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Sample records for bioreactor vmbr macromolecular

  1. A vibrating membrane bioreactor (VMBR): Macromolecular transmission-influence of extracellular polymeric substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2009-01-01

    The vibrating membrane bioreactor (VMBR) system facilitates the possibility of conducting a separation of macromolecules (BSA) from larger biological components (yeast cells) with a relatively high and stable macromolecular transmission at sub-critical flux. This is not possible to achieve for a...

  2. Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators

  3. Bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaleddine, E. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Bioresource Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Composting is once again gaining interest among ecological engineers in view of greener industrial and residential activities. Uniform composting is needed to ensure decomposition and to keep the whole system at the same composting stage. A homogeneous temperature must be maintained throughout the media. A bioreactor design consisting of a heater core made of copper tubing was designed and tested. Two four-inch holes were made at the top and bottom of the barrel to allow air to flow through the system and promote aerobic composting. Once composting began and temperature increased, the water began to flow through the copper piping and the core heat was distributed throughout the medium. Three thermocouples were inserted at different heights on a 200 litre plastic barrel fitted with the aforementioned apparatus. Temperature variations were found to be considerably lower when the apparatus was operated with the heat redistribution system, enabling uniform composting, accelerating the process and reducing the risks of pathogenic or other contaminants remaining active in the barrels.

  4. Full-Scale Implementation of a Vertical Membrane Bioreactor for Simultaneous Removal of Organic Matter and Nutrients from Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Ryong Chae

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In nutrient-sensitive estuaries, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs are required to implement more advanced treatment methods in order to meet increasingly stringent effluent guidelines for organic matter and nutrients. To comply with current and anticipated water quality regulations and to reduce the volume of produced sludge, we have successfully developed a vertical membrane bioreactor (VMBR that is composed of anoxic (lower layer and oxic (upper layer zones in one reactor. Since 2009, the VMBR has been commercialized (Q = 1100–16,000 m3/d under the trade-name of DMBRTM for recycling of municipal wastewater in South Korea. In this study, we explore the performance and stability of the full-scale systems. As a result, it was found that the DMBRTM systems showed excellent removal efficiencies of organic substances, suspended solids (SS and Escherichia coli (E. coli. Moreover, average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP by the DMBRTM systems were found to be 79% and 90% at 18 °C, 8.3 h HRT and 41 d SRT. Moreover, transmembrane pressure (TMP was maintained below 40 kPa at a flux of 18 L/m2/h (LMH more than 300 days. Average specific energy consumption of the full-scale DMBRTM systems was found to be 0.94 kWh/m3.

  5. Progress in bioreactors of bioartiifcial livers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Bo Yu; Xiao-Ping Pan; Lan-Juan Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bioartiifcial liver support systems are becoming an effective therapy for hepatic failure. Bioreactors, as key devices in these systems, can provide a favorable growth and metabolic environment, mass exchange, and immunological isolation as a platform. Currently, stagnancy in bioreactor research is the main factor restricting the development of bioartiifcial liver support systems. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed database search of English-language literature was performed to identify relevant articles using the keywords "bioreactor", "bioartiifcial liver", "hepatocyte", and "liver failure". More than 40 articles related to the bioreactors of bioartiifcial livers were reviewed. RESULTS: Some progress has been made in the improvement of structures, functions, and modiifed macromolecular materials related to bioreactors in recent years. The current data on the improvement of bioreactor conifgurations for bioartiifcial livers or on the potential of the use of certain scaffold materials in bioreactors, combined with the clinical efifcacy and safety evaluation of cultured hepatocytesin vitro, indicate that the AMC (Academic Medical Center) BAL bioreactor and MELS (modular extracorporeal liver support) BAL bioreactor system can partly replace the synthetic and metabolic functions of the liver in phaseⅠ clinical studies. In addition, it has been indicated that the microlfuidic PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) bioreactor, or SlideBioreactor, and the microfabricated grooved bioreactor are appropriate for hepatocyte culture, which is also promising for bioartiifcial livers. Similarly, modiifed scaffolds can promote the adhesion, growth, and function of hepatocytes, and provide reliable materials for bioreactors.CONCLUSIONS: Bioreactors, as key devices in bioartiifcial livers, play an important role in the therapy for liver failure both now and in the future. Bioreactor conifgurations are indispensable for the development of bioartiifcial livers used for liver

  6. Molecular and macromolecular gastronomy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raab, Miroslav

    Praha : Ústav makromolekulární chemie AV ČR, 2010. CL_1. ISBN 978-80-85009-62-0. [Workshop "Career in Polymers" /2./. 23.07.2010-24.07.2010, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : molecular and macromolecular gastronomy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  7. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Close-up view of the interior of a NASA Bioreactor shows the plastic plumbing and valves (cylinders at center) to control fluid flow. A fresh nutrient bag is installed at top; a flattened waste bag behind it will fill as the nutrients are consumed during the course of operation. The drive chain and gears for the rotating wall vessel are visible at bottom center center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  8. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The heart of the bioreactor is the rotating wall vessel, shown without its support equipment. Volume is about 125 mL. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  9. Bioreactor principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Cells cultured on Earth (left) typically settle quickly on the bottom of culture vessels due to gravity. In microgravity (right), cells remain suspended and aggregate to form three-dimensional tissue. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  10. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Edward H [Biophysics Group, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Code XD42, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Helliwell, John R [Department of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  11. Teaching macromolecular modeling.

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, S C; Tan, R K

    1992-01-01

    Training newcomers to the field of macromolecular modeling is as difficult as is training beginners in x-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, or other methods in structural biology. In one or two lectures, the most that can be conveyed is a general sense of the relationship between modeling and other structural methods. If a full semester is available, then students can be taught how molecular structures are built, manipulated, refined, and analyzed on a computer. Here we describe...

  12. Bioreactor landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; XING Kai; Anthony Adzomani

    2004-01-01

    Following the population expansion, there is a growing threat brought by municipal solid waste (MSW) against environment and human health. Sanitary landfill is the most important method of MSW disposal in China. In contrast to the conventional landfill, this paper introduces a new technique named bioreactor landfill (BL). Mechanisms, operation conditions as well as the advantages and disadvantages of BL are also discussed in this paper.

  13. Microgravity and Macromolecular Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.; Snell, Edward H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Macromolecular crystal growth has been seen as an ideal experiment to make use of the reduced acceleration environment provided by an orbiting spacecraft. The experiments are small, simply operated and have a high potential scientific and economic impact. In this review we examine the theoretical reasons why microgravity should be a beneficial environment for crystal growth and survey the history of experiments on the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on unmanned spacecraft, and on the Mir space station. Finally we outline the direction for optimizing the future use of orbiting platforms.

  14. Teaching macromolecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S C; Tan, R K

    1992-12-01

    Training newcomers to the field of macromolecular modeling is as difficult as is training beginners in x-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, or other methods in structural biology. In one or two lectures, the most that can be conveyed is a general sense of the relationship between modeling and other structural methods. If a full semester is available, then students can be taught how molecular structures are built, manipulated, refined, and analyzed on a computer. Here we describe a one-semester modeling course that combines lectures, discussions, and a laboratory using a commercial modeling package. In the laboratory, students carry out prescribed exercises that are coordinated to the lectures, and they complete a term project on a modeling problem of their choice. The goal is to give students an understanding of what kinds of problems can be attacked by molecular modeling methods and which problems are beyond the current capabilities of those methods. PMID:1489919

  15. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor develop...

  16. Bioreactor droplets from liposome-stabilized all-aqueous emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Daniel C.; Strulson, Christopher A.; Cacace, David N.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Keating, Christine D.

    2014-08-01

    Artificial bioreactors are desirable for in vitro biochemical studies and as protocells. A key challenge is maintaining a favourable internal environment while allowing substrate entry and product departure. We show that semipermeable, size-controlled bioreactors with aqueous, macromolecularly crowded interiors can be assembled by liposome stabilization of an all-aqueous emulsion. Dextran-rich aqueous droplets are dispersed in a continuous polyethylene glycol (PEG)-rich aqueous phase, with coalescence inhibited by adsorbed ~130-nm diameter liposomes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and dynamic light scattering data indicate that the liposomes, which are PEGylated and negatively charged, remain intact at the interface for extended time. Inter-droplet repulsion provides electrostatic stabilization of the emulsion, with droplet coalescence prevented even for submonolayer interfacial coatings. RNA and DNA can enter and exit aqueous droplets by diffusion, with final concentrations dictated by partitioning. The capacity to serve as microscale bioreactors is established by demonstrating a ribozyme cleavage reaction within the liposome-coated droplets.

  17. Denitrification in Membrane Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Anabela Duarte

    1999-01-01

    Three membrane bioreactors, a low flux filter (LFF), a diafilter (DF), and an ion-exchange (IE) membrane bioreactor were used to treat water polluted with 50 ppm-N nitrate. The three systems were compared in terms of removal efficiency of nitrate, operational complexity, and overall quality of the treated water. In the low flux filter (LFF) membrane bioreactor an hemo-dialysis hollow fiber module was used and operated continuously for 29 days with a constant flux of permeate. The perform...

  18. NASA Bioreactor Demonstration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  19. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  20. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  1. Data Mining of Macromolecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beusekom, Bart; Perrakis, Anastassis; Joosten, Robbie P

    2016-01-01

    The use of macromolecular structures is widespread for a variety of applications, from teaching protein structure principles all the way to ligand optimization in drug development. Applying data mining techniques on these experimentally determined structures requires a highly uniform, standardized structural data source. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) has evolved over the years toward becoming the standard resource for macromolecular structures. However, the process selecting the data most suitable for specific applications is still very much based on personal preferences and understanding of the experimental techniques used to obtain these models. In this chapter, we will first explain the challenges with data standardization, annotation, and uniformity in the PDB entries determined by X-ray crystallography. We then discuss the specific effect that crystallographic data quality and model optimization methods have on structural models and how validation tools can be used to make informed choices. We also discuss specific advantages of using the PDB_REDO databank as a resource for structural data. Finally, we will provide guidelines on how to select the most suitable protein structure models for detailed analysis and how to select a set of structure models suitable for data mining. PMID:27115630

  2. Macromolecular mimicry of nucleic acid and protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup Pedersen, Gitte; Nyborg, Jens; Clark, Brian F

    1999-01-01

    of the concept of macromolecular mimicry. Macromolecular mimicry has further been proposed among initiation and release factors, thereby adding a new element to the description of protein synthesis in bacteria. Such mimicry has also been observed in other biological processes such as autoimmunity, DNA repair...

  3. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  4. NASA Bioreactor Schematic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The schematic depicts the major elements and flow patterns inside the NASA Bioreactor system. Waste and fresh medium are contained in plastic bags placed side-by-side so the waste bag fills as the fresh medium bag is depleted. The compliance vessel contains a bladder to accommodate pressure transients that might damage the system. A peristolic pump moves fluid by squeezing the plastic tubing, thus avoiding potential contamination. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  5. Macromolecular crystallography research at Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen positions in small molecules of biological interest at Trombay have provided valuable information that has been used in protein and enzyme structure model-building and in developing hydrogen bond potential functions. The new R-5 reactor is expected to provide higher neutron fluxes and also make possible small-angle neutron scattering studies of large biomolecules and bio-aggregates. In the last few years infrastructure facilities have also been established for macromolecular x-ray crystallography research. Meanwhile, the refinement of carbonic hydrases and lyysozyme structures have been carried out and interesting results obtained on protein dynamics and structure-function relationships. Some interesting presynaptic toxin phospholipases have also taken up for study. (author)

  6. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t1/2 and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and 14C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats

  7. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  8. Fractal Dimensions of Macromolecular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroff, Nickolay; Kunze, Jens; Schreuder, Herman; Hessler, Gerhard; Baringhaus, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the properties of macromolecules is a prerequisite for understanding their roles in biochemical processes. One of the less-explored geometric features of macromolecules is molecular surface irregularity, or ‘roughness’, which can be measured in terms of fractal dimension (D). In this study, we demonstrate that surface roughness correlates with ligand binding potential. We quantified the surface roughnesses of biological macromolecules in a large-scale survey that revealed D values between 2.0 and 2.4. The results of our study imply that surface patches involved in molecular interactions, such as ligand-binding pockets and protein-protein interfaces, exhibit greater local fluctuations in their fractal dimensions than ‘inert’ surface areas. We expect approximately 22 % of a protein’s surface outside of the crystallographically known ligand binding sites to be ligandable. These findings provide a fresh perspective on macromolecular structure and have considerable implications for drug design as well as chemical and systems biology. PMID:26213587

  9. Macromolecular synthesis in algal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper is a review of our experimental results obtained previously on the macromolecular biosyntheses in the cells of blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans as a representative species of prokaryote, and also in those of three species of eukaryotic algae, i.e. Euglena gracilis strain Z, Chlamydomonas reinhardi, and Cyanidium caldarium. In these algal cells, the combined methods consisting of pulse-labelling using 32P, 3H- and 14C-labelled precursors for macromolecules, of their chasing and of the use of inhibitors which block specifically the syntheses of macromolecules such as proteins, RNA and DNA in living cells were very effectively applied for the analyses of the regulatory mechanism in biosyntheses of macromolecules and of the mode of their assembly into the cell structure, especially organelle constituents. Rased on the results obtained thus, the following conclusions are reached: (1) the metabolic pool for syntheses of macromolecules in the cells of prokaryotic blue-green alga is limited to the small extent and such activities couple largely with the photosynthetic mechanism; (2) 70 S ribosomes in the blue-green algal cells are assembled on the surface of thylakoid membranes widely distributed in their cytoplasm; and (3) the cells of eukaryotic unicellular algae used here have biochemical characters specific for already differentiated enzyme system involving in transcription and translation machineries as the same as in higher organisms, but the control mechanism concerning with such macromolecule syntheses are different among each species. (author)

  10. Quantifying macromolecular conformational transition pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Sean; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, Michael; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes that are challenging for computer simulations. A range of fast path-sampling techniques have been used to generate transitions, but it has been difficult to compare paths from (and assess the relative strengths of) different methods. We introduce a comprehensive method (pathway similarity analysis, PSA) for quantitatively characterizing and comparing macromolecular pathways. The Hausdorff and Fréchet metrics (known from computational geometry) are used to quantify the degree of similarity between polygonal curves in configuration space. A strength of PSA is its use of the full information available from the 3 N-dimensional configuration space trajectory without requiring additional specific knowledge about the system. We compare a sample of eleven different methods for the closed-to-open transitions of the apo enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) and also apply PSA to an ensemble of 400 AdK trajectories produced by dynamic importance sampling MD and the Geometrical Pathways algorithm. We discuss the method's potential to enhance our understanding of transition path sampling methods, validate them, and help guide future research toward deeper physical insights into conformational transitions.

  11. Molecular Control of Macromolecular Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Thomas Wesley, III

    Molecular level control over macromolecules has been at the heart of human advancement, long before Hermann Staudinger coined the term Makromolekule. From the development of primitive pharmaceuticals to the advanced materials that sent Man into outer-space, We have been tinkering with God's paint since our inception. The work described herein primarily involves advances concerning poly-aromatic macromolecules for use in future electronic applications, particularly that of organic photovoltaics. There is a final chapter, however, that gives the reader a taste of how some molecular level changes can be directly visualized with modern microscopy techniques. Chapter 1 provides a very brief introduction to conjugated polymers and molecular level control over macromolecular properties. Chapters 2--4 introduces the concept of polymer substitution as a means by which to control and improve charge generation in organic photovoltaic devices. Chapters 5 and 6 show how these polymers can take on larger, defined structures, yet are still beholden to intrinsic molecular properties---such as regioregularity, a fancy word for the regularity of the position in which two aromatic rings are joined together. Chapter 7 re-examines the role of polymer substitution on photovoltaic performance, this time with an emphasis on homo-polymer packing rather than electron transfer at the donor/acceptor interface. Finally, Chapter 8 visualizes how controlling the environment about a single metal atom can lead directly to a cyclic polyolefin. Individually, these advances do not yield any breakthroughs noticeable to a general audience; collectively, they sit atop a mountain of human knowledge, waiting to provide a stepping stone for the next generation.

  12. Membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Reij, M W

    1997-01-01

    SummaryThis thesis describes the design and testing of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) for removal of organic pollutants from air. In such a bioreactor for biological gas treatment pollutants are degraded by micro-organisms. The membrane bioreactor is an alternative to other types of bioreactors for waste gas treatment, such as compost biofilters and bioscrubbers. Propene was used as a model pollutant to study the membrane bioreactor.A membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment consists of a gas...

  13. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  14. The design of macromolecular crystallography diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoughts about the decisions made in designing macromolecular X-ray crystallography experiments at synchrotron beamlines are presented. The measurement of X-ray diffraction data from macromolecular crystals for the purpose of structure determination is the convergence of two processes: the preparation of diffraction-quality crystal samples on the one hand and the construction and optimization of an X-ray beamline and end station on the other. Like sample preparation, a macromolecular crystallography beamline is geared to obtaining the best possible diffraction measurements from crystals provided by the synchrotron user. This paper describes the thoughts behind an experiment that fully exploits both the sample and the beamline and how these map into everyday decisions that users can and should make when visiting a beamline with their most precious crystals

  15. Effects of macromolecular crowding on genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Marco J; Allen, Rosalind J; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten

    2011-12-21

    The intracellular environment is crowded with proteins, DNA, and other macromolecules. Under physiological conditions, macromolecular crowding can alter both molecular diffusion and the equilibria of bimolecular reactions and therefore is likely to have a significant effect on the function of biochemical networks. We propose a simple way to model the effects of macromolecular crowding on biochemical networks via an appropriate scaling of bimolecular association and dissociation rates. We use this approach, in combination with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, to analyze the effects of crowding on a constitutively expressed gene, a repressed gene, and a model for the bacteriophage λ genetic switch, in the presence and absence of nonspecific binding of transcription factors to genomic DNA. Our results show that the effects of crowding are mainly caused by the shift of association-dissociation equilibria rather than the slowing down of protein diffusion, and that macromolecular crowding can have relevant and counterintuitive effects on biochemical network performance. PMID:22208186

  16. New pharmaceutical applications for macromolecular binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Gauthier, Marc A; Bouvet, Céline; Moreau, Pierre; Petitjean, Anne; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Leblond, Jeanne

    2011-10-30

    Macromolecular binders consist of polymers, dendrimers, and oligomers with binding properties for endogenous or exogenous substrates. This field, at the frontier of host/guest chemistry and pharmacology, has met a renewed interest in the past decade due to the clinical success of several sequestrants, like sevelamer hydrochloride (Renagel®) or sugammadex (Bridion®). In many instances, multivalent binding by the macromolecular drugs can modify the properties of the substrate, and may prevent it from reaching its site of action and/or trigger a biological response. From small (e.g., ions) to larger substrates (e.g., bacteria and cells), this review presents the state-of-the-art of macromolecular binders and provides detailed illustrative examples of recent developments bearing much promise for future pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21571017

  17. Determining the architectures of macromolecular assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alber, Frank; Dokudovskaya, Svetlana; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Zhang, Wenzhu; Kipper, Julia; Devos, Damien; Suprapto, Adisetyantari; Karni-Schmidt, Orit; Williams, Rosemary; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    To understand the workings of a living cell, we need to know the architectures of its macromolecular assemblies. Here we show how proteomic data can be used to determine such structures. The process involves the collection of sufficient and diverse high-quality data, translation of these data into s

  18. Sensing in tissue bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, P.

    2006-03-01

    Specialized sensing and measurement instruments are under development to aid the controlled culture of cells in bioreactors for the fabrication of biological tissues. Precisely defined physical and chemical conditions are needed for the correct culture of the many cell-tissue types now being studied, including chondrocytes (cartilage), vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (blood vessels), fibroblasts, hepatocytes (liver) and receptor neurones. Cell and tissue culture processes are dynamic and therefore, optimal control requires monitoring of the key process variables. Chemical and physical sensing is approached in this paper with the aim of enabling automatic optimal control, based on classical cell growth models, to be achieved. Non-invasive sensing is performed via the bioreactor wall, invasive sensing with probes placed inside the cell culture chamber and indirect monitoring using analysis within a shunt or a sampling chamber. Electroanalytical and photonics-based systems are described. Chemical sensing for gases, ions, metabolites, certain hormones and proteins, is under development. Spectroscopic analysis of the culture medium is used for measurement of glucose and for proteins that are markers of cell biosynthetic behaviour. Optical interrogation of cells and tissues is also investigated for structural analysis based on scatter.

  19. Microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbut, Warakorn; Loyprasert, Suchera; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Limsakul, Chusak; Wongkittisuksa, Booncharoen; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2007-06-15

    A microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor has been developed. Enzyme was immobilized in the microfluidic channel on poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface via covalent binding method. The detection unit consisted of two gold electrodes and a laboratory-built conductimetric transducer to monitor the increase in the conductivity of the solution due to the change of the charges generated by the enzyme-substrate catalytic reaction. Urea-urease was used as a representative analyte-enzyme system. Under optimum conditions urea could be determined with a detection limit of 0.09 mM and linearity in the range of 0.1-10 mM (r=0.9944). The immobilized urease on the microchannel chip provided good stability (>30 days of operation time) and good repeatability with an R.S.D. lower than 2.3%. Good agreement was obtained when urea concentrations of human serum samples determined by the microfluidic flow injection conductimetric bioreactor system were compared to those obtained using the Berthelot reaction (P<0.05). After prolong use the immobilized enzyme could be removed from the PDMS microchannel chip enabling new active enzyme to be immobilized and the chip to be reused. PMID:17289366

  20. Cells growing in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    For 5 days on the STS-70 mission, a bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells, which grew to 30 times the volume of control specimens grown on Earth. This significant result was reproduced on STS-85 which grew mature structures that more closely match what are found in tumors in humans. Shown here, clusters of cells slowly spin inside a bioreactor. On Earth, the cells continually fall through the buffer medium and never hit bottom. In space, they are naturally suspended. Rotation ensures gentle stirring so waste is removed and fresh nutrient and oxygen are supplied. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  1. Spiral vane bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spiral vane bioreactor of a perfusion type is described in which a vertical chamber, intended for use in a microgravity condition, has a central rotating filter assembly and has flexible membranes disposed to rotate annularly about the filter assembly. The flexible members have end portions disposed angularly with respect to one another. A fluid replenishment medium is input from a closed loop liquid system to a completely liquid filled chamber containing microcarrier beads, cells and a fluid medium. Output of spent medium is to the closed loop. In the closed loop, the output and input parameters are sensed by sensors. A manifold permits recharging of the nutrients and pH adjustment. Oxygen is supplied and carbon dioxide and bubbles are removed and the system is monitored and controlled by a microprocessor.

  2. Biofilm development in membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Savnik, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of biofilm development and its removal has crucial meaning in membrane reactor. Biofilm causes pore blocking on membranes, which causes a drop in efficiency of mixed liquor filtration and consequently deteriorates the efficiency of whole membrane bioreactor. This thesis deals with factors that affect biofilm development in membrane bioreactors. Structure and growth of biofilm are presented from its initial attachment of individual particles, their parameters of adhesion, hydrodynam...

  3. Membrane Bioreactor With Pressure Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiou, George S.; Shuler, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Improved class of multilayer membrane bioreactors uses convention forced by differences in pressure to overcome some of diffusional limitations of prior bioreactors. In reactor of new class, flow of nutrient solution reduces adverse gradients of concentration, keeps cells supplied with fresh nutrient, and sweeps away products faster than diffusion alone. As result, overall yield and rate of reaction increased. Pressures in sweeping gas and nutrient alternated to force nutrient liquid into and out of biocatalyst layer through hyrophilic membrane.

  4. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  5. Growth and dissolution of macromolecular Markov chains

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of free living copolymerization are studied for processes with rates depending on k monomeric units of the macromolecular chain behind the unit that is attached or detached. In this case, the sequence of monomeric units in the growing copolymer is a kth-order Markov chain. In the regime of steady growth, the statistical properties of the sequence are determined analytically in terms of the attachment and detachment rates. In this way, the mean growth velocity as well as the thermodynamic entropy production and the sequence disorder can be calculated systematically. These different properties are also investigated in the regime of depolymerization where the macromolecular chain is dissolved by the surrounding solution. In this regime, the entropy production is shown to satisfy Landauer's principle.

  6. Enhancement and simplification of macromolecular images.

    OpenAIRE

    Namba, K; Caspar, D L; Stubbs, G

    1988-01-01

    Computer graphics programs have been devised to display selected atomic features and to simplify images of complex macromolecular structures. By using boundary outlines, adjustment of size and shape of the molecular components, color coding, shading, and selective omission of obscuring detail, attention can be focused on specific interactions which determine higher levels of organization. A balanced color table has been constructed in which different hues have equal steps in brightness; this ...

  7. Stochastic dynamics of macromolecular-assembly networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Leonor; Vilar, Jose

    2006-03-01

    The formation and regulation of macromolecular complexes provides the backbone of most cellular processes, including gene regulation and signal transduction. The inherent complexity of assembling macromolecular structures makes current computational methods strongly limited for understanding how the physical interactions between cellular components give rise to systemic properties of cells. Here we present a stochastic approach to study the dynamics of networks formed by macromolecular complexes in terms of the molecular interactions of their components [1]. Exploiting key thermodynamic concepts, this approach makes it possible to both estimate reaction rates and incorporate the resulting assembly dynamics into the stochastic kinetics of cellular networks. As prototype systems, we consider the lac operon and phage λ induction switches, which rely on the formation of DNA loops by proteins [2] and on the integration of these protein-DNA complexes into intracellular networks. This cross-scale approach offers an effective starting point to move forward from network diagrams, such as those of protein-protein and DNA-protein interaction networks, to the actual dynamics of cellular processes. [1] L. Saiz and J.M.G. Vilar, submitted (2005). [2] J.M.G. Vilar and L. Saiz, Current Opinion in Genetics & Development, 15, 136-144 (2005).

  8. Platelet bioreactor-on-a-chip

    OpenAIRE

    Thon, Jonathan N.; Mazutis, Linas; Wu, Stephen; Sylman, Joanna L.; Ehrlicher, Allen; Machlus, Kellie R.; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Shijiang; Lanza, Robert; Neeves, Keith B.; Weitz, David A; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a biomimetic microfluidic platelet bioreactor that recapitulates bone marrow and blood vessel microenvironments.Application of shear stress in this bioreactor triggers physiological proplatelet production, and platelet release.

  9. Open Source Software to Control Bioflo Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Burdge, David A.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed...

  10. Celebrating macromolecular crystallography: A personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Zapatero, Celerino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The twentieth century has seen an enormous advance in the knowledge of the atomic structures that surround us. The discovery of the first crystal structures of simple inorganic salts by the Braggs in 1914, using the diffraction of X-rays by crystals, provided the critical elements to unveil the atomic structure of matter. Subsequent developments in the field leading to macromolecular crystallography are presented with a personal perspective, related to the cultural milieu of Spain in the late 1950’s. The journey of discovery of the author, as he developed professionally, is interwoven with the expansion of macromolecular crystallography from the first proteins (myoglobin, hemoglobin to the ‘coming of age’ of the field in 1971 and the discoveries that followed, culminating in the determination of the structure of the ribosomes at the turn of the century. A perspective is presented exploring the future of the field and also a reflection about the future generations of Spanish scientists.El siglo XX ha sido testigo del increíble avance que ha experimentado el conocimiento de la estructura atómica de la materia que nos rodea. El descubrimiento de las primeras estructuras atómicas de sales inorgánicas por los Bragg en 1914, empleando difracción de rayos X con cristales, proporcionó los elementos clave para alcanzar tal conocimiento. Posteriores desarrollos en este campo, que condujeron a la cristalografía macromolecular, se presentan aquí desde una perspectiva personal, relacionada con el contexto cultural de la España de la década de los 50. La experiencia del descubrimiento científico, durante mi desarrollo profesional, se integra en el desarrollo de la cristalografía macromolecular, desde las primeras proteínas (míoglobina y hemoglobina, hasta su madurez en 1971 que, con los posteriores descubrimientos, culmina con la determinación del la estructura del ribosoma. Asimismo, se explora el futuro de esta disciplina y se

  11. Automated macromolecular crystal detection system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Allen T.; Segelke, Brent; Rupp, Bernard; Toppani, Dominique

    2007-06-05

    An automated macromolecular method and system for detecting crystals in two-dimensional images, such as light microscopy images obtained from an array of crystallization screens. Edges are detected from the images by identifying local maxima of a phase congruency-based function associated with each image. The detected edges are segmented into discrete line segments, which are subsequently geometrically evaluated with respect to each other to identify any crystal-like qualities such as, for example, parallel lines, facing each other, similarity in length, and relative proximity. And from the evaluation a determination is made as to whether crystals are present in each image.

  12. Tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  13. Bioreactor technology for herbal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants have been an important source of medicine for thousands of years and herbs are hot currency in the world today. During the last decade, popularity of alternative medicine increased significantly worldwide with noticeable trend. This in turn accelerated the global trade of herbal raw materials and herbal products and created greater scope for Asian countries that possess the major supply of herbal raw materials within their highly diversified tropical rain forest. As such, advanced bioreactor culture system possesses a great potential for large scale production than the traditional tissue culture system. Bioreactor cultures have many advantages over conventional cultures. Plant cells in bioreactors can grow fast and vigorously in shorter period as the culture conditions in bioreactor such as temperature, pH, concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide and nutrients can be optimised by on-line manipulation. Nutrient uptake can also be enhanced by continuous medium circulation, which ultimately increased cell proliferation rate. Consequently, production period and cost are substantially reduced, product quality is controlled and standardized as well as free of pesticide contamination and production of raw material can be conducted all year round. Taking all these into consideration, current research efforts were focused on varying several parameters such as inoculation density, air flow, medium formulation, PGRs etc. for increased production of cell and organ cultures of high market demand herbal and medicinal plants, particularly Eurycoma longifolia, Panax ginseng and Labisia pumila. At present, the production of cell and organ culture of these medicinal plants have also been applied in airlift bioreactor with different working volumes. It is hope that the investment of research efforts into this advanced bioreactor technology will open up a bright future for the modernization of agriculture and commercialisation of natural product. (author)

  14. Macromolecular recognition in the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray structures in the PDB illustrate both the specific recognition of two polypeptide chains in protein–protein complexes and dimeric proteins and their nonspecific interaction at crystal contacts. Crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank illustrate the diversity of biological macromolecular recognition: transient interactions in protein–protein and protein–DNA complexes and permanent assemblies in homodimeric proteins. The geometric and physical chemical properties of the macromolecular interfaces that may govern the stability and specificity of recognition are explored in complexes and homodimers compared with crystal-packing interactions. It is found that crystal-packing interfaces are usually much smaller; they bury fewer atoms and are less tightly packed than in specific assemblies. Standard-size interfaces burying 1200–2000 Å2 of protein surface occur in protease–inhibitor and antigen–antibody complexes that assemble with little or no conformation changes. Short-lived electron-transfer complexes have small interfaces; the larger size of the interfaces observed in complexes involved in signal transduction and homodimers correlates with the presence of conformation changes, often implicated in biological function. Results of the CAPRI (critical assessment of predicted interactions) blind prediction experiment show that docking algorithms efficiently and accurately predict the mode of assembly of proteins that do not change conformation when they associate. They perform less well in the presence of large conformation changes and the experiment stimulates the development of novel procedures that can handle such changes

  15. The role of macromolecular stability in desiccation tolerance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkers, W.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns a study on the molecular interactions that play a role in the macromolecular stability of desiccation-tolerant higher plant organs. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used as the main experimental technique to assess macromolecular structures

  16. Panorama of ancient metazoan macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Cuihong; Borgeson, Blake; Phanse, Sadhna; Tu, Fan; Drew, Kevin; Clark, Greg; Xiong, Xuejian; Kagan, Olga; Kwan, Julian; Bezginov, Alexandr; Chessman, Kyle; Pal, Swati; Cromar, Graham; Papoulas, Ophelia; Ni, Zuyao; Boutz, Daniel R; Stoilova, Snejana; Havugimana, Pierre C; Guo, Xinghua; Malty, Ramy H; Sarov, Mihail; Greenblatt, Jack; Babu, Mohan; Derry, W Brent; Tillier, Elisabeth R; Wallingford, John B; Parkinson, John; Marcotte, Edward M; Emili, Andrew

    2015-09-17

    Macromolecular complexes are essential to conserved biological processes, but their prevalence across animals is unclear. By combining extensive biochemical fractionation with quantitative mass spectrometry, here we directly examined the composition of soluble multiprotein complexes among diverse metazoan models. Using an integrative approach, we generated a draft conservation map consisting of more than one million putative high-confidence co-complex interactions for species with fully sequenced genomes that encompasses functional modules present broadly across all extant animals. Clustering reveals a spectrum of conservation, ranging from ancient eukaryotic assemblies that have probably served cellular housekeeping roles for at least one billion years, ancestral complexes that have accrued contemporary components, and rarer metazoan innovations linked to multicellularity. We validated these projections by independent co-fractionation experiments in evolutionarily distant species, affinity purification and functional analyses. The comprehensiveness, centrality and modularity of these reconstructed interactomes reflect their fundamental mechanistic importance and adaptive value to animal cell systems. PMID:26344197

  17. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins—they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing.

  18. Phylogenetic Diversity in the Macromolecular Composition of Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Zoe V.; Follows, Mick J.; Liefer, Justin D.; Brown, Chris M.; Benner, Ina; Irwin, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental stoichiometry of microalgae reflects their underlying macromolecular composition and influences competitive interactions among species and their role in the food web and biogeochemistry. Here we provide a new estimate of the macromolecular composition of microalgae using a hierarchical Bayesian analysis of data compiled from the literature. The median macromolecular composition of nutrient-sufficient exponentially growing microalgae is 32.2% protein, 17.3% lipid, 15.0% carbohydrate, 17.3% ash, 5.7% RNA, 1.1% chlorophyll-a and 1.0% DNA as percent dry weight. Our analysis identifies significant phylogenetic differences in macromolecular composition undetected by previous studies due to small sample sizes and the large inherent variability in macromolecular pools. The phylogenetic differences in macromolecular composition lead to variations in carbon-to-nitrogen ratios that are consistent with independent observations. These phylogenetic differences in macromolecular and elemental composition reflect adaptations in cellular architecture and biochemistry; specifically in the cell wall, the light harvesting apparatus, and storage pools. PMID:27228080

  19. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor under extreme conditions (poster)

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz Sierra, J.D.; De Kreuk, M.K.; Spanjers, H.; van Lier, J B

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors ensure biomass retention by the application of micro or ultrafiltration processes. This allows operation at high sludge concentrations. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an efficient way to retain specialist microorganisms for treating wastewaters from different industries such as coke, textile, food, and chemical. However, few research has been found into the use of membrane bioreactors for anaerobic treatment of wastewater under extreme ...

  20. Review of nonconventional bioreactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.E.; Mcllwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Biotechnology will significantly affect many industrial sectors in the future. Industrial sectors that will be affected include pharmaceutical, chemical, fuel, agricultural, and environmental remediation. Future research is needed to improve bioprocessing efficiency and cost-effectiveness in order to compete with traditional technologies. This report describes recent advances in bioprocess technologies and bioreactor designs and relates them to problems encountered in many industrial bioprocessing operations. The primary focus is directed towards increasing gas and vapor transfer for enhanced bioprocess kinetics as well as unproved by-product separation and removal. The advantages and disadvantages of various conceptual designs such as hollow-fiber, gas-phase, hyperbaric/hypobaric, and electrochemical bioreactors are also discussed. Specific applications that are intended for improved bioprocesses include coal desulfurization, coal liquefaction, soil bioremediation, biomass conversion to marketable chemicals, biomining, and biohydrometallurgy as well as bioprocessing of gases and vapors.

  1. Optimizing of Culture Conditionin Horizontal Rotating Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionBioreactor is the most important equipment in tissue engineering. It can mimic the micro-environment of cell growth in vitro. At present, horizontal rotating bioreactor is the most advanced equipment for cell culture in the world. 2 Rotating bioreactors2.1 Working principleThere are two kinds of horizontal rotating bioreactor: HARV(high aspect ratio vessel) and RCCS (rotary cell culture system). It is drived by step motor with horizontal rotation, the culture medium and cell is filled between ...

  2. Prostate tumor grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  3. Filtration characteristics in membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Evenblij, H.

    2006-01-01

    Causes of and remedies for membrane fouling in Membrane Bioreactors for wastewater treatment are only poorly understood and described in scientific literature. A Filtration Characterisation Installation and a measurement protocol were developed with the aim of a) unequivocally determination and quantification of the filterability of an activated sludge and b) carrying out short term experiments at labscale to determine foulants and/or fouling propensity determining factors. The installation w...

  4. Image Analysis and Multiphase Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, E. C.; Mota, M.; Pons, M.N.

    2001-01-01

    The applications of visualisation and image analysis to bioreactors can be found in two main areas: the characterisation of biomass (fungi, bacteria, yeasts, animal and plant cells, etc), in terms of size, morphology and physiology, that is the far most developed, and the characterisation of the multiphase behaviour of the reactors (flow patterns, velocity fields, bubble size and shape distribution, foaming), that may require sophisticated visualisation techniques.

  5. Denitrification using immersed membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    McAdam, Ewan J.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate is practically ubiquitous in waters abstracted for municipal potable water production in Europe due to decades of intensive agricultural practice. Ion exchange is principally selected to target abstracted waters with elevated nitrate concentrations. However, the cost associated with disposal of the waste stream has re-ignited interest in destructive rather concentrative technologies. This thesis explores the potential of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology for the remo...

  6. An upper limit for macromolecular crowding effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklos Andrew C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solutions containing high macromolecule concentrations are predicted to affect a number of protein properties compared to those properties in dilute solution. In cells, these macromolecular crowders have a large range of sizes and can occupy 30% or more of the available volume. We chose to study the stability and ps-ns internal dynamics of a globular protein whose radius is ~2 nm when crowded by a synthetic microgel composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid with particle radii of ~300 nm. Results Our studies revealed no change in protein rotational or ps-ns backbone dynamics and only mild (~0.5 kcal/mol at 37°C, pH 5.4 stabilization at a volume occupancy of 70%, which approaches the occupancy of closely packing spheres. The lack of change in rotational dynamics indicates the absence of strong crowder-protein interactions. Conclusions Our observations are explained by the large size discrepancy between the protein and crowders and by the internal structure of the microgels, which provide interstitial spaces and internal pores where the protein can exist in a dilute solution-like environment. In summary, microgels that interact weakly with proteins do not strongly influence protein dynamics or stability because these large microgels constitute an upper size limit on crowding effects.

  7. Miniaturized kappa goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A goniometer with kappa geometry has been designed and built specifically for macromolecular crystallography. The main feature is a miniaturized kappa stage made possible by the small weight of specimen and specimen holder. The design goal was to: 1) eliminate interference between stage and area detector for specimen-to-detector distances of 100 mm and more; 2) minimize the sphere of confusion on expectation of dealing with very small crystals at third generation sources; 3) minimize the solid angle of shadow and inaccessible positioning of the sample due to interference of the stage with other objects in the sample area; 4) achieve a rotation speed of 10 degree/s at 0.5% constancy and 0.4 s acceleration time for 0.05 s exposures of 0.2 degree fine slice frames every 2 seconds, and 5) to achieve precise synchronization between rotation angle and shutter opening and closing. The kappa stage is mounted on a commercial high precision rotary table, designed for use in both horizontal and vertical orientation. This table provides the high precision rotation for data acquisition. The required crisp response and constant speed is delivered by a high output direct drive DC-motor, controlled by a closed-loop controller using feedback from a precision angular encoder. The kappa- and phi-motions are used for sample positioning only and are driven by miniature DC-motors equipped with integral encoders.copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  8. Miniaturized kappa goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A goniometer with kappa geometry has been designed and built specifically for macromolecular crystallography. The main feature is a miniaturized kappa stage made possible by the small weight of specimen and specimen holder. The design goal was to: 1) eliminate interference between stage and area detector for specimen-to-detector distances of 100 mm and more; 2) minimize the sphere of confusion on expectation of dealing with very small crystals at third generation sources; 3) minimize the solid angle of shadow and inaccessible positioning of the sample due to interference of the stage with other objects in the sample area; 4) achieve a rotation speed of 10 degree/s at 0.5% constancy and 0.4 s acceleration time for 0.05 s exposures of 0.2 degree fine slice frames every 2 seconds, and 5) to achieve precise synchronization between rotation angle and shutter opening and closing. The kappa stage is mounted on a commercial high precision rotary table, designed for use in both horizontal and vertical orientation. This table provides the high precision rotation for data acquisition. The required crisp response and constant speed is delivered by a high output direct drive DC-motor, controlled by a closed-loop controller using feedback from a precision angular encoder. The kappa- and phi-motions are used for sample positioning only and are driven by miniature DC-motors equipped with integral encoders

  9. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  10. Following an Optimal Batch Bioreactor Operations Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra-Junquera, V.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Virgen-Ortíz, J.J.;

    2012-01-01

    The problem of following an optimal batch operation model for a bioreactor in the presence of uncertainties is studied. The optimal batch bioreactor operation model (OBBOM) refers to the bioreactor trajectory for nominal cultivation to be optimal. A multiple-variable dynamic optimization of fed-batch...... reactor for biomass production is studied using a differential geometry approach. The maximization problem is solved by handling both the optimal filling policy and substrate concentration in the inlet stream. In order to follow the OBBOM, a master–slave synchronization is used. The OBBOM is considered as...... the master system which includes the optimal cultivation trajectory for the feed flow rate and the substrate concentration. The “real” bioreactor, the one with unknown dynamics and perturbations, is considered as the slave system. Finally, the controller is designed such that the real bioreactor is...

  11. Scavengers in macromolecular crystallography. Do they help?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation damage continues to present a problem to macromolecular crystallographers using cryo-cooled protein crystals at synchrotrons where a linear decay in diffraction intensity is observed with increasing dose. Free radical scavengers and radioprotectants have been suggested as a possible means of reducing the rate of this damage. Early room temperature (RT) experiments seemed to show that styrene and PEG might have a positive effect on the dose tolerance of crystals, but the idea was not systematically pursued. We have previously reported that 0.5 M-1 M ascorbate incorporated by cocrystallisation was effective in quenching the disulphide breakage in lysozyme (HEWL) crystals during 100 K data collection. The screening of a large number of potential radioprotectants was then undertaken with an on-line microspectrophotometer using cystine and cysteine respectively to model protein disulphide bonds and thiol groups, and observe any quenching of the disulphide anion peak. Evidence for the potential of ascorbate as a radioprotectant was strengthened, and 1,4 benzoquinone, 2,2,6,6- tetramethyl-4-piperidone (TEMP) and reduced dithiothreitol also showed promise. In recent work to search for RT radiation damage mitigation strategies, three of these putative radioprotectants were tested. The results indicate that ascorbate and 1,4-benzoquinone are effective radioprotectants, whereas studies on TEMP were inconclusive. Ascorbate offered a 2x enhancement of crystal dose tolerance, whereas benzoquinone gave a >8x increase at the dose-rates used. The universally previously observed exponential form of the RT diffraction intensity decay was modified by the addition of scavengers to become linear as is observed at 100 K without scavengers present. The radiation damage mechanisms are elucidated by these results, which enable postulates to be made on the radical species causing damage at 100 K. Recent results using the electron scavenger

  12. Measuring Water in Bioreactor Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B.; Gallagher, V. N.; Imhoff, P. T.; Yazdani, R.; Chiu, P.

    2004-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. Maintaining optimal moisture conditions for waste degradation is perhaps the most important operational parameter in bioreactor landfills. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, methods are required to measure water within solid waste. However, there is no reliable method that can measure moisture content simply and accurately in the heterogeneous environment typical of landfills. While well drilling and analysis of solid waste samples is sometimes used to determine moisture content, this is an expensive, time-consuming, and destructive procedure. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone --- the partitioning tracer test (PTT) --- was evaluated for measuring water in solid waste in a full-scale bioreactor landfill in Yolo County, CA. Two field tests were conducted in different regions of an aerobic bioreactor landfill, with each test measuring water in ≈ 250 ft3 of solid waste. Tracers were injected through existing tubes inserted in the landfill, and tracer breakthrough curves were measured through time from the landfill's gas collection system. Gas samples were analyzed on site using a field-portable gas chromatograph and shipped offsite for more accurate laboratory analysis. In the center of the landfill, PTT measurements indicated that the fraction of the pore space filled with water

  13. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    For 5 days on the STS-70 mission, a bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells, such as the culture section shown here, which grew to 30 times the volume of control specimens grown on Earth. This significant result was reproduced on STS-85 which grew mature structures that more closely match what are found in tumors in humans. The two white circles within the tumor are part of a plastic lattice that helped the cells associate. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  14. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  15. Development of Fundamental Technologies for Micro Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiichi; Kitamori, Takehiko

    This chapter reviews the development of fundamental technologies required for microchip-based bioreactors utilizing living mammalian cells and pressure driven flow. The most important factor in the bioreactor is the cell culture. For proper cell culturing, continuous medium supply from a microfluidic channel and appropriate modification of the channel surface to accommodate cell attachment is required. Moreover, the medium flow rate should be chosen carefully, because shear stress affects cell activity. The techniques presented here could be applied to the development of micro bioreactors such as microlivers, pigment production by plant cells, and artificial insemination.

  16. Spatial Experiment Technologies Suitable for Unreturnable Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Weibo; Tong, Guanghui

    2016-07-01

    The system composition and main function of the bioreactor piggybacked on TZ cargo transport spacecraft are introduced briefly in the paper.The spatial experiment technologies which are suitable for unreturnable bioreactor are described in detail,including multi-channel liquid transportion and management,multi-type animal cells circuit testing,dynamic targets microscopic observation in situ etc..The feasibility and effectiveness of these technologies which will be used in space experiment in bioreactor are verified in tests and experiments on the ground.

  17. Immobilized yeast in bioreactor for alcohol fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed using a Co-60 source. Cells were immobilized onto sterile, channeled alumina beads and packed into bioreactor column under controlled temperature. Feedstocks containing substrate and nutrients were fed into the bioreactor at specific rates. Beads with greatest porosity and surface area produced the most ethanol. Factors affecting ethanol productivity included: temperature, pH, flow rate, nutrients and substrate in the feedstock

  18. Aeration and hydrodynamics in submerged membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Braak, Etienne; Alliet-Gaubert, Marion; Schetrite, Sylvie; Albasi, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) is already a well-developed wastewater treatment process for both municipal and industrial applications. Nonetheless, membrane fouling remains a significant problem for its wider development. In the case of submerged membrane bioreactors (SMBRs), one of the most efficient strategies to limit fouling is the use of a gas/liquid two-phase flow to enhance the mass transfer. However, the effect of aeration still remains incompletely understood. The complexity ...

  19. New bioreactors systems for pharmacological screening

    OpenAIRE

    Vozzi, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Bioreactors, biotechnological devices for in vitro cell cultures with dynamic conditions, have the potential to provide information on local cell behavior and function. The development of bioreactors could lead to a multitude of applications from drug testing and development, tissue engineering and basic research to the identification of new and alternative therapies for many disorders. High quality, reliable, in vitro data also provide a shift in focus from large scale animal testing to the ...

  20. Heart tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Lisa Freed and Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, both of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have taken the first steps toward engineering heart muscle tissue that could one day be used to patch damaged human hearts. Cells isolated from very young animals are attached to a three-dimensional polymer scaffold, then placed in a NASA bioreactor. The cells do not divide, but after about a week start to cornect to form a functional piece of tissue. Here, a transmission electron micrograph of engineered tissue shows a number of important landmarks present in functional heart tissue: (A) well-organized myofilaments (Mfl), z-lines (Z), and abundant glycogen granules (Gly); and (D) intercalcated disc (ID) and desmosomes (DES). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: MIT

  1. Simplified Bioreactor For Growing Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.

    1995-01-01

    Improved bioreactor for growing mammalian cell cultures developed. Designed to support growth of dense volumes of mammalian cells by providing ample, well-distributed flows of nutrient solution with minimal turbulence. Cells relatively delicate and, unlike bacteria, cannot withstand shear forces present in turbulent flows. Bioreactor vessel readily made in larger sizes to accommodate greater cell production quantities. Molding equipment presently used makes cylinders up to 30 centimeters long. Alternative sintered plastic techniques used to vary pore size and quantity, as necessary.

  2. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  3. Macromolecular crystallography radiation damage research: what’s new?

    OpenAIRE

    Garman, Elspeth F.; Weik, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage in macromolecular crystallography has become a mainstream concern over the last ten years. The current status of research into this area is briefly assessed, and the ten new papers published in this issue are set into the context of previous work in the field. Some novel and exciting developments emerging over the last two years are also summarized.

  4. Effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on human Tau fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingying; Teng, Ningning; Li, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Tau fibrillation is reported to be involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, in which the natural environment is very crowded in the cells. Understanding the role of crowding environments in regulating Tau fibrillation is of great importance for elucidating the etiology of these diseases. In this experiment, the effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte reagents in the crowding environment on Tau fibrillation were studied by thioflavin T binding, SDS-PAGE and TEM assays. Ficoll 70 and Dextran 70 of different concentrations were used as macromolecular crowding reagents inside the cells and showed a strong enhancing effect on the fibrillation of normal and hyperphosphorylated Tau. The enhancing effect of Dextran is stronger than that of Ficoll 70 at the same concentration. In addition, the cellular osmolyte sucrose was found to protect Tau against fibrillation, and inhibit the enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on Tau fibrillation. A possible model for the fibrillation process of Tau and the effect of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on this process was proposed based on these experimental results. The information obtained from our study can enhance the understanding of how proteins aggregate and avoid aggregation in crowded physiological environments and might lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in vivo. PMID:26683879

  5. Optimizing of Culture Condition in Horizontal Rotating Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Fang ZHANG; Huai-Qing CHEN; Hua HUANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Bioreactor is the most important equipment in tissue engineering. It can mimic the micro-environment of cell growth in vitro. At present, horizontal rotating bioreactor is the most advanced equipment for cell culture in the world.

  6. Macromolecular and elemental composition analysis and extracellular metabolite balances of Pichia pastoris growing at different oxygen levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of the cell operation at the metabolic level requires collecting data of different types and to determine their confidence level. In addition, the acquired information has to be combined in order to obtain a consistent operational view. In the case of Pichia pastoris, information of its biomass composition at macromolecular and elemental level is scarce particularly when different environmental conditions, such as oxygen availability or, genetic backgrounds (e.g. recombinant protein production vs. non production conditions are compared. Results P. pastoris cells growing in carbon-limited chemostat cultures under different oxygenation conditions (% O2 in the bioreactor inlet gas: 21%, 11% and 8%, corresponding to normoxic, oxygen-limiting and hypoxic conditions, respectively, as well as under recombinant protein (antibody fragment, Fab producing and non-producing conditions, were analyzed from different points of view. On the one hand, the macromolecular and elemental composition of the biomass was measured using different techniques at the different experimental conditions and proper reconciliation techniques were applied for gross error detection of the measured substrates and products conversion rates. On the other hand, fermentation data was analyzed applying elemental mass balances. This allowed detecting a previously missed by-product secreted under hypoxic conditions, identified as arabinitol (aka. arabitol. After identification of this C5 sugar alcohol as a fermentation by-product, the mass balances of the fermentation experiments were validated. Conclusions After application of a range of analytical and statistical techniques, a consistent view of growth parameters and compositional data of P. pastoris cells growing under different oxygenation conditions was obtained. The obtained data provides a first view of the effects of oxygen limitation on the physiology of this microorganism, while recombinant Fab

  7. Contamination of a high-cell-density continuous bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues, Lucília; Lima, Nelson; Teixeira, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Continuous fermentations were carried out with a recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain in an airlift bioreactor. Once operating under steady state at a dilution rate of 0.45 h−1, the bioreactor was contaminated with Escherichia coli cells. The faster growing E. coli strain was washed out of the bioreactor and the recombinant, slower growing flocculating S. cerevisiae strain remained as the only species detected in the bioreactor. Flocculation, besides ...

  8. Bioreactor design and optimization – a future perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    Bioreactor design and optimisation are essential in translating the experience gained from lab or pilot scale experiments to efficient production processes in industrial scale bioreactors. This article gives a future perspective on bioreactor design and optimisation, where it is foreseen that technologies including mechanistic models, process simulation and advanced model analysis will play an increasingly important role.

  9. Bioreactor design and optimization – a future perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Bioreactor design and optimisation are essential in translating the experience gained from lab or pilot scale experiments to efficient production processes in industrial scale bioreactors. This article gives a future perspective on bioreactor design and optimisation, where it is foreseen that...

  10. Evolution of Bioreactors for Extracorporeal Liver Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilkova Е.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of effective extracorporeal liver support systems in acute and chronic hepatic failure for transplantology purposes and in toxic injuries is a promising direction in modern biomedical studies. Widely used techniques are based on physicochemical interactions of biological molecules, and able to perform a detoxification function only (hemodialysis, hemofiltration, hemodiafiltration, sorption, albumin dialysis, plasmapheresis. However, support systems combining both blood/plasma perfusion and cellular technologies to maintain metabolic, synthetic and regulatory hepatic functions — “artificial liver” systems — are being extensively developed in recent decades. The review describes the main types of cell lines cultured to occupy bioreactors, various technological concepts for bioreactor design (dynamic, static, scaffold-carriers as part of bioreactors (structure, biochemical composition. The study gives metabolic characteristics of a cellular component of “bioartificial liver”: nourishment, oxygen saturation. Various types of existing extracorporeal support systems, their evolution, and preclinical and clinical test results are presented.

  11. Macromolecular Brushes as Stabilizers of Hydrophobic Solute Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hanying; Raciti, David; Wang, Chao; Herrera-Alonso, Margarita

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular brushes bearing poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(d,l-lactide) side chains were used to stabilize hydrophobic solute nanoparticles formed by a rapid change in solvent quality. Unlike linear diblock copolymers with the same hydrophilic and hydrophobic block chemistries, the brush copolymer enabled the formation of ellipsoidal β-carotene nanoparticles, which in cosolvent mixtures developed into rod-like structures, resulting from a combination of Ostwald ripening and particle aggregation. The stabilizing ability of the copolymer was highly dependent on the mobility of the hydrophobic component, influenced by its molecular weight. As shown here, asymmetric amphiphilic macromolecular brushes of this type may be used as hydrophobic drug stabilizers and potentially assist the shape control of nonspherical aggregate morphologies. PMID:27035279

  12. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  13. Effects of macromolecular chelators on intestinal cadmium absorption in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, O.; Nielsen, J.B.; Bulman, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Suppression of absorption by macromolecular chelators have been sucessful with several metals. In this paper a series of immobilized chelators ranging from DTPA to S-containing soft bases have been synthetized and investigated for ability to suppress intestinal uptake of /sup 109/Cd/sup 2+/ in mice. Dextran-O-ethyl-mercaptan, xanthates derived from polysaccharides and polyvinyl alcohol, dithiocarbamates of polyethylene imine and aminoethyl cellulose, and DTPA immobilized on aminopropyl silica were all ineffective. DTPA immobilized on aminoethyl cellulose even enhanced the intestinal uptake. The macromolecular chelators were without extensive effect on organ distribution of absorbed cadmium, except for dithiocarbamate immobilized on polyethylene imine, which enhanced the deposition of cadmium in several organs including the brain. Although the results are discouragign, they indicate that desing and synthesis of immobilized vicinal dithio compounds may represent an avenue for development of non-absorbable chelators with high affinity for cadmium.

  14. Stochastic reaction–diffusion algorithms for macromolecular crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Compartment-based (lattice-based) reaction–diffusion algorithms are often used for studying complex stochastic spatio-temporal processes inside cells. In this paper the influence of macromolecular crowding on stochastic reaction–diffusion simulations is investigated. Reaction–diffusion processes are considered on two different kinds of compartmental lattice, a cubic lattice and a hexagonal close packed lattice, and solved using two different algorithms, the stochastic simulation algorithm and the spatiocyte algorithm (Arjunan and Tomita 2010 Syst. Synth. Biol. 4, 35–53). Obstacles (modelling macromolecular crowding) are shown to have substantial effects on the mean squared displacement and average number of molecules in the domain but the nature of these effects is dependent on the choice of lattice, with the cubic lattice being more susceptible to the effects of the obstacles. Finally, improvements for both algorithms are presented.

  15. Bioreactor and methods for producing synchronous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstetter, Charles E. (Inventor); Thornton, Maureen (Inventor); Gonda, Steve (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are directed to a perfusion culture system in which a rotating bioreactor is used to grow cells in a liquid culture medium, while these cells are attached to an adhesive-treated porous surface. As a result of this arrangement and its rotation, the attached cells divide, with one cell remaining attached to the substrate, while the other cell, a newborn cell is released. These newborn cells are of approximately the same age, that are collected upon leaving the bioreactor. The populations of newborn cells collected are of synchronous and are minimally, if at all, disturbed metabolically.

  16. Integrating Topology and Geometry for Macro-Molecular Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Edward L. F.; Peters, Thomas J.; Ferguson, David R.; Neil F Stewart

    2005-01-01

    Emerging macro-molecular simulations, such as supercoiling of DNA and protein unfolding, have an opportunity to profit from two decades of experience with geometric models within computer-aided geometric design (CAGD). For CAGD, static models are often sufficient, while form and function are inextricably related in biochemistry, resulting in greater attention to critical topological characteristics of these dynamic models. The greater emphasis upon dynamic change in macro-...

  17. E-MSD: the European Bioinformatics Institute Macromolecular Structure Database

    OpenAIRE

    Boutselakis, H.; Dimitropoulos, D.; Fillon, J.; Golovin, A.; Henrick, K.; A. Hussain; Ionides, J.; M. John; Keller, P. A.; Krissinel, E.; McNeil, P.; Naim, A; Newman, R.; Oldfield, T.; Pineda, J

    2003-01-01

    The E-MSD macromolecular structure relational database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd) is designed to be a single access point for protein and nucleic acid structures and related information. The database is derived from Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries. Relational database technologies are used in a comprehensive cleaning procedure to ensure data uniformity across the whole archive. The search database contains an extensive set of derived properties, goodness-of-fit indicators, and links to other ...

  18. Application of complex macromolecular architectures for advanced microelectronic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, James L; Magbitang, Teddie; Connor, Eric F; Glauser, Thierry; Volksen, Willi; Hawker, Craig J; Lee, Victor Y; Miller, Robert D

    2002-08-01

    The distinctive features of well-defined, three-dimensional macromolecules with topologies designed to enhance solubility and amplify end-group functionality facilitated nanophase morphologies in mixtures with organosilicates and ultimately nanoporous organosilicate networks. Novel macromolecular architectures including dendritic and star-shaped polymers and organic nanoparticles were prepared by a modular approach from several libraries of building blocks including various generations of dendritic initiators and dendrons, selectively placed to amplify functionality and/or arm number, coupled with living polymerization techniques. Mixtures of an organosilicate and the macromolecular template were deposited, cured, and the phase separation of the organic component, organized the vitrifying organosilicate into nanostructures. Removal of the sacrificial macromolecular template, also denoted as porogen, by thermolysis, yielded the desired nanoporous organosilicate, and the size scale of phase separation was strongly dependent on the chain topology. These materials were designed for use as interlayer, ultra-low dielectric insulators for on-chip applications with dielectric constant values as low as 1.5. The porogen design, chemistry and role of polymer architecture on hybrid and pore morphology will be emphasized. PMID:12203311

  19. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A

  20. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  1. Establishing Liver Bioreactors for In Vitro Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Sofia P; Costa, Rita; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M

    2015-01-01

    In vitro systems that can effectively model liver function for long periods of time are fundamental tools for preclinical research. Nevertheless, the adoption of in vitro research tools at the earliest stages of drug development has been hampered by the lack of culture systems that offer the robustness, scalability, and flexibility necessary to meet industry's demands. Bioreactor-based technologies, such as stirred tank bioreactors, constitute a feasible approach to aggregate hepatic cells and maintain long-term three-dimensional cultures. These three-dimensional cultures sustain the polarity, differentiated phenotype, and metabolic performance of human hepatocytes. Culture in computer-controlled stirred tank bioreactors allows the maintenance of physiological conditions, such as pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature, with minimal fluctuations. Moreover, by operating in perfusion mode, gradients of soluble factors and metabolic by-products can be established, aiming at resembling the in vivo microenvironment. This chapter provides a protocol for the aggregation and culture of hepatocyte spheroids in stirred tank bioreactors by applying perfusion mode for the long-term culture of human hepatocytes. This in vitro culture system is compatible with feeding high-throughput screening platforms for the assessment of drug elimination pathways, being a useful tool for toxicology research and drug development in the preclinical phase. PMID:26272143

  2. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrenc

  3. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn H. Hjertager

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-dimensional models of flow processes in bioreactors are presented. Particular emphasis is given to models that use the two-fluid technique. The models use a two-equation turbuluence model and a Monod type kinetic reaction model. Predictions are given for both bubble column and mechanically stirred reactors.

  4. Engineering skeletal muscle tissue in bioreactor systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Yang; Li Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To give a concise review of the current state of the art in tissue engineering (TE) related to skeletal muscle and kinds of bioreactor environment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection A total of 106 articles were selected from several hundred original articles or reviews.The content of selected articles is in accordance with our purpose and the authors are authorized scientists in the study of engineered muscle tissue in bioreactor.Results Skeletal muscle TE is a promising interdisciplinary field which aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss.Although numerous studies have indicated that engineering skeletal muscle tissue may be of great importance in medicine in the near future,this technique still represents a limited degree of success.Since tissue-engineered muscle constructs require an adequate connection to the vascular system for efficient transport of oxygen,carbon dioxide,nutrients and waste products.Moreover,functional and clinically applicable muscle constructs depend on adequate neuromuscular junctions with neural calls.Third,in order to engineer muscle tissue successfully,it may be beneficial to mimic the in vivo environment of muscle through association with adequate stimuli from bioreactors.Conclusion Vascular system and bioreactors are necessary for development and maintenance of engineered muscle in order to provide circulation within the construct.

  5. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios;

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor technology exists for a couple of decades, but has not yet overwhelmed the market due to some serious drawbacks of which operational cost due to fouling is the major contributor. Knowledge buildup and optimisation for such complex systems can heavily benefit from mathematical...

  6. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  7. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 30CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppor...

  8. Effects of alkalinity on membrane bioreactors for reject water treatment: Performance improvement, fouling mitigation and microbial structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dalong; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Xuelian; Wei, Haijuan; Jiang, Lu-Man; Lv, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Two submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for reject water treatment were operated to investigate effects of sodium bicarbonate (SB) addition on enhancing process performance and mitigating membrane fouling. Results showed that SB addition enhanced average removal efficiencies of COD and NH4-N by 14.6% and 38.3%, respectively. With SB addition, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content in activated sludge increased, but those in membrane foulants greatly decreased. Gel permeation chromatography analysis demonstrated that EPS in MBRs for reject water treatment had much larger molecular weight (MW) and broader MW distribution than those in MBRs for municipal wastewater treatment. The fouling mitigation by SB was attributed to a deprotonation mechanism reduced EPS adsorption on negatively charged membrane surfaces, and improvement of degradation efficiency of macromolecular organic matters. SB addition into MBRs for reject water treatment increased microbial abundance, enriched nitrifying bacteria, and converted predominant AOB genus from Nitrosomonas to Nitrosospira. PMID:26340030

  9. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of

  10. Impact of synchrotron radiation on macromolecular crystallography: a personal view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article, largely based on personal experiences of the authors, reviews the early history of the application of synchrotron radiation to structural biology, and particularly protein crystallography, to show the tremendous impact that this experimental innovation has had on these disciplines. The introduction of synchrotron radiation sources almost four decades ago has led to a revolutionary change in the way that diffraction data from macromolecular crystals are being collected. Here a brief history of the development of methodologies that took advantage of the availability of synchrotron sources are presented, and some personal experiences with the utilization of synchrotrons in the early days are recalled

  11. Workshop on algorithms for macromolecular modeling. Final project report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimkuhler, B.; Hermans, J.; Skeel, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    A workshop was held on algorithms and parallel implementations for macromolecular dynamics, protein folding, and structural refinement. This document contains abstracts and brief reports from that workshop.

  12. Bioreactors as a low cost option for tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioreactors are vessels designed for large-scale cell, tissue or organ culture in liquid media. Functionally, plant culture bioreactors can be divided into two broad types: those in which the cultures are immersed partially or temporarily in the medium, and those in which the cultures are continuously submerged. Bioreactors provide more precise control of the plant growth gaseous exchange, illumination, medium agitation, temperature and pH than the conventional culture vessels. Bioreactor-based propagation of plants can increase rate of multiplication and growth of cultures and reduce space, energy and labour requirements in commercial micropropagation. They can therefore be attractive to developing countries as regards new or expanding plant culture facilities, in combination with a conventional laboratory. However, to be cost- effective, use of bioreactors requires indexed plant cultures, and attention to aseptic procedures during handling of plant material. Hence, the integration of bioreactors into production systems should only be attempted by facilities with skilled and experienced propagators. (author)

  13. Modeling of a membrane bioreactor for production of biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the use of an enzymatic catalyst lipase, produced by Candida Antarctica a membrane bioreactor was modeled and simulated to obtain biodiesel from palm oil and ethanol. A conversion of 0.97 was reached for a residence time of 10.64 min. The membrane bioreactor was compared to a CSTR reactor, where a conversion of 0.76 was obtained. It was concluded that the membrane bioreactor is a better way of producing biodiesel than the CSTR

  14. Investigations concerning the use of membrane bioreactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane bioreactor systems are increasingly being used to clean leachates from landfills. Besides being compact they can, especially, be easily combined with further cleaning techniques. The paper first of all gives an overview on landfill leachate cleaning standards in Austria. A combination of processes is applied where the membrane bioreactor forms a preferred element. Finally, results are presented which should help with the dimensioning of membrane bioreactors. (orig.)

  15. Simulation of Temperature Control in Fermentation Bioreactor for Ethanol Production

    OpenAIRE

    MARGINEAN Calin; MARGINEAN Ana-Maria; TRIFA Viorel

    2012-01-01

    Present paper deals with aspects regardingthe simulation of fermentation bioreactor process andfermentation bioreactor control for ethanolproduction. The bioreactor model was implemented inMatlab Simulink and the results of simulation usingdifferent control strategies are presentedcomparatively. Three types of control strategy are usedrespectively, PID, Neural Network Model PredictiveController (NN-MPC) and Nonlinear Auto RegressiveMoving Average(NARMA-L2) control strategy.

  16. Enzymes as Green Catalysts for Precision Macromolecular Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Shin-Ichiro; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi; Kimura, Shunsaku; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2016-02-24

    The present article comprehensively reviews the macromolecular synthesis using enzymes as catalysts. Among the six main classes of enzymes, the three classes, oxidoreductases, transferases, and hydrolases, have been employed as catalysts for the in vitro macromolecular synthesis and modification reactions. Appropriate design of reaction including monomer and enzyme catalyst produces macromolecules with precisely controlled structure, similarly as in vivo enzymatic reactions. The reaction controls the product structure with respect to substrate selectivity, chemo-selectivity, regio-selectivity, stereoselectivity, and choro-selectivity. Oxidoreductases catalyze various oxidation polymerizations of aromatic compounds as well as vinyl polymerizations. Transferases are effective catalysts for producing polysaccharide having a variety of structure and polyesters. Hydrolases catalyzing the bond-cleaving of macromolecules in vivo, catalyze the reverse reaction for bond forming in vitro to give various polysaccharides and functionalized polyesters. The enzymatic polymerizations allowed the first in vitro synthesis of natural polysaccharides having complicated structures like cellulose, amylose, xylan, chitin, hyaluronan, and chondroitin. These polymerizations are "green" with several respects; nontoxicity of enzyme, high catalyst efficiency, selective reactions under mild conditions using green solvents and renewable starting materials, and producing minimal byproducts. Thus, the enzymatic polymerization is desirable for the environment and contributes to "green polymer chemistry" for maintaining sustainable society. PMID:26791937

  17. Data Management System at the Photon Factory Macromolecular Crystallography Beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macromolecular crystallography is a very powerful tool to investigate three-dimensional structures of macromolecules at the atomic level, and is widely spread among structural biology researchers. Due to recent upgrades of the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Photon Factory, beamline throughput has improved, allowing more experiments to be conducted during a user's beam time. Although the number of beamlines has increased, so has the number of beam time applications. Consequently, both the experimental data from users' experiments and data derived from beamline operations have dramatically increased, causing difficulties in organizing these diverse and large amounts of data for the beamline operation staff and users. To overcome this problem, we have developed a data management system by introducing commercial middleware, which consists of a controller, database, and web servers. We have prepared several database projects using this system. Each project is dedicated to a certain aspect such as experimental results, beam time applications, beam time schedule, or beamline operation reports. Then we designed a scheme to link all the database projects.

  18. Macromolecular Crowding Enhances Thermal Stability of Rabbit Muscle Creatine Kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiang; HE Huawei; LI Sen

    2008-01-01

    The effect of dextran on the conformation (or secondary structure) and thermal stability of creatine kinase (CK) was studied using the far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) spectra.The results showed that lower concentrations of dextran (less than 60 g/L) induced formation of the secondary CK structures.However,the secondary structure content of CK decreased when the dextran concentrations exceeded 60 g/L.Thermally induced transition curves were measured for CK in the presence of different concentrations of dextran by far-UV CD.The thermal transition curves were fitted to a two-state model by a nonlinear,least-squares method to obtain the transition temperature of the unfolding transition.An increase in the tran- sition temperature was observed with the increase of the dextran concentration.These observations qualita-tively accord with predictions of a previously proposed model for the effect of intermolecular excluded volume (macromolecular crowding) on protein stability and conformation.These findings imply that the effects of macromolecular crowding can have an important influence on our understanding of how protein folding oc-curs in vivo.

  19. Cardiac voltage-gated calcium channel macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20years, a new field of research, called channelopathies, investigating diseases caused by ion channel dysfunction has emerged. Cardiac ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the cardiac action potential. Investigators have largely determined the physiological roles of different cardiac ion channels, but little is known about the molecular determinants of their regulation. The voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.2 shapes the plateau phase of the cardiac action potential and allows the influx of calcium leading to cardiomyocyte contraction. Studies suggest that the regulation of Cav1.2 channels is not uniform in working cardiomyocytes. The notion of micro-domains containing Cav1.2 channels and different calcium channel interacting proteins, called macro-molecular complex, has been proposed to explain these observations. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently known information on the Cav1.2 macromolecular complexes in the cardiac cell and discuss their implication in cardiac function and disorder. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26707467

  20. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortony, Julia H.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Franck, John M.; Kausik, Ravinath; Pavlova, Anna; Hunt, Jasmine; Han, Songi

    2011-01-01

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (~r-3) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (=100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ~10 Å distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  1. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described

  2. The Phenix Software for Automated Determination of Macromolecular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul D.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Chen, Vincent B.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Hung, Li-Wei; Jain, Swati; Kapral, Gary J.; Grosse Kunstleve, Ralf W.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Oeffner, Robert D.; Read, Randy J.; Richardson, David C.; Richardson, Jane S.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Zwart, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is a critical tool in the study of biological systems. It is able to provide information that has been a prerequisite to understanding the fundamentals of life. It is also a method that is central to the development of new therapeutics for human disease. Significant time and effort are required to determine and optimize many macromolecular structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data, often using many different software packages, and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. The Phenix software package has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for macromolecular crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on automation. This has required the development of new algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input in favour of built-in expert-systems knowledge, the automation of procedures that are traditionally performed by hand, and the development of a computational framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms. The application of automated methods is particularly appropriate in the field of structural proteomics, where high throughput is desired. Features in Phenix for the automation of experimental phasing with subsequent model building, molecular replacement, structure refinement and validation are described and examples given of running Phenix from both the command line and graphical user interface. PMID:21821126

  3. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch; Pradervand, Claude [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Glettig, Wayne [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland); Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R.; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Dectris Ltd, Baden 5400 (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-05-09

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrence of sulfate reduction was considered to be undesired. However, there are some recent developments in which sulfate reduction is optimized for the removal of sulfur compounds from waste streams. In...

  5. Control of Dissolved Oxygen in Stirred Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Åkesson, Mats; Hagander, Per

    1998-01-01

    This report discusses control of dissolved oxygen in a bioreactor where the oxygen supply is manipulated using the stirrer speed. In batch and fed-batch cultivations the operating conditions change significantly which may cause tuning problems. Analysis using a linearized process model shows that the process dynamics is mainly affected by changes in the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient $K_La$. % To account for the process variations, a control strategy based on PID control and gain sche...

  6. Membrane Bioreactors: Past, Present and Future?

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanowicz, Slav W

    2011-01-01

    A brief description of membrane bioreactor (MBR) historical evolution has been presented with emphasis on continual decline of treatment costs and energy requirements. Although MBR can operate at biomass (MLSS) concentrations 5 to 10 times higher than activated sludge these concentrations are limited in practice by increasing biomass suspension viscosity that in turn increases “reversible” membrane fouling and decreases oxygen transfer rates. “Irreversible” fouling is a major operational chal...

  7. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Fawehinmi, Folasade

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment has historically been considered unsuitable for the treatment of domestic wastewaters. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the incorporation of membranes into the anaerobic bioreactor to uncouple solid retention time and hydraulic retention time. This in turn prevents biomass washout and allows sufficient acclimatisation periods for anaerobes. However, the exposure of membranes to anaerobic biomass comes with its own inherent problems namely fouling. Fouling w...

  8. Oxygen transfer in a pressurized airlift bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, Gilson; Ribeiro, Marcelo Perencin Arruda; Horta, Antônio Carlos Luperni; Giordano, Roberto Campos; Badino, Alberto Colli; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Airlift bioreactors (ALBs) offer advantages over conventional systems, such as simplicity of construction, reduced risk of contamination, and efficient gas-liquid dispersion with low power consumption. ALBs are usually operated under atmospheric pressure. However, in bioprocesses with high oxygen demand, such as high cell density cultures, oxygen limitation may occur even when operating with high superficial gas velocity and air enriched with oxygen. One way of overcoming this drawback is to pressurize the reactor. In this configuration, it is important to assess the influence of bioreactor internal pressure on the gas hold-up, volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a), and volumetric oxygen transfer rate (OTR). Experiments were carried out in a concentric-tube airlift bioreactor with a 5 dm(3) working volume, equipped with a system for automatic monitoring and control of the pressure, temperature, and inlet gas flow rate. The results showed that, in disagreement with previous published results for bubble column and external loop airlift reactors, overpressure did not significantly affect k(L)a within the studied ranges of pressure (0.1-0.4 MPa) and superficial gas velocity in the riser (0.032-0.065 m s(-1)). Nevertheless, a positive effect on OTR was observed: it increased up to 5.4 times, surpassing by 2.3 times the oxygen transfer in a 4 dm(3) stirred tank reactor operated under standard cultivation conditions. These results contribute to the development of non-conventional reactors, especially pneumatic bioreactors operated using novel strategies for oxygen control. PMID:25903476

  9. Immersed Membrane Bioreactors for Produced Water Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Brookes, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor for the duty of gas field produced water treatment was appraised. The system was operated under steady state conditions at a range of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentrations and treatment and membrane performance examined. Organics removal (COD and TOC) display removal rates between 90 and 97%. Removal of specific target compounds Benzene, Toulene, Ethylbenzene and Xylene were removed to above 99% in liquid phase...

  10. Engineering stem cell niches in bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells have the potential to be expanded and differentiated into various cell types in the body. Efficient differentiation of stem cells with the desired tissue-specific function is critical for stem cell-based cell therapy, tissue engineering, drug discovery and disease modeling. Bioreactors provide a great platform to regulate the stem cell microenvironment, known as “ni...

  11. Bioreactor Yields Extracts for Skin Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center researchers created a unique rotating-wall bioreactor that simulates microgravity conditions, spurring innovations in drug development and medical research. Renuèll Int'l Inc., based in Aventure, Florida, licensed the technology and used it to produce a healing skin care product, RE`JUVEL. In a Food and Drug Administration test, RE`JUVEL substantially increased skin moisture and elasticity while reducing dark blotches and wrinkles.

  12. Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Lousada-Ferreira, M

    2011-01-01

    The Thesis entitled “Filterability and Sludge Concentration in Membrane Bioreactors” aims at explaining the relation between Mixed Liquid Suspended Solids (MLSS) concentration, the amount of solids in the wastewater being treated, also designated as sludge, and filterability, being the ability of the sludge to be filtrated through a membrane, in a wastewater treatment system designated as Membrane Bioreactor (MBR). An MBR is a wastewater treatment system that combines an activated sludge proc...

  13. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    OpenAIRE

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Van, Lier, G

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A self-forming dynamic membrane only requires a support material over which a cake layer is formed, which determines the rejection properties of the system. The present research studies the applicat...

  14. Replaceable Sensor System for Bioreactor Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Mike; Savoy, Steve; Bruno, John

    2006-01-01

    A sensor system was proposed that would monitor spaceflight bioreactor parameters. Not only will this technology be invaluable in the space program for which it was developed, it will find applications in medical science and industrial laboratories as well. Using frequency-domain-based fluorescence lifetime technology, the sensor system will be able to detect changes in fluorescence lifetime quenching that results from displacement of fluorophorelabeled receptors bound to target ligands. This device will be used to monitor and regulate bioreactor parameters including glucose, pH, oxygen pressure (pO2), and carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2). Moreover, these biosensor fluorophore receptor-quenching complexes can be designed to further detect and monitor for potential biohazards, bioproducts, or bioimpurities. Biosensors used to detect biological fluid constituents have already been developed that employ a number of strategies, including invasive microelectrodes (e.g., dark electrodes), optical techniques including fluorescence, and membrane permeable systems based on osmotic pressure. Yet the longevity of any of these sensors does not meet the demands of extended use in spacecraft habitat or bioreactor monitoring. It was therefore necessary to develop a sensor platform that could determine not only fluid variables such as glucose concentration, pO2, pCO2, and pH but can also regulate these fluid variables with controlled feedback loop.

  15. Aujeszky's disease virus production in disposable bioreactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Slivac; V Gaurina Srček; K Radošević; I Kmetič; Z Kniewald

    2006-09-01

    A novel, disposable-bag bioreactor system that uses wave action for mixing and transferring oxygen was evaluated for BHK 21 C13 cell line growth and Aujeszky’s disease virus (ADV) production. Growth kinetics of BHK 21 C13 cells in the wave bioreactor during 3-day period were determined. At the end of the 3-day culture period and cell density of 1.82 × 106 cells ml–1, the reactor was inoculated with 9 ml of gE- Bartha K-61 strain ADV suspension (105.9 TCID50) with multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.01. After a 144 h incubation period, 400 ml of ADV harvest was obtained with titre of 107.0 TCID50 ml–1, which corresponds to 40,000 doses of vaccine against AD. In conclusion, the results obtained with the wave bioreactor using BHK 21 C13 cells showed that this system can be considered as suitable for ADV or BHK 21 C13 cell biomass production.

  16. Degradation of Refuse in Hybrid Bioreactor Landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN LONG; Yu-YANG LONG; HAI-CHUN LIU; DONG-SHENG SHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objectivess To explore the process of refuse decomposition in hybrid bioreactor landfill. Methods The bioreactor landfill was operated in sequencing of facultative-anaerobic and aerobic conditions with leachate recireulation, pH, COD, and ammonia in the leachate and pH, biodegradable organic matter (BDM), and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in refuse were detected. Results CEC increased gradually with the degradation of refuse, which was negatively correlad, With BDM. COD and ammonia in the leachate was declined to 399.2 mg L-1 and 20.6 mg N L-1, respectively, during the 357-day operation. The respective concentrations of ammonia and COD were below the second and the third levels of current discharge standards in China. Conclusion The refuse is relatively stable at the end of hybrid bioreactor landfill operation. Most of the readily biodegradable organic matter is mineralized in the initial phase of refuse degradation, whereas the hard-biodegradable organic matter is mainly humidified in the maturity phase of refuse degradation.

  17. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline. PMID:26960130

  18. On macromolecular refinement at subatomic resolution withinteratomic scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre

    2007-11-09

    A study of the accurate electron density distribution in molecular crystals at subatomic resolution, better than {approx} 1.0 {angstrom}, requires more detailed models than those based on independent spherical atoms. A tool conventionally used in small-molecule crystallography is the multipolar model. Even at upper resolution limits of 0.8-1.0 {angstrom}, the number of experimental data is insufficient for the full multipolar model refinement. As an alternative, a simpler model composed of conventional independent spherical atoms augmented by additional scatterers to model bonding effects has been proposed. Refinement of these mixed models for several benchmark datasets gave results comparable in quality with results of multipolar refinement and superior of those for conventional models. Applications to several datasets of both small- and macro-molecules are shown. These refinements were performed using the general-purpose macromolecular refinement module phenix.refine of the PHENIX package.

  19. MR lymphography with macromolecular Gd-DTPA compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the suitability of macromolecular Gd-DTPA compounds as signal-enhancing lymphographic agents in MR imaging. Two Gd-DTPA polylysin compounds and Gd-DTPA albumin, with molecular weights of 48,000,170,000, and 87,000 daltons, respectively, were tested in rabbits at gadolinium doses of 5 and 15 μmol per animal. Three animals were examined at each dose with T1-weighted sequences. The iliac lymph nodes were imaged prior to and during unilateral endolymphatic infusion into a femoral lymph vessel as well as over a period of 2 hours thereafter. All contrast media showed a homogeneous and pronounced signal enhancement in the lymph nodes during infusion at both doses

  20. Macromolecular Crystallization with Microfluidic Free-Interface Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segelke, B

    2005-02-24

    Fluidigm released the Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 crystallization chips in the fall of 2004. Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 are the latest evolution of Fluidigm's microfluidics crystallization technologies that enable ultra low volume rapid screening for macromolecular crystallization. Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 are similar to each other but represent a major redesign of the Topaz system and have of substantially improved ease of automation and ease of use, improved efficiency and even further reduced amount of material needed. With the release of the new Topaz system, Fluidigm continues to set the standard in low volume crystallization screening which is having an increasing impact in the field of structural genomics, and structural biology more generally. In to the future we are likely to see further optimization and increased utility of the Topaz crystallization system, but we are also likely to see further innovation and the emergence of competing technologies.

  1. Protein Coevolution and Isoexpression in Yeast Macromolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner A. Veitia

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that genes encoding subunits of macromolecular complexes have similar evolutionary rates (K and expression levels (E. Besides, it is known that the expression of a gene is a strong predictor of its rate of evolution (i.e., E and K are correlated. Here we show that intracomplex variation of subunit expression correlates with intracomplex variation of their evolutionary rates (using two different measures of dispersion. However, a similar trend was observed for randomized complexes. Therefore, using a mathematical transformation, we created new variables capturing intracomplex variation of both E and K. The values of these new compound variables were smaller for real complexes than for randomized ones. This shows that proteins in complexes tend to have closer expressivities (E and K's simultaneously than in the randomly grouped genes. We speculate about the possible implications of this finding.

  2. Macromolecular organization of xyloglucan and cellulose in pea epicotyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xyloglucan is known to occur widely in the primary cell walls of higher plants. This polysaccharide in most dicots possesses a cellulose-like main chain with three of every four consecutive residues substituted with xylose and minor addition of other sugars. Xyloglucan and cellulose metabolism is regulated by different processes; since different enzyme systems are probably required for the synthesis of their 1,4-β-linkages. A macromolecular complex composed of xyloglucan and cellulose only was obtained from elongating regions of etiolated pea stems. It was examined by light microscopy using iodine staining, by radioautography after labeling with [3H]fructose, by fluorescence microscopy using a fluorescein-lectin (fructose-binding) as probe, and by electron microscopy after shadowing. The techniques all demonstrated that the macromolecule was present in files of cell shapes, referred to here as cell-wall ghosts, in which xyloglucan was localized both on and between the cellulose microfibrils

  3. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  4. Macromolecular contrast agents for MR mammography: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macromolecular contrast media (MMCM) encompass a new class of diagnostic drugs that can be applied with dynamic MRI to extract both physiologic and morphologic information in breast lesions. Kinetic analysis of dynamic MMCM-enhanced MR data in breast tumor patients provides useful estimates of tumor blood volume and microvascular permeability, typically increased in cancer. These tumor characteristics can be applied to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, to define the angiogenesis status of cancers, and to monitor tumor response to therapy. The most immediate challenge to the development of MMCM-enhanced mammography is the identification of those candidate compounds that demonstrate the requisite long intravascular distribution and have the high tolerance necessary for clinical use. Potential mammographic applications and limitations of various MMCM, defined by either experimental animal testing or clinical testing in patients, are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  5. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  6. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (∼r-3) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (<10 μl) and dilute (≥100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ∼10 A distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  7. Facilities for macromolecular crystallography at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three macromolecular crystallography beamlines BL14.1, BL14.2 and BL14.3 at the BESSY II storage ring at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin are described. Three macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) are available for the regional, national and international structural biology user community. The state-of-the-art synchrotron beamlines for MX BL14.1, BL14.2 and BL14.3 are located within the low-β section of the BESSY II electron storage ring. All beamlines are fed from a superconducting 7 T wavelength-shifter insertion device. BL14.1 and BL14.2 are energy tunable in the range 5–16 keV, while BL14.3 is a fixed-energy side station operated at 13.8 keV. All three beamlines are equipped with CCD detectors. BL14.1 and BL14.2 are in regular user operation providing about 200 beam days per year and about 600 user shifts to approximately 50 research groups across Europe. BL14.3 has initially been used as a test facility and was brought into regular user mode operation during the year 2010. BL14.1 has recently been upgraded with a microdiffractometer including a mini-κ goniometer and an automated sample changer. Additional user facilities include office space adjacent to the beamlines, a sample preparation laboratory, a biology laboratory (safety level 1) and high-end computing resources. In this article the instrumentation of the beamlines is described, and a summary of the experimental possibilities of the beamlines and the provided ancillary equipment for the user community is given

  8. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Ravelli, Raimond B. G. [Maastricht University, PO Box 616, Maastricht 6200 MD (Netherlands); Carmichael, Ian [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E., E-mail: john.mcgeehan@port.ac.uk [University of Portsmouth, King Henry 1st Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Quantitative X-ray induced radiation damage studies employing a model protein–DNA complex revealed a striking partition of damage sites. The DNA component was observed to be far more resistant to specific damage compared with the protein. Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N{sub 1}—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses.

  9. STATE OF THE PRACTICE FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - SUMMARY OF USEPA WORKSHOP ON BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: SUMMARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a summary of the Workshop on Landfill Bioreactors, held 9/6-7/2000 in Arlington, VA. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum to EPA, state and local governments, solid waste industry, and academic research representatives to exchange information and ideas on b...

  10. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Final samples from Mir and Earth appeared histologically cartilaginous throughout their entire cross sections (5-8 mm thick), with the exception of fibrous outer capsules. Constructs grown on Earth (A) appeared to have a more organized extracellular matrix with more uniform collagen orientation as compared with constructs grown on Mir (B), but the average collagen fiber diameter was similar in the two groups (22 +- 2 nm) and comparable to that previously reported for developing articular cartilage. Randomly oriented collagen in Mir samples would be consistent with previous reports that microgravity disrupts fibrillogenesis. These are transmission electron micrographs of constructs from Mir (A) and Earth (B) groups at magnifications of x3,500 and x120,000 (Inset). The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  11. MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR TREATMENT OF RECALCITRANT WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprihatin Suprihatin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The low biodegradable wastewaters remain a challenge in wastewater treatment technology. The performance of membrane bioreactor systems with submerged hollow fiber micro- and ultrafiltration membrane modules were examined for purifying recalcitrant wastewaters of leachate of a municipal solid waste open dumping site and effluent of pulp and paper mill. The use of MF and UF membrane bioreactor systems showed an efficient treatment for both types wastewaters with COD reduction of 80-90%. The membrane process achieved the desirable effects of maintaining reasonably high biomass concentration and long sludge retention time, while producing a colloid or particle free effluent. For pulp and paper mill effluent a specific sludge production of 0.11 kg MLSS/kg COD removed was achieved. A permeate flux of about 5 L/m²h could be achieved with the submerged microfiltration membrane. Experiments using ultrafiltration membrane produced relatively low permeate fluxes of 2 L/m²h. By applying periodical backwash, the flux could be improved significantly. It was indicated that the particle or colloid deposition on membrane surface was suppressed by backwash, but reformation of deposit was not effectively be prevented by shear-rate effect of aeration. Particle and colloid started to accumulate soon after backwash. Construction of membrane module and operation mode played a critical role in achieving the effectiveness of aeration in minimizing deposit formation on the membrane surface.

  12. Membrane bioreactor for drinking water denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiros, A.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal)]|[Escola Superior de Tecnologia, Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua do Vale de Chaves, Estefanilha, 2900 Setubal (Portugal); Rodrigues, C.M.; Crespo, J.P.S.G.; Reis, M.A.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal)

    1998-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a membrane bioreactor with cell recycle to be used for drinking water denitrification, when operated with a high nitrate load (up to 7.68 kgNO{sub 3}{sup -}/m{sup 3} day) and low hydraulic retention time (down to 0.625 h). Nitrate and nitrite were always completely removed for all the operational conditions used. The effluent`s nitrite concentration kept below 0.1 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}/l with exception of a short period, during the reactor start-up, when it accumulates. The performance of the membrane bioreactor was also evaluated using a groundwater containing 148 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -}/l. Nitrate and nitrite concentration in the effluent were below the recommended values for drinking water when the reactor was controlled at pH 7.0. The membrane flux decreases during operation as a consequence of membrane fouling. The flux decrease was more severe during operation with synthetic medium than with contaminated groundwater due to the existence of molecular complexes in the synthetic broth. A backshock technique was used to reduce the surface fouling of the membrane. Combining this technique with the use of a reserve asymmetric structured membrane it was found that the membrane flux remains nearly unchanged. (orig.) With 7 figs., 14 refs.

  13. LTCC based bioreactors for cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H.; Welker, T.; Welker, K.; Witte, H.; Müller, J.

    2016-01-01

    LTCC multilayers offer a wide range of structural options and flexibility of connections not available in standard thin film technology. Therefore they are considered as material base for cell culture reactors. The integration of microfluidic handling systems and features for optical and electrical capturing of indicators for cell culture growth offers the platform for an open system concept. The present paper assesses different approaches for the creation of microfluidic channels in LTCC multilayers. Basic functions required for the fluid management in bioreactors include temperature and flow control. Both features can be realized with integrated heaters and temperature sensors in LTCC multilayers. Technological conditions for the integration of such elements into bioreactors are analysed. The temperature regulation for the system makes use of NTC thermistor sensors which serve as real value input for the control of the heater. It allows the adjustment of the fluid temperature with an accuracy of 0.2 K. The tempered fluid flows through the cell culture chamber. Inside of this chamber a thick film electrode array monitors the impedance as an indicator for the growth process of 3-dimensional cell cultures. At the system output a flow sensor is arranged to monitor the continual flow. For this purpose a calorimetric sensor is implemented, and its crucial design parameters are discussed. Thus, the work presented gives an overview on the current status of LTCC based fluid management for cell culture reactors, which provides a promising base for the automation of cell culture processes.

  14. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C. PMID:25022362

  15. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pin-jing; QU Xian; SHAO Li-ming; LEE Duu-jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste(MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95%(61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas.

  16. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pin-Jing; Qu, Xian; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste (MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95% (61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas. PMID:20050569

  17. High retention membrane bioreactors: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-09-01

    Extensive research has focussed on the development of novel high retention membrane bioreactor (HR-MBR) systems for wastewater reclamation in recent years. HR-MBR integrates high rejection membrane separation with conventional biological treatment in a single step. High rejection membrane separation processes currently used in HR-MBR applications include nanofiltration, forward osmosis, and membrane distillation. In these HR-MBR systems, organic contaminants can be effectively retained, prolonging their retention time in the bioreactor and thus enhancing their biodegradation. Therefore, HR-MBR can offer a reliable and elegant solution to produce high quality effluent. However, there are several technological challenges associated with the development of HR-MBR, including salinity build-up, low permeate flux, and membrane degradation. This paper provides a critical review on these challenges and potential opportunities of HR-MBR for wastewater treatment and water reclamation, and aims to guide and inform future research on HR-MBR for fast commercialisation of this innovative technology. PMID:24996563

  18. Performance of pulsed plate bioreactor for biodegradation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of phenol was carried out using Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans immobilised on glass beads, in a pulsed plate bioreactor. The effect of operating parameters like frequency of pulsation and amplitude of pulsation on the performance of pulsed plate bioreactor for biodegradation of phenol in a synthetic wastewater containing 500 ppm phenol was studied. Axial concentration profile measurements revealed that the pulsed plate bioreactor shows continuous stirred tank behaviour. As the amplitude was increased, percentage degradation increased, reaching 100% at amplitude of 4.7 cm and higher. Introduction of pulsation is found to increase the percentage degradation. Percentage degradation has increased with increase in frequency and 100% degradation was achieved at 0.5 s-1 and above. Biofilms developed in a non-pulsed bioreactor were thicker than those in the pulsed plate bioreactor. But biofilm thickness remained almost constant with increasing frequency. Biofilm density was found to be influenced by pulsation. The time required to reach steady state was more for pulsed reactor than the non-pulsed reactor and this start-up time had increased with increase in frequency of pulsation. The performance studies reveal that the pulsed plate bioreactor with immobilized cells has the potential to be an efficient bioreactor for wastewater treatment

  19. JBluIce-EPICS control system for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trio of macromolecular crystallography beamlines constructed by the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) in Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been in growing demand owing to their outstanding beam quality and capacity to measure data from crystals of only a few micrometres in size. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and optical design of these beamlines, a significant effort has been devoted to designing fast, convenient, intuitive and robust beamline controls that could easily accommodate new beamline developments. The GM/CA-CAT beamline controls are based on the power of EPICS for distributed hardware control, the rich Java graphical user interface of Eclipse RCP and the task-oriented philosophy as well as the look and feel of the successful SSRL BluIce graphical user interface for crystallography. These beamline controls feature a minimum number of software layers, the wide use of plug-ins that can be written in any language and unified motion controls that allow on-the-fly scanning and optimization of any beamline component. This paper describes the ways in which BluIce was combined with EPICS and converted into the Java-based JBluIce, discusses the solutions aimed at streamlining and speeding up operations and gives an overview of the tools that are provided by this new open-source control system for facilitating crystallographic experiments, especially in the field of microcrystallography.

  20. Macromolecular Powder Diffraction: Ready for genuine biological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavassili, Fotini; Margiolaki, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of 3D structures of biological molecules plays a major role in both understanding important processes of life and developing pharmaceuticals. Among several methods available for structure determination, macromolecular X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) has transformed over the past decade from an impossible dream to a respectable method. XRPD can be employed in biosciences for various purposes such as observing phase transitions, characterizing bulk pharmaceuticals, determining structures via the molecular replacement method, detecting ligands in protein-ligand complexes, as well as combining micro-sized single crystal crystallographic data and powder diffraction data. Studies using synchrotron and laboratory sources in some standard configuration setups are reported in this review, including their respective advantages and disadvantages. Methods presented here provide an alternative, complementary set of tools to resolve structural problems. A variety of already existing software packages for powder diffraction data processing and analysis, some of which have been adapted to large unit cell studies, are briefly described. This review aims to provide necessary elements of theory and current methods, along with practical explanations, available software packages and highlighted case studies. PMID:26786768

  1. Automated identification of elemental ions in macromolecular crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent-picking procedure in phenix.refine has been extended and combined with Phaser anomalous substructure completion and analysis of coordination geometry to identify and place elemental ions. Many macromolecular model-building and refinement programs can automatically place solvent atoms in electron density at moderate-to-high resolution. This process frequently builds water molecules in place of elemental ions, the identification of which must be performed manually. The solvent-picking algorithms in phenix.refine have been extended to build common ions based on an analysis of the chemical environment as well as physical properties such as occupancy, B factor and anomalous scattering. The method is most effective for heavier elements such as calcium and zinc, for which a majority of sites can be placed with few false positives in a diverse test set of structures. At atomic resolution, it is observed that it can also be possible to identify tightly bound sodium and magnesium ions. A number of challenges that contribute to the difficulty of completely automating the process of structure completion are discussed

  2. Polycapillary x-ray optics for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycapillary x-ray optics have found potential application in many different fields, including antiscatter and magnification in mammography, radiography, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray lithography, and x-ray diffraction techniques. In x-ray diffraction, an optic is used to collect divergent x-rays from a point source and redirect them into a quasi-parallel, or slightly focused beam. Monolithic polycapillary optics have been developed recently for macromolecular crystallography and have already shown considerable gains in diffracted beam intensity over pinhole collimation. Development is being pursued through a series of simulations and prototype optics. Many improvements have been made over the stage 1 prototype reported previously, which include better control over the manufacturing process, reducing the diameter of the output beam, and addition of a slight focusing at the output of the optic to further increase x-ray flux at the sample. The authors report the characteristics and performance of the stage 1 and stage 2 optics

  3. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Helliwell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR in macromolecular crystallography (MX instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development.

  4. Synthesis of a water-soluble macromolecular light stabilizer containing hindered amine structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ma; Mei Meng; Xue Jiang; Bing-Tao Tang; Shu-Fen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A novel water-soluble macromolecular light stabilizer was synthesized by grafting 2-chloro-4,6-bis-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-yl)amino]-1,3,5-triazine onto polyvinylamine.The intermediate 2-chloro-4,6-bis-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-yl)amino]-1,3,5-triazine and the obtained macromolecular light stabilizer were characterized by 1H NMR,HRMS,IR and UV spectroscopy.Cotton fabrics dyed with C.I.Reactive Yellow 145,C.l.Reactive Red 195 and C.I.Reactive Blue 19 were finished with the macromolecular light stabilizer,and the lightfastness of the dyes was tested.The results showed that the lightfastness of the reactive dyes was improved by 0.5-1.0 grade after being finished and the macromolecular light stabilizer exhibited good wash fastness and thermal stability.

  5. Mechanobiologic Research in a Microgravity Environment Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, A.; Dubini, G.; Tominetti, F.; Raimondi, M.

    A current problem in tissue culturing technology is the unavailability of an effective Bioreactor for the in vitro cultivation of cells and explants. It has, in fact, proved extremely difficult to promote the high-density three-dimensional in vitro growth of human tissues that have been removed from the body and deprived of their normal in vivo vascular sources of nutrients and gas exchange. A variety of tissue explants can be maintained for a short period of time on a supportive collagen matrix surrounded by culture medium. But this system provides only limited mass transfer of nutrients and wastes through the tissue, and gravity-induced sedimentation prevents complete three- dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Several devices presently on the market have been used with only limited success since each has limitations, which restrict usefulness and versatility. Further, no Bioreactor or culture vessel is known that will allow for unimpeded growth of three dimensional cellular aggregates or tissue. Extensive research on the effect of mechanical stimuli on cell metabolism suggests that tissues may respond to mechanical stimulation via loading-induced flow of the interstitial fluids. During the culture, cells are subject to a flow of culture medium. Flow properties such as flow field, flow regime (e.g. turbulent or laminar), flow pattern (e.g. circular), entity and distribution of the shear stress acting on the cells greatly influence fundamental aspects of cell function, such as regulation and gene expression. This has been demonstrated for endothelial cells and significant research efforts are underway to elucidate these mechanisms in various other biological systems. Local fluid dynamics is also responsible of the mass transfer of nutrients and catabolites as well as oxygenation through the tissue. Most of the attempts to culture tissue-engineered constructs in vitro have utilized either stationary cultures or systems generating relatively small

  6. Rapid Metal -free Macromolecular Coupling via in situ Nitrile Oxide-Activated Alkene Cycloaddition

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacman, Michael J.; Cui, Weibin; Theogarajan, Luke S.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrile oxide 1,3 dipolar cycloaddition is a simple and powerful coupling methodology. However, the self-dimerization of nitrile oxides has prevented the widespread use of this strategy for macromolecular coupling. By combining an in situ nitrile oxide generation with a highly reactive activated dipolarophile, we have overcome these obstacles and present a metal-free macromolecular coupling strategy for the modular synthesis of several ABA triblock copolymers. Nitrile oxides were generated in...

  7. Production of monoclonal antibody with Celline-350 bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies are protein that are highly specific and sensitive in their reaction with specific sites on target molecules that they have become reagents of central importance in the diagnostic and treatment of human diseases. This paper reports the use of CELLine-350 bioreactor to produce continuous supply of serum-free breast cancer monoclonal antibody. Initial volume of 5ml (1.5 x 106 viable cells/ml) is inoculated into the bioreactor and harvesting is done every 5 days to obtain high yield monoclonal antibody. The serum-free supernatant is precipitated with 50% saturated ammonia sulfate and the antibody is purified by protein-G affinity chromatography. The concentration of monoclonal antibody successfully produced by the bioreactor is 0.91mg/ml respectively and it is measured by the Lowry method. This result shows that bioreactor Celline-350 is easy to handle and cost effective for the continuous production of serum free monoclonal antibody. (Author)

  8. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN - METHANOTROPHIC BIOREACTOR SYSTEM - BIOTROL, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BioTrol's Methanotrophic Bioreactor is an above-ground remedial system for water contaminated with halogenated volatile organic compounds, including trichloroethylene (ICE) and related chemicals. Its design features circumvent problems peculiar to treatment of this unique class o...

  9. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals. PMID:27322258

  10. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Spaulding, Glenn F.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Flechsig, Scott; Jones, Leslie; Soehnge, Holly

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) is a bioreactor system designed for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue-engineering investigations on orbiting spacecraft and in laboratories on Earth. The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear culture environment simultaneously with the "herding" of suspended cells, tissue assemblies, and air bubbles. Under development for use in the Biotechnology Facility on the International Space Station, the HFB has successfully grown large three-dimensional, tissuelike assemblies from anchorage-dependent cells and grown suspension hybridoma cells to high densities. The HFB, based on the principle of hydrodynamic focusing, provides the capability to control the movement of air bubbles and removes them from the bioreactor without degrading the low-shear culture environment or the suspended three-dimensional tissue assemblies. The HFB also provides unparalleled control over the locations of cells and tissues within its bioreactor vessel during operation and sampling.

  11. Salmonella Typhimurium grown in a rotating wall bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium appears green in on human intestinal tissue (stained red) cultured in a NASA rotating wall bioreactor. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  12. Hairy root culture: bioreactor design and process intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Amanda R; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    The cultivation of hairy roots for the production of secondary metabolites offers numerous advantages; hairy roots have a fast growth rate, are genetically stable, and are relatively simple to maintain in phytohormone free media. Hairy roots provide a continuous source of secondary metabolites, and are useful for the production of chemicals for pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food additives. In order for hairy roots to be utilized on a commercial scale, it is necessary to scale-up their production. Over the last several decades, significant research has been conducted on the cultivation of hairy roots in various types of bioreactor systems. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various bioreactor systems, the major factors related to large-scale bioreactor cultures, process intensification technologies and overview the mathematical models and computer-aided methods that have been utilized for bioreactor design and development. PMID:23604206

  13. Modelling across bioreactor scales: methods, challenges and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Scale-up and scale-down of bioreactors are very important in industrial biotechnology, especially with the currently available knowledge on the occurrence of gradients in industrial-scale bioreactors. Moreover, it becomes increasingly appealing to model such industrial scale systems, considering...... that it is challenging and expensive to acquire experimental data of good quality that can be used for characterizing gradients occurring inside a large industrial scale bioreactor. But which model building methods are available? And how can one ensure that the parameters in such a model are properly...... estimated? And what are the limitations of different types of mod - els? This paper will provide examples of models that have been published in the literature for use across bioreactor scales, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance models. Furthermore, the importance of good...

  14. Upflow bioreactor with septum and pressure release mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Conly L.; Hansen, Carl S.; Pack, Kevin; Milligan, John; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Tolman, C. Wayne; Tolman, Kenneth W.

    2010-04-20

    An upflow bioreactor includes a vessel having an inlet and an outlet configured for upflow operation. A septum is positioned within the vessel and defines a lower chamber and an upper chamber. The septum includes an aperture that provides fluid communication between the upper chamber and lower chamber. The bioreactor also includes means for releasing pressure buildup in the lower chamber. In one configuration, the septum includes a releasable portion having an open position and a closed position. The releasable portion is configured to move to the open position in response to pressure buildup in the lower chamber. In the open position fluid communication between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is increased. Alternatively the lower chamber can include a pressure release line that is selectively actuated by pressure buildup. The pressure release mechanism can prevent the bioreactor from plugging and/or prevent catastrophic damage to the bioreactor caused by high pressures.

  15. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals. PMID:27322258

  16. Water reuse by membrane bioreactors (MBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows an up-to date overview of the use of membrane bioreactor (MBR) to obtain water treated for reusing it. Considering the existing rules. it has been presented a summary of published studies in which the quality of the effluent is analyzed in terms on physico-chemical and biological parameters. Furthermore, MBR results are compared with the conventional treatment ones. Due to the suitability of MBR technology for removing pathogens, particular attention has been paid to disinfection process and the mechanism that govern it. Results from reviewed studies of MBR have showed equal or better quality of water treated than conventional treatments (activated sludge plus disinfection tertiary treatment by the addition of antibacterial agents). (Author) 32 refs.

  17. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  18. Robust Control Methods for a Recycle Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin IONETE

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a robust control design strategy for bioprocesses, which are characterized by strongly nonlinear dynamics. More precisely, we present the H2 methodology in order to compute the controller for a recycle Continuous Stirred Tank Bioreactor (CSTB. We consider a general method of formulating control problem, which makes use of linear fractional transformation as introduced by Doyle (1978. The formulation makes use of the general two-port configuration of the generalized plant with a generalized controller. The H2 norm is the quadratic criterion used in optimal control as LQG. The overall control objective is to minimize the H2 norm of the transfer matrix function from the weighted exogenous inputs to the weighted controlled outputs. The advantage of H2 control technique, which uses the linearized model of the CSTB, is that it is completely automated and very flexible. Finally, we prove that the closed loop control structure has very good inner robustness.

  19. Microbial Bioreactor Development in the ALS NSCORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cary; Whitaker, Dawn; Banks, M. Katherine; Heber, Albert J.; Turco, Ronald F.; Nies, Loring F.; Alleman, James E.; Sharvelle, Sybil E.; Li, Congna; Heller, Megan

    The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training in Advanced Life Support (the ALS NSCORT), a partnership of Alabama A & M, Howard, and Purdue Universities, was established by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that will reduce the Equivalent System Mass (ESM) of regenerative processes within future space life-support systems. A key focus area of NSCORT research has been the development of efficient microbial bioreactors for treatment of human, crop, and food-process wastes while enabling resource recovery. The approach emphasizes optimizing the energy-saving advantages of hydrolytic enzymes for biomass degradation, with focus on treatment of solid wastes including crop residue, paper, food, and human metabolic wastes, treatment of greywater, cabin air, off-gases from other treatment systems, and habitat condensate. This summary includes important findings from those projects, status of technology development, and recommendations for next steps. The Plant-based Anaerobic-Aerobic Bioreactor-Linked Operation (PAABLO) system was developed to reduce crop residue while generating energy and/or food. Plant residues initially were added directly to the bioreactor, and recalcitrant residue was used as a substrate for growing plants or mushrooms. Subsequently, crop residue was first pretreated with fungi to hydrolyze polymers recalcitrant to bacteria, and leachate from the fungal beds was directed to the anaerobic digester. Exoenzymes from the fungi pre-soften fibrous plant materials, improving recovery of materials that are more easily biodegraded to methane that can be used for energy reclamation. An Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD) system was developed for biodegradable solid wastes. Objectives were to increase water and nutrient recovery, reduce waste volume, and inactivate pathogens. Operational parameters of the reactor were optimized for degradation and resource recovery while minimizing system requirements and footprint. The start-up behavior

  20. Start-up Strategy for Continuous Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. da Costa

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - The start-up of continuous bioreactors is solved as an optimal control problem. The choice of the dilution rate as the control variable reduces the dimension of the system by making the use of the global balance equation unnecessary for the solution of the optimization problem. Therefore, for systems described by four or less mass balance equations, it is always possible to obtain an analytical expression for the singular arc as a function of only the state variables. The steady state conditions are shown to satisfy the singular arc expression and, based on this knowledge, a feeding strategy is proposed which leads the reactor from an initial state to the steady state of maximum productivity

  1. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  2. Radiotracer investigation in a rotary fluidized bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rotary fluidized bioreactor (RFBR) designed for treatment of wastewater was required to be investigated for its hydrodynamic behaviour and validation of design. A radiotracer investigation was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of wastewater in the RFBR using 82Br as a radiotracer. The radiotracer was instantaneously injected into the inlet feed line and monitored at the inlet and outlet of the reactor using collimated scintillation detectors connected to a data acquisition system. The measured RTD data was treated and simulated using a tanks-in-series model and model parameters i.e. number of tanks describing the degree of mixing was obtained. The results of the investigation showed no flow abnormalities and the reactor behaved as an ideal continuously stirred-tank reactor at all the operating conditions. Based on the results, the design of the reactor was validated. (author)

  3. The Role of Bioreactors in Tissue Engineering for Musculoskeletal Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Oragui, Emeka; Nannaparaju, Madhusudhan; Khan, Wasim S.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering involves using the principles of biology, chemistry and engineering to design a ‘neotissue’ that augments a malfunctioning in vivo tissue. The main requirements for functional engineered tissue include reparative cellular components that proliferate on a biocompatible scaffold grown within a bioreactor that provides specific biochemical and physical signals to regulate cell differentiation and tissue assembly. We discuss the role of bioreactors in tissue engineering and eva...

  4. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in an immobilized cell airlift bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermanshahi Pour, A.; Karamanev, D.; Margaritis, A. [Universityn of Western Ontario, London (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    2005-09-01

    An ''immobilized cell airlift bioreactor'', was used for the aerobic bioremediation of simulated diesel fuel contaminated groundwater and tested with p-xylene and naphthalene in batch and continuous regimes. The innovative design of the experiments consists of two stages. At the first stage ''immobilized soil bioreactor'' (ISBR) was used to develop an efficient microbial consortium from the indigenous microorganisms, which exist in diesel fuel contaminated soil. The concept of ISBR relies on the entrapment of the soil particles into the pores of a semi-permeable membrane, which divides the bioreactor into two aerated and non-aerated portions. The second stage involves inoculating the ''immobilized cell air lift bioreactor'' with the cultivated microbial consortia of the first stage. Immobilized cell airlift bioreactor has the same configuration as ISBR except that in this bioreactor instead of soil, microorganisms were immobilized on the fibers of the membrane. The performance of a 0.83 L immobilized cell airlift bioreactor was investigated at various retention time (0.5-6 h) and concentrations of p-xylene (15, 40 and 77 mg/L) and naphthalene (8, 15 and 22 mg/L) in the continuous operation. In the batch regime, 0.9 L bioreactor was operated at various biodegradation times (15-135 min) and concentrations of p-xylene (13.6, 44.9 and 67.5 mg/L) and naphthalene (1.5 and 3.8 mg/L). Under the conditions of the complete biodegradation of p-xylene and naphthalene, the obtained volumetric biodegradation rates at biomass density of 720 mg/L were 15 and 16 mg/L h, respectively. (author)

  5. Optimisation of a hollow fibre membrane bioreactor for water refuse

    OpenAIRE

    Verrecht, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, implementation of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) has increased due to their superior effluent quality and low plant footprint. However, they are still viewed as a high-cost option, both with regards to capital and operating expenditure (capex and opex). The present thesis extends the understanding of the impact of design and operational parameters of membrane bioreactors on energy demand, and ultimately whole life cost. A simple heuristic aeration model ...

  6. Integrated operation of membrane bioreactors: simulation and experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmau Figueras, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are a combination of common bioreactors and membrane filtration units for biomass retention, presenting unique advantages like high effluent quality and a smaller footprint than the one by conventional wastewater treatment plants. However, fouling and its associated costs are the main drawbacks related to this technology. This thesis presents a step towards the integrated operation of MBRs through experimental and model-based studies. Interactions between the biolog...

  7. Studies on a Novel Bioreactor Design for Chondrocyte Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Harshad; Chandel, Ishan Saurav; Rastogi, Amit K.; Srivastava, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    A bioreactor system plays an important role in tissue engineering and enables reproduction and controlled changes in the environmental factor. The bioreactor provides technical means to perform controlled processes in safe and reduced reproducible generation of time. Cartilage cells were grown in vitro by mimicking the in vivo condition. The basic unit of cartilage, that is, chondrocyte, requires sufficient shear, strain, and hydrodynamic pressure for regular growth as it is nonvascular tissu...

  8. A Compact X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Gibson, Walter; Joy, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high flux x-ray system for a macromolecular crystallography that combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 micrometer full width at half maximum spot size at a power level of 46.5 W) and a collimating polycapillary optic. The Cu Ka lpha x-ray flux produced by this optimized system through a 500,um diam orifice is 7.0 times greater than the x-ray flux previously reported by Gubarev et al. [M. Gubarev et al., J. Appl. Crystallogr. 33, 882 (2000)]. The x-ray flux from the microfocus system is also 2.6 times higher than that produced by a rotating anode generator equipped with a graded multilayer monochromator (green optic, Osmic Inc. CMF24-48-Cu6) and 40% less than that produced by a rotating anode generator with the newest design of graded multilayer monochromator (blue optic, Osmic, Inc. CMF12-38-Cu6). Both rotating anode generators operate at a power level of 5000 W, dissipating more than 100 times the power of our microfocus x-ray system. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals are of high quality. For example, 42 540 reflections collected at ambient temperature from a lysozyme crystal yielded R(sub sym)=5.0% for data extending to 1.70 A, and 4.8% for the complete set of data to 1.85 A. The amplitudes of the observed reflections were used to calculate difference electron density maps that revealed positions of structurally important ions and water molecules in the crystal of lysozyme using the phases calculated from the protein model.

  9. A Compact X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Joy, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high flux x-ray system for macromolecular crystallography that combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 gm FWHM spot size at a power level of 46.5Watts) and a 5.5 mm focal distance polycapillary optic. The Cu K(sub alpha) X-ray flux produced by this optimized system is 7.0 times above the X-ray flux previously reported. The X-ray flux from the microfocus system is also 3.2 times higher than that produced by the rotating anode generator equipped with a long focal distance graded multilayer monochromator (Green optic; CMF24-48-Cu6) and 30% less than that produced by the rotating anode generator with the newest design of graded multilayer monochromator (Blue optic; CMF12-38-Cu6). Both rotating anode generators operate at a power level of 5000 Watts, dissipating more than 100 times the power of our microfocus x-ray system. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals are of high quality. For example, 42,540 reflections collected at ambient temperature from a lysozyme crystal yielded R(sub sym) 5.0% for the data extending to 1.7A, and 4.8% for the complete set of data to 1.85A. The amplitudes of the reflections were used to calculate difference electron density maps that revealed positions of structurally important ions and water molecules in the crystal of lysozyme using the phases calculated from the protein model.

  10. Macromolecular compositions of phytoplankton in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Kyung; Lee, Jang Han; Joo, HuiTae; Song, Ho Jung; Yang, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Sang H.

    2016-01-01

    The biochemical compositions (proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) of phytoplankton provide useful information for their environmental growth conditions and nutritional status as a basic food source for upper trophic consumers. Concentrations of these compositions were assessed at 100, 30, and 1% light penetration depths within the euphotic zone in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, using colorimetric techniques. The major inorganic nutrients were generally abundant throughout the study area. The average chlorophyll a (chl-a) concentration was 49.2 mg m-2 (S.D.=±27.6 mg m-2) and large phytoplankton (>20 μm) accounted for 64.1% of the total chl-a concentration. The biochemical compositions of the phytoplankton were not significantly different among different light depths or productivity stations. The overall compositions of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids from all stations averaged 65.9% (S.D.=±12.5%), 22.4% (S.D.=±10.9%), and 11.7% (S.D.=±6.5%), respectively. Regardless of dominant phytoplankton species, nitrogen-abundant conditions sustained high protein compositions of phytoplankton in the Amundsen Sea during the cruise period. Based on the macromolecular compositions, the average food material (FM) concentration was 219.4 μg L-1 (S.D.=±151.1 μg L-1) and correlated positively with the primary productivity in the Amundsen Sea. High protein/carbohydrate ratios (>1) and large proportions of proteins suggest that phytoplankton provide nitrogen-sufficient foods to higher trophic consumers through a higher efficiency of protein carbon incorporated into herbivores.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of macromolecular layers grafted to polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtovyy, Oleksandr

    The composition and behavior of surfaces and interfaces play a pivotal role in dictating the overall efficiency of the majority of polymeric materials and devices. Surface properties of the materials can be altered using surface modification techniques. It is necessary to highlight that successful methods of surface modification should affect only the upper layer of the polymer material without changing bulk properties. The processes must introduce new functionalities to the surface, optimize surface roughness, lubrication, hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, adhesion, conductivity, and/or biocompatibility. Research presented in this dissertation is dedicated to the synthesis, characterization, and application of thin macromolecular layers anchored to polymer substrates. Specifically, attachment of functional polymers via a "grafting to" approach has been extensively studied using PET and nylon model substrates. First, poly(glycidyl methacrylate) was used to introduce permanent functionalities to the model substrates by anchoring it to model films. Then, three different functional polymers were grafted on top of the previous layer. As one part of this study, the temperature and time dependence of grafting functional layers were studied. The surface coverage by hydrophobic polymer was determined from experimental data and predicted by a model. In general, the model has a high degree of predictive capability. Next, surface modification of polymeric fibers and membranes is presented as an important application of the polymer thin layers targeted in the study. Specifically, the procedures developed for surface modification of model substrates was employed for modification of PET, nylon, and cotton fabrics as well as PET track-etched membranes. Since epoxy groups are highly reactive in various chemical reactions, the approach becomes virtually universal, allowing both various surfaces and end-functionalized macromolecules to be used in the grafted layer synthesis. PET

  12. Changing the warm-up transition of macromolecular system at irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The whole complex of characteristics of macromolecular system is defined by its warm-up condition. So for revealing a consequence of irradiating it is necessary study of warm-up turning the molecules of chain construction from the energy of irradiation. As is well known an irradiation is accompanied by suturing or destruction of separate kinetic units. In given work is studied changing a warm-up interval of high-elastic state of macromolecular system depending on energy of irradiating for the reason extrapolation its results to deciding the applied problems of ecological, metabolically processes. Coming from theories free volume and Boltzmann's distribution were determined changing the temperatures of glassing and viscous current. The variable parameter considered models is a mobility factor, which is defined as an attitude radiation energy to energy of Van-der-Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds, where energy of irradiation is taken much less, than energy of chemical bond. Restriction of energy of inter- and intramolecular chemical unbound kinetic units guarantees wholeness of the macromolecular chains that it is required for functional quality conservations. The obtained results show that than more deflection of mobility factor from units, that broader area high-elastic considered model of macromolecular system. Changing a warm-up interval also enough vastly depends on the free member of deciding, which characterizes a condition of polymer before the irradiation. Rendered that the most vulnerable to irradiating is hard chain macromolecular system

  13. Bioconversion of High Concentrations of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur in Airlift Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abdel-Monaem Zytoon; Abdulraheem Ahmad AlZahrani; Madbuli Hamed Noweir; Fadia Ahmed El-Marakby

    2014-01-01

    Several bioreactor systems are used for biological treatment of hydrogen sulfide. Among these, airlift bioreactors are promising for the bioconversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. The performance of airlift bioreactors is not adequately understood, particularly when directly fed with hydrogen sulfide gas. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of an airlift bioreactor fed with high concentrations of H2S with special emphasis on the effect of pH in combinat...

  14. Operation of a fluidized-bed bioreactor for denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two denitrification fluidized-bed bioreactors of the same length (i.e., 5 m) but with different inside diameters (i.e., 5 and 10 cm) have been operated on feed ranging in nitrate concentration from 200 to 2000 g/m3; thus far, good agreement has been obtained. Two 10-cm-ID bioreactors operating in series have also been tested; the results are in accordance with predicted results based on the performance of a 5-cm-ID bioreactor. The overall denitrification rate in the dual 10-cm-ID bioreactor system was found to be 23 kg N(NO3-)/day-m3 using feed with a nitrate concentration of 1800 g/m3. Data obtained in operating-temperature tests indicate that the maximum denitrification rate is achieved between 22 and 300C. These data will form the basis of the design of our mobile pilot plant which consists of dual 20-cm-ID by 7.3-m-long bioreactors

  15. Bioreactor technology for production of valuable algal products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Cai; Cao, Ying

    1998-03-01

    Bioreactor technology has long been employed for the production of various (mostly cheap) food and pharmaceutical products. More recently, research has been mainly focused on the development of novel bioreactor technology for the production of high—value products. This paper reports the employment of novel bioreactor technology for the production of high-value biomass and metabolites by microalgae. These high-value products include microalgal biomass as health foods, pigments including phycocyanin and carotenoids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. The processes involved include heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultures using organic substrates as the carbon source. We have demonstrated that these bioreactor cultivation systems are particularly suitable for the production of high-value products from various microalgae. These cultivation systems can be further modified to improve cell densities and productivities by using high cell density techniques such as fed-batch and membrane cell recycle systems. For most of the microalgae investigated, the maximum cell concentrations obtained using these bioreactor systems in our laboratories are much higher than any so far reported in the literature.

  16. Osteocytes Mechanosensing in NASA Rotating Wall Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Jordan; Sibonga, Jean; Wu, Honglu; Barry, Kevin; Bouxsein, Mary; Pajevic, Paola Divieti

    2010-01-01

    Osteocyte cells are the most abundant (90%) yet least understood bone cell type in the human body. Osteocytes are theorized to be the mechanosensors and transducers of mechanical load for bones, yet the biological mechanism of this action remains elusive. However, recent discoveries in osteocyte cell biology have shed light on their importance as key mechanosensing cells regulating bone remodeling and phosphate homeostasis. The aim of this project was to characterize gene expression patterns and protein levels following exposure of MLO-Y4, a very well characterized murine osteocyte-like cell line, to simulated microgravity using the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor. To determine mechanistic pathways of the osteocyte's gravity sensing ability, we evaluated in vitro gene and protein expression of osteocytes exposed to simulated microgravity. Improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of mechano transduction at the osteocyte cellular level may lead to revolutionary treatment otions to mitigate the effects of bone loss encountered by astronauts on long duration space missions and provide tailored treatment options for maintaining bone strength of immobilized/partially paralyzed patients here on Earth.

  17. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-05-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment.

  18. Bioreactor for acid mine drainage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluski, Marek H.; Manchester, Kenneth R.

    2001-01-01

    A bioreactor for reacting an aqueous heavy metal and sulfate containing mine drainage solution with sulfate reducing bacteria to produce heavy metal sulfides and reduce the sulfuric acid content of the solution. The reactor is an elongated, horizontal trough defining an inlet section and a reaction section. An inlet manifold adjacent the inlet section distributes aqueous mine drainage solution into the inlet section for flow through the inlet section and reaction section. A sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition in the inlet section provides sulfate reducing bacteria that with the sulfuric acid and heavy metals in the solution to form solid metal sulfides. The sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition is retained in the cells of a honeycomb structure formed of cellular honeycomb panels mounted in the reactor inlet section. The honeycomb panels extend upwardly in the inlet section at an acute angle with respect to the horizontal. The cells defined in each panel are thereby offset with respect to the honeycomb cells in each adjacent panel in order to define a tortuous path for the flow of the aqueous solution.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of miktoarm star copolymer of styrene and butadiene using multifunctional macromolecular initiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Yan Zhang; Xing Ying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A new kind of multifunctional macromolecular initiator with Sn-C bonds and polydiene arms was synthesized by living anionic polymerization.At first,polydiene-stannum chloride(PD-SnCl3)was prepared by the reaction of n-butyl-Li(n-BuLi),stannic chloride(SnCl4)and diene.Then PD-SnCl3 was used to react with the dilithium initiator to prepare the multifunctional organic macromolecular initiators.The result suggested that the initiators had a remarkable yield by GPC,nearly 90%.By using these multifunctional macromolecular initiators,styrene and butadiene were effectively polymerized via anionic polymerization,which gave birth to novel miktoarm star copolymers.The relative molecular weight and polydispersity index,microstructure contents,copolymerization components,glass transition temperature(Tg)and morphology of the miktoarm star copolymers were investigated by GPC-UV,1H NMR,DSC and TEM,respectively.

  20. Performance of anaerobic membrane bioreactor during digestion and thickening of aerobic membrane bioreactor excess sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafuka, Akira; Mimura, Kazuhisa; Ding, Qing; Yamamura, Hiroshi; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor in terms of digestion and thickening of excess sludge from an aerobic membrane bioreactor. A digestion reactor equipped with an external polytetrafluoroethylene tubular microfiltration membrane module was operated in semi-batch mode. Solids were concentrated by repeated membrane filtration and sludge feeding, and their concentration reached 25,400mg/L after 92d. A high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, i.e., 98%, was achieved during operation. A hydraulic retention time of 34d and a pulse organic loading rate of 2200mg-COD/(L-reactor) gave a biogas production rate and biogas yield of 1.33L/(reactor d) and 0.08L/g-CODinput, respectively. The external membrane unit worked well without membrane cleaning for 90d. The transmembrane pressure reached 25kPa and the filtration flux decreased by 80% because of membrane fouling after operation for 90d. PMID:27394993

  1. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited enzymatic reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Agrawal; S B Santra; Rajat Anand; Rajaram Swaminathan

    2008-08-01

    The cytoplasm of a living cell is crowded with several macromolecules of different shapes and sizes. Molecular diffusion in such a medium becomes anomalous due to the presence of macromolecules and diffusivity is expected to decrease with increase in macromolecular crowding. Moreover, many cellular processes are dependent on molecular diffusion in the cell cytosol. The enzymatic reaction rate has been shown to be affected by the presence of such macromolecules. A simple numerical model is proposed here based on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some of the experimental observations.

  2. Effect of macromolecular polymer structures on drag reduction in a turbulent channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the influence of injected polymer solutions on turbulence in fully developed channel flows. In particular, it investigates the impact of concentration and mixing of the polymer solution on drag reduction. It is observed, via flow visualization and birefringence measurements, that for large injection concentrations macromolecular polymer structures exist in the flow. They are found to be mostly located in the neighborhood of the channel centerline. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to characterize the mean and turbulent flow with and without the presence of macromolecular polymer structures

  3. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  4. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines. PMID:27232665

  5. Biological reduction of nitrate wastewater using fluidized-bed bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a number of nitrate-containing wastewater sources, as concentrated as 30 wt % NO3- and as large as 2000 m3/d, in the nuclear fuel cycle as well as in many commercial processes such as fertilizer production, paper manufacturing, and metal finishing. These nitrate-containing wastewater sources can be successfully biologically denitrified to meet discharge standards in the range of 10 to 20 gN(NO3-)/m3 by the use of a fluidized-bed bioreactor. The major strain of denitrification bacteria is Pseudomonas which was derived from garden soil. In the fluidized-bed bioreactor the bacteria are allowed to attach to 0.25 to 0.50-mm-diam coal particles, which are fluidized by the upward flow of influent wastewater. Maintaining the bacteria-to-coal weight ratio at approximately 1:10 results in a bioreactor bacteria loading of greater than 20,000 g/m3. A description is given of the results of two biodenitrification R and D pilot plant programs based on the use of fluidized bioreactors capable of operating at nitrate levels up to 7000 g/m3 and achieving denitrification rates as high as 80 gN(NO3-)/d per liter of empty bioreactor volume. The first of these pilot plant programs consisted of two 0.2-m-diam bioreactors, each with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 208 liters, operating in series. The second pilot plant was used to determine the diameter dependence of the reactors by using a 0.5-m-diam reactor with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 1200 liters. These pilot plants operated for a period of six months and two months respectively, while using both a synthetic waste and the actual waste from a gaseous diffusion plant operated by Goodyear Atomic Corporation

  6. ANAEROBIC MEMBRANE BIOREACTORS FOR DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMENT. PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The operation of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SAnMBRs for domestic wastewaters treatment was studied in laboratory scale, with the objective to define sustainable filtration conditions of the suspensions along the process. During continuous experiments, the organic matter degradation by anaerobic way showed an average DQOT removal of 85% and 93%. Indeed, the degradation generated biogas after 12 days of operation and its relative methane composition was of 60% after 25 days of operation. Additionally, the comparison between membrane bioreactors (MBRs performance in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in filterability terms, reported that both systems behave similarly once reached the stationary state.

  7. BIOREACTOR WITH LID FOR EASY ACCESS TO INCUBATION CAVITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible.......There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible....

  8. Production of galanthamine by Leucojum aestivum shoots grown in different bioreactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Anika; Berkov, Strahil; Claus, Diana; Gerth, André; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles

    2012-08-01

    The production of galanthamine by shoots of Leucojum aestivum grown in different bioreactor systems (shaking and nonshaking batch culture, temporary immersion system, bubble bioreactor, continuous and discontinuous gassing bioreactor) under different culture conditions was studied. The influence of the nutrient medium, weight of inoculum, and size of bioreactor on both growth and galanthamine production was studied. The maximal yield of galanthamine (19.416 mg) was achieved by cultivating the L. aestivum shoots (10 g of fresh inoculum) in a temporary immersion system in a 1-L bioreactor vessel which was used as an airlift culture vessel, gassing 12 times per day (5 min). PMID:22639366

  9. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology for growing three-dimensional plant tissue models in a hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) has been developed. The methodology is expected to be widely applicable, both on Earth and in outer space, as a means of growing plant cells and aggregates thereof under controlled conditions for diverse purposes, including research on effects of gravitation and other environmental factors upon plant growth and utilization of plant tissue cultures to produce drugs in quantities greater and at costs lower than those of conventional methodologies. The HFB was described in Hydro focus - ing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture (MSC-22358), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 66. To recapitulate: The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear liquid culture environment simultaneously with the herding of suspended cells and tissue assemblies and removal of unwanted air bubbles. The HFB includes a rotating cell-culture vessel with a centrally located sampling port and an internal rotating viscous spinner attached to a rotating base. The vessel and viscous spinner can be made to rotate at the same speed and direction or different speeds and directions to tailor the flow field and the associated hydrodynamic forces in the vessel in order to obtain low-shear suspension of cells and control of the locations of cells and air bubbles. For research and pharmaceutical-production applications, the HFB offers two major benefits: low shear stress, which promotes the assembly of cells into tissue-like three-dimensional constructs; and randomization of gravitational vectors relative to cells, which affects production of medicinal compounds. Presumably, apposition of plant cells in the absence of shear forces promotes cell-cell contacts, cell aggregation, and cell differentiation. Only gentle mixing is necessary for distributing nutrients and oxygen. It has been postulated that inasmuch as cells in the simulated

  10. Optimizing of Bioreactor Heat Supply and Material Feeding by Numerical Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Song, Boyan; Zhu, Likuan; Li, Zuntao; Wang, Yang

    Cell culture at large scale normally uses stirred structure. And the situation of temperature field distribution is very important to the cell culture at large scale. Some cells are very sensitive to the circumstances. The local temperature is too high or too low all influences the cell survival and low the cell quantity at unit volume. This paper simulates the temperature field under three different heating conditions. Then analysis and contrast the simulation results. The mixed situation in bioreactor is extremely significant for nutrition transmit. Usually, use ways to measure the average mixture time in bioreactor, and improve the mixture circumstance in the bioreactor through stirred impeller and bioreactor structure change. This paper adopts numerical calculation method to investigate the flow field in bioreactor. It gets the mixture time of bioreactor through virtual tracer in simulate flow field and detects the tracer density time variation curve in the bioreactor.

  11. Productivity Studies Utilizing Recombinant CHO Cells In Stirred-Tank Bioreactors: A Comparative Study Between The Pitch-Blade And The Packed-Bed Bioreactor Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hatton, Taylor Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A recombinat Chinese Hamster Ovary (rCHO) cell line designated as CHO SEAP was utilized in this investigation to optimize protein production. Two bench top stirred-tank bioreactors, namely a pitched-blade and a packed-bed basket bioreactor, were utilized for a comparative study to determine which bioreactor would produce the best results in terms of protein production. The objective of this research project was to provide basic data that shows cells cultured in a packed-bed basket bioreactor ...

  12. Interplay between the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS and macromolecular crowding in compacting DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

      In this dissertation we discuss H-NS and its connection to nucleoid compaction and organization. Nucleoid formation involves a dramatic reduction in coil volume of the genomic DNA. Four factors are thought to influence coil volume: supercoiling, DNA charge neutralization, macromolecular crow

  13. The interplay of intrinsic disorder and macromolecular crowding on α-synuclein fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2016-02-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is an intrinsically disordered protein which is considered to be one of the causes of Parkinson's disease. This protein forms amyloid fibrils when in a highly concentrated solution. The fibril formation of α-syn is induced not only by increases in α-syn concentration but also by macromolecular crowding. In order to investigate the coupled effect of the intrinsic disorder of α-syn and macromolecular crowding, we construct a lattice gas model of α-syn in contact with a crowding agent reservoir based on statistical mechanics. The main assumption is that α-syn can be expressed as coarse-grained particles with internal states coupled with effective volume; and disordered states are modeled by larger particles with larger internal entropy than other states. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, we can exactly calculate the number of conformations of crowding agents, and this enables us to prove that the original grand canonical ensemble with a crowding agent reservoir is mathematically equivalent to a canonical ensemble without crowding agents. In this expression, the effect of macromolecular crowding is absorbed in the internal entropy of disordered states; it is clearly shown that the crowding effect reduces the internal entropy. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we provide scenarios of crowding-induced fibril formation. We also discuss the recent controversy over the existence of helically folded tetramers of α-syn, and suggest that macromolecular crowding is the key to resolving the controversy.

  14. Detection and cellular localisation of the synthetic soluble macromolecular drug carrier pHPMA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kissel, M.; Peschke, P.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Strunz, A. M.; Kühnlein, R.; Debus, J.; Friedrich, E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2002), s. 1055-1062. ISSN 1619-7070 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV307/96/K226 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : EPR effect * Radiolabelled macromolecules * Pharmacokinetic Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.568, year: 2002

  15. Developing genetic tools to exploit Chaetomium thermophilum for biochemical analyses of eukaryotic macromolecular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Nikola Kellner; Johannes Schwarz; Miriam Sturm; Javier Fernandez-Martinez; Sabine Griesel; Wenzhu Zhang; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Ulrich Kück; Ed Hurt

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method to genetically manipulate Chaetomium thermophilum, a eukaryotic thermophile, along with various biochemical applications. The transformation method depends on a thermostable endogenous selection marker operating at high temperatures combined with chromosomal integration of target genes. Our technique allows exploiting eukaryotic thermophiles as source for purifying thermostable native macromolecular complexes with an emphasis on the nuclear pore complex, holding great pot...

  16. Oxygen Sensors Monitor Bioreactors and Ensure Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In order to cultivate healthy bacteria in bioreactors, Kennedy Space Center awarded SBIR funding to Needham Heights, Massachusetts-based Polestar Technologies Inc. to develop sensors that could monitor oxygen levels. The result is a sensor now widely used by pharmaceutical companies and medical research universities. Other sensors have also been developed, and in 2013 alone the company increased its workforce by 50 percent.

  17. NASA's Bioreactor: Growing Cells in a Microgravity Environment. Educational Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This brief discusses growing cells in a microgravity environment for grades 9-12. Students are provided with plans for building a classroom bioreactor that can then be used with the included activity on seed growth in a microgravity environment. Additional experimental ideas are also suggested along with a history and background on microgravity…

  18. Modelling and characterization of an airlift-loop bioreactor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, P.

    1987-01-01

    An airlift-loop reactor is a bioreactor for aerobic biotechnological processes. The special feature of the ALR is the recirculation of the liquid through a downcomer connecting the top and the bottom of the main bubbling section. Due to the high circulation-flow rate, efficient mixing and oxygen tra

  19. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  20. Scale-up of bioreactors: physiological approach contra geometrical similarity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prell, Aleš; Sobotka, Miroslav; Kujan, Petr; Votruba, Jaroslav; Flieger, Miroslav

    Brooklyn, NY : Verlag, 2006, s. 15-15. [Natural Products Discovery and Production: New Challenges; New Opportunities. Santa Fe (US), 04.06.2006-08.06.2006] Grant ostatní: XE(XE) COOP-CT-2003-508169 BIOFERM Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : scale-up * bioreactors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  1. Introducing Textiles as Material of Construction of Ethanol Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osagie A. Osadolor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional materials for constructing bioreactors for ethanol production are stainless and cladded carbon steel because of the corrosive behaviour of the fermenting media. As an alternative and cheaper material of construction, a novel textile bioreactor was developed and examined. The textile, coated with several layers to withstand the pressure, resist the chemicals inside the reactor and to be gas-proof was welded to form a 30 L lab reactor. The reactor had excellent performance for fermentative production of bioethanol from sugar using baker’s yeast. Experiments with temperature and mixing as process parameters were performed. No bacterial contamination was observed. Bioethanol was produced for all conditions considered with the optimum fermentation time of 15 h and ethanol yield of 0.48 g/g sucrose. The need for mixing and temperature control can be eliminated. Using a textile bioreactor at room temperature of 22 °C without mixing required 2.5 times longer retention time to produce bioethanol than at 30 °C with mixing. This will reduce the fermentation investment cost by 26% for an ethanol plant with capacity of 100,000 m3 ethanol/y. Also, replacing one 1300 m3 stainless steel reactor with 1300 m3 of the textile bioreactor in this plant will reduce the fermentation investment cost by 19%.

  2. Internal hydraulics of an agricultural drainage denitrification bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification bioreactors to reduce the amount of nitrate-nitrogen in agricultural drainage are now being deployed across the U.S. Midwest. However, there are still many unknowns regarding internal hydraulic-driven processes in these "black box" engineered treatment systems. To improve this unders...

  3. Optimising Microbial Growth with a Bench-Top Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. M. R.; Borin, S. L.; Chooi, K. P.; Huang, S. S.; Newgas, A. J. S.; Sodagar, D.; Ziegler, C. A.; Chan, G. H. T.; Walsh, K. A. P.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of impeller size, agitation and aeration on the rate of yeast growth were investigated using bench-top bioreactors. This exercise, carried out over a six-month period, served as an effective demonstration of the importance of different operating parameters on cell growth and provided a means of determining the optimisation conditions…

  4. Performance of Submerged Membrane Bioreactor for Domestic Wastewater Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the present research, a submerged membrane bioreactor was tested to treat domestic wastewater. Three experimental runs were conducted all with a hydraulic retention time of 5h and sludge retention times (SRTs) of 5, 10, and 20 d. The pollutant removal performance of the membrane bioreactor, the membrane effluent quality, and a kinetic model for sludge growth in the bioreactor were investigated. The combined process was capable of removing over 90% of both COD (chemical oxygen demand) and NH3-N on the average. The total removal for COD was almost independent of SRT, but that for NH3-N improved with increasing SRT. Membrane effluent quality meets the water quality standard for reuse issued by the Ministry of Construction of China. Increasing SRT causes the concentrations of suspended solids (SS) and volatile suspended solids (VSS) in the bioreactor to increase. However, the ratio of VSS/SS did not change much. Kinetic analysis showed that the sludge yield coefficient (kg-VSS·kg-COD-1) and the endogenous coefficient of microorganisms were 0.25 and 0.04d-1, which are similar to those of the conventional activated sludge process.

  5. Bioreactor landfill technology in municipal solid waste treatment: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Mudhoo, Ackmez

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, due to an advance in knowledge of landfill behaviour and decomposition processes of municipal solid waste, there has been a strong thrust to upgrade existing landfill technologies for optimizing these degradation processes and thereafter harness a maximum of the useful bioavailable matter in the form of higher landfill gas generation rates. Operating landfills as bioreactors for enhancing the stabilization of wastes is one such technology option that has been recently investigated and has already been in use in many countries. A few full-scale implementations of this novel technology are gaining momentum in landfill research and development activities. The publication of bioreactor landfill research has resulted in a wide pool of knowledge and useful engineering data. This review covers leachate recirculation and stabilization, nitrogen transformation and corresponding extensive laboratory- and pilot-scale research, the bioreactor landfill concept, the benefits to be derived from this bioreactor landfill technology, and the design and operational issues and research trends that form the basis of applied landfill research. PMID:20578971

  6. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented

  7. Hydraulic flow characteristics of agricultural residues for denitrifying bioreactor media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrifying bioreactors are a promising technology to mitigate agricultural subsurface drainage nitrate-nitrogen losses, a critical water quality goal for the Upper Mississippi River Basin. This study was conducted to evaluate the hydraulic properties of agricultural residues that are potential bio...

  8. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleva, I.; Lecheva, A.

    2015-10-01

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  9. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleva, I., E-mail: izheleva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Heat Technology, Hydraulics and Ecology, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria); Lecheva, A., E-mail: alecheva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Mathematics, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria)

    2015-10-28

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  10. BIOREACTOR WITH LID FOR EASY ACCESS TO INCUBATION CAVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Fey, S J; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS AT A BIOREACTOR LANDFILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report focuses on three field campaigns performed in 2002 and 2003 to measure fugitive emissions at a bioreactor landfill in Louisville, KY, using an open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The study uses optical remote sensing-radial plume mapping. The horizontal...

  12. Reduced Order Dead-Beat Observers for a Bioreactor

    CERN Document Server

    Karafyllis, Iasson

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the strong observability property and the reduced-order dead-beat observer design problem for a continuous bioreactor. New relationships between coexistence and strong observability, and checkable sufficient conditions for strong observability, are established for a chemostat with two competing microbial species. Furthermore, the dynamic output feedback stabilization problem is solved for the case of one species.

  13. Simulating woodchip bioreactor performance using a dual-porosity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate in the Nation's surface waters has been a persistent health and ecological problem. The major source of nitrate is tile drainage from agricultural row crops. Denitrification bioreactors have been shown to be effective in removing much of the nitrate from tile drains. While we understand i...

  14. Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors For Cost-Effective Municipal Water Reuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özgün, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology has been increasingly researched for municipal wastewater treatment as a means to produce nutrient-rich, solids free effluents with low levels of pathogens, while occupying a small footprint. An AnMBR can be used not only for on-site

  15. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somerville Robert PT

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scales in both static bags and the WAVE bioreactor. Both bioreactors produced comparable numbers of cells; however the cultures generated in the WAVE bioreactor had a higher percentage of CD4+ cells and had a less activated phenotype. Conclusions The WAVE bioreactor simplifies the process of rapidly expanding tumor reactive lymphocytes under GMP conditions, and provides an alternate approach to cell generation for ACT protocols.

  16. Production of bacterial cellulose membranes in a modified airlift bioreactor by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Chi; Li, Meng-Hsun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a novel bioreactor for producing bacterial cellulose (BC) is proposed. Traditional BC production uses static culture conditions and produces a gelatinous membrane. The potential for using various types of bioreactor, including a stirred tank, conventional airlift, and modified airlift with a rectangular wire-mesh draft tube, in large-scale production has been investigated. The BC obtained from these bioreactors is fibrous or in pellet form. Our proposed airlift bioreactor produces a membrane-type BC from Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the water-holding capacity of which is greater than that of cellulose types produced using static cultivation methods. The Young's modulus of the product can be manipulated by varying the number of net plates in the modified airlift bioreactor. The BC membrane produced using the proposed bioreactor exhibits potential for practical application. PMID:25823854

  17. Drug-Free Macromolecular Therapeutics--A New Paradigm in Polymeric Nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Te-Wei; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-07-01

    This review highlights a unique research area in polymer-based nanomedicine designs. Drug-free macromolecular therapeutics induce apoptosis of malignant cells by the crosslinking of surface non-internalizing receptors. The receptor crosslinking is mediated by the biorecognition of high-fidelity natural binding motifs (such as antiparallel coiled-coil peptides or complementary oligonucleotides) that are grafted to the side chains of polymers or attached to targeting moieties against cell receptors. This approach features the absence of low-molecular-weight cytotoxic compounds. Here, we summarize the rationales, different designs, and advantages of drug-free macromolecular therapeutics. Recent developments of novel therapeutic systems for B-cell lymphomas are discussed, as well as relevant approaches for other diseases. We conclude by pointing out various potential future directions in this exciting new field. PMID:26191406

  18. Clustering procedures for the optimal selection of data sets from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic approach to the scaling and merging of data from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography is introduced and explained. The availability of intense microbeam macromolecular crystallography beamlines at third-generation synchrotron sources has enabled data collection and structure solution from microcrystals of <10 µm in size. The increased likelihood of severe radiation damage where microcrystals or particularly sensitive crystals are used forces crystallographers to acquire large numbers of data sets from many crystals of the same protein structure. The associated analysis and merging of multi-crystal data is currently a manual and time-consuming step. Here, a computer program, BLEND, that has been written to assist with and automate many of the steps in this process is described. It is demonstrated how BLEND has successfully been used in the solution of a novel membrane protein

  19. Extraction of cobalt ion from textile using a complexing macromolecular surfactant in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobalt ion under the form of cobalt nitrate is removed from a textile lab coat using supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. The process involves a macromolecular additive of well-defined architecture, acting both as a surfactant and a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency of cobalt reaches 66% when using a poly(1,1,2,2-tetrahydroperfluoro-decyl-acrylate-co-vinyl-benzylphosphonic diacid) gradient copolymer in the presence of water at 160 bar and 40 C. The synergy of the two additives, namely the copolymer and water which are useless if used separately, is pointed out. The potential of the supercritical carbon dioxide process using complexing macromolecular surfactant lies in the ability to modulate the complexing unit as a function of the metal as well as the architecture of the surface-active agent for applications ranging for instance from nuclear decontamination to the recovery of strategic metals. (authors)

  20. Quantification of Complex Topologies in Macromolecular and Nanoscale Structures using Small-Angle Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Siddharth; Ramachandran, Ramanth; Rai, Durgesh; Beaucage, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    Polymers are characterized by molecular weight distribution, tacticity, block copolymer content and branch content and chain topology. The branch structure and particularly the topology of branched chains has remained a difficult characterization problem. Recently we have developed a scaling model that can be coupled with small-angle scattering to measure the average branch length, number of branches and branch-on-branch structure in macromolecules of complex topology. This method has been extended to understand the structure of two dimensional structures and crumpling in these macromolecular systems. We have explored a wide range of materials in this regard. This poster will give an overview of the current uses for the scaling model for macromolecular topology. References pertaining to this poster can be found at http://www.eng.uc.edu/˜gbeaucag/BranchingPapers.html.

  1. Pi sampling: a methodical and flexible approach to initial macromolecular crystallization screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi sampling, derived from the incomplete factorial approach, is an effort to maximize the diversity of macromolecular crystallization conditions and to facilitate the preparation of 96-condition initial screens. The Pi sampling method is derived from the incomplete factorial approach to macromolecular crystallization screen design. The resulting ‘Pi screens’ have a modular distribution of a given set of up to 36 stock solutions. Maximally diverse conditions can be produced by taking into account the properties of the chemicals used in the formulation and the concentrations of the corresponding solutions. The Pi sampling method has been implemented in a web-based application that generates screen formulations and recipes. It is particularly adapted to screens consisting of 96 different conditions. The flexibility and efficiency of Pi sampling is demonstrated by the crystallization of soluble proteins and of an integral membrane-protein sample

  2. Thermodynamics and kinetics of apoazurin folding under macromolecular crowding effect and chemical interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegarra, Fabio; Cheung, Margaret

    2013-03-01

    Proteins fold in a cellular milieu crowded by different kinds of macromolecules. They exert volume exclusion impacting protein folding processes in vivo. Folding processes, however, has been studied by chemical denaturation under in vitro conditions. The impact of the two factors as an attempt to advance the understanding of folding mechanism in vivo is not understood. Here, we investigate the folding mechanisms of apoazurin affected by the macromolecular crowding and chemical interference by using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Crowding agents are modeled as hard-spheres and the chemical denaturation effects are implemented into an energy function of the side chain and backbone interactions. Protein folding stability, mechanism, and kinetics rates of apoazurin under chemical interference and macromolecular crowding conditions are being investigated. Supported by NSF, Molecular & Cellular Biosciences (MCB0919974).

  3. PIMADb: A Database of Protein–Protein Interactions in Huge Macromolecular Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Oommen K.; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions play a very important role in the process of cellular functionality. Intricate details about the interactions between the proteins in a macromolecular assembly are important to understand the function and significance of protein complexes. We are reporting about a database of protein–protein interactions in huge macromolecular assemblies (PIMADb) that records the intrinsic details of 189,532 interchain interactions in 40,049 complexes from the Protein Data Bank. These details include the results of the quantification and analysis of all the interactions in the complex. The availability of interprotomer interaction networks can enable the design of point mutation experiments. PIMADb can be accessed from the URL: http://caps.ncbs.res.in/pimadb PMID:27478368

  4. Effect of Component Mobility on the Properties of Macromolecular [2]Rotaxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Aoki, Daisuke; Uchida, Satoshi; Marubayashi, Hironori; Nojima, Shuichi; Takata, Toshikazu

    2016-02-18

    Macromolecular [2]rotaxanes comprising a polymer axle and crown ether wheel were synthesized to evaluate the effect of component mobility on the properties of the axle polymer, especially its crystallinity. Living ring-opening polymerization of δ-valerolactone with a pseudorotaxane initiator with a hydroxy group at the axle terminus was followed by end-capping with a bulky isocyanate. This yielded macromolecular [2]rotaxanes (M2Rs) possessing polyester axles of varying molecular weights. The crystallinity of the axle polymers of two series of M2Rs, with either fixed and movable components, was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry. The results revealed that the effect of component mobility was significant in the fixed and movable M2Rs with a certain axle length, thus suggesting that the properties of the axle polymer depend on the mobility of the polyrotaxane components. PMID:26806916

  5. Characterization of wax as a potential diffraction intensity standard for macromolecular crystallography beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao-Neto, J; Thompson, S P; Lennie, A R; Ferreira, F F; Tang, C C

    2010-01-01

    A number of commercially available waxes in the form of thin disc samples have been investigated as possible diffraction intensity standards for macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines. Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements show that beeswax offers the best performance of these waxes owing to its polycrystallinity. Crystallographic lattice parameters and diffraction intensities were examined between 281 and 309 K, and show stable and predictable thermal behaviour. Using an X-ray beam of known incident flux at lambda = 1 A, the diffraction power of two strong Bragg reflections for beeswax were quantified as a function of sample thickness and normalized to 10(10) photons s(-1). To demonstrate its feasibility as a diffraction intensity standard, test measurements were then performed on a new third-generation macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamline. PMID:20029111

  6. Characterization of organic membrane foulants in a forward osmosis membrane bioreactor treating anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Tian, Yu; Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Feng; You, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this study, two aerobic forward osmosis (FO) membrane bioreactors (MBR) were utilized to treat the effluent of mesophilic (35°C) and atmospheric (25°C) anaerobic MBRs, respectively. The results showed that the FO membrane process could significantly improve the removal efficiencies of N and P. Meanwhile, the flux decline of the FOMBR treating effluent of mesophilic AnMBR (M-FOMBR) was higher than that treating effluent of atmospheric AnMBR (P-FOMBR). The organic membrane foulants in the two FOMBRs were analyzed to understand the membrane fouling behavior in FO processes. It was found that the slightly increased accumulation of protein-like substances into external foulants did not cause faster flux decline in P-FOMBR than that in M-FOMBR. However, the quantity of organic matter tended to deposit or adsorb into FO membrane pores in P-FOMBR was less than that in M-FOMBR, which was accordance with the tendency of membrane fouling indicated by flux decline. PMID:24976492

  7. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be...

  8. A Nonlinear Elasticity Model of Macromolecular Conformational Change Induced by Electrostatic Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Y. C. ZHOU; Holst, Michael; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a nonlinear elasticity model of macromolecular conformational change (deformation) induced by electrostatic forces generated by an implicit solvation model. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrostatic potential is analyzed in a domain varying with the elastic deformation of molecules, and a new continuous model of the electrostatic forces is developed to ensure solvability of the nonlinear elasticity equations. We derive the estimates of electrostatic forces ...

  9. Macromolecular HPMA-based nanoparticles with cholesterol in solution and blood enviroment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippov, Sergey K.; Chytil, Petr; Vishnevetskaya, N.; Niebuur, B.-J.; Pánek, Jiří; Janoušková, Olga; Pilař, Jan; Starovoytova, Larisa; Bogomolova, Anna; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Štěpánek, Petr; Papadakis, C. M.

    Dresden : Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V. (IPF), 2015. 217 /BIO-P-073/. ISBN 978-3-936028-89-8. [European Polymer Federation Congress 2015. 21.06.2015-26.06.2015, Dresden] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-10527J Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA * cholesterol * blood Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  10. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Rodriguez, Brian J.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulate...

  11. From “Simple” DNA-Protein Interactions to the Macromolecular Machines of Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    von Hippel, Peter H.

    2007-01-01

    The physicochemical concepts that underlie our present ideas on the structure and assembly of the “macromolecular machines of gene expression” are developed, starting with the structure and folding of the individual protein and DNA components, the thermodynamics and kinetics of their conformational rearrangements during complex assembly, and the molecular basis of the sequence specificity and recognition interactions of the final assemblies that include the DNA genome. The role of diffusion i...

  12. PIMA: Protein-Protein interactions in Macromolecular Assembly - a web server for its Analysis and Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Kaleeckal Mathew, Oommen; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are essential for the basic biological machinery of the cell. This is important for processes like protein synthesis, enzyme kinetics, molecular assembly and signal transduction. A high number of macromolecular structural complexes are known due to recent advances in structure determination techniques. Therefore, it is of interest to develop an interactive tool to objectively analyze large protein complexes. Hence, we describe the development and utility of a web ...

  13. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and free from radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract statistically...

  14. STUDY ON HYDROLYSIS OF MACROMOLECULAR GELATIN WITH ENZYMES IN COMBINATION MODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-qin Huang; Rui Guan; Ming-zhi Huang

    2004-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of macromolecular gelatin with AS1.398 neutral protease, bromelain and their combinations was studied by estimating the molecular weights of their hydrolytic products. It was discovered that the products hydrolyzed by using combination enzymes had lower molecular weight than those obtained by using single ones,and the kind of enzymes, their combination mode and addition sequence are effective ways to control the molecular weights of gelatin hydrolyzates.

  15. Definitions of terms relating to individual macromolecules, macromolecular assemblies, polymer solutions, and amorphous bulk polymers (IUPAC Recommendations 2014)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stepto, R.; Chang, T.; Kratochvíl, Pavel; Hess, M.; Horie, K.; Sato, T.; Vohlídal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2015), s. 71-120. ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amorphous polymers * bulk polymers * IUPAC Polymer Division Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.492, year: 2014

  16. σ2R, a reciprocal-space measure of the quality of macromolecular electron-density maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reciprocal-space measure of the quality of macromolecular crystallographic phases based on the variance of the local roughness of the map is presented. It has previously been shown that the presence of distinct regions of solvent and protein in macromolecular crystals leads to a high value of the standard deviation of local r.m.s. electron density and that this can in turn be used as a reliable measure of the quality of macromolecular electron-density maps [Terwilliger & Berendzen (1999a ▶). Acta Cryst. D55, 501–505]. Here, it is demonstrated that a similar measure, θR2, the variance of the local roughness of the electron density, can be calculated in reciprocal space. The formulation is suitable for rapid evaluation of macromolecular crystallographic phases, for phase improvement and for ab initio phasing procedures

  17. Sludge Bulking Property of Membrane Bio-reactor in Albumen Wqastewater Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Albumen wastewater was treated by Membrane Bio-reactor. Sludge bulking property of Membrane Bio-Reactor was investigated in this study through contrast research. When the sludge bulking appeared, the removal efficiency of COD in Membrane Bio-reactor increased slightly under the function of filamentous bacteria. However, the negative effects of the higher net water-head differential pressures,the higher block rate of membrane pore and the great quantity of filamentous bacteria at the externalsurface pres...

  18. Rheological characterization of mixed liquor in a submerged membrane bioreactor: Interest for process management

    OpenAIRE

    Van Kaam, Romuald; Anne-Archard, Dominique; Alliet-Gaubert, Marion; Albasi, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Rheological analyses of a submerged membrane bioreactor mixed liquor were performed in the aim of characterizing the mixed liquor present in the bioreactor and thus proposing a process management. These analyses pointed out that the mixed liquor was characterized by its viscoplastic property, which leads to a possible restructuring ability when a shear stress lower than the yield stress is applied. As the shear stress in the bioreactor is essentially generated by coarse bubbles, specific expe...

  19. Biodegradation of Trichloroethylene in Continuous-Recycle Expanded-Bed Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Phelps, T. J.; Niedzielski, J. J.; Schram, R M; Herbes, S. E.; White, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental bioreactors operated as recirculated closed systems were inoculated with bacterial cultures that utilized methane, propane, and tryptone-yeast extract as aerobic carbon and energy sources and degraded trichloroethylene (TCE). Up to 95% removal of TCE was observed after 5 days of incubation. Uninoculated bioreactors inhibited with 0.5% Formalin and 0.2% sodium azide retained greater than 95% of their TCE after 20 days. Each bioreactor consisted of an expanded-bed column through wh...

  20. An Update to Space Biomedical Research: Tissue Engineering in Microgravity Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Barzegari; Amir Ata Saei

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The severe need for constructing replacement tissues in organ transplantation has necessitated the development of tissue engineering approaches and bioreactors that can bring these approaches to reality. The inherent limitations of conventional bioreactors in generating realistic tissue constructs led to the devise of the microgravity tissue engineering that uses Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors initially developed by NASA. Methods: In this review article, we intend to hig...

  1. [Adaptation of coimmobilized Rhodococcus cells to oil hydrocarbons in a column bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrennikova, M K; Kuiukina, M S; Krivoruchko, A V; Ivshina, I B

    2014-01-01

    The possible adaptation of the association of Rhodococcus ruber and Rhodococcus opacus strains immobilized on modified sawdust to oil hydrocarbons in a column bioreactor was investigated. In the bioreactor, the bacterial population showed higher hydrocarbon and antibiotic resistance accompanied by the changes in cell surface properties (hydrophobicity, electrokinetic potential) and in the content of cellular lipids and biosurfactants. The possibility of using adapted Rhodococcus strains for the purification of oil-polluted water in the bioreactor was demonstrated. PMID:25757338

  2. Imaging Analysis of the In vivo Bioreactor: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, Ginger E.; Halpern, Jennifer L.; Lynch, Conor C.; Devin, Clinton J; Schwartz, Herbert S.

    2008-01-01

    The in vivo bioreactor is a hermetically sealed, acellular hydroxyapatite scaffold coated with growth factors that has a pulsating vascular pedicle leash threaded through its center. Tissue-engineered bone is created in weeks while the bioreactor remains embedded under the skin of an animal. The bioreactor also provides a model to study osteogenesis and pathologic scenarios such as tumor progression and metastasis by creating a controlled microenvironment that makes skeletogenesis amenable to...

  3. Mathematical modeling and experimental testing of three bioreactor configurations based on windkessel models

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve Lachance; Jean Ruel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of three bioreactor configurations. The bioreactor is intended to be used for the development of tissue-engineered heart valve substitutes. Therefore it must be able to reproduce physiological flow and pressure waveforms accurately. A detailed analysis of three bioreactor arrangements is presented using mathematical models based on the windkessel (WK) approach. First, a review of the many applications of this approach in medical studies enhances its f...

  4. High cell density and productivity culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells in a fluidized bed bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, D.; Cardak, S.; Chen, M.; Gentz, R; Zhang, J.

    1999-01-01

    A recombinant Chinese hamster ovary clone was cultivated in a 2L Cytopilot Mini fluidized bed bioreactor using Cytoline 1 microcarriers and a 10L B. Braun stirred tank bioreactor with Cytodex 1 microcarriers. Cytoline 1 is a macroporous polyethylene microcarrier and Cytodex 1 is a solid DEAE-dextran microcarrier. Cytoline 1 microcarriers in the fluidized bed bioreactor were gently mixed by an uplifting flow. Circulation and sparging in Cytopilot Mini were separated from the fluidized microcar...

  5. A smooth and differentiable bulk-solvent model for macromolecular diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for modeling the bulk solvent in macromolecular diffraction data based on Babinet’s principle is presented. The proposed models offer the advantage of differentiability with respect to atomic coordinates. Inclusion of low-resolution data in macromolecular crystallography requires a model for the bulk solvent. Previous methods have used a binary mask to accomplish this, which has proven to be very effective, but the mask is discontinuous at the solute–solvent boundary (i.e. the mask value jumps from zero to one) and is not differentiable with respect to atomic parameters. Here, two algorithms are introduced for computing bulk-solvent models using either a polynomial switch or a smoothly thresholded product of Gaussians, and both models are shown to be efficient and differentiable with respect to atomic coordinates. These alternative bulk-solvent models offer algorithmic improvements, while showing similar agreement of the model with the observed amplitudes relative to the binary model as monitored using R, Rfree and differences between experimental and model phases. As with the standard solvent models, the alternative models improve the agreement primarily with lower resolution (>6 Å) data versus no bulk solvent. The models are easily implemented into crystallographic software packages and can be used as a general method for bulk-solvent correction in macromolecular crystallography

  6. Macromolecular knot in good and poor solvents: a Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huan-Quan; Zhang, Lu; Liao, Qi

    2010-09-30

    The probability and dimension of the simple macromolecular knots over a wide range of temperatures corresponding from good to poor solvents are investigated by Monte Carlo simulation. Macromolecular knots are modeled as rings of self-avoiding walks on a simple cubic lattice with the nearest neighbor attractions. We found that there is a minimum probability for the unknotted ring at a certain temperature. The size dependence of trivial, trefoil, and figure-eight knots on chain lengths and temperatures is presented. The simulation results for the size dependence on the knot's complication in different solvents are in good qualitative agreement with prediction of the scaling model proposed by Grosberg et al. The critical exponent for long chain is independent of the knot types based on the simulation results, although the mean square radius of gyration is influenced significantly by the knot types for a shorter length macromolecular ring. We calculated the ratio of the topological invariant p of trefoil knot and figure-eight knot and found that the ratio is approaching to 1.3 with the increasing of the chain length. PMID:20825151

  7. Principles and Overview of Sampling Methods for Modeling Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Ryan; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of macromolecular structure and dynamics is fundamental to understanding how macromolecules carry out their functions in the cell. Significant advances have been made toward this end in silico, with a growing number of computational methods proposed yearly to study and simulate various aspects of macromolecular structure and dynamics. This review aims to provide an overview of recent advances, focusing primarily on methods proposed for exploring the structure space of macromolecules in isolation and in assemblies for the purpose of characterizing equilibrium structure and dynamics. In addition to surveying recent applications that showcase current capabilities of computational methods, this review highlights state-of-the-art algorithmic techniques proposed to overcome challenges posed in silico by the disparate spatial and time scales accessed by dynamic macromolecules. This review is not meant to be exhaustive, as such an endeavor is impossible, but rather aims to balance breadth and depth of strategies for modeling macromolecular structure and dynamics for a broad audience of novices and experts. PMID:27124275

  8. Principles and Overview of Sampling Methods for Modeling Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, Tatiana; Moffatt, Ryan; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Shehu, Amarda

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of macromolecular structure and dynamics is fundamental to understanding how macromolecules carry out their functions in the cell. Significant advances have been made toward this end in silico, with a growing number of computational methods proposed yearly to study and simulate various aspects of macromolecular structure and dynamics. This review aims to provide an overview of recent advances, focusing primarily on methods proposed for exploring the structure space of macromolecules in isolation and in assemblies for the purpose of characterizing equilibrium structure and dynamics. In addition to surveying recent applications that showcase current capabilities of computational methods, this review highlights state-of-the-art algorithmic techniques proposed to overcome challenges posed in silico by the disparate spatial and time scales accessed by dynamic macromolecules. This review is not meant to be exhaustive, as such an endeavor is impossible, but rather aims to balance breadth and depth of strategies for modeling macromolecular structure and dynamics for a broad audience of novices and experts. PMID:27124275

  9. Principles and Overview of Sampling Methods for Modeling Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Maximova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of macromolecular structure and dynamics is fundamental to understanding how macromolecules carry out their functions in the cell. Significant advances have been made toward this end in silico, with a growing number of computational methods proposed yearly to study and simulate various aspects of macromolecular structure and dynamics. This review aims to provide an overview of recent advances, focusing primarily on methods proposed for exploring the structure space of macromolecules in isolation and in assemblies for the purpose of characterizing equilibrium structure and dynamics. In addition to surveying recent applications that showcase current capabilities of computational methods, this review highlights state-of-the-art algorithmic techniques proposed to overcome challenges posed in silico by the disparate spatial and time scales accessed by dynamic macromolecules. This review is not meant to be exhaustive, as such an endeavor is impossible, but rather aims to balance breadth and depth of strategies for modeling macromolecular structure and dynamics for a broad audience of novices and experts.

  10. Tuning the properties of an anthracene-based PPE-PPV copolymer by fine variation of its macromolecular parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tinti, F.; Sabir, F. K.; Gazzano, M.; Righi, S.; Ulbricht, C.; Usluer, Ö.; Pokorná, Veronika; Cimrová, Věra; Yohannes, T.; Egbe, D. A. M.; Camaioni, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 19 (2013), s. 6972-6980. ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/12/0827; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-26542S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : anthracene-containing PPE-PPV copolymer * macromolecular parameters * structural and transport properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.708, year: 2013

  11. Bacterial study of the anaerobic bioreactor for distillery effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study relates with anaerobic bioreactors of Habib Sugar Mills, Nawabshah. Bacterial growth was studied through microscope along with its effect on the production of methane gas (Biogas) at all HRTs (Hydraulic Retention Times) between 15 and 28 days. The bacterium has the efficiency to convert 12% glucose within 24 hours to final product and cell mass. The acetogenic organisms also show their maximum growth on glucose in BGP-1 and BPG-2 at both the corks, where as Methanogenic organisms have shown their zero shown their zero growth on glucose. The efforts have been taken to determine the methanogenic, acetogenic and syntrophomonas sp. data of anaerobic bioreactors of BGP (Biogas Plant) I and II, when these samples were cultured on acetate, methanol, formate, butyrate, propionate and glucose. (author)

  12. [Performance of internal-loop air-lift nitrifying bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng-Mei; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, Yang-Yang; Hu, Bao-Lan; Chen, Jian-Song

    2002-07-01

    The performance of internal-loop air-lift nitrifying bioreactor was good with strong tolerance to influent ammonia concentration (78.49 mmol/L), high volume converting rate (163.18 mmol/L.d) and obvious working stability (ammonia removal > 94.42%). During operation of internal-loop air-lift bioreactor, the nitrifying activated sludge was granulated. The nitrifying granular activated sludge began to appear on day 45. Its average diameter was 0.83 mm, settling velocity was 55.53 m/h and specific ammonia removal rate was 0.95 mmol (NH4(+)-N)/g (VS).d. The nitrifying granular activated sludge had the activity for anaerobic ammonia oxidation with ammonia oxidation rate of 0.23 mmol (NH4(+)-N)/g(VS).d and nitrite reduction rate of 0.24 mmol (NO2(-)-N)/g(VS).d. PMID:12385250

  13. Treatment of textile wastewater with membrane bioreactor: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Chen, Jingyu; Navaratna, Dimuth; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Shu, Li

    2016-03-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology has been used widely for various industrial wastewater treatments due to its distinct advantages over conventional bioreactors. Treatment of textile wastewater using MBR has been investigated as a simple, reliable and cost-effective process with a significant removal of contaminants. However, a major drawback in the operation of MBR is membrane fouling, which leads to the decline in permeate flux and therefore requires membrane cleaning. This eventually decreases the lifespan of the membrane. In this paper, the application of aerobic and anaerobic MBR for textile wastewater treatment as well as fouling and control of fouling in MBR processes have been reviewed. It has been found that long sludge retention time increases the degradation of pollutants by allowing slow growing microorganisms to establish but also contributes to membrane fouling. Further research aspects of MBR for textile wastewater treatment are also considered for sustainable operations of the process. PMID:26776150

  14. Sensor equipment for quantification of spatial heterogeneity in large bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Stocks, Stuart M.;

    cannot be directly compared to laboratory scale experiments due to these reasons, and thus, in order to understand the large scale processes, experimental data has to be collected at large scale. The cost of acquiring data at large scale is high. The bioreactors are usually run with a limited array of...... sensors and in order to apply more sensor equipment the bioreactor has to be modified which is both costly and results in production downtime. The presence of three phases (gas, liquid, and solid), and the opaque nature of the fermentation broth together with the necessity of heat sterilization further...... increases the requirements to the sensor equipment. In order to address these issues this study aims to make an investigation into freely floating, battery driven sensor particles that can follow the liquid movement in the reactor and make measurements while being distributed in the whole volume of the...

  15. Characteristics, Process Parameters, and Inner Components of Anaerobic Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Abdelgadir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB, namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT, Organic Loading Rate (OLR, and sludge retention time (SRT were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive.

  16. Hydrodynamic characterization of a column-type prototype bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Morales-Contreras, Marcos; Robles-Martínez, Fabián; García-Nazariega, Melvin; Lobato-Calleros, Consuelo

    2008-03-01

    Agro-food industrial processes produce a large amount of residues, most of which are organic. One of the possible solutions for the treatment of these residues is anaerobic digestion in bioreactors. A novel 18-L bioreactor for treating waste water was designed based on pneumatic agitation and semispherical baffles. Flow patterns were visualized using the particle tracer technique. Circulation times were measured with the particle tracer and the thermal technique, while mixing times were measured using the thermal technique. Newtonian fluid and two non-Newtonian fluids were used to simulate the operational conditions. The results showed that the change from Newtonian to non-Newtonian properties reduces mixed zones and increases circulation and mixing times. Circulation time was similar when evaluated with the thermal and the tracer particle methods. It was possible to predict dimensionless mixing time (theta (m)) using an equivalent Froude number (Fr (eq)). PMID:18401759

  17. Enhancing inhibited fermentations through a dynamic electro-membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres; Garde, Arvid; Rype, Jens-Ulrik;

    challenging operation is associated with different dynamic behaviors of the individual units plus their interaction. The purpose of this contribution is to show the results of experimental and model based efforts done in order to investigate the operation of a membrane bioreactor. From modeling point of view...... technology ensures long operation time by reversing periodically the polarity of the imposed electrical field to significantly reduce the influence of membrane fouling. The periodic nature of the electrically driven membrane separation process makes the membrane bioreactor operation non trivial. This......, it is interesting to reveal to which extend the REED module can facilitate the pH control in the fermenter. In this case, the membrane and reactor unit interactions are exploited to substantially increase the lactate productivity and substrate utilization compared to a conventional fermentation with...

  18. Biological nitrogen removal using a submerged membrane bioreactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot-scale study was conducted using ZenoGem hollow-fiber microfiltration membrane bioreactor system to investigate the performance of membrane bioreactor process to remove nitrogen from primary effluent at a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Different operating conditions were examined by varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and sludge retention time (SRT) between 5-8 h and 20-50 days, respectively. In addition, a series of laboratory batch tests were performed to measure the biodegradation kinetic and stoichiometric parameters under the conditions consistent with the pilot testing. The results showed that the process achieved removal efficiencies of 80-98% for COD, 93%-99% for BOD5, and 70-93% for nitrogen. The efficiency and kinetics of COD and nitrogen removal would change greatly from one operating condition to another. However, the measured kinetic parameters still fell within the typical range of those reported in the literature using Activated Sludge Models (ASM)

  19. Macromolecular Crowding Modifies the Impact of Specific Hofmeister Ions on the Coil-Globule Transition of PNIPAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Kenji; Tabata, Daiki; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2015-08-13

    Macromolecular crowding alters many biological processes ranging from protein folding and enzyme reactions in vivo to the precipitation and crystallization of proteins in vitro. Herein, we have investigated the effect of specific monovalent Hofmeister salts (NaH2PO4, NaF, NaCl, NaClO4, and NaSCN) on the coil-globule transition of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) in a crowded macromolecular environment as a model for understanding the specific-ion effect on the solubility and stability of proteins in a crowded macromolecular environment. It was found that although the salts (NaH2PO4, NaF, and NaCl) and the macromolecular crowder (polyethylene glycol) lowered the transition temperature almost independently, the macromolecular crowder had a great impact on the transition temperature in the case of the chaotropes (NaClO4 and NaSCN). The electrostatic repulsion between the chaotropic anions (ClO4(-) or SCN(-)) adsorbed on PNIPAM may reduce the entropic gain of water associated with the excluded volume effect, leading to an increase in the transition temperature, especially in the crowded environment. Furthermore, the affinity of the chaotropic anions for PNIPAM becomes small in the crowded environment, leading to further modification of the transition temperature. Thus, we have revealed that macromolecular crowding alters the effect of specific Hofmeister ions on the coil-globule transition of PNIPAM. PMID:26215482

  20. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Na Yan; Chengming Fan; Yuhong Chen; Zanmin Hu

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving incr...

  1. Gel layer formation on membranes in Membrane Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Brink, P.F.H.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment is hampered by membrane fouling. Fouling increases energy demand, reduces process performance and creates the need for more frequent (chemical) membrane cleaning or replacement. Membrane fouling in MBRs is known to be caused by several membrane fouling mechanisms. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play a major role during fouling development. However, EPS concentration in the bulk solution can ...

  2. Mammalian cell retention devices for stirred perfusion bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Woodside, Steven M.; Bowen, Bruce D.; Piret, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Within the spectrum of current applications for cell culture technologies, efficient large-scale mammalian cell production processes are typically carried out in stirred fed-batch or perfusion bioreactors. The specific aspects of each individual process that can be considered when determining the method of choice are presented. A major challenge for perfusion reactor design and operation is the reliability of the cell retention device. Current retention systems include cross-flow membrane fil...

  3. ANAEROBIC MEMBRANE BIOREACTORS FOR DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMENT. PRELIMINARY STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Luisa Vera; Ignacio Ruigómez; Enrique González; Paula Bodelón; Juan Rodríguez-Sevilla

    2014-01-01

    The operation of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SAnMBRs) for domestic wastewaters treatment was studied in laboratory scale, with the objective to define sustainable filtration conditions of the suspensions along the process. During continuous experiments, the organic matter degradation by anaerobic way showed an average DQOT removal of 85% and 93%. Indeed, the degradation generated biogas after 12 days of operation and its relative methane composition was of 60% after 25 days of o...

  4. Bacteriorhodopsin as a Possible Element of Membrane Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimychev, A. V.; Chamorovskii, S. K.

    1988-06-01

    Certain approaches to the creation of membrane bioreactors, representing an example of integrated membrane systems, are examined. The characteristic features of the use of organised molecular assemblies in such systems as sensor and regulatory elements are discussed. The properties of the retinal-protein complex of bacteriorhodopsin as a promising component of integrated membrane systems, capable of carrying out regulatory functions, are examined. The bibliography includes 139 references.

  5. Membrane life estimation in full-scale immersed membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala, D. F.; Ferre, V; Judd, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    Limited quantitative available information exists regarding the robustness of membranes used in immersed membrane bioreactor (iMBR) applications, and no information on the relative contribution of the two main membrane failure modes of permeability and integrity loss. Such information is crucial given the significance of membrane replacement costs to the viability and sustainability of iMBRs. Measurements of membrane permeability and integrity have been made on flat sheet (F...

  6. Automated HPLC monitoring of broth components on bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Favre, Eric; Pugeaud, Patrick; Raboud, Jean Philippe; Péringer, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Under proper operating conditions, a low dead volume continuous filtration module operated on biological broths (yeast and bacteria suspensions in stirred reactors) still fulfills the flow-rate requirements of an analytical apparatus (for example HPLC or FIA) without membrane regeneration. The filtrate stream has been successfully connected to a bioreactor in order to perform the automated HPLC analysis of broth components. The monitoring of the carbon source (lactose), and minor products (gl...

  7. Computational Model for Microbubble Enhanced Performance of Airlift Bioreactor (ALB)

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, W C; Brittle, S.; Howell, R; W. B. Zimmerman

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model for microbubble enhanced performance of an airlift bioreactor (ALB). Five different bubble diameters were defined in the model under the same conditions (440 µm to 1 mm bubble diameter). The computational model parameters and the size of the ALB were defined by referring to experimental work done previously. The main objective of the model is to study the effect of bubble size on the rising velocity and the liquid flow velocity in the airlift reactor...

  8. Mathematical interpretation of mass transfer process in anaerobic bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Ружинская, Людмила Ивановна; Фоменкова, Анастасия Алексеевна

    2013-01-01

    The article considers the methanogenesis in bioreactors with immobilized microflora on fixed media. The processes of decomposition of organic pollution of the wastewater and the formation of metabolic products are analyzed. At the same time, the decomposition of organic pollution is considered from the standpoint of a two-stage process. As the first stage, the hydrolysis and acid production is considered, as the second - methanogenesis. On the basis of this process the spatial distribution of...

  9. A Novel Seeding and Conditioning Bioreactor for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schulte

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple efforts have been made to develop small-diameter tissue engineered vascular grafts using a great variety of bioreactor systems at different steps of processing. Nevertheless, there is still an extensive need for a compact all-in-one system providing multiple and simultaneous processing. The aim of this project was to develop a new device to fulfill the major requirements of an ideal system that allows simultaneous seeding, conditioning, and perfusion. The newly developed system can be actuated in a common incubator and consists of six components: a rotating cylinder, a pump, a pulse generator, a control unit, a mixer, and a reservoir. Components that are in direct contact with cell media, cells, and/or tissue allow sterile processing. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed with polyurethane tubes and collagen tubes. The scaffolds were seeded with fibroblasts and endothelial cells that were isolated from human saphenous vein segments. Scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry showed better seeding success of polyurethane scaffolds in comparison to collagen. Conditioning of polyurethane tubes with 100 dyn/cm2 resulted in cell detachments, whereas a moderate conditioning program with stepwise increase of shear stress from 10 to 40 dyn/cm2 induced a stable and confluent cell layer. The new bioreactor is a powerful tool for quick and easy testing of various scaffold materials for the development of tissue engineered vascular grafts. The combination of this bioreactor with native tissue allows testing of medical devices and medicinal substances under physiological conditions that is a good step towards reduction of animal testing. In the long run, the bioreactor could turn out to produce tissue engineered vascular grafts for human applications “at the bedside”.

  10. Transport Advances in Disposable Bioreactors for Liver Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Gerardo; Patzer, John F.; Gerlach, Jörg Christian

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a devastating diagnosis with an overall survival of approximately 60%. Liver transplantation is the therapy of choice for ALF patients but is limited by the scarce availability of donor organs. The prognosis of ALF patients may improve if essential liver functions are restored during liver failure by means of auxiliary methods because liver tissue has the capability to regenerate and heal. Bioartificial liver (BAL) approaches use liver tissue or cells to provide ALF patients with liver-specific metabolism and synthesis products necessary to relieve some of the symptoms and to promote liver tissue regeneration. The most promising BAL treatments are based on the culture of tissue engineered (TE) liver constructs, with mature liver cells or cells that may differentiate into hepatocytes to perform liver-specific functions, in disposable continuous-flow bioreactors. In fact, adult hepatocytes perform all essential liver functions. Clinical evaluations of the proposed BALs show that they are safe but have not clearly proven the efficacy of treatment as compared to standard supportive treatments. Ambiguous clinical results, the time loss of cellular activity during treatment, and the presence of a necrotic core in the cell compartment of many bioreactors suggest that improvement of transport of nutrients, and metabolic wastes and products to or from the cells in the bioreactor is critical for the development of therapeutically effective BALs. In this chapter, advanced strategies that have been proposed over to improve mass transport in the bioreactors at the core of a BAL for the treatment of ALF patients are reviewed.

  11. Denitrification 'Woodchip' Bioreactors for Productive and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, L. E.; Summerfelt, S.; Sharrer, K.; Lepine, C.; Helmers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Growing alarm about negative cascading effects of reactive nitrogen in the environment has led to multifaceted efforts to address elevated nitrate-nitrogen levels in water bodies worldwide. The best way to mitigate N-related impacts, such as hypoxic zones and human health concerns, is to convert nitrate to stable, non-reactive dinitrogen gas through the natural process of denitrification. This means denitrification technologies need to be one of our major strategies for tackling the grand challenge of managing human-induced changes to our global nitrogen cycle. While denitrification technologies have historically been focused on wastewater treatment, there is great interest in new lower-tech options for treating effluent and drainage water from one of our largest reactive nitrogen emitters -- agriculture. Denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactors are able to enhance this natural N-conversion via addition of a solid carbon source (e.g., woodchips) and through designs that facilitate development of anoxic conditions required for denitrification. Wood-based denitrification technologies such as woodchip bioreactors and 'sawdust' walls for groundwater have been shown to be effective at reducing nitrate loads in agricultural settings around the world. Designing these systems to be low-maintenance and to avoid removing land from agricultural production has been a primary focus of this "farmer-friendly" technology. This presentation provides a background on woodchip bioreactors including design considerations, N-removal performance, and current research worldwide. Woodchip bioreactors for the agricultural sector are an accessible new option to address society's interest in improving water quality while simultaneously allowing highly productive agricultural systems to continue to provide food in the face of increasing demand, changing global diets, and fluctuating weather.

  12. The determination and origin of fibre clogging in membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanski, M.; Kennedy, S.; Judd, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane channel clogging in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) has been largely unexplored by the research community, despite it being widely recognised as the main impediment to sustainable MBR operation by practitioners, and reflects the difficulty of examining clogging with the same scientific rigour as membrane fouling. The incidence of clogging/“ragging” has been assessed across 10–12 full-scale flat sheet immersed MBRs, equipped with inlet screens of similar rating, and ...

  13. Biological treatment and thickening with a hollow fibre membrane bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zsirai, T.; Wang, Z-Z.; Gabarrón, S.; Connery, K.; Fabiyi, M.; Larrea, A.; Judd, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic operation of an immersed hollow fibre membrane bioreactor, treating municipal wastewater supplemented with molasses solution, has been studied across mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentrations between 8 and 32 g L-1, the higher concentrations being normally associated with thickening operations. Only a marginal loss in membrane permeability was noted between 8 and 18 g L-1 when operation was conducted without clogging. The sustainable operational flux attainable above 18 g L-...

  14. Bubble Bed Bioreactor Malfunctions Revealed by Computational Flow Simulation Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fialová, Marie; Staykov, P.; Vlaev, S. D.

    Bratislava: Slovak University of Technology, 2009 - (Markoš, J.), s. 351 ISBN 978-80-227-3072-3. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /36./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 25.05.2009-29.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble column bioreactor * gas holdup * CFD Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  15. Analysis and control of an anaerobic upflow Fixed bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the bifurcation analysis in an anaerobic upflow fixed bed bioreactor, which is an anaerobic digestion system useful for wastewater treatment. In the dynamic analysis part, the equilibrium points, linear stability and bifurcation curves are studied, focusing in the washout condition. For the self tuning regulator the parameter estimation and control law are designed, and an integral action is introduced in order to address the disturbances. The simulation studies show the improvement of the performance when a disturbance appears.

  16. Video of Tissue Grown in Space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Principal investigator Leland Chung grew prostate cancer and bone stromal cells aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia during the STS-107 mission. Although the experiment samples were lost along with the ill-fated spacecraft and crew, he did obtain downlinked video of the experiment that indicates the enormous potential of growing tissues in microgravity. Cells grown aboard Columbia had grown far larger tissue aggregates at day 5 than did the cells grown in a NASA bioreactor on the ground.

  17. Micropollutants removal and tecnological development of membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The increasing worldwide contamination of aquatic environment with pollutants introduced by anthropogenic sources has become of great concern. Although present at low concentration, many of these pollutants have considerable long-term impacts on the ecosystem, such that extremely challenging legislative limits on their concentration in effluents are being proposed. This has led to the examination of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology for wastewater treatment, since it offers ...

  18. Startup and stabilization of anaerobic membrane bioreactors at ambient temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Benito Peña, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in wastewater treatment in last decades to reduce human footprint. Primarily, anaerobic technology focused on treatment and stabilization of sludge, but now the tendency is to give it a major role in low cost treatment of high/low strength wastewaters, since anaerobic digestion offers energy generation through gas production. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) combine anaerobic digestion with membrane filtration. They are becoming a feasible opti...

  19. Cytotoxicity micropollutant removal in a crossflow membrane bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado, Luis Fernando; Faucet-Marquis, Virginie; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Dorandeu, Christophe; Marion, Bénédicte; Schetrite, Sylvie; Albasi, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The application of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology was investigated with the aim of evaluating its potential for cytostatic drug and cytotoxicity bioremoval. The toxicity removal was assessed from biomarker test. CP removal of up to 80% was achieved under the operating conditions studied (HRT of 48 h and a SRT of 50 days). The increase of TMP was associated with an increase of supernatant toxicity as if fouling led to retention of the toxicity. Peaks of supernatant cytotoxicity were corr...

  20. Analysis of fouling mechanisms in anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Charfi, Amine; Ben Amar, Nihel; Harmand, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fouling mechanisms responsible for MF and UF membrane flux decline in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors (AnMBR). We have used the fouling mechanism models proposed by Hermia (1982), namely pore constriction, cake formation, complete blocking and intermediate blocking. Based on an optimization approach and using experimental data extracted from the literature, we propose a systematic procedure for identifying the most likely fouling mechanism in play. Short-term ...

  1. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment: feasibility and potential applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jeison, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Biomass retention is a necessary feature for the successful application of anaerobic digestion for wastewater treatment. Biofilms and granule formation are the traditional way to achieve such retention, enabling reactor operation at high biomass concentrations, and therefore at high organic loading rates. Membrane filtration represents an alternative way to achieve biomass retention. In membrane bioreactors, complete biomass retention can be achieved, irrespective of cells capacity to form bi...

  2. Biogas Production from Citrus Waste by Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachma Wikandari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in the membranes, while freely suspended digesting bacteria were present in the culture as well. In this membrane bioreactor (MBR, the free digesting bacteria digested the citrus wastes and produced soluble compounds, which could pass through the membrane and converted to biogas by the encapsulated cell. As a control experiment, similar digestions were carried out in bioreactors containing the identical amount of just free cells. The experiments were carried out in thermophilic conditions at 55 °C, and hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The organic loading rate (OLR was started with 0.3 kg VS/m3/day and gradually increased to 3 kg VS/m3/day. The results show that at the highest OLR, MBR was successful to produce methane at 0.33 Nm3/kg VS, while the traditional free cell reactor reduced its methane production to 0.05 Nm3/kg VS. Approximately 73% of the theoretical methane yield was achieved using the membrane bioreactor.

  3. Denitrifying Bioreactors for Nitrate Removal: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Kelly; Gold, Arthur J; Christianson, Laura E; David, Mark B; Schipper, Louis A; Ratigan, Nicole A

    2016-05-01

    Meta-analysis approaches were used in this first quantitative synthesis of denitrifying woodchip bioreactors. Nitrate removal across environmental and design conditions was assessed from 26 published studies, representing 57 separate bioreactor units (i.e., walls, beds, and laboratory columns). Effect size calculations weighted the data based on variance and number of measurements for each bioreactor unit. Nitrate removal rates in bed and column studies were not significantly different, but both were significantly higher than wall studies. In denitrifying beds, wood source did not significantly affect nitrate removal rates. Nitrate removal (mass per volume) was significantly lower in beds with effects with bed temperature; a of 2.15 was quite similar to other studies. Lessons from this meta-analysis can be incorporated into bed designs, especially extending hydraulic retention times to increase nitrate removal under low temperature and high flow conditions. Additional column studies are warranted for comparative assessments, as are field-based studies for assessing in situ conditions, especially in aging beds, with careful collection and reporting of design and environmental data. Future assessment of these systems might take a holistic view, reviewing nitrate removal in conjunction with other processes, including greenhouse gas and other unfavorable by-product production. PMID:27136153

  4. Growing Three-Dimensional Corneal Tissue in a Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glen F.; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Aten, Laurie; Prewett, Tacey; Fitzgerald, Wendy S.; OConnor, Kim; Caldwell, Delmar; Francis, Karen M.

    2003-01-01

    Spheroids of corneal tissue about 5 mm in diameter have been grown in a bioreactor from an in vitro culture of primary rabbit corneal cells to illustrate the production of optic cells from aggregates and tissue. In comparison with corneal tissues previously grown in vitro by other techniques, this tissue approximates intact corneal tissue more closely in both size and structure. This novel three-dimensional tissue can be used to model cell structures and functions in normal and abnormal corneas. Efforts continue to refine the present in vitro method into one for producing human corneal tissue to overcome the chronic shortage of donors for corneal transplants: The method would be used to prepare corneal tissues, either from in vitro cultures of a patient s own cells or from a well-defined culture from another human donor known to be healthy. As explained in several articles in prior issues of NASA Tech Briefs, generally cylindrical horizontal rotating bioreactors have been developed to provide nutrient-solution environments conducive to the 30 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 growth of delicate animal cells, with gentle, low-shear flow conditions that keep the cells in suspension without damaging them. The horizontal rotating bioreactor used in this method, denoted by the acronym "HARV," was described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 16, No. 5 (May, 1992), page 150.

  5. Immunological analysis of aerobic bioreactor bovine theileriosis vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Habibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the pilot production of aerobic bioreactor tropical theileriosis vaccine was optimized with the aim of immunological assays for further mass production.We have shown earlier the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH assay could be used for evaluating the immunity and memory cells against specific Theileria antigen in vaccinated animals. In addition, TNF-α is the principle cytokine in modulating the cytotoxic activity of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL. Immunological analysis of the vaccine was performed by using two cell mediated immunity (CMI in vitro and in vivo DTH test (Theilerin and TNF-α assay.The results of immune responses of susceptible immunized cattle by bioreactor vaccine in comparison with conventional flask vaccine revealed a significant stimulation of immune cells by transcription of high level of TNF-α and positive reaction against Theileria antigen in Theilerin skin test (DTH.The equal immunological results achieved in both above mentioned vaccines verified the satisfactory immunity for aerobic bioreactor theileriosis vaccine for advance mass vaccination in the field on a large-scale.

  6. Simulation of three-phase fluidized bioreactors for denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluidized-bed bioreactors were developed and operated at three scales (diameters of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.5 m) by the Chemical Technology Division. The performance of these reactors in denitrification was simulated using the following modified form of Monod kinetics to describe the reaction kinetics: rate = V/sub max/ (NO3-/K/sub s/ + NO3-) (% biomass). In the fluids-movement portion of the simulation the tanks-in-series approximation to backmixing was used. This approach yielded a V/sub max/ of 3.5 g/m3-min (% biomass) and a K/sub s/ of 163 g/m3 for the 0.5-m bioreactor. Values of V/sub max/ and K/sub s/ were also determined for data derived from the 0.1-m bioreactor, but inadequate RTD data reduced the confidence level in these results. A complication in denitrification is the multi-step nature of the reduction from nitrate to nitrite to hyponitrite and finally to nitrogen. An experimental study of the effect of biomass loading upon denitrification was begun. It is recommended that the experimental work be continued

  7. Bioreactors for tissue engineering--a new role for perfusionists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistino, Joseph J

    2003-09-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new area of medicine with rapid growth and expansion over the last decade. It has the potential to have a profound impact on the practice of medicine and influence the economic development in the industry of biotechnology. In almost every specialty of medicine, the ability to generate replacement cells and develop tissues will change the focus from artificial organs and transplantation to growing replacement organs from the patient's own stem cells. Once these organs are at a size that requires perfusion to maintain oxygen and nutrient delivery, then automated perfusion systems termed "bioreactors" will be necessary to sustain the organ until harvesting. The design of these "bioreactors" will have a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular function throughout the growth period. The perfusion schemes necessary to determine the optimal conditions have not been well elucidated and will undergo extensive research over the next decade. The key to progress in this endeavor will development of long-term perfusion techniques and identifying the ideal pressures, flow rates, type of flow (pulsatile/nonpulsatile), and perfusate solution. Perfusionists are considered experts in the field of whole body perfusion, and it is possible that they can participate in the development and operation of these "bioreactors." Additional education of perfusionists in the area of tissue engineering is necessary in order for them to become integral parts of this exciting new area of medicine. PMID:14653420

  8. The effect of macromolecular crowding on the structure of the protein complex superoxide dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha Mudalige, Ajith Rathnaweera

    Biological environments contain between 7 - 40% macromolecules by volume. This reduces the available volume for macromolecules and elevates the osmotic pressure relative to pure water. Consequently, biological macromolecules in their native environments tend to adopt more compact and dehydrated conformations than those in vitro. This effect is referred to as macromolecular crowding and constitutes an important physical difference between native biological environments and the simple solutions in which biomolecules are usually studied. We used small angle scattering (SAS) to measure the effects of macromolecular crowding on the size of a protein complex, superoxide dismutase (SOD). Crowding was induced using 400 MW polyethylene glycol (PEG), triethylene glycol (TEG), methyl-alpha-glucoside (alpha-MG) and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). Parallel small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) allowed us to unambiguously attribute apparent changes in radius of gyration to changes in the structure of SOD. For a 40% PEG solution, we find that the volume of SOD was reduced by 9%. SAS coupled with osmotic pressure measurements allowed us to estimate a compressibility modulus for SOD. We believe this to be the first time the osmotic compressibility of a protein complex was measured. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to obtain insights on biomolecular processes. However, it is not clear whether MD is capable of predicting subtle effects of macromolecular crowding. We used our experimentally observed compressibility of SOD to evaluate the ability of MD to predict macromolecular crowding. Effects of macromolecular crowding due to PEG on SOD were modeled using an all atom MD simulation with the CHARMM forcefield and the crystallographically resolved structures of SOD and PEG. Two parallel MD simulations were performed for SOD in water and SOD in 40% PEG for over 150~ns. Over the period of the simulation the SOD structure in 40

  9. Application of high cell density airlift bioreactors to bio-ethanol production – study on optimal bioreactor operation

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Jaroslav; Vicente, A.A.; Maia, J. M.; Domingues, Lucília; Teixeira, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a hydrodynamic and rheological analysis of a continuous airlift bioreactor with high cell density system is presented. A highly flocculating recombinant strain of Sacharomyces cerevisae containing genes for lactose transport (lactose permease) and hydrolysis (β-galactosidase) was exploited to ferment lactose from cheese whey to ethanol. The magnetic particle-tracer method was used to assess the effect of operational conditions (air flow rate, biomass concentration) o...

  10. Start-up of membrane bioreactor and hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor: kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Díaz, J C; Poyatos, J M

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBR) system was studied as an alternative solution to conventional activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors. This paper shows the results obtained from three laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants working in parallel in the start-up and steady states. The first wastewater treatment plant was a MBR, the second one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system containing carriers both in anoxic and aerobic zones of the bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBRa), and the last one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system which contained carriers only in the aerobic zone (hybrid MBBR-MBRb). The reactors operated with a hydraulic retention time of 30.40 h. A kinetic study for characterizing heterotrophic biomass was carried out and organic matter and nutrients removals were evaluated. The heterotrophic biomass of the hybrid MBBR-MBRb showed the best kinetic performance in the steady state, with yield coefficient for heterotrophic biomass=0.30246 mg volatile suspended solids per mg chemical oxygen demand, maximum specific growth rate for heterotrophic biomass=0.00308 h(-1) and half-saturation coefficient for organic matter=3.54908 mg O2 L(-1). The removal of organic matter was supported by the kinetic study of heterotrophic biomass. PMID:26606088

  11. Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

    2004-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular

  12. Optimization of denitrifying bioreactor performance with agricultural residue-based filter media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification bioreactors are a promising technology for mitigation of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) losses in subsurface drainage water. Bioreactors are constructed with carbon substrates, typically wood chips, to provide a substrate for denitrifying microorganisms. Columns were packed with wood chips...

  13. Treatment of contaminated drilling sludge in a bioreactor; Behandlung von Bohrspuelschlaemmen im Bioreaktorverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noke, A.

    2003-07-01

    Fine-grained contaminated drilling mud from petroleum production processes was purified in an airlift bioreactor. The process regime of bioreactor treatment was optimized, elements of the process periphery were investigated (e.g. purification of reactor off-air in biofilters as well as mud dehydration), and the hazard of the resulting material was assessed.

  14. Optimizing hydraulic retention times in denitrifying woodchip bioreactors treating recirculating aquaculture system wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performance of wood-based denitrifying bioreactors to treat high-nitrate wastewaters from aquaculture systems has not previously been demonstrated. Four pilot-scale woodchip bioreactors (approximately 1:10 scale) were constructed and operated for 268 d to determine the optimal range of design hy...

  15. Effects of a perfusion bioreactor activated novel bone substitute in spine fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Koroma, Kariatta Ester; Ding, Ming; Wendt, David; Jespersen, Stig; Juhl, Maria Vinther; Theilgaard, Naseem; Martin, Ivan; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a large perfusion-bioreactor cell-activated bone substitute, on a two-level large posterolateral spine fusion sheep model.......To evaluate the effect of a large perfusion-bioreactor cell-activated bone substitute, on a two-level large posterolateral spine fusion sheep model....

  16. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  17. Fluid bed porosity equation for an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with particles growing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluid Bed Bioreactor performance is strongly affected by bed void fraction or bed porosity fluctuations. Particle size enlargement due to biofilm growth is an important factor that is involved in these variations and until now there are no mathematical equations that consider biofilm growth. In this work a mathematical equation is proposed to calculate bed void fraction in an inverse fluid bed bioreactor. (Author)

  18. Evaluation Of Landfill Gas Decay Constant For Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Operated As Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediction of the rate of gas production from bioreactor landfills is important to optimize energy recovery and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions. Landfill gas (LFG) composition and flow rate were monitored for four years for a conventional and two bioreactor landfill landfil...

  19. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Ó Conchúir

    Full Text Available The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  20. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Conchúir, Shane; Barlow, Kyle A; Pache, Roland A; Ollikainen, Noah; Kundert, Kale; O'Meara, Matthew J; Smith, Colin A; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks) to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available. PMID:26335248

  1. In vitro properties of an in situ forming gel for the parenteral delivery of macromolecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R; Robinson, D H; Himmelstein, K J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to (i) formulate a solution of a water-insoluble interpolymeric complex (IPC) containing poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA), 15 kDa, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), 20 kDa, in a biocompatible cosolvent system; (ii) demonstrate that the IPC solution can transform into a gel, in situ, at physiological pH; and (iii) determine the ability of the gel to entrap, protect, and control the release of macromolecular drugs such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Ternary phase diagrams were prepared to identify cosolvent composition containing N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), ethanol, and water that dissolve the IPC. IPC solutions (40, 50, or 60% w/v) each containing 1 mg of either model proteins, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-insulin and FITC-albumin, or 24-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, were placed in containers that were immersed in buffer, pH 7.4. Aliquots of the buffer were sampled periodically and analyzed for the macromolecular content. In addition, in vitro bioactivity of another model protein, alpha-amylase, contained in the IPC solution was also determined. The studies demonstrated that a cosolvent containing 1:1:2 ratio of NMP/ethanol/water was most suitable for dissolving the IPC. Concentrations > 30% w/v IPC were required to form the gel, however, those mixtures containing > 60% w/v IPC could not be easily injected via 18-22 gauge needle. The gel can entrap and control the release of the model macromolecules for up to 6 days, in vitro. In addition, the gel can maintain the bioactivity of the protein, alpha-amylase, for 6 days. Therefore, an IPC gel can entrap, protect, and control the release of macromolecular drugs over a period of 6 days, in vitro, and therefore can be considered for in vivo investigation. PMID:10578505

  2. Propagation and Dissolution of CO2 bubbles in Algae Photo-bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    Research grade photo-bioreactors are used to study and cultivate different algal species for biofuel production. In an attempt to study the growth properties of a local algal species in rain water, a custom made bioreactor is designed and being tested. Bio-algae consumes dissolved CO2 in water and during its growth cycle, the consumed CO2 must be replenished. Conventional methods use supply of air or CO2 bubbles in the growth medium. The propagation and dissolution of the bubbles, however, are strongly dependent on the design parameters of the photo-bioreactor. In this paper, we discuss the numerical modeling of the air and CO2 bubble propagation and dissolution in the photo-bioreactor. Using the results the bioreactor design will be modified for maximum productivity.

  3. Membrane bioreactors for enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose; Idrolisi enzimatica del lattosio con bioreattori a membrana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzichini, M.; Pilloton, R. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione; Pontecorvo, M.; Mignogna, G.; Fortunato, A.; Beone, F.

    1993-03-01

    Bioreactor systems obtained by cell or enzyme immobilization offer many advantages compared with native enzyme, intact cell systems or other biocatalysts. Thus, many attempts have been made to design and use new types of bioreactor systems in order to improve performance, enhance productivity and reduce environmental impacts. Membrane bioreactors, obtained by physical immobilization of biocatalysts, in polymeric membrane support, offer such practical advantages as: a continuous separation and transformation process with low product inhibition and suitable hydraulic configuration (backflushing recycling, ultrafiltrating). Specific membrane modules (Amicon VitaFiber), for bioreactor applications are being commercialized. Beta-galctosidase enzyme has successfully been immobilized in a hollow fiber and in ceramic modules to hydrolyze lactose in waste whey. This technical report presents the general properties and performances (permeability, washing procedures, hydraulic configurations, physical and chemical properties) of both, polymeric and ceramic supports, enzyme kinetics, physical and covalent immobilization, mathematical model of the bioreactor and on-line process monitoring.

  4. Construction and evaluation of urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To design and construct a urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes and to compare the viability and proliferative activity of cell-seeded extracellular matrix scaffolds cultured in the bioreactor with conventional static growth conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A urinary bladder bioreactor was designed and constructed to replicate physiologic bladder dynamics. The bioreactor mimicked the filling pressures of the human bladder by way of a cyclical low-delivery pressure regulator. In addition, cell growth was evaluated by culturing human urothelial cells (UCs) on porcine extracellular matrix scaffolds in the bioreactor and in static growth conditions for 5 consecutive days. The attachment, viability, and proliferative potential were assessed and compared with quantitative viability indicators and by fluorescent markers for intracellular esterase activity and plasma membrane integrity. Scaffold integrity was characterized with scanning electron microscopy and 4\\

  5. Remote Access to the PXRR Macromolecular Crystallography Facilities at the NSLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Soares; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Cowan; R Buono; H Robinson; A Heroux; M Carlucci-Dayton; A Saxena; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The most recent surge of innovations that have simplified and streamlined the process of determining macromolecular structures by crystallography owes much to the efforts of the structural genomics community. However, this was only the last step in a long evolution that saw the metamorphosis of crystallography from an heroic effort that involved years of dedication and skill into a straightforward measurement that is occasionally almost trivial. Many of the steps in this remarkable odyssey involved reducing the physical labor that is demanded of experimenters in the field. Other steps reduced the technical expertise required for conducting those experiments.

  6. Remote Access to the PXRR Macromolecular Crystallography Facilities at the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most recent surge of innovations that have simplified and streamlined the process of determining macromolecular structures by crystallography owes much to the efforts of the structural genomics community. However, this was only the last step in a long evolution that saw the metamorphosis of crystallography from an heroic effort that involved years of dedication and skill into a straightforward measurement that is occasionally almost trivial. Many of the steps in this remarkable odyssey involved reducing the physical labor that is demanded of experimenters in the field. Other steps reduced the technical expertise required for conducting those experiments.

  7. Remote Access to the PXRR Macromolecular Crystallography Facilities at the NSLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, A.S.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Cowan, M.; Buono, R.; Robinson, H. H.; Heroux, A.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Saxena, A.; Sweet, R. M.

    2008-09-01

    The most recent surge of innovations that have simplified and streamlined the process of determining macromolecular structures by crystallography owes much to the efforts of the structural genomics community. However, this was only the last step in a long evolution that saw the metamorphosis of crystallography from an heroic effort that involved years of dedication and skill into a straightforward measurement that is occasionally almost trivial. Many of the steps in this remarkable odyssey involved reducing the physical labor that is demanded of experimenters in the field. Other steps reduced the technical expertise required for conducting those experiments.

  8. INFLUENCE OF THE SOLVENT SWELLING ON MACROMOLECULAR CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTALLINE STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zeng; Yong Huang

    1999-01-01

    Ethyl-cyanoethyl cellulose [(E-CE)C]/cross-linked polyacrylic acid [PAA] molecular composites with cholesteric order were prepared. It was found that the macromolecular cholesteric structure was changed with the swelling of PAA in the composites. The selective reflection of the cholesteric phase shifted to the longer wavelength and the X-ray diffraction angle shifted to the high angle direction during swelling, which suggested that the cholesteric pitch and the number of the layers of ordered (E-CE)C chains in the cholesteric phase were increased.

  9. The "macromolecular tourist": universal temperature dependence of thermal diffusion in aqueous colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopini, S; Rusconi, R; Piazza, R

    2006-01-01

    By performing measurements on a large class of macromolecular and colloidal systems, we show that thermophoresis (particle drift induced by thermal gradients) in aqueous solvents displays a distinctive universal dependence on temperature. For systems of particles interacting via temperature-independent forces, this behavior is strictly related to the solvent thermal expansivity, while an additional, T-independent term is needed to account for the behavior of "thermophilic" (migrating to the warmth) particles. The former relation between thermophoresis and thermal expansion may be exploited to envisage other fruitful studies of colloidal diffusion in inhomogeneous fluids. PMID:16446985

  10. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Bogan, Michael J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Adams, Paul D.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and free from radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract statistically significant high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements. PMID:24633409

  11. Biodegradable multiblock polymers based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide for preparation of macromolecular therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mužíková, Gabriela; Pola, Robert; Laga, Richard; Pechar, Michal

    Bratislava : Young Scientists Council of Polymer Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, 2016. s. 79. ISBN 978-80-970923-8-2. [Bratislava Young Polymer Scientists workshop /6./ - BYPoS 2016. 14.03.2016-18.03.2016, Ždiar] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12742S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-14957Y Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : multiblock polymers * RAFT polymerization * biodegradation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  12. Relations between functionality and macromolecular properties of alterated coals: the behaviour in solubility and swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Gruber, R.; Bimer, J.; Salbut, P.D.; Djega-Mariadassou, G.; Kruchinin, A.V.; Kuznetsova, L.I. [Institute of Chemistry and Chemico-Metallurgical Processes, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Describes the study of the effects of chemical alteration of brown and bituminous coals on the solubility and swelling behaviour. A variety of chemical procedures such as ion-exchange with HCl, O-methylation and reductive methylation, reduction with LiAlH{sub 4} and with K/isopropanol in THF and oxidation with performic acid was applied in order to vary the oxygen functionality, the content of the alkyl substitutes and the proportion of aromatic to hydroaromatic rings. The extent of degradation of the macromolecular structure was evaluated as a function of chemical alteration. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Molecularly imprinted polymers for separating and sensing of macromolecular compounds and microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskierko, Zofia; Sharma, Piyush Sindhu; Bartold, Katarzyna; Pietrzyk-Le, Agnieszka; Noworyta, Krzysztof; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    The present review article focuses on gathering, summarizing, and critically evaluating the results of the last decade on separating and sensing macromolecular compounds and microorganisms with the use of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) synthetic receptors. Macromolecules play an important role in biology and are termed that way to contrast them from micromolecules. The former are large and complex molecules with relatively high molecular weights. The article mainly considers chemical sensing of deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs), proteins and protein fragments as well as sugars and oligosaccharides. Moreover, it briefly discusses fabrication of chemosensors for determination of bacteria and viruses that can ultimately be considered as extremely large macromolecules. PMID:26656748

  14. Development of thin-film photo-bioreactor and its application to outdoor culture of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Jun; Choi, Seung Phill; Kim, Jaoon Y H; Chang, Won Seok; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-06-01

    Photosynthetic microalgae have received much attention as a microbial source of diverse useful biomaterials through CO(2) fixation and various types of photo-bioreactors have been developed for efficient microalgal cultivation. Herein, we developed a novel thin-film photo-bioreactor, which was made of cast polypropylene film, considering outdoor mass cultivation. To develop optimal design of photo-bioreactor, we tested performance of three shapes of thin-film photo-bioreactors (flat, horizontal and vertical tubular shapes) and various parts in the bioreactor. Collectively, vertical tubular bioreactor with H/D ratio 6:1 and cylindrical stainless steel spargers showed the most outstanding performance. Furthermore, the photo-bioreactor was successfully applied to the cultivation of other microalgae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris. The scalability of photo-bioreactor was confirmed by gradually increasing culture volume from 4 to 25 L and the biomass productivity of each reactor was quite consistent (0.05-0.07 g/L/day) during the cultivation of H. pluvialis under indoor and outdoor conditions. Especially, we also achieved dry cell weight of 4.64 g/L and astaxanthin yield of 218.16 mg/L through long-term cultivation (100 days) under outdoor condition in 15 L photo-bioreactor using Haematococcus pluvialis, which means that the astaxanthin yield from outdoor cultivation is equal or superior to that obtained from controlled indoor condition. Therefore, these results indicate that we can apply this approach to development of optimal photo-bioreactor for the large-scale culture of microalgae and production of useful biomaterials under outdoor condition. PMID:23361185

  15. The influence of interchain coupling on intramolecular oscillation mobility in coupled macromolecular chains: The case of coplanar parallel chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čevizović, D.; Petković, S.; Galović, S.; Chizhov, A.; Reshetnyak, A.

    2015-10-01

    We enlarge our results from the study of the hopping mechanism of the oscillation excitation transport in 1D model of one biologica-likel macromolecular chain to the case of a system composed from two 1D parallel macromolecular chains with consideration of the properties of intramolecular oscillation excitations. We suppose, that due to the exciton interaction with thermal oscillation (generated by mechanical phonon subsystem) of structural elements (consisting of the peptide group) of the chains, the exciton becomes by self trapped and forms the polaron state. We suggest a model which generalizes the modified Holstein polaron model to the case of two macromolecular chains and find that because of the interchain coupling, the exciton energy band is splitted into two subbands. The hopping process of exciton migration along the macromolecular chains is studied in dependence of system parameters and temperature. We pay an special attention to the temperature range (near T = 300 K) in which living cells operate. It is found that for the certain values of the system parameters there exists the abrupt change of the exciton migration nature from practically free (light) exciton motion to an immobile (heavy, dressed by phonon cloud) quasiparticle We discuss an application of the obtained results to the exciton transport both within deoxyribonucleic acid molecule and in the 2D polymer films organized from such macromolecular chains.

  16. Preliminary Study on Airlift Membran-Bioreactor%气升式膜-生物反应器的设计与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐农; 邢卫红; 徐南平; 时钧

    2002-01-01

    A new type of membrane bioreactor named "airlift membrane-bioreactor" is discussed. For municipal wastewater reclamation, the preliminary study on airlift membrane-bioreactor shows its good performance such as higher flux and lower energy consumption. The airlift membrane-bioreactor is potentially applicable in bioengineering and environmental protection fields.

  17. Trace Gas Emission from in-Situ Denitrifying Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluer, W.; Walter, M. T.; Geohring, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite decades of concerted effort to mitigate nonpoint source nitrate (NO3-) pollution from agricultural lands, these efforts have not been sufficient to arrest eutrophication. A primary process for removing excess NO3- from water is denitrification, where denitrifying bacteria use NO3- for respiration in the absence of oxygen. Denitrification results in reduced forms of nitrogen, often dinitrogen gas (N2) but also nitrous oxide (N2O), an aggressive greenhouse gas. A promising solution to NO3- pollution is to intercept agricultural discharges with denitrifying bioreactors (DNBRs). DNBRs provide conditions ideal for denitrifiers: an anaerobic environment, sufficient organic matter, and excess NO3-. These conditions are also ideal for methanogens, which produce methane (CH4), another harmful trace gas. While initial results from bioreactor studies show that they can cost-effectively remove NO3-, trace gas emissions are an unintended consequence. This study's goal was to determine how bioreactor design promotes denitrification while limiting trace gas production. Reactor inflow and outflow water samples were tested for nutrients, including NO3-, and dissolved inflow and outflow gas samples were tested for N2O and CH4. NO3- reduction and trace gas production were evaluated at various residence times, pHs, and inflow NO3- concentrations in field and lab-scale reactors. Low NO3- reduction indicated conditions that stressed denitrifying bacteria while high reductions indicated designs that optimized pollutant treatment for water quality. Several factors influenced high N2O, suggesting non-ideal conditions for the final step of complete denitrification. High CH4 emissions pointed to reactor media choice for discouraging methanogens, which may remove competition with denitrifiers. It is critical to understand all of potential impacts that DNBRs may have, which means identifying processes and design specifications that may affect them.

  18. Production of biopesticides in an in situ cell retention bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Gunjan; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2008-12-01

    The seeds of Azadirachta indica contain azadirachtin and other limonoids, which can be used as a biopesticide for crop protection. Significant variability and availability of seed only in arid zones has triggered biotechnological production of biopesticides to cope up with its huge requirement. Batch cultivation of A. indica suspension culture was carried out in statistically optimized media (25.0 g/l glucose, 5.7 g/l nitrate, 0.094 g/l phosphate and 5 g/l inoculum) in 3 l stirred tank bioreactor. This resulted in 15.5 g/l biomass and 0.05 g/l azadirachtin production in 10 days leading to productivity of 5 mg l(-1) day(-1). Possible inhibition by the limiting substrates (C, N, P) were also studied and maximum inhibitory concentrations identified. The batch kinetic/inhibitory data were then used to develop and identify an unstructured mathematical model. The batch model was extrapolated to simulate continuous cultivation with and without cell retention in the bioreactor. Several offline computer simulations were done to identify right nutrient feeding strategies (with respect to key limiting substrates; carbon, nitrate and phosphate) to maintain non-limiting and non-inhibitory substrate concentrations in bioreactor. One such continuous culture (with cell retention) simulation was experimentally implemented. In this cultivation, the cells were propagated batch-wise for 8 days. It was then converted to continuous cultivation by feeding MS salts with glucose (75 g/l), nitrate (10 g/l), and phosphate (0.5 g/l) at a feed rate of 500 ml/day and withdrawing the spent medium at the same rate. The above continuous cultivation (with cell retention) demonstrated an improvement in cell growth to 95.8 g/l and intracellular accumulation of 0.38 g/l azadirachtin in 40 days leading to an overall productivity of 9.5 mg l(-1) day(-1). PMID:18392561

  19. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  20. L-Tryptophan depletion bioreactor, a possible cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Bambauer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer therapeutic strategies knownto date are not adequate for all cancer patients. Most of them are followed by a high rate of side effects and complications. The L-tryptophan depletion bioreactor is described as a possible new method of cancer therapy. L-tryptophan is an essential amino acid which has been recognized as an important cancer nutrient and its removal can lead to destruction of the tumour. Normal human cells or tumor cells cannot synthesize L-tryptophan and therefore tumor resistance is unlikely to develop. L-tryptophan is also a constituent for different bio-molecules such as Serotonin, Melatonin, and is needed for other synthesis processes in the cell growth. L-tryptophan degrading enzymes with 3 iso-enzymes called tryptophan side chain oxydase (TSO I, II, III were isolated. The 3 iso-enzymes can be differentiated by tryptic digestion. They have different molecular weights with different effectivenesses. All the TSO enzymes have heme that can catalyze essentially similar reactions involving L-tryptophan as a substrate. The most effective TSO is the type TSO III. A column which contained TSO as a bioreactor was integrated in a plasmapheresis unit and tested it in different animals. In sheep and rabbits L-tryptophan depletion in plasma was shown at 95% and 100% rates respectively by a single pass through the bioreactor. The results in immune supprimized rats with tumors were impressive, too. In 20 different tumor cell lines there were different efficacies. Brest cancer and medulloblastoma showed the greatest efficacy of L-tryptophan degrading. The gene technology of TSO production from Pseudomonas is associated with formation of endotoxins. This disadvantage can be prevented by different washing procedures or by using fungal sources for the TSO production. TSO III is developed to treat cancer diseases successfully, and has low side effects. A combination of L-tryptophan depletion with all available cancer therapies is

  1. Modelling and characterization of an airlift-loop bioreactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Verlaan, P

    1987-01-01

    An airlift-loop reactor is a bioreactor for aerobic biotechnological processes. The special feature of the ALR is the recirculation of the liquid through a downcomer connecting the top and the bottom of the main bubbling section. Due to the high circulation-flow rate, efficient mixing and oxygen transfer is combined with a controlled liquid flow in the absence of mechanical agitators.Liquid velocities and gas hold-ups in an external-loop airlift reactor (ALR) on different scales were modelled...

  2. Mixing and In situ product removal in micro-bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X

    2009-01-01

    Summary Of the thesis :’ Mixing and In-situ product removal in micro bioreactors’ by Xiaonan Li The work presented in this thesis is a part of a large cluster project, which was formed between DSM, Organon, Applikon and two university groups (TU Delft and University of Twente), under the ACTS and IBOS program. The aim of this cluster project was to develop a system consisting of parallel bioreactors of 30 to 200 microliter working volume for the cultivation of micro-organisms under well contr...

  3. Estimation of Volumetric Mass Transfer Coefficient in Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zainab Yaquob Atiya

    2012-01-01

    This study is concentrated to investigate the effects of aeration and stirring speed on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (KLa). A dynamic technique was used in estimating KLa values in order to achieve the aim of this study.This study was done in 10L bioreactor by using two medias:-1. Dionized water2. Xanthan solution (1 g /L)Moreover, the research covered a comparison between the obtained values of KLa.The Xanthan solution was used because of its higher viscosity in comparison with w...

  4. Biomass effects on oxygen transfer in membrane bioreactors.

    OpenAIRE

    Germain, Eve; Nelles, F.; Drews, A.; Pearce, P; Kraume, M.; Reid, E; Judd, Simon J.; Stephenson, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Ten biomass samples from both municipal and industrial pilot and full scale submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with mixed liquor suspended solids concentrations (MLSS) ranging from 7.2 to 30.2 g L−1 were studied at six air-flow rates (0.7, 1.3, 2.3, 3, 4.4 and 6 m3 m−3 h−1). Statistical analyses were applied to identify the relative impacts of the various bulk biomass characteristics on oxygen transfer. Of the biomass characteristics studied, only solids concentration (correlated with visc...

  5. Enrichment of carbon monoxide utilising microorganisms from methanogenic bioreactor sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana Luísa; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M. M.; Sousa, D.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of CO is the rate limiting step during anaerobic conversion of syngas (a gaseous mixture mainly composed of CO, CO2 and H2). In this work we study the microbial diversity in anaerobic sludge submitted to extended contact to syngas in a multi-orifice baffled bioreactor (MOBB). Methane was the main product resulting from syngas conversion in the MOBB. Enrichment cultures started with this sludge produced methane as final product, but also acetate. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed a pr...

  6. Orbitally Shaken Bioreactors - Viscosity effects on flow characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Ducci, A.; Weheliye, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Phase resolved PIV measurements were carried out to assess the flow dynamics occurring in orbitally shaken bioreactors of cylindrical geometry when working fluids of increasing viscosity are considered. Study of the phase-resolved flow characteristics allowed to built a Re-Fr map, where four quadrants associated to di fferent flow regimes are identifi ed: in-phase toroidal vortex (low Fr, high Re), out-of-phase precessional vortex (high Fr, high Re), in-phase single vortex (low Fr, low Re), o...

  7. Bioreactor activated graft material for early implant fixation in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek Henriksen, Susan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    from the iliac crest. For both groups, mononuclear cells were isolated, and injected into a perfusion bioreactor (Millenium Biologix AG, Switzerland). Scaffold granules (Ø~900-1500 µm, ~88% porosity) in group 1, consisted of hydroxyapatite (HA, 70%) with β-tricalcium-phosphate (β-TCP, 30%) (Danish...... Technological Institute, Denmark). The granules were coated with poly-lactic acid (PLA) 12%, in order to increase the mechanical strength of the material (Phusis, France). Scaffold granules (Ø~900-1400 µm, 80% porosity) in group 2 consisted of pure HA/β-TCP (FinCeramica, Italy). For both groups, cells were...

  8. Performance of bioreactor landfill with waste mined from a dumpsite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Obuli P; Swati, M; Nagendran, R; Joseph, Kurian

    2007-12-01

    Emissions from landfills via leachate and gas are influenced by state and stability of the organic matter in the solid waste and the environmental conditions within the landfill. This paper describes a modified, ecologically sound waste treatment technique, where municipal solid waste is anaerobically treated in a lysimeter-scale landfill bioreactor with leachate recirculation to enhance organic degradation. The results demonstrate a substantial decrease in organic matter (BOD 99%, COD 88% and TOC 81%) and a clear decrease in nutrient concentrations especially ammonia (85%) over a period of 1 year with leachate recirculation. PMID:17457683

  9. Anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor and process for wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Amy, Gary

    2015-07-09

    An anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor (AnEMBR) can include a vessel into which wastewater can be introduced, an anode electrode in the vessel suitable for supporting electrochemically active microorganisms (EAB, also can be referred to as anode reducing bacteria, exoelectrogens, or electricigens) that oxidize organic compounds in the wastewater, and a cathode membrane electrode in the vessel, which is configured to pass a treated liquid through the membrane while retaining the electrochemically active microorganisms and the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (for example, the key functional microbial communities, including EAB, methanogens and possible synergistic fermenters) in the vessel. The cathode membrane electrode can be suitable for catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction to generate hydro en.

  10. Influence of macromolecular architecture on necking in polymer extrusion film casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extrusion film casting (EFC) is an important polymer processing technique that is used to produce several thousand tons of polymer films/coatings on an industrial scale. In this research, we are interested in understanding quantitatively how macromolecular chain architecture (for example long chain branching (LCB) or molecular weight distribution (MWD or PDI)) influences the necking and thickness distribution of extrusion cast films. We have used different polymer resins of linear and branched molecular architecture to produce extrusion cast films under controlled experimental conditions. The necking profiles of the films were imaged and the velocity profiles during EFC were monitored using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. Additionally, the temperature profiles were captured using an IR thermography and thickness profiles were calculated. The experimental results are compared with predictions of one-dimensional flow model of Silagy et al1 wherein the polymer resin rheology is modeled using molecular constitutive equations such as the Rolie-Poly (RP) and extended Pom Pom (XPP). We demonstrate that the 1-D flow model containing the molecular constitutive equations provides new insights into the role of macromolecular chain architecture on film necking.1D. Silagy, Y. Demay, and J-F. Agassant, Polym. Eng. Sci., 36, 2614 (1996)

  11. MRI characterization of tumors and grading angiogenesis using macromolecular contrast media: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced with a macromolecular contrast medium (MMCM) has been applied successfully to assay tumor microvascular characteristics. These MRI-assayed characteristics correlate closely with histologic microvascular density, an established surrogate of tumor angiogenesis, and with pathologic tumor grade. The utility of MMCM-enhanced MRI for tumor characterizations has been established experimentally in a range of cancer types including breast, ovary, fibrosarcoma, and prostate. The MMCM-enhanced MRI technique can also be applied to monitor changes in tumor vessels that result from administration of an angiogenesis inhibitor, antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Suppression of microvascular permeability (up to 98%) induced by this inhibitor of angiogenesis was detected and quantified as soon as 24 h after initiation of therapy. Thus, MRI assays of tumor microvascular characteristics, particularly macromolecular permeability, provide a means to non-invasively characterize tumors for prognostication, for individualization and optimization of treatment, and for monitoring therapeutic response. Pending successful completion of drug trials, now in progress, the availability of MMCM should permit the immediate application of these powerful techniques in clinical practice

  12. A new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography beamlines derived from high-pressure methodology and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macromolecular crystallography at high pressure (HPMX) is a mature technique. Shorter X-ray wavelengths increase data collection efficiency on cryocooled crystals. Extending applications and exploiting spin-off of HPMX will require dedicated synchrotron radiation beamlines based on a new paradigm. Biological structures can now be investigated at high resolution by high-pressure X-ray macromolecular crystallography (HPMX). The number of HPMX studies is growing, with applications to polynucleotides, monomeric and multimeric proteins, complex assemblies and even a virus capsid. Investigations of the effects of pressure perturbation have encompassed elastic compression of the native state, study of proteins from extremophiles and trapping of higher-energy conformers that are often of biological interest; measurements of the compressibility of crystals and macromolecules were also performed. HPMX results were an incentive to investigate short and ultra-short wavelengths for standard biocrystallography. On cryocooled lysozyme crystals it was found that the data collection efficiency using 33 keV photons is increased with respect to 18 keV photons. This conclusion was extended from 33 keV down to 6.5 keV by exploiting previously published data. To be fully exploited, the potential of higher-energy photons requires detectors with a good efficiency. Accordingly, a new paradigm for MX beamlines was suggested, using conventional short and ultra-short wavelengths, aiming at the collection of very high accuracy data on crystals under standard conditions or under high pressure. The main elements of such beamlines are outlined

  13. A new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography beamlines derived from high-pressure methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourme, Roger, E-mail: roger.fourme@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girard, Eric [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dhaussy, Anne-Claire [CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Maréchal Juin, 14000 Caen (France); Medjoubi, Kadda [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Prangé, Thierry [LCRB (UMR 8015 CNRS), Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Pharmacie, 4 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75270 Paris (France); Ascone, Isabella [ENSCP (UMR CNRS 7223), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mezouar, Mohamed [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kahn, Richard [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography at high pressure (HPMX) is a mature technique. Shorter X-ray wavelengths increase data collection efficiency on cryocooled crystals. Extending applications and exploiting spin-off of HPMX will require dedicated synchrotron radiation beamlines based on a new paradigm. Biological structures can now be investigated at high resolution by high-pressure X-ray macromolecular crystallography (HPMX). The number of HPMX studies is growing, with applications to polynucleotides, monomeric and multimeric proteins, complex assemblies and even a virus capsid. Investigations of the effects of pressure perturbation have encompassed elastic compression of the native state, study of proteins from extremophiles and trapping of higher-energy conformers that are often of biological interest; measurements of the compressibility of crystals and macromolecules were also performed. HPMX results were an incentive to investigate short and ultra-short wavelengths for standard biocrystallography. On cryocooled lysozyme crystals it was found that the data collection efficiency using 33 keV photons is increased with respect to 18 keV photons. This conclusion was extended from 33 keV down to 6.5 keV by exploiting previously published data. To be fully exploited, the potential of higher-energy photons requires detectors with a good efficiency. Accordingly, a new paradigm for MX beamlines was suggested, using conventional short and ultra-short wavelengths, aiming at the collection of very high accuracy data on crystals under standard conditions or under high pressure. The main elements of such beamlines are outlined.

  14. Oral delivery of macromolecular drugs: Where we are after almost 100years of attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Elena; Matoori, Simon; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-06-01

    Since the first attempt to administer insulin orally in humans more than 90years ago, the oral delivery of macromolecular drugs (>1000g/mol) has been rather disappointing. Although several clinical pilot studies have demonstrated that the oral absorption of macromolecules is possible, the bioavailability remains generally low and variable. This article reviews the formulations and biopharmaceutical aspects of orally administered biomacromolecules on the market and in clinical development for local and systemic delivery. The most successful approaches for systemic delivery often involve a combination of enteric coating, protease inhibitors and permeation enhancers in relatively high amounts. However, some of these excipients have induced local or systemic adverse reactions in preclinical and clinical studies, and long-term studies are often missing. Therefore, strategies aimed at increasing the oral absorption of macromolecular drugs should carefully take into account the benefit-risk ratio. In the absence of specific uptake pathways, small and potent peptides that are resistant to degradation and that present a large therapeutic window certainly represent the best candidates for systemic absorption. While we acknowledge the need for systemically delivering biomacromolecules, it is our opinion that the oral delivery to local gastrointestinal targets is currently more promising because of their accessibility and the lacking requirement for intestinal permeability enhancement. PMID:26826437

  15. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amninder S Virk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction. Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  16. Can visco-elastic phase separation, macromolecular crowding and colloidal physics explain nuclear organisation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iborra Francisco J

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell nucleus is highly compartmentalized with well-defined domains, it is not well understood how this nuclear order is maintained. Many scientists are fascinated by the different set of structures observed in the nucleus to attribute functions to them. In order to distinguish functional compartments from non-functional aggregates, I believe is important to investigate the biophysical nature of nuclear organisation. Results The various nuclear compartments can be divided broadly as chromatin or protein and/or RNA based, and they have very different dynamic properties. The chromatin compartment displays a slow, constrained diffusional motion. On the other hand, the protein/RNA compartment is very dynamic. Physical systems with dynamical asymmetry go to viscoelastic phase separation. This phase separation phenomenon leads to the formation of a long-lived interaction network of slow components (chromatin scattered within domains rich in fast components (protein/RNA. Moreover, the nucleus is packed with macromolecules in the order of 300 mg/ml. This high concentration of macromolecules produces volume exclusion effects that enhance attractive interactions between macromolecules, known as macromolecular crowding, which favours the formation of compartments. In this paper I hypothesise that nuclear compartmentalization can be explained by viscoelastic phase separation of the dynamically different nuclear components, in combination with macromolecular crowding and the properties of colloidal particles. Conclusion I demonstrate that nuclear structure can satisfy the predictions of this hypothesis. I discuss the functional implications of this phenomenon.

  17. A NEW UNSTEADY THREE DIMENSIONAL MODEL FOR MACROMOLECULAR TRANSPORT AND WATER FILTRATION ACROSS THE ARTERIAL WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄浩; 温功碧

    2001-01-01

    A new unsteady three-dimensional convective-diffusive mathematical model for the transportation of macromolecules and water across the arterial wall was proposed . After the formation of leaky junctions due to the mitosis of endothelial cell of the arterial wall, the macromolecular transport happens surrounding the leaky cells. The arterial wall was divided into four layers: the endothelial layer, the subendothelial intima, the internal elastic lamina and the media for the convenience of research. The time-dependent concentration growth,the effect of the shape of endothelial cell and the effect of physiological parameters were analyzed. The analytical solution of velocity field and pressure field of water flow across the arterial wall were obtained; and concentration distribution of three macromolecules ; LDL,HRP and Albumin, were calculated with numerical simulation method. The new theory predicts, the maximum and distribution areas of time dependent concentration with round shape endothelial cell are both larger than that with ellipse-shape endothelial cell. The model also predicts the concentration growth is much alike that of a two-dimensional model and it shows that the concentration reaches its peak at the leaky junction where atherosclerotic formation frequently occurs and falls down rapidly in a limited area beginning from its earlier time growth to the state when macromolecular transfer approaches steadily. These predictions of the new model are in agreement with the experimental observation for the growth and concentration distribution of LDL and Albumin.

  18. Estimation of Volumetric Mass Transfer Coefficient in Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Yaquob Atiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concentrated to investigate the effects of aeration and stirring speed on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (KLa. A dynamic technique was used in estimating KLa values in order to achieve the aim of this study.This study was done in 10L bioreactor by using two medias:-1. Dionized water2. Xanthan solution (1 g /LMoreover, the research covered a comparison between the obtained values of KLa.The Xanthan solution was used because of its higher viscosity in comparison with water. It behaves similarly to the cultivation medium when organisms are cultivated in a bioreactor. Growth of organisms in the reactor leads to a change in the viscosity of the medium which affects the mass transfer.Two variables, the effect of air flow rate (3-20 L/min and the effect of stirring speed (250-700rpm on KLa value were studied. Other parameters such as temperature, liquid volume, and stirrer shape and stirrer position were held constant; the results demonstrated an increase in KLa – value and mass transfer with increasing stirrer speed. Thus at higher speed, better dispersion of the bubbles was obtained. Therefore, that increased the surface / volume ratio which increased the mass transfer area i.e. KLa value.

  19. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Youngstrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems.

  20. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  1. Glyco-engineering for biopharmaceutical production in moss bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva L. Decker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The production of recombinant biopharmaceuticals (pharmaceutical proteins is a strongly growing area in the pharmaceutical industry. While most products to date are produced in mammalian cell cultures, namely CHO cells, plant-based production systems gained increasing acceptance over the last years. Different plant systems have been established which are suitable for standardization and precise control of cultivation conditions, thus meeting the criteria for pharmaceutical production.The majority of biopharmaceuticals comprise glycoproteins. Therefore, differences in protein glycosylation between humans and plants have to be taken into account and plant-specific glycosylation has to be eliminated to avoid adverse effects on quality, safety and efficacy of the products.The basal land plant Physcomitrella patens (moss has been employed for the recombinant production of high-value therapeutic target proteins (e.g., Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Complement Factor H, monoclonal antibodies, Erythropoietin. Being genetically excellently characterized and exceptionally amenable for precise gene targeting via homologous recombination, essential steps for the optimization of moss as a bioreactor for the production of recombinant proteins have been undertaken.Here, we discuss the glyco-engineering approaches to avoid non-human N- and O-glycosylation on target proteins produced in moss bioreactors.

  2. A fault diagnosis prototype for a bioreactor for bioinsecticide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to develop an algorithm for fault diagnosis in a process of animal cell cultivation, for bioinsecticide production. Generally, these processes are batch processes. It is a fact that the diagnosis for a batch process involves a division of the process evolution (time horizon) into partial processes, which are defined as pseudocontinuous blocks. Therefore, a PCB represents the evolution of the system in a time interval where it has a qualitative behavior similar to a continuous one. Thus, each PCB, in which the process is divided, can be handled in a conventional way (like continuous processes). The process model, for each PCB, is a Signed Directed Graph (SDG). To achieve generality and to allow the computational implementation, the modular approach was used in the synthesis of the bioreactor digraph. After that, the SDGs were used to carry out qualitative simulations of faults. The achieved results are the fault patterns. A special fault symptom dictionary - SM - has been adopted as data base organization for fault patterns storage. An effective algorithm is presented for the searching process of fault patterns. The system studied, as a particular application, is a bioreactor for cell cultivation for bioinsecticide production. During this work, we concentrate on the SDG construction, and 3btaining real fault patterns by the elimination of spurious patterns. The algorithm has proved to be effective in both senses, resolution and accuracy, to diagnose different kinds of simulated faults

  3. Thiosulphate conversion in a methane and acetate fed membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; Timmers, Peer H A; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Buisman, Cees J N; Weijma, Jan

    2016-02-01

    The use of methane and acetate as electron donors for biological reduction of thiosulphate in a 5-L laboratory membrane bioreactor was studied and compared to disproportionation of thiosulphate as competing biological reaction. The reactor was operated for 454 days in semi-batch mode; 30 % of its liquid phase was removed and periodically replenished (days 77, 119, 166, 258, 312 and 385). Although the reactor was operated under conditions favourable to promote thiosulphate reduction coupled to methane oxidation, thiosulphate disproportionation was the dominant microbial process. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that the most abundant microorganisms in the bioreactor were phototrophic green sulphur bacteria (GSB) belonging to the family Chlorobiaceae and thiosulphate-disproportionating bacteria belonging to the genus Desulfocapsa. Even though the reactor system was surrounded with opaque plastic capable of filtering most of the light, the GSB used it to oxidize the hydrogen sulphide produced from thiosulphate disproportionation to elemental sulphur. Interrupting methane and acetate supply did not have any effect on the microbial processes taking place. The ultimate goal of our research was to develop a process that could be applied for thiosulphate and sulphate removal and biogenic sulphide formation for metal precipitation. Even though the system achieved in this study did not accomplish the targeted conversion using methane as electron donor, it does perform microbial conversions which allow to directly obtain elemental sulphur from thiosulphate. PMID:26423279

  4. Microbial acetate oxidation in horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Slavica; B Šantek; S Novak; V Marić

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of conducting a continuous aerobic bioprocess in a horizontal rotating tubular bioreactor (HRTB). Aerobic oxidation of acetate by the action of a mixed microbial culture was chosen as a model process. The microbial culture was not only grown in a suspension but also in the form of a biofilm on the interior surface of HRTB. Efficiency of the bioprocess was monitored by determination of the acetate concentration and chemical oxygen demand (COD). While acetate inlet concentration and feeding rate influenced efficiency of acetate oxidation, the bioreactor rotation speed did not influence the bioprocess dynamics significantly. Gradients of acetate concentration and pH along HRTB were more pronounced at lower feeding rates. Volumetric load of acetate was proved to be the most significant parameter. High volumetric loads (above 2 g acetate l–1 h–1) gave poor acetate oxidation efficiency (only 17 to 50%). When the volumetric load was in the range of 0.60–1.75 g acetate l–1 h–1, acetate oxidation efficiency was 50–75%. At lower volumetric loads (0.14–0.58 g acetate l–1 h–1), complete acetate consumption was achieved. On the basis of the obtained results, it can be concluded that HRTB is suitable for conducting aerobic continuous bioprocesses.

  5. A Good Neighborhood for Cells: Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS-05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Leland W. K.; Goodwin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Good neighborhoods help you grow. As with a city, the lives of a cell are governed by its neighborhood connections Connections that do not work are implicated in a range of diseases. One of those connections - between prostate cancer and bone cells - will be studied on STS-107 using the Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS-05). To improve the prospects for finding novel therapies, and to identify biomarkers that predict disease progression, scientists need tissue models that behave the same as metastatic or spreading cancer. This is one of several NASA-sponsored lines of cell science research that use the microgravity environment of orbit in an attempt to grow lifelike tissue models for health research. As cells replicate, they "self associate" to form a complex matrix of collagens, proteins, fibers, and other structures. This highly evolved microenvironment tells each cell who is next door, how it should grow arid into what shapes, and how to respond to bacteria, wounds, and other stimuli. Studying these mechanisms outside the body is difficult because cells do not easily self-associate outside a natural environment. Most cell cultures produce thin, flat specimens that offer limited insight into how cells work together. Ironically, growing cell cultures in the microgravity of space produces cell assemblies that more closely resemble what is found in bodies on Earth. NASA's Bioreactor comprises a miniature life support system and a rotating vessel containing cell specimens in a nutrient medium. Orbital BDS experiments that cultured colon and prostate cancers have been highly promising.

  6. Modeling of leachate recirculation using vertical wells in bioreactor landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Cao, Ben-Yi; Zhang, Xu; Xie, Hai-Jian

    2015-06-01

    Leachate recirculation (LR) in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills operated as bioreactors offers significant economic and environmental benefits. The subsurface application method of vertical wells is one of the most common LR techniques. The objective of this study was to develop a novel two-dimensional model of leachate recirculation using vertical wells. This novel method can describe leachate flow considering the effects of MSW settlement while also accounting separately for leachate flow in saturated and unsaturated zones. In this paper, a settlement model for MSW when considering the effects of compression and biodegradation on the MSW porosity was adopted. A numerical model was proposed using new governing equations for the saturated and unsaturated zones of a landfill. The following design parameters were evaluated by simulating the recirculated leachate volume and the influence zones of waste under steady-state flow conditions: (1) the effect of MSW settlement, (2) the effect of the initial void ratio, (3) the effect of the injected head, (4) the effect of the unit weight, (5) the effect of the biodegradation rate, and (6) the effect of the compression coefficient. The influence zones of LR when considering the effect of MSW settlement are smaller than those when neglecting the effect. The influence zones and LR volume increased with an increase in the injection pressure head and initial void ratio of MSW. The proposed method and the calculation results can provide important insight into the hydrological behavior of bioreactor landfills. PMID:25874416

  7. Characterization of Microbial Communities Found in Bioreactor Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowe, Candice

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine microbial communities of simulated wastewater effluent from hollow fiber membrane bioreactors collected from the Space Life Science Laboratory and Texas Technical University. Microbes were characterized using quantitative polymerase chain reaction where a total count of bacteria and fungi were determined. The primers that were used to determine the total count of bacteria and fungi were targeted for 16S rDNA genes and the internal transcribed spacer, respectively. PCR products were detected with SYBR Green I fluorescent dye and a melting curve analysis was performed to identify unique melt profiles resulting from DNA sequence variations from each species of the community. Results from both the total bacteria and total fungi count assays showed that distinct populations were present in isolates from these bioreactors. This was exhibited by variation in the number of peaks observed on the melting curve analysis graph. Further analysis of these results using species-specific primers will shed light on exactly which microbes are present in these effluents. Information gained from this study will enable the design of a system that can efficiently monitor microbes that play a role in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in wastewater on the International Space Station to assist in the design of a sustainable system capable of converting this nutrient.

  8. Submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment and energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornare, J B; Adhyapak, U S; Minde, G P; Kalyan Raman, V; Sapkal, V S; Sapkal, R S

    2015-01-01

    Compared with conventional wastewater treatment processes, membrane bioreactors (MBRs) offer several advantages including high biodegradation efficiency, excellent effluent quality and smaller footprint. However, it has some limitations on account of its energy intensive operation. In recent years, there has been growing interest in use of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) due to their potential advantages over aerobic systems, which include low sludge production and energy generation in terms of biogas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a submerged AnMBR for the treatment of synthetic wastewater having 4,759 mg/l chemical oxygen demand (COD). The COD removal efficiency was over 95% during the performance evaluation study. Treated effluent with COD concentration of 231 mg/l was obtained for 25.5 hours hydraulic retention time. The obtained total organic carbon concentrations in feed and permeate were 1,812 mg/l and 89 mg/l, respectively. An average biogas generation and yield were 25.77 l/d and 0.36 m3/kg COD, respectively. Evolution of trans-membrane pressure (TMP) as a function of time was studied and an average TMP of 15 kPa was found suitable to achieve membrane flux of 12.17 l/(m2h). Almost weekly back-flow chemical cleaning of the membrane was found necessary to control TMP within the permissible limit of 20 kPa. PMID:26038930

  9. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Topical report: Bioreactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the proposed research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H{sub 2} from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; evaluation of biological synthesis gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses. The purpose of this report is to present results from bioreactor studies involving H{sub 2} production by water gas shift and H{sub 2}S removal to produce elemental sulfur. Many of the results for H{sub 2} production by Rhodospirillum rubrum have been presented during earlier contracts. Thus, this report concentrates mainly on H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur by R. rubrum.

  10. Comparison between controlled landfill reactor and conditioned landfill bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Chen, Wan-Zhi; Song, Fu-Zhong; Li, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Qing

    2004-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. The laboratory-scale simulators of landfill reactors treating municipal solid wastes were studied, the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation, nutrient balance, pH value, moisture content and temperature on the rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) biodegradation were determined, and it indicated the optimum pH value, moisture content and temperature decomposing MSW. The results of waste biodegradation were compared with that of the leachate-recirculated landfill simulator and conservative sanitary landfill simulator. In the control experiment the antitheses of a decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was shown. An obvious enhancement of effective disposal from conservative sanitary landfill (CSL) simulator, to the leachate-recirculated landfill (LRL) simulator and to the conditioned bioreactor landfill (CBL) simulator would be noted, through displaying the compared results of solid waste settlement, heavy metal concentration in leachate, methane production rate, biogas composition, BOD and COD as well as their ratio. PMID:15559832

  11. Two Devices for Removing Sludge From Bioreactor Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Shivaun; Hitchens, G. DUncan; Jabs, Harry; Cross, Jennifer; Pilkinton, Michelle; Taylor, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Two devices a magnetic separator and a special filter denoted a self-regenerating separator (SRS) have been developed for separating sludge from the stream of wastewater from a bioreactor. These devices were originally intended for use in microgravity, but have also been demonstrated to function in normal Earth gravity. The magnetic separator (see Figure 1) includes a thin-walled nonmagnetic, stainless-steel cylindrical drum that rotates within a cylindrical housing. The wastewater enters the separator through a recirculation inlet, and about 80 percent of the wastewater flow leaves through a recirculation outlet. Inside the drum, a magnet holder positions strong permanent magnets stationary and, except near a recirculation outlet, close to the inner drum surface. To enable magnetic separation, magnetite (a ferromagnetic and magnetically soft iron oxide) powder is mixed into the bioreactor wastewater. The magnetite becomes incorporated into the sludge by condensation, onto the powder particles, of microbe flocks that constitute the sludge. As a result, the magnets inside the drum magnetically attract the sludge onto the outer surface of the drum.

  12. Comparison between controlled landfill reactor and conditioned landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feng; CHEN Wan-zhi; SONG Fu-zhong; LI Xiao-peng; ZHANG Guo-qing

    2004-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. The results of laboratory-scale simulators of landfill reactors treating municipal solid wastes were studied, the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation, nutrient balance, pH value, moisture content and temperature on the rate of municipal solid waste(MSW) biodegradation were determined, and it indicated the optimum pH value, moisture content and temperature can used to decompose MSW. The results of waste biodegradation were compared with that of the simulators of the leachate-recirculated landfill and conservative sanitary landfill. In the control experiment the antitheses of a decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was shown, and heavy metals concentration was observed. An obvious enhancement of effective disposal from simulator of conservative sanitary landfill(CSL), to that of leachate-recirculated landfill(LRL) and to that of conditioned bioreactor landfill(CBL) would be noted, through displaying the compared results of solid waste settlement, heavy metal concentration in leachate, methane production rate, biogas composition, BOD and COD as well as their ratio.

  13. Pulse shear stress for anaerobic membrane bioreactor fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixiang; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-01-01

    Increase of shear stress at membrane surfaces is a generally applied strategy to minimize membrane fouling. It has been reported that a two-phase flow, better known as slug flow, is an effective way to increase shear stress. Hence, slug flow was introduced into an anaerobic membrane bioreactor for membrane fouling control. Anaerobic suspended sludge was cultured in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AMBR) operated with a side stream inside-out tubular membrane unit applying sustainable flux flow regimes. The averaged particle diameter decreased from 20 to 5 microm during operation of the AMBR. However, the COD removal efficiency did not show any significant deterioration, whereas the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) increased from 0.16 to 0.41 gCOD/g VSS/day. Nevertheless, the imposed gas slug appeared to be insufficient for adequate fouling control, resulting in rapidly increasing trans membrane pressures (TMP) operating at a flux exceeding 16 L/m2/h. Addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) enhanced the effect of slug flow on membrane fouling. However, the combined effect was still considered as not being significant. The tubular membrane was subsequently equipped with inert inserts for creating a locally increased shear stress for enhanced fouling control. Results show an increase in the membrane flux from 16 L/m2/h to 34 L/m2/h after the inserts were mounted in the membrane tube. PMID:22097007

  14. Errors in macromolecular synthesis after stress : a study of the possible protective role of the small heat shock proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Marin Vinader, L.

    2006-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis was to gain insight in what small heat shock proteins (sHsps) do with respect to macromolecular synthesis during a stressful situation in the cell. It is known that after a non-lethal heat shock, cells are better protected against a subsequent more severe heat shock, a phenomenon known as thermotolerance and attributed to the presence of the heat shock proteins. The question we asked first is whether the error rate in macromolecular synthesis (transcription, RN...

  15. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macromolecular crystallography beamline MX1 at the Australian Synchrotron is described. MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented

  16. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Park, Seul-Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  17. Bioconversion of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in airlift bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytoon, Mohamed Abdel-Monaem; AlZahrani, Abdulraheem Ahmad; Noweir, Madbuli Hamed; El-Marakby, Fadia Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Several bioreactor systems are used for biological treatment of hydrogen sulfide. Among these, airlift bioreactors are promising for the bioconversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. The performance of airlift bioreactors is not adequately understood, particularly when directly fed with hydrogen sulfide gas. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of an airlift bioreactor fed with high concentrations of H2S with special emphasis on the effect of pH in combination with other factors such as H2S loading rate, oxygen availability, and sulfide accumulation. H2S inlet concentrations between 1,008 ppm and 31,215 ppm were applied and elimination capacities up to 113 g H2S m(-3) h(-1) were achieved in the airlift bioreactor under investigation at a pH range 6.5-8.5. Acidic pH values reduced the elimination capacity. Elemental sulfur recovery up to 95% was achieved under oxygen limited conditions (DO 500 mg/L at pH values 8.0-8.5, and near 100% removal efficiency was achieved. Overall, the resident microorganisms in the studied airlift bioreactor favored pH values in the alkaline range. The bioreactor performance in terms of elimination capacity and sulfur recovery was better at pH range 8-8.5. PMID:25147857

  18. Solvent Fermentation From Palm Oil Mill Effluent Using Clostridium acetobutylicum In Oscillatory Flow Bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) by C. acetobutylicum NCIMB 13357 in an oscillatory flow bioreactor was investigated. Experimental works were conducted in a U-shaped stainless steel oscillatory flow bioreactor at oscillation frequency between 0.45-0.78 Hz and a constant amplitude of 12.5 mm. Fermentations were carried out for 72 hr at 35 degree Celsius using palm oil mill effluent and reinforced clostridia medium as a growth medium in batch culture. Result of this investigation showed that POME is a viable media for ABE fermentation and oscillatory flow bioreactor has an excellent potential as an alternative fermentation device. (author)

  19. Some process control/design considerations in the development of a microgravity mammalian cell bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goochee, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to review some of the physical/metabolic factors which must be considered in the development of an operating strategy for a mammalian cell bioreactor. Emphasis is placed on the dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements of growing mammalian epithelial cells. Literature reviews concerning oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements are discussed. A preliminary, dynamic model which encompasses the current features of the NASA bioreactor is presented. The implications of the literature survey and modeling effort on the design and operation of the NASA bioreactor are discussed.

  20. Commissioning of Research Bioreactor made in Korea with Malaysian Environment Adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioreactor is equipment used by researcher in Agrotechnology and Biosciences department (BAB) as a scientific approach to get a scale up of product. Headed by one of the senior researcher in the department, an effort has been made to upscale the project by using MTDC fund. The technology platform has been acquired from South Korea. Some modification has to be made to cater for the need of a research bioreactor to be established for Nuclear Malaysia Agency. This research bioreactor is to emulate a tissue culture product in a bigger scale bio processing, pharmaceutical biotechnology and industrial production. (author)

  1. Example study for granular bioreactor stratification: Three-dimensional evaluation of a sulfate-reducing granular bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tian-wei; Luo, Jing-hai; Su, Kui-zu; Wei, Li; Mackey, Hamish R.; Chi, Kun; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Recently, sulfate-reducing granular sludge has been developed for application in sulfate-laden water and wastewater treatment. However, little is known about biomass stratification and its effects on the bioprocesses inside the granular bioreactor. A comprehensive investigation followed by a verification trial was therefore conducted in the present work. The investigation focused on the performance of each sludge layer, the internal hydrodynamics and microbial community structures along the height of the reactor. The reactor substratum (the section below baffle 1) was identified as the main acidification zone based on microbial analysis and reactor performance. Two baffle installations increased mixing intensity but at the same time introduced dead zones. Computational fluid dynamics simulation was employed to visualize the internal hydrodynamics. The 16S rRNA gene of the organisms further revealed that more diverse communities of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and acidogens were detected in the reactor substratum than in the superstratum (the section above baffle 1). The findings of this study shed light on biomass stratification in an SRB granular bioreactor to aid in the design and optimization of such reactors. PMID:27539264

  2. Polarizable Atomic Multipole X-Ray Refinement: Particle Mesh Ewald Electrostatics for Macromolecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnieders, Michael J; Fenn, Timothy D; Pande, Vijay S

    2011-04-12

    Refinement of macromolecular models from X-ray crystallography experiments benefits from prior chemical knowledge at all resolutions. As the quality of the prior chemical knowledge from quantum or classical molecular physics improves, in principle so will resulting structural models. Due to limitations in computer performance and electrostatic algorithms, commonly used macromolecules X-ray crystallography refinement protocols have had limited support for rigorous molecular physics in the past. For example, electrostatics is often neglected in favor of nonbonded interactions based on a purely repulsive van der Waals potential. In this work we present advanced algorithms for desktop workstations that open the door to X-ray refinement of even the most challenging macromolecular data sets using state-of-the-art classical molecular physics. First we describe theory for particle mesh Ewald (PME) summation that consistently handles the symmetry of all 230 space groups, replicates of the unit cell such that the minimum image convention can be used with a real space cutoff of any size and the combination of space group symmetry with replicates. An implementation of symmetry accelerated PME for the polarizable atomic multipole optimized energetics for biomolecular applications (AMOEBA) force field is presented. Relative to a single CPU core performing calculations on a P1 unit cell, our AMOEBA engine called Force Field X (FFX) accelerates energy evaluations by more than a factor of 24 on an 8-core workstation with a Tesla GPU coprocessor for 30 structures that contain 240 000 atoms on average in the unit cell. The benefit of AMOEBA electrostatics evaluated with PME for macromolecular X-ray crystallography refinement is demonstrated via rerefinement of 10 crystallographic data sets that range in resolution from 1.7 to 4.5 Å. Beginning from structures obtained by local optimization without electrostatics, further optimization using AMOEBA with PME electrostatics improved

  3. Submerged membrane bioreactor for domestic wastewater treatment and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mediterranean basin (and particularly North African countries) is one of the poorest regions in the world in terms of water resources. In Tunisia, treated municipal wastewater is becoming one of the main alternative sources of water. Indeed, in 2007, 99 municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) has treated a quantity of 215 millions of m3 from which more than 30 pour cent are reused. The treated volume in 2011 is expected to be 266 millions m3, whereas the reused wastewaters should reach more than 50 pour cent. However, especially in the eastern and northern Mediterranean regions, wastewaters are inefficiently treated and re-used for irrigation or sanitary purposes, serving as a carrier for diseases or causing water pollution when discharged to water bodies. In the last decade, several water treatment technologies have been used in the region with little success in pathogen removal. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology is a very promising alternative to those conventional water treatments as membranes act as a barrier against bacteria and viruses achieving a high degree of water purification. However, most membrane bioreactors currently in use have very high running costs because of the high pressure drop and high air-flushing rate required for their operation. The objective of this PURATREAT FP 6 EU project was to study a new approach to the operation of membrane bioreactors. This study was included a comparison of three leading membrane technologies. The operating procedure to be studied is expected to yield very low energy consumption and reduced maintenance costs. After the start up period, the MBR3 was operated with a MLSS concentration of 4.5 and 9 g/L, respectively. Different fluxes as 16, 18, 20 and 22 Lh-1m-2 were tested. When the flux increase from 16 to 22 Lh-1m-2, the treatment energy consumption decreased from 7 to 5 kWh/m3. However the increases of MLSS concentration from 4.5 and 9 g/L raise the membrane fouling frequency from 1 time every 3

  4. Arsenic removal in a sulfidogenic fixed-bed column bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altun, Muslum, E-mail: muslumaltun@hotmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Sahinkaya, Erkan [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Bioengineering Department, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Durukan, Ilknur; Bektas, Sema [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Komnitsas, Kostas [Technical University of Crete, Department of Mineral Resources Engineering, Chania (Greece)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Sulfidogenic treatment of As-containing AMD was investigated. • High rate simultaneous removal of As and Fe was achieved. • As was removed without adding alkalinity or adjusting pH. • As and Fe removal mechanisms were elucidated. - Abstract: In the present study, the bioremoval of arsenic from synthetic acidic wastewater containing arsenate (As{sup 5+}) (0.5–20 mg/L), ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) (100–200 mg/L) and sulfate (2000 mg/L) was investigated in an ethanol fed (780–1560 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD)) anaerobic up-flow fixed bed column bioreactor at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9.6 h. Arsenic removal efficiency was low and averaged 8% in case iron was not supplemented to the synthetic wastewater. Neutral to slightly alkaline pH and high sulfide concentration in the bioreactor retarded the precipitation of arsenic. Addition of 100 mg/L Fe{sup 2+} increased arsenic removal efficiency to 63%. Further increase of influent Fe{sup 2+} concentration to 200 mg/L improved arsenic removal to 85%. Decrease of influent COD concentration to its half, 780 mg/L, resulted in further increase of As removal to 96% when Fe{sup 2+} and As{sup 5+} concentrations remained at 200 mg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. As a result of the sulfidogenic activity in the bioreactor the effluent pH and alkalinity concentration averaged 7.4 ± 0.2 and 1736 ± 239 mg CaCO{sub 3}/L respectively. Electron flow from ethanol to sulfate averaged 72 ± 10%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were carried out to identify the nature of the precipitate generated by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) activity. Precipitation of arsenic in the form of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} (orpiment) and co-precipitation with ferrous sulfide (FeS), pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) or arsenopyrite (FeAsS) were the main arsenic removal mechanisms.

  5. Toward the Standardization of Bioreactors for Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michel; Nebuloni, Stefano; Dainesi, Paolo; Gass, Samuel

    Growing interest in long-term human space missions and exploration as well as future plans for extra-terrestrial human settlements, places increasing importance on understanding biological and chemical processes in space at cellular and molecular level. RUAG Space has been involved in the development of bioreactors for life-science experiments in space for the past 20 years. Throughout these developments, RUAG has acted as the link between scientists and the space industry, translating high-level scientific requirements into technical requirements, verifying their feasibility within the space context, and developing state-of-the-art experiment hardware which can interface with dedicated micro-gravity platform. Although this approach has brought forth promising developments in the field, it is associated to very long development phases as well as correspondingly high costs. Each new scientific experiment is often associated to an entirely new hardware development. This is, in large, due to the limited information available on the possibilities and constraints imposed by the particular context of space. Therefore, a considerable amount of time and development costs are invested in order to accommodate stringent scientific requirements and/or specific experiment design in space hardware. This does not only have an impact on funding opportunities for micro-gravity experiments in space, it also curbs the pace of scientific discoveries and limits the number of research opportunities. Therefore, in the following, we present an overview of already established possibilities for cellular research in space, with special emphasis on hardware developed by RUAG Space. This is intended to provide scientists with key technical information on already existing bioreactors, subsystems, and components, which may be used as a basis when designing scientific studies. By considering this information from the onset of the establishment of scientific requirements, technical solutions can

  6. Greenhouse Gas Emission from In-situ Denitrifying Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluer, W.; Walter, M. T.; Geohring, L.

    2013-12-01

    Despite decades of concerted effort to mitigate nonpoint source nitrate (NO3-) pollution from agricultural lands, these efforts have not been sufficient to arrest eutrophication, which continues to be a serious and chronic problem. Two primary processes for removing excess NO3- from water are biological assimilation and denitrification. Denitrifying bacteria use NO3- as the electron acceptor for respiration in the absence of oxygen. Denitrification results in reduced forms of nitrogen, often dinitrogen gas (N2) but also nitrous oxide (N2O), an aggressive greenhouse gas (GHG). A promising solution to NO3- pollution is to intercept agricultural discharges with denitrifying bioreactors (DNBRs), though research has been limited to NO3- level reduction and omitted process mechanisms. DNBRs work by providing an anaerobic environment with plenty of organic matter (commonly woodchips) for denitrifying bacteria to flourish. While, initial results from bioreactor studies show that they can cost-effectively remove NO3-, GHG emission could be an unintended consequence. The study's goal is to determine how bioreactor design promotes microbial denitrification while limiting N2O production. It specifically focuses on expanding the body of knowledge concerning DNBRs in the areas of design implications and internal processes by measuring intermediate compounds and not solely NO3-. Nutrient samples are collected at inflow and outflow structures and tested for NO3- and nitrite (NO2-). Dissolved and headspace gas samples are collected and tested for N2O. Additional gas samples will be analyzed for naturally-occurring isotopic N2 to support proposed pathways. Designs will be analyzed both through the N2O/N2 production ratio and NO2- production caused by various residence times and inflow NO3- concentrations. High GHG ratios and NO2- production suggest non-ideal conditions or flow patterns for complete denitrification. NO3- reduction is used for comparison with previous studies. Few

  7. Arsenic removal in a sulfidogenic fixed-bed column bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Sulfidogenic treatment of As-containing AMD was investigated. • High rate simultaneous removal of As and Fe was achieved. • As was removed without adding alkalinity or adjusting pH. • As and Fe removal mechanisms were elucidated. - Abstract: In the present study, the bioremoval of arsenic from synthetic acidic wastewater containing arsenate (As5+) (0.5–20 mg/L), ferrous iron (Fe2+) (100–200 mg/L) and sulfate (2000 mg/L) was investigated in an ethanol fed (780–1560 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD)) anaerobic up-flow fixed bed column bioreactor at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9.6 h. Arsenic removal efficiency was low and averaged 8% in case iron was not supplemented to the synthetic wastewater. Neutral to slightly alkaline pH and high sulfide concentration in the bioreactor retarded the precipitation of arsenic. Addition of 100 mg/L Fe2+ increased arsenic removal efficiency to 63%. Further increase of influent Fe2+ concentration to 200 mg/L improved arsenic removal to 85%. Decrease of influent COD concentration to its half, 780 mg/L, resulted in further increase of As removal to 96% when Fe2+ and As5+ concentrations remained at 200 mg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. As a result of the sulfidogenic activity in the bioreactor the effluent pH and alkalinity concentration averaged 7.4 ± 0.2 and 1736 ± 239 mg CaCO3/L respectively. Electron flow from ethanol to sulfate averaged 72 ± 10%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were carried out to identify the nature of the precipitate generated by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) activity. Precipitation of arsenic in the form of As2S3 (orpiment) and co-precipitation with ferrous sulfide (FeS), pyrite (FeS2) or arsenopyrite (FeAsS) were the main arsenic removal mechanisms

  8. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilca, Serban L; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M; Stuart, David I; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  9. Parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to cells employing nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli V; Griffin, Guy D; Guillorn, Michael A; Merkulov, Vladimir L; Simpson, Michael L

    2015-03-31

    Systems and methods are described for parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to whole cells employing carbon nanostructures including nanofibers and nanotubes. A method includes providing a first material on at least a first portion of a first surface of a first tip of a first elongated carbon nanostructure; providing a second material on at least a second portion of a second surface of a second tip of a second elongated carbon nanostructure, the second elongated carbon nanostructure coupled to, and substantially parallel to, the first elongated carbon nanostructure; and penetrating a boundary of a biological sample with at least one member selected from the group consisting of the first tip and the second tip.

  10. Phase transitions of macromolecular microsphere composite hydrogels based on the stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation to simulate the phase transitions of the macromolecular microsphere composite (MMC) hydrogels under a random disturbance. Based on the Flory–Huggins lattice model and the Boltzmann entropy theorem, we develop a reticular free energy suit for the network structure of MMC hydrogels. Taking the random factor into account, with the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) mesoscopic simulation method, we set up a stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation, designated herein as the MMC-TDGL equation. The stochastic term in the equation is constructed appropriately to satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and is discretized on a spatial grid for the simulation. A semi-implicit difference scheme is adopted to numerically solve the MMC-TDGL equation. Some numerical experiments are performed with different parameters. The results are consistent with the physical phenomenon, which verifies the good simulation of the stochastic term

  11. Modulation of phosphofructokinase action by macromolecular interactions. Quantitative analysis of the phosphofructokinase-aldolase-calmodulin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, F; Christova, T Y; Ovádi, J

    1988-11-23

    The simultaneous effect of calmodulin and aldolase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-lyase, EC 4.1.2.13) on the concentration-dependent behaviour of muscle phosphofructokinase (ATP: D-fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.11) has been analysed by means of a covalently attached fluorescent probe, gel penetration experiments, and using a kinetic approach. We found that calmodulin-induced inactivation of phosphofructokinase is suspended by addition of an equimolar amount of aldolase. This effect was attributed to an apparent competition of calmodulin and aldolase for the dimeric forms of kinase. Moreover, the direct binding of aldolase to calmodulin has also been demonstrated, which resulted in a significant decrease in the kcat value of the enzyme. The quantitative analysis of these interactions in the system phosphofructokinase-calmodulin-aldolase is presented. A possible molecular model for the modulation of phosphofructokinase action by macromolecular interactions is envisaged. PMID:2973356

  12. Computational Methodologies for Real-Space Structural Refinement of Large Macromolecular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Boon Chong; Hadden, Jodi A; Bernardi, Rafael C; Singharoy, Abhishek; McGreevy, Ryan; Rudack, Till; Cassidy, C Keith; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    The rise of the computer as a powerful tool for model building and refinement has revolutionized the field of structure determination for large biomolecular systems. Despite the wide availability of robust experimental methods capable of resolving structural details across a range of spatiotemporal resolutions, computational hybrid methods have the unique ability to integrate the diverse data from multimodal techniques such as X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy into consistent, fully atomistic structures. Here, commonly employed strategies for computational real-space structural refinement are reviewed, and their specific applications are illustrated for several large macromolecular complexes: ribosome, virus capsids, chemosensory array, and photosynthetic chromatophore. The increasingly important role of computational methods in large-scale structural refinement, along with current and future challenges, is discussed. PMID:27145875

  13. OCTOPUS: an innovative multimodal diffractometer for neutron macromolecular crystallography across the length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to construct a novel protein diffractometer at position H112B. The new instrument will deliver major efficiency gains, as well as offering greatly extended flexibility through the option of several easily interchangeable modes of operation. This proposal builds on the demonstrable need to extend ILL's capacity for high resolution structural studies of protein systems, as well as a need to widen the scope of biological crystallography - in particular for monochromatic studies at both high and low resolution. The development will be carried out in close collaboration with structural biologists at the ESRF, and engineered in such a way that the user interface of the instrument (from sample to software) will be transparently identifiable to a large, dynamic, and driven community of European synchrotron X-ray macromolecular crystallographers. (authors)

  14. Recent Major Improvements to the ALS Sector 5 Macromolecular Crystallography Beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Advanced Light Source (ALS) was initially conceived primarily as a low energy (1.9GeV) 3rd generation source of VUV and soft x-ray radiation it was realized very early in the development of the facility that a multipole wiggler source coupled with high quality, (brightness preserving), optics would result in a beamline whose performance across the optimal energy range (5-15keV) for macromolecular crystallography (MX) would be comparable to, or even exceed, that of many existing crystallography beamlines at higher energy facilities. Hence, starting in 1996, a suite of three beamlines, branching off a single wiggler source, was constructed, which together formed the ALS Macromolecular Crystallography Facility. From the outset this facility was designed to cater equally to the needs of both academic and industrial users with a heavy emphasis placed on the development and introduction of high throughput crystallographic tools, techniques, and facilities--such as large area CCD detectors, robotic sample handling and automounting facilities, a service crystallography program, and a tightly integrated, centralized, and highly automated beamline control environment for users. This facility was immediately successful, with the primary Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction beamline (5.0.2) in particular rapidly becoming one of the foremost crystallographic facilities in the US--responsible for structures such as the 70S ribosome. This success in-turn triggered enormous growth of the ALS macromolecular crystallography community and spurred the development of five additional ALS MX beamlines all utilizing the newly developed superconducting bending magnets ('superbends') as sources. However in the years since the original Sector 5.0 beamlines were built the performance demands of macromolecular crystallography users have become ever more exacting; with growing emphasis placed on studying larger complexes, more difficult structures, weakly diffracting or smaller

  15. Phenix - a comprehensive python-based system for macromolecular structure solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hung, Li - Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adams, Paul D [UC BERKELEY; Afonine, Pavel V [UC BERKELEY; Bunkoczi, Gabor [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Chen, Vincent B [DUKE UNIV; Davis, Ian [DUKE UNIV; Echols, Nathaniel [LBNL; Headd, Jeffrey J [DUKE UNIV; Grosse Kunstleve, Ralf W [LBNL; Mccoy, Airlie J [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Moriarty, Nigel W [LBNL; Oeffner, Robert [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Read, Randy J [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; Richardson, David C [DUKE UNIV; Richardson, Jane S [DUKE UNIV; Zwarta, Peter H [LBNL

    2009-01-01

    Macromolecular X-ray crystallography is routinely applied to understand biological processes at a molecular level. However, significant time and effort are still required to solve and complete many of these structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data using many software packages, and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. Phenix has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on automation of all procedures. This has relied on the development of algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input, the development of algorithms that automate procedures that are traditionally performed by hand, and finally the development of a framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms.

  16. Integration and global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for studying macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Zhao, Huaying; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro; Schuck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful and widely used method to measure the energetics of macromolecular interactions by recording a thermogram of differential heating power during a titration. However, traditional ITC analysis is limited by stochastic thermogram noise and by the limited information content of a single titration experiment. Here we present a protocol for bias-free thermogram integration based on automated shape analysis of the injection peaks, followed by combination of isotherms from different calorimetric titration experiments into a global analysis, statistical analysis of binding parameters and graphical presentation of the results. This is performed using the integrated public-domain software packages NITPIC, SEDPHAT and GUSSI. The recently developed low-noise thermogram integration approach and global analysis allow for more precise parameter estimates and more reliable quantification of multisite and multicomponent cooperative and competitive interactions. Titration experiments typically take 1-2.5 h each, and global analysis usually takes 10-20 min. PMID:27055097

  17. Phase transitions of macromolecular microsphere composite hydrogels based on the stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao, E-mail: lixiao1228@163.com; Ji, Guanghua, E-mail: ghji@bnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Hui, E-mail: hzhang@bnu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    We use the stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation to simulate the phase transitions of the macromolecular microsphere composite (MMC) hydrogels under a random disturbance. Based on the Flory–Huggins lattice model and the Boltzmann entropy theorem, we develop a reticular free energy suit for the network structure of MMC hydrogels. Taking the random factor into account, with the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) mesoscopic simulation method, we set up a stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation, designated herein as the MMC-TDGL equation. The stochastic term in the equation is constructed appropriately to satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and is discretized on a spatial grid for the simulation. A semi-implicit difference scheme is adopted to numerically solve the MMC-TDGL equation. Some numerical experiments are performed with different parameters. The results are consistent with the physical phenomenon, which verifies the good simulation of the stochastic term.

  18. Local analysis of strains and rotations for macromolecular electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorzano, C O S; Martín-Ramos, A; Prieto, F; Melero, R; Martín-Benito, J; Jonic, S; Navas-Calvente, J; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Abrishami, V; de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Gómez-Blanco, J; Vilas, J L; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    Macromolecular complexes perform their physiological functions by local rearrangements of their constituents and biochemically interacting with their reaction partners. These rearrangements may involve local rotations and the induction of local strains causing different mechanical efforts and stretches at the different areas of the protein. The analysis of these local deformations may reveal important insight into the way proteins perform their tasks. In this paper we introduce a method to perform this kind of local analysis using Electron Microscopy volumes in a fully objective and automatic manner. For doing so, we exploit the continuous nature of the result of an elastic image registration using B-splines as its basis functions. We show that the results obtained by the new automatic method are consistent with previous observations on these macromolecules. PMID:27102900

  19. Probing a continuum of macro-molecular assembly models with graph templates of complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Tom; Doye, Valérie; Cazals, Frédéric

    2013-11-01

    Reconstruction by data integration is an emerging trend to reconstruct large protein assemblies, but uncertainties on the input data yield average models whose quantitative interpretation is challenging. This article presents methods to probe fuzzy models of large assemblies against atomic resolution models of subsystems. Consider a toleranced model (TOM) of a macromolecular assembly, namely a continuum of nested shapes representing the assembly at multiple scales. Also consider a template namely an atomic resolution 3D model of a subsystem (a complex) of this assembly. We present graph-based algorithms performing a multi-scale assessment of the complexes of the TOM, by comparing the pairwise contacts which appear in the TOM against those of the template. We apply this machinery on TOM derived from an average model of the nuclear pore complex, to explore the connections among members of its well-characterized Y-complex. PMID:23609891

  20. Site-selective electroless nickel plating on patterned thin films of macromolecular metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Yamagiwa, Hiroki; Asakawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Makoto; Kurashina, Tadashi; Fukawa, Tadashi; Shirai, Hirofusa

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple route to depositing nickel layer patterns using photocross-linked polymer thin films containing palladium catalysts, which can be used as adhesive interlayers for fabrication of nickel patterns on glass and plastic substrates. Electroless nickel patterns can be obtained in three steps: (i) the pattern formation of partially quaterized poly(vinyl pyridine) by UV irradiation, (ii) the formation of macromolecular metal complex with palladium, and (iii) the nickel metallization using electroless plating bath. Metallization is site-selective and allows for a high resolution. And the resulting nickel layered structure shows good adhesion with glass and plastic substrates. The direct patterning of metallic layers onto insulating substrates indicates a great potential for fabricating micro/nano devices. PMID:21069972

  1. The structural organization and luminescence properties of macromolecular metal complexes containing terbium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of aminobenzoic acid (ABA)-groups effect on luminescence of Tb3+ ions in aqueous solutions of ABA-containing copolymers, as well as investigation into connection of Tb3+ luminescence with peculiarities of ABA structure, content of ABA in copolymer, structure of copolymer, and with conditions of formation and structure of metal complexes are the task of the research. Copolymers of N-alkylmethacrylamides with various isomers of N-methacryloylaminobenzoic acids were synthesized and used to obtain the macromolecular metal complexes (MMC) with Tb3+ ions in aqueous solutions. The luminescence spectra of Tb3+ ions in these systems were measured. The composition and stability of MMC are established. Polymer-competitor (polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids) were used for determination of stability of Tb3+ ion-copolymer bond. The effect of Tb3+ ions on the structural organization of macromolecules is characterized by the relaxation times determined using the method of polarized luminescence

  2. Polymer segregation under confinement: Influences of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the polymer and crowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhao; Yu, Wancheng; Wang, Jiajun; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-10-01

    Entropy driven polymer segregation in confinements as a model for chromosome separation in bacteria has attracted wide attention; however, the effects of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the binding protein and the newly replicated DNA on the segregation dynamics are not clear. Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the influences of crowders and the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders on segregation of two overlapping polymers under a cylindrical confinement. We find that the segregation time increases with increasing the volume fraction of crowders due to the slower chain diffusion in crowded environments. For a fixed volume fraction of crowders, the segregation time decreases with increasing the size of crowders. Moreover, the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders can significantly facilitate the chain segregation. These results are important for understanding the chromosome segregation in living cells.

  3. Proteome-wide dataset supporting the study of ancient metazoan macromolecular complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhna Phanse

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Our analysis examines the conservation of multiprotein complexes among metazoa through use of high resolution biochemical fractionation and precision mass spectrometry applied to soluble cell extracts from 5 representative model organisms Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and Homo sapiens. The interaction network obtained from the data was validated globally in 4 distant species (Xenopus laevis, Nematostella vectensis, Dictyostelium discoideum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and locally by targeted affinity-purification experiments. Here we provide details of our massive set of supporting biochemical fractionation data available via ProteomeXchange (PXD002319-PXD002328, PPIs via BioGRID (185267; and interaction network projections via (http://metazoa.med.utoronto.ca made fully accessible to allow further exploration. The datasets here are related to the research article on metazoan macromolecular complexes in Nature [1].

  4. Proteome-wide dataset supporting the study of ancient metazoan macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanse, Sadhna; Wan, Cuihong; Borgeson, Blake; Tu, Fan; Drew, Kevin; Clark, Greg; Xiong, Xuejian; Kagan, Olga; Kwan, Julian; Bezginov, Alexandr; Chessman, Kyle; Pal, Swati; Cromar, Graham; Papoulas, Ophelia; Ni, Zuyao; Boutz, Daniel R; Stoilova, Snejana; Havugimana, Pierre C; Guo, Xinghua; Malty, Ramy H; Sarov, Mihail; Greenblatt, Jack; Babu, Mohan; Derry, W Brent; Tillier, Elisabeth R; Wallingford, John B; Parkinson, John; Marcotte, Edward M; Emili, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Our analysis examines the conservation of multiprotein complexes among metazoa through use of high resolution biochemical fractionation and precision mass spectrometry applied to soluble cell extracts from 5 representative model organisms Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and Homo sapiens. The interaction network obtained from the data was validated globally in 4 distant species (Xenopus laevis, Nematostella vectensis, Dictyostelium discoideum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and locally by targeted affinity-purification experiments. Here we provide details of our massive set of supporting biochemical fractionation data available via ProteomeXchange (PXD002319-PXD002328), PPIs via BioGRID (185267); and interaction network projections via (http://metazoa.med.utoronto.ca) made fully accessible to allow further exploration. The datasets here are related to the research article on metazoan macromolecular complexes in Nature [1]. PMID:26870755

  5. Macromolecular crowding creates heterogeneous environments of gene expression in picolitre droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maike M. K.; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Spruijt, Evan; Maas, Roel J. M.; Rosquelles, Marta Ventosa; Groen, Joost; Heus, Hans A.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics of complex enzymatic reactions in highly crowded small volumes is crucial for the development of synthetic minimal cells. Compartmentalized biochemical reactions in cell-sized containers exhibit a degree of randomness due to the small number of molecules involved. However, it is unknown how the physical environment contributes to the stochastic nature of multistep enzymatic processes. Here, we present a robust method to quantify gene expression noise in vitro using droplet microfluidics. We study the changes in stochasticity in the cell-free gene expression of two genes compartmentalized within droplets as a function of DNA copy number and macromolecular crowding. We find that decreased diffusion caused by a crowded environment leads to the spontaneous formation of heterogeneous microenvironments of mRNA as local production rates exceed the diffusion rates of macromolecules. This heterogeneity leads to a higher probability of the molecular machinery staying in the same microenvironment, directly increasing the system's stochasticity.

  6. A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Hongwei; YAO; Lei; ZHAO; Hong; ZHANG; Jichuan; XUE; Zhaohong

    2006-01-01

    A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials is presented.The dynamic mechanical parameters of materials are first measured by using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Apparatus(DMTA) at low frequencies,usually less than 100 Hz; then based on the Principles of Time-Temperature Super position (TTS),these parameters are extended to the frequency range that acousticians are concerned about,usually from hundreds to thousands of hertz; finally the extended dynamic mechanical parameters are transformed into acoustic parameters with the help of acoustic measurement and inverse analysis.To test the feasibility and accuracy,we measure a kind of rubber sample in DMTA and acquire the basic acoustic parameters of the sample by using this method.While applying the basic parameters to calculating characteristics of the sample in acoustic pipe,a reasonable agreement of sound absorption coefficients is obtained between the calculations and measurements in the acoustic pipe.

  7. A specificity switch in selected cre recombinase variants is mediated by macromolecular plasticity and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Enoch P; Martin, Shelley S; Abel, Jonas; Gelato, Kathy A; Kim, Hanseong; Schultz, Peter G; Santoro, Stephen W

    2003-11-01

    The basis for the altered DNA specificities of two Cre recombinase variants, obtained by mutation and selection, was revealed by their cocrystal structures. The proteins share similar substitutions but differ in their preferences for the natural LoxP substrate and an engineered substrate that is inactive with wild-type Cre, LoxM7. One variant preferentially recombines LoxM7 and contacts the substituted bases through a hydrated network of novel interlocking protein-DNA contacts. The other variant recognizes both LoxP and LoxM7 utilizing the same DNA backbone contact but different base contacts, facilitated by an unexpected DNA shift. Assisted by water, novel interaction networks can arise from few protein substitutions, suggesting how new DNA binding specificities might evolve. The contributions of macromolecular plasticity and water networks in specific DNA recognition observed here present a challenge for predictive schemes. PMID:14652076

  8. Errors in macromolecular synthesis after stress : a study of the possible protective role of the small heat shock proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Vinader, L.

    2006-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis was to gain insight in what small heat shock proteins (sHsps) do with respect to macromolecular synthesis during a stressful situation in the cell. It is known that after a non-lethal heat shock, cells are better protected against a subsequent more severe heat shock,

  9. Proceedings of a one-week course on exploiting anomalous scattering in macromolecular structure determination (EMBO'07)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This course, which was directed to young scientists, illustrated both theoretical and practical aspects of macromolecular crystal structure solution using synchrotron radiation. Some software dedicated to data collection, processing and analysis were presented. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  10. Proceedings of a one-week course on exploiting anomalous scattering in macromolecular structure determination (EMBO'07)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, M.S.; Shepard, W.; Dauter, Z.; Leslie, A.; Diederichs, K.; Evans, G.; Svensson, O.; Schneider, T.; Bricogne, G.; Dauter, Z.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Leslie, A.; Kabsch, W.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Read, R.; Panjikar, S.; Pannu, N.S.; Dauter, Z.; Weiss, M.S.; McSweeney, S

    2007-07-01

    This course, which was directed to young scientists, illustrated both theoretical and practical aspects of macromolecular crystal structure solution using synchrotron radiation. Some software dedicated to data collection, processing and analysis were presented. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  11. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-08-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes.

  12. Development of an online UV–visible microspectrophotometer for a macromolecular crystallography beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An online UV–visible microspectrophotometer has been developed for the macromolecular crystallography beamline at SPring-8. Details of this spectrophotometer are reported. Measurement of the UV–visible absorption spectrum is a convenient technique for detecting chemical changes of proteins, and it is therefore useful to combine spectroscopy and diffraction studies. An online microspectrophotometer for the UV–visible region was developed and installed on the macromolecular crystallography beamline, BL38B1, at SPring-8. This spectrophotometer is equipped with a difference dispersive double monochromator, a mercury–xenon lamp as the light source, and a photomultiplier as the detector. The optical path is mostly constructed using mirrors, in order to obtain high brightness in the UV region, and the confocal optics are assembled using a cross-slit diaphragm like an iris to eliminate stray light. This system can measure optical densities up to a maximum of 4.0. To study the effect of radiation damage, preliminary measurements of glucose isomerase and thaumatin crystals were conducted in the UV region. Spectral changes dependent on X-ray dose were observed at around 280 nm, suggesting that structural changes involving Trp or Tyr residues occurred in the protein crystal. In the case of the thaumatin crystal, a broad peak around 400 nm was also generated after X-ray irradiation, suggesting the cleavage of a disulfide bond. Dose-dependent spectral changes were also observed in cryo-solutions alone, and these changes differed with the composition of the cryo-solution. These responses in the UV region are informative regarding the state of the sample; consequently, this device might be useful for X-ray crystallography

  13. PURY: a database of geometric restraints of hetero compounds for refinement in complexes with macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejasic, Miha; Praaenikar, Jure; Turk, Dusan

    2008-11-01

    The number and variety of macromolecular structures in complex with ;hetero' ligands is growing. The need for rapid delivery of correct geometric parameters for their refinement, which is often crucial for understanding the biological relevance of the structure, is growing correspondingly. The current standard for describing protein structures is the Engh-Huber parameter set. It is an expert data set resulting from selection and analysis of the crystal structures gathered in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). Clearly, such a manual approach cannot be applied to the vast and ever-growing number of chemical compounds. Therefore, a database, named PURY, of geometric parameters of chemical compounds has been developed, together with a server that accesses it. PURY is a compilation of the whole CSD. It contains lists of atom classes and bonds connecting them, as well as angle, chirality, planarity and conformation parameters. The current compilation is based on CSD 5.28 and contains 1978 atom classes and 32,702 bonding, 237,068 angle, 201,860 dihedral and 64,193 improper geometric restraints. Analysis has confirmed that the restraints from the PURY database are suitable for use in macromolecular crystal structure refinement and should be of value to the crystallographic community. The database can be accessed through the web server http://pury.ijs.si/, which creates topology and parameter files from deposited coordinates in suitable forms for the refinement programs MAIN, CNS and REFMAC. In the near future, the server will move to the CSD website http://pury.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/. PMID:19020347

  14. Numerical Simulation of Microcarrier Motion in a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI-HAO JU; TIAN-QING LIU; XUE-HU MA; ZHAN-FENG CUI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the forces of rotational wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor on small tissue pieces or microcarrier particles and to determine the tracks of microcarrier particles in RWV bioreactor. Methods The motion of the microcarrier in the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor with both the inner and outer cylinders rotating was modeled by numerical simulation. Results The continuous trajectory of microcarrier particles, including the possible collision with the wall was obtained. An expression between the minimum rotational speed difference of the inner and outer cylinders and the microcarrier particle or aggregate radius could avoid collisions with either wall. The range of microcarrier radius or tissue size, which could be safely cultured in the RWV bioreactor, in terms of shear stress level, was determined. Conclusion The model works well in describing the trajectory of a heavier microcarrier particle in rotating wall vessel.

  15. Method and Apparatus for a Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J. (Inventor); Geffert, Sandra K. (Inventor); Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A bioreactor and method that permits continuous and simultaneous short, moderate, or long term cell culturing of one or more cell types or tissue in a laminar flow configuration is disclosed, where the bioreactor supports at least two laminar flow zones, which are isolated by laminar flow without the need for physical barriers between the zones. The bioreactors of this invention are ideally suited for studying short, moderate and long term studies of cell cultures and the response of cell cultures to one or more stressors such as pharmaceuticals, hypoxia, pathogens, or any other stressor. The bioreactors of this invention are also ideally suited for short, moderate or long term cell culturing with periodic cell harvesting and/or medium processing for secreted cellular components.

  16. NOVEL CERAMIC MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR LOW-FLOW SYSTEMS - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improved low-flow (50,000 gallons per day) sanitary wastewater treatment systems are needed. CeraMem Corporation's proposed approach includes a membrane bioreactor (MBR) using fully proven biological processes for biological oxygen demand oxidation and (optionally) fo...

  17. Biodegradation of the water-soluble gasoline components in a novel hybrid bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-De-Jesus, A.; Lara-Rodriguez, A.; Santoyo-Tepole, F.; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N.; Galindez Mayer, J. [Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Carpio y Plan de Ayala, ' ' Centro Operativo Naranjo' ' , Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    A novel hybrid bioreactor was designed to remove volatile organic compounds from water contaminated with water-soluble gasoline components, and the performance of this new bioreactor was investigated. It was composed of two biotrickling filter sections and one biofilter section. The liquid phase pollutants were removed by a mixed culture in the biotrickling filter sections and the gas phase pollutants stripped by air injection in the biofilter section. The specific rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal obtained in the reactor were directly proportional to the pollutant-loading rate. A stable operation of the hybrid bioreactor was attained for long periods of time. The bioreactor had the potential to simultaneously treat a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds, e.g., those present in the water-soluble fraction of gasoline, as well as the capacity to readily adapt to changing operational conditions, such as an increased contaminant loading, and variations in the airflow rate. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Optimal Homogenization of Perfusion Flows in Microfluidic Bio-Reactors: A Numerical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Dufva, Martin; Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in small-scale bio-reactors has increased dramatically. To ensure homogeneous conditions within the complete area of perfused microfluidic bio-reactors, we develop a general design of a continually feed bio-reactor with uniform perfusion flow. This is achieved by...... introducing a specific type of perfusion inlet to the reaction area. The geometry of these inlets are found using the methods of topology optimization and shape optimization. The results are compared with two different analytic models, from which a general parametric description of the design is obtained and...... tested numerically. Such a parametric description will generally be beneficial for the design of a broad range of microfluidic bioreactors used for, e. g., cell culturing and analysis and in feeding bio-arrays....

  19. Influence of phosphorus precipitation on permeability and soluble microbial product concentration in a membrane bioreactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gómez, M.; Dvořák, L.; Růžičková, I.; Wanner, J.; Holba, Marek; Sýkorová, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 129, Feb 2013 (2013), s. 164-169. ISSN 0960-8524 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : membrane bioreactor * coagulant adition * soluble microbial products Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.039, year: 2013

  20. Three-Dimensional Modelling inside a Differential Pressure Laminar Flow Bioreactor Filled with Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Weyand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics- (CFD- model based on a differential pressure laminar flow bioreactor prototype was developed to further examine performance under changing culture conditions. Cell growth inside scaffolds was simulated by decreasing intrinsic permeability values and led to pressure build-up in the upper culture chamber. Pressure release by an integrated bypass system allowed continuation of culture. The specific shape of the bioreactor culture vessel supported a homogenous flow profile and mass flux at the scaffold level at various scaffold permeabilities. Experimental data showed an increase in oxygen concentration measured inside a collagen scaffold seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells when cultured in the perfusion bioreactor after 24 h compared to static culture in a Petri dish (dynamic: 11% O2 versus static: 3% O2. Computational fluid simulation can support design of bioreactor systems for tissue engineering application.

  1. Plasmid maintenance and protein overproduction in selective recycle bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, K L; Davis, R H

    1991-02-20

    A new plasmid construct has been used in conjunction with selective recycle to successfully maintain otherwise unstable plasmid-bearing E. coli cells in a continuous bioreactor and to produce significant amounts of the plasmid-encoded protein beta-lactamase. The plasmid is constructed so that pilin expression, which leads to bacterial flocculation, is under control of the tac operon. The plasmid-bearing cells are induced to flocculate in the separator, whereas cell growth and product synthesis occur in the main fermentation vessel without the inhibiting effects of pilin production. Selective recycle allows for the maintenance of the plasmid-bearing cells by separating flocculent, plasmid-bearing cells from nonflocculent, segregant cells in an inclined settler, and recycling only the plasmid-bearing cells to the reactor. As a result, product expression levels are maintained that are more than ten times the level achieved without selective recycle. All experimental data agree well with theoretical predictions. PMID:18597374

  2. Phase separated membrane bioreactor - Results from model system studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestrial simulation.

  3. Model system studies with a phase separated membrane bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, Eric H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestial simulation.

  4. Optimal feedback control of a bioreactor with a remote sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, S. C.; San, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors used to monitor bioreactor conditions directly often perform poorly in the face of adverse nonphysiological conditions. One way to circumvent this is to use a remote sensor block. However, such a configuration usually causes a significant time lag between measurements and the actual state values. Here, the problem of implementing feedback control strategies for such systems, described by nonlinear equations, is addressed. The problem is posed as an optimal control problem with a linear quadratic performance index. The linear control law so obtained is used to implement feedback. A global linearization technique as well as an expansion using Taylor series is used to linearize the nonlinear system, and the feedback is subsequently implemented.

  5. Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

    2010-01-07

    The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

  6. Fouling Characteristics and Prevention Techniques for Membrane Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hua; WANG Zhi-qiang; YANG Jin-ying

    2005-01-01

    Membrane fouling is the main problem of membrane bioreactors (MBR), which seriously influences its wastewater treatment effect and running. The characteristics of microbiology and hydrodynamics concerning membrane fouling were investigated and the measure was put forward for optimum operation of MBR. The measure is that 1) the parameters of activated sludge concentration (X) and membrane flux should be lower than the critical values of X and membrane flux respectively, and 2) the activated sludge should be discharged periodically. The experimental results show that the combination backwashing of gas and permeated effluent is better than single gas backwashing or single permeated effluent backwashing. This technique can remove the cake layer deposited on the membrane surface, decrease the membrane fouling, and recover the membrane flux effectively. So it is effective for prevention of membrane fouling.

  7. Leachate pretreatment for enhancing organic matter conversion in landfill bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct recycling of leachate from refuse of high food waste content was shown to ineffectively stabilize the refuse. This work aims at evaluating the effects of three pretreatments of leachate on the refuse stabilization efficiency were investigated. Pretreatment of leachate using an anaerobic upflow filtration bioreactor (UFB) or a well-decomposed waste layer could reduce the COD and provide methanogens, both were beneficial to establish early methanogenesis status. Using an aerobic sequential batch reactor (SBR) to pretreat the leachate could reduce its COD to 1000 mg l-1, but the fully developed methanogenesis phase would be built up in a later stage. The organic matters in the effluent leachate inhibited both the hydrolysis/acidogenesis and the methanogenesis steps in the refuse. With the dilution and acid neutralization effects by the recycled leachate, a favorable methanogenetic environment could be produced from the column's top, which moved downward along, and finally made the breakthrough of the column

  8. Instrumentation, control, and automation for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Ángel; Durán, Freddy; Ruano, María Victoria; Ribes, Josep; Rosado, Alfredo; Seco, Aurora; Ferrer, José

    2015-01-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON®, Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was designed and operated for urban wastewater treatment. An instrumentation, control, and automation (ICA) system was designed and implemented for proper process performance. Several single-input-single-output (SISO) feedback control loops based on conventional on-off and PID algorithms were implemented to control the following operating variables: flow-rates (influent, permeate, sludge recycling and wasting, and recycled biogas through both reactor and membrane tanks), sludge wasting volume, temperature, transmembrane pressure, and gas sparging. The proposed ICA for AnMBRs for urban wastewater treatment enables the optimization of this new technology to be achieved with a high level of process robustness towards disturbances. PMID:25635702

  9. Microfluidic bioreactors for culture of non-adherent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota;

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic bioreactors (μBR) are becoming increasingly popular for cell culture, sample preparation and analysis in case of routine genetic and clinical diagnostics. We present a novel μBR for non-adherent cells designed to mimic in vivo perfusion of cells based on diffusion of media through a...... sandwiched membrane. The culture chamber and perfusion chamber are separated by a sandwiched membrane and each chamber has separate inlet/outlets for easy loading/unloading of cells and perfusion of the media. The perfusion of media and exchange of nutrients occur through the sandwiched membrane, which was...... of CFSE staining and subsequent counting in a flow cytometer. To conclude on the applicability of μBR for genetic diagnostics, we prepare chromosome spreads on glass slides from the cultured samples, which is the primary step for metaphase FISH analysis....

  10. The application of membrane Bio-Reactor for East Java Domestic waste water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Aisyah E. Palupi; Ali Altway; Arief Widjaja

    2008-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment research have been carried out. In this system, membrane replaces the function of the sedimentation tank. Until recent time, fouling was still the main problem for membrane processes. This research has investigated the effect of MLSS concentration and back flushing on external membrane bioreactor performances such as COD and BOD reduction, and the back flushing effect for domestic wastewater treatment. Polyacrylonitril hollow fiber membrane with p...

  11. Anaerobic membrane bio-reactors for severe industrial effluents and urban spill waters: The AMBROSIUS project

    OpenAIRE

    van Lier, J B; Ozgun, H.; Ersahin, M.E.; Dereli, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors, combination of membrane and anaerobic processes become more and more attractive and feasible. In anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs), biomass and particulate organic matter are physically retained inside the reactor, providing optimal conditions for organic matter degradation. AnMBRs offer high quality effluents free of solids and complete retention of biomass, regardless its settling and/or granulation properties. Th...

  12. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic membrane (DM) formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition ...

  13. Hydrodynamic performance of a three-phase airlift bioreactor with an enlarged degassing zone

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente, A.A.; Teixeira, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of biotechnological processes is complex. So far, few studies were made with bioreactors of the airlift type with an enlarged degassing zone. In this work, the influence of solids loading, solids specific gravity and draught tube dimensions on mixing and circulation times and critical air flow rate for an internal loop airlift bioreactor with an enlarged sedimentation/degassing zone is studied. The results indicate that the critical air flow rate as well as the mixing ...

  14. Performance of Sand Channel as Pre-Treatment for Anaerobic Landfill Bioreactor Leachate and Biogas Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Olisa; Nasiman Sapari; Amirhossein Malakahmad; Ezerie Henry Ezechi; Ali Riahi; Kalu Uka Orji; Oseihioria Alex- Ohunyon; Salihi Umar Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory scale landfill bioreactor with two compartments (simulated landfill reactor and a sand channel) was investigated in this study. Solid waste components similar to the typical Malaysian waste were collected from the cafeterias in University Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP), Perak, Malaysia and used to generate leachate in the simulated landfill bioreactor. Leachate produced were slowly and systematically introduced into the bottom sand channel where methanogenesis rapidl...

  15. Flexible Community Structure Correlates with Stable Community Function in Methanogenic Bioreactor Communities Perturbed by Glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Ana S.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Dollhopf, Sherry L.; Raskin, Lutgarde; Glagoleva, Olga; Dazzo, Frank B.; Hickey, Robert F.; Criddle, Craig S.; Tiedje, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Methanogenic bioreactor communities were used as model ecosystems to evaluate the relationship between functional stability and community structure. Replicated methanogenic bioreactor communities with two different community structures were established. The effect of a substrate loading shock on population dynamics in each microbial community was examined by using morphological analysis, small-subunit (SSU) rRNA oligonucleotide probes, amplified ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction analysis (ARDR...

  16. Moving Denitrifying Bioreactors beyond Proof of Concept: Introduction to the Special Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Laura E; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-05-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors are organic carbon-filled excavations designed to enhance the natural process of denitrification for the simple, passive treatment of nitrate-nitrogen. Research on and installation of these bioreactors has accelerated within the past 10 years, particularly in watersheds concerned about high nonpoint-source nitrate loads and also for tertiary wastewater treatment. This special section, inspired by the meeting of the Managing Denitrification in Agronomic Systems Community at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, aims to firmly establish that denitrifying bioreactors for treatment of nitrate in drainage waters, groundwater, and some wastewaters have moved beyond the proof of concept. This collection of 14 papers expands the peer-reviewed literature of denitrifying bioreactors into new locations, applications, and environmental conditions. There is momentum behind the pairing of wood-based bioreactors with other media (biochar, corn cobs) and in novel designs (e.g., use within treatment trains or use of baffles) to broaden applicability into new kinds of waters and pollutants and to improve performance under challenging field conditions such as cool early season agricultural drainage. Concerns about negative bioreactor by-products (nitrous oxide and hydrogen sulfide emissions, start-up nutrient flushing) are ongoing, but this translates into a significant research opportunity to develop more advanced designs and to fine tune management strategies. Future research must think more broadly to address bioreactor impacts on holistic watershed health and greenhouse gas balances and to facilitate collaborations that allow investigation of mechanisms within the bioreactor "black box." PMID:27136139

  17. A comparative study of leachate quality and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Temporary aeration shortened the initial acid inhibition phase for methanogens. • COD decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactor than that in the anaerobic control. • Methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kgvs and 113.2 L/kgvs. • MSW settlement increased with increasing the frequency of intermittent aeration. - Abstract: Research has been conducted to compare leachate characterization and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactor landfills with typical Chinese municipal solid waste (MSW). Three laboratory-scale reactors, an anaerobic (A1) and two hybrid bioreactors (C1 and C2), were constructed and operated for about 10 months. The hybrid bioreactors were operated in an aerobic–anaerobic mode with different aeration frequencies by providing air into the upper layer of waste. Results showed that the temporary aeration into the upper layer aided methane generation by shortening the initial acidogenic phase because of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) reduction and pH increase. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactors, but the concentrations of ammonia–nitrogen in the hybrid bioreactors were greater than those in the anaerobic control. Methanogenic conditions were established within 75 d and 60 d in C1 and C2, respectively. However, high aeration frequency led to the consumption of organic matters by aerobic degradation and resulted in reducing accumulative methane volume. The temporary aeration enhanced waste settlement and the settlement increased with increasing the frequency of aeration. Methane production was inhibited in the anaerobic control; however, the total methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kgvs and 113.2 L/kgvs. As for MSW with high content of food waste, leachate recirculation right after aeration stopped was not recommended due to VFA inhibition for methanogens

  18. A comparative study of leachate quality and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiyong; Tian, Ying; Wang, Shen; Ko, Jae Hac, E-mail: jaehacko@pkusz.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Temporary aeration shortened the initial acid inhibition phase for methanogens. • COD decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactor than that in the anaerobic control. • Methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. • MSW settlement increased with increasing the frequency of intermittent aeration. - Abstract: Research has been conducted to compare leachate characterization and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactor landfills with typical Chinese municipal solid waste (MSW). Three laboratory-scale reactors, an anaerobic (A1) and two hybrid bioreactors (C1 and C2), were constructed and operated for about 10 months. The hybrid bioreactors were operated in an aerobic–anaerobic mode with different aeration frequencies by providing air into the upper layer of waste. Results showed that the temporary aeration into the upper layer aided methane generation by shortening the initial acidogenic phase because of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) reduction and pH increase. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactors, but the concentrations of ammonia–nitrogen in the hybrid bioreactors were greater than those in the anaerobic control. Methanogenic conditions were established within 75 d and 60 d in C1 and C2, respectively. However, high aeration frequency led to the consumption of organic matters by aerobic degradation and resulted in reducing accumulative methane volume. The temporary aeration enhanced waste settlement and the settlement increased with increasing the frequency of aeration. Methane production was inhibited in the anaerobic control; however, the total methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. As for MSW with high content of food waste, leachate recirculation right after aeration stopped was not recommended due to VFA inhibition for methanogens.

  19. Proof-of-concept of a novel micro-bioreactor for fast development of industrial bioprocesses

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, N; C. N. Gonçalves; Vicente, A.A.; Teixeira, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The experimental performance of a novel micro-bioreactor envisaged for parallel screening and development of industrial bioprocesses has been tested in this work. The micro-bioreactor with an internal volume of 4.5mL is operated under oscillatory flow mixing (OFM), where a controllable mixing and mass transfer rates are achieved under batch or continuous laminar flow conditions. Several batch fermentations with a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain were carried out at initi...

  20. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville Robert PT; Devillier Laura; Parkhurst Maria R; Rosenberg Steven A; Dudley Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scale...

  1. Cultivation of Mammalian Cells Using a Single-use Pneumatic Bioreactor System

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina M. Obom; Cummings, Patrick J.; Ciafardoni, Janelle A.; Hashimura, Yasunori; Giroux, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mammalian, insect, and stem cell cultivation and scale-up have created tremendous opportunities for new therapeutics and personalized medicine innovations. However, translating these advances into therapeutic applications will require in vitro systems that allow for robust, flexible, and cost effective bioreactor systems. There are several bioreactor systems currently utilized in research and commercial settings; however, many of these systems are not optimal for establishi...

  2. Use of a Rotating Bioreactor toward Tissue Engineering the Temporomandibular Joint Disc

    OpenAIRE

    DETAMORE, MICHAEL S.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2005-01-01

    This objective of this study was to determine the effects of a rotating bioreactor in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc tissue engineering. Porcine TMJ disc cells were seeded at a density of 20 million cells/mL onto nonwoven poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) scaffolds in spinner flasks for 1 week and then cultured either under static conditions or in a rotating bioreactor for a period of 6 weeks. A series of analyses was performed, including mechanical testing, measurement of cellularity, quantifica...

  3. Osmotic stress on nitrification in an airlift bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Rencun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zheng Ping [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Mahmood, Qaisar [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Hu Baolan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)]. E-mail: blhu@zju.edu.cn

    2007-07-19

    The effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification was studied in a lab-scale internal-loop airlift-nitrifying reactor. The reactor slowly adapted to the escalating osmotic pressure during 270 days operation. The conditions were reversed to the initial stage upon full inhibition of the process. Keeping influent ammonium concentration constant at 420 mg N L{sup -1} and hydraulic retention time at 20.7 h, with gradual increase in osmotic pressure from 4.3 to 18.8 x 10{sup 5} Pa by adding sodium sulphate, the ammonium removal efficiencies of the nitrifying bioreactor were maintained at 93-100%. Further increase in osmotic pressure up to 19.2 x 10{sup 5} Pa resulted in drop of the ammonium conversion to 69.2%. The osmotic pressure caused abrupt inhibition of nitrification without any alarm and the critical osmotic pressure value causing inhibition remained between 18.8 and 19.2 x 10{sup 5} Pa. Nitrite oxidizers were found more sensitive to osmotic stress as compared with ammonia oxidizers, leading to nitrite accumulation up to 61.7% in the reactor. The performance of bioreactor recovered gradually upon lowering the osmotic pressure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy indicated that osmotic stress resulted in simplification of the nitrifying bacterial populations in the activated sludge as the cellular size reduced; the inner membrane became thinner and some unknown inclusions appeared within the cells. The microbial morphology and cellular structure restored upon relieving the osmotic pressure. Addition of potassium relieved the effect of osmotic pressure upon nitrification. Results demonstrate that the nitrifying reactor possesses the potential to treat ammonium-rich brines after acclimatization.

  4. Foaming in membrane bioreactors: identification of the causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Gaetano; Torregrossa, Michele

    2013-10-15

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) represent by now a well established alternative for wastewater treatment. Their increasing development is undoubtedly related to the several advantages that such technology is able to guarantee. Nevertheless, this technology is not exempt from operational problems; among them the foaming still represents an "open challenge" of the MBR field, due to the high complexity of phenomenon. Unfortunately, very little work has been done on the foaming in MBRs and further studies are required. Actually, there is not a distinct difference between conventional activated system and MBR: the main difference is that the MBR plants can retain most Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPSs) in the bioreactor. For these reason, unlike conventional activated sludge systems, MBRs have experienced foaming in the absence of foam-forming micro-organisms. Nevertheless, the actual mechanisms of EPS production and the role of bacteria in producing foam in activated sludge in MBRs are still unclear. In this paper, the authors investigated the roles of EPS and foam-forming filamentous bacteria by analyzing samples from different pilot plants using MBRs. In particular, in order to define the macroscopic features and the role of EPS and filamentous bacteria, a Modified Scum Index (MSI) test was applied and proposed. Based on the MSI and the foam power test, the causes of biological foaming were identified in terms of the potential for foaming, the quality and the quantity of the foam. The results indicated that the MBR foaming was influenced significantly by the concentration of bound EPSs in the sludge. In addition, the quantity and stability of MBR scum increased when both bound EPSs and foam-forming filamentous bacteria were present in the activated sludge. PMID:23792916

  5. Osmotic stress on nitrification in an airlift bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification was studied in a lab-scale internal-loop airlift-nitrifying reactor. The reactor slowly adapted to the escalating osmotic pressure during 270 days operation. The conditions were reversed to the initial stage upon full inhibition of the process. Keeping influent ammonium concentration constant at 420 mg N L-1 and hydraulic retention time at 20.7 h, with gradual increase in osmotic pressure from 4.3 to 18.8 x 105 Pa by adding sodium sulphate, the ammonium removal efficiencies of the nitrifying bioreactor were maintained at 93-100%. Further increase in osmotic pressure up to 19.2 x 105 Pa resulted in drop of the ammonium conversion to 69.2%. The osmotic pressure caused abrupt inhibition of nitrification without any alarm and the critical osmotic pressure value causing inhibition remained between 18.8 and 19.2 x 105 Pa. Nitrite oxidizers were found more sensitive to osmotic stress as compared with ammonia oxidizers, leading to nitrite accumulation up to 61.7% in the reactor. The performance of bioreactor recovered gradually upon lowering the osmotic pressure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy indicated that osmotic stress resulted in simplification of the nitrifying bacterial populations in the activated sludge as the cellular size reduced; the inner membrane became thinner and some unknown inclusions appeared within the cells. The microbial morphology and cellular structure restored upon relieving the osmotic pressure. Addition of potassium relieved the effect of osmotic pressure upon nitrification. Results demonstrate that the nitrifying reactor possesses the potential to treat ammonium-rich brines after acclimatization

  6. NASA's Bioreactor: Growing Cells in a Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Denise

    2003-01-01

    National Science Education Standards (NSES), Science for All Americans, the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) as well as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are all making an effort to promote scientific literacy in America. Unfortunately, major evaluation programs such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) have provided information that suggested our students are not able to compete with peers from comparable countries. Although results indicated that American students are recalling memorized, factual knowledge well enough, the real problem is the ability to apply what they know. Concerned with these reports, the National Science Teacher's Association (NSTA) has developed a mission to support innovation and high quality in science teaching and learning for every student. NSTA recommends less emphasis on factual knowledge (memorization) and information and more understanding of the concepts. Science process skills are considered imperative to prepare America's students for the 21st century. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports this mission and adds that NASA strives to help prepare and encourage the next generation of researchers and explorers. One method that NASA supports educators and its mission is to publish educational briefs. NASA describes a brief as a publication that ranges from one-to-thirty pages. The focus is on mission discoveries and results. The brief provides curriculum to educators that supports their objectives and NASA's interest. Educational Briefs are specific to the grade level and course so that educators may have choices that fit their methods and students level. Sometimes, the brief includes lessons and activities teachers may use. For example, NASA's Microgravity Division has designed a student bioreactor. Consequently, an Educational Brief is being written that focuses on how

  7. H2S removal from biogas using bioreactors: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dumont

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to provide an overview of the bioprocesses used for the removal of H2S from biogas. The ability of aerobic and anoxic bioreactors (biotrickling filters, bioscrubbers, and a combination of chemical scrubbers and bioreactors to perform the degradation of H2S is considered. For each operating mode (aerobic and anoxic, the bioprocesses are presented, the operating conditions affecting performance are summarized, the state of the art of research studies is described and commercial applications are given. At laboratory-scale, whatever their operating mode, biological processes are effective for biogas cleaning and provide the same performance. The clogging of the packed bed due to the deposit of elemental sulfur S0 and biomass accumulation clearly represents the main drawback of bioprocesses. Although elimination capacities (EC determined at laboratory-scale can be very high, EC should not be higher than 90 g m-3 h-1 at industrial-scale in order to limit clogging effects. For aerobic processes, the need to control the oxygen mass transfer accurately remains a key issue for their development at full-scale. As a result, the aerobic processes alone are probably not the most suitable bioprocesses for the treatment of biogas highly loaded with H2S. For anaerobic bioprocesses using nitrate as an electron acceptor, the scale-up of the laboratory process to a full-size plant remains a challenge. However, the use of wastewater from treatment plants, which constitutes a cheap source of nitrates, represents an interesting opportunity for the development of innovative bioprocesses enabling the simultaneous removal of H2S and nitrates.

  8. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  9. Non-disruptive measurement system of cell viability in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Nelsen, B. L.; Baselt, T.; Berger, T.; Wiele, M.; Prade, I.; Hartmann, P.

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient and oxygen transport, as well as the removal of metabolic waste are essential processes to support and maintain viable tissue. Current bioreactor technology used to grow tissue cultures in vitro has a fundamental limit to the thickness of tissues. Based on the low diffusion limit of oxygen a maximum tissue thickness of 200 μm is possible. The efficiency of those systems is currently under investigation. During the cultivation process of the artificial tissue in bioreactors, which lasts 28 days or longer, there are no possibilities to investigate the viability of cells. This work is designed to determine the influence of a non-disruptive cell viability measuring system on cellular activity. The measuring system uses a natural cellular marker produced during normal metabolic activity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a coenzyme naturally consumed and produced during cellular metabolic processes and has thoroughly been studied to determine the metabolic state of a cell. Measuring the fluorescence of NADH within the cell represents a non-disruptive marker for cell viability. Since the measurement process is optical in nature, NADH fluorescence also provides a pathway for sampling at different measurement depths within a given tissue sample. The measurement system we are using utilizes a special UV light source, to excite the NADH fluorescence state. However, the high energy potentially alters or harms the cells. To investigate the influence of the excitation signal, the cells were irradiated with a laser operating at a wavelength of 355 nm and examined for cytotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to develop a non-cytotoxic system that is applicable for large-scale operations during drug-tissue interaction testing.

  10. Seasonal Patterns in Microbial Community Composition in Denitrifying Bioreactors Treating Subsurface Agricultural Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Matthew D; Andrus, J Malia; Bartolerio, Nicholas A; Rodriguez, Luis F; Zhang, Yuanhui; Zilles, Julie L; Kent, Angela D

    2015-10-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors, consisting of water flow control structures and a woodchip-filled trench, are a promising approach for removing nitrate from agricultural subsurface or tile drainage systems. To better understand the seasonal dynamics and the ecological drivers of the microbial communities responsible for denitrification in these bioreactors, we employed microbial community "fingerprinting" techniques in a time-series examination of three denitrifying bioreactors over 2 years, looking at bacteria, fungi, and the denitrifier functional group responsible for the final step of complete denitrification. Our analysis revealed that microbial community composition responds to depth and seasonal variation in moisture content and inundation of the bioreactor media, as well as temperature. Using a geostatistical analysis approach, we observed recurring temporal patterns in bacterial and denitrifying bacterial community composition in these bioreactors, consistent with annual cycling. The fungal communities were more stable, having longer temporal autocorrelations, and did not show significant annual cycling. These results suggest a recurring seasonal cycle in the denitrifying bioreactor microbial community, likely due to seasonal variation in moisture content. PMID:25910602

  11. Application of wireless sensor network based on ZigBee technology in photo-bioreactors system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Chen, Ming; Chi, Tao

    2013-03-01

    A photo-bioreactor is a bioreactor that incorporates some types of light source to provide photonic energy input into the reactor[1][2]. In the situation of Large-scale industrialization production of micro-algae, hundreds of photo-bioreactors will be deployed in a factory, thus the design of entire system is based on the distribution theory and the remote monitoring must be deployed. So the communication in the entire photo-bioreactors system is very important. However, the recent solution of communication is based on RS-485 data bus, and the twisted-pair cable is used as the communication medium, so the flexibility and scalability of entire system reduce. In this paper, the wireless sensor network (WSN) based on ZigBee technology is applied to this photo-bioreactors system, and the related key problems include the architecture of entire system and the design of wireless sensor network nodes[3]~[6]. The application of this technology will also reduce the cost and effectively raise the intelligence level of the large-scale industrialization photo-bioreactors system.

  12. Biodegradation of high concentrations of benzene vapors in a two phase partition stirred tank bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the biodegradation rate of benzene vapors in a two phase stirred tank bioreactor by a bacterial consortium obtained from wastewater of an oil industry refinery house. Initially, the ability of the microbial consortium for degrading benzene was evaluated before running the bioreactor. The gaseous samples from inlet and outlet of bioreactor were directly injected into a gas chromatograph to determine benzene concentrations. Carbone oxide concentration at the inlet and outlet of bioreactor were also measured with a CO2 meter to determine the mineralization rate of benzene. Influence of the second non-aqueous phase (silicon oil has been emphasized, so at the first stage the removal efficiency (RE and elimination capacity (EC of benzene vapors were evaluated without any organic phase and in the second stage, 10% of silicon oil was added to bioreactor media as an organic phase. Addition of silicon oil increased the biodegradation performance up to an inlet loading of 5580 mg/m3, a condition at which, the elimination capacity and removal efficiency were 181 g/m3/h and 95% respectively. The elimination rate of benzene increased by 38% in the presence of 10% of silicone oil. The finding of this study demonstrated that two phase partition bioreactors (TPPBs are potentially effective tools for the treatment of gas streams contaminated with high concentrations of poorly water soluble organic contaminant, such as benzene.

  13. Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS) for Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Imhoff; Ramin Yazdani; Don Augenstein; Harold Bentley; Pei Chiu

    2010-04-30

    Methane is an important contributor to global warming with a total climate forcing estimated to be close to 20% that of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past two decades. The largest anthropogenic source of methane in the US is 'conventional' landfills, which account for over 30% of anthropogenic emissions. While controlling greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily focus on large CO2 sources, attention to reducing CH4 emissions from landfills can result in significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost. For example, the use of 'controlled' or bioreactor landfilling has been estimated to reduce annual US greenhouse emissions by about 15-30 million tons of CO2 carbon (equivalent) at costs between $3-13/ton carbon. In this project we developed or advanced new management approaches, landfill designs, and landfill operating procedures for bioreactor landfills. These advances are needed to address lingering concerns about bioreactor landfills (e.g., efficient collection of increased CH4 generation) in the waste management industry, concerns that hamper bioreactor implementation and the consequent reductions in CH4 emissions. Collectively, the advances described in this report should result in better control of bioreactor landfills and reductions in CH4 emissions. Several advances are important components of an Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS).

  14. Biodegradation of High Concentrations of Benzene Vapors in a Two Phase Partition Stirred Tank Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the biodegradation rate of benzene vapors in a two phase stirred tank bioreactor by a bacterial consortium obtained from wastewater of an oil industry refinery house. Initially, the ability of the microbial consortium for degrading benzene was evaluated before running the bioreactor. The gaseous samples from inlet and outlet of bioreactor were directly injected into a gas chromatograph to determine benzene concentrations. Carbone oxide concentration at the inlet and outlet of bioreactor were also measured with a CO2 meter to determine the mineralization rate of benzene. Influence of the second non-aqueous phase (silicon oil has been emphasized, so at the first stage the removal efficiency (RE and elimination capacity (EC of benzene vapors were evaluated without any organic phase and in the second stage, 10% of silicon oil was added to bioreactor media as an organic phase. Addition of silicon oil increased the biodegradation performance up to an inlet loading of 5580?mg/m3, a condition at which, the elimination capacity and removal efficiency were 181?g/m3/h and 95% respectively. The elimination rate of benzene increased by 38% in the presence of 10% of silicone oil. The finding of this study demonstrated that two phase partition bioreactors (TPPBs are potentially effective tools for the treatment of gas streams contaminated with high concentrations of poorly water soluble organic contaminant, such as benzene.

  15. A comparative study of leachate quality and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Tian, Ying; Wang, Shen; Ko, Jae Hac

    2015-07-01

    Research has been conducted to compare leachate characterization and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactor landfills with typical Chinese municipal solid waste (MSW). Three laboratory-scale reactors, an anaerobic (A1) and two hybrid bioreactors (C1 and C2), were constructed and operated for about 10months. The hybrid bioreactors were operated in an aerobic-anaerobic mode with different aeration frequencies by providing air into the upper layer of waste. Results showed that the temporary aeration into the upper layer aided methane generation by shortening the initial acidogenic phase because of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) reduction and pH increase. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactors, but the concentrations of ammonia-nitrogen in the hybrid bioreactors were greater than those in the anaerobic control. Methanogenic conditions were established within 75d and 60d in C1 and C2, respectively. However, high aeration frequency led to the consumption of organic matters by aerobic degradation and resulted in reducing accumulative methane volume. The temporary aeration enhanced waste settlement and the settlement increased with increasing the frequency of aeration. Methane production was inhibited in the anaerobic control; however, the total methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4L/kgvs and 113.2L/kgvs. As for MSW with high content of food waste, leachate recirculation right after aeration stopped was not recommended due to VFA inhibition for methanogens. PMID:25857421

  16. Assessment of packed bed bioreactor systems in the production of viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Ramya; Lingala, Rajendra; Vuppu, Siva Kumar; Bandi, Bala Obulapathi; Manickam, Elaiyaraja; Macherla, Sankar Rao; Dubois, Stéphanie; Havelange, Nicolas; Maithal, Kapil

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is believed to be the most effective method for the prevention of infectious diseases. Thus it is imperative to develop cost effective and scalable process for the production of vaccines so as to make them affordable for mass use. In this study, performance of a novel disposable iCELLis fixed bed bioreactor system was investigated for the production of some viral vaccines like Rabies, Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya vaccines in comparison to conventional systems like the commercially available packed bed system and roller bottle system. Vero and MRC-5 cell substrates were evaluated for growth parameters in all the three systems maintaining similar seeding density, multiplicity of infection (MOI) and media components. It was observed that Vero cells showed similar growth in all the three bioreactors whereas MRC-5 cells showed better growth in iCELLis Nano system and roller bottle system. Subsequently, the virus infection and antigen production studies also revealed that for Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya iCELLis Nano bioreactor system was better to the commercial packed bed bioreactor and roller bottle systems. Although for rabies antigen production commercially available packed bed bioreactor system was found to be better. This study shows that different bioreactor platforms may be employed for viral vaccine production and iCELLis Nano is one of such new convenient and a stable platform for production of human viral vaccines. PMID:24949260

  17. Dechlorination of polychlorinated methanes by a sequential methanogenic-denitrifying bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z; Smith, G B

    2000-04-01

    A two-stage bioreactor has been developed to link dechlorination of halogenated methane compounds to the anaerobic processes of methanogenesis and denitrification. A digester methanogenic consortium was shown to dechlorinate chloroform (CF) and carbon tetrachloride (CT) to dichloromethane (DCM), and DCM was then mineralized by an acclimated denitrifying biological activated carbon consortium. Combining these two processes, a sequential methanogenic-denitrifying bioreactor (SMDB) system that completely degraded polychlorinated methanes including CT, CF, and DCM was developed. More than 95% of the added CT and CF was dechlorinated in the methanogenic bioreactor with methanol as the primary substrate, and the resultant DCM was biodegraded in the denitrifying bioreactor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. In the denitrifying bioreactor, the residual CF was completely removed, and the DCM removal efficiency was more than 95%. This novel bioreactor system eliminates the need for aeration and so avoids the air contamination associated with aerobic biotreatment of volatile chlorinated pollutants. This SMDB system provides an alternative to conventional biotreatment of wastewaters and other matrices contaminated with polychlorinated methanes and is, to our knowledge, the first report on such a sequential anoxic system. PMID:10803908

  18. Characterization of algal and microbial community growth in a wastewater treating batch photo-bioreactor inoculated with lake water

    OpenAIRE

    Krustok, Ivo; Odlare, Monica; M.A., Shabiimam; Truu, Jaak; Truu, Marika; Ligi, Teele; Nehrenheim, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae grown in photo-bioreactors can be a valuable source of biomass, especially when combined with wastewater treatment. While most published research has studied pure cultures, the consortia of algae and bacteria from wastewater have more complex community dynamics which affect both the biomass production and pollutant removal. In this paper we investigate the dynamics of algal and bacterial growth in wastewater treating batch photo-bioreactors. The photo-bioreactors were inoculated wi...

  19. Treatment of cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater and the reuse of sludge for biodiesel production by microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Manzoni Maroneze; Juliano Smanioto Barin; Cristiano Ragagnin de Menezes; Maria Isabel Queiroz; Leila Queiroz Zepka; Eduardo Jacob-Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors are a potential technological development that can convert organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus of wastewaters into a biomass suitable for energy production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors in the secondary treatment of cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater and the reuse of microalgal sludge for biodiesel production. The experiments were performed in a bubble column bioreactor using the microalgae ...

  20. Aroma production by Yarrowia lipolytica in airlift and stirred tank bioreactors : differences in yeast metabolism and morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Braga, Adelaide; Mesquita, D. P.; Amaral, A.L.; Ferreira, E. C.; Belo, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The production of γ-decalactone from castor oil in batch cultures of Yarrowia lipolytica W29 was compared in stirred tank (STR) and airlift bioreactors. Oxygen mass transfer from air to biphasic medium was characterized in both bioreactors trough correlations for kLa with power input and superficial gas velocity. Different conditions of oxygen transfer rate (OTR) were selected to perform biotransformations and for both bioreactors improvement of γ-decalactone productivity was obtained with OT...

  1. Fiber Attachment Module Experiment (FAME): Using a Multiplexed Miniature Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactor Solution for Rapid Process Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Koss, Lawrence L.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Spencer, Lachelle E.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Ellis, Ronald; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactor research is mostly limited to continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) which are not an option for microgravity (g) applications due to the lack of a gravity gradient to drive aeration as described by the Archimedes principle. Bioreactors and filtration systems for treating wastewater in g could avoid the need for harsh pretreatment chemicals and improve overall water recovery. Solution: Membrane Aerated Bioreactors (MABRs) for g applications, including possible use for wastewater treatment systems for the International Space Station (ISS).

  2. Evaluation of the Growth Environment of a Hydrostatic Force Bioreactor for Preconditioning of Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    OpenAIRE

    Reinwald, Yvonne; Leonard, Katherine H.L.; Henstock, James R.; Whiteley, Jonathan P.; Osborne, James M.; Waters, Sarah L.; Levesque, Philippe; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors have been widely acknowledged as valuable tools to provide a growth environment for engineering tissues and to investigate the effect of physical forces on cells and cell-scaffold constructs. However, evaluation of the bioreactor environment during culture is critical to defining outcomes. In this study, the performance of a hydrostatic force bioreactor was examined by experimental measurements of changes in dissolved oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and pH after mechanical stim...

  3. Novel Sensor-Enabled Ex Vivo Bioreactor: A New Approach towards Physiological Parameters and Porcine Artery Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra Mundargi; Divya Venkataraman; Saranya Kumar; Vishal Mogal; Raphael Ortiz; Joachim Loo; Subbu Venkatraman; Terry Steele

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to design and construct an ex vivo bioreactor system to assess the real time viability of vascular tissue. Porcine carotid artery as a model tissue was used in the ex vivo bioreactor setup to monitor its viability under physiological conditions such as oxygen, pressure, temperature, and flow. The real time tissue viability was evaluated by monitoring tissue metabolism through a fluorescent indicator “resorufin.” Our ex vivo bioreactor allows real time monitoring...

  4. STIRRED BIOREACTOR FOR THE ROBUSTNESS PRODUCTION OF RECOMBINANT GST.VP28 IN FED-BATCH CULTIVATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    OpenAIRE

    MUHAMAD ALI; ISMAINI; Sulaiman N. Depamede; BAGUS D. H. SETYONO; ALIS MUKHLIS; MUHAMAD AMIN; MOHAMMAD ASHARI

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most popular platform for the production of recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates. One important factor that may influence the quantity and quality of the expressed proteins using the bacterial host is a bioreactor. Thus, this study was aimed at comparing the influence of two different bioreactors, conventional (Sakaguchi flask) and stirred bioreactors on the growth of E. coli BL21 as a host cell and production of GST.VP28 recombinant protein in the host. The resu...

  5. Biogeochemistry of the compost bioreactor components of a composite acid mine drainage passive remediation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compost bioreactor ('anaerobic cell') components of three composite passive remediation systems constructed to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) at the former Wheal Jane tin mine, Cornwall, UK were studied over a period of 16 months. While there was some amelioration of the preprocessed AMD in each of the three compost bioreactors, as evidenced by pH increase and decrease in metal concentrations, only one of the cells showed effective removal of the two dominant heavy metals (iron and zinc) present. With two of the compost bioreactors, concentrations of soluble (ferrous) iron draining the cells were significantly greater than those entering the reactors, indicating that there was net mobilisation (by reductive dissolution) of colloidal and/or solid-phase ferric iron compounds within the cells. Soluble sulfide was also detected in waters draining all three compost bioreactors which was rapidly oxidised, in contrast to ferrous iron. Oxidation and hydrolysis of iron, together with sulfide oxidation, resulted in reacidification of processed AMD downstream of the compost bioreactors in two of the passive treatment systems. The dominant cultivatable microorganism in waters draining the compost bioreactors was identified, via analysis of its 16S rRNA gene, as a Thiomonas sp. and was capable of accelerating the dissimilatory oxidation of both ferrous iron and reduced sulfur compounds. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were also detected, although only in the bioreactor that was performing well were these present in significant numbers. This particular compost bioreactor had been shut down for 10 months prior to the monitoring period due to operational problems. This unforeseen event appears to have allowed more successful development of AMD-tolerant and other microbial populations with critical roles in AMD bioremediation, including neutrophilic SRB (nSRB), in this compost bioreactor than in the other two, where the throughput of AMD was not interrupted. This study has

  6. AutoDrug: fully automated macromolecular crystallography workflows for fragment-based drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New software has been developed for automating the experimental and data-processing stages of fragment-based drug discovery at a macromolecular crystallography beamline. A new workflow-automation framework orchestrates beamline-control and data-analysis software while organizing results from multiple samples. AutoDrug is software based upon the scientific workflow paradigm that integrates the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource macromolecular crystallography beamlines and third-party processing software to automate the crystallography steps of the fragment-based drug-discovery process. AutoDrug screens a cassette of fragment-soaked crystals, selects crystals for data collection based on screening results and user-specified criteria and determines optimal data-collection strategies. It then collects and processes diffraction data, performs molecular replacement using provided models and detects electron density that is likely to arise from bound fragments. All processes are fully automated, i.e. are performed without user interaction or supervision. Samples can be screened in groups corresponding to particular proteins, crystal forms and/or soaking conditions. A single AutoDrug run is only limited by the capacity of the sample-storage dewar at the beamline: currently 288 samples. AutoDrug was developed in conjunction with RestFlow, a new scientific workflow-automation framework. RestFlow simplifies the design of AutoDrug by managing the flow of data and the organization of results and by orchestrating the execution of computational pipeline steps. It also simplifies the execution and interaction of third-party programs and the beamline-control system. Modeling AutoDrug as a scientific workflow enables multiple variants that meet the requirements of different user groups to be developed and supported. A workflow tailored to mimic the crystallography stages comprising the drug-discovery pipeline of CoCrystal Discovery Inc. has been deployed and successfully

  7. AutoDrug: fully automated macromolecular crystallography workflows for fragment-based drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yingssu [Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Mudd Building, Stanford, CA 94305-5080 (United States); McPhillips, Scott E.; González, Ana; McPhillips, Timothy M. [Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Zinn, Daniel [LogicBlox Inc., 1349 West Peachtree Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30309 (United States); Cohen, Aina E. [Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Feese, Michael D.; Bushnell, David [Cocrystal Discovery Inc., 19805 North Creek Parkway, Bothell, WA 98011 (United States); Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C. David [The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Ludaescher, Bertram [University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O. [Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Mudd Building, Stanford, CA 94305-5080 (United States); Soltis, S. Michael, E-mail: soltis@slac.stanford.edu [Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    New software has been developed for automating the experimental and data-processing stages of fragment-based drug discovery at a macromolecular crystallography beamline. A new workflow-automation framework orchestrates beamline-control and data-analysis software while organizing results from multiple samples. AutoDrug is software based upon the scientific workflow paradigm that integrates the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource macromolecular crystallography beamlines and third-party processing software to automate the crystallography steps of the fragment-based drug-discovery process. AutoDrug screens a cassette of fragment-soaked crystals, selects crystals for data collection based on screening results and user-specified criteria and determines optimal data-collection strategies. It then collects and processes diffraction data, performs molecular replacement using provided models and detects electron density that is likely to arise from bound fragments. All processes are fully automated, i.e. are performed without user interaction or supervision. Samples can be screened in groups corresponding to particular proteins, crystal forms and/or soaking conditions. A single AutoDrug run is only limited by the capacity of the sample-storage dewar at the beamline: currently 288 samples. AutoDrug was developed in conjunction with RestFlow, a new scientific workflow-automation framework. RestFlow simplifies the design of AutoDrug by managing the flow of data and the organization of results and by orchestrating the execution of computational pipeline steps. It also simplifies the execution and interaction of third-party programs and the beamline-control system. Modeling AutoDrug as a scientific workflow enables multiple variants that meet the requirements of different user groups to be developed and supported. A workflow tailored to mimic the crystallography stages comprising the drug-discovery pipeline of CoCrystal Discovery Inc. has been deployed and successfully

  8. Comparative analysis of ethanolic fermentation in two continuous flocculation bioreactors and effect of flocculation additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, M. (Dept. de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Univ. do Porto (Portugal)); Teixeira, J.A. (Dept. de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Univ. do Porto (Portugal)); Mota, M. (Dept. de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Univ. do Porto (Portugal))

    1994-08-01

    Two types of bioreactor using a flocculating strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and continuous ethanolic fermentation as model were compared in terms of start-up evolution, overall performance and power costs. Also, the effect of adding to the medium a polymer - Magna Floc LT[sub 25] - that increases floc porosity was studied. The main difference between the reactors lies on the system that is used to recycle the flocculated cells - one presents an external loop with mechanically forced recycling and the other has an airlift configuration with an internal loop. During start-up of both bioreactors, no significant differences between the fermentation kinetics were established, either with or without Magna Floc. In the airlift bioreactor no positive effect of the dilution rate on substrate uptake was observed. Concerning ethanol productivity, both systems behave in a similar way. The best ethanol productivity, 12,9 kg/kg/h, was obtained for the airlift system. This value is 7 times higher than in conventional systems and justifies the interest devoted to flocculation bioreactors. The results also indicate that the activity of the cells that are kept inside the airlift bioreactor is higher and compensates its lower cell retention capacity at higher diluation rates. The addition of Magna Floc to the medium causes a reduction on the ethanol yield on glucose for the external loop system, but allows for an increase in the maximal dilution rate for total glucose consumption. Such a behavior is not observed for the airlift system. The analysis of the power cost associated with the operation of the two bioreactors indicates that the differences between them are only relevant at laboratory and pilot scales. However, from an industrial scale point of view the airlift bioreactor is advantageous because no mechanical parts are involved in recycling. (orig.)

  9. Biofabrication of customized bone grafts by combination of additive manufacturing and bioreactor knowhow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports on an original concept of additive manufacturing for the fabrication of tissue engineered constructs (TEC), offering the possibility of concomitantly manufacturing a customized scaffold and a bioreactor chamber to any size and shape. As a proof of concept towards the development of anatomically relevant TECs, this concept was utilized for the design and fabrication of a highly porous sheep tibia scaffold around which a bioreactor chamber of similar shape was simultaneously built. The morphology of the bioreactor/scaffold device was investigated by micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy confirming the porous architecture of the sheep tibiae as opposed to the non-porous nature of the bioreactor chamber. Additionally, this study demonstrates that both the shape, as well as the inner architecture of the device can significantly impact the perfusion of fluid within the scaffold architecture. Indeed, fluid flow modelling revealed that this was of significant importance for controlling the nutrition flow pattern within the scaffold and the bioreactor chamber, avoiding the formation of stagnant flow regions detrimental for in vitro tissue development. The bioreactor/scaffold device was dynamically seeded with human primary osteoblasts and cultured under bi-directional perfusion for two and six weeks. Primary human osteoblasts were observed homogenously distributed throughout the scaffold, and were viable for the six week culture period. This work demonstrates a novel application for additive manufacturing in the development of scaffolds and bioreactors. Given the intrinsic flexibility of the additive manufacturing technology platform developed, more complex culture systems can be fabricated which would contribute to the advances in customized and patient-specific tissue engineering strategies for a wide range of applications. (paper)

  10. On-line removal of volatile fatty acids from CELSS anaerobic bioreactor via nanofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Guillermo

    1995-01-01

    The CELSS (controlled ecological life support system) resource recovery system, which is a waste processing system, uses aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors to recover plants nutrients and secondary foods from the inedible biomass. The anaerobic degradation of the inedible biomass by means of culture of rumen bacteria,generates organic compounds such as volatile fatty acids (acetic, propionic, butyric, VFA) and ammonia. The presence of VFA in the bioreactor medium at fairly low concentrations decreases the microbial population's metabolic reactions due to end-product inhibition. Technologies to remove VFA continuously from the bioreactor are of high interest. Several candidate technologies were analyzed, such as organic solvent liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption and/or ion exchange, dialysis, electrodialysis, and pressure driven membrane separation processes. The proposed technique for the on-line removal of VFA from the anaerobic bioreactor was a nanofiltration membrane recycle bioreactor. In order to establish the nanofiltration process performance variables before coupling it to the bioreactor, a series of experiments were carried out using a 10,000 MWCO tubular ceramic membrane module. The variables studied were the bioreactor slurry permeation characteristics, such as, the permeate flux, VFA and the nutrient removal rates as a function of applied transmembrane pressure, fluid recirculation velocity, suspended matter concentration, and process operating time. Results indicate that the permeate flux, VFA and nutrients removal rates are directly proportional to the fluid recirculation velocity in the range between 0.6 to 1.0 m/s, applied pressure when these are low than 1.5 bar, and inversely proportional to the total suspended solids concentration in the range between 23,466 to 34,880. At applied pressure higher than 1.5 bar the flux is not more linearly dependent due to concentration polarization and fouling effects over the membrange surface. It was also found

  11. Impact of stirred suspension bioreactor culture on the differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells into cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafa Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Embryonic stem cells (ESCs can proliferate endlessly and are able to differentiate into all cell lineages that make up the adult organism. Under particular in vitro culture conditions, ESCs can be expanded and induced to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in stirred suspension bioreactors (SSBs. However, in using these systems we must be cognizant of the mechanical forces acting upon the cells. The effect of mechanical forces and shear stress on ESC pluripotency and differentiation has yet to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the suspension culture environment on ESC pluripotency during cardiomyocyte differentiation. Results Murine D3-MHC-neor ESCs formed embyroid bodies (EBs and differentiated into cardiomyocytes over 25 days in static culture and suspension bioreactors. G418 (Geneticin was used in both systems from day 10 to enrich for cardiomyocytes by eliminating non-resistant, undifferentiated cells. Treatment of EBs with 1 mM ascorbic acid and 0.5% dimethyl sulfoxide from day 3 markedly increased the number of beating EBs, which displayed spontaneous and cadenced contractile beating on day 11 in the bioreactor. Our results showed that the bioreactor differentiated cells displayed the characteristics of fully functional cardiomyocytes. Remarkably, however, our results demonstrated that the bioreactor differentiated ESCs retained their ability to express pluripotency markers, to form ESC-like colonies, and to generate teratomas upon transplantation, whereas the cells differentiated in adherent culture lost these characteristics. Conclusions This study demonstrates that although cardiomyocyte differentiation can be achieved in stirred suspension bioreactors, the addition of medium enhancers is not adequate to force complete differentiation as fluid shear forces appear to maintain a subpopulation of cells in a transient pluripotent state. The development of successful ESC

  12. Critical flux and chemical cleaning-in-place during the long-term operation of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai

    2011-01-01

    The critical flux and chemical cleaning-in-place (CIP) in a long-term operation of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment were investigated. Steady filtration under high flux (30 L/(m2 h)) was successfully achieved due to effective membrane fouling control by sub-critical flux operation and chemical CIP with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) in both trans-membrane pressure (TMP) controlling mode (cleaning with high concentration NaClO of 2000-3000 mg/L in terms of effective chorine was performed when TMP rose to 15 kPa) and time controlling mode (cleanings were performed weekly and monthly respectively with low concentration NaClO (500-1000 mg/L) and high concentration NaClO (3000 mg/L)). Microscopic analysis on membrane fibers before and after high concentration NaClO was also conducted. Images of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that NaClO CIP could effectively remove gel layer, the dominant fouling under sub-critical flux operation. Porosity measurements indicated that NaClO CIP could partially remove pore blockage fouling. The analyses from fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) with attenuated total reflectance accessory (ATR) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) demonstrated that protein-like macromolecular organics and inorganics were the important components of the fouling layer. The analysis of effluent quality before and after NaClO CIP showed no obvious effect on effluent quality. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. DISTURBANCE OF THE CARDIOMYOCYTE’S MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE IN HEART ALLOGRAFTS AS A SIGN OF CHRONIC REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kupriyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic rejection, especially cardiac allograft vasculopathy, is a major limiting factor for long-term transplant survival. This process affects not only the blood vessels, but also cardiomyocytes. However, there are extremely few reports on the evaluation of their macromolecular structure state. The aim of the study was to evaluate the structural proteins of cardiomyocytes (actin, myosin, troponin I, titin, desmin, vinculin of heart allografts in different periods after the operation (from 6 days to 15 years. Major changes of macromolecular structure were revealed in late period after transplantation (6 months – 15 years. The contribution of humoral immune response in the process of chronic cardiac allograft rejection was observed: in eight of twelve recipients episodes of acute humoral rejection had been repeatedly registered; disorders of the expression of 5 proteins out of 6 characterized were found in recipients with recurrent and persistent antibody-mediated rejection. 

  14. ‘Broken symmetries’ in macromolecular crystallography: phasing from unmerged data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site-specific radiation damage and anisotropy of anomalous scattering can induce intensity differences in symmetry-related reflections. If the data are kept unmerged, these symmetry-breaking effects can become a source of phase information. The space-group symmetry of a crystal structure imposes a point-group symmetry on its diffraction pattern, giving rise to so-called symmetry-equivalent reflections. Instances in macromolecular crystallography are discussed in which the symmetry in reciprocal space is broken, i.e. where symmetry-related reflections are no longer equivalent. Such a situation occurs when the sample suffers from site-specific radiation damage during the X-ray measurements. Another example of broken symmetry arises from the polarization anisotropy of anomalous scattering. In these cases, the genuine intensity differences between symmetry-related reflections can be exploited to yield phase information in the structure-solution process. In this approach, the usual separation of the data merging and phasing steps is abandoned. The data are kept unmerged down to the Harker construction, where the symmetry-breaking effects are explicitly modelled and refined and become a source of supplementary phase information

  15. Olfactory nerve transport of macromolecular drugs to the brain. A problem in olfactory impaired patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasal administration of macromolecular drugs (including peptides and nanoparticles) has the potential to enable drug delivery system beyond the blood brain barrier (BBB) via olfactory nerve transport. Basic research on drug deliver systems to the brain via nasal administration has been well reported. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is associated with the development and growth of the central nervous system. Clinical application of IGF-I with nasal administration is intended to enable drug delivery to brain through the BBB. Uptake of IGF-I in the olfactory bulb and central nervous system increased according to the dosage of nasally administered IGF-I in normal ICR mice, however IGF-I uptake in the trigeminal nerve remained unchanged. Olfactory nerve transport is important for the delivery of nasally administered IGF-I to the brain in vivo. Because a safe olfactory nerve tracer has not been clinically available, olfactory nerve transport has not been well studied in humans. Nasal thallium-201 (201Tl) administration has been safely used to assess the direct pathway to the brain via the nose in healthy volunteers with a normal olfactory threshold. 201Tl olfactory nerve transport has recently been shown to decrease in patients with hyposmia. The olfactory nerve transport function in patients with olfactory disorders will be determined using 201Tl olfacto-scintigraphy for the exclusion of candidates in a clinical trial to assess the usefulness of nasal administration of IGF-I. (author)

  16. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morshed, Nader [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Echols, Nathaniel, E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A method to automatically identify possible elemental ions in X-ray crystal structures has been extended to use support vector machine (SVM) classifiers trained on selected structures in the PDB, with significantly improved sensitivity over manually encoded heuristics. In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.

  17. The Effect of Attractive Interactions and Macromolecular Crowding on Crystallins Association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Wei

    Full Text Available In living systems proteins are typically found in crowded environments where their effective interactions strongly depend on the surrounding medium. Yet, their association and dissociation needs to be robustly controlled in order to enable biological function. Uncontrolled protein aggregation often causes disease. For instance, cataract is caused by the clustering of lens proteins, i.e., crystallins, resulting in enhanced light scattering and impaired vision or blindness. To investigate the molecular origins of cataract formation and to design efficient treatments, a better understanding of crystallin association in macromolecular crowded environment is needed. Here we present a theoretical study of simple coarse grained colloidal models to characterize the general features of how the association equilibrium of proteins depends on the magnitude of intermolecular attraction. By comparing the analytic results to the available experimental data on the osmotic pressure in crystallin solutions, we identify the effective parameters regimes applicable to crystallins. Moreover, the combination of two models allows us to predict that the number of binding sites on crystallin is small, i.e. one to three per protein, which is different from previous estimates. We further observe that the crowding factor is sensitive to the size asymmetry between the reactants and crowding agents, the shape of the protein clusters, and to small variations of intermolecular attraction. Our work may provide general guidelines on how to steer the protein interactions in order to control their association.

  18. Chemical composition and structural features of the macromolecular components of plantation Acacia mangium wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Paula C; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Pascoal Neto, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    The wood of Acacia mangium, a prominent fast-growing plantation species used in the pulp-and-paper industry and, so far, poorly investigated for its chemical structure, was submitted to a detailed characterization of its main macromolecular components. Lignin (28% wood weight) isolated by mild acidolysis and characterized by permanganate oxidation, 1H and 13C NMR, and GPC, showed a very low content of syringylpropane-derived units (S:G:H of 48:49:3), a high degree of condensation, a low content of beta-O-4 ( approximately 0.40-0.43 per C6) structures, and a Mw of 2230. Glucuronoxylan (14% wood weight) isolated by alkaline (KOH) or by dimethyl sulfoxide extraction was characterized by methylation analysis, 1H NMR, and GPC. About 10% of the xylopyranose (Xylp) units constituting the linear backbone were substituted at O-2 with 4-O-methylglucuronic acid residues. Almost half of the Xylp units (45%) were O-2 (18%), O-3 (24%) or O-2,3 (3%) acetylated. X-ray diffraction analysis of cellulose (46% wood weight), isolated according to the Kürschner-Hoffer method, showed a degree of crystallinity of 67.6%. PMID:16190642

  19. MRI macromolecular contrast agents as indicators of changed tumor blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. A rapid mapping technique derived from dynamic contrast enhanced MRI data was used to identify and characterize reduction of blood flow in fibrosarcoma SA-1 tumors treated either by application of electric pulses or vinblastine. Materials and methods. Tissue permeability surface area product (PS) and fractional blood volume (BV) were calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis using dynamic MRI intensity data after administration of gadomer- 17 or polylysine-Gd-DTPA; prototypic macromolecular contrast agents designed for blood pool enhancement. PS and BV values of untreated tumors were compared to those of tumors treated by local application of 8 electric pulses (amplitude/distance ratio, 1300 V/cm; duration, 100 μs, frequency, 1 Hz) percutaneously to the tumor or by systemic administration of vinblastine (2.5 mg/kg). Results. Both treatments transiently, but significantly reduced tumor blood flow, application of electric pulses to the tumors being by 40% more effective in reducing tumor blood flow than systemic administration of vinblastine. PS and BV values derived with polylysine-Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI were lower compared to those with gadomer-17, due to larger molecular size. Interestingly, Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI did not show any significant changes of PS and BV between untreated and treated tumors. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that dynamic contrast enhanced MRI can be effectively used to qualitatively monitor tumor blood flow, and quantitatively by means of BV and PS. (author)

  20. Temperature sensitivity of soil microbial communities: An application of macromolecular rate theory to microbial respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J.; Koyama, Akihiro; Johnson, Nels G.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    There is compelling evidence that microbial communities vary widely in their temperature sensitivity and may adapt to warming through time. To date, this sensitivity has been largely characterized using a range of models relying on versions of the Arrhenius equation, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature. However, there is growing evidence from laboratory and field studies that observe nonmonotonic responses of reaction rates to variation in temperature, indicating that Arrhenius is not an appropriate model for quantitatively characterizing temperature sensitivity. Recently, Hobbs et al. (2013) developed macromolecular rate theory (MMRT), which incorporates thermodynamic temperature optima as arising from heat capacity differences between isoenzymes. We applied MMRT to measurements of respiration from soils incubated at different temperatures. These soils were collected from three grassland sites across the U.S. Great Plains and reciprocally transplanted, allowing us to isolate the effects of microbial community type from edaphic factors. We found that microbial community type explained roughly 30% of the variation in the CO2 production rate from the labile C pool but that temperature and soil type were most important in explaining variation in labile and recalcitrant C pool size. For six out of the nine soil × inoculum combinations, MMRT was superior to Arrhenius. The MMRT analysis revealed that microbial communities have distinct heat capacity values and temperature sensitivities sometimes independent of soil type. These results challenge the current paradigm for modeling temperature sensitivity of soil C pools and understanding of microbial enzyme dynamics.

  1. Large area high-resolution CCD-based X-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Pokric, M; Jorden, A R; Cox, M P; Marshall, A; Long, P G; Moon, K; Jerram, P A; Pool, P; Nave, C; Derbyshire, G E; Helliwell, J R

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray detector system for macromolecular crystallography based on a large area charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor has been developed as part of a large research and development programme for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) in the UK. The prototype detector consists of two large area three-sides buttable charge-coupled devices (CCD 46-62 EEV), where the single CCD area is 55.3 mmx41.5 mm. Overall detector imaging area is easily extendable to 85 mmx110 mm. The detector consists of an optically coupled X-ray sensitive phosphor, skewed fibre-optic studs and CCDs. The crystallographic measurement requirements at synchrotron sources are met through a high spatial resolution (2048x1536 pixel array), high dynamic range (approx 10 sup 5), a fast readout (approx 1 s), low noise (<10e sup -) and much reduced parallax error. Additionally, the prototype detector system has been optimised by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray ene...

  2. Polarizable atomic multipole X-ray refinement: weighting schemes for macromolecular diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, T D; Schnieders, M J

    2011-11-01

    In the past, weighting between the sum of chemical and data-based targets in macromolecular crystallographic refinement was based on comparing the gradients or Hessian diagonal terms of the two potential functions. Here, limitations of this scheme are demonstrated, especially in the context of a maximum-likelihood target that is inherently weighted by the model and data errors. In fact, the congruence between the maximum-likelihood target and a chemical potential based on polarizable atomic multipole electrostatics evaluated with Ewald summation has opened the door to a transferable static weight. An optimal static weight is derived from first principles and is demonstrated to be transferable across a broad range of data resolutions in the context of a recent implementation of X-ray crystallographic refinement using the polarizable AMOEBA force field and it is shown that the resulting models are balanced with respect to optimizing both R(free) and MolProbity scores. Conversely, the classical automatic weighting scheme is shown to lead to underfitting or overfitting of the data and poor model geometry. The benefits of this approach for low-resolution diffraction data, where the need for prior chemical information is of particular importance, are also highlighted. It is demonstrated that this method is transferable between low- and high-resolution maximum-likelihood-based crystallographic refinement, which proves for the first time that resolution-dependent parameterization of either the weight or the chemical potential is unnecessary. PMID:22101822

  3. RoboDiff: combining a sample changer and goniometer for highly automated macromolecular crystallography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurizzo, Didier; Bowler, Matthew W.; Caserotto, Hugo; Dobias, Fabien; Giraud, Thierry; Surr, John; Guichard, Nicolas; Papp, Gergely; Guijarro, Matias; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Flot, David; McSweeney, Sean; Cipriani, Florent; Theveneau, Pascal; Leonard, Gordon A.

    2016-01-01

    Automation of the mounting of cryocooled samples is now a feature of the majority of beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX). Robotic sample changers have been developed over many years, with the latest designs increasing capacity, reliability and speed. Here, the development of a new sample changer deployed at the ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1), based on an industrial six-axis robot, is described. The device, named RoboDiff, includes a high-capacity dewar, acts as both a sample changer and a high-accuracy goniometer, and has been designed for completely unattended sample mounting and diffraction data collection. This aim has been achieved using a high level of diagnostics at all steps of the process from mounting and characterization to data collection. The RoboDiff has been in service on the fully automated endstation MASSIF-1 at the ESRF since September 2014 and, at the time of writing, has processed more than 20 000 samples completely automatically. PMID:27487827

  4. SPring-8 BL41XU, a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Kazuya [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Shimizu, Nobutaka [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); KEK-PF, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Okumura, Hideo; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Baba, Seiki [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hirata, Kunio [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Takeuchi, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kumasaka, Takashi, E-mail: kumasaka@spring8.or.jp [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    SPring-8 BL41XU provides a high-flux X-ray beam of size 10–50 µm, and enables high-quality diffraction data to be obtained from various types of protein crystals. Details of this beamline and an upgrade project are described. SPring-8 BL41XU is a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline using an in-vacuum undulator as a light source. The X-rays are monochromated by a liquid-nitrogen-cooling Si double-crystal monochromator, and focused by Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror optics. The focused beam size at the sample is 80 µm (H) × 22 µm (V) with a photon flux of 1.1 × 10{sup 13} photons s{sup −1}. A pinhole aperture is used to collimate the beam in the range 10–50 µm. This high-flux beam with variable size provides opportunities not only for micro-crystallography but also for data collection effectively making use of crystal volume. The beamline also provides high-energy X-rays covering 20.6–35.4 keV which allows ultra-high-resolution data to be obtained and anomalous diffraction using the K-edge of Xe and I. Upgrade of BL41XU for more rapid and accurate data collection is proceeding. Here, details of BL41XU are given and an outline of the upgrade project is documented.

  5. Automatic processing of macromolecular crystallography X-ray diffraction data at the ESRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Stéphanie; Gordon, Elspeth; Bowler, Matthew W; Delagenière, Solange; Guijarro, Matias; Spruce, Darren; Svensson, Olof; McSweeney, Sean M; McCarthy, Andrew A; Leonard, Gordon; Nanao, Max H

    2013-06-01

    The development of automated high-intensity macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines at synchrotron facilities has resulted in a remarkable increase in sample throughput. Developments in X-ray detector technology now mean that complete X-ray diffraction datasets can be collected in less than one minute. Such high-speed collection, and the volumes of data that it produces, often make it difficult for even the most experienced users to cope with the deluge. However, the careful reduction of data during experimental sessions is often necessary for the success of a particular project or as an aid in decision making for subsequent experiments. Automated data reduction pipelines provide a fast and reliable alternative to user-initiated processing at the beamline. In order to provide such a pipeline for the MX user community of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), a system for the rapid automatic processing of MX diffraction data from single and multiple positions on a single or multiple crystals has been developed. Standard integration and data analysis programs have been incorporated into the ESRF data collection, storage and computing environment, with the final results stored and displayed in an intuitive manner in the ISPyB (information system for protein crystallography beamlines) database, from which they are also available for download. In some cases, experimental phase information can be automatically determined from the processed data. Here, the system is described in detail. PMID:23682196

  6. RoboDiff: combining a sample changer and goniometer for highly automated macromolecular crystallography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurizzo, Didier; Bowler, Matthew W; Caserotto, Hugo; Dobias, Fabien; Giraud, Thierry; Surr, John; Guichard, Nicolas; Papp, Gergely; Guijarro, Matias; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Flot, David; McSweeney, Sean; Cipriani, Florent; Theveneau, Pascal; Leonard, Gordon A

    2016-08-01

    Automation of the mounting of cryocooled samples is now a feature of the majority of beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX). Robotic sample changers have been developed over many years, with the latest designs increasing capacity, reliability and speed. Here, the development of a new sample changer deployed at the ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1), based on an industrial six-axis robot, is described. The device, named RoboDiff, includes a high-capacity dewar, acts as both a sample changer and a high-accuracy goniometer, and has been designed for completely unattended sample mounting and diffraction data collection. This aim has been achieved using a high level of diagnostics at all steps of the process from mounting and characterization to data collection. The RoboDiff has been in service on the fully automated endstation MASSIF-1 at the ESRF since September 2014 and, at the time of writing, has processed more than 20 000 samples completely automatically. PMID:27487827

  7. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shaobin; Zhang, Yongzhu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress. PMID:27077011

  8. Native gel analysis of macromolecular protein complexes in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawar, Nayla; Olivero, Giorgio; Jerman, Emilia; Doyle, Benjamin; Streubel, Gundula; Wynne, Kieran; Bracken, Adrian; Cagney, Gerard

    2015-11-01

    Native gel electrophoresis enables separation of cellular proteins in their non-denatured state. In experiments aimed at analysing proteins in higher order or multimeric assemblies (i.e. protein complexes) it offers some advantages over rival approaches, particularly as an interface technology with mass spectrometry. Here we separated fractions from HEK293 cells by native electrophoresis in order to survey protein complexes in the cytoplasmic, nuclear and chromatin environments, finding 689 proteins distributed among 217 previously described complexes. As expected, different fractions contained distinct combinations of macromolecular complexes, with subunits of the same complex tending to co-migrate. Exceptions to this observation could often be explained by the presence of subunits shared among different complexes. We investigated one identified complex, the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2), in more detail following affinity purification of the EZH2 subunit. This approach resulted in the identification of all previously reported members of PRC2. Overall, this work demonstrates that the use of native gel electrophoresis as an upstream separating step is an effective approach for analysis of the components and cellular distribution of protein complexes. PMID:26223664

  9. Characterization of PEG-Like Macromolecular Coatings on Plasma Modified NiTi Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG-like) coating was developed to improve the biocompatibility of Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) alloy implants. The PEG-like macromolecular coatings were deposited on NiTi substrates at a room temperature of 298 K through a ECR (electron-cyclotron resonance) cold-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method using tetraglyme (CH3-O-(CH2-CH2-O)4-CH3) as a precursor. A power supply with a frequency of 2.45 GHz was applied to ignite the plasma with Ar(argon) used as the carrier gas. Based on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies, a thin smooth coating on NiTi substrates with highly amorphous functional groups on the modified NiTi surfaces were mainly the same accumulated stoichiometric ratio of C and O with PEG. The vitro studies showed that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) adsorption on the modified NiTi alloy surface was significantly reduced. This study indicated that plasma surface modification changes the surface components of NiTi alloy and subsequently improves its biocompatibility.

  10. Characterization of PEG-Like Macromolecular Coatings on Plasma Modified NiTi Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Gao, Jiacheng; Chang, Peng; Wang, Jianhua

    2008-04-01

    A poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG-like) coating was developed to improve the biocompatibility of Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) alloy implants. The PEG-like macromolecular coatings were deposited on NiTi substrates at a room temperature of 298 K through a ECR (electron-cyclotron resonance) cold-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method using tetraglyme (CH3-O-(CH2-CH2-O)4-CH3) as a precursor. A power supply with a frequency of 2.45 GHz was applied to ignite the plasma with Ar(argon) used as the carrier gas. Based on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies, a thin smooth coating on NiTi substrates with highly amorphous functional groups on the modified NiTi surfaces were mainly the same accumulated stoichiometric ratio of C and O with PEG. The vitro studies showed that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) adsorption on the modified NiTi alloy surface was significantly reduced. This study indicated that plasma surface modification changes the surface components of NiTi alloy and subsequently improves its biocompatibility.

  11. About Small Streams and Shiny Rocks: Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we have grown diffraction quality protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. With this technology volumes smaller than achievable with any laboratory pipette can be dispensed with high accuracy. We have performed a feasibility study in which we crystallized several proteins with the aid of a LabChip device. The protein crystals are of excellent quality as shown by X-ray diffraction. The advantages of this new technology include improved accuracy of dispensing for small volumes, complete mixing of solution constituents without bubble formation, highly repeatable recipe and growth condition replication, and easy automation of the method. We have designed a first LabChip device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode and can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents. We are currently testing this design. Upon completion additional crystallization techniques, such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility aboard the International Space Station.

  12. Visualization of X-ray Beam Using CdWO4 Crystal for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz J. Gofron

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In synchrotron diffraction experiments, it is typically assumed that the X-ray beam at the sample position is uniform, stable and has dimensions that are controlled by the focus and slits settings. As might be expected, this process is much more complex. We present here an investigation of the properties of a synchrotron X-ray beam at the sample position. The X-ray beam is visualized with a single crystal scintillator that converts X-ray photons into visible light photons, which can be imaged using Structure Biology Center (SBC on-axis and off-axis microscope optics. The X-ray penetration is dependent on the composition of the scintillator (especially the effective Z, and X-ray energy. Several scintillators have been used to visualize X-ray beams. Here we compare CdWO4, PbWO4, Bi4Ge3O12, Y3Al5O12:Ce (YAG:Ce, and Gd2O2S:Tb (phosphor. We determined that scintillator crystals made of CdWO4 and similar high-Z materials are best suited for the energy range (7–20 keV and are most suitable for beam visualization for macromolecular crystallography applications. These scintillators show excellent absorption, optical, and mechanical properties.

  13. Multiphoton excitation and photodynamic activity of macromolecular derivatized mTHPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc; Graschew, Georgi; Roelofs, Theo A.; Balanos, Evangelos; Rakowsky, Stefan; Sinn, Hanns-joerg; Schlag, Peter M.

    2000-03-01

    Multiphoton excitation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy constitutes a promising approach, because of the increasing tissue penetration for longer wavelength of illumination. In this contribution the photodynamic activity of polyethylene glycol macromolecular derivatized mTHPC upon two-photon excitation is established. To test the photo- activity of the photosensitizer, human colon carcinoma cells, HCT-116, were incubated with 2 (mu) g/ml of mTHPC- CMPEG4 in the nutrition medium. Subsequent pulsed laser irradiation at 784 nm focused down on growing cell monolayers restricts cell vitality clearly within 24 hours after irradiation. To investigate whether an anoxic or euoxic energy transfer mechanism is involved, a uric acid assay was performed to test for the generation of singlet oxygen. Upon single-photon excitation mTHPC-CMPEG4 in TriPEG decomposed uric acid via the generation of singlet oxygen. Using femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation no decomposition of the uric acid was found, implying an anoxic energy transfer mechanism after tow-photon excitation. However, at present, we cannot exclude local hyperthermic effects in the cells containing the photosensitizer to contribute to the photodynamic activity upon two-photon excitation.

  14. A facile metal-free "grafting-from" route from acrylamide-based substrate toward complex macromolecular combs

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2013-01-01

    High-molecular-weight poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) was used as a model functional substrate to investigate phosphazene base (t-BuP 4)-promoted metal-free anionic graft polymerization utilizing primary amide moieties as initiating sites. The (co)polymerization of epoxides was proven to be effective, leading to macromolecular combs with side chains being single- or double-graft homopolymer, block copolymer and statistical copolymer. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. DISTURBANCE OF THE CARDIOMYOCYTE’S MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE IN HEART ALLOGRAFTS AS A SIGN OF CHRONIC REJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Kupriyanova; L. V. Beletskaya; I. M. Ilyinsky; V. A. Zaidenov; N. P. Mozeiko; R. S. Saitgareev; A. Y. Kormer; A. M. Golts; V. M. Zakharevich; S. V. Gautier

    2012-01-01

    Chronic rejection, especially cardiac allograft vasculopathy, is a major limiting factor for long-term transplant survival. This process affects not only the blood vessels, but also cardiomyocytes. However, there are extremely few reports on the evaluation of their macromolecular structure state. The aim of the study was to evaluate the structural proteins of cardiomyocytes (actin, myosin, troponin I, titin, desmin, vinculin) of heart allografts in different periods after the operation (from ...

  16. The influence of hyaluronic acid hydrogel crosslinking density and macromolecular diffusivity on human MSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Liming; Hou, Chieh; Tous, Elena; Rai, Reena; Mauck, Robert L.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels formed via photocrosslinking provide stable 3D hydrogel environments that support the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Crosslinking density has a significant impact on the physical properties of hydrogels, including their mechanical stiffness and macromolecular diffusivity. Variations in the HA hydrogel crosslinking density can be obtained by either changes in the HA macromer concentration (1, 3, or 5% w/v at 15 min exposure) or the extent of rea...

  17. Glycogen-graft-poly(2-alkyl-2-oxazolines) - the new versatile biopolymer-based thermoresponsive macromolecular toolbox

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšilová, Aneta; Filippov, Sergey K.; Bogomolova, Anna; Turner, S.; Sedláček, Ondřej; Matushkin, Nikolai; Černochová, Zulfiya; Štěpánek, Petr; Hrubý, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 106 (2014), s. 61580-61588. ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-08336S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14079 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200501201; AV ČR(CZ) ASCR/CONICET 2012CZ006 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : glycogen * poly(2-alkyl-2-oxazoline) * hybrid copolymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014

  18. Impaired Macromolecular Protein Pools in Fronto-Striato-Thalamic Circuits in Type 2 Diabetes Revealed by Magnetization Transfer Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shaolin; Ajilore, Olusola; Wu, Minjie; Lamar, Melissa; Kumar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with white matter microstructural changes, cognitive impairment, and decreased resting-state functional connectivity and spontaneous brain activity. This study used magnetization transfer imaging to examine, for the first time, the integrity of macromolecular protein pools in fronto-striato-thalamic circuits and its clinical and cognitive correlates in patients with T2DM. T2DM patients without mood disorders (n = 2...

  19. Biological reduction of nitrates in wastewaters from nuclear processing using a fluidized-bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a number of nitrate-containing wastewater sources, as concentrated as 30 wt.% NO3- and as large as 2000 m3/day, in the nuclear fuel cycle. The biological reduction of nitrate in wastewater to gaseous nitrogen, accompanied by the oxidation of a nutrient carbon source to gaseous carbon dioxide, is an ecologically sound and cost-effective method of treating wastewaters containing nitrates. These nitrate-containing wastewater sources can be successfully biologically denitrified to meet discharge standards in the range of 10 to 20 gN(NO3-)/m3 by the use of a fluidized-bed bioreactor. The denitrification bacteria are a mixed culture derived from garden soil; the major strain is Pseudomonas. In the fluidized-bed bioreactor the bacteria are allowed to attach to 0.25- to 0.50-mm-diam coal fluidization particles, which are then fluidized by the upward flow of influent wastewater. Maintaining the bacteria-to-coal weight ratio at approximately 1:10 results in a bioreactor bacteria loading of greater than 20,000 g/m3. This paper describes the results of a biodenitrification R and D program based on the use of fluidized bioreactors capable of operating at nitrate levels up to 7000 g/m3 and achieving denitrification rates as high as 80 g N(NO3-) per day per liter of empty bioreactor volume. 4 figures, 7 tables

  20. Bag Bioreactor Based on Wave-Induced Motion: Characteristics and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Regine; Werner, Sören; Eibl, Dieter

    Today wave-mixed bag bioreactors are common devices in modern biotechnological processes where simple, safe and flexible production has top priority. Numerous studies that have been published on ex vivo generation of cells, viruses and therapeutic agents during the last 10 years have confirmed their suitability and even superiority to stirred bioreactors made from glass or stainless steel for animal as well as plant cell cultivations. In these studies the wave-mixed bag bioreactors enabled middle to high cell density and adequate productivity in laboratory and pilot scale. This mainly results from low-shear conditions and highly efficient oxygen transfer for cell cultures, as demonstrated for the widely used BioWave®.Starting with an overview of wave-mixed bag bioreactors and their common operation strategies, this chapter delineates engineering aspects of BioWave®, which like Wave Reactor™ and BIOSTAT®CultiBag RM originates from the prototype of a wave-mixed bag bioreactor introduced in 1998. Subsequently, the second part of the chapter focuses on reported BioWave® applications. Conditions and results from cultivations with animal cells, plant cells, microbial cells and nematodes are presented and discussed.