7 to 19.8 believed that as currently practiced, harmful ME and near miss ME are disclosed, and 34.0% (30.7 to 37.4 that ME are disclosed by at-fault-physician. Distributions of perception of norm and preference were similar but significantly different from the distribution of perception of current practice (P Conclusions We conclude that: 1 there is a considerable diversity in preferences and perceptions of norm and current practice among respondents regarding which ME to be disclosed and by whom, 2 Distributions of preference and perception of norm were similar but significantly different from the distribution of perception of current practice, 3 most respondents preferred to be informed of ME and by at-fault physician, and 4 one third of respondents preferred to be

  6. Review of current practices and requirements for the inspection of prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Code requirements for pre- and in-service inspection of prestressed concrete pressure vessels as utilized in gas-cooled reactors are reviewed and compared with practices and experiences during construction, commissioning, and operation of such reactors. The pre-service inspection relies heavily on embedded instrumentation for measurements of stresses, temperatures, and displacements. The same instrumentation is later used for in-service surveillance, which additionally includes visual examination of exposed surfaces, monitoring of tendon conditions, and measurement of tendon loads. Improvement of present monitoring instrumentation and/or techniques, rather than development of new in-service inspection methods, is recommended

  7. Management of Patients With Venous Leg Ulcers: Challenges and Current Best Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Peter J; Barker, Judith; Collier, Mark; Gethin, Georgina; Haesler, Emily; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Laeuchli, Severin; Mosti, Giovanni; Probst, Sebastian; Weller, Carolina

    2016-06-01

    Introduction It is well documented that the prevalence of venous leg ulcers (VLUs) is increasing, coinciding with an ageing population. Accurate global prevalence of VLUs is difficult to estimate due to the range of methodologies used in studies and accuracy of reporting. (1) Venous ulceration is the most common type of leg ulceration and a significant clinical problem, affecting approximately 1% of the population and 3% of people over 80 years of age (2) in westernised countries. Moreover, the global prevalence of VLUs is predicted to escalate dramatically, as people are living longer, often with multiple comorbidities. Recent figures on the prevalence of VLUs are based on a small number of studies, conducted in Western countries, and the evidence is weak. However, it is estimated that 93% of VLUs will heal in 12 months, and 7% remain unhealed after five years. (3) Furthermore, the recurrence rate within 3 months after wound closure is as high as 70%. (4) (-6) Thus, cost-effective adjunct evidence-based treatment strategies and services are needed to help prevent these ulcers, facilitate healing when they occur and prevent recurrence. The impact of a VLU represents social, personal, financial and psychological costs on the individual and further economic drain on the health-care system. This brings the challenge of providing a standardised leg ulcer service which delivers evidence-based treatment for the patient and their ulcer. It is recognised there are variations in practice and barriers preventing the implementation of best practice. There are patients not receiving appropriate and timely treatment in the initial development of VLUs, effective management of their VLU and preventing recurrence once the VLU has healed. Health-care professionals (HCPs) and organisations must have confidence in the development process of clinical practice guidelines and have ownership of these guidelines to ensure those of the highest quality guide their practice. These systematic

  8. Too Anxious to Speak? The Implications of Current Research into Selective Mutism for Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleave, Hayley

    2009-01-01

    Selective Mutism is a low incidence disorder but has considerable impact on the school system when it occurs. Over the last decade several research articles have been published which have challenged the understanding of the aetiology of Selective Mutism. Current perceptions about the aetiology of Selective Mutism are considered in order to inform…

  9. The State of Knowledge of Outdoor Orientation Programs: Current Practices, Research, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brent J.; Gass, Michael A.; Nafziger, Christopher S.; Starbuck, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor orientation programs represent a prominent area of experiential education with over 25,000 participants annually. More than 191 outdoor orientation programs currently operate in the United States and Canada. The research examining outdoor orientation programs consists of 25 peer-reviewed published studies and 11 dissertations. A new theory…

  10. Testing for Accountability: A Balancing Act That Challenges Current Testing Practices and Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Koretz, in his article published in this issue, provides compelling arguments that the high stakes currently associated with accountability testing lead to behavioral changes in students, teachers, and other stakeholders that often have negative consequences, such as inflated scores. Koretz goes on to argue that these negative consequences require…

  11. Current internal-dosimetry practices at US Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal dosimetry practice at DOE facilities were characterized. The purpose was to determine the size of the facilities' internal dosimetry programs, the uniformity of the programs among the facilities, and the areas of greatest concern to health physicists in providing and reporting accurate estimates of internal radiation dose and in meeting proposed changes in internal dosimetry. The differences among the internal-dosimetry programs are related to the radioelements in use at each facility and, to some extent, the number of workers at each facility. The differences include different frequencies in the use of quality control samples, different minimum detection levels, different methods of recording radionuclides, different amounts of data recorded in the permanent record, and apparent differences in modeling the metabolism of radionuclides within the body. Recommendations for improving internal-dosimetry practices include studying the relationship between air-monitoring/survey readings and bioassay data, establishing uniform methods for recording bioassay results, developing more sensitive direct-bioassay procedures, establishing a mechanism for sharing information on internal-dosimetry procedures among DOE facilities, and developing mathematical models and interactive computer codes that can help quantify the uptake of radioactive materials and predict their distribution in the body. 19 refs., 8 tabs

  12. Fast track anesthesia for liver transplantation: Review of the current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniskevich, Stephen; Pai, Sher-Lu

    2015-09-18

    Historically, patients undergoing liver transplantation were left intubated and extubated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after a period of recovery. Proponents of this practice argued that these patients were critically ill and need time to be properly optimized from a physiological and pain standpoint prior to extubation. Recently, there has been a growing movement toward early extubation in transplant centers worldwide. Initially fueled by research into early extubation following cardiac surgery, extubation in the operating room or soon after arrival to the ICU, has been shown to be safe with proper patient selection. Additionally, as experience at determining appropriate candidates has improved, some institutions have developed systems to allow select patients to bypass the ICU entirely and be admitted to the surgical ward after transplant. We discuss the history of early extubation and the arguments in favor and against fast track anesthesia. We also described our practice of fast track anesthesia at Mayo Clinic Florida, in which, we extubate approximately 60% of our patients in the operating room and send them to the surgical ward after a period of time in the post anesthesia recovery unit. PMID:26380654

  13. SRT and SBRT: Current practices for QA dosimetry and 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major feature that separates stereotactic radiation therapy (cranial SRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) from conventional radiation treatment is the delivery of large doses in a few fractions which results in a high biological effective dose (BED). In order to minimize the normal tissue toxicity, quality assurance of the conformation of high doses to the target and rapid fall off doses away from the target is critical. The practice of SRT and SBRT therefore requires a high-level of confidence in the accuracy of the entire treatment delivery process. In SRT and SBRT confidence in this accuracy is accomplished by the integration of modern imaging, simulation, treatment planning and delivery technologies into all phases of the treatment process; from treatment simulation and planning and continuing throughout beam delivery. In this report some of the findings of Task group 101 of the AAPM will be presented which outlines the best-practice guidelines for SBRT. The task group report includes a review of the literature to identify reported clinical findings and expected outcomes for this treatment modality. Information in this task group is provided for establishing an SBRT program, including protocols, equipment, resources, and QA procedures.

  14. Woodchip bioreactors for N-source reduction in a highly managed agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kult, K.; Jones, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Excess nutrification and the resulting hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico are increasingly understood to originate in managed landscapes of the Upper Mississippi River basin. Nitrogen inputs to cropped fields are high in landscapes with soils containing high organic nitrogen content that, when mineralized, releases nitrogen in the soluble nitrate form. These in situ sources supply extensive subsurface drainage systems that rapidly transport nitrogen to streams and ultimately the Gulf. Aggressive in-field N management can reduce loading to streams, but will not reduce loads to sufficiently impact Gulf hypoxia. Edge of Field (EOF) treatment will be needed to reach water quality objectives. Denitrification bioreactors are one technology being studied for practical and economical EOF nitrate reduction. Bioreactors intercept the high-N tile-drain effluent with woodchip substrates that provide carbon and energy to support denitrification. Iowa Soybean Association (ISA) installed six bioreactors. Design of the ISA bioreactors has focused on the diameter of the field tile and the catchment area. Designs balance discharge with retention times. The bioreactors have been designed to have a 4-hour hydraulic retention time (HRT) capable of treating 20% of peak flow. Denitrification is assumed to follow zero-order kinetics given the high NO3 concentrations in the studied systems. Aerobic organisms must deplete DO sufficiently so anaerobic denitrifying organisms can compete. Insufficient HRT results in unsatisfactory NO3 reductions. Conditions favoring incomplete denitrification can lead to emission of the greenhouse gas N2O. Excessive retention times allow for complete denitrification enabling SO4-reducing bacteria to thrive. This produces undesirable results: conversion of SO4 to H2S, C-source depletion, production of toxic CH3Hg+, and methanogenesis. A flow control structure (FCS) allows for management of HRT by modifying the position of stop logs. Increased HRT reduces the amount

  15. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-04-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/3/2001 through 4/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, we are continuing to evaluate candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and we are expanding the test facilities in preparation for scaled up system-level testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) has been selected for further investigations because of its favorable growth properties. (2) Research on optimal conditions for the growth of cyanobacterial isolates from YNP should be carried out using distilled water which has more stable chemical parameters, although tap water use may be permissible during full scale operations (at the cost of longer organism doubling times). (3) Tr. 9.4 WF is able to generate a biofilm on an Omnisil surface. Over the long term Omnisil does not inhibit the growth of TR 9.4 isolate, though it does elongate the lag phase of growth of this isolate. (4) Initial survivability tests for the TR 9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 modelscale bioreactor are underway. We have experienced problems keeping the organisms alive for more than three days, but we are currently investigating several possible causes for this unexpected result. (5) Accelerated materials testing have shown that Omnisil fabric has acceptable strength properties for use in a practical bioreactor system. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) Several CO{sub 2} scrubbing experiments have been completed in the translating slug flow test system, however the error introduced by the

  16. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A

  17. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  18. Establishing Liver Bioreactors for In Vitro Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Sofia P; Costa, Rita; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M

    2015-01-01

    In vitro systems that can effectively model liver function for long periods of time are fundamental tools for preclinical research. Nevertheless, the adoption of in vitro research tools at the earliest stages of drug development has been hampered by the lack of culture systems that offer the robustness, scalability, and flexibility necessary to meet industry's demands. Bioreactor-based technologies, such as stirred tank bioreactors, constitute a feasible approach to aggregate hepatic cells and maintain long-term three-dimensional cultures. These three-dimensional cultures sustain the polarity, differentiated phenotype, and metabolic performance of human hepatocytes. Culture in computer-controlled stirred tank bioreactors allows the maintenance of physiological conditions, such as pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature, with minimal fluctuations. Moreover, by operating in perfusion mode, gradients of soluble factors and metabolic by-products can be established, aiming at resembling the in vivo microenvironment. This chapter provides a protocol for the aggregation and culture of hepatocyte spheroids in stirred tank bioreactors by applying perfusion mode for the long-term culture of human hepatocytes. This in vitro culture system is compatible with feeding high-throughput screening platforms for the assessment of drug elimination pathways, being a useful tool for toxicology research and drug development in the preclinical phase. PMID:26272143

  19. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrenc

  20. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn H. Hjertager

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-dimensional models of flow processes in bioreactors are presented. Particular emphasis is given to models that use the two-fluid technique. The models use a two-equation turbuluence model and a Monod type kinetic reaction model. Predictions are given for both bubble column and mechanically stirred reactors.

  1. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios;

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor technology exists for a couple of decades, but has not yet overwhelmed the market due to some serious drawbacks of which operational cost due to fouling is the major contributor. Knowledge buildup and optimisation for such complex systems can heavily benefit from mathematical...

  2. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  3. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 30CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppor...

  4. Current strategies in the farm practices and post-harvest pesticidal defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Molinari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today, people often talk about biologic agriculture and Integrated Production (IP, even if the real meaning of these terms is altered. In both cases, they deal with production methods characterized by a particular attention to the reduction of the environmental impact of all the farm practices used, especially for defence from adversities, being the element of major concern for environment and consumers’ health.Farm practice evolution, especially those about pest defence, is based on important conceptual change, accurate scientific analysis and organization of technical assistance, rationalization of agri-pharmaceutical product use is one of the main objective of Integrated Production Specifications (IPS. The quantitative reduction is the first objective, obtained by various means such as the use of efficient equipment and the qualitative selection based on the priority use of minor impact means, effectiveness being equal. At post-harvest, the anti-parasitary defence is undergoing deep changes in our country. Once, pesticides very toxic and persistent were used; however, in the last years the availability of active principles (a.p. usable on foodstuffs or in productive environments; for instance, methyl bromide use has been progressively reduced till its banishment because it is recognized to damage the ozone layer. Thus, on the whole we can talk about “integrated pest management” even for the post-harvest sector. However, substantial differences exist between agriculture and post-harvest, thus the integrated pest management in food production environment has to be designed in a different way. The fundamental element of this technique is to identify a tolerance threshold to pest attack but for the defence of food industries and stored foodstuffs is very difficult, if not impossible, to fix a limit to insect presence after which intervening is compulsory. Monitoring of pest attacks and the implementation of prevention practices is

  5. Superheroes in autoimmune warfare: biologic therapies in current South African practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, G; Hodkinson, B; Reuter, H

    2014-11-01

    Biologic drugs targeting immune cells or cytokines underlying systemic inflammation have dramatically improved outcomes in patients with rheumatological and autoimmune diseases. Nine biologic drugs are currently available in South Africa (SA)--all showing good efficacy and safety profiles. Their high cost and potential adverse events preclude them from being used as first-line agents. They are therefore indicated for severe disease refractory to standard therapies, and their use must be initiated by a specialist. The most important adverse effect of this class of drugs is infection and, in SA, tuberculosis is of particular concern. As new targets in the immune system are identified, new biologics will be developed. The current challenges are to optimise standard care for all patients with autoimmune diseases, and to offer the appropriate biologic to patients with refractory disease. PMID:25909121

  6. New measures for new roles: defining and measuring the current practices of health sciences librarians

    OpenAIRE

    Scherrer, Carol S.; Jacobson, Susan

    2002-01-01

    The roles of academic health sciences librarians are continually evolving as librarians initiate new programs and services in response to developments in computer technology and user demands. However, statistics currently collected by libraries do not accurately reflect or measure these new roles. It is essential for librarians to document, measure, and evaluate these new activities to continue to meet the needs of users and to ensure the viability of their professional role. To determine wha...

  7. Private Finance Initiative (PFI) for Road Projects in UK: Current Practice with a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Akbiyikli, Rifat; Dikmen, Seyyit Umit; Eaton, David

    2011-01-01

    The long-term sustainable provision of new and high quality maintained road stock is vitally important, especially in times of economic constraint such as Europe is currently experiencing. The Private Finance Initiative (PFI) is one method of financing such large-scale, capital intensive projects. An important aspect of this form of financing projects is that the risks are borne not only by the sponsors but are shared by different types of investors such as equity holders, debt providers, and...

  8. Nutrition support in the United States, what is the current practice?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia S. Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Clinical nutrition in the United States encompasses a vast continuum of nutrition:from the process of identification of malnutition to the management and prevention of obesity. This presentation with focus on the current pratice of nutrition support in the United States. Nutrition support is the provision of specially formulated and/or delivered parenteral or enteral nutrients to maintain or restore optimal nutrition status.

  9. Postmethod Pedagogy and reflective practice: current stance of Turkish EFL teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Dağkıran, İpek

    2015-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. Current discussions about the methods in English language teaching show the dissatisfaction with the outcomes of the implementations of the conventional teaching methods. The postmethod pedagogy argues that traditional methods have limiting and limited effects on both language learners and teachers. In this sense, postmethod pedagogy, which highlights the importance of location specific, contextsensitive and teacher-generated educationa...

  10. [Management of acute pain therapy: guidelines, recommendations and current practice in german hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Organisational requirements and the education and training of stuff provide the basis for an adequate supply of quality in acute pain and should be the focus of efforts. Although organizational recommendations of the German guideline on "treatment of acute perioperative and post-traumatic pain" have been increasingly established in practice within the last few years, in many German hospitals there is still lagging far behind in the implementation of general supply conditions, such as regular pain measurement or the introduction of appropriate standardized treatment protocols for all areas of the hospital.As specialized care structures acute pain services have been implemented in 80% of the German hospitals, but only 45% of them meet quality criteria. Due to the heterogeneous realization of acute pain management in different hospitals, it comes apparent, that general guideline recommendations and binding definitions are required to achieve adequate supply conditions. PMID:26863643

  11. Prevention of supine hypotensive syndrome in pregnant women undergoing computed tomography - A national survey of current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Supine hypotensive syndrome (SHS) can occur in women in the second half of pregnancy due to compression of the aorta and inferior vena cava by the gravid uterus. This results in a decrease in cardiac output with effects ranging from transient asymptomatic hypotension to cardiovascular collapse. SHS can be easily avoided by left lateral tilt positioning. We undertook a nationwide survey to assess the awareness amongst senior computed tomography (CT) radiographers of the potential risk of SHS in women in this patient group, and to identify the extent to which preventative practices and protocols are in place. Methods and materials: A questionnaire was sent to superintendent CT radiographers at all acute NHS Trusts in England and Wales examining awareness of the risk of SHS and the preventative practices and protocols currently used. Results: Completed questionnaires were received from 64% institutions. Of respondents who scan women in this patient group, only 44% were aware of the risk of SHS. No institution had a written protocol specifying positioning of women in this patient group. Seventy-five percent of institutions never employed oblique positioning. Eighty-five percent felt that specific guidelines from the Society of Radiographers or Royal College of Radiologists would be helpful. Conclusion: Current awareness and practices for preventing this easily avoidable but potentially harmful condition are inadequate. Central guidance would be welcomed by a large majority of respondents.

  12. Prevention of supine hypotensive syndrome in pregnant women undergoing computed tomography - A national survey of current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Michelle A.; Fenwick, Alison [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Queen' s Medical Centre Campus, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Derby Road, Nottingham, NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Banks, Amelia [Department of Anaesthesia, City Hospital Campus, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Hucknall Road, Nottingham, NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); Dineen, Robert A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Queen' s Medical Centre Campus, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Derby Road, Nottingham, NG7 2UH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Robert.dineen@nhs.net

    2009-05-15

    Aim: Supine hypotensive syndrome (SHS) can occur in women in the second half of pregnancy due to compression of the aorta and inferior vena cava by the gravid uterus. This results in a decrease in cardiac output with effects ranging from transient asymptomatic hypotension to cardiovascular collapse. SHS can be easily avoided by left lateral tilt positioning. We undertook a nationwide survey to assess the awareness amongst senior computed tomography (CT) radiographers of the potential risk of SHS in women in this patient group, and to identify the extent to which preventative practices and protocols are in place. Methods and materials: A questionnaire was sent to superintendent CT radiographers at all acute NHS Trusts in England and Wales examining awareness of the risk of SHS and the preventative practices and protocols currently used. Results: Completed questionnaires were received from 64% institutions. Of respondents who scan women in this patient group, only 44% were aware of the risk of SHS. No institution had a written protocol specifying positioning of women in this patient group. Seventy-five percent of institutions never employed oblique positioning. Eighty-five percent felt that specific guidelines from the Society of Radiographers or Royal College of Radiologists would be helpful. Conclusion: Current awareness and practices for preventing this easily avoidable but potentially harmful condition are inadequate. Central guidance would be welcomed by a large majority of respondents.

  13. Single level cervical disc herniation: A questionnaire based study on current surgical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrishamkar Saeid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative procedures like simple discectomy, with or without fusion and with or without instrumentation, for single level cervical disc herniation causing neck pain or neurological compromise have been described and are largely successful. However, there is a debate on definitive criteria to perform fusion (with or without instrumentation for single level cervical disc herniation. Hence, we conducted a questionnaire based study to elicit the opinions of practicing neurosurgeons. Materials and Methods: About 148 neurosurgeons with atleast 12 years of operative experience on single level cervical disc herniation, utilizing the anterior approach, were enrolled in our study. All participating neurosurgeons were asked to complete a practice based questionnaire. The responses of 120 neurosurgeons were analysed. Results: The mean age of enrolled surgeons was 51 yrs (range 45-73 with mean surgical experience of 16.9 yrs (range 12-40 yrs on single level cervical disc herniation. Out of 120 surgeons 10(8% had 15-25 years experience and always preferred fusion with or without instrumentation and six (five per cent with 17-27 yrs experience had never used fusion techniques. However, 104 (87% surgeons with 12-40 yrs experience had their own criteria based on their experiences for performing fusion with graft and instrumentation (FGI, while. 85 (75% preferred auto graft with cage. Conclusions: Most of surgeons performed FGI before the age of 40, but for others, patient criteria such as job (heavier job, physical examination (especially myelopathy and imaging findings (mild degenerative changes on X-ray and signal change in the spinal cord on MRI were considered significant for performing FGI.

  14. The Profile of Patients and Current Practice of Treatment of Upper Limb Muscle Spasticity with Botulinum Toxin Type A: An International Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    To document the current practice in relation with the treatment of patients with upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A to inform future research in this area. We designed an international, cross-sectional, noninterventional survey of current practice. Nine hundred and seventy-four patients from 122 investigational centres in 31…

  15. Single Phase Current-Source Active Rectifier for Traction: Control System Design and Practical Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Michalik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been motivated by industrial demand for single phase current-source active rectifier dedicated for reconstruction of older types of dc machine locomotives. This paper presents converters control structure design and simulations. The proposed converter control is based on the mathematical model and due to possible interaction with railway signaling and required low switching frequency employs synchronous PWM. The simulation results are verified by experimental tests performed on designed laboratory prototype of power of 7kVA

  16. Current industrial practice of managing risks in product development project portfolios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, R.; Oehmen, Josef; Ben-Daya, M.;

    2013-01-01

    influences them. The objective of this paper is two-fold: First, based on a literature review and industry focus group discussions, we introduce a new model for describing portfolio-level risks. It consists of three types of risks (escalated risks, common cause risks, and cascading risks) based on 9 types of...... currently executed in industry. The paper describes the results of a survey with n=43 participants, investigating the frequency and impact of portfolio risks, and the influence of the interdependencies on the portfolio risks....

  17. Recommended protocols based on a survey of current practice in genotoxicity testing laboratories: study evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillinger, R L; Nestmann, E R; Sigal, E A; Swierenga, S H

    1991-02-01

    The approach used in the survey of current methodologies used in mammalian cell genotoxicity testing (unscheduled DNA synthesis, mutation, cell transformation and cytogenetics testing) is discussed. The recommended protocols, described in the preceding papers, were developed using responses to detailed questionnaires. This summary outlines general observations related to the survey methodology and to the protocols themselves. Also discussed are the qualities of an effective survey; the evolution of a survey and of a protocol; and the contributions and limitations of this study. PMID:1996127

  18. Antioxidant compounds in Salvia officinalis L. shoot and hairy root cultures in the nutrient sprinkle bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Grzegorczyk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the production of compounds with antioxidant activity in hairy root and shoot cultures of Salvia officinalis grown in laboratory-scale sprinkle nutrient bioreactors. HPLC analysis showed that production of rosmarinic acid in transformed roots (34.65 ±1.07 mg l-1 was higher that in shoot culture (26.24 ±0.48 mg l-1. In the latter diterpenoids: carnosic acid (1.74 ±0.02 mg l-1 and carnosol (1.34 ±0.01 mg l-1 were also found. Biomass accumulation after a growth period in the bioreactor was also studied. An 18-fold increase in hairy root biomass was recorded after 40 days of culture. In sage shoot culture, biomass increased 43 times after 21 days of bioreactor run. The current operating conditions of the bioreactor were not suitable for the propagation of Salvia officinalis mainly due to the hyperhydricity problem of leaves and stems.

  19. Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    Practice refers to a characteristic way professionals use common standards to customize solutions to a range of problems. Practice includes (a) standards for outcomes and processes that are shared with one's colleagues, (b) a rich repertoire of skills grounded in diagnostic acumen, (c) an ability to see the actual and the ideal and work back and forth between them, (d) functional artistry, and (e) learning by doing that transcends scientific rationality. Communities of practice, such as dental offices, are small groups that work together in interlocking roles to achieve these ends. PMID:19413050

  20. Intranasal live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine: does not challenge current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Influenza vaccination of children is only justified when there is a risk of serious influenza complications. In 2012, a live attenuated vaccine for intranasal administration was authorised in the European Union for influenza prevention in individuals aged from 2 to less than 18 years. This type of vaccine has been available in the United States since 2003. Clinical evaluation of this live vaccine is based on three non-inferiority trials versus an injected inactivated vaccine. There are no specific trials in children at risk of serious influenza complications. Only one of these trials was double-blinded. Two trials involved children with a history of respiratory problems. Symptomatic influenza confirmed by viral culture was less frequent in these three trials after intranasal vaccination than after injection of the conventional vaccine (about 3 to 5% and 6 to 10%, respectively). There was no difference between the vaccines in terms of clinical complications of influenza, especially asthma exacerbations. Adverse effects attributed to the intranasal vaccine mainly consisted of local reactions such as rhinorrhoea and nasal congestion, as well as flu-like syndromes. Wheezing, respiratory tract infections and hospitalisation were more frequent with the intranasal vaccine than with the injected vaccine in children aged less than 1 year and in children with a history of severe respiratory illness. The intranasal vaccine is contraindicated in these children. The intranasal vaccine contains live attenuated virus strains and is therefore contraindicated in immunocompromised patients. US pharmacovigilance data suggest that severe allergic reactions to the intranasal vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and transmission of vaccine viruses to contacts are very rare. Intranasal administration seems to be more practical, especially for children. In practice, there is no firm evidence that this live attenuated influenza vaccine has any clinical advantages over injected vaccines

  1. The global momentum for smokefree public places: best practice in current and forthcoming smokefree policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BA G Griffith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Global Smokefree Partnership has recently prepared a map of smokefree campaigns and policies around the world. It focuses primarily on countries that are parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, but other countries were included. The smokefree status of 172 countries was mapped. Of these countries, 31 (18.0% have established comprehensive smokefree policies, either nationally or at state or city level - best practice; 25 (14.6% are planning to implement smokefree policies in 2008 or 2009; and 51(29.6% are making significant progress with smokefree policies. Only 65 countries (37.8% have limited or no smokefree polices. A selection of countries representing best practices in smokefree policies or planning to implement smokefree policies in 2008 or 2009 is highlighted. They illustrate the significant global momentum for smokefree policies, the success of established policies, the importance of civil society and the sharing of experience between countries.El Global Smokefree Partnership recién completó un mapa de las campañas para promover políticas de ambientes libres de humo (ALH a nivel mundial. El mapa se centra en los países Partes al Convenio Marco para el Control del Tabaco de la OMS, aunque otros países también se incluyen, y documenta el estatus de 172 países en el tema de los ALH. De estos países, 31 (18.0% tienen políticas comprehensivas de ALH, a nivel nacional, provincial, y/o estatal - mejores prácticas; 25 (14.6% prevén la implementación de políticas de ALH en 2008 o 2009; y 51 (29.6% han progresado significativamente con estas políticas. Sólo 65 países (37.8% no tienen políticas de ALH, o sólo políticas limitadas en este ámbito. Este ensayo destaca una selección de países que representan las mejores prácticas en las políticas de ALH o que prevén la implementación de estas políticas en 2008 o 2009, con tal de ilustrar el movimiento global hacia los ambientes libres de humo; el

  2. Prisoners as research participants: current practice and attitudes in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Anna; Rid, Annette; Davies, Hugh; Draper, Heather

    2016-04-01

    The use of prisoners as research participants is controversial. Efforts to protect them in response to past exploitation and abuse have led to strict regulations and reluctance to involve them as participants. Hence, prisoners are routinely denied the opportunity to participate in research. In the absence of comprehensive information regarding prisoners' current involvement in research, we examined UK prisoners' involvement through review of research applications to the UK National Research Ethics Service. We found that prisoners have extremely limited access to research participation. This analysis was augmented by a survey of those involved in research and research governance (UK researchers and Research Ethics Committee members). Our results suggest that pragmatic concerns regarding the perceived burden of including prisoners are far more prominent in motivating their exclusion than ethical concerns or knowledge of regulations. While prisoners may remain a vulnerable research population due to constraints upon their liberty and autonomy and the coercive nature of the prison environment, routine exclusion from participation may be disadvantageous. Rigorous ethical oversight and the shift in the prevailing attitude towards the risks and benefits of participation suggest that it may be time for research to be more accessible to prisoners in line with the principle of equivalence in prison healthcare. We suggest the necessary first step in this process is a re-examination of current guidance in the UK and other countries with exclusions. PMID:24958334

  3. A microbial fuel cell–membrane bioreactor integrated system for cost-effective wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► An MFC–MBR integrated system for wastewater treatment and electricity generation. ► Stable electricity generation during 1000-h continuous operation. ► Low-cost electrode, separator and filter materials were adopted. -- Abstract: Microbial fuel cell (MFC) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) are both promising technologies for wastewater treatment, but both with limitations. In this study, a novel MFC–MBR integrated system, which combines the advantages of the individual systems, was proposed for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery. The system favored a better utilization of the oxygen in the aeration tank of MBR by the MFC biocathode, and enabled a high effluent quality. Continuous and stable electricity generation, with the average current of 1.9 ± 0.4 mA, was achieved over a long period of about 40 days. The maximum power density reached 6.0 W m−3. Moreover, low-cost materials were used for the reactor construction. This integrated system shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application.

  4. Numerical investigation of a bubble-column photo-bioreactor design for biodiesel production from microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, I.H.; Lee, I.B.; Hwang, H.S.; Hong, S.W.; Bitog, J.P.; Kwon, K.S.; Choi, J.S.; Song, S.H. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Democratic People' s Republic of). Dept. of Rural Systems Engineering and Research Inst. for Agriculture and Life Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Biodiesel made from vegetable oil is among the most desirable of renewable energy sources because it can be a substitute for diesel oil. However, biodiesel from soybean or corn can be confronted with a food crisis. Microalgae is a new biodiesel source which contains high oil lipids with a high growth rate, and which also offers value-added products from the residue, such as cosmetics, health functional food or pharmaceuticals. Microalgae are best cultivated in photo-bioreactors (PBRs) where light, nutrients, carbon dioxide and temperature can be controlled. Despite the current availability of PBRs, only a few can be practically used for mass production. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used in this study to design an optimum bubble-column PBR for mass production of microalgae. Multi-phase models including bubble movement, meshes and time step independent tests were considered to develop the 3-dimensional CFD model. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) tests were used to enhance and validate the model. Different types of PBRs were simulated and compared quantitatively with the microalgae's growth model.

  5. Quantification of current practice in pediatric roentgenography for organ dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of data on pediatric technique factors that allows the adaptation of the Monte Carlo dosimetry method to infants and children. A survey of five hospitals in the Baltimore-Washington area, and additional records from two large hospitals, have provided data on the relative frequencies and types of radiographic procedures perfomed on infants and children. The frequencies and types of radiographic procedures were determined for five age groups: birth to 6 months, 7 months to 18 months, 4 to 6 years, 9 to 11 years, and 14 to 16 years. Excluding examinations of the limbs, the procedures that constituted 1 percent or more of the cumulative total for an age group were investigated further. The projections usually associated with those examinations were determined and adapted to five reference child phantoms corresponding to the five survey age groups. For each projection, the x-ray beam quality, exposure geometry and field size, and location on the patient were simulated on the child phantoms, based on the survey data. In order to represent the variations seen in practice, most projection descriptions include two field sizes and three x-ray beam qualities

  6. Sexual practices and psychosocial correlates of current condom use among Chinese gay men in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi-yan; Tang, Catherine So-kum

    2004-04-01

    This study examined sexual practices, condom use, and psychosocial correlates of condom use in a convenience sample of 187 Chinese gay men in Hong Kong. Among those who were sexually active and answered the item on condom use (n = 164), 22% never used condoms, 39% were inconsistent condom users, and 39% used condoms every time they engaged in sexual activities in the past 6 months. Compared to inconsistent and noncondom users, consistent condom users had more positive feelings toward condom use, perceived greater vulnerability to STD/AIDS infections, showed greater self-acceptance and disclosure of their homosexual sexual orientation, were more involved with local gay communities, endorsed more favorable attitudes toward coming out, and had a lower level of perceived discrimination because of their homosexual sexual orientation. The two groups did not differ significantly on perceived partner reaction to condom use. Results of a logistic regression analysis showed that positive feelings toward condom use were the most salient correlate of consistent condom use. PMID:15146148

  7. Cellulite treatment: evidence and ethics, brief history, and emphasis on current practices including liposuction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2005-04-01

    According to Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary "cellulite" is defined as: "a non-technical term for subcutaneous deposits of fat, especially in the buttocks, legs, and thighs." These deposits result in puckered, dimply skin and they are a cause for major aesthetic concerns in affected patients. The etiology of this condition is still unclear. Female predilection is witnessed in clinical practice as it is reported in the literature. It remains a subject for further studies whether it is a structural problem of connective tissue or as suggested probably related to hormonal causes. Magnetic resonance imaging may provide some answers to these questions. Not knowing what is causing this nuisance makes it almost impossible to treat. No wonder that there is little scientific validation to support any of the many treatments that are advertised on the Internet or in women's magazines. This review focuses on mechanical and microinvasive interventions that claim to alleviate "cellulite": lipoplasty, liposcultpure, liposuction, subcision, and laser. Among the parameters analyzed are the proposed modes of action of these techniques as well as adverse events and complications that may occur. Of special interest will be the evidence that backs these procedures. Extracting reliable data is hampered by methodical problems with the design of most of the published trials. In essence, at this time there is no "cure" for cellulite. Safe treatment recommendations are related to healthy life style choices that include toning exercises, dietary changes, and weight loss.

  8. Current practice of public involvement activities in biomedical research and innovation: a systematic qualitative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Lander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A recent report from the British Nuffield Council on Bioethics associated 'emerging biotechnologies' with a threefold challenge: 1 uncertainty about outcomes, 2 diverse public views on the values and implications attached to biotechnologies and 3 the possibility of creating radical changes regarding societal relations and practices. To address these challenges, leading international institutions stress the need for public involvement activities (PIAs. The objective of this study was to assess the state of PIA reports in the field of biomedical research. METHODS: PIA reports were identified via a systematic literature search. Thematic text analysis was employed for data extraction. RESULTS: After filtering, 35 public consultation and 11 public participation studies were included in this review. Analysis and synthesis of all 46 PIA studies resulted in 6 distinguishable PIA objectives and 37 corresponding PIA methods. Reports of outcome translation and PIA evaluation were found in 9 and 10 studies respectively (20% and 22%. The paper presents qualitative details. DISCUSSION: The state of PIAs on biomedical research and innovation is characterized by a broad range of methods and awkward variation in the wording of objectives. Better comparability of PIAs might improve the translation of PIA findings into further policy development. PIA-specific reporting guidelines would help in this regard. The modest level of translation efforts is another pointer to the "deliberation to policy gap". The results of this review could inform the design of new PIAs and future efforts to improve PIA comparability and outcome translation.

  9. Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis in Otolaryngologist Practice: A Review of Current Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Joanna; Krajewski, Wojciech; Krajewski, Piotr; Kręcicki, Tomasz

    2016-03-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an idiopathic vasculitis of medium and small arteries, characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. GPA typically affects upper and lower respiratory tract with coexisting glomerulonephritis. This disease is generally characterized by antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA), nevertheless, there are rare cases with negative ANCA. GPA affects people at any age, with predominance of the sixth and seventh decade of life. In 80%-95% of the patients the first symptoms of GPA are otorhinolaryngological manifestations of head and neck including nose/sinuses, ears, eyes, larynx/trachea, oral cavity, and salivary glands. Diagnosis of GPA is based on Criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. In clinical practice diagnosis, the presence of distinctive ANCA antibodies and biopsy of affected organ are crucial. GPA must be differentiated from neoplastic, infectious or inflammatory ulcerative lesions of the head and neck. The standard treatment procedure is divided into two essential phases, induction and maintenance. The induction phase is based on combination of systemic corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy, whereas the maintenance phase comprises corticosteroids and azathioprine/methotrexate supplementation. Surgical treatment ought to be considered for patients who are not responding to pharmacotherapy. PMID:26976020

  10. Current waste-management practices and operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for efficient management of industrial chemical wastes, especially those considered hazardous or radioactive, is receiving increased attention in the United States. During the past five years, several federal laws have addressed the establishment of stronger programs for the control of hazardous and residual wastes. At a facility such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an efficient waste management program is an absolute necessity to ensure protection of human health and compliance with regulatory requirements addressing the treatment and disposal of hazardous, nonhazardous, and radioactive wastes. This report highlights the major regulatory requirements under which the Laboratory must operate and their impact on ORNL facilities. Individual waste streams, estimates of quantities of waste, and current waste management operations are discussed

  11. Civility and workplace bullying: resonance of Nightingale's persona and current best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fidelindo A; Bernstein, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Conflict or aggression occurring between and among healthcare workers is undermining attempts to create a culture of safety in the workplace. Healthcare occupations have higher rates of workplace bullying (WPB), and intimidating behavior across healthcare settings has been shown to foster medical errors, increase the cost of care, and contribute to poor patient satisfaction and preventable adverse outcomes. WBP is also partially responsible for the high attrition among nurses, a particular concern in the current nursing shortage. Through a narrative that explores Florence Nightingale's professional persona and experience, this article outlines various factors that contribute to incivility and WPB, and provides suggestions for curriculum design that may help preempt incivility in tomorrow's nurses. PMID:24955475

  12. Current waste-management practices and operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.; Coobs, J.H.; Weeter, D.W.

    1982-09-01

    The need for efficient management of industrial chemical wastes, especially those considered hazardous or radioactive, is receiving increased attention in the United States. During the past five years, several federal laws have addressed the establishment of stronger programs for the control of hazardous and residual wastes. At a facility such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an efficient waste management program is an absolute necessity to ensure protection of human health and compliance with regulatory requirements addressing the treatment and disposal of hazardous, nonhazardous, and radioactive wastes. This report highlights the major regulatory requirements under which the Laboratory must operate and their impact on ORNL facilities. Individual waste streams, estimates of quantities of waste, and current waste management operations are discussed.

  13. Former Soviet Regulations for seismic design of NPPs and comparison with current international practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostarev, V.; Schukin, A.; Berkovski, A. [CKTI-Vibroseism Co. Ltd. (Cape Verde)

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents a summary of current earthquake design criteria used in former Soviet Regulations for equipment and piping systems of nuclear power plants in light of those used in United States and Japan. The detailed comparative seismic analysis of PWR (WWER) Primary Coolant Loop System (PCLS) according to Former Soviet (Russian) PNAE Code and ASME BPV Code with some comments regarding to Japan Code JEAG - 4601 was undertaken for better understanding of the differences and coincidences of seismic design criteria and requirements. The selection of these three guides for the study has very simple explanation: according to ASME BVPC, JEAG and PNAE the huge majority of existing NPPs has been designed. (J.P.N.)

  14. Environmental assessment of waste management in Greenland: current practice and potential future developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisted, Rasmus; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2013-01-01

    waste are collected separately and exported to Europe. The impacts from the current waste management system were modelled from a life-cycle perspective using the LCA-waste model EASEWASTE. Impacts with regard to global warming, acidification, etc. are small (a few hundred person-equivalents (PE......) for a system serving 56 000 inhabitants), but significant environmental loads are caused by air emissions from the incinerators and leachate from the landfills. Several alternative management scenarios were modelled and results show that increased use of incineration, full utilization of the heat production...... for district heating and separation of hazardous waste probably could improve Greenland’s waste management system. Segregation of recyclable materials as paper, cardboard and biowaste will do little to environmentally improve the waste management system due to loss of energy recovery from incineration...

  15. Waste management in the Irkutsk Region, Siberia, Russia: Environmental assessment of current practice focusing on landfilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Rechberger, Helmut;

    2014-01-01

    years, the LCA modelling showed that introduction of a new and modern landfill with gas and leachate collection could improve the performance of the waste management system significantly. Collection of landfill gas and utilization for 30 years for electricity production (gas turbine) would reduce......The municipal waste management system of the region of Irkutsk is described and a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed to assess the environmental performance of the system. Annually about 500 000 tons of waste are managed. The waste originates from three sources: household waste (27%), commercial...... waste (23%) and office & institutional waste (44%). Other waste of unknown composition constitutes 6%. Only 3% of the waste is recycled; 97% of the municipal waste is disposed of at the old Alexandrovsky landfill. The environmental impact from the current system is dominated by the landfill, which has...

  16. Former Soviet Regulations for seismic design of NPPs and comparison with current international practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of current earthquake design criteria used in former Soviet Regulations for equipment and piping systems of nuclear power plants in light of those used in United States and Japan. The detailed comparative seismic analysis of PWR (WWER) Primary Coolant Loop System (PCLS) according to Former Soviet (Russian) PNAE Code and ASME BPV Code with some comments regarding to Japan Code JEAG - 4601 was undertaken for better understanding of the differences and coincidences of seismic design criteria and requirements. The selection of these three guides for the study has very simple explanation: according to ASME BVPC, JEAG and PNAE the huge majority of existing NPPs has been designed. (J.P.N.)

  17. Proton therapy for head and neck cancer: Rationale, potential indications, practical considerations, and current clinical evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a strong rationale for potential benefits from proton therapy (PT) for selected cancers of the head and neck because of the opportunity to improve the therapeutic ratio by improving radiation dose distributions and because of the significant differences in radiation dose distribution achievable with x-ray-based radiation therapy (RT) and PT. Comparisons of dose distributions between x-ray-based and PT plans in selected cases show specific benefits in dose distribution likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. However, the use of PT in head and neck cancers requires special considerations in the simulation and treatment planning process, and currently available PT technology may not permit realization of the maximum potential benefits of PT. To date, few clinical data are available, but early clinical experiences in sinonasal tumors in particular suggest significant improvements in both disease control and radiation-related toxicity

  18. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote Performance: A Reviewof Current Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-06-01

    Increasing levels of financial support for customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, provided through publicly-funded incentive programs, has heightened concerns about the long-term performance of these systems. Given the barriers that customers face to ensuring that their PV systems perform well, and the responsibility that PV incentive programs bear to ensure that public funds are prudently spent, these programs should, and often do, play a critical role in ensuring that PV systems receiving incentives perform well. To provide a point of reference for assessing the current state of the art, and to inform program design efforts going forward, we examine the approaches to encouraging PV system performance used by 32 prominent PV incentive programs in the U.S. We identify eight general strategies or groups of related strategies that these programs have used to address performance issues, and highlight important differences in the implementation of these strategies among programs.

  19. Current and future use of the mannitol bronchial challenge in everyday clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Backer, Vibeke; Joos, Guy;

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory Society (ERS) at the ERS Congress, Berlin 2008. RESULTS: Indirect challenge tests such as exercise testing, hypertonic saline or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) are more specific though less sensitive than direct challenge tests (such as methacholine) for identifying patients with active asthma....... Indirect BCTs may be used to diagnose exercise-induced bronchoconstriction or AHR consistent with active asthma, to evaluate AHR that will respond to treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs and to determine the effectiveness and optimal dosing of such therapy. An ideal indirect challenge test should be...... standardised and reproducible, and the test result should correlate with the degree of airway inflammation. The mannitol BCT provides a standardised and rapid point-of-need test to identify currently active asthma, and is clinically useful in the identification of patients with asthma who are likely to benefit...

  20. Aerosol delivery of antimicrobial agents during mechanical ventilation: current practice and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, Argyris; Metaxas, Eugenios I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2011-03-01

    Critically ill patients, who develop ventilator-associated pneumonia during prolonged mechanical ventilation, often require antimicrobial agents administered through the endotracheal or the tracheotomy tube. The delivery of antibiotics via the respiratory tract has been established over the past years as an alternative route in order to deliver high concentrations of antimicrobial agents directly to the lungs and avoid systemic toxicity. Since the only formal indications for inhaled/aerosolized antimicrobial agents is for patients suffering from cystic fibrosis, consequently the majority of research and published studies concerns this group of patients. Newer devices and new antibiotic formulations are currently off-label used in ambulatory cystic fibrosis patients whereas similar data for the mechanically ventilated patients do not yet exist. PMID:21235473

  1. Offshore produced water management: A review of current practice and challenges in harsh/Arctic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jisi; Chen, Bing; Thanyamanta, Worakanok; Hawboldt, Kelly; Zhang, Baiyu; Liu, Bo

    2016-03-15

    Increasing offshore oil and gas exploration and development in harsh/Arctic environments require more effective offshore produced water management, as these environments are much more sensitive to changes in water quality than more temperate climates. However, the number and scope of studies of offshore produced water management in harsh/Arctic environments are limited. This paper reviews the current state of offshore produced water management, impacts, and policies, as well as the vulnerability, implications and operational challenges in harsh/Arctic environments. The findings show that the primary contaminant(s) of concern are contained in both the dissolved oil and the dispersed oil. The application of emerging technologies that can tackle this issue is significantly limited by the challenges of offshore operations in harsh/Arctic environments. Therefore, there is a need to develop more efficient and suitable management systems since more stringent policies are being implemented due to the increased vulnerability of harsh/Arctic environments. PMID:26781453

  2. Animal Disease Import Risk Analysis--a Review of Current Methods and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, E J; Reese, R A; Thrush, M A

    2015-10-01

    The application of risk analysis to the spread of disease with international trade in animals and their products, that is, import risk analysis (IRA), has been largely driven by the Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) agreement of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The degree to which the IRA standard established by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and associated guidance, meets the needs of the SPS agreement is discussed. The use of scenario trees is the core modelling approach used to represent the steps necessary for the hazard to occur. There is scope to elaborate scenario trees for commodity IRA so that the quantity of hazard at each step is assessed, which is crucial to the likelihood of establishment. The dependence between exposure and establishment suggests that they should fall within the same subcomponent. IRA undertaken for trade reasons must include an assessment of consequences to meet SPS criteria, but guidance is sparse. The integration of epidemiological and economic modelling may open a path for better methods. Matrices have been used in qualitative IRA to combine estimates of entry and exposure, and consequences with likelihood, but this approach has flaws and better methods are needed. OIE IRA standards and guidance indicate that the volume of trade should be taken into account, but offer no detail. Some published qualitative IRAs have assumed current levels and patterns of trade without specifying the volume of trade, which constrains the use of IRA to determine mitigation measures (to reduce risk to an acceptable level) and whether the principle of equivalence, fundamental to the SPS agreement, has been observed. It is questionable whether qualitative IRA can meet all the criteria set out in the SPS agreement. Nevertheless, scope exists to elaborate the current standards and guidance, so they better serve the principle of science-based decision-making. PMID:24237667

  3. Why current breast pathology practices must be evaluated. A Susan G. Komen for the Cure white paper: June 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Cheryl; Balma, Diane; Garcia, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Ending breast cancer has long been the mission of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. To this end, the organization has a strong interest and proven track record in ensuring public investment in quality breast health and breast cancer care. Recently, Susan G. Komen for the Cure identified major issues in the practice of pathology that have a negative impact on the lives of thousands of breast cancer patients in the United States. These issues were identified through a comprehensive literature review and interviews conducted in 2005-2006 with experts in oncology, breast pathology, surgery, and radiology. The interviewees practiced in community, academic, and cooperative group settings. Komen for the Cure has identified four areas that have a direct impact on the quality of care breast cancer patients receive in the United States, the accuracy of breast pathology diagnostics, the effects of current health insurance, and reimbursement policies on patients who are evaluated for a possible breast cancer diagnosis, the substantial decrease in tissue banking participation, particularly during a time of rapid advances in biologically correlated clinical science and the role for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure, pathology professional societies and the Federal government in ensuring that breast pathology practices meet the highest possible standards in the United States Concerns surrounding the quality and practice of breast pathology are not limited to diagnostic accuracy. Other considerations include, training and proficiency of pathologists who are evaluating breast specimens, the lack of integration of pathologists in the clinical care team, inadequate compensation for the amount of work required to thoroughly analyze specimens, potential loss in translational research as a result of medical privacy regulations, and the lack of mandatory uniform pathology practice standards without any way to measure the degree of variation or to remedy it. PMID:17760664

  4. Living-donor kidney transplantation: a review of the current practices for the live donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Connie L; Delmonico, Francis L

    2005-07-01

    The first successful living-donor kidney transplant was performed 50 yr ago. Since then, in a relatively brief period of medical history, living kidney transplantation has become the preferred treatment for those with ESRD. Organ replacement from either a live or a deceased donor is preferable to dialysis therapy because transplantation provides a better quality of life and improved survival. The advantages of live versus deceased donor transplantation now are readily apparent as it affords earlier transplantation and the best long-term survival. Live kidney donation has also been fostered by the technical advance of laparoscopic nephrectomy and immunologic maneuvers that can overcome biologic obstacles such as HLA disparity and ABO or cross-match incompatibility. Congressional legislation has provided an important model to remove financial disincentives to being a live donor. Federal employees now are afforded paid leave and coverage for travel expenses. Candidates for renal transplantation are aware of these developments, and they have become less hesitant to ask family members, spouses, or friends to become live kidney donors. Living donation as practiced for the past 50 yr has been safe with minimal immediate and long-term risk for the donor. However, the future experience may not be the same as our society is becoming increasingly obese and developing associated health problems. In this environment, predicting medical futures is less precise than in the past. Even so, isolated abnormalities such as obesity and in some instances hypertension are no longer considered absolute contraindications to donation. These and other medical risks bring additional responsibility in such circumstances to track the unknown consequences of a live-donor nephrectomy. PMID:15930096

  5. Current practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India (WINGS-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manni Mohanraj Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To obtain information on existing practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs in India. Methods: Details regarding diagnostic criteria used, screening methods, management strategies, and the postpartum follow-up of GDM were obtained from physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs across 24 states of India using online/in-person surveys using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 3841 doctors participated in the survey of whom 68.6% worked in private clinics. Majority of OB/GYNs (84.9% preferred universal screening for GDM, and screening in the first trimester was performed by 67% of them. Among the OB/GYNs, 600 (36.7% reported using the nonfasting 2 h criteria for diagnosing GDM whereas 560 (29.4% of the diabetologists/endocrinologists reported using the same. However, further questioning on the type of blood sample collected and the glucose load used revealed that, in reality, only 208 (12.7% and 72 (3.8%, respectively, used these criteria properly. The survey also revealed that the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria was followed properly by 299 (18.3% of OB/GYNs and 376 (19.7% of physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists. Postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing was advised by 56% of diabetologists and 71.6% of OB/GYNs. Conclusion: More than half of the physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India do not follow any of the recommended guidelines for the diagnosis of GDM. This emphasizes the need for increased awareness about screening and diagnosis of GDM both among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India.

  6. Non-inferiority clinical trials: Practical issues and current regulatory perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep K Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-inferiority clinical trials are being performed with an increasing frequency now-a-days, because it helps in finding a new treatment that have approximately the same efficacy, but may offer other benefits such as better safety profile. Non-inferiority clinical trials aim to demonstrate that the test product is no worse than the comparator by more than a pre-specified small amount. There are several fundamental differences between non-inferiority and superiority trials. Some practical issues concerning the non-inferiority trials are assay sensitivity, choice of the non-inferiority margin, sample size estimation, choice of active-control, and analysis of non-inferiority clinical trials. For serious infections such as hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia/ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia, community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA has recently recommended that it is possible to define a reliable and consistent estimate of the efficacy of active treatment relative to placebo from available data, which can serve as the basis for defining a new inferiority margin for an active-controlled, non-inferiority trial. But for some indications with a high rate of resolution without antibacterial drug therapy such as acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS, acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB, and acute bacterial otitis media (ABOM, the US FDA has recommended that the available data will not support the use of a non-inferiority design and other trial designs (i.e., superiority designs should be used to provide the evidence of effectiveness in these three indications.

  7. Current practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India (WINGS-5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmi, Manni Mohanraj; Bhavadharini, Balaji; Maheswari, Kumar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Jebarani, Saravanan; Ninov, Lyudmil; Kayal, Arivudainambi; Malanda, Belma; Belton, Anne; Uma, Ram; Mohan, Viswanathan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To obtain information on existing practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs) in India. Methods: Details regarding diagnostic criteria used, screening methods, management strategies, and the postpartum follow-up of GDM were obtained from physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs across 24 states of India using online/in-person surveys using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 3841 doctors participated in the survey of whom 68.6% worked in private clinics. Majority of OB/GYNs (84.9%) preferred universal screening for GDM, and screening in the first trimester was performed by 67% of them. Among the OB/GYNs, 600 (36.7%) reported using the nonfasting 2 h criteria for diagnosing GDM whereas 560 (29.4%) of the diabetologists/endocrinologists reported using the same. However, further questioning on the type of blood sample collected and the glucose load used revealed that, in reality, only 208 (12.7%) and 72 (3.8%), respectively, used these criteria properly. The survey also revealed that the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria was followed properly by 299 (18.3%) of OB/GYNs and 376 (19.7%) of physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists. Postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing was advised by 56% of diabetologists and 71.6% of OB/GYNs. Conclusion: More than half of the physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India do not follow any of the recommended guidelines for the diagnosis of GDM. This emphasizes the need for increased awareness about screening and diagnosis of GDM both among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India. PMID:27186555

  8. Regulatory framework for Spanish NPP seismic revaluation: Past practice, current periodic safety review and future life extension trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper historical Spanish regulatory practice on seismic revaluation of nuclear power plants from a site point of view is presented. The Spanish NPP's vintages are very different (the oldest plant started his commercial operation in 1968 and the most recent did it in 1988). Applied plant seismic design has followed the state of the art of the knowledge at each moment, including for the oldest plants latter reevaluations to ensure a seismic level for safe shutdown according to current regulations. More recent approaches to know existing Seismic Margin beyond design basis has been performed for all together plants. Also results obtained from those reevaluations programs and plant improves adopted are presented. A simplified overview of current Periodical Safety Review licensing process followed in Spain, and some trends for future plant life extension from a site point of view are showed. (author)

  9. Biosecurity risks associated with current identification practices of producers trading live pigs at livestock sales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Jover, M; Schembri, N; Toribio, J-A L M L; Holyoake, P K

    2008-11-01

    Approximately 5% of pigs produced in Australia is believed to be traded at livestock sales. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with producers (106 and 30 producers, respectively), who traded pigs at livestock sales. The purpose of the study was to gather information on how producers identified their pigs in order to evaluate how these practices may impact the ability to trace pig movements in the event of an emergency animal disease outbreak or food safety hazard. Results were analyzed according to herd size (0 to 150 sows, 150+ sows) and location (peri-urban, regional) as prior studies suggested a higher biosecurity risk among smaller farms and due to perceptions that peri-urban farms pose additional risk. Most producers (91.5%) had less than 150 sows and a high proportion (70.8%) resided in regional areas compared with only 29.2% residing in peri-urban areas. A higher proportion of large-scale producers identified their pigs than small-scale producers. A third of small-scale producers reported not identifying breeding stock and most did not identify progeny. The most common forms of on-farm identification used were ear tags for breeding stock and ear notches for progeny. Producers identified breeding stock to assist with mating management and genetic improvement. Ear notches were used to determine the litter of origin of progeny. All large-scale producers owned a registered swine brand and used the official body tattoo for post-farm-gate identification. However, approximately 15% of small-scale producers did not own a registered swine brand, and an additional 8% did not identify their pigs post-farm-gate. Producers were satisfied with tattoos as a methodology for post-farm-gate identification of pigs and considered other methodologies cost-prohibitive. However, variations in the maintenance of the branding equipment, the type of ink used and the time of tattoo application in relation to the animal sale were highlighted during focus group

  10. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote Performance: A Reviewof Current Practice in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-10-06

    In the U.S., the increasing financial support for customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems provided through publicly-funded incentive programs has heightened concerns about the long-term performance of these systems. Given the barriers that customers face to ensuring that their PV systems perform well, and the responsibility that PV incentive programs bear to ensure that public funds are prudently spent, these programs should, and often do, play a critical role in addressing PV system performance. To provide a point of reference for assessing the current state of the art, and to inform program design efforts going forward, we examine the approaches to encouraging PV system performance used by 32 prominent PV incentive programs in the U.S. We identify eight general strategies or groups of related strategies that these programs have used to address factors that affect performance, and describe key implementation details. Based on this review, we then offer recommendations for how PV incentive programs can be effectively designed to mitigate potential performance issues.

  11. Recent evidence, advances, and current practices in surgical treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Shimoji, Masaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-11-01

    In the last 10-15 years, strategies and modalities of lung cancer treatment have changed dramatically. Meanwhile, the treatment objectives, the lung cancers themselves, have also changed, probably owing to early detection by computed tomography and aging of the population. In particular, the proportions of smaller lung cancers, lung adenocarcinomas with ground-glass opacity, and lung cancers in older patients are increasing. Along with these changes, surgeons have innovated and evaluated novel procedures for pulmonary resection. These include the application of minimally invasive surgical techniques, such as video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and robotic surgery, and sub-lobar resection, such as wedge resection and segmentectomy, for small peripheral lung cancers. Currently, VATS has gained wide acceptance and several institutions in Japan have started using robotic surgery for lung cancers. Two important clinical trials of sub-lobar resection for small peripheral lung cancers are now underway in Japan. In addition, surgery itself is of growing importance in lung cancer treatment. In particular, recent evidence supports the use of surgery in strictly selected patients with locally advanced disease, lung cancers with N2 lymph node metastases, small cell lung cancers, recurrent oligo-metastasis after pulmonary resection, or relapsed tumors after drug treatment. Surgical treatment also provides abundant tumor samples for molecular analysis, which can be used for drug selection in the adjuvant setting or after disease relapse. In the era of personalized treatment, surgery is still one of the most important treatment modalities to combat lung cancer. PMID:25453375

  12. SCO shipments from Rocky Flats - Experience and current practice [Surface Contaminated Object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Gary; Morris, Robert L.

    2001-01-10

    Decommissioning activities at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) are expected to generate approximately 251,000 cubic meters of low-level radioactive waste. Almost half of this will be characterized and shipped as the Department of Transportation ''Surface Contaminated Object'' (SCO) shipping class. In the 2 years since an SCO characterization method was implemented, almost 11,000 of the 18,000 cubic meters of low-level waste were SCO. RFETS experience to-date using an SCO waste characterization method has shown significant time and cost savings, reduced errors, and enhanced employee safety. SCO waste is characterized prior to packaging, near the point of generation, by any of the site's 300 Radiological Control Technicians using inexpensive radiological control survey instruments. This reduces on-site waste container moves and eliminates radiometric analysis at centrally located drum or crate counters. Containers too large for crate counters can also be characterized. Current instrumentation is not adequate to take full advantage of the SCO regulations. Future improvements in the SCO characterization and shipping process are focused on use of larger and/or reusable containers, extended-range instruments, and additional statistical methods, so that the full extent of the SCO regulations can be used.

  13. SCO shipments from Rocky Flats - Experience and current practice [Surface Contaminated Object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning activities at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) are expected to generate approximately 251,000 cubic meters of low-level radioactive waste. Almost half of this will be characterized and shipped as the Department of Transportation ''Surface Contaminated Object'' (SCO) shipping class. In the 2 years since an SCO characterization method was implemented, almost 11,000 of the 18,000 cubic meters of low-level waste were SCO. RFETS experience to-date using an SCO waste characterization method has shown significant time and cost savings, reduced errors, and enhanced employee safety. SCO waste is characterized prior to packaging, near the point of generation, by any of the site's 300 Radiological Control Technicians using inexpensive radiological control survey instruments. This reduces on-site waste container moves and eliminates radiometric analysis at centrally located drum or crate counters. Containers too large for crate counters can also be characterized. Current instrumentation is not adequate to take full advantage of the SCO regulations. Future improvements in the SCO characterization and shipping process are focused on use of larger and/or reusable containers, extended-range instruments, and additional statistical methods, so that the full extent of the SCO regulations can be used

  14. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Use in Bladder Cancer: A Survey of Current Practice and Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Cowan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Level 1 evidence supports the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC to improve overall survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer; however utilization rates remain low. The aims of our study were to determine factors associated with NAC use, to more clearly define reasons for low utilization, and to determine the current rate of NAC use among urologic oncologists. Materials and Methods. Active members of the Society for Urologic Oncology were provided a 20-question survey. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted for each question and univariate analysis was performed. Results. We achieved a response rate of 21%. Clinical T3/T4 disease was the most often selected reason for recommending NAC (87%. Concerns with recommending NAC were age and comorbidities (54% followed by delay in surgery (35%. An association was identified between urologic oncologists who discussed NAC with >90% of their patients and medical oncologists “always” recommending NAC (P=0.0009. NAC utilization rate was between 30 and 57%. Conclusions. Amongst this highly specialized group of respondents, clinical T3-T4 disease was the most common reason for implementation of NAC. Respondents who frequently discussed NAC were more likely to report their medical oncologist always recommending NAC. Reported NAC use was higher in this surveyed group (30–57% compared with recently published rates.

  15. Municipal solid waste (MSW) as a renewable source of energy: current and future practices in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan

    2010-06-01

    With rapid economic growth and massive urbanization, China faces the problem of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the pressing need for development of alternative energy. Waste-to-energy (WTE) incineration, which recovers energy from discarded MSW and produces electricity and/or steam for heating, is recognized as a renewable source of energy and is playing an increasingly important role in MSW management in China. This article provides an overview of the WTE industry, discusses the major challenges in expanding WTE incineration in China, namely, high capital and operational costs, equipment corrosion, air pollutant emissions, and fly ash disposal. A perspective on MSW as a renewable energy source in China is also presented. Currently, only approximately 13% of MSW generated in China is disposed in WTE facilities. With the significant benefits of environmental quality, the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and government policies and financial incentives as a renewable energy source, WTE incineration industry is expected to experience significant growth in the coming decade and make greater contribution to supplying renewable energy in China. PMID:20137912

  16. Biologic therapies in the metastatic colorectal cancer treatment continuum--applying current evidence to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marc; Price, Timothy

    2012-08-01

    More therapeutic options are now available than ever before for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and, as such, treatment decisions have become more complex. A multidisciplinary approach is, therefore, required to effectively manage these patients. In the past few years, many trials have reported on the value of combining biological agents, such as those targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A and epidermal growth factor receptors, with chemotherapy. However, despite the plethora of information now available, the optimal treatment strategy for patients with mCRC remains unclear. Indeed, the propensity of investigators to conduct clinical trials utilising a variety of chemotherapy backbones combined with the increased complexity of retrospectively incorporating analyses of genetic mutation status (e.g. KRAS and BRAF) have led to conflicting results for seemingly similar endpoints, particularly overall survival. As a result, guidelines that have been developed, whilst having some similarities, have distinct differences in terms of suggested therapeutic combinations. Therefore, here, we review and distil the currently available data reported from phase III trials of biologic agents in the first-, second- and third-line mCRC settings. PMID:21899955

  17. Bioreactors as a low cost option for tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioreactors are vessels designed for large-scale cell, tissue or organ culture in liquid media. Functionally, plant culture bioreactors can be divided into two broad types: those in which the cultures are immersed partially or temporarily in the medium, and those in which the cultures are continuously submerged. Bioreactors provide more precise control of the plant growth gaseous exchange, illumination, medium agitation, temperature and pH than the conventional culture vessels. Bioreactor-based propagation of plants can increase rate of multiplication and growth of cultures and reduce space, energy and labour requirements in commercial micropropagation. They can therefore be attractive to developing countries as regards new or expanding plant culture facilities, in combination with a conventional laboratory. However, to be cost- effective, use of bioreactors requires indexed plant cultures, and attention to aseptic procedures during handling of plant material. Hence, the integration of bioreactors into production systems should only be attempted by facilities with skilled and experienced propagators. (author)

  18. Waste management in the Irkutsk Region, Siberia, Russia: environmental assessment of current practice focusing on landfilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Rechberger, Helmut; Christensen, Thomas H

    2014-05-01

    The municipal waste management system of the region of Irkutsk is described and a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed to assess the environmental performance of the system. Annually about 500 000 tons of waste are managed. The waste originates from three sources: household waste (27%), commercial waste (23%) and office & institutional waste (44%). Other waste of unknown composition constitutes 6%. Only 3% of the waste is recycled; 97% of the municipal waste is disposed of at the old Alexandrovsky landfill. The environmental impact from the current system is dominated by the landfill, which has no gas or leachate collection system. The global warming contribution is due to the emission of methane of the order of 420 000 tons CO2-equivalents per year. Collection and transport of the waste are insignificant compared with impacts from the landfill. As the old landfill runs out of capacity in a few years, the LCA modelling showed that introduction of a new and modern landfill with gas and leachate collection could improve the performance of the waste management system significantly. Collection of landfill gas and utilization for 30 years for electricity production (gas turbine) would reduce the global warming completely and result in a net saving of 100 000 CO2-equivalents per year due to storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill beyond 100 years. Considering other first-order degradation rates for the landfilled organic matter did not overtly affect the results, while assumptions about the top cover oxidation of methane significantly affected the results. This shows the importance of controlling the gas escape from the landfill. PMID:24692457

  19. The Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching and Assessing: Current Practices at Polytechnics in Bangladesh and its Effects in Developing Students’ Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruque A. Haolader

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polytechnics in Bangladesh endeavour to produce quality graduates for national and international job markets. The quality of graduates depends on several factors. This study examines the implementation process of the polytechnic curriculum with the objectives of determining the current level of practices in learning/ teaching material design, in delivering curriculum content, in assessing students and its effect on students’ competence development. Data was collected through observation, opinion survey and competence test. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used for data interpretation and analysis in this descriptive type of research study. Findings revealed that the learning materials are mainly theory oriented and mostly cover those contents usually common in exams. About half of teachers are aware of the taxonomy for learning, teaching and assessing, but they rarely put importance on it. In the classroom, teachers spend only a little time for delivering content at the level of apply/analyse. However, a significant number of tasks performed in labs are practical and occupation relevant and can be classified at higher levels of the taxonomy. In student assessment, the test-items assess mainly theoretical knowledge at the level of remember. The effect of these practices is reflected in demonstrating student performance in a competence test. The study concludes with some recommendations.

  20. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature

  1. Modeling of a membrane bioreactor for production of biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the use of an enzymatic catalyst lipase, produced by Candida Antarctica a membrane bioreactor was modeled and simulated to obtain biodiesel from palm oil and ethanol. A conversion of 0.97 was reached for a residence time of 10.64 min. The membrane bioreactor was compared to a CSTR reactor, where a conversion of 0.76 was obtained. It was concluded that the membrane bioreactor is a better way of producing biodiesel than the CSTR

  2. Investigations concerning the use of membrane bioreactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane bioreactor systems are increasingly being used to clean leachates from landfills. Besides being compact they can, especially, be easily combined with further cleaning techniques. The paper first of all gives an overview on landfill leachate cleaning standards in Austria. A combination of processes is applied where the membrane bioreactor forms a preferred element. Finally, results are presented which should help with the dimensioning of membrane bioreactors. (orig.)

  3. Simulation of Temperature Control in Fermentation Bioreactor for Ethanol Production

    OpenAIRE

    MARGINEAN Calin; MARGINEAN Ana-Maria; TRIFA Viorel

    2012-01-01

    Present paper deals with aspects regardingthe simulation of fermentation bioreactor process andfermentation bioreactor control for ethanolproduction. The bioreactor model was implemented inMatlab Simulink and the results of simulation usingdifferent control strategies are presentedcomparatively. Three types of control strategy are usedrespectively, PID, Neural Network Model PredictiveController (NN-MPC) and Nonlinear Auto RegressiveMoving Average(NARMA-L2) control strategy.

  4. Current practice for diagnosis and management of silent atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobreanu, Dan; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Lewalter, Thorsten; Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Lip, Gregory Y H; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-08-01

    Although it is well known that silent atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with morbidity and mortality rates similar to those of symptomatic AF, no specific strategy for screening and management of this form of AF has been advocated. The purpose of this survey was to identify current practices for the diagnosis and management of silent AF. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network partners. Responses were received from 33 centres in 16 countries. The preferred screening methods for silent AF in patients with rhythm control by pharmacological therapy was 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) at outpatient visits (31.3%) and periodical 24 h Holter ECG recordings (34.4%), while after pulmonary vein isolation the corresponding figures were 6.3 and 65.6%, respectively. No consensus has been reached concerning the therapeutic approach for such patients. Most responders preferred rate control over rhythm control in patients with silent AF, although some favoured pulmonary vein isolation in young patients. However, oral anticoagulant therapy in patients at high thromboembolic risk was considered mandatory by most, provided that at least one episode of silent AF was documented, without recommending further investigations. The results of this survey have confirmed that there is currently no consensus regarding the screening and management of patients with silent AF and that clinical practice is not always consistent with the few existing evidence-based recommendations. PMID:23878150

  5. Regulatory aspects of oncology drug safety evaluation: Past practice, current issues, and the challenge of new drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drug development of new anti-cancer agents is streamlined in response to the urgency of bringing effective drugs to market for patients with limited life expectancy. FDA's regulation of oncology drugs has evolved from the practices set forth in Arnold Lehman's seminal work published in the 1950s through the current drafting of a new International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) safety guidance for anti-cancer drug nonclinical evaluations. The ICH combines the efforts of the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan, and the United States and the pharmaceutical industry from these three regions to streamline the scientific and technical aspects of drug development. The recent development of new oncology drug classes with novel mechanisms of action has improved survival rates for some cancers but also brings new challenges for safety evaluation. Here we present the legacy of Lehman and colleagues in the context of past and present oncology drug development practices and focus on some of the current issues at the center of an evolving harmonization process that will generate a new safety guidance for oncology drugs, ICH S9. The purpose of this new guidance will be to facilitate oncology drug development on a global scale by standardizing regional safety requirements.

  6. An audit of current practice and management of metastatic spinal cord compression at a regional cancer centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sui, J

    2012-02-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency requiring prompt recognition and management to preserve neurological function and mobility. We performed an audit to assess current practice of MSCC against current best practice as outlined by NICE. Our retrospective audit identified 10 patients from January to December 2009 with confirmed MSCC. The most common primary tumours were prostate 3 (30%), breast 3 (30%) and lung 2 (20%). Pain was the main presenting symptom 9 (90%), followed by weakness 7 (70%) and sensory changes 1 (10%). 5 (50%) had MRI within 24 hours and only 6 (60%) underwent full MRI scan. 8 (80%) had corticosteroids before MRI scan. 6 (60%) received radiotherapy within 24 hours. Only 4 (40%) were referred to orthopaedics and none of these patients had been recommended surgery. Up 14 days following radiological confirmation of MSCC, the number of patients who were unable to walk increased by 20%. Only 5 (50%) were discharged during this period of study. Our audit reported a number of variances in management compared to NICE guideline. These can be improved by following a\\'fast track\\' referral pathway and regular education for junior doctors and primary care doctors.

  7. Bulgarian Seismological and GPS/GNSS networks-current status and practical implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solakov, Dimcho; Simeonova, Stela; Georgiev, Ivan; Dimitrova, Lilia; Slavcheva, Krasimira; Raykova, Plamena

    2016-04-01

    responsible governmental authorities if necessary urgent activities to be undertaken. The available infrastructure - permanent GNSS stations, spread all over the country allow performing permanent monitoring of the Earth's crust movements on the basis of the obtained velocities of the permanent stations and the time series with their coordinates. Additional information for the current movements is obtained by the processing and analysis of the regular GNSS measurements of geodynamic network. In the GNSS Analysis Center are acquired, processed and analyzed data from more than 70 permanent stations on Bulgarian territory. In the analysis are included also data from permanent stations on the Balkan Peninsula and from the European Permanent Network. Along with the seismological and geological information, the quantitative assessment of the movements of the Earth's crust is of the substantial importance for monitoring of the active tectonic structures and is the base for the seismic hazard assessment.

  8. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote System Performance: AReview of Current Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-11-12

    rather than the rated capacity of the modules or system, are often suggested as one possible strategy. Somewhat less recognized are the many other program design options also available, each with its particular advantages and disadvantages. To provide a point of reference for assessing the current state of the art, and to inform program design efforts going forward, we examine the approaches to encouraging PV system performance - including, but not limited to, PBIs - used by 32 prominent PV incentive programs in the U.S. (see Table 1).1 We focus specifically on programs that offer an explicit subsidy payment for customer-sited PV installations. PV support programs that offer other forms of financial support or that function primarily as a mechanism for purchasing renewable energy credits (RECs) through energy production-based payments are outside the scope of our review.2 The information presented herein is derived primarily from publicly available sources, including program websites and guidebooks, programs evaluations, and conference papers, as well as from a limited number of personal communications with program staff. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. The next section presents a simple conceptual framework for understanding the issues that affect PV system performance and provides an overview of the eight general strategies to encourage performance used among the programs reviewed in this report. The subsequent eight sections discuss in greater detail each of these program design strategies and describe how they have been implemented among the programs surveyed. Based on this review, we then offer a series of recommendations for how PV incentive programs can effectively promote PV system performance.

  9. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrence of sulfate reduction was considered to be undesired. However, there are some recent developments in which sulfate reduction is optimized for the removal of sulfur compounds from waste streams. In...

  10. Control of Dissolved Oxygen in Stirred Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Åkesson, Mats; Hagander, Per

    1998-01-01

    This report discusses control of dissolved oxygen in a bioreactor where the oxygen supply is manipulated using the stirrer speed. In batch and fed-batch cultivations the operating conditions change significantly which may cause tuning problems. Analysis using a linearized process model shows that the process dynamics is mainly affected by changes in the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient $K_La$. % To account for the process variations, a control strategy based on PID control and gain sche...

  11. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Fawehinmi, Folasade

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment has historically been considered unsuitable for the treatment of domestic wastewaters. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the incorporation of membranes into the anaerobic bioreactor to uncouple solid retention time and hydraulic retention time. This in turn prevents biomass washout and allows sufficient acclimatisation periods for anaerobes. However, the exposure of membranes to anaerobic biomass comes with its own inherent problems namely fouling. Fouling w...

  12. Oxygen transfer in a pressurized airlift bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, Gilson; Ribeiro, Marcelo Perencin Arruda; Horta, Antônio Carlos Luperni; Giordano, Roberto Campos; Badino, Alberto Colli; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Airlift bioreactors (ALBs) offer advantages over conventional systems, such as simplicity of construction, reduced risk of contamination, and efficient gas-liquid dispersion with low power consumption. ALBs are usually operated under atmospheric pressure. However, in bioprocesses with high oxygen demand, such as high cell density cultures, oxygen limitation may occur even when operating with high superficial gas velocity and air enriched with oxygen. One way of overcoming this drawback is to pressurize the reactor. In this configuration, it is important to assess the influence of bioreactor internal pressure on the gas hold-up, volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a), and volumetric oxygen transfer rate (OTR). Experiments were carried out in a concentric-tube airlift bioreactor with a 5 dm(3) working volume, equipped with a system for automatic monitoring and control of the pressure, temperature, and inlet gas flow rate. The results showed that, in disagreement with previous published results for bubble column and external loop airlift reactors, overpressure did not significantly affect k(L)a within the studied ranges of pressure (0.1-0.4 MPa) and superficial gas velocity in the riser (0.032-0.065 m s(-1)). Nevertheless, a positive effect on OTR was observed: it increased up to 5.4 times, surpassing by 2.3 times the oxygen transfer in a 4 dm(3) stirred tank reactor operated under standard cultivation conditions. These results contribute to the development of non-conventional reactors, especially pneumatic bioreactors operated using novel strategies for oxygen control. PMID:25903476

  13. Immersed Membrane Bioreactors for Produced Water Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Brookes, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor for the duty of gas field produced water treatment was appraised. The system was operated under steady state conditions at a range of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentrations and treatment and membrane performance examined. Organics removal (COD and TOC) display removal rates between 90 and 97%. Removal of specific target compounds Benzene, Toulene, Ethylbenzene and Xylene were removed to above 99% in liquid phase...

  14. Engineering stem cell niches in bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells have the potential to be expanded and differentiated into various cell types in the body. Efficient differentiation of stem cells with the desired tissue-specific function is critical for stem cell-based cell therapy, tissue engineering, drug discovery and disease modeling. Bioreactors provide a great platform to regulate the stem cell microenvironment, known as “ni...

  15. Bioreactor Yields Extracts for Skin Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center researchers created a unique rotating-wall bioreactor that simulates microgravity conditions, spurring innovations in drug development and medical research. Renuèll Int'l Inc., based in Aventure, Florida, licensed the technology and used it to produce a healing skin care product, RE`JUVEL. In a Food and Drug Administration test, RE`JUVEL substantially increased skin moisture and elasticity while reducing dark blotches and wrinkles.

  16. Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Lousada-Ferreira, M

    2011-01-01

    The Thesis entitled “Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors” aims at explaining the relation between Mixed Liquid Suspended Solids (MLSS) concentration, the amount of solids in the wastewater being treated, also designated as sludge, and filterability, being the ability of the sludge to be filtrated through a membrane, in a wastewater treatment system designated as Membrane Bioreactor (MBR). An MBR is a wastewater treatment system that combines an activated sludge proc...

  17. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    OpenAIRE

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Van, Lier, G

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A self-forming dynamic membrane only requires a support material over which a cake layer is formed, which determines the rejection properties of the system. The present research studies the applicat...

  18. Replaceable Sensor System for Bioreactor Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Mike; Savoy, Steve; Bruno, John

    2006-01-01

    A sensor system was proposed that would monitor spaceflight bioreactor parameters. Not only will this technology be invaluable in the space program for which it was developed, it will find applications in medical science and industrial laboratories as well. Using frequency-domain-based fluorescence lifetime technology, the sensor system will be able to detect changes in fluorescence lifetime quenching that results from displacement of fluorophorelabeled receptors bound to target ligands. This device will be used to monitor and regulate bioreactor parameters including glucose, pH, oxygen pressure (pO2), and carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2). Moreover, these biosensor fluorophore receptor-quenching complexes can be designed to further detect and monitor for potential biohazards, bioproducts, or bioimpurities. Biosensors used to detect biological fluid constituents have already been developed that employ a number of strategies, including invasive microelectrodes (e.g., dark electrodes), optical techniques including fluorescence, and membrane permeable systems based on osmotic pressure. Yet the longevity of any of these sensors does not meet the demands of extended use in spacecraft habitat or bioreactor monitoring. It was therefore necessary to develop a sensor platform that could determine not only fluid variables such as glucose concentration, pO2, pCO2, and pH but can also regulate these fluid variables with controlled feedback loop.

  19. Aujeszky's disease virus production in disposable bioreactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Slivac; V Gaurina Srček; K Radošević; I Kmetič; Z Kniewald

    2006-09-01

    A novel, disposable-bag bioreactor system that uses wave action for mixing and transferring oxygen was evaluated for BHK 21 C13 cell line growth and Aujeszky’s disease virus (ADV) production. Growth kinetics of BHK 21 C13 cells in the wave bioreactor during 3-day period were determined. At the end of the 3-day culture period and cell density of 1.82 × 106 cells ml–1, the reactor was inoculated with 9 ml of gE- Bartha K-61 strain ADV suspension (105.9 TCID50) with multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.01. After a 144 h incubation period, 400 ml of ADV harvest was obtained with titre of 107.0 TCID50 ml–1, which corresponds to 40,000 doses of vaccine against AD. In conclusion, the results obtained with the wave bioreactor using BHK 21 C13 cells showed that this system can be considered as suitable for ADV or BHK 21 C13 cell biomass production.

  20. Towards a Tissue-Engineered Ligament: Design and Preliminary Evaluation of a Dedicated Multi-Chamber Tension-Torsion Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric P. Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering may constitute a promising alternative to current strategies in ligament repair, providing that suitable scaffolds and culture conditions are proposed. The objective of the present contribution is to present the design and instrumentation of a novel multi-chamber tension-torsion bioreactor dedicated to ligament tissue engineering. A preliminary biological evaluation of a new braided scaffold within this bioreactor under dynamic loading is reported, starting with the development of a dedicated seeding protocol validated from static cultures. The results of these preliminary biological characterizations confirm that the present combination of scaffold, seeding protocol and bioreactor may enable us to head towards a suitable ligament tissue-engineered construct.

  1. Biohydrogen production: prospects and limitations to practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen may be produced by a number of processes, including electrolysis of water, thermocatalytic reformation of hydrogen rich organic compounds, and biological processes. Currently, hydrogen is produced, almost exclusively, by electrolysis of water or by steam reformation of methane. Biological production of hydrogen (Biohydrogen) technologies provide a wide range of approaches to generate hydrogen, including Direct biophotolysis, Indirect Biophotolysis, Photo-fermentations, and Dark-fermentation. The practical application of these technologies to every day energy problems, however, is unclear. In order to assess which biohydrogen systems may be practical when combined with fuel cell technologies, we have calculated the size of biohydrogen bioreactors that would be required to power Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells of various sizes. Our analysis suggests that light-driven biohydrogen systems (Direct Photolysis, Indirect Photolysis, and Photo-fermentation) do not produce H2 at rates that are sufficient to power PEMFCs of sufficient size to be of practical use. Thermophilic and extreme thermophilic biohydrogen systems would require very large bioreactors (in the range of approximately 2900 L to 14,600 L) to provide sufficient H2 to power PEMFCs of 1.5 kW to 5.0 kW, respectively. Some Dark-fermentation systems, however, appear promising. Bioreactors of 500 L and 1000 L, designed so that H2 is rapidly removed from the culture medium, would be sufficient to power PEMFCs of 2.5 kW and 5.0 kW, respectively. Further research and development aimed at increasing rates of synthesis and final yields of H2 are essential if biohydrogen systems are to be of practical use. (author)

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Controlled Stirred Tank Bioreactor With Predator-Prey Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabiś Bolesław

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the dynamic characteristics of a continuous tank bioreactor for microbiological process, with a developed predator-prey food chain. The presence of the predator microorganism considerably influences the position and stability character of steady-states. There appears to exist a wide range of unstable steady-states and high-amplitude oscillations of state variables. Without automatic control, the system can operate only in unsteady conditions. From technological point of view, this circumstance is unfavorable. It was shown that oscillations can be removed by employing automatic control with continuous P or PI controllers. Moreover, the use of a controller with integrating element causes removal of the predator from the bioreactor. The paper discusses an application of this phenomenon for practical purposes.

  3. Non-disruptive measurement system of cell viability in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Nelsen, B. L.; Baselt, T.; Berger, T.; Wiele, M.; Prade, I.; Hartmann, P.

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient and oxygen transport, as well as the removal of metabolic waste are essential processes to support and maintain viable tissue. Current bioreactor technology used to grow tissue cultures in vitro has a fundamental limit to the thickness of tissues. Based on the low diffusion limit of oxygen a maximum tissue thickness of 200 μm is possible. The efficiency of those systems is currently under investigation. During the cultivation process of the artificial tissue in bioreactors, which lasts 28 days or longer, there are no possibilities to investigate the viability of cells. This work is designed to determine the influence of a non-disruptive cell viability measuring system on cellular activity. The measuring system uses a natural cellular marker produced during normal metabolic activity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a coenzyme naturally consumed and produced during cellular metabolic processes and has thoroughly been studied to determine the metabolic state of a cell. Measuring the fluorescence of NADH within the cell represents a non-disruptive marker for cell viability. Since the measurement process is optical in nature, NADH fluorescence also provides a pathway for sampling at different measurement depths within a given tissue sample. The measurement system we are using utilizes a special UV light source, to excite the NADH fluorescence state. However, the high energy potentially alters or harms the cells. To investigate the influence of the excitation signal, the cells were irradiated with a laser operating at a wavelength of 355 nm and examined for cytotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to develop a non-cytotoxic system that is applicable for large-scale operations during drug-tissue interaction testing.

  4. Effects of Varying Sludge Quality on the Permeability of a Membrane Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolopoulou - Kalkavoura, Varvara

    2014-01-01

    This master thesis firstly includes a theory part describing, the conventional municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and especially the conventional activated sludge (CAS) process. As Stockholm municipality want to retrofit the current activated sludge system at Henriksdal into a membrane bioreactor (MBR), an extensive description of the MBR and its advantages and disadvantages are included. Fouling is considered a really important issue for the operation of an MBR since it reduces an M...

  5. Submerged membrane bioreactor for domestic wastewater treatment and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mediterranean basin (and particularly North African countries) is one of the poorest regions in the world in terms of water resources. In Tunisia, treated municipal wastewater is becoming one of the main alternative sources of water. Indeed, in 2007, 99 municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) has treated a quantity of 215 millions of m3 from which more than 30 pour cent are reused. The treated volume in 2011 is expected to be 266 millions m3, whereas the reused wastewaters should reach more than 50 pour cent. However, especially in the eastern and northern Mediterranean regions, wastewaters are inefficiently treated and re-used for irrigation or sanitary purposes, serving as a carrier for diseases or causing water pollution when discharged to water bodies. In the last decade, several water treatment technologies have been used in the region with little success in pathogen removal. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology is a very promising alternative to those conventional water treatments as membranes act as a barrier against bacteria and viruses achieving a high degree of water purification. However, most membrane bioreactors currently in use have very high running costs because of the high pressure drop and high air-flushing rate required for their operation. The objective of this PURATREAT FP 6 EU project was to study a new approach to the operation of membrane bioreactors. This study was included a comparison of three leading membrane technologies. The operating procedure to be studied is expected to yield very low energy consumption and reduced maintenance costs. After the start up period, the MBR3 was operated with a MLSS concentration of 4.5 and 9 g/L, respectively. Different fluxes as 16, 18, 20 and 22 Lh-1m-2 were tested. When the flux increase from 16 to 22 Lh-1m-2, the treatment energy consumption decreased from 7 to 5 kWh/m3. However the increases of MLSS concentration from 4.5 and 9 g/L raise the membrane fouling frequency from 1 time every 3

  6. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-07-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2001 through 7/01/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts are focused on improving the design of the bioreactor test system, evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Our collection of cyanobacteria, isolated in YNP was increased to 15 unialgal cultures. (2) Illumination rate about 50 {micro}E/m{sup 2}/sec is not saturated for the growth of 1.2 s.c. (2) isolate. The decrease of illumination rate led to the decrease of doubling time of this isolate. (3) The positive effect of Ca{sup 2+} on the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) without Omnisil was revealed, though Ca{sup 2+} addition was indifferent for the growth of this isolate at the presence of Omnisil. (4) Calcium addition had a positive effect on the generation of cyanobacterial biofilm on Omnisil surface. (5) The survivability problems with the Tr9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 model-scale bioreactor have been solved. The problems were related to the method used to populate the growth surfaces. When pre-populated screens were placed in the bioreactor the microalgae died within 72 hours, but when the microalgae were cultured while in place in the bioreactor using a continuous-population method they grew well inside of the CRF2 test system and survived for the full 7-day test duration. CRF2 tests will continue as soon as the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe

  7. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Valsami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization.

  8. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  9. Are current practices adequate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Events related to safeguards during the last year are reviewed. Present needs are a clear statement of safeguards objectives, more Federal funds, and design of facilities for easier safeguards. It is felt that effective safeguards can be implemented at relatively low overall cost to industry. C. Walske's presentation of the AIF position is strongly endorsed. (U.S.)

  10. Analysis of the Current Nutrient Management Practices in Semi-Arid Areas of Eastern Kenya: A Nutmon Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Declining soil fertility caused mainly by continuous cultivation without adequate replenishment of nutrients, is a major factor contributing to low crop yields in the arid and semi arid areas of Kenya. Development of appropriate nutrient management strategies for suitable agricultural production in these areas is, therefore, a priority issue. in the study reported here, analyses of the current nutrient management practices were carried out using the nutrient monitoring (NUTMON) approach in order to create farm house-hold awareness on nutrient management aspects. The procedure involved participatory soil and nutrient flow maps and soil sampling at farm level. laboratory analysis of the soil samples was later carried out. Structured questionnaires were used for systematic collection of information on farm management practices in order to quantify flows of materials with emphasis on soil nutrients and cash. Results of the laboratory soil analysis were also presented to the farmers and discussed during feedback sessions. The test was carried out in three places namely, Kibwezi, Kasikeu and Kiomo. In all the three clusters, off-farm income was an important component of the total family income. Farm net cash flow was highest in Kibwezi cluster due to horticultural crop production activities. Household net cash flow was highest in Kasikeu, largely originating from off-farm income. It was concluded that NUTMON methodology appeared a suitable tool for the diagnostic of the farming system analysis and design in the arid and semi-arid lands of Kenya

  11. Comparison of current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran with American Society of Extracorporeal Technology’s standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravan, Amir; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Alireza; Toutounchi, Mohammad Zia; Ghanbari, Ameneh; Mazloomi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Standards have a significant role in showing the minimum level of optimal optimum and the expected performance. Since the perfusion technology staffs play an the leading role in providing the quality services to the patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this study aimed to assess the standards on how Iranian perfusion technology staffs evaluate and manage the patients during the cardiopulmonary bypass process and compare their practice with the recommended standards by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Methods: In this descriptive study, data was collected from 48 Iranian public hospitals and educational health centers through a researcher-created questionnaire. The data collection questionnaire assessed the standards which are recommended by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Results: Findings showed that appropriate measurements were carried out by the perfusion technology staffs to prevent the hemodilution and avoid the blood transfusion and unnecessary blood products, determine the initial dose of heparin based on one of the proposed methods, monitor the anticoagulants based on ACT measurement, and determine the additional doses of heparin during the cardiopulmonary bypass based on ACT or protamine titration. It was done only in 4.2% of hospitals and health centers. Conclusion: Current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran are inappropriate based on the standards of American Society of Cardiovascular Perfusion. This represents the necessity of authorities’ attention to the validation programs and development of the caring standards on one hand and continuous assessment of using these standards on the other hand. PMID:27489600

  12. Oral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Riordain, Richeal

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the current knowledge and practices of general medical practitioners (GMPs) in Ireland regarding the examination of the oral cavity and the detection of oral malignancy and the training they had received at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and since commencing in practice. A questionnaire survey of GMPs in Ireland was conducted. One hundred and fifty four (65.3%) of the practitioners reported regularly examining the oral mucosa of their patients. Almost half of these (n=68) further qualified this response by stating that they only examined the oral mucosa if the patient reported pain in this area or if the patient specifically requested an oral examination for some reason. Eighty one (34.3%) practitioners surveyed felt confident in their ability to detect oral malignancies with the remaining two thirds unsure of whether they would be able to detect oral cancer. There was a significant association between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on examination of the oral cavity and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=4.811, p<0.05]. A statistically significant association was also found between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on the diagnosis of oral malignant disease and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=6.194, p<0.05]. In conclusion the level of knowledge of Irish general medical practitioners needs to be addressed with appropriate initiatives both at undergraduate level and via CME.

  13. TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING – A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated

  14. Practical aspects of treatment with target specific anticoagulants: initiation, payment and current market, transitions, and venous thromboembolism treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Charles E

    2015-04-01

    Target specific anticoagulants (TSOACs) have recently been introduced to the US market for multiple indications including venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention in total hip and knee replacement surgeries, VTE treatment and reduction in the risk of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Currently, three TSOACs are available including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and dabigatran with edoxaban currently under Food and Drug Administration review for VTE treatment and stroke prevention in NVAF. The introduction of these agents has created a paradigm shift in anticoagulation by considerably simplifying treatment and anticoagulant initiation for patients by giving clinicians the opportunity to use a rapid onset, rapid offset, oral agent. The availability of these rapid onset TSOACs is allowing for outpatient treatment of low risk pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis which can greatly reduce healthcare costs by avoiding inpatient hospitalizations and treatment for the disease. Additionally with this practice, the complications of an inpatient hospitalization may also be avoided such as nosocomial infections. Single-agent approaches with TSOACs represent a paradigm shift in the treatment of VTE versus the complicated overlap of a parenteral agent with warfarin. Transitions between anticoagulants, including TSOACs, are a high-risk period for the patient, and clinicians must carefully consider patient characteristics such as renal function as well as the agents that are being transitioned. TSOAC use appears to be growing slowly with improved payment coverage throughout the US. PMID:25605686

  15. Current Practices and Implementation of Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources in Industrial Radiography in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper aims to illustrate the current level of maturity on the compliance to the international regulatory requirements on safety and security of radioactive sources in the Philippines as perceived by the licensees themselves through the implementation of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) as the regulatory body. The study showed that current practices and implementation of radiation safety in the use of radioactive sources in industrial radiography as perceive by the operators showed that out of the 38 questions, only five questions got an answer of ‘No’ (i.e. only 13.1% of the respondents are not compliant to the requirements — while 86.9% could be compliant). On the implementation of the security of radioactive sources, which was answered by senior managers, out of 14 respondents, 6, 1 and 5 respondents answered levels 3, 4 and 5, respectively. Therefore, the current security level of the licensees according to their perception showed the following: 50% at level 3, 8.33% at level 4 and 41.6% at level 5. The paper recommends that national regulatory requirements should be harmonized with the international standards and that continuing awareness and training programme should be carried out both for the operating organization and the regulators. The continued compliance to the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources and the development and promotion of safety and security culture among radiographers and the regulators shall be one of the outcomes of the paper. (author)

  16. A test facility for fritted spargers of production-scale-bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieblist, C; Aehle, M; Pohlscheidt, M; Jenzsch, M; Lübbert, A

    2011-01-01

    The production of therapeutic proteins requires qualification of equipment components and appropriate validation procedures for all operations. Since protein productions are typically performed in bioreactors using aerobic cultivation processes air sparging is an essential factor. As recorded in literature, besides ring spargers and open pipe, sinter frits are often used as sparging elements in large scale bioreactors. Due to the manufacturing process these frits have a high lot-to-lot product variability. Experience shows this is a practical problem for use in production processes of therapeutic proteins, hence frits must be tested before they can be employed. The circumstance of checking quality and performance of frits as sparging elements was investigated and various possibilities have been compared. Criteria have been developed in order to evaluate the sparging performance under conditions comparable to those in production bioreactors. The oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k ( L ) a) was chosen as the evaluation criterion. It is well known as an essential performance measure for fermenters in the monoclonal antibody production. Therefore a test rig was constructed able to automatically test frit-spargers with respect to their k ( L ) a-values at various gas throughputs. Performance differences in the percent range could be detected. PMID:21161376

  17. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Final samples from Mir and Earth appeared histologically cartilaginous throughout their entire cross sections (5-8 mm thick), with the exception of fibrous outer capsules. Constructs grown on Earth (A) appeared to have a more organized extracellular matrix with more uniform collagen orientation as compared with constructs grown on Mir (B), but the average collagen fiber diameter was similar in the two groups (22 +- 2 nm) and comparable to that previously reported for developing articular cartilage. Randomly oriented collagen in Mir samples would be consistent with previous reports that microgravity disrupts fibrillogenesis. These are transmission electron micrographs of constructs from Mir (A) and Earth (B) groups at magnifications of x3,500 and x120,000 (Inset). The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  18. The results of an Australian and New Zealand Survey on the current practice of chest immobilisation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine how widely chest immobilisation and 3D planning are currently being used, a survey was sent to each Chief Radiation Therapist of Australia (31) and New Zealand (6) in 2001. Questions were focused to radiation therapy practice when planning and treating patients with lung cancer with curative intent. There was a high response rate of 86 per cent (32/37) from the Radiation Oncology Departments of Australia (26/31) and New Zealand (6/6). 87.5 per cent (28/32) of departments use chest immobilisation (Australia, 22/26; New Zealand, 6/6) and of these, 82.1 per cent (23/28) use a 3D planning system. Furthermore, 78.6 per cent (22/28) practice conformal therapy. There are three main devices for chest immobilisation that are routinely used in Australia and one in New Zealand. The devices comprise: a) Personally contoured chest immobilisation (6/22) such as Vac Fix(Registered Trade Mark). This was the only device used in New Zealand. b) Adjustable chest immobilisation (7/22), consisting of movable shoulder and hand support such as Wing Board (Med-Tec(Registered Trade Mark)) or a device created in the department. c) A device comprised of (a) and (b), utilising the personalised contoured device and adjustable hand and shoulder supports (9/22). The results also showed that 65.6% (21/32) of users of chest immobilisation and no immobilisation reported satisfaction with the devices utilised in their department. Chest immobilisation was routinely used in 90.5% (19/21) of these departments. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  19. The current status of radiopharmacy laboratories in Turkey, conveniences to good radiopharmacy practice (GRP) and quality management systems (ISO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study ha been conducted in the Radiopharmacy Laboratories of Nuclear Medicine departments of various hospitals and private nuclear medicine laboratories. A total of 35 laboratories from 7 regions of Turkey have been selected by layered sampling method from 131 Radiopharmacy Laboratories located in 30 different cities. During the study, a GRP investigation list with 67 questions and direct communication technique have been used. The aim was determine the current status of the Radiopharmacy Laboratories in general and the administration of radiopharmaceuticals on patients, and good practices in radiopharmacy and conformance with quality assurance systems. In this respect, questions have been asked to determine a) General status, b) Information level of lab workers regarding to the GRP and ISO concepts (i-Status of lab managers, ii- Responsibilities and knowledge of lab workers and iii- regarding to GRP and ISO-9000), c) Conditions of infrastructure, and lab services and its quality, d) Status of organizations. Results showed that only two of the 35 managers of laboratories were radiopharmacists, the rest were Nuclear Medicine specialists. There were less knowledge on GRP than ISO, the labs holding ISO certificate were in minority even though ISO is known concept, radiopharmacist were more knowledgeable in GRP while nuclear medicine specialists were in ISO, the labs with better GRP knowledge have better infrastructure, the GRP knowledge were better in the university and armed forces hospitals while ISO knowledge and certificates were more in private labs and hospitals, the armed forces hospitals better paraphernalia, practically almost all radiopharmaceutical kits were imported goods and there were important problems in quality control

  20. Dual-Purpose Bioreactors to Monitor Noninvasive Physical and Biochemical Markers of Kidney and Liver Scaffold Recellularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzarski, Joseph S; Bijonowski, Brent M; Wang, Bo; Ward, Heather H; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Miller, William M; Wertheim, Jason A

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of perfusion-based bioreactors for organ engineering and a detailed evaluation of physical and biochemical parameters that measure dynamic changes within maturing cell-laden scaffolds are critical components of ex vivo tissue development that remain understudied topics in the tissue and organ engineering literature. Intricately designed bioreactors that house developing tissue are critical to properly recapitulate the in vivo environment, deliver nutrients within perfused media, and monitor physiological parameters of tissue development. Herein, we provide an in-depth description and analysis of two dual-purpose perfusion bioreactors that improve upon current bioreactor designs and enable comparative analyses of ex vivo scaffold recellularization strategies and cell growth performance during long-term maintenance culture of engineered kidney or liver tissues. Both bioreactors are effective at maximizing cell seeding of small-animal organ scaffolds and maintaining cell survival in extended culture. We further demonstrate noninvasive monitoring capabilities for tracking dynamic changes within scaffolds as the native cellular component is removed during decellularization and model human cells are introduced into the scaffold during recellularization and proliferate in maintenance culture. We found that hydrodynamic pressure drop (ΔP) across the retained scaffold vasculature is a noninvasive measurement of scaffold integrity. We further show that ΔP, and thus resistance to fluid flow through the scaffold, decreases with cell loss during decellularization and correspondingly increases to near normal values for whole organs following recellularization of the kidney or liver scaffolds. Perfused media may be further sampled in real time to measure soluble biomarkers (e.g., resazurin, albumin, or kidney injury molecule-1) that indicate degree of cellular metabolic activity, synthetic function, or engraftment into the scaffold. Cell growth within bioreactors is

  1. Adaptive Comanagement in the Venice Lagoon? An Analysis of Current Water and Environmental Management Practices and Prospects for Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Huitema

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive comanagement (ACM is often suggested as a way of handling the modern challenges of environmental governance, which include uncertainty and complexity. ACM is a novel combination of the learning dimension of adaptive management and the linkage dimension of comanagement. As has been suggested, there is a need for more insight on enabling policy environments for ACM success and failure. Picking up on this agenda we provide a case study of the world famous Venice lagoon in Italy. We address the following questions: first, to what extent are four institutional prescriptions typically associated with ACM currently practiced in the Venice system? Second, to what extent is learning taking place in the Venice system? Third, how is learning related to the implementation or nonimplementation of the prescriptions of ACM in the Venice system? Our analysis is based on interviews with stakeholders, participatory observation, and archive data. This paper demonstrates that the prescriptions of ACM are hardly followed in the Venice lagoon, but some levels of cognitive learning do take place, albeit very much within established management paradigms. Normative and relational learning are much rarer and when they do occur, they seem to have a relatively opportunistic reason. We propose that in particular the low levels of collaboration, because the governance system was deliberately set up in a hierarchical and mono-centric way, and the limited possibilities for stakeholder participation are implicated in this finding because they cause low levels of social capital and an incapacity to handle disagreements and uncertainty very well.

  2. Current practice of glucocorticoid replacement therapy and patient-perceived health outcomes in adrenal insufficiency - a worldwide patient survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forss M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to survey current practice in glucocorticoid replacement therapy and self-perceived health outcomes in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Methods Participants were recruited via patient organizations to respond anonymously to a web-based survey developed by clinical experts. Unique entries were set up for each patient organization enabling geographical localization of the entries. Results 1245 participants responded (primary adrenal insufficiency: 84%; secondary adrenal insufficiency: 11%; unsure: 5%. Therapies included hydrocortisone (75%, prednisone/prednisolone (11%, cortisone acetate (6% and dexamethasone (4%. Dosing regimens were once daily (10%, twice daily (42%, thrice daily (32% or other (17%. Compromised subjective health necessitating changes to physical activity or social-, work- or family life was reported by 64% of the participants. 40% of the participants reported absence from work/school in the last 3 months. Irrespective of diagnosis, 76% were concerned about long-term side-effects of therapy, mainly osteoporosis (78%, obesity (64% and cardiovascular morbidity (46%. 38% of the participants had been hospitalized in the last year. Conclusions Glucocorticoid replacement therapy among the respondents consisted primarily of hydrocortisone administered twice or thrice daily. A majority reported impact of their disease or treatment on subjective health requiring alterations in e.g. physical activity or family life. Three quarters reported concerns about long-term side-effects of the treatment. These data demonstrate - from the patients' perspective - a need for improvement in the management of adrenal insufficiency.

  3. Food for Thought: A Critical Overview of Current Practical and Conceptual Challenges in Trace Element Analysis in Natural Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Filella

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The practical and conceptual challenges faced by the analysis of trace elements present in natural waters are not merely, as is often thought, an endless race towards lower detection limits or to the development of techniques allowing the determination of any possible chemical species formed by all chemical elements. Rather, as discussed in this paper, they include the development of (i robust, cheap, and reliable methods that could also be used by laypeople (the experience gained in the development of field kits for As is discussed as an example from which similar developments for other elements may be drawn; (ii more environmentally-friendly methods (the current guiding criteria probably being too simplistic; and (iii methods making it possible to follow diel concentration changes and sharp concentration variations caused by the probable increase of heavy rainfall events. This paper also claims that neither the measurement of total concentrations (reliable methods are lacking for many elements of the periodic table of trace elements, as illustrated through the cases of Bi, Te, and Sb, nor chemical speciation analysis, are as mature as often thought. In particular, chemical speciation studies demand the development of a better, comprehensive conceptual framework. A trial is carried out to lay the basis of such a framework.

  4. WWER 440/213 NPP containment from the point of view of IAEA requirements and current European practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In principle, in a NPP three barriers are used to prevent the release of radioactive substances into the environment: the fuel cladding, the primary circuit boundary, and the containment. The presentation deals with the third barrier - the containment, and explains the philosophy of maximum design accident management in the containment of WWER-440/213 NPPs. This type of containment is shown to be an original and fully functional technical solution. Due to the use of the large reserve of the H3BO3 solution and to the active spray systems, an underpressure can be quickly established, thus minimizing any impact of the accident on the environment. The capability of the bubble condenser system for a maximum design accident has been proven by analyses and by tests performed within the framework of PHARE PH 2.13/95: the condenser system can reduce the pressure in the containment in an effective way. The majority of questions arising so far have been answered and the concern resulting from insufficient verification of the system with regard to western standards has been refuted. The WWER-440/213 is fully consistent with IAEA requirements and with current European practice. (A.K.)

  5. Current practices in managing acutely disturbed patients at three hospitals in Rio de Janeiro-Brazil: a prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Jose Ramon RA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical management of aggressive and violent behaviour is a critical situation for which there is little evidence. In order to prepare for a randomised trial, due to start in the psychiatric emergency rooms of Rio de Janeiro in 2001, a survey of current practice was necessary. Methods A seven day survey of pharmacological management of aggressive people with psychosis in the emergency rooms of all four public psychiatric hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Results In one hospital data were not available. Of the 764 people with psychosis attending these ERs, 74 were given IM medication for rapid tranquillisation (9.7%, 2.1/week/100,000. A haloperidol-promethazine mix (with or without other drugs was used for the majority of patients (83%. Conclusion The haloperidol-promethazine mix, given intramuscularly for rapid tranquilization, is prevalent in Rio, where it is considered both safe and efficient. However, scientific evaluation of all pharmacological approaches to rapid tranquilization of psychotic people is inadequate or incomplete and a randomized trial of IM haloperidol-promethazine is overdue.

  6. MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR TREATMENT OF RECALCITRANT WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprihatin Suprihatin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The low biodegradable wastewaters remain a challenge in wastewater treatment technology. The performance of membrane bioreactor systems with submerged hollow fiber micro- and ultrafiltration membrane modules were examined for purifying recalcitrant wastewaters of leachate of a municipal solid waste open dumping site and effluent of pulp and paper mill. The use of MF and UF membrane bioreactor systems showed an efficient treatment for both types wastewaters with COD reduction of 80-90%. The membrane process achieved the desirable effects of maintaining reasonably high biomass concentration and long sludge retention time, while producing a colloid or particle free effluent. For pulp and paper mill effluent a specific sludge production of 0.11 kg MLSS/kg COD removed was achieved. A permeate flux of about 5 L/m²h could be achieved with the submerged microfiltration membrane. Experiments using ultrafiltration membrane produced relatively low permeate fluxes of 2 L/m²h. By applying periodical backwash, the flux could be improved significantly. It was indicated that the particle or colloid deposition on membrane surface was suppressed by backwash, but reformation of deposit was not effectively be prevented by shear-rate effect of aeration. Particle and colloid started to accumulate soon after backwash. Construction of membrane module and operation mode played a critical role in achieving the effectiveness of aeration in minimizing deposit formation on the membrane surface.

  7. Membrane bioreactor for drinking water denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiros, A.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal)]|[Escola Superior de Tecnologia, Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua do Vale de Chaves, Estefanilha, 2900 Setubal (Portugal); Rodrigues, C.M.; Crespo, J.P.S.G.; Reis, M.A.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal)

    1998-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a membrane bioreactor with cell recycle to be used for drinking water denitrification, when operated with a high nitrate load (up to 7.68 kgNO{sub 3}{sup -}/m{sup 3} day) and low hydraulic retention time (down to 0.625 h). Nitrate and nitrite were always completely removed for all the operational conditions used. The effluent`s nitrite concentration kept below 0.1 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}/l with exception of a short period, during the reactor start-up, when it accumulates. The performance of the membrane bioreactor was also evaluated using a groundwater containing 148 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -}/l. Nitrate and nitrite concentration in the effluent were below the recommended values for drinking water when the reactor was controlled at pH 7.0. The membrane flux decreases during operation as a consequence of membrane fouling. The flux decrease was more severe during operation with synthetic medium than with contaminated groundwater due to the existence of molecular complexes in the synthetic broth. A backshock technique was used to reduce the surface fouling of the membrane. Combining this technique with the use of a reserve asymmetric structured membrane it was found that the membrane flux remains nearly unchanged. (orig.) With 7 figs., 14 refs.

  8. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pin-jing; QU Xian; SHAO Li-ming; LEE Duu-jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste(MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95%(61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas.

  9. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pin-Jing; Qu, Xian; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste (MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95% (61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas. PMID:20050569

  10. Performance of pulsed plate bioreactor for biodegradation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of phenol was carried out using Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans immobilised on glass beads, in a pulsed plate bioreactor. The effect of operating parameters like frequency of pulsation and amplitude of pulsation on the performance of pulsed plate bioreactor for biodegradation of phenol in a synthetic wastewater containing 500 ppm phenol was studied. Axial concentration profile measurements revealed that the pulsed plate bioreactor shows continuous stirred tank behaviour. As the amplitude was increased, percentage degradation increased, reaching 100% at amplitude of 4.7 cm and higher. Introduction of pulsation is found to increase the percentage degradation. Percentage degradation has increased with increase in frequency and 100% degradation was achieved at 0.5 s-1 and above. Biofilms developed in a non-pulsed bioreactor were thicker than those in the pulsed plate bioreactor. But biofilm thickness remained almost constant with increasing frequency. Biofilm density was found to be influenced by pulsation. The time required to reach steady state was more for pulsed reactor than the non-pulsed reactor and this start-up time had increased with increase in frequency of pulsation. The performance studies reveal that the pulsed plate bioreactor with immobilized cells has the potential to be an efficient bioreactor for wastewater treatment

  11. Biological technologies for the removal of sulfur containing compounds from waste streams: bioreactors and microbial characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Jingying; Lin, Jian; Liu, Junxin

    2015-10-01

    Waste gases containing sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, thioethers, and mercaptan, produced and emitted from industrial processes, wastewater treatment, and landfill waste may cause undesirable issues in adjacent areas and contribute to atmospheric pollution. Their control has been an area of concern and research for many years. As alternative to conventional physicochemical air pollution control technologies, biological treatment processes which can transform sulfur compounds to harmless products by microbial activity, have gained in popularity due to their efficiency, cost-effectiveness and environmental acceptability. This paper provides an overview of the current biological techniques used for the treatment of air streams contaminated with sulfur compounds as well as the advances made in the past year. The discussion focuses on bioreactor configuration and design, mechanism of operation, insights into the overall biological treatment process, and the characterization of the microbial species present in bioreactors, their populations and their interactions with the environment. Some bioreactor case studies are also introduced. Finally, the perspectives on future research and development needs in this research area were also highlighted. PMID:26250546

  12. Design and evaluation of a bioreactor with application to forensic burial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, Melissa A; Weisensee, Katherine E; Mikhailova, Elena A; Harman, Melinda K

    2015-12-01

    Existing forensic taphonomic methods lack specificity in estimating the postmortem interval (PMI) in the period following active decomposition. New methods, such as the use of citrate concentration in bone, are currently being considered; however, determining the applicability of these methods in differing environmental contexts is challenging. This research aims to design a forensic bioreactor that can account for environmental factors known to impact decomposition, specifically temperature, moisture, physical damage from animals, burial depth, soil pH, and organic matter content. These forensically relevant environmental variables were characterized in a soil science context. The resulting metrics were soil temperature regime, soil moisture regime, slope, texture, soil horizon, cation exchange capacity, soil pH, and organic matter content. Bioreactor chambers were constructed using sterilized thin-walled polystyrene boxes housed in calibrated temperature units. Gravesoil was represented using mineral soil (Ultisols), and organic soil proxy for Histosols, horticulture mix. Gravesoil depth was determined using mineral soil horizons A and Bt2 to simulate surface scatter and shallow grave burial respectively. A total of fourteen different environmental conditions were created and controlled successfully over a 90-day experiment. These results demonstrate successful implementation and control of forensic bioreactor simulating precise environments in a single research location, rather than site-specific testing occurring in different geographic regions. Bone sections were grossly assessed for weathering characteristics, which revealed notable differences related to exposure to different temperature regimes and soil types. Over the short 90-day duration of this experiment, changes in weathering characteristics were more evident across the different temperature regimes rather than the soil types. Using this methodology, bioreactor systems can be created to replicate many

  13. Current sedation practice among general dental practitioners and dental specialists in Jordan: an example of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shayyab MH

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad H Al-Shayyab,1 Soukaina Ryalat,1 Najla Dar-odeh,1 Firas Alsoleihat21Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, 2Department of Conservative Dentistry and Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, JordanPurpose: The study reported here aimed to identify current sedation practice among general dental practitioners (GDPs and specialist dental practitioners (SDPs in Jordan in 2010.Methods: Questionnaires were sent by email to 1683 GDPs and SDPs who were working in Jordan at the time of the study. The contact details of these dental practitioners were obtained from a Jordan Dental Association list. Details on personal status, use of, and training in, conscious sedation techniques were sought by the questionnaires.Results: A total of 1003 (60% questionnaires were returned, with 748 (86.9% GDPs and 113 (13.1% SDPs responding. Only ten (1.3% GDPs and 63 (55.8% SDPs provided information on the different types of treatments related to their specialties undertaken under some form of sedation performed by specialist and/or assistant anesthetists. Approximately 0.075% of the Jordanian population received some form of sedation during the year 2010, with approximately 0.054% having been treated by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The main reason for the majority of GDPs (55.0% and many SDPs (40% not to perform sedation was lack of training in this field. While some SDPs (26.0% indicated they did not use sedation because of the inadequacy of sedative facilities.Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the provision of conscious sedation services in general and specialist dental practices in Jordan is inconsistent and inadequate. This stresses the great need to train practitioners and dental assistants in Jordan to enable them to safely and effectively perform all forms of sedation.Keywords: Jordan Dental

  14. Current practices of partner notification among MSM with HIV, gonorrhoea and syphilis in the Netherlands: an urgent need for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Aar Fleur

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partner notification (PN among individuals newly diagnosed with HIV/STI is seen as a vital tool to identify others at risk of infection. However, hardly any data are available on the effectiveness of PN on HIV/STI transmission in the Netherlands. This study aims to fill this gap by assessing current PN practices, case-finding effectiveness, and determinants of being notified among men having sex with men (MSM in the Netherlands. Methods Nurses from five STI centers participated in a prospective pilot study on PN outcomes (partners being: at risk, notifiable, notified, and tested for HIV/STI, by completing a newly developed PN registration form (PN database. PN outcomes including case-finding effectiveness (number of newly diagnosed cases in partners/number of partners being tested for HIV, syphilis, and gonorrhoea were studied among MSM. Furthermore, the national STI database was analyzed to identify determinants of being notified. The number of infections that remained undetected was estimated based on these two databases. Results In total 105 MSM, newly diagnosed with HIV/STI, reported 612 sexual partners at risk of whom 41% were notifiable and 31% were notified. Patient referral was the predominant PN method (90%. The overall case-finding percentage was 36% (HIV: 15-33%, gonorrhoea: 17-50% and syphilis: 4-11%. Case-finding percentages were lower in the national STI database: 21% (5%, 28%, 12%. Persons with one or more sexual partners, known HIV positives, and IDU were more likely to be notified to the STI clinic. Notified clients were more likely to have HIV/STI than unnotified clients (OR 1.7-2.5. Based on these two databases, an estimated 75 to 133 infections remained undetected (HIV: 12–90; gonorrhoea: 28–97; syphilis: 5–12 infections. Conclusions Partner notification among MSM in the Netherlands is suboptimal; an extensive number of STI/HIV infections remained undetected mainly due to unnotifiable partners. To

  15. Development of an energy-saving anaerobic hybrid membrane bioreactors for 2-chlorophenol-contained wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Kun; Pan, Xin-Rong; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Li, Wen-Wei; Shi, Bing-Jing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    A novel energy-saving anaerobic hybrid membrane bioreactor (AnHMBR) with mesh filter, which takes advantage of anaerobic membrane bioreactor and fixed-bed biofilm reactor, is developed for low-strength 2-chlorophenol (2-CP)-contained wastewater treatment. In this system, the anaerobic membrane bioreactor is stuffed with granular activated carbon to construct an anaerobic hybrid fixed-bed biofilm membrane bioreactor. The effluent turbidity from the AnHMBR system was low during most of the operation period, and the chemical oxygen demand and 2-CP removal efficiencies averaged 82.3% and 92.6%, respectively. Furthermore, a low membrane fouling rate was achieved during the operation. During the AnHMBR operation, the only energy consumption was for feed pump. And a low energy demand of 0.0045-0.0063kWhm(-3) was estimated under the current operation conditions. All these results demonstrated that this novel AnHMBR is a sustainable technology for treating 2-CP-contained wastewater. PMID:24880609

  16. Production of monoclonal antibody with Celline-350 bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies are protein that are highly specific and sensitive in their reaction with specific sites on target molecules that they have become reagents of central importance in the diagnostic and treatment of human diseases. This paper reports the use of CELLine-350 bioreactor to produce continuous supply of serum-free breast cancer monoclonal antibody. Initial volume of 5ml (1.5 x 106 viable cells/ml) is inoculated into the bioreactor and harvesting is done every 5 days to obtain high yield monoclonal antibody. The serum-free supernatant is precipitated with 50% saturated ammonia sulfate and the antibody is purified by protein-G affinity chromatography. The concentration of monoclonal antibody successfully produced by the bioreactor is 0.91mg/ml respectively and it is measured by the Lowry method. This result shows that bioreactor Celline-350 is easy to handle and cost effective for the continuous production of serum free monoclonal antibody. (Author)

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN - METHANOTROPHIC BIOREACTOR SYSTEM - BIOTROL, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BioTrol's Methanotrophic Bioreactor is an above-ground remedial system for water contaminated with halogenated volatile organic compounds, including trichloroethylene (ICE) and related chemicals. Its design features circumvent problems peculiar to treatment of this unique class o...

  18. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Spaulding, Glenn F.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Flechsig, Scott; Jones, Leslie; Soehnge, Holly

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) is a bioreactor system designed for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue-engineering investigations on orbiting spacecraft and in laboratories on Earth. The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear culture environment simultaneously with the "herding" of suspended cells, tissue assemblies, and air bubbles. Under development for use in the Biotechnology Facility on the International Space Station, the HFB has successfully grown large three-dimensional, tissuelike assemblies from anchorage-dependent cells and grown suspension hybridoma cells to high densities. The HFB, based on the principle of hydrodynamic focusing, provides the capability to control the movement of air bubbles and removes them from the bioreactor without degrading the low-shear culture environment or the suspended three-dimensional tissue assemblies. The HFB also provides unparalleled control over the locations of cells and tissues within its bioreactor vessel during operation and sampling.

  19. Salmonella Typhimurium grown in a rotating wall bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium appears green in on human intestinal tissue (stained red) cultured in a NASA rotating wall bioreactor. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  20. Hairy root culture: bioreactor design and process intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Amanda R; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    The cultivation of hairy roots for the production of secondary metabolites offers numerous advantages; hairy roots have a fast growth rate, are genetically stable, and are relatively simple to maintain in phytohormone free media. Hairy roots provide a continuous source of secondary metabolites, and are useful for the production of chemicals for pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food additives. In order for hairy roots to be utilized on a commercial scale, it is necessary to scale-up their production. Over the last several decades, significant research has been conducted on the cultivation of hairy roots in various types of bioreactor systems. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various bioreactor systems, the major factors related to large-scale bioreactor cultures, process intensification technologies and overview the mathematical models and computer-aided methods that have been utilized for bioreactor design and development. PMID:23604206