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Sample records for bioreactor cultivated human

  1. Dynamic cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells in a rotating bed bioreactor system based on the Z RP platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Solvig; Röker, Stefanie; Marten, Dana; Peterbauer, Anja; Scheper, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; Kasper, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    Because the regeneration of large bone defects is limited by quantitative restrictions and risks of infections, the development of bioartificial bone substitutes is of great importance. To obtain a three-dimensional functional tissue-like graft, static cultivation is inexpedient due to limitations in cell density, nutrition and oxygen support. Dynamic cultivation in a bioreactor system can overcome these restrictions and furthermore provide the possibility to control the environment with regard to pH, oxygen content, and temperature. In this study, a three-dimensional bone construct was engineered by the use of dynamic bioreactor technology. Human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on a macroporous zirconium dioxide based ceramic disc called Sponceram. Furthermore, hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram was used. The cells were cultivated under dynamic conditions and compared with statically cultivated cells. The differentiation into osteoblasts was initiated by osteogenic supplements. Cellular proliferation during static and dynamic cultivation was compared measuring glucose and lactate concentration. The differentiation process was analysed determining AP-expression and using different specific staining methods. Our results demonstrate much higher proliferation rates during dynamic conditions in the bioreactor system compared to static cultivation measured by glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell densities on the scaffolds indicated higher proliferation on native Sponceram compared to hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram. With this study, we present an excellent method to enhance cellular proliferation and bone lineage specific growth of tissue like structures comprising fibrous (collagen) and globular (mineral) extracellular components. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  2. LTCC based bioreactors for cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H.; Welker, T.; Welker, K.; Witte, H.; Müller, J.

    2016-01-01

    LTCC multilayers offer a wide range of structural options and flexibility of connections not available in standard thin film technology. Therefore they are considered as material base for cell culture reactors. The integration of microfluidic handling systems and features for optical and electrical capturing of indicators for cell culture growth offers the platform for an open system concept. The present paper assesses different approaches for the creation of microfluidic channels in LTCC multilayers. Basic functions required for the fluid management in bioreactors include temperature and flow control. Both features can be realized with integrated heaters and temperature sensors in LTCC multilayers. Technological conditions for the integration of such elements into bioreactors are analysed. The temperature regulation for the system makes use of NTC thermistor sensors which serve as real value input for the control of the heater. It allows the adjustment of the fluid temperature with an accuracy of 0.2 K. The tempered fluid flows through the cell culture chamber. Inside of this chamber a thick film electrode array monitors the impedance as an indicator for the growth process of 3-dimensional cell cultures. At the system output a flow sensor is arranged to monitor the continual flow. For this purpose a calorimetric sensor is implemented, and its crucial design parameters are discussed. Thus, the work presented gives an overview on the current status of LTCC based fluid management for cell culture reactors, which provides a promising base for the automation of cell culture processes.

  3. Mathematical model of a rotational bioreactor for the dynamic cultivation of scaffold-adhered human mesenchymal stem cells for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganimedov, V. L.; Papaeva, E. O.; Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2017-09-01

    Development of cell-mediated scaffold technologies for the treatment of critical bone defects is very important for the purpose of reparative bone regeneration. Today the properties of the bioreactor for cell-seeded scaffold cultivation are the subject of intensive research. We used the mathematical modeling of rotational reactor and construct computational algorithm with the help of ANSYS software package to develop this new procedure. The solution obtained with the help of the constructed computational algorithm is in good agreement with the analytical solution of Couette for the task of two coaxial cylinders. The series of flow computations for different rotation frequencies (1, 0.75, 0.5, 0.33, 1.125 Hz) was performed for the laminar flow regime approximation with the help of computational algorithm. It was found that Taylor vortices appear in the annular gap between the cylinders in a simulated bioreactor. It was obtained that shear stress in the range of interest (0.002-0.1 Pa) arise on outer surface of inner cylinder when it rotates with the frequency not exceeding 0.8 Hz. So the constructed mathematical model and the created computational algorithm for calculating the flow parameters allow predicting the shear stress and pressure values depending on the rotation frequency and geometric parameters, as well as optimizing the operating mode of the bioreactor.

  4. Lactose autoinduction with enzymatic glucose release: characterization of the cultivation system in bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sonja; Junne, Stefan; Ukkonen, Kaisa; Glazyrina, Julia; Glauche, Florian; Neubauer, Peter; Vasala, Antti

    2014-02-01

    The lactose autoinduction system for recombinant protein production was combined with enzymatic glucose release as a method to provide a constant feed of glucose instead of using glycerol as a carbon substrate. Bioreactor cultivation confirmed that the slow glucose feed does not prevent the induction by lactose. HPLC studies showed that with successful recombinant protein production only a very low amount of lactose was metabolized during glucose-limited fed-batch conditions by the Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3)pLysS in well-aerated conditions, which are problematic for glycerol-based autoinduction systems. We propose that slow enzymatic glucose feed does not cause a full activation of the lactose operon. However recombinant PDI-A protein (A-domain of human disulfide isomerase) was steadily produced until the end of the cultivation. The results of the cultivations confirmed our earlier observations with shaken cultures showing that lactose autoinduction cultures based on enzymatic glucose feed have good scalability, and that this system can be applied also to bioreactor cultivations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  6. Cultivation of Mammalian Cells Using a Single-use Pneumatic Bioreactor System

    OpenAIRE

    Obom, Kristina M.; Cummings, Patrick J.; Ciafardoni, Janelle A.; Hashimura, Yasunori; Giroux, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mammalian, insect, and stem cell cultivation and scale-up have created tremendous opportunities for new therapeutics and personalized medicine innovations. However, translating these advances into therapeutic applications will require in vitro systems that allow for robust, flexible, and cost effective bioreactor systems. There are several bioreactor systems currently utilized in research and commercial settings; however, many of these systems are not optimal for establishi...

  7. Modeling of hydrodynamics in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor for mammalian cells cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Menshutina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling in CFD-packages are powerfull instrument for design and calculation of any engineering tasks. CFD-package contains the set of programs that allow to model the different objects behavior based on the mathematical lows. ANSYS Fluent are widely used for modelling of biotechnological and chemical-technological processes. This package is convenient to describe their hydrodynamics. As cell cultivation is one of the actual scientific direction in modern biotechnology ANSYS Fluent was used to create the model of hollow fiber membrane bioreactor. The fibers are hollow cylindrical membrane to be used for cell cultivation. The criterion of process effectiveness for cell growth is full filling of the membrane surface by cells in the bioreactor. While the cell growth the fiber permeability is decreased which effects to feed flow through membrane pores. The specific feature of this process is to ensure such feed flow to deliver the optimal nutrition for the cells on the external membrane surface. The velocity distribution inside the fiber and in all bioreactor as a whole has been calculated based on mass an impulse conservation equations taking into account the mathematical model assumptions. The hydrodynamics analysis in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor is described by the three-dimensional model created in ANSYS Fluent. The specific features of one membrane model are considered and for whole bioreactor too.

  8. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  9. Development and application of a milliliter-scale bioreactor for continuous microbial cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolic, Andrijana

    genetic manipulation of microorganisms, producing more strains and thereby creating a need for even more processes that need to be evaluated than ever before. In order to provide a high-throughput solution to this issue and cut the cost, time spent and the general labor intensity per experiment, a new...... to milliliter scale, which raises a question of potential application and what is the aim or purpose of the developed tool. Examining commercial solutions, it is clear that two design directions are adopted for submerged microbial cultivations: (1) microtiter plate modifications to gain a more controlled...... bioreactors aimed to provide the middle ground between the two established bioreactor design directions mentioned above and explore benefits and drawbacks of milliliter scalebioreactors during batch and continuous microbial cultivations. The first prototype (MSBR I) consisted of a reusable platform containing...

  10. Use of a special bioreactor for the cultivation of a new flexible polyurethane scaffold for aortic valve tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksieva Genoveva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue engineering represents a promising new method for treating heart valve diseases. The aim of this study was evaluate the importance of conditioning procedures of tissue engineered polyurethane heart valve prostheses by the comparison of static and dynamic cultivation methods. Methods Human vascular endothelial cells (ECs and fibroblasts (FBs were obtained from saphenous vein segments. Polyurethane scaffolds (n = 10 were primarily seeded with FBs and subsequently with ECs, followed by different cultivation methods of cell layers (A: static, B: dynamic. Group A was statically cultivated for 6 days. Group B was exposed to low flow conditions (t1= 3 days at 750 ml/min, t2= 2 days at 1100 ml/min in a newly developed conditioning bioreactor. Samples were taken after static and dynamic cultivation and were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results SEM results showed a high density of adherent cells on the surface valves from both groups. However, better cell distribution and cell behavior was detected in Group B. IHC staining against CD31 and TE-7 revealed a positive reaction in both groups. Higher expression of extracellular matrix (ICAM, Collagen IV was observed in Group B. RT- PCR demonstrated a higher expression of inflammatory Cytokines in Group B. Conclusion While conventional cultivation method can be used for the development of tissue engineered heart valves. Better results can be obtained by performing a conditioning step that may improve the tolerance of cells to shear stress. The novel pulsatile bioreactor offers an adequate tool for in vitro improvement of mechanical properties of tissue engineered cardiovascular prostheses.

  11. Bioreactor Cultivation of Zeltnera beyrichii (Torr. & A. Gray Mans.: A Novel Source of Biologically Active Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Radović

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available With regard to world’s increasing demand for biologically active compounds, a novel source of xanthones and secoiridoid glycosides has been studied . Zeltnera beyrichii (Torr. & A. Gray Mans., an insufficiently acknowledged North American medicinal plant species, may be considered a pharmacological substitute for commercial C. erythraea Rafn, since it accumulates in aerial parts nearly the same amount of secoiridoid glycosides: swertiamarin, gentiopicrin, and sweroside (13.76, 7.56, and 0.17 mmol per 100 g dry weight, respectively in plants grown under greenhouse condition, and a considerable amount of xanthones: decussatin and eustomin. Additionally, Z. beyrichii produced as much biomass during cultivation in RITA ® temporary immersion bioreactors as greenhouse-grown plants, in a third of the time. Plants grown in bioreactors contained moderate levels of total phenolics and total flavonoids, and possessed modest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial potential against eight bacterial and eight fungal species. Therefore, this species may be highly recommended for cultivation either in natural environment, or in bioreactors under in vitro conditions, for producing compounds of interest of modern pharmacology and food industry.

  12. Carbon dioxide fixation by microalgae cultivated in open bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno da Rosa, Ana Priscila; Fernandes Carvalho, Lisiane; Goldbeck, Luzia [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande, RS 96201-900 (Brazil); Vieira Costa, Jorge Alberto, E-mail: dqmjorge@furg.br [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande, RS 96201-900 (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} We studied the growth and CO{sub 2} fixation by Spirulina LEB18 and Chlorella kessleri. {yields} The maximum dailyfixation was obtained for Spirulina with an injection of 6% of CO{sub 2}. {yields} The microalgae presented growth during the 20 d of culture with up to 18% of CO{sub 2}. {yields} The use of CO{sub 2} from industrial generation decreases the cost of producing biomass. - Abstract: The biofixation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by microalgae has been proven to be an efficient and economical method, mainly due to the photosynthetic ability of these microorganisms to use this gas as a source of nutrients for their development. The aim of this work was to study the growth of Spirulina LEB18 and Chlorella kessleri microalgae, exposed to controlled and non-controlled conditions, with the injection of different concentrations of CO{sub 2}. The cultures was carried out in 6 L open raceway ponds, under controlled conditions at 30 {sup o}C and 39 {mu}E m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and under non-controlled conditions, protected by a tunnel of transparent film. The experiments were subjected to CO{sub 2} injections at concentrations of 0.038, 6, 12 and 18% (v/v). The highest concentration of biomass (4.95 g L{sup -1}) and maximum daily fixation (0.21 g g{sup -1} d{sup -1}) were obtained for Spirulina LEB18 in culture that was prepared in non-controlled conditions with an injection of 6% (v/v) of CO{sub 2}. C. kessleri had maximum (p < 0.0008) specific growth rate (0.84 d{sup -1}) when grown with 18% (v/v) of CO{sub 2} in non-controlled conditions of cultivation.

  13. Carbon dioxide fixation by microalgae cultivated in open bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centeno da Rosa, Ana Priscila; Fernandes Carvalho, Lisiane; Goldbeck, Luzia; Vieira Costa, Jorge Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We studied the growth and CO 2 fixation by Spirulina LEB18 and Chlorella kessleri. → The maximum dailyfixation was obtained for Spirulina with an injection of 6% of CO 2 . → The microalgae presented growth during the 20 d of culture with up to 18% of CO 2 . → The use of CO 2 from industrial generation decreases the cost of producing biomass. - Abstract: The biofixation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by microalgae has been proven to be an efficient and economical method, mainly due to the photosynthetic ability of these microorganisms to use this gas as a source of nutrients for their development. The aim of this work was to study the growth of Spirulina LEB18 and Chlorella kessleri microalgae, exposed to controlled and non-controlled conditions, with the injection of different concentrations of CO 2 . The cultures was carried out in 6 L open raceway ponds, under controlled conditions at 30 o C and 39 μE m -2 s -1 and under non-controlled conditions, protected by a tunnel of transparent film. The experiments were subjected to CO 2 injections at concentrations of 0.038, 6, 12 and 18% (v/v). The highest concentration of biomass (4.95 g L -1 ) and maximum daily fixation (0.21 g g -1 d -1 ) were obtained for Spirulina LEB18 in culture that was prepared in non-controlled conditions with an injection of 6% (v/v) of CO 2 . C. kessleri had maximum (p -1 ) when grown with 18% (v/v) of CO 2 in non-controlled conditions of cultivation.

  14. Cultivating human nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary psychology claims to offer a unified perspective on human nature and culture, which can serve to further the integration of psychology and the social sciences. I describe four approaches to evolutionary psychology, and note increasing attention to the agency of the individual in

  15. Analysis of the efficiency of recombinant Escherichia coli strain cultivation in a gas-vortex bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Nemudraya, Anna A; Podgornyi, Vladimir F; Laburkina, Nadezhda V; Ramazanov, Yuriy A; Repkov, Andrey P; Kuligina, Elena V; Richter, Vladimir A

    2017-09-01

    The levels of aeration and mass transfer are critical parameters required for an efficient aerobic bioprocess, and directly depend on the design features of exploited bioreactors. A novel apparatus, using gas vortex for aeration and mass transfer processes, was constructed in the Center of Vortex Technologies (Novosibirsk, Russia). In this paper, we compared the efficiency of recombinant Escherichia coli strain cultivation using novel gas-vortex technology with conventional bioprocess technologies such as shake flasks and bioreactors with mechanical stirrers. We demonstrated that the system of aeration and agitation used in gas-vortex bioreactors provides 3.6 times higher volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient in comparison with mechanical bioreactor. The use of gas-vortex bioreactor for recombinant E. coli strain cultivation allows to increase the efficiency of target protein expression at 2.2 times for BL21(DE3)/pFK2 strain and at 3.5 times for auxotrophic C600/pRT strain (in comparison with stirred bioreactor). © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Cultivation of methanogenic community from 2-km deep subseafloor coalbeds using a continuous-flow bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imachi, H.; Tasumi, E.; Morono, Y.; Ito, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep subseafloor environments associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs have been least explored by previous scientific drilling and hence the nature of deep subseafloor life and its ecological roles in the carbon cycle remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed cultivation of subseafloor methanogenic communities using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. The sample used for the reactor cultivation was obtained from 2 km-deep coalbeds off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan, the northwestern Pacific, during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 using a riser drilling technology of the drilling vessel Chikyu. The coalbed samples were incubated anaerobically in the DHS reactor at the in-situ temperature of 40°C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with a tiny amount of yeast extract, acetate, propionate and butyrate was provided into the DHS reactor. After 34 days of the bioreactor operation, a small production of methane was observed. The methane concentration was gradually increased and the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane was consistency 13C-depleted during the bioreactor operation, indicating the occurrence of microbial methanogenesis. Microscopic observation showed that the enrichment culture contained a variety of microorganisms, including methanogen-like rod-shaped cells with F420 auto-fluorescence. Interestingly, many spore-like particles were observed in the bioreactor enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed the growth of phylogenetically diverse bacteria and archaea in the DHS reactor. Predominant archaeal components were closely related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the genus Methanobacterium. Some predominant bacteria were related to the spore-formers within the class Clostridia, which are overall in good agreement with microscopic observations. By analyzing ion images using a nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Nano

  17. Characterization of a chip-based bioreactor for three-dimensional cell cultivation via magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottwald, E.; Kleintschek, T.; Giselbrecht, S.; Truckenmüller, R.K.; Altmann, B; Worgull, M.; Döpfert, J.; Schad, L.; Heilmann, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a chip-based platform (3D-KITChip) for the three-dimensional cultivation of cells under perfusion conditions via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Besides the chip, the microfluidic system is comprised of a bioreactor housing, a medium supply, a pump for

  18. Feeding strategies enhance high cell density cultivation and protein expression in milliliter scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Georg; Janzen, Nils H; Bendig, Christoph; Römer, Lin; Kaufmann, Klaus; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Miniature bioreactors under parallel fed-batch operations are not only useful screening tools for bioprocess development but also provide a suitable basis for eventual scale-up. In this study, three feeding strategies were investigated: besides the established intermittent feeding by a liquid handler, an optimized microfluidic device and a new enzymatic release system were applied for parallel fed-batch cultivation of Escherichia coli HMS174(DE3) and BL21(DE3) strains in stirred-tank bioreactors on a 10 mL scale. Lower fluctuation in dissolved oxygen (DO) and higher optical densities were measured in fed-batch processes applying the microfluidic device or the enzymatic glucose/fructose release system (conversion of intermittently added sucrose by an invertase), but no difference in dry cell weights (DCW) were observed. With all three feeding strategies high cell densities were realized on a milliliter scale with final optical density measured at 600 nm (OD600 ) of 114-133 and final DCW concentrations of 69-70 g L(-1) . The effect of feeding strategies on the expression of two heterologous proteins was investigated. Whereas no impact was observed on the expression of the spider silk protein eADF4(C16), the fluorescence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) was reproducibly lower, if an intermittent glucose feed was applied. Thus, the impact of feeding strategy on expression is strongly dependent on the E. coli strain and/or expressed protein. As a completely continuous feed supply is difficult to realize in miniature bioreactors, the enzymatic release approach from this study can be easily applied in all microfluidic system to reduce fluctuations of glucose supply and DO concentrations. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Cultivation of diploid and tetraploid hairy roots of Datura stramonium L. in stirred tank bioreactor for tropane alkaloids production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ATANAS PAVLOV

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass accumulation and tropane alkaloids production by diploid and tetraploid hairy root cultures of Datura stramonium L. cultivated in stirred tank bioreactor at different aeration rates were investigated. The maximal growth for both hairy root cultures (ADB = 8.3 g/L and 6.8 g/L for diploid and tetraploid line, respectively was achieved at aeration rate of 15.0 L/(L.h. The corresponding growth indexes were remarkably high (GIDW = 9.0 and 7.8 for diploid and tetraploid line, respectively compared to the values, usually reported for other hairy root cultures. The optimal aeration rate for biomass accumulation was also optimal for alkaloids biosynthesis. According to our survey, the achieved maximal amounts of accumulated hyoscyamine (35.0 mg/L and 27.0 mg/L for diploid and tetraploid line were the highest reported in the scientific literature for D. stramonium L. hairy roots. During the cultivation in stirred tank bioreactor, the hairy roots biosynthesized pharmaceutically important alkaloid scopolamine in minor concentrations. This is an important observation since scopolamine was not detected during submerged cultivation of these hairy root lines in other bioreactor types. However, the ploidy level was found to be the most important factor concerning scopolamine production by D. stramonium L. hairy roots cultures. The present work demonstrated the effect of ploidity levels on biomass accumulation and tropane alkaloids production by D. stramonium L. hairy roots cultivated in stirred tank bioreactor. This investigation show that the stirred tank bioreactor could be successfully applied for both maximal biomass accumulations, as well as for manipulation of tropane alkaloids production by diploid and tetraploid D. stramonium L. hairy root cultures.

  20. Cultivation of oleaginous Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in airlift bioreactor by using seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Liao, Yu-Ting; Liu, Yi Xian

    2016-02-01

    The enormous water resource consumption is a concern to the scale-up fermentation process, especially for those cheap fermentation commodities, such as microbial oils as the feedstock for biodiesel production. The direct cultivation of oleaginous Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a 5-L airlift bioreactor using seawater instead of pure water led to a slightly lower biomass being achieved, at 17.2 compared to 18.1 g/L, respectively. Nevertheless, a higher lipid content of 65 ± 5% was measured in the batch using seawater as compared to the pure water batch. Both the salinity and osmotic pressure decreased as the cultivation time increased in the seawater batch, and these effects may contribute to the high tolerance for salinity. No effects were observed for the seawater on the fatty acid profiles. The major components for both batches using seawater and pure water were C16:0 (palmitic acid), C18:1 (oleic acid) and C18:2 (linoleic acid), which together accounted for over 85% of total lipids. The results of this study indicated that seawater could be a suitable option for scaling up the growth of oleaginous R. mucilaginosa, especially from the perspective of water resource utilization. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaleddine, E. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Bioresource Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Composting is once again gaining interest among ecological engineers in view of greener industrial and residential activities. Uniform composting is needed to ensure decomposition and to keep the whole system at the same composting stage. A homogeneous temperature must be maintained throughout the media. A bioreactor design consisting of a heater core made of copper tubing was designed and tested. Two four-inch holes were made at the top and bottom of the barrel to allow air to flow through the system and promote aerobic composting. Once composting began and temperature increased, the water began to flow through the copper piping and the core heat was distributed throughout the medium. Three thermocouples were inserted at different heights on a 200 litre plastic barrel fitted with the aforementioned apparatus. Temperature variations were found to be considerably lower when the apparatus was operated with the heat redistribution system, enabling uniform composting, accelerating the process and reducing the risks of pathogenic or other contaminants remaining active in the barrels.

  2. A Novel Bioreactor for High Density Cultivation of Diverse Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jacob R; Shieh, Wen K; Sales, Christopher M

    2015-12-25

    A novel reactor design, coined a high density bioreactor (HDBR), is presented for the cultivation and study of high density microbial communities. Past studies have evaluated the performance of the reactor for the removal of COD(1) and nitrogen species(2-4) by heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic bacteria, respectively. The HDBR design eliminates the requirement for external flocculation/sedimentation processes while still yielding effluent containing low suspended solids. In this study, the HDBR is applied as a photobioreactor (PBR) in order to characterize the nitrogen removal characteristics of an algae-based photosynthetic microbial community. As previously reported for this HDBR design, a stable biomass zone was established with a clear delineation between the biologically active portion of the reactor and the recycling reactor fluid, which resulted in a low suspended solid effluent. The algal community in the HDBR was observed to remove 18.4% of total nitrogen species in the influent. Varying NH4(+) and NO3(-) concentrations in the feed did not have an effect on NH4(+) removal (n=44, p=0.993 and n=44, p=0.610 respectively) while NH4(+) feed concentration was found to be negatively related with NO3(-) removal (n=44, p=0.000) and NO3(-) feed concentration was found to be positively correlated with NO3(-) removal (n=44, p=0.000). Consistent removal of NH4(+), combined with the accumulation of oxidized nitrogen species at high NH4(+) fluxes indicates the presence of ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria within the microbial community.

  3. [Cultivation of ANAMMOX bacteria and the ammonium anaerobic oxidation technology in the plug flow bio-reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Du, Bing; Si, Ya-an; Sun, Yan-ling; Shen, Li-xian

    2005-03-01

    It is feasible that the ANAMMOX bacteria can be enriched and cultivated to red granular in plug flow immobilized floc bioreactor. Average ammonium and nitrite removal rate are more than 98 %, and average total nitrogen removal rate is 86% combined with 14% nitrate production; the removal volumetric total nitrogen load is 2.56kg/(m3 x d). The influence of the influent substrate ratio of ammonium to nitrite on reactor's performance has been studied. The granule structure has been observed by the scan electro-microscope.

  4. Teratoma formation of human embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional perfusion culture bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachelscheid, H; Wulf-Goldenberg, A; Eckert, K; Jensen, J; Edsbagge, J; Björquist, P; Rivero, M; Strehl, R; Jozefczuk, J; Prigione, A; Adjaye, J; Urbaniak, T; Bussmann, P; Zeilinger, K; Gerlach, J C

    2013-09-01

    Teratoma formation in mice is today the most stringent test for pluripotency that is available for human pluripotent cells, as chimera formation and tetraploid complementation cannot be performed with human cells. The teratoma assay could also be applied for assessing the safety of human pluripotent cell-derived cell populations intended for therapeutic applications. In our study we examined the spontaneous differentiation behaviour of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a perfused 3D multi-compartment bioreactor system and compared it with differentiation of hESCs and human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs) cultured in vitro as embryoid bodies and in vivo in an experimental mouse model of teratoma formation. Results from biochemical, histological/immunohistological and ultrastuctural analyses revealed that hESCs cultured in bioreactors formed tissue-like structures containing derivatives of all three germ layers. Comparison with embryoid bodies and the teratomas revealed a high degree of similarity of the tissues formed in the bioreactor to these in the teratomas at the histological as well as transcriptional level, as detected by comparative whole-genome RNA expression profiling. The 3D culture system represents a novel in vitro model that permits stable long-term cultivation, spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation and tissue formation of pluripotent cells that is comparable to in vivo differentiation. Such a model is of interest, e.g. for the development of novel cell differentiation strategies. In addition, the 3D in vitro model could be used for teratoma studies and pluripotency assays in a fully defined, controlled environment, alternatively to in vivo mouse models. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Yeast Extract Stimulates Ginsenoside Production in Hairy Root Cultures of American Ginseng Cultivated in Shake Flasks and Nutrient Sprinkle Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Ewa; Szymczyk, Piotr; Kuźma, Łukasz; Lipert, Anna; Szymańska, Grażyna

    2017-05-26

    One of the most effective strategies to enhance metabolite biosynthesis and accumulation in biotechnological systems is the use of elicitation processes. This study assesses the influence of different concentrations of yeast extract (YE) on ginsenoside biosynthesis in Panax quinquefolium (American ginseng) hairy roots cultivated in shake flasks and in a nutrient sprinkle bioreactor after 3 and 7 days of elicitation. The saponin content was determined using HPLC. The maximum yield (20 mg g -1 d.w.) of the sum of six examined ginsenosides (Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Rd, Re and Rg1) in hairy roots cultivated in shake flasks was achieved after application of YE at 50 mg L -1 concentration and 3 day exposure time. The ginsenoside level was 1.57 times higher than that attained in control medium. The same conditions of elicitation (3 day time of exposure and 50 mg L -1 of YE) also favourably influenced the biosynthesis of studied saponins in bioreactor cultures. The total ginsenoside content was 32.25 mg g -1 d.w. and was higher than that achieved in control medium and in shake flasks cultures. Obtained results indicated that yeast extract can be used to increase ginsenoside production in hairy root cultures of P. quinquefolium .

  6. The Cultivation of Human Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Brůčková

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The major functions of granulosa cells (GCs include the production of steroids, as well as a myriad of growth factors to interact with the oocyte during its development within the ovarian follicle. Also FSH stimulates GCs to convert androgens (coming from the thecal cells to estradiol by aromatase. However, after ovulation the GCs produce progesterone that may maintain a potential pregnancy. Experiments with human GCs are mainly focused on the purification of GCs from ovarian follicular fluid followed by FACS analysis or short-term cultivation. The aim of our study was to cultivate GCs for a long period, to characterize their morphology and phenotype. Moreover, we have cultivated GCs under gonadotropin stimulation in order to simulate different pathological mechanisms during folliculogenesis (e.g. ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. GCs were harvested from women undergoing in vitro fertilization. Complex oocyte-cumulus oophorus was dissociated by hyaluronidase. The best condition for transport of GCs was optimized as short transport in follicular fluid at 37 °C. GCs expansion medium consisted of DMEM/F12, 2 % FCS, ascorbic acid, dexamethasone, L-glutamine, gentamycine, penicillin, streptomycin and growth factors (EGF, bFGF. GCs transported in follicular fluid and cultivated in 2 % FCS containing DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with follicular fluid presented increased adhesion, proliferation, viability and decreased doubling time. Cell viability was 92 % and mean cell doubling time was 52 hrs. We have optimized transport and cultivation protocols for long-term cultivation of GCs.

  7. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z.; Møller, Per

    2016-01-01

    of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scaleusing a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large...

  8. Enhancing the Production of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Biopolymer by Azohydromonas Australica Using a Simple Empty and Fill Bioreactor Cultivation Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gahlawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are biodegradable polymers which are considered as an effective alternative for conventional plastics due to their mechanical properties similar to the latter. However, widespread use of these polymers is still hampered due to their high cost of production. This shortcoming could partly be resolved by obtaining high yields and productivity. In the present study, a drain-and-fill strategy of repeated-batch cultivation was adopted for the enhanced production of polyhydroxybutyrate PHB using Azohydromonas australica. In this strategy, 20 % (v/v of the culture broth was removed from the reactor and supplemented with an equal volume of fresh medium. This strategy demonstrated a 3.3 fold and 1.8 fold increase in PHB concentration and productivity, respectively, as compared to batch cultivation. Repeated cultivation had also the benefit of avoiding non-productive time required for cleaning, refilling and sterilization of bioreactor during batch, thereby increasing the overall volumetric productivity and industrial importance of the process.

  9. A long-term cultivation of an anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial community from deep-sea methane-seep sediment using a continuous-flow bioreactor.

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    Masataka Aoki

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM in marine sediments is an important global methane sink, but the physiological characteristics of AOM-associated microorganisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the cultivation of an AOM microbial community from deep-sea methane-seep sediment using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called the down-flow hanging sponge (DHS bioreactor. We anaerobically incubated deep-sea methane-seep sediment collected from the Nankai Trough, Japan, for 2,013 days in the bioreactor at 10°C. Following incubation, an active AOM activity was confirmed by a tracer experiment using 13C-labeled methane. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that phylogenetically diverse Archaea and Bacteria grew in the bioreactor. After 2,013 days of incubation, the predominant archaeal components were anaerobic methanotroph (ANME-2a, Deep-Sea Archaeal Group, and Marine Benthic Group-D, and Gammaproteobacteria was the dominant bacterial lineage. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that ANME-1 and -2a, and most ANME-2c cells occurred without close physical interaction with potential bacterial partners. Our data demonstrate that the DHS bioreactor system is a useful system for cultivating fastidious methane-seep-associated sedimentary microorganisms.

  10. Algae-facilitated chemical phosphorus removal during high-density Chlorella emersonii cultivation in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Bernards, Matthew; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    An algae-based membrane bioreactor (A-MBR) was evaluated for high-density algae cultivation and phosphorus (P) removal. The A-MBR was seeded with Chlorella emersonii and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 1day with minimal biomass wastage for about 150days. The algae concentration increased from initially 385mg/L (or 315mg biomass COD/L) to a final of 4840mg/L (or 1664mg COD/L), yielding an average solids (algae biomass+minerals) production rate of 32.5gm(-3)d(-1) or 6.2gm(-2)d(-1). The A-MBR was able to remove 66±9% of the total P from the water while the algal biomass had an average of 7.5±0.2% extracellular P and 0.4% of intracellular P. The results suggest that algae-induced phosphate precipitation by algae is key to P removal and high-density algae cultivation produces P-rich algal biomass with excellent settling properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance of Aspergillus niger Cultivation in Geometrically Dissimilar Bioreactors Evaluated on the Basis of Morphological Analyses

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    M. A. Priede

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of Aspergillus niger, citric acid production and mycelia morphology changes were compared under different mixing conditions in bioreactors with two types of stirrers: Rushton turbine stirrers (RTS1 or RTS2 and axial counterflow stirrers (ACS1 or ACS2. The characteristics of growth, productivity and morphology varied with the mixing system and the applied agitation regime. In the first series of experiments, the flow characteristics of Aspergillus niger broth under different mixing conditions were analysed in a model bioreactor using RTS1 and ACS1. The kinetic energy E of flow fluctuations was measured in gassed and ungassed water and fermentation broth systems using a stirring intensity measuring device (SIMD-f1. The difference of energy E values at different points was more pronounced in the bioreactor with RTS1 than in the case of ACS1. High viscous A. niger broths provided higher energy E values in comparison with water. It was observed that the Aspergillus niger growth rate and citric acid synthesis rate decreased at very high energy E values, the behaviour obviously being connected with the influence of the irreversible shear stress on the mycelial morphology. In the second series of experiments, a higher citric acid yield was achieved in the case of ACS2 at a power input approximately twice lower than in the case of RTS2. Morphological characterization of A. niger pellets was carried out by the image analysis method. ACS2 provided the development of morphology, where pellets and cores had larger area, perimeter and diameter, and the annular region of pellets was looser and more »hairy« in comparison with the case of RTS2. The pellets from the fermentation with RTS2 were smaller, denser, with shorter hyphae in the annular region of pellets, and the broth was characterized by a higher percentage of diffuse mycelia. Power input studies of RTS2 and ACS2 were made at different agitator rotation speeds and gas flow rates using water

  12. Microalgae cultivation in a novel top-lit gas-lift open bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Hosseini, Nekoo; Shang, Helen; Ross, Gregory M; Scott, John A

    2015-09-01

    This work investigated a top-lit open microalgae bioreactor that uses a gas-lift system to enable deeper production depths, thereby significantly reducing the footprint. Growth of Scenedesmus sp. in a one-meter deep system by sparged with 6% CO2-enhanced air was evaluated. The results gave comparable volumetric biomass productivity (0.06 g(dw) L(-1) day(-1)), but around three-times higher areal productivity (60.0 g(dw)m(-)(2) day(-)(1)) than reported for traditional raceways. The lipid content of the Scenedesmus sp. was increased by 27% with an enhanced level of CO2 in the sparging gas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Membrane photobioreactors for integrated microalgae cultivation and nutrient remediation of membrane bioreactors effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbelia, L; Bilad, M R; Passaris, I; Discart, V; Vandamme, D; Beuckels, A; Muylaert, K; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of a new concept of wastewater treatment by combining a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a microalgae membrane photobioreactor (MPBR) is assessed in this study. In this system, the organic carbon present in wastewater is expected to be fully oxidized in the MBR, while the nutrients are removed via the subsequent MPBR treatment. The effluent of a lab-scale MBR was fed into a PBR and a MPBR which served as growing medium for Chlorella vulgaris. The MPBRs demonstrated their superiority by limiting the algae wash-out, thus increasing the allowable optimum dilution rate (Dopt). At these corresponding Dopt values, 3.5 and 2 times higher biomass concentrations and volumetric productivities respectively were achieved by the MPBR. It is also possible to run the MPBR at still higher biomass concentration, thus enabling a smaller footprint and higher nutrient removal efficiency. However, reduced nutrient removal efficiencies were found to be one possible drawback. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A system of miniaturized stirred bioreactors for parallel continuous cultivation of yeast with online measurement of dissolved oxygen and off-gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Schneider, Konstantin; Heinzle, Elmar

    2013-02-01

    Chemostat cultivation is a powerful tool for physiological studies of microorganisms. We report the construction and application of a set of eight parallel small-scale bioreactors with a working volume of 10 mL for continuous cultivation. Hungate tubes were used as culture vessels connected to multichannel-peristaltic pumps for feeding fresh media and removal of culture broth and off-gas. Water saturated air is sucked into the bioreactors by applying negative pressure, and small stirrer bars inside the culture vessels allow sufficient mixing and oxygen transfer. Optical sensors are used for non-invasive online measurement of dissolved oxygen, which proved to be a powerful indicator of the physiological state of the cultures, particularly of steady-state conditions. Analysis of culture exhaust-gas by means of mass spectrometry enables balancing of carbon. The capacity of the developed small-scale bioreactor system was validated using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, focusing on the metabolic shift from respiratory to respiro-fermentative metabolism, as well as studies on consumption of different substrates such as glucose, fructose, and gluconate. In all cases, an almost completely closed carbon balance was obtained proving the reliability of the experimental setup. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-07-29

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  16. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Safafar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids, tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  17. Bioreactor design and implementation strategies for the cultivation of filamentous fungi and the production of fungal metabolites: from traditional methods to engineered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musoni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of fungal metabolites and conidia at an industrial scale requires an adequate yield at relatively low cost. To this end, many factors are examined and the design of the bioreactor to be used for the selected product takes a predominant place in the analysis. One approach to addressing the issue is to integrate the scaling-up procedure according to the biological characteristics of the microorganism considered, i.e. in our case filamentous fungi. Indeed, the scaling-up procedure is considered as one of the major bottlenecks in fermentation technology, mainly due to the near impossibility of reproducing the ideal conditions obtained in small reactors designed for research purposes when transposing them to a much larger production scale. The present review seeks to make the point regarding the bioreactor design and its implementation for cultivation of filamentous fungi and the production of fungal metabolites according to different developmental stages of fungi of industrial interest. Solid-state (semi-solid, submerged, fermentation and biofilm reactors are analyzed. The different bioreactor designs used for these three processes are also described at the technological level.

  18. Validation of Bioreactor and Human-on-a-Chip Devices for Chemical Safety Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Sofia P; Dehne, Eva-Maria; Brito, Catarina; Horland, Reyk; Alves, Paula M; Marx, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Equipment and device qualification and test assay validation in the field of tissue engineered human organs for substance assessment remain formidable tasks with only a few successful examples so far. The hurdles seem to increase with the growing complexity of the biological systems, emulated by the respective models. Controlled single tissue or organ culture in bioreactors improves the organ-specific functions and maintains their phenotypic stability for longer periods of time. The reproducibility attained with bioreactor operations is, per se, an advantage for the validation of safety assessment. Regulatory agencies have gradually altered the validation concept from exhaustive "product" to rigorous and detailed process characterization, valuing reproducibility as a standard for validation. "Human-on-a-chip" technologies applying micro-physiological systems to the in vitro combination of miniaturized human organ equivalents into functional human micro-organisms are nowadays thought to be the most elaborate solution created to date. They target the replacement of the current most complex models-laboratory animals. Therefore, we provide here a road map towards the validation of such "human-on-a-chip" models and qualification of their respective bioreactor and microchip equipment along a path currently used for the respective animal models.

  19. Application of nano TiO2 modified hollow fiber membranes in algal membrane bioreactors for high-density algae cultivation and wastewater polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Yin, Jun; Deng, Baolin; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes with nano-TiO2 (5% of PVDF by mass, average size = 25 nm) additives were fabricated and applied for high-density algae (Chlorella vulgaris) cultivation. At the average light intensity of 121 μmol/m(2)/s, the algal membrane bioreactors (A-MBR) operated at a hydraulic retention time of 0.5d and an average solids retention time of 25d had an average algae biomass concentration of 2350 ± 74 mg/L (in COD units) and algal biomass production rate of 6.5 ± 0.1g/m(2)/d. The A-MBRs removed an average of 78% of phosphorus from the wastewater at the initial total phosphorus concentrations ranging from 3.5 to 8.6 mg/L. The nano TiO2-embedded membranes had improved surface hydrophilicity with its total resistance about 50% lower than that of the control. This study demonstrated that PVDF/TiO2 nanocomposite membranes had a better antifouling property for high-density algae cultivation and wastewater polishing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scalable cultivation of human pluripotent stem cells on chemically-defined surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Michael Chi-Wei

    Human stem cells (SCs) are classified as self-renewing cells possessing great ability in therapeutic applications due of their ability to differentiate along any major cell lineage in the human body. Despite their restorative potential, widespread use of SCs is hampered by strenuous control issues. Along with the need for strict xeno-free environments to sustain growth in culture, current methods for growing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) rely on platforms which impede large-scale cultivation and therapeutic delivery. Hence, any progress towards development of large-scale culture systems is severely hindered. In a concentrated effort to develop a scheme that can serve as a model precursor for large scale SC propagation in clinical use, we have explored methods for cultivating hPSCs on completely defined surfaces. We discuss novel approaches with the potential to go beyond the limitations presented by current methods. In particular, we studied the cultivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) on surface which underwent synthetic or chemical modification. Current methods for hPSCs rely on animal-based extracellular matrices (ECMs) such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or feeders and murine sacoma cell-derived substrates to facilitate their growth. While these layers or coatings can be used to maximize the output of hPSC production, they cannot be considered for clinical use because they risk introducing foreign pathogens into culture. We have identified and developed conditions for a completely defined xeno-free substrate used for culturing hPSCs. By utilizing coupling chemistry, we can functionalize ester groups on a given surface and conjugate synthetic peptides containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, known for their role in cell adhesion. This method offers advantages over traditional hPSC culture by keeping the modified substrata free of xenogenic response and can be scaled up in

  1. Lipid for biodiesel production from attached growth Chlorella vulgaris biomass cultivating in fluidized bed bioreactor packed with polyurethane foam material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Sahib, Ainur-Assyakirin; Lim, Jun-Wei; Lam, Man-Kee; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ho, Chii-Dong; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed; Wong, Chung-Yiin; Rosli, Siti-Suhailah

    2017-09-01

    The potential to grow attached microalgae Chlorella vulgaris in fluidized bed bioreactor was materialized in this study, targeting to ease the harvesting process prior to biodiesel production. The proposed thermodynamic mechanism and physical property assessment of various support materials verified polyurethane to be suitable material favouring the spontaneous adhesion by microalgae cells. The 1-L bioreactor packed with only 2.4% (v/v) of 1.00-mL polyurethane foam cubes could achieve the highest attached growth microalgae biomass and lipid weights of 812±122 and 376±37mg, respectively, in comparison with other cube sizes. The maturity of attached growth microalgae biomass for harvesting could also be determined from the growth trend of suspended microalgae biomass. Analysis of FAME composition revealed that the harvested microalgae biomass was dominated by C16-C18 (>60%) and mixture of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (>65%), satiating the biodiesel standard with adequate cold flow property and oxidative stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Multicompartment Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Freyer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC holds great potential for application in regenerative medicine, pharmacological drug screening, and toxicity testing. However, full maturation of hiPSC into functional hepatocytes has not yet been achieved. In this study, we investigated the potential of a dynamic three-dimensional (3D hollow fiber membrane bioreactor technology to improve the hepatic differentiation of hiPSC in comparison to static two-dimensional (2D cultures. A total of 100 × 106 hiPSC were seeded into each 3D bioreactor (n = 3. Differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE was induced by adding activin A, Wnt3a, and sodium butyrate to the culture medium. For further maturation, hepatocyte growth factor and oncostatin M were added. The same differentiation protocol was applied to hiPSC maintained in 2D cultures. Secretion of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, a marker for DE, was significantly (p < 0.05 higher in 2D cultures, while secretion of albumin, a typical characteristic for mature hepatocytes, was higher after hepatic differentiation of hiPSC in 3D bioreactors. Functional analysis of multiple cytochrome P450 (CYP isoenzymes showed activity of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 in both groups, although at a lower level compared to primary human hepatocytes (PHH. CYP2B6 activities were significantly (p < 0.05 higher in 3D bioreactors compared with 2D cultures, which is in line with results from gene expression. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the majority of cells was positive for albumin, cytokeratin 18 (CK18, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4A at the end of the differentiation process. In addition, cytokeratin 19 (CK19 staining revealed the formation of bile duct-like structures in 3D bioreactors similar to native liver tissue. The results indicate a better maturation of hiPSC in the 3D bioreactor system compared to 2D cultures and emphasize the potential of dynamic 3D culture

  3. NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101825 for a version with major elements labeled, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic. 0101816

  4. Long term organ culture of human prostate tissue in a NASA-designed rotating wall bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, L.; Hatfill, S.; Chuaqui, R.; Vocke, C.; Emmert-Buck, M.; Linehan, W. M.; Duray, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To maintain ex vivo integral prostatic tissue including intact stromal and ductal elements using the NASA-designed Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) which maintains colocalized cells in an environment that promotes both three-dimensional cellular interactions together with the uniform mass transfer of nutrients and metabolic wastes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Samples of normal prostate were obtained as a byproduct of transurethral prostatectomy or needle biopsy. Prostatic tissue dissected into small 1 x 1 mm. blocks was cultured in the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor for various time periods and analyzed using histological, immunochemical, and total cell RNA assays. RESULTS: We report the long term maintenance of benign explanted human prostate tissue grown in simple culture medium, under the simulated microgravity conditions afforded by the RWV bioreactor. Mesenchymal stromal elements including blood vessels and architecturally preserved tubuloglandular acini were maintained for a minimum of 28 days. Cytokeratins, vimentin and TGF-beta2 receptor and ligand were preserved through the entire culture period as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was continuously expressed during the culture period, although somewhat decreased. Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and its transcript were down regulated over time of culture. Prostatic carcinoma cells from the TSU cell line were able to invade RWV-cultured benign prostate tissue explants. CONCLUSIONS: The RWV bioreactor represents an additional new technology for culturing prostate tissue for further investigations concerning the basic physiology and pathobiology of this clinically important tissue.

  5. Sequential Crop Cultivation Experiment using CEEF for Human Habitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tako, Y.; Arai, R.; Nitta, K.; Shinohara, M.

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) can be used as a test bed for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS), because technologies developed for the CEEF system facilitate self-sufficient material circulation. In the experiment conducted from August to December of 2001, rice and soybeans were cultivated sequentially in two chambers and a chamber, each having a cultivation bed area of 30 m 2 and floor area of 43 m 2, inside the Plantation Module with artificial lighting of the CEEF. Stable transplant or seeding and harvest of each crop were maintained during 28 days, after a 110-days preparatory cultivation. Flows of gas and liquid materials to and from the crops were analyzed during the stable cultivation period. Almost all equipments of the Gas Processing Subsystem of the Closed Plantation Experiment Facilities (CPEF) in the CEEF were operated during the period. Stable operation of the subsystem was confirmed during the period. Daily averages of carbohydrate, lipid, and protein contained in edible biomass from harvested rice and soybeans for the 28-days were 2.1, 1.2, and 2.2 of the necessary amount of each for a standard human activity. Stable uptake of CO2 by each crop was confirmed during the 28 -days. Amounts of CO2 taken up by each crop were consistent with produced biomass of both crops. Exchange ratios of CO2 and O2 were also consistent with nutritional compositions of both crops biomass.

  6. Impact of Feeding Strategies on the Scalable Expansion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Single-Use Stirred Tank Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Christina; Kempf, Henning; Halloin, Caroline; Robles-Diaz, Diana; Franke, Annika; Scheper, Thomas; Kinast, Katharina; Knorpp, Thomas; Joos, Thomas O; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich; Zweigerdt, Robert; Olmer, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    : The routine application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and their derivatives in biomedicine and drug discovery will require the constant supply of high-quality cells by defined processes. Culturing hPSCs as cell-only aggregates in (three-dimensional [3D]) suspension has the potential to overcome numerous limitations of conventional surface-adherent (two-dimensional [2D]) cultivation. Utilizing single-use instrumented stirred-tank bioreactors, we showed that perfusion resulted in a more homogeneous culture environment and enabled superior cell densities of 2.85 × 10 6 cells per milliliter and 47% higher cell yields compared with conventional repeated batch cultures. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and global gene expression analysis revealed a high similarity across 3D suspension and 2D precultures, underscoring that matrix-free hPSC culture efficiently supports maintenance of pluripotency. Interestingly, physiological data and gene expression assessment indicated distinct changes of the cells' energy metabolism, suggesting a culture-induced switch from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation in the absence of hPSC differentiation. Our data highlight the plasticity of hPSCs' energy metabolism and provide clear physiological and molecular targets for process monitoring and further development. This study paves the way toward more efficient GMP-compliant cell production and underscores the enormous process development potential of hPSCs in suspension culture. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are a unique source for the, in principle, unlimited production of functional human cell types in vitro, which are of high value for therapeutic and industrial applications. This study applied single-use, clinically compliant bioreactor technology to develop advanced, matrix-free, and more efficient culture conditions for the mass production of hPSCs in scalable suspension culture. Using extensive analytical tools to

  7. Organ culture bioreactors--platforms to study human intervertebral disc degeneration and regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Chan, Samantha C W; Walser, Jochen; Haglund, Lisbet; Ferguson, Stephen J; Iatridis, James C; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the application of bioreactors has revolutionized the concept of culturing tissues and organs that require mechanical loading. In intervertebral disc (IVD) research, collaborative efforts of biomedical engineering, biology and mechatronics have led to the innovation of new loading devices that can maintain viable IVD organ explants from large animals and human cadavers in precisely defined nutritional and mechanical environments over extended culture periods. Particularly in spine and IVD research, these organ culture models offer appealing alternatives, as large bipedal animal models with naturally occurring IVD degeneration and a genetic background similar to the human condition do not exist. Latest research has demonstrated important concepts including the potential of homing of mesenchymal stem cells to nutritionally or mechanically stressed IVDs, and the regenerative potential of "smart" biomaterials for nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus repair. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about cell therapy, injection of cytokines and short peptides to rescue the degenerating IVD. We further stress that most bioreactor systems simplify the real in vivo conditions providing a useful proof of concept. Limitations are that certain aspects of the immune host response and pain assessments cannot be addressed with ex vivo systems. Coccygeal animal disc models are commonly used because of their availability and similarity to human IVDs. Although in vitro loading environments are not identical to the human in vivo situation, 3D ex vivo organ culture models of large animal coccygeal and human lumbar IVDs should be seen as valid alternatives for screening and feasibility testing to augment existing small animal, large animal, and human clinical trial experiments.

  8. A review of bioreactor protocols for human neural precursor cell expansion in preparation for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghbaderani, Behnam A; Mukhida, Karim; Hong, Murray; Mendez, Ivar; Behie, Leo A

    2011-09-01

    Tissue-specific human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) can be isolated from various regions of the developing or adult central nervous system and may serve as a viable source of cells in cell replacement therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. However, in order for cell replacement strategies to become a routine therapeutic option for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, hNPCs should be generated under standardized and controlled conditions. Studies over the last two decades have focused on developing cell growth media and cell handling protocols for expansion and differentiation of hNPCs in culture. Key studies have reported the development of serum-free growth media and large-scale computer-controlled suspension bioreactors that can support high cell proliferation rates (doubling times < 3 days), multipotentiality, and potential neurogenic differentiation (more than 60% neurons). Moreover, bioengineering studies have focused on controlling culture conditions in suspension bioreactors including inoculation, hydrodynamics of culture, oxygen and nutrients transfer to the cells, monitoring in situ physiological parameters using process control techniques, and expansion for extended periods of time. In addition, in vitro and in vivo characterization of hNPCs have been performed, providing information on stem/progenitor cell characteristics, cell surface analysis, and appropriate type of cells to use in transplantation studies.

  9. Serial cultivation of human scalp hair follicle keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, P J; Roelofs, H M; Vermorken, A J; Bloemendal, H

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the serial cultivation of adult human hair follicle keratinocytes. Plucked scalp hair follicles, placed on bovine eye lens capsules as a growth substrate, give rise to quickly expanding colonies within a few days. After trypsinization, the cells are replated with irradiated 3T3 cells as 'feeders'. Using this combination of techniques the keratinocytes can be subcultured up to four times. In this way about 10(7) keratinocytes can be generated from one single hair follicle. Moreover, the technique enables cryogenic storage of the cells, allowing for instance, convenient transportation. Subcultured hair follicle keratinocytes can be plated on glass coverslips. This allows immunofluorescence studies. The keratin cytoskeletons visualized using an antiserum against human keratin.

  10. A two-compartment bioreactor system made of commercial parts for bioprocess scale-down studies: impact of oscillations on Bacillus subtilis fed-batch cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junne, Stefan; Klingner, Arne; Kabisch, Johannes; Schweder, Thomas; Neubauer, Peter

    2011-08-01

    This study describes an advanced version of a two-compartment scale-down bioreactor that simulates inhomogeneities present in large-scale industrial bioreactors on the laboratory scale. The system is made of commercially available parts and is suitable for sterilization with steam. The scale-down bioreactor consists of a usual stirred tank bioreactor (STR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR) equipped with static mixer modules. The PFR module with a working volume of 1.2 L is equipped with five sample ports, and pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) sensors. The concept was applied using the non-sporulating Bacillus subtilis mutant strain AS3, characterized by a SpoIIGA gene knockout. In a fed-batch process with a constant feed rate, it is found that oscillating substrate and DO concentration led to diminished glucose uptake, ethanol formation and an altered amino acid synthesis. Sampling at the PFR module allowed the detection of dynamics at different concentrations of intermediates, such as pyruvic acid, lactic acid and amino acids. Results indicate that the carbon flux at excess glucose and low DO concentrations is shifted towards ethanol formation. As a result, the reduced carbon flux entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle is not sufficient to support amino acid synthesis following the oxaloacetic acid branch point. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. NASA-approved rotary bioreactor enhances proliferation of human epidermal stem cells and supports formation of 3D epidermis-like structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua Lei

    Full Text Available The skin is susceptible to different injuries and diseases. One major obstacle in skin tissue engineering is how to develop functional three-dimensional (3D substitute for damaged skin. Previous studies have proved a 3D dynamic simulated microgravity (SMG culture system as a "stimulatory" environment for the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Here, we employed the NASA-approved rotary bioreactor to investigate the proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells (hEpSCs. hEpSCs were isolated from children foreskins and enriched by collecting epidermal stem cell colonies. Cytodex-3 micro-carriers and hEpSCs were co-cultured in the rotary bioreactor and 6-well dish for 15 days. The result showed that hEpSCs cultured in rotary bioreactor exhibited enhanced proliferation and viability surpassing those cultured in static conditions. Additionally, immunostaining analysis confirmed higher percentage of ki67 positive cells in rotary bioreactor compared with the static culture. In contrast, comparing with static culture, cells in the rotary bioreactor displayed a low expression of involucrin at day 10. Histological analysis revealed that cells cultured in rotary bioreactor aggregated on the micro-carriers and formed multilayer 3D epidermis structures. In conclusion, our research suggests that NASA-approved rotary bioreactor can support the proliferation of hEpSCs and provide a strategy to form multilayer epidermis structure.

  12. Expansion of 3D human induced pluripotent stem cell aggregates in bioreactors: Bioprocess intensification and scaling-up approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecasis, Bernardo; Aguiar, Tiago; Arnault, Émilie; Costa, Rita; Gomes-Alves, Patricia; Aspegren, Anders; Serra, Margarida; Alves, Paula M

    2017-03-20

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) are attractive tools for drug screening and disease modeling and promising candidates for cell therapy applications. However, to achieve the high numbers of cells required for these purposes, scalable and clinical-grade technologies must be established. In this study, we use environmentally controlled stirred-tank bioreactors operating in perfusion as a powerful tool for bioprocess intensification of hiPSC production. We demonstrate the importance of controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration at low levels (4%) and perfusion at 1.3day -1 dilution rate to improve hiPSC growth as aggregates in a xeno-free medium. This strategy allowed for increased cell specific growth rate, maximum volumetric concentrations (4.7×10 6 cell/mL) and expansion factors (approximately 19 in total cells), resulting in a 2.6-fold overall improvement in cell yields. Extensive cell characterization, including whole proteomic analysis, was performed to confirm that cells' pluripotent phenotype was maintained during culture. A scalable protocol for continuous expansion of hiPSC aggregates in bioreactors was implemented using mechanical dissociation for aggregate disruption and cell passaging. A total expansion factor of 1100 in viable cells was obtained in 11days of culture, while cells maintained their proliferation capacity, pluripotent phenotype and potential as well as genomic stability after 3 sequential passages in bioreactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cultivation-based multiplex phenotyping of human gut microbiota allows targeted recovery of previously uncultured bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rettedal, Elizabeth; Gumpert, Heidi; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    show that carefully designed conditions enable cultivation of a representative proportion of human gut bacteria, enabling rapid multiplex phenotypic profiling. We use this approach to determine the phylogenetic distribution of antibiotic tolerance phenotypes for 16 antibiotics in the human gut...... microbiota. Based on the phenotypic mapping, we tailor antibiotic combinations to specifically select for previously uncultivated bacteria. Utilizing this method we cultivate and sequence the genomes of four isolates, one of which apparently belongs to the genus Oscillibacter; uncultivated Oscillibacter...

  14. Production of high-titer human influenza A virus with adherent and suspension MDCK cells cultured in a single-use hollow fiber bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Felipe; Vogel, Thomas; Genzel, Yvonne; Behrendt, Ilona; Hirschel, Mark; Gangemi, J David; Reichl, Udo

    2014-02-12

    Hollow fiber bioreactors (HFBRs) have been widely described as capable of supporting the production of highly concentrated monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Only recently HFBRs have been proposed as new single-use platforms for production of high-titer influenza A virus. These bioreactors contain multiple hollow fiber capillary tubes that separate the bioreactor in an intra- and an extra-capillary space. Cells are usually cultured in the extra-capillary space and can grow to a very high cell concentration. This work describes the evaluation of the single-use hollow fiber bioreactor PRIMER HF (Biovest International Inc., USA) for production of influenza A virus. The process was setup, characterized and optimized by running a total of 15 cultivations. The HFBRs were seeded with either adherent or suspension MDCK cells, and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), and the pandemic strain A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1). High HA titers and TCID₅₀ of up to 3.87 log₁₀(HA units/100 μL) and 1.8 × 10(10)virions/mL, respectively, were obtained for A/PR/8/34 influenza strain. Influenza virus was collected by performing multiple harvests of the extra-capillary space during a virus production time of up to 12 days. Cell-specific virus yields between 2,000 and 8,000 virions/cell were estimated for adherent MDCK cells, and between 11,000 and 19,000 virions/cell for suspension MDCK.SUS2 cells. These results do not only coincide with the cell-specific virus yields obtained with cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors and other high cell density systems, but also demonstrate that HFBRs are promising and competitive single-use platforms that can be considered for commercial production of influenza virus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Production of oncolytic adenovirus and human mesenchymal stem cells in a single-use, Vertical-Wheel bioreactor system: Impact of bioreactor design on performance of microcarrier-based cell culture processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marcos F Q; Silva, Marta M; Giroux, Daniel; Hashimura, Yas; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Lee, Brian; Roldão, António; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Serra, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cell cultures are used for the production of viruses, viral vectors, and vaccines, as well as for various cell therapies and tissue engineering applications. Most of these applications currently rely on planar technologies for the generation of biological products. However, as new cell therapy product candidates move from clinical trials towards potential commercialization, planar platforms have proven to be inadequate to meet large-scale manufacturing demand. Therefore, a new scalable platform for culturing anchorage-dependent cells at high cell volumetric concentrations is urgently needed. One promising solution is to grow cells on microcarriers suspended in single-use bioreactors. Toward this goal, a novel bioreactor system utilizing an innovative Vertical-Wheel™ technology was evaluated for its potential to support scalable cell culture process development. Two anchorage-dependent human cell types were used: human lung carcinoma cells (A549 cell line) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Key hydrodynamic parameters such as power input, mixing time, Kolmogorov length scale, and shear stress were estimated. The performance of Vertical-Wheel bioreactors (PBS-VW) was then evaluated for A549 cell growth and oncolytic adenovirus type 5 production as well as for hMSC expansion. Regarding the first cell model, higher cell growth and number of infectious viruses per cell were achieved when compared with stirred tank (ST) bioreactors. For the hMSC model, although higher percentages of proliferative cells could be reached in the PBS-VW compared with ST bioreactors, no significant differences in the cell volumetric concentration and expansion factor were observed. Noteworthy, the hMSC population generated in the PBS-VW showed a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells as well as reduced levels of HLA-DR positive cells. Overall, these results showed that process transfer from ST bioreactor to PBS-VW, and scale-up was

  16. Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth – Isolation, Long Term Cultivation and Phenotypical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Suchánek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Our aims were to isolate stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, to cultivate them in vitro and to investigate their basic biological properties, phenotype and to compare our findings with dental pulp stem cells (DPSC isolated from permanent teeth. Methods: Dental pulp was gently evacuated from exfoliated teeth. After enzymatic dissociation of dental pulp, SHED were cultivated in modified cultivation media for mesenchymal adult progenitor cells containing 2 % FCS and supplemented with growth factors and insulin, transferrin, sodium (ITS supplement. Cell viability and other biological properties were examined using a Vi-Cell analyzer and a Z2-Counter. DNA analyses and phenotyping were performed with flow cytometry. Results: We were able to cultivate SHED over 45 population doublings. Our results showed that SHED cultivated under same conditions as DPSC had longer average population doubling time (41.3 hrs for SHED vs. 24.5 hrs for DPSC. Phenotypic comparison of cultivated SHED to that of cultivated DPSC showed differential expression CD29, CD44, CD71, CD117, CD166. During long-term cultivation, SHED did not showed any signs of degeneration or spontaneous differentiation. Conclusions: We isolated stem cells from exfoliated teeth. In comparison to DPSC, SHED proliferation rate was about 50% slower, and SHED showed slightly different phenotype. These cells may be extremely useful for stem cell tissue banking, further stem cell research and future therapeutic applications.

  17. Cattle mammary bioreactor generated by a novel procedure of transgenic cloning for large-scale production of functional human lactoferrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghua Yang

    Full Text Available Large-scale production of biopharmaceuticals by current bioreactor techniques is limited by low transgenic efficiency and low expression of foreign proteins. In general, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC harboring most regulatory elements is capable of overcoming the limitations, but transferring BAC into donor cells is difficult. We describe here the use of cattle mammary bioreactor to produce functional recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF by a novel procedure of transgenic cloning, which employs microinjection to generate transgenic somatic cells as donor cells. Bovine fibroblast cells were co-microinjected for the first time with a 150-kb BAC carrying the human lactoferrin gene and a marker gene. The resulting transfection efficiency of up to 15.79 x 10(-2 percent was notably higher than that of electroporation and lipofection. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer, we obtained two transgenic cows that secreted rhLF at high levels, 2.5 g/l and 3.4 g/l, respectively. The rhLF had a similar pattern of glycosylation and proteolytic susceptibility as the natural human counterpart. Biochemical analysis revealed that the iron-binding and releasing properties of rhLF were identical to that of native hLF. Importantly, an antibacterial experiment further demonstrated that rhLF was functional. Our results indicate that co-microinjection with a BAC and a marker gene into donor cells for somatic cell cloning indeed improves transgenic efficiency. Moreover, the cattle mammary bioreactors generated with this novel procedure produce functional rhLF on an industrial scale.

  18. Removal properties of human enteric viruses in a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takayuki; Okabe, Satoshi; Nakahara, Yoshihito; Sano, Daisuke

    2015-05-15

    In order to evaluate removal properties of human enteric viruses from wastewater by a membrane bioreactor (MBR), influent, anoxic and oxic mixed liquor, and membrane effluent samples were collected in a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic MBR process for 16 months, and concentrations of enteroviruses, norovirus GII, and sapoviruses were determined by real-time PCR using murine norovirus as a process control. Mixed liquor samples were separated into liquid and solid phases by centrifugation, and viruses in the bulk solution and those associated with mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) were quantified. Enteroviruses, norovirus GII, and sapoviruses were detected in the influent throughout the sampling period (geometrical mean, 4.0, 3.1, and 4.4 log copies/mL, respectively). Enterovirus concentrations in the solid phase of mixed liquor were generally lower than those in the liquid phase, and the mean log reduction value between influent and anoxic mixed liquor was 0.40 log units. In contrast, norovirus GII and sapovirus concentrations in the solid phase were equal to or higher than those in the liquid phase, and higher log reduction values (1.3 and 1.1 log units, respectively) were observed between influent and anoxic mixed liquor. This suggested that enteroviruses were less associated with MLSS than norovirus GII and sapoviruses, resulting in lower enterovirus removal in the activated sludge process. Enteroviruses and norovirus GII were detected in the MBR effluent but sapoviruses were not in any effluent samples. When MLSS concentration was reduced to 50-60% of a normal operation level, passages of enteroviruses and norovirus GII through a PVDF microfiltration membrane were observed. Since rejection of viruses by the membrane was not related to trans-membrane pressure which was monitored as a parameter of membrane fouling, the results indicated that adsorption to MLSS plays an important role in virus removal by an MBR, and removal properties vary by viruses reflecting different

  19. An Integrated Bioprocess for the Expansion and Chondrogenic Priming of Human Periosteum-Derived Progenitor Cells in Suspension Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka; Geris, Liesbet; Luyten, Frank P; Papantoniou, Ioannis

    2018-02-01

    The increasing use of microcarrier-based suspension bioreactors for scalable expansion of adult progenitor cells in recent years reveals the necessity of such approaches to address bio manufacturing challenges of advanced therapeutic medicinal products. However, the differentiation of progenitor cells within suspension bioreactors for the production of tissue modules is of equal importance but not well investigated. This study reports on the development of a bioreactor-based integrated process for expansion and chondrogenic priming of human periosteum-derived stem cells (hPDCs) using Cultispher S microcarriers. Spinner flask-based expansion and priming of hPDCs were carried out over 12 days for expansion and 14 days for priming. Characterization of the cells were carried out every 3rd day. Our study showed that hPDCs were able to expand till confluency with fold increase of 3.2±0.64 and to be subsequently primed toward a chondrogenic state within spinner flasks. During expansion, the cells maintained their phenotypic markers, trilineage differentiation capabilities and viability. Upon switching to TGF-β containing media the cells were able to differentiate toward chondrogenic lineage by clustering into mm-sized macrotissues containing hundreds of microcarriers. Chondrogenic priming was further evidenced by the expression of relevant markers at the mRNA level while maintaining their viability. Ectopic implantation of macrotissues highlighted that they were able to sustain their chondrogenic properties for 8 weeks in vivo. The method indicated here, suggests that expansion and relevant priming of progenitor cells can be carried out in an integrated bioprocess using spinner flasks and as such could be potentially extrapolated to other stem and progenitor cell populations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Optimization of in vitro cultivation strategies for human adipocyte derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, K; Ell, J; Regn, S; Rittler-Ungetüm, B; Mayer, H; Schantz, T; Müller, D; Buchberger, M

    2015-01-01

    With adipose-derived stem cells being in the focus of research in regenerative medicine, the need arises for fast reliable cultivation protocols. We have tested the cultivation of human adipose-derived stem cells in endothelial cell growth medium prior to induction and differentiation, against the long-established use of DMEM/F12 medium-based cultivation protocols. We found that cultivation in endothelial cell growth medium not only accelerates growth before induction and differentiation, but also allows shorter induction and differentiation times than those following precultivation with DMEM/F12 medium with regard to the formation of mature adipocytes and to the viability undifferentiated cells. These results were first observed morphologically but could be confirmed by performing adiponectin ELISA and cell proliferation assays.

  1. Liberal Education Reconsidered: Cultivating Humanity in the Knowledge Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    In the knowledge society, there is a conflict between "education for profit" and "education for humanity." Education for profit is needed for students' economic survival and success in the knowledge economy. Education for humanity is needed for their existential lives worthy of human beings. This paper deals with the…

  2. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  3. Tubular membrane bioreactors for biotechnological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Christoph; Beutel, Sascha; Scheper, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    This article is an overview of bioreactors using tubular membranes such as hollow fibers or ceramic capillaries for cultivation processes. This diverse group of bioreactor is described here in regard to the membrane materials used, operational modes, and configurations. The typical advantages of this kind of system such as environments with low shear stress together with high cell densities and also disadvantages like poor oxygen supply are summed up. As the usage of tubular membrane bioreactors is not restricted to a certain organism, a brief overview of various applications covering nearly all types of cells from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells is also given here.

  4. Cultivation of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells on Topographical Substrates to Mimic the Human Corneal Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shi Chua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells have a limited ability to replicate in vivo and in vitro. Allograft transplantation becomes necessary when an accident or trauma results in excessive cell loss. The reconstruction of the cornea endothelium using autologous cell sources is a promising alternative option for therapeutic or in vitro drug testing applications. The native corneal endothelium rests on the Descemet’s membrane, which has nanotopographies of fibers and pores. The use of synthetic topographies mimics the native environment, and it is hypothesized that this can direct the behavior and growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs to resemble the corneal endothelium. In this study, HMVECs are cultivated on substrates with micron and nano-scaled pillar and well topographies. Closely packed HMVEC monolayers with polygonal cells and well-developed tight junctions were formed on the topographical substrates. Sodium/potassium (Na+/K+ adenine triphosphatase (ATPase expression was enhanced on the microwells substrate, which also promotes microvilli formation, while more hexagonal-like cells are found on the micropillars samples. The data obtained suggests that the use of optimized surface patterning, in particular, the microtopographies, can induce HMVECs to adopt a more corneal endothelium-like morphology with similar barrier and pump functions. The mechanism involved in cell contact guidance by the specific topographical features will be of interest for future studies.

  5. NASA Bioreactors Advance Disease Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is falling. This is no threat to the astronauts onboard, however, because falling is part of the ISS staying in orbit. The absence of gravity beyond the Earth s atmosphere is actually an illusion; at the ISS s orbital altitude of approximately 250 miles above the surface, the planet s gravitational pull is only 12-percent weaker than on the ground. Gravity is constantly pulling the ISS back to Earth, but the space station is also constantly traveling at nearly 18,000 miles per hour. This means that, even though the ISS is falling toward Earth, it is moving sideways fast enough to continually miss impacting the planet. The balance between the force of gravity and the ISS s motion creates a stable orbit, and the fact that the ISS and everything in it including the astronauts are falling at an equal rate creates the condition of weightlessness called microgravity. The constant falling of objects in orbit is not only an important principle in space, but it is also a key element of a revolutionary NASA technology here on Earth that may soon help cure medical ailments from heart disease to diabetes. In the mid-1980s, NASA researchers at Johnson Space Center were investigating the effects of long-term microgravity on human tissues. At the time, the Agency s shuttle fleet was grounded following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, and researchers had no access to the microgravity conditions of space. To provide a method for recreating such conditions on Earth, Johnson s David Wolf, Tinh Trinh, and Ray Schwarz developed that same year a horizontal, rotating device called a rotating wall bioreactor that allowed the growth of human cells in simulated weightlessness. Previously, cell cultures on Earth could only be grown two-dimensionally in Petri dishes, because gravity would cause the multiplying cells to sink within their growth medium. These cells do not look or function like real human cells, which grow three-dimensionally in

  6. Investigation of Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 265 Cultivation under Light and Low Temperature Stressed Conditions for Lutein Production in Flasks and the Coiled Tree Photo-Bioreactor (CTPBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mengyue; Bassi, Amarjeet

    2017-10-01

    Lutein has an increasing share in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical market due to its benefits to eye health. Microalgae may be a potential source for lutein production while the expense limits the commercialization. In this study, a coiled tubular tree photobioreactor (CTPBR) design was investigated for cultivating the cold tolerant microalgae Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 265 under various conditions for lutein production. The influence and interaction of light irradiance strength, lighting cycle, and temperature on microalgae and lutein production efficiency at low temperature range were also studied in flasks via response surface method (RSM). The results demonstrated that 14 h day-light, 120 μmol photons m -2  s -1 , and 10 °C was the optimal condition for algae growth and lutein production at low temperature experimental ranges. C. vulgaris UTEX 265 showed good potential to produce lutein in cold weather, and the optimum lutein production was contrary to the specific lutein content but corresponds to the trend of optimum growth. Additionally, fast growth (μ = 1.50 day -1 ) and good lutein recovery (11.98 mg g -1  day -1 ) in CTPBR were also achieved at the low irradiance stress condition and the low temperature photo-inhibition conditions.

  7. Water resource recovery by means of microalgae cultivation in outdoor photobioreactors using the effluent from an anaerobic membrane bioreactor fed with pre-treated sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruela, Alexandre; Murgui, Mónica; Gómez-Gil, Tao; Durán, Freddy; Robles, Ángel; Ruano, María Victoria; Ferrer, José; Seco, Aurora

    2016-10-01

    With the aim of assessing the potential of microalgae cultivation for water resource recovery (WRR), the performance of three 0.55m(3) flat-plate photobioreactors (PBRs) was evaluated in terms of nutrient removal rate (NRR) and biomass production. The PBRs were operated outdoor (at ambient temperature and light intensity) using as growth media the nutrient-rich effluent from an AnMBR fed with pre-treated sewage. Solar irradiance was the most determining factor affecting NRR. Biomass productivity was significantly affected by temperatures below 20°C. The maximum biomass productivity (52.3mgVSS·L(-1)·d(-1)) and NRR (5.84mgNH4-N·L(-1)·d(-1) and 0.85mgPO4-P·L(-1)·d(-1)) were achieved at solar irradiance of 395μE·m(-2)·s(-1), temperature of 25.5°C, and HRT of 8days. Under these conditions, it was possible to comply with effluent nutrient standards (European Directive 91/271/CEE) when the nutrient content in the influent was in the range of 40-50mgN·L(-1) and 6-7mg P·L(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Current state and perspectives in modeling and control of human pluripotent stem cell expansion processes in stirred-tank bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanauskas, Vytautas; Grincas, Vykantas; Simutis, Rimvydas; Kagawa, Yuki; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Implementation of model-based practices for process development, control, automation, standardization, and validation are important factors for therapeutic and industrial applications of human pluripotent stem cells. As robust cultivation strategies for pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation have yet to be determined, process development could be enhanced by application of mathematical models and advanced control systems to optimize growth conditions. Therefore, it is important to understand both the potential of possible applications and the apparent limitations of existing mathematical models to improve pluripotent stem cell cultivation technologies. In the present review, the authors focus on these issues as they apply to stem cell expansion processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:355-364, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Production of functional human nerve growth factor from the saliva of transgenic mice by using salivary glands as bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Zhu, Qingchun; Dong, Rui; Zhao, Chengcheng; Li, Guoling; Li, Guo; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Zheng, Enqin; Cai, Gengyuan; Moisyadi, Stefan; Urschitz, Johann; Yang, Huaqiang; Liu, Dewu; Wu, Zhenfang

    2017-01-01

    The salivary glands of animals have great potential to act as powerful bioreactors to produce human therapeutic proteins. Human nerve growth factor (hNGF) is an important pharmaceutical protein that is clinically effective in the treatment of many human neuronal and non-neuronal diseases. In this study, we generated 18 transgenic (TG) founder mice each carrying a salivary gland specific promoter-driven hNGF transgene. A TG mouse line secreting high levels of hNGF protein in its saliva (1.36 μg/mL) was selected. hNGF protein was successfully purified from the saliva of these TG mice and its identity was verified. The purified hNGF was highly functional as it displayed the ability to induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, it strongly promoted proliferation of TF1 cells, above the levels observed with mouse NGF. Additionally, saliva collected from TG mice and containing unpurified hNGF was able to significantly enhance the growth of TF1 cells. This study not only provides a new and efficient approach for the synthesis of therapeutic hNGF but also supports the concept that salivary gland from TG animals is an efficient system for production of valuable foreign proteins. PMID:28117418

  10. Human Plasma and Human Platelet-rich Plasma as a Substitute for Fetal Calf Serum during Long-term Cultivation of Mesenchymal Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Suchánková Kleplová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Our aims were to isolate and cultivate mesenchymal dental pulp stem cells (DPSC in various media enriched with human blood components, and subsequently to investigate their basic biological properties. Methods: DPSC were cultivated in five different media based on α MEM containing different concentrations of human plasma (HP, platelet-rich plasma (PRP, or fetal calf serum (FCS. The DPSC biological properties were examined periodically. Results: We cultivated DPSC in the various cultivation media over 15 population doublings except for the medium supplemented with 10% HP. Our results showed that DPSC cultivated in medium supplemented with 10% PRP showed the shortest average population doubling time (DT (28.6 ± 4.6 hours, in contrast to DPSC cultivated in 10% HP which indicated the longest DT (156.2 ± 17.8 hours; hence this part of the experiment had been cancelled in the 6th passage. DPSC cultivated in media with 2% FCS+ITS (DT 47.3 ± 10.4 hours, 2% PRP (DT 40.1 ± 5.7 hours and 2% HP (DT 49.0 ± 15.2 hours showed almost the same proliferative activity. DPSC’s viability in the 9th passage was over 90% except for the DPSC cultivated in the 10% HP media. Conclusions: We proved that human blood components are suitable substitution for FCS in cultivation media for long-term DPSC cultivation.

  11. Cultivation and Differentiation of Encapsulated hMSC-TERT in a Disposable Small-Scale Syringe-Like Fixed Bed Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Christian; Pohl, Sebastian; Pörtner, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The use of commercially available plastic syringes is introduced as disposable small-scale fixed bed bioreactors for the cultivation of implantable therapeutic cell systems on the basis of an alginate-encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cell line. The system introduced is fitted with a noninvasiv...

  12. The Cultivation of Humanities and Emotions. Reflections on Moral and Political Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gil

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper involves a reflection on the current orientation that education is adopting based on Martha Nussbaum’s thinking. Under the imperative of the economic growth, education is seen as a mere means to achieve success in the job market, and arts and humanities are being marginalized from study programs increasingly. We will talk about the cultivation of empathic imagination and compassion as mechanisms that help us to understand people that are different from us, and to acquire a concern for them. We will see why the role of these emotions might be relevant in order to prompt us to help whoever that finds himself in a vulnerability situation or suffering. This is why we will argue that the cultivation of these emotions may help us to develop a better moral agency, and also to enhance our condition as citizens, making us more sensitive towards other’s necessities, and orienting our political decisions towards cooperation and solidarity.

  13. Role of Bioreactors in Microbial Biomass and Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liang [Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; Zhang, Biao [Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; Zhu, Xun [Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; Chang, Haixing [Chongqing University of Technology; Ou, Shawn [ORNL; Wang, HONG [Chongqing University, Chongqing, China

    2018-04-01

    Bioenergy is the world’s largest contributor to the renewable and sustainable energy sector, and it plays a significant role in various energy industries. A large amount of research has contributed to the rapidly evolving field of bioenergy and one of the most important topics is the use of the bioreactor. Bioreactors play a critical role in the successful development of technologies for microbial biomass cultivation and energy conversion. In this chapter, after a brief introduction to bioreactors (basic concepts, configurations, functions, and influencing factors), the applications of the bioreactor in microbial biomass, microbial biofuel conversion, and microbial electrochemical systems are described. Importantly, the role and significance of the bioreactor in the bioenergy process are discussed to provide a better understanding of the use of bioreactors in managing microbial biomass and energy conversion.

  14. Prostate tumor grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  15. Column bioreactor use for optimization of pectinase production in solid substrate cultivation Uso de bioreator de coluna para otimização da produção de pectinases por cultivo semi-sólido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giani Andrea Linde

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the influence of process variables and production, of polygalacturonase (PG and polymetylgalacturonase (PMG by solid substrate cultivation using a fixed bed column bioreactor. A fractional factorial design (FFD was used to study the effect of the following variables: microorganism (Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus niger, substratum (wheat bran and defatted rice bran, aeration (40 and 60 ml h-1g-1, pectin (5 and 10 g g-1 and nitrogen (urea and ammonium sulfate. Microorganism, aeration and initial pectin were identified in FFD as significant variables (pO objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a influência de variáveis de processo na produção das enzimas poligalacturonase (PG e polimetilgalacturonase (PMG por cultivo semi-sólido utilizando bioreator de coluna. Um planejamento fatorial fracionário foi utilizado para determinar o efeito das variáveis "microrganismo" (Aspergillus oryzae e Aspergillus niger, "substrato" (farelo de trigo e farelo desengordurado de arroz, "aeração" (40 e 60 ml h-1 g-1, "pectina" (5 e 10 g g-1 e "nitrogênio" (uréia e sulfato de amônia para a produção de PG. Microrganismo, aeração e pectina foram significantes (p<0,05 para a produção de PG. Utilizando-se um planejamento composto central com quadruplicata no ponto central concluiu-se que Aspergillus niger apresenta maior produção de PG, o substrato e a fonte de nitrogênio não afetam (p<0,05 a produção de PG, a aeração afeta positivamente a produção de PG e negativamente a de PMG, e a concentração inicial de pectina afeta positivamente a atividade de ambas enzimas. Os pontos ótimos de aeração e de concentração inicial de pectina para a produção de PG são 66,13 ml h-1 g-1 e 12,8 g g-1, respectivamente, e para a produção de PMG são 40 ml h-1 g-1 e 15,0 g g-1, respectivamente.

  16. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLeferink

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising candidates for tissue engineering based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix (ECM distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  17. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  18. Following an Optimal Batch Bioreactor Operations Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra-Junquera, V.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay; Virgen-Ortíz, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    -batch reactor for biomass production is studied using a differential geometry approach. The maximization problem is solved by handling both the optimal filling policy and substrate concentration in the inlet stream. In order to follow the OBBOM, a master–slave synchronization is used. The OBBOM is considered...... as the master system which includes the optimal cultivation trajectory for the feed flow rate and the substrate concentration. The “real” bioreactor, the one with unknown dynamics and perturbations, is considered as the slave system. Finally, the controller is designed such that the real bioreactor...

  19. Lymphocyte trafficking and HIV infection of human lymphoid tissue in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, L. B.; Fitzgerald, W.; Glushakova, S.; Hatfill, S.; Amichay, N.; Baibakov, B.; Zimmerberg, J.

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV infection involves a complex interplay between both the infected and noninfected cells of human lymphoid tissue, the release of free viral particles, the de novo infection of cells, and the recirculatory trafficking of peripheral blood lymphocytes. To develop an in vitro model for studying these various aspects of HIV pathogenesis we have utilized blocks of surgically excised human tonsils and a rotating wall vessel (RWV) cell culture system. Here we show that (1) fragments of the surgically excised human lymphoid tissue remain viable and retain their gross cytoarchitecture for at least 3 weeks when cultured in the RWV system; (2) such lymphoid tissue gradually shows a loss of both T and B cells to the surrounding growth medium; however, this cellular migration is reversible as demonstrated by repopulation of the tissue by labeled cells from the growth medium; (3) this cellular migration may be partially or completely inhibited by embedding the blocks of lymphoid tissue in either a collagen or agarose gel matrix; these embedded tissue blocks retain most of the basic elements of a normal lymphoid cytoarchitecture; and (4) both embedded and nonembedded RWV-cultured blocks of human lymphoid tissue are capable of productive infection by HIV-1 of at least three various strains of different tropism and phenotype, as shown by an increase in both p24 antigen levels and free virus in the culture medium, and by the demonstration of HIV-1 RNA-positive cells inside the tissue identified by in situ hybridization. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that gel-embedded and nonembedded blocks of human lymphoid tissue, cocultured with a suspension of tonsillar lymphocytes in an RWV culture system, constitute a useful model for simulating normal lymphocyte recirculatory traffic and provide a new tool for testing the various aspects of HIV pathogenesis.

  20. Processing highly porous calcium phosphate ceramics for use in bioreactor cores for culturing human liver cells in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finoli, Anthony

    Chronic liver disease is the 11th highest cause of death in the United States claiming over 30,000 lives in 2009. The current treatment for chronic liver failure is liver transplantation but the availability of tissue is far less than the number of patients in need. To develop human liver tissue in the lab a 3D culturing environment must be created to support the growth of a complex tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been chosen as a scaffold material because of its biocompatibility in the body and the ability to create a bioresorbable scaffold. By using a ceramic material, it is possible to create a three dimensional, protective environment in which tissue can grow. The first part of this study is to examine the behavior of adult human liver cells grown on composites of HAp and different biocompatible hydrogels. Porous HAp has been created using an emulsion foaming technique and cells are injected into the structure after being suspended in a hydrogel and are kept in culture for up to 28 days. Functional assays, gene expression and fluorescent microscopy will be used to examine these cultures. The second part of this study will be to develop a processing technique to create a resorbable scaffold that incorporates a vascular system template. Previous experiments have shown the high temperature decomposition of HAp into resorbable calcium phosphates will be used to create a multiphase material. By controlling the amount of transformation product formed, it is proposed that the resorption of the scaffold can be tailored. To introduce a pore network to guide the growth of a vascular system, a positive-negative casting technique has also been developed. A positive polymer copy can be made of a natural vascular system and ceramic is foamed around the copy. During sintering, the polymer is pyrolyzed leaving a multiscale pore network in the ceramic. By combining these techniques, it is proposed that a calcium phosphate bioreactor core can be processed that is suitable for

  1. Bioreactor engineering using disposable technology for enhanced production of hCTLA4Ig in transgenic rice cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jun-Young; Yang, Yong-Suk; Cheon, Su-Hwan; Nam, Hyung-Jin; Jin, Gi-Hong; Kim, Dong-Il

    2013-09-01

    Two kinds of disposable bioreactors, air-lift disposable bioreactors (ADB) and wave disposable bioreactors (WDB) were compared with stirred-tank reactors (5-L STR). These bioreactors were successfully applied to transgenic rice cell cultures for the production of recombinant human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig). In both systems, a fed-batch culture method was used to produce hCTLA4Ig efficiently by feeding concentrated amino acids and production levels were enhanced when dissolved oxygen (DO) level was regulated at 30% using pure oxygen sparging. Agitation and aeration rate during cultivation in ADB and WDB were determined by the same mixing time. The results in both disposable bioreactors showed similar values in maximum cell density (11.9 gDCW/L and 12.6 gDCW/L), doubling time (4.8- and 5.0-day), and maximum hCTLA4Ig concentration (43.7 and 43.3 mg/L). Relatively higher cell viability was sustained in the ADB whereas hCTLA4Ig productivity was 1.2-fold higher than that in WDB. The productivity was improved by increasing aeration rate (0.2 vvm). Overall, our experiments demonstrate pneumatically driven disposable bioreactors are applicable for the production of recombinant proteins in plant cell cultures. These results will be useful for development and scale-up studies of disposable bioreactor systems for transgenic plant cell cultures. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bioreactor Technology in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsching, H.; Hansmann, J.

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering is a fast evolving field of biomedical science and technology to manufacture viable blood vessels, heart valves, myocar-dial substitutes and vascularised complex tissues. In consideration of the specific role of the haemodynamics of human circulation, bioreactors are a fundamental of this field. The development of perfusion bioreactor technology is a consequence of successes in extracorporeal circulation techniques, to provide an in vitro environment mimicking in vivo conditions. The bioreactor system should enable an automatic hydrodynamic regime control. Furthermore, the systematic studies regarding the cellular responses to various mechanical and biochemical cues guarantee the viability, bio-monitoring, testing, storage and transportation of the growing tissue.

  3. A study of some problems in chromosome cultivation after ionization radiation of human blood in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Benrong; Yao Bo; Chen Zhijian

    1992-01-01

    The effects of Cytochalasin B (Cyt-B) and cultural time on mitotic index (MI) during chromosome culture of human peripheral blood irradiated by 6 MV X-ray in vitro were studied. The results showed: (1) a successful cultivation with enough mitotic figures could be carried out in order to estimate the irradiation dose with chromosome aberrations and when the predicted dose was above 6 Gy in a radiation accident, when the predicted dose was up to 15 Gy the cultural time should be prolonged and Cyt-B should be added to the cultural medium; (2) it was possible to establish a dose effect calibration curve for doses above 5 Gy by adding Cyt-B and prolonging the cultural time; so that its value as a biological dosimeter for clinical application might be increased than before

  4. The design and characterisation of miniature bioreactors for microbial fermentation process development.

    OpenAIRE

    Betts, J. I.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the design and characterisation of miniature bioreactors and evaluates their potential as a scale-down device for microbial cultivation processes. Miniature bioreactors, such as the one detailed in this work, have been developed by many research groups and companies, and seek to increase throughput at the early stages of bioprocess development. Power input was measured in two prototype stirred-tank miniature bioreactors (10 ml and 25 ml) as a function of impeller speed ...

  5. Glyco-engineering for biopharmaceutical production in moss bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva L. Decker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The production of recombinant biopharmaceuticals (pharmaceutical proteins is a strongly growing area in the pharmaceutical industry. While most products to date are produced in mammalian cell cultures, namely CHO cells, plant-based production systems gained increasing acceptance over the last years. Different plant systems have been established which are suitable for standardization and precise control of cultivation conditions, thus meeting the criteria for pharmaceutical production.The majority of biopharmaceuticals comprise glycoproteins. Therefore, differences in protein glycosylation between humans and plants have to be taken into account and plant-specific glycosylation has to be eliminated to avoid adverse effects on quality, safety and efficacy of the products.The basal land plant Physcomitrella patens (moss has been employed for the recombinant production of high-value therapeutic target proteins (e.g., Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Complement Factor H, monoclonal antibodies, Erythropoietin. Being genetically excellently characterized and exceptionally amenable for precise gene targeting via homologous recombination, essential steps for the optimization of moss as a bioreactor for the production of recombinant proteins have been undertaken.Here, we discuss the glyco-engineering approaches to avoid non-human N- and O-glycosylation on target proteins produced in moss bioreactors.

  6. Cultivation of Tanzanian Coprinus cinereus (sisal compost mushroom)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coprinus cinereus is a Tanzanian wild edible mushroom whose cultivation in the laboratory was performed in solid-state fermentation bioreactors using sisal decortication wastes namely; sisal dusts, sisal fibres and sisal leaves as basal substrates supplemented with chicken manure at various rates. Bioreactors containing ...

  7. Pedagogical Symmetry and the Cultivation of Humanity: Nussbaum, Seneca and Symmetry in the Teacher-Pupil Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltow, David

    2014-01-01

    Martha Nussbaum argues that the aims of higher education ought to include the development in pupils of the capacity to contribute to the cultivation of humanity as intelligent, global citizens. For Nussbaum, "training" in this capacity is distinctly "philosophical" and she proposes that, to achieve this, teacher-pupil…

  8. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  9. Factorial experimental design for the culture of human embryonic stem cells as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors reveals the potential for interaction effects between bioprocess parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Megan M; Meng, Guoliang; Rancourt, Derrick E; Gates, Ian D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Traditional optimization of culture parameters for the large-scale culture of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as aggregates is carried out in a stepwise manner whereby the effect of varying each culture parameter is investigated individually. However, as evidenced by the wide range of published protocols and culture performance indicators (growth rates, pluripotency marker expression, etc.), there is a lack of systematic investigation into the true effect of varying culture parameters especially with respect to potential interactions between culture variables. Here we describe the design and execution of a two-parameter, three-level (3(2)) factorial experiment resulting in nine conditions that were run in duplicate 125-mL stirred suspension bioreactors. The two parameters investigated here were inoculation density and agitation rate, which are easily controlled, but currently, poorly characterized. Cell readouts analyzed included fold expansion, maximum density, and exponential growth rate. Our results reveal that the choice of best case culture parameters was dependent on which cell property was chosen as the primary output variable. Subsequent statistical analyses via two-way analysis of variance indicated significant interaction effects between inoculation density and agitation rate specifically in the case of exponential growth rates. Results indicate that stepwise optimization has the potential to miss out on the true optimal case. In addition, choosing an optimum condition for a culture output of interest from the factorial design yielded similar results when repeated with the same cell line indicating reproducibility. We finally validated that human ESCs remain pluripotent in suspension culture as aggregates under our optimal conditions and maintain their differentiation capabilities as well as a stable karyotype and strong expression levels of specific human ESC markers over several passages in suspension bioreactors.

  10. Designing electrical stimulated bioreactors for nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagita, Ignasius Dwi; Whulanza, Yudan; Dhelika, Radon; Nurhadi, Ibrahim

    2018-02-01

    Bioreactor provides a biomimetic ecosystem that is able to culture cells in a physically controlled system. In general, the controlled-parameters are temperature, pH, fluid flow, nutrition flow, etc. In this study, we develop a bioreactor that specifically targeted to culture neural stem cells. This bioreactor could overcome some limitations of conventional culture technology, such as petri dish, by providing specific range of observation area and a uniform treatment. Moreover, the microfluidic bioreactor, which is a small-controlled environment, is able to observe as small number of cells as possible. A perfusion flow is applied to mimic the physiological environment in human body. Additionally, this bioreactor also provides an electrical stimulation which is needed by neural stem cells. In conclusion, we found the correlation between the induced shear stress with geometric parameters of the bioreactor. Ultimately, this system shall be used to observe the interaction between stimulation and cell growth.

  11. Simple and efficient method for isolation and cultivation of endoscopically obtained human colonocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Horn, Thomas; Nielsen, Ole H

    2003-01-01

    Few comparative and validated reports exist on the isolation and growth of colonoscopically obtained colonic epithelium. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple method for the cultivation of colonoscopically obtained colonocytes. Forty patients, who underwent routine colonoscop....... A simple method is presented, which makes cultivation of colonocytes obtained at endoscopy possible for up to 72 h.......Few comparative and validated reports exist on the isolation and growth of colonoscopically obtained colonic epithelium. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple method for the cultivation of colonoscopically obtained colonocytes. Forty patients, who underwent routine colonoscopy...

  12. Production and release of infectious hepatitis C virus from human liver cell cultures in the three-dimensional radial-flow bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizaki, Hideki; Nagamori, Seishi; Matsuda, Mami; Kawakami, Hayato; Hashimoto, Osamu; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Kawada, Masaaki; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Hasumura, Satoshi; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    Lack of efficient culture systems for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been a major obstacle in HCV research. Human liver cells grown in a three-dimensional radial-flow bioreactor were successfully infected following inoculation with plasma from an HCV carrier. Subsequent detection of increased HCV RNA suggested viral replication. Furthermore, transfection of HCV RNA transcribed from full-length cDNA also resulted in the production and release of HCV virions into supernatant. Infectivity was shown by successful secondary passage to a new culture. Introduction of mutations in RNA helicase and polymerase regions of HCV cDNA abolished virus replication, indicating that reverse genetics of this system is possible. The ability to replicate and detect the extracellular release of HCV might provide clues with regard to the persistent nature of HCV infection. It will also accelerate research into the pathogenicity of HCV, as well as the development of prophylactic agents and new therapy

  13. Configuration of bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.; End, van den E.J.; Streefland, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lab-scale stirred-tank bioreactors (0.2–20 l) are used for fundamental research on animal cells and in process development and troubleshooting for large-scale production. In this chapter, different configurations of bioreactor systems are shortly discussed and setting up these different

  14. Corneal regeneration by induced human buccal mucosa cultivated on an amniotic membrane following alkaline injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Rohaina Che; Yong, Then Kong; Hwei, Ng Min; Halim, Wan Haslina Wan Abdul; Zahidin, Aida Zairani Mohd; Ramli, Roszalina; Saim, Aminuddin Bin; Idrus, Ruszymah Binti Hj

    2017-01-01

    Various clinical disorders and injuries, such as chemical, thermal, or mechanical injuries, may lead to corneal loss that results in blindness. PURPOSE : The aims of this study were to differentiate human buccal mucosa (BMuc) into corneal epithelial-like cells, to fabricate engineered corneal tissue using buccal mucosal epithelial cells, and to reconstruct a damaged corneal epithelium in a nude rat model. BMuc were subjected to 10 d of induction factors to investigate the potential of cells to differentiate into corneal lineages. Corneal stem cell markers β1-integrin, C/EBPδ, ABCG2, p63, and CK3 were upregulated in the gene expression analysis in induced BMuc, whereas CK3 and p63 showed significant protein expression in induced BMuc compared to the uninduced cells. BMuc were then left to reach 80% confluency after differential trypsinization. The cells were harvested and cultivated on a commercially available untreated air-dried amniotic membrane (AM) in a Transwell system in induction medium. The corneal constructs were fabricated and then implanted into damaged rat corneas for up to 8 weeks. A significant improvement was detected in the treatment group at 8 weeks post-implantation, as revealed by slit lamp biomicroscopy analysis. The structure and thickness of the corneal layer were also analyzed using histological staining and time-domain optical coherence tomography scans and were found to resemble a native corneal layer. The protein expression for CK3 and p63 were continuously detected throughout the corneal epithelial layer in the corneal construct. In conclusion, human BMuc can be induced to express a corneal epithelial-like phenotype. The addition of BMuc improves corneal clarity, prevents vascularization, increases corneal thickness and stromal alignment, and appears to have no adverse effect on the host after implantation.

  15. Synergistic property of cordycepin in cultivated Cordyceps militaris-mediated apoptosis in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shang-Min; Lai, Wan-Jung; Hong, Tzu-Wen; Lai, Jui-Ya; Tsai, Sheng-Hong; Chen, Yen-Hsun; Yu, Sz-Hsien; Kao, Cheng-Hsiang; Chu, Richard; Ding, Shih-Torng; Li, Tsai-Kun; Shen, Tang-Long

    2014-10-15

    Cordyceps militaris is a well-known Chinese traditional medicinal mushroom frequently used for tonics and recently of a potential interest for cancer intervention. Here, we explored the cancer cell killing activity of the hot water extracts of C. militaris cultured mycelia (CM(MY)) and cultivated fruiting bodies (CM(FB)). We found that CM(FB) exhibited a greater cytotoxic effect against various cancer cells over CM(MY). Apoptotic phenotypes including apoptotic body formation, DNA laddering, caspase 3 activation and cleavage of PARP proteins were induced by CM(FB) treatment but only slightly induced by same concentration of CM(MY) treatment in human HL-60 leukemia cells. Cordycepin in CM(FB) (10.47 mg/g) is significantly higher (∼ 15.2 times) than that of CM(MY) (0.69 mg/g). Using isobolographic analysis, the synergy of cytotoxicity was observed across different combined concentrations of CM(MY) and cordycepin. By complementing cordycepin into CM(MY) to the level comparable with CM(FB), we observed that CM(MY) (500 μg/ml) with cordycepin (4.8 μg/ml) induced apoptosis to a level similar to that induced by CM(FB) (500 μg/ml). Together, our results suggest that cordycepin possesses a synergistic cytotoxic effect with Cordyceps militaris-mediated apoptosis in human leukemia cells and therefore explaining a better anti-proliferating activity of CM(FB) over CM(MY). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Toward the Standardization of Bioreactors for Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michel; Nebuloni, Stefano; Dainesi, Paolo; Gass, Samuel

    Growing interest in long-term human space missions and exploration as well as future plans for extra-terrestrial human settlements, places increasing importance on understanding biological and chemical processes in space at cellular and molecular level. RUAG Space has been involved in the development of bioreactors for life-science experiments in space for the past 20 years. Throughout these developments, RUAG has acted as the link between scientists and the space industry, translating high-level scientific requirements into technical requirements, verifying their feasibility within the space context, and developing state-of-the-art experiment hardware which can interface with dedicated micro-gravity platform. Although this approach has brought forth promising developments in the field, it is associated to very long development phases as well as correspondingly high costs. Each new scientific experiment is often associated to an entirely new hardware development. This is, in large, due to the limited information available on the possibilities and constraints imposed by the particular context of space. Therefore, a considerable amount of time and development costs are invested in order to accommodate stringent scientific requirements and/or specific experiment design in space hardware. This does not only have an impact on funding opportunities for micro-gravity experiments in space, it also curbs the pace of scientific discoveries and limits the number of research opportunities. Therefore, in the following, we present an overview of already established possibilities for cellular research in space, with special emphasis on hardware developed by RUAG Space. This is intended to provide scientists with key technical information on already existing bioreactors, subsystems, and components, which may be used as a basis when designing scientific studies. By considering this information from the onset of the establishment of scientific requirements, technical solutions can

  17. Oxygen Sensors Monitor Bioreactors and Ensure Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In order to cultivate healthy bacteria in bioreactors, Kennedy Space Center awarded SBIR funding to Needham Heights, Massachusetts-based Polestar Technologies Inc. to develop sensors that could monitor oxygen levels. The result is a sensor now widely used by pharmaceutical companies and medical research universities. Other sensors have also been developed, and in 2013 alone the company increased its workforce by 50 percent.

  18. Mechanobiologic Research in a Microgravity Environment Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, A.; Dubini, G.; Tominetti, F.; Raimondi, M.

    A current problem in tissue culturing technology is the unavailability of an effective Bioreactor for the in vitro cultivation of cells and explants. It has, in fact, proved extremely difficult to promote the high-density three-dimensional in vitro growth of human tissues that have been removed from the body and deprived of their normal in vivo vascular sources of nutrients and gas exchange. A variety of tissue explants can be maintained for a short period of time on a supportive collagen matrix surrounded by culture medium. But this system provides only limited mass transfer of nutrients and wastes through the tissue, and gravity-induced sedimentation prevents complete three- dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Several devices presently on the market have been used with only limited success since each has limitations, which restrict usefulness and versatility. Further, no Bioreactor or culture vessel is known that will allow for unimpeded growth of three dimensional cellular aggregates or tissue. Extensive research on the effect of mechanical stimuli on cell metabolism suggests that tissues may respond to mechanical stimulation via loading-induced flow of the interstitial fluids. During the culture, cells are subject to a flow of culture medium. Flow properties such as flow field, flow regime (e.g. turbulent or laminar), flow pattern (e.g. circular), entity and distribution of the shear stress acting on the cells greatly influence fundamental aspects of cell function, such as regulation and gene expression. This has been demonstrated for endothelial cells and significant research efforts are underway to elucidate these mechanisms in various other biological systems. Local fluid dynamics is also responsible of the mass transfer of nutrients and catabolites as well as oxygenation through the tissue. Most of the attempts to culture tissue-engineered constructs in vitro have utilized either stationary cultures or systems generating relatively small

  19. Behaviour of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultivated in microfluidic channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Patty P. M. F. A.; Molema, Grietje; Koster, Sander; van der Linden, Heiko J.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to develop advanced tools for cell studies and analysis based on microfluidic systems. In this paper, we report on endothelial cell cultivation in microchannels and 96-well tissue plates, and compare cell phenotype and cellular status in the two enviroments. This was done under

  20. Cultivating Responsibility and Humanity in Public Schools through Democratic Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghid, Yusef

    2015-01-01

    After more than a decade of democratic citizenship education in public schools in South Africa, the Department of Basic Education (DoBE) has still not produced sufficiently plausible ways for how democracy and citizenship ought to be taught in classrooms. I argue that the recent "practical guide" on how to cultivate "responsibility…

  1. Simple and efficient method for isolation and cultivation of endoscopically obtained human colonocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Horn, Thomas; Nielsen, Ole H

    2003-01-01

    and where the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was later reached, were included. Seven colon biopsies were taken and incubated at varying time periods of 10-120 min and temperatures of 4-37 degrees C in a chelating buffer. The epithelium was then harvested and cultivated under three different...

  2. Simple and efficient method for isolation and cultivation of endoscopically obtained human colonocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Horn, Thomas; Nielsen, Ole H

    2003-01-01

    Few comparative and validated reports exist on the isolation and growth of colonoscopically obtained colonic epithelium. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple method for the cultivation of colonoscopically obtained colonocytes. Forty patients, who underwent routine colonoscopy...... and where the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was later reached, were included. Seven colon biopsies were taken and incubated at varying time periods of 10-120 min and temperatures of 4-37 degrees C in a chelating buffer. The epithelium was then harvested and cultivated under three different...... conditions: 1) on a collagen coating, 2) embedded in a collagen gel, or 3) embedded in a gel put on a porous well insert. The effect of conditioned medium (CM), insulin, transferrin, selenium, and the oxygen content was assessed. Viability was tested by the metabolic dimethylthiazol...

  3. Cultivation of human neural progenitor cells in a 3-dimensional self-assembling peptide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedmann, Andrea; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2012-01-11

    technique like fluorescence microscopes able to take z-stacks of the specimen. Furthermore this kind of analysis is extremely time consuming. Here we demonstrate a method to release cells from the 3D-scaffolds for the later analysis e.g. by flow cytometry. In this protocol human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) of the ReNcell VM cell line (Millipore USA) were cultured and differentiated in 3D-scaffolds consisting of PuraMatrix (PM) or PuraMatrix supplemented with laminin (PML). In our hands a PM-concentration of 0.25% was optimal for the cultivation of the cells, however the concentration might be adapted to other cell types. The released cells can be used for e.g. immunocytochemical studies and subsequently analysed by flow cytometry. This speeds up the analysis and more over, the obtained data rest upon a wider base, improving the reliability of the data. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Visualized Experiments

  4. In vivo human corpus cavernosum regeneration: fabrication of tissue-engineered corpus cavernosum in rat using the body as a natural bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Abbasioun, Reza; Sabetkish, Nastaran; Sabetkish, Shabnam; Habibi, Ali Akbar; Tavakkolitabassi, Kamyar

    2017-07-01

    Few researches have been conducted to develop an ideal method for tissue engineering of corpus cavernosum. We produce a decellularized human corpus cavernosum scaffold and investigate the in vivo cell seeding of the scaffold after transplantation into the rat omentum. Eight adult human male corpus cavernosum were obtained in sterile condition. After dissecting the urethra, corpus cavernosum was decellularized by inserting an 18-gauge needle into the body of the tissue. The gauge was connected to a peristaltic pump to circulate the detergents in the corpus. Several assessments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of decellularization and extracellular matrix (ECM) preservation. A section of decellularized scaffold was washed several times and transplanted into the omentum of 4 male healthy Sprague-Dawley rats and located into the scrotum. Biopsies were taken 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. Histological examination, SEM, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to assess the efficacy of natural recellularization. The results of the examinations performed prior to transplantation revealed a decellularized ECM resembling to the native tissue with normal pits that may be appropriate for further in vivo cell seeding. Histopathology examination of the biopsies after transplantations confirmed successful cell seeding with endothelium-like cells in different time points. CD34 staining was dominant in the short-time biopsies, while CD31 staining was higher than CD34 in long-term specimens. The feasibility of natural bioreactor in recellularizing corpus cavernosum was confirmed. This technique may have the potential to facilitate homologous transplantation for repair of corpus defects.

  5. [Research on ursolic acid production of Eriobotrya japonica cell suspension culture in WAVE bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-hua; Yao, De-heng; Xu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Chang, Qiang; Su, Ming-hua

    2015-05-01

    Through scale-up cultivation of Eriobotrya japonica suspension cells using WAVE bioreactor, the cell growth and ursolic acid (UA) accumulation were studied. The comparison test was carried out in the flask and the reactor with cell dry weight (DW) and UA content as evaluation indexes. The culture medium, DW and UA content were compared in 1 L and 5 L working volumes of bioreactor. The orthogonal test with main actors of inoculation amount, speed and angle of rotation was developed to find the optimal combination, in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. DW of the cell growth and the UA content in bioreactor were higher than those of the shaker by 105.5% and 27.65% respectively. In bioreactor, the dynamic changes of elements in the fluid culture, the dry weight of the cell growth and the UA content in 1 L and 5 L working volumes were similar. Inoculation of 80 g, rotational speed of 26 r · min(-1), and angle of 6 ° was the optimal combination, and the cell biomass of 19.01 g · L(-1) and the UA content of 27.750 mg · g(-1) were achieved after 100 h cultivation in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. WAVE Bioreactor is more suitable than flasks for the E. japonica cell suspension culture, and culture parameters can be achieved from 1 L to 5 L amplification.

  6. Cascades of bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooijer, de C.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis a common phenomenon in bioprocess engineering is described : the execution of a certain bioprocess in more than one bioreactor. Chapter 1, a review, classifies bioprocesses by means of a number of characteristics :
    i) processes with a variable

  7. Cultivation and irradiation of human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with platelet lysate for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshito, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    For over 30 years, the use of culture medium, enriched with bovine serum, and murines fibroblasts, with the rate of proliferation controlled by irradiation or by share anticarcinogenic drugs, has been playing successfully its role in assisting in the development of keratinocytes in culture, for clinical purposes. However, currently there is a growing concern about the possibility of transmitting prions and animals viruses to transplanted patients. Taking into account this concern, the present work aims to cultivate human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with human platelets lysate and determine the irradiation dose of these cells, for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture. For carrying out the proposed objective, platelets lysis has standardized, this lysate was used for human fibroblasts cultivation and the irradiation dose enough to inhibit its duplication was evaluated. Human keratinocytes were cultivated in these feeder layers, in culture medium enriched with the lysate. With these results we conclude that the 10% platelets lysate promoted a better adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts and in all dose levels tested (60 to 300 Gy), these had their mitotic activity inactivated by ionizing irradiation, being that the feeder layers obtained with doses from 70 to 150 Gy were those that provided the best development of keratinocytes in medium containing 2.5% of human platelet lysate. Therefore, it was possible to standardize both the cultivation of human fibroblasts as its inactivation for use as feeder layer in culture of keratinocytes, so as to eliminate xenobiotics components. (author)

  8. Human Endothelial Cells: Use of Heparin in Cloning and Long-Term Serial Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Susan C.; Mueller, Stephen N.; Levine, Elliot M.

    1983-11-01

    Endothelial cells from human blood vessels were cultured in vitro, with doubling times of 17 to 21 hours for 42 to 79 population doublings. Cloned human endothelial cell strains were established for the first time and had similar proliferative capacities. This vigorous cell growth was achieved by addition of heparin to culture medium containing reduced concentrations of endothelial cell growth factor. The routine cloning and long-term culture of human endothelial cells will facilitate studying the human endothelium in vitro.

  9. In vitro evaluation of major in vivo drug metabolic pathways using primary human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells in suspension and a dynamic three-dimensional bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Malin; Ulvestad, Maria; Ellis, Ewa; Weidolf, Lars; Andersson, Tommy B

    2012-10-01

    Major human specific metabolites, not detected during in vivo and in vitro preclinical studies, may cause unexpected drug interactions and toxicity in human and delays in clinical programs. Thus, reliable preclinical tools for the detection of major human metabolites are of high importance. The aim of this study was to compare major drug metabolic pathways in HepaRG cells, a human hepatoma cell line, to fresh human hepatocytes, cryopreserved human hepatocytes, and human in vivo data. Furthermore, the maintenance of cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities in a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) bioreactor were evaluated over time by using HepaRG cells and human hepatocytes. (14)C-diclofenac and a candidate from AstraZeneca's drug development program, (14)C-AZD6610, which are metabolized by P450 and UGT in vivo, were used as model substrates. The proportion of relevant biotransformation pathways of the investigated drug was clearly different in the various cell systems. The hydroxylation route was favored in primary human hepatocytes, whereas the glucuronidation route was favored in HepaRG cells. The human in vivo metabolite profile of AZD6610 was best represented by human hepatocytes, whereas all major diclofenac metabolites were detected in HepaRG cells. Moreover, the metabolite profiles in cryopreserved and fresh human hepatocytes were essentially the same. The liver bioreactor using both fresh human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells retained biotransformation capacity over 1 week. Thus, the incubation time can be increased from a few hours in suspension to several days in 3D cultures, which opens up for detection of metabolites from slowly metabolized drugs.

  10. Scaffold-free cartilage tissue engineering with a small population of human nasoseptal chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; To, William T H; Lee, John M; Waldman, Stephen D

    2017-03-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide suitable materials for nasal reconstruction; however, it typically requires large numbers of cells. We have previously shown that a small number of chondrocytes cultivated within a continuous flow bioreactor can elicit substantial tissue growth, but translation to human chondrocytes is not trivial. Here, we aimed to demonstrate the application of the bioreactor to generate large-sized tissues from a small population of primary human nasoseptal chondrocytes. Experimental study. Chondrocytes were cultured in the bioreactor using different medium compositions, with varying amounts of serum and with or without growth factors. Resulting engineered tissues were analyzed for physical properties, biochemical composition, tissue microstructure, and protein localization. Bioreactor-cultivated constructs grown with serum and growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor beta 2) had greater thickness, as well as DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents, compared to low serum and no growth factor controls. These constructs also showed the most intense proteoglycan and collagen II staining. The combination of bioreactor conditions, serum, and growth factors allowed the generation of large, thick scaffold-free human cartilaginous tissues that resembled the native nasoseptal cartilage. There also may be implications for patient selection in future clinical applications of these engineered tissues because their GAG content decreased with donor age. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E91-E99, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raven, N.; Rasche, F.; Kuehn, C.; Anderlei, T.; Klöckner, W.; Schuster, F.; Henquet, M.G.L.; Bosch, H.J.; Büchs, J.; Fischer, R.; Schillberg, S.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is

  12. Production of the soluble human Fas ligand by Dictyostelium discoideum cultivated on a synthetic medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.H.; Knol, J.C.; Linskens, M.H.K.; Friehs, K.; van Haastert, P. J. M.; Flaschel, E.

    2004-01-01

    Human Fas ligand (hFasL) is of considerable interest since it is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein that induces programmed cell death, or apoptosis. In this study Dictyostelium discoideum was used to produce a soluble form of the human Fas ligand. The recombinant cells were adapted to a modified

  13. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  14. Cascades of bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Gooijer, de, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis a common phenomenon in bioprocess engineering is described : the execution of a certain bioprocess in more than one bioreactor. Chapter 1, a review, classifies bioprocesses by means of a number of characteristics :
    i) processes with a variable stoichiometry ,
    ii) processes with a constant stoichiometry using biocatalysts ,
    iii) processes with a constant stoichiometry that are &...

  15. Combining hypoxia and bioreactor hydrodynamics boosts induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation towards cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Cláudia; Serra, Margarida; Espinha, Nuno; Sousa, Marcos; Brito, Catarina; Burkert, Karsten; Zheng, Yunjie; Hescheler, Jürgen; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Sarić, Tomo; Alves, Paula M

    2014-12-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for patient-specific disease modeling, drug screening and cell therapy. However, existing protocols for CM differentiation of iPSCs besides being highly dependent on the application of expensive growth factors show low reproducibility and scalability. The aim of this work was to develop a robust and scalable strategy for mass production of iPSC-derived CMs by designing a bioreactor protocol that ensures a hypoxic and mechanical environment. Murine iPSCs were cultivated as aggregates in either stirred tank or WAVE bioreactors. The effect of dissolved oxygen and mechanical forces, promoted by different hydrodynamic environments, on CM differentiation was evaluated. Combining a hypoxia culture (4 % O2 tension) with an intermittent agitation profile in stirred tank bioreactors resulted in an improvement of about 1000-fold in CM yields when compared to normoxic (20 % O2 tension) and continuously agitated cultures. Additionally, we showed for the first time that wave-induced agitation enables the differentiation of iPSCs towards CMs at faster kinetics and with higher yields (60 CMs/input iPSC). In an 11-day differentiation protocol, clinically relevant numbers of CMs (2.3 × 10(9) CMs/1 L) were produced, and CMs exhibited typical cardiac sarcomeric structures, calcium transients, electrophysiological profiles and drug responsiveness. This work describes significant advances towards scalable cardiomyocyte differentiation of murine iPSC, paving the way for the implementation of this strategy for mass production of their human counterparts and their use for cardiac repair and cardiovascular research.

  16. Detection of DNA fingerprints of cultivated rice by hybridization with a human minisatellite DNA probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    A human minisatellite DNA probe detects several restriction fragment length polymorphisms in cultivars of Asian and African rice. Certain fragments appear to be inherited in a Mendelian fashion and may represent unlinked loci. The hybridization patterns appear to be cultivar-specific and largely unchanged after the regeneration of plants from tissue culture. The results suggest that these regions of the rice genome may be used to generate cultivar-specific DNA fingerprints. The demonstration of similarity between a human minisatellite sequence and polymorphic regions in the rice genome suggests that such regions also occur in the genomes of many other plant species

  17. Cultivating Curiosity: Integrating Hybrid Teaching in Courses in Human Behavior in the Social Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Keyes, Elizabeth; Schneider, Dana A.

    2013-01-01

    This study illustrates an experience of implementing a hybrid model for teaching human behavior in the social environment in an urban university setting. Developing a hybrid model in a BSW program arose out of a desire to reach students in a different way. Designed to promote curiosity and active learning, this particular hybrid model has students…

  18. Congratulations or Condolences? The Role of Human Capital in the Cultivation of a University Administrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, John; Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Stater, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Administrative skill is essential to organizational effectiveness. Yet, few studies examine how human capital investments over a career affect selection into administration. We use panel data for economists to estimate the probability of choosing administration over a pure academic track. The results show that, while research-specific human…

  19. The cultivation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in clinical grade medium for bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pytlík, R.; Stehlík, D.; Soukup, T.; Kalbáčová, M.; Rypáček, František; Trč, T.; Mulinková, Katarína; Michnová, P.; Kideryová, L.; Živný, J.; Klener, P.Jr.; Veselá, R.; Trněný, M.; Klener, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 20 (2009), s. 3415-3427 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MZd ND7448 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : tissue engineering * multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells * human serum Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.365, year: 2009

  20. [Comparative analysis of a new human cell line 4BL karyotype at long-term cultivation. Ploidy of chromosomal set].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopian, H R; Huleiuk, N L; Kushniruk, V O; Mykytenko, D O; Iatsyshyna, A P; Lukash, L L

    2013-01-01

    Long-term cultivation of human cells, including stem cells, can lead to substantial transformation of the karyotype and occurrence of genetic instability. The aim of this research was a comparative cytogenetic study of the karyotype of a new human stem cell line 4BL at 160 and 205 passages. The absence of 10 and 13 pairs of chromosomes and the monosomy of chromosomes 4, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, X were observed; also six regular marker chromosomes were detected. Chromosomes 1, 15 and 21 are involved in translocations t(l;11), t(5;15), t(12; 15), t(16;21). Modal class of the karyotype is within 41-43 chromosomes at both 160 and 205 passages. The frequency of polyploid cells have been increased from 2.8% at 160 passage up to 36% at 205 passage. Cells with a near-haploid karyotype were not detected at 205 passage (in contrast to 24.6% at 160 passages) and a decline of the level of premature separation of chromatids was observed. We assume stabilization of karyotype of the cell line 4BL at 205 passage and consider that further research is needed to predict the direction of karyotypic evolution of these cells in vitro.

  1. Influence of Oxygen in the Cultivation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Simulated Microgravity: An Explorative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versari, Silvia; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; van Loon, Jack; Bradamante, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies indicated that human Adipose Tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) cultured in simulated microgravity (sim-μg) in standard laboratory incubators alter their proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies on the stem cell (SC) niches and the influence of oxygen on SC proliferation, senescence, and differentiation point to oxygen level as one of the key regulators of SC fate. Here we present the results of a study that focussed at the evaluation of the influence of oxygen level in the cultivation of AT-MSCs in sim-μg. In detail, cells were cultured for 14 days in sim-μg using the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) and two different oxygen concentrations: 5 % and 20 %. The results were compared with those obtained at 1g in the same conditions. Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed. The results confirmed that in all of the sim-μg experiments oxygen concentration modulates cell signalling and adhesion, in line with the knowledge that sim-μg affects cell shape and cytoskeletal organization.

  2. Effect of 'witness' at joint cultivation of yeast and human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, O.P.; Pronina, O. V.; Rushkovskij, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we have demonstrated the ability of unicellulates to generate this effect in bystander cells of multicellular organisms. It was found that the level of chromosomal aberrations (CA) was significantly increased in nonirradiated human lymphocytes incubated with X-ray and UV irradiated S. cerevisiae as compared with control. The incubation with nonirradiated yeast cells had no effect on lymphocytes chromosomal stability. (authors)

  3. Effects of Composition of Iron-Cross-Linked Alginate Hydrogels for Cultivation of Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Machida-Sano, Ikuko; Ogawa, Sakito; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Satoh, Nao; Namiki, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the suitability of ferric-ion-cross-linked alginates (Fe-alginate) with various proportions of L-guluronic acid (G) and D-mannuronic acid (M) residues as a culture substrate for human dermal fibroblasts. High-G and high-M Fe-alginate gels showed comparable efficacy in promoting initial cell adhesion and similar protein adsorption capacities, but superior cell proliferation was observed on high-G than on high-M Fe-alginate as culture time progressed. During immersion in culture...

  4. Design of bioreactors for SSF and SMF (Xanthan)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Design of bioreactors for SSF and SMF (Xanthan). Design of bioreactors for SSF and SMF (Xanthan). Tray Bioreactor; Packed bed bioreactor; Rotary drum bioreactor; Integrated bioreactor; CSTR with helical ribbon. Design of bioreactors for Hairy root cultures. Acoustic Mist ...

  5. Biocompatibility and Inflammatory Potential of Titanium Alloys Cultivated with Human Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markhoff, Jana; Krogull, Martin; Schulze, Christian; Rotsch, Christian; Hunger, Sandra; Bader, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The biomaterials used to maintain or replace functions in the human body consist mainly of metals, ceramics or polymers. In orthopedic surgery, metallic materials, especially titanium and its alloys, are the most common, due to their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Aside from the established Ti6Al4V alloy, shape memory materials such as nickel-titanium (NiTi) have risen in importance, but are also discussed because of the adverse effects of nickel ions. These might be reduced by specific surface modifications. In the present in vitro study, the osteoblastic cell line MG-63 as well as primary human osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages were cultured on titanium alloys (forged Ti6Al4V, additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, NiTi, and Diamond-Like-Carbon (DLC)-coated NiTi) to verify their specific biocompatibility and inflammatory potential. Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V and NiTi revealed the highest levels of metabolic cell activity. DLC-coated NiTi appeared as a suitable surface for cell growth, showing the highest collagen production. None of the implant materials caused a strong inflammatory response. In general, no distinct cell-specific response could be observed for the materials and surface coating used. In summary, all tested titanium alloys seem to be biologically appropriate for application in orthopedic surgery. PMID:28772412

  6. Biocompatibility and Inflammatory Potential of Titanium Alloys Cultivated with Human Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Markhoff

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomaterials used to maintain or replace functions in the human body consist mainly of metals, ceramics or polymers. In orthopedic surgery, metallic materials, especially titanium and its alloys, are the most common, due to their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Aside from the established Ti6Al4V alloy, shape memory materials such as nickel-titanium (NiTi have risen in importance, but are also discussed because of the adverse effects of nickel ions. These might be reduced by specific surface modifications. In the present in vitro study, the osteoblastic cell line MG-63 as well as primary human osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages were cultured on titanium alloys (forged Ti6Al4V, additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, NiTi, and Diamond-Like-Carbon (DLC-coated NiTi to verify their specific biocompatibility and inflammatory potential. Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V and NiTi revealed the highest levels of metabolic cell activity. DLC-coated NiTi appeared as a suitable surface for cell growth, showing the highest collagen production. None of the implant materials caused a strong inflammatory response. In general, no distinct cell-specific response could be observed for the materials and surface coating used. In summary, all tested titanium alloys seem to be biologically appropriate for application in orthopedic surgery.

  7. Use of cultivated plants and non-plant remedies for human and animal home-medication in Liubań district, Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sõukand, Renata; Hrynevich, Yanina; Prakofjewa, Julia; Valodzina, Tatsiana; Vasilyeva, Iryna; Paciupa, Jury; Shrubok, Aliaksandra; Hlushko, Aliaksei; Knureva, Yana; Litvinava, Yulia; Vyskvarka, Siarhei; Silivonchyk, Hanna; Paulava, Alena; Kõiva, Mare; Kalle, Raivo

    2017-10-03

    To use any domestic remedy, specific knowledge and skills are required. Simple logic dictates that the use of wild plants in the context of limited interaction with nature requires prior identification, while in the case of non-plant remedies and cultivated plants this step can be omitted. This paper aims to document the current and past uses of non-plant remedies and cultivated plants in the study region for human/animal medication; to analyze the human medicinal and veterinary use areas in the context of the remedy groups; to qualitatively compare the results with relevant historical publications; and to compare the intensity and purpose of use between the remedy groups. During field studies 134 semi-structured interviews were conducted with locals from 11 villages in the Liubań district of Belarus. Currently used home-remedies as well as those used in the past were documented by employing the folk history method. The subject was approached through health-related uses, not by way of remedies. Interview records were digitalized and structured in Detailed Use Records in order to ascertain local perceptions. An Informant Consensus Factor (FIC) was calculated for remedy groups as well as for different use categories. In the human medication area the use of nearby remedies was neither very diverse nor numerous: 266 DUR for 45 taxa belonging to 27 families were recorded for cultivated plants along with 188 DUR for 58 different non-plant remedies. The FIC values for both remedy groups were lower than for wild plants. In the ethnoveterinary medicine use area there were 48 DUR referring to the use of 14 cultivated plant taxa from 12 families and 72 DUR referring to the use of 31 non-plant remedies. The FIC value for the whole veterinary use area of cultivated plants was relatively low, yet similar to the FIC of wild plants. Differences between remedy groups were pronounced, indicating that in domestic human medicine cultivated plants and non-plant remedies are either

  8. Toilet compost and human urine used in agriculture: fertilizer value assessment and effect on cultivated soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, D; Sou Dakoure, M; Hijikata, N; Lahmar, R; Yacouba, H; Coulibaly, L; Funamizu, N

    2015-01-01

    Toilet compost (TC) and human urine are among natural fertilizers, which raise interest due to their double advantages to combine sanitation and nutrient recovery. However, combination of urine and TC is not so spread probably because the best ratio (urine/TC) is still an issue and urine effect on soil chemical properties remains poorly documented. This study aims to determine the best ratio of urine and TC in okra cultivation, by targeting higher fertilization effect combined with lower impact on soil chemical properties. Based on Nitrogen requirement of okra, seven treatments were compared: (T0) no fertilizer, (T1) chemical fertilizer (NPK: 14-23-14), (T2) 100% urine, (T3) 100% TC, (T4) ratio of 75% urine+25% TC, (T5) 50% urine+50% TC and (T6) 25% urine+75% TC. Results indicated that T4 (75% urine+25% TC) gave the highest plant height and yield. In contrast, T2 (100% urine) gave the lowest results among all treatments, indicating toxicity effects on plant growth and associated final yield. Such toxicity is confirmed by soil chemical properties at T2 with soil acidification and significant increase in soil salinity. In contrast, application of urine together with TC mitigates soil acidification and salinity, highlighting the efficiency of urine and TC combination on soil chemical properties. However, further investigation is necessary to refine better urine/TC ratio for okra production.

  9. Effects of Composition of Iron-Cross-Linked Alginate Hydrogels for Cultivation of Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuko Machida-Sano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the suitability of ferric-ion-cross-linked alginates (Fe-alginate with various proportions of L-guluronic acid (G and D-mannuronic acid (M residues as a culture substrate for human dermal fibroblasts. High-G and high-M Fe-alginate gels showed comparable efficacy in promoting initial cell adhesion and similar protein adsorption capacities, but superior cell proliferation was observed on high-G than on high-M Fe-alginate as culture time progressed. During immersion in culture medium, high-G Fe-alginate showed little change in gel properties in terms of swelling and polymer content, but the properties of high-M Fe-alginate gel were altered due to loss of ion cross-linking. However, the degree of cell proliferation on high-M Fe-alginate gel was improved after it had been stabilized by immersion in culture medium until no further changes occurred. These results suggest that the mode of cross-linkage between ferric ions and alginate differs depending on alginate composition and that the major factor giving rise to differences in cell growth on the two types of Fe-alginate films is gel stability during culture, rather than swelling of the original gel, polymer content, or protein adsorption ability. Our findings may be useful for extending the application of Fe-alginate to diverse biomedical fields.

  10. Construction and evaluation of urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To design and construct a urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes and to compare the viability and proliferative activity of cell-seeded extracellular matrix scaffolds cultured in the bioreactor with conventional static growth conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A urinary bladder bioreactor was designed and constructed to replicate physiologic bladder dynamics. The bioreactor mimicked the filling pressures of the human bladder by way of a cyclical low-delivery pressure regulator. In addition, cell growth was evaluated by culturing human urothelial cells (UCs) on porcine extracellular matrix scaffolds in the bioreactor and in static growth conditions for 5 consecutive days. The attachment, viability, and proliferative potential were assessed and compared with quantitative viability indicators and by fluorescent markers for intracellular esterase activity and plasma membrane integrity. Scaffold integrity was characterized with scanning electron microscopy and 4\\

  11. Bag bioreactor based on wave-induced motion: characteristics and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Regine; Werner, Sören; Eibl, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Today wave-mixed bag bioreactors are common devices in modern biotechnological processes where simple, safe and flexible production has top priority. Numerous studies that have been published on ex vivo generation of cells, viruses and therapeutic agents during the last 10 years have confirmed their suitability and even superiority to stirred bioreactors made from glass or stainless steel for animal as well as plant cell cultivations. In these studies the wave-mixed bag bioreactors enabled middle to high cell density and adequate productivity in laboratory and pilot scale. This mainly results from low-shear conditions and highly efficient oxygen transfer for cell cultures, as demonstrated for the widely used BioWave((R)).Starting with an overview of wave-mixed bag bioreactors and their common operation strategies, this chapter delineates engineering aspects of BioWave((R)), which like Wave Reactor and BIOSTAT((R))CultiBag RM originates from the prototype of a wave-mixed bag bioreactor introduced in 1998. Subsequently, the second part of the chapter focuses on reported BioWave((R)) applications. Conditions and results from cultivations with animal cells, plant cells, microbial cells and nematodes are presented and discussed.

  12. Bag Bioreactor Based on Wave-Induced Motion: Characteristics and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Regine; Werner, Sören; Eibl, Dieter

    Today wave-mixed bag bioreactors are common devices in modern biotechnological processes where simple, safe and flexible production has top priority. Numerous studies that have been published on ex vivo generation of cells, viruses and therapeutic agents during the last 10 years have confirmed their suitability and even superiority to stirred bioreactors made from glass or stainless steel for animal as well as plant cell cultivations. In these studies the wave-mixed bag bioreactors enabled middle to high cell density and adequate productivity in laboratory and pilot scale. This mainly results from low-shear conditions and highly efficient oxygen transfer for cell cultures, as demonstrated for the widely used BioWave®.Starting with an overview of wave-mixed bag bioreactors and their common operation strategies, this chapter delineates engineering aspects of BioWave®, which like Wave Reactor™ and BIOSTAT®CultiBag RM originates from the prototype of a wave-mixed bag bioreactor introduced in 1998. Subsequently, the second part of the chapter focuses on reported BioWave® applications. Conditions and results from cultivations with animal cells, plant cells, microbial cells and nematodes are presented and discussed.

  13. Synchronized mammalian cell culture: part I--a physical strategy for synchronized cultivation under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, Oscar Platas; Jandt, Uwe; Becker, Max; Bahnemann, Janina; Pörtner, Ralf; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Conventional analysis and optimization procedures of mammalian cell culture processes mostly treat the culture as a homogeneous population. Hence, the focus is on cell physiology and metabolism, cell line development, and process control strategy. Impact on cultivations caused by potential variations in cellular properties between different subpopulations, however, has not yet been evaluated systematically. One main cause for the formation of such subpopulations is the progress of all cells through the cell cycle. The interaction of potential cell cycle specific variations in the cell behavior with large-scale process conditions can be optimally determined by means of (partially) synchronized cultivations, with subsequent population resolved model analysis. Therefore, it is desirable to synchronize a culture with minimal perturbation, which is possible with different yield and quality using physical selection methods, but not with frequently used chemical or whole-culture methods. Conventional nonsynchronizing methods with subsequent cell-specific, for example, flow cytometric analysis, can only resolve cell-limited effects of the cell cycle. In this work, we demonstrate countercurrent-flow centrifugal elutriation as a useful physical method to enrich mammalian cell populations within different phases of a cell cycle, which can be further cultivated for synchronized growth in bioreactors under physiological conditions. The presented combined approach contrasts with other physical selection methods especially with respect to the achievable yield, which makes it suitable for bioreactor scale cultivations. As shown with two industrial cell lines (CHO-K1 and human AGE1.HN), synchronous inocula can be obtained with overall synchrony degrees of up to 82% in the G1 phase, 53% in the S phase and 60% in the G2/M phase, with enrichment factors (Ysync) of 1.71, 1.79, and 4.24 respectively. Cells are able to grow with synchrony in bioreactors over several cell cycles. This

  14. Controle genético das células-tronco humanas cultivadas Genetic control of cultivated human stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer L. M. Payão

    2009-05-01

    period of time could result in an accumulation of genetic alterations and consequently, in a neoplastic process. For this reason, cytogenetic techniques are very important to guarantee the control and safety of cultivated stem cells to be used in human therapy. Structural chromosomal alterations, such as for example, deletions, translocations and inversions represent an important mechanism by which cells might gradually transform in a neoplastic process. Thus, these chromosomal alterations could result in an abnormal expression of the genes and lead to cancer.

  15. Studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cultivation under Oscillatory Mixing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M?ris Rikmanis

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated under non-aerated conditions in a 5 l laboratory bioreactor. Using the experimental data and the regression analysis method, some mathematical correlations for stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency and the reaction of the yeast were established. It has been found that different growth parameters are influenced variously by stirrer rotational speed and stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency. Stirring oscillations can be among the methods for stimulation of biotechnological processes. The obtained results can be used for designing bioreactors and optimizing working conditions.

  16. Mixing and In situ product removal in micro-bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Of the thesis :’ Mixing and In-situ product removal in micro bioreactors’ by Xiaonan Li The work presented in this thesis is a part of a large cluster project, which was formed between DSM, Organon, Applikon and two university groups (TU Delft and University of Twente), under the ACTS and IBOS program. The aim of this cluster project was to develop a system consisting of parallel bioreactors of 30 to 200 microliter working volume for the cultivation of micro-organisms under well contr...

  17. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  18. Membrane bioreactors: present and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H N; Furusaki, S

    1991-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors have a very handy in-situ separation capability lacking in other types of bioreactors. Combining various functions of membrane separations and biocatalyst characteristics of enzymes, microbial cells, organelles, animal and plant tissues can generate quite a number of membrane bioreactor systems. The cell retaining property of membranes and selective removal of inhibitory byproducts makes high cell density culture possible and utilizes enzyme catalytic activity better, which leads to high productivity of bioreactors. Enzyme reactions utilizing cofactors and hydrolysis of macromolecules are advantageous in membrane bioreactors. Anaerobic cell culture may be efficiently carried out in membrane cell recycle systems, while aerobic cultures work well in dual hollow fiber reactors. Animal and plant cells have much a better chance of success in membrane reactors because of the protective environment of the reactor and the small oxygen uptake rate of these cells. Industrial use of these reactors are still in its infancy and limited to enzyme and animal tissue culture, but applications will expand as existing problems are resolved.

  19. Membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reij, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Summary

    This thesis describes the design and testing of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) for removal of organic pollutants from air. In such a bioreactor for biological gas treatment pollutants are degraded by micro-organisms. The membrane bioreactor is an alternative to other types of

  20. Bioreactor technology for herbal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobri Hussein; Rusli Ibrahim; Abdul Rahim Harun; Azhar Mohamad; Hawa Abdul Aziz; Wan Nazirah Wan Ali

    2010-01-01

    Plants have been an important source of medicine for thousands of years and herbs are hot currency in the world today. During the last decade, popularity of alternative medicine increased significantly worldwide with noticeable trend. This in turn accelerated the global trade of herbal raw materials and herbal products and created greater scope for Asian countries that possess the major supply of herbal raw materials within their highly diversified tropical rain forest. As such, advanced bioreactor culture system possesses a great potential for large scale production than the traditional tissue culture system. Bioreactor cultures have many advantages over conventional cultures. Plant cells in bioreactors can grow fast and vigorously in shorter period as the culture conditions in bioreactor such as temperature, pH, concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide and nutrients can be optimised by on-line manipulation. Nutrient uptake can also be enhanced by continuous medium circulation, which ultimately increased cell proliferation rate. Consequently, production period and cost are substantially reduced, product quality is controlled and standardized as well as free of pesticide contamination and production of raw material can be conducted all year round. Taking all these into consideration, current research efforts were focused on varying several parameters such as inoculation density, air flow, medium formulation, PGRs etc. for increased production of cell and organ cultures of high market demand herbal and medicinal plants, particularly Eurycoma longifolia, Panax ginseng and Labisia pumila. At present, the production of cell and organ culture of these medicinal plants have also been applied in airlift bioreactor with different working volumes. It is hope that the investment of research efforts into this advanced bioreactor technology will open up a bright future for the modernization of agriculture and commercialisation of natural product. (author)

  1. Application of semifluidized bed bioreactor as novel bioreactor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conventional bioreactors such as pond digester, anaerobic filtration, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), up-flow anaerobic sludge fixed-film (UASFF), continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), anaerobic contact digestion and fluidized bed, used over the past decades are largely operated anaerobically. They have ...

  2. Studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cultivation under Oscillatory Mixing Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    M?ris Rikmanis; Stoyan Tzonkov; Uldis Viesturs; Andr?js B?rzi??

    2005-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated under non-aerated conditions in a 5 l laboratory bioreactor. Using the experimental data and the regression analysis method, some mathematical correlations for stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency and the reaction of the yeast were established. It has been found that different growth parameters are influenced variously by stirrer rotational speed and stirrer rotational speed oscillation frequency. Stirring oscillations can be among the methods...

  3. Use of human wastes oxidized to different degrees in cultivation of higher plants on the soil-like substrate intended for closed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, A. A.; Kudenko, Yu. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Tirranen, L. S.; Gribovskaya, I. A.; Gros, J.-B.; Lasseur, Ch.

    2010-09-01

    To close mass exchange loops in bioregenerative life support systems more efficiently, researchers of the Institute of Biophysics SB RAS (Krasnoyarsk, Russia) have developed a procedure of wet combustion of human wastes and inedible parts of plants using H 2O 2 in alternating electromagnetic field. Human wastes pretreated in this way can be used as nutrient solutions to grow plants in the phototrophic unit of the LSS. The purpose of this study was to explore the possibilities of using human wastes oxidized to different degrees to grow plants cultivated on the soil-like substrate (SLS). The treated human wastes were analyzed to test their sterility. Then we investigated the effects produced by human wastes oxidized to different degrees on growth and development of wheat plants and on the composition of microflora in the SLS. The irrigation solution contained water, substances extracted from the substrate, and certain amounts of the mineralized human wastes. The experiments showed that the human wastes oxidized using reduced amounts of 30% H 2O 2: 1 ml/g of feces and 0.25 ml/ml of urine were still sterile. The experiments with wheat plants grown on the SLS and irrigated by the solution containing treated human wastes in the amount simulating 1/6 of the daily diet of a human showed that the degree of oxidation of human wastes did not significantly affect plant productivity. On the other hand, the composition of the microbiota of irrigation solutions was affected by the oxidation level of the added metabolites. In the solutions supplemented with partially oxidized metabolites yeast-like microscopic fungi were 20 times more abundant than in the solutions containing fully oxidized metabolites. Moreover, in the solutions containing incompletely oxidized human wastes the amounts of phytopathogenic bacteria and denitrifying microorganisms were larger. Thus, insufficiently oxidized sterile human wastes added to the irrigation solutions significantly affect the composition of

  4. A flow bioreactor system compatible with real-time two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nian; Riedl, Julia A; Carvajal Berrio, Daniel A; Davis, Zachary; Monaghan, Michael G; Layland, Shannon L; Hinderer, Svenja; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2018-02-02

    Bioreactors are essential cell and tissue culture tools that allow the introduction of biophysical signals into in vitro cultures. One major limitation is the need to interrupt experiments and sacrifice samples at certain time points for analyses. To address this issue, we designed a bioreactor that combines high-resolution contact-free imaging and continuous flow in a closed system that is compatible with various types of microscopes. The high throughput fluid flow bioreactor was combined with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) and validated. The hydrodynamics of the bioreactor chamber were characterized using COMSOL. The simulation of shear stress indicated that the bioreactor system provides homogeneous and reproducible flow conditions. The designed bioreactor was used to investigate the effects of low shear stress on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In a scratch assay, we observed decreased migration of HUVECs under shear stress conditions. Furthermore, metabolic activity shifts from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms in HUVECs cultured under low shear stress conditions were detected using 2P-FLIM. Future applications for this bioreactor range from observing cell fate development in real-time to monitoring the environmental effects on cells or metabolic changes due to drug applications.

  5. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Kyu Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS. The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36±1°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  6. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Park, Seul-Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  8. Bioreactors Drive Advances in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    It was an unlikely moment for inspiration. Engineers David Wolf and Ray Schwarz stopped by their lab around midday. Wolf, of Johnson Space Center, and Schwarz, with NASA contractor Krug Life Sciences (now Wyle Laboratories Inc.), were part of a team tasked with developing a unique technology with the potential to enhance medical research. But that wasn t the focus at the moment: The pair was rounding up colleagues interested in grabbing some lunch. One of the lab s other Krug engineers, Tinh Trinh, was doing something that made Wolf forget about food. Trinh was toying with an electric drill. He had stuck the barrel of a syringe on the bit; it spun with a high-pitched whirr when he squeezed the drill s trigger. At the time, a multidisciplinary team of engineers and biologists including Wolf, Schwarz, Trinh, and project manager Charles D. Anderson, who formerly led the recovery of the Apollo capsules after splashdown and now worked for Krug was pursuing the development of a technology called a bioreactor, a cylindrical device used to culture human cells. The team s immediate goal was to grow human kidney cells to produce erythropoietin, a hormone that regulates red blood cell production and can be used to treat anemia. But there was a major barrier to the technology s success: Moving the liquid growth media to keep it from stagnating resulted in turbulent conditions that damaged the delicate cells, causing them to quickly die. The team was looking forward to testing the bioreactor in space, hoping the device would perform more effectively in microgravity. But on January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger broke apart shortly after launch, killing its seven crewmembers. The subsequent grounding of the shuttle fleet had left researchers with no access to space, and thus no way to study the effects of microgravity on human cells. As Wolf looked from Trinh s syringe-capped drill to where the bioreactor sat on a workbench, he suddenly saw a possible solution to both

  9. Cell retention by encapsulation for the cultivation of Jurkat cells in fixed and fluidized bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, P; Werner, M; Jérôme, V; Hübner, H; Buchholz, R; Freitag, R

    2014-12-01

    Jurkat cells are accepted model cells for primary human T lymphocytes, for example, in medical research. Their growth to tissue-like cell densities (up to 100 × 10(6)  cells/mLcapsule ) in semi-permeable (molecular weight cut off jurkat cells. Biotechnol Prog 29(4): 986-993]. Herein, we demonstrate that encapsulation can be used to retain the cells in continuously operated bioreactors, which opens new possibilities for research, for example, the use of Jurkat cells in pulse response experiments under steady state conditions. Two reactor concepts are presented, a fluidized and a fixed bed reactor. A direct comparison of the growth kinetics in batch and repeated batch spinner cultivations, that is, under conditions where both encapsulated and non-encapsulated cells can be cultivated under otherwise identical conditions, showed that maximum specific growth rates were higher for the encapsulated than for the non-encapsulated cells. In the subsequent batch and repeated batch bioreactor experiments (only encapsulated cells), growth rates were similar, with the exception of the fixed bed batch reactor, where growth kinetics were significantly slower. Concomitantly, a significant fraction of the cells towards the bottom of the bed were no longer metabolically active, though apparently not dead. In the repeated batch fluidized bed reactor cellular division could be maintained for more than two weeks, albeit with a specific growth rate below the maximum one, leading to final cell densities of approximately 180 × 10(6)  cell/gcapsule . At the same time, the cell cycle distribution of the cells was shifted to the S and G2/M phases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Impact of the cultivation strategy on resveratrol production from glucose in engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Adelaide; Oliveira, Joana; Silva, Rita; Ferreira, Patricia; Rocha, Isabel; Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Marienhagen, Jan; Faria, Nuno

    2018-01-10

    The health benefits of polyphenols such as stilbenes and flavonoids for humans are increasingly attracting attention. Resveratrol is a well-characterized naturally-occurring stilbene and potent anti-oxidant, which is used as food supplement and cosmetic ingredient. Several microorganisms including Corynebacterium glutamicum were engineered for resveratrol production from glucose. Based on the cultivation of a resveratrol-producing C. glutamicum strain in shake flasks, different strategies for improving production under controlled conditions at bioreactor scale were tested. To this end, different cultivation parameters including substrate concentration and operation modes (batch and fed-batch) were evaluated. Whereas the highest biomass concentration was observed during fed-batch fermentation, the maximum resveratrol production was achieved in batch mode. The maximal titer obtained was 12mgL -1 of resveratrol without the addition of the fatty acid synthase inhibitor cerulenin, which was previously shown to be crucial for production with C. glutamicum. The specific growth rate during production seems to have a significant effect in resveratrol production and apparently low specific growth rates may redirect the metabolic bottleneck from p-coumaric acid formation to malonyl-CoA or ATP availability. We also show that high oxygen concentrations in the bioreactor negatively affected the obtained resveratrol titers with C. glutamicum, which is most likely due to the strong tendency of resveratrol to oxidize or oligomerize. Thus, up-scaling of the resveratrol production process is technically challenging and individual process parameters have to be optimized cautiously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi is cultivable in a modified Kelly-Pettenkofer medium, and is resistant to human complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, Alex; Oei, Anneke; Fikrig, Michelle M; Miellet, Willem R; Hovius, Joppe W

    2014-09-04

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever spirochete found in Ixodes ticks in North America, Europe, and Asia, and has recently been found to be invasive in humans. Cultivation of this spirochete has not yet been described, but is important for patient diagnostics and scientific purposes. Host specificity of Borrelia species is dependent on resistance to host complement (serum resistance), and since B. miyamotoi has been identified as a human pathogen we were interested whether B. miyamotoi is resistant to human complement. We inoculated B. miyamotoi strains LB-2001 and HT31 in modified-Kelly-Pettenkofer medium with 10% fetal calf serum (MKP-F), and used standard non-laborious Borrelia culture methods to culture the spirochetes. Next, we assessed serum sensitivity by a direct killing assay and a growth inhibition assay. We were able to passage B. miyamotoi over 10 times using a standard culture method in MKP-F medium, and found B. miyamotoi to be resistant to human complement. In contrast to B. miyamotoi, Borrelia anserina--a relapsing fever spirochete unrelated to human infection--was serum sensitive. Using a variation on MKP medium we were able to culture B. miyamotoi, opening the door to in vitro research into this spirochete. In addition, we describe that B. miyamotoi is resistant to human complement, which might play an important role in pathogenesis. We have also found B. anserina to be sensitive to human complement, which might explain why it is not related to human infection. Summarizing, we describe a novel culture method for B. miyamotoi and show it is resistant to human complement.

  12. Axiological epistemology and transdisciplinary knowledge: cognitive strategies for recognition and cultivation of the human deep quality and the sacred dimension of existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Néstor Osorio García

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of the current European societies, which are made possible through the production of scientific knowledge and technical, is simple in its formulation. They are societies in constant knowledge creation.  Given socio-economic and working conditions, implemented from the neo-liberal model of society, the abstract knowledge, associated with the profit of a few over the many, is leading the cultural logic of knowledge societies, without any axiological hesitation, That is to say, without postulating and discerning common goals and values ​​that can motivate human beings to live for the human journey. Thus, the current European societies, but not only them, are knowledge societies, (because they live in the continuous creation of technical and scientific knowledge. At the same time, companies are axiologically dismantled. They are societies that do not have been axiologically oriented. If humanity does not recover and increase this constitutive dimension, may not be feasible in human form. Our reflection presents a proposal for an axiological epistemology (M. Corbi and the proposal of a transdisciplinary knowledge (B. Nicolescu as "devices" that explicitly cultivated, can prevent human collapse in knowledge societies.

  13. Spaceflight bioreactor studies of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the fundamental role of gravity in the development and function of biological organisms are a central component of the human exploration of space. Microgravity affects numerous physical phenomena relevant to biological research, including the hydrostatic pressure in fluid filled vesicles, sedimentation of organelles, and buoyancy-driven convection of flow and heat. These physical phenomena can in turn directly and indirectly affect cellular morphology, metabolism, locomotion, secretion of extracellular matrix and soluble signals, and assembly into functional tissues. Studies aimed at distinguishing specific effects of gravity on biological systems require the ability to: (i) control and systematically vary gravity, e.g. by utilizing the microgravity environment of space in conjunction with an in-flight centrifuge; and (ii) maintain constant all other factors in the immediate environment, including in particular concentrations and exchange rates of biochemical species and hydrodynamic shear. The latter criteria imply the need for gravity-independent mechanisms to provide for mass transport between the cells and their environment. Available flight hardware has largely determined the experimental design and scientific objectives of spaceflight cell and tissue culture studies carried out to date. Simple culture vessels have yielded important quantitative data, and helped establish in vitro models of cell locomotion, growth and differentiation in various mammalian cell types including embryonic lung cells [6], lymphocytes [2,8], and renal cells [7,31]. Studies done using bacterial cells established the first correlations between gravity-dependent factors such as cell settling velocity and diffusional distance and the respective cell responses [12]. The development of advanced bioreactors for microgravity cell and tissue culture and for tissue engineering has benefited both research areas and provided relevant in vitro model systems for studies of astronaut

  14. Production and partial characterization of alkaline feruloyl esterases by Fusarium oxysporum during submerged batch cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topakas, E.; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Production of feruloyl esterases (FAEs) by Fusarium oxysporum was enhanced by optimization of initial pH of the culture medium, the type and concentration of nitrogen and carbon source. Submerged batch cultivation in a laboratory bioreactor (17 1) produced activity at 82 nkat g(-1) dry substrate...

  15. Development of a cultivation process for the enhancement of human interferon alpha 2b production in the oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasmi Najla

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As an oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica is able to assimilate hydrophobic substrates. This led to the isolation of several promoters of key enzymes of this catabolic pathway. Less is known about the behavior of Y. lipolytica in large bioreactors using these substrates. There is therefore a lack of established know-how concerning high cell density culture protocols of this yeast. Consequently, the establishment of suitable induction conditions is required, to maximize recombinant protein production under the control of these promoters. Results Human interferon α2b (huIFN α2b production in Yarrowia lipolytica was used as a model for the enhancement of recombinant protein production under the control of the oleic acid (OA-inducible promoter POX2. Cell viability and heterologous protein production were enhanced by exponential glucose feeding, to generate biomass before OA induction. The optimal biomass level before induction was determined (73 g L-1, and glucose was added with oleic acid during the induction phase. Several oleic acid feeding strategies were assessed. Continuous feeding with OA at a ratio of 0.02 g OA per g dry cell weight increased huIFNα2b production by a factor of 1.88 (425 mg L-1 and decreased the induction time (by a factor of 2.6, 21 h. huIFN α2b degradation by an aspartic protease secreted by Y. lipolytica was prevented by adding pepstatin (10 μM, leading to produce a 19-fold more active huIFN α2b (26.2 × 107 IU mg-1. Conclusion Y. lipolytica, a generally regarded as safe (GRAS microorganism is one of the most promising non conventional yeasts for the production of biologically active therapeutic proteins under the control of hydrophobic substrate-inducible promoter.

  16. Controlled Growth and the Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Cultivation with Defined Medium on Extracellular Matrix-Coated Micropatterned Dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Chiemi; Miyajima, Hiroshi; Yoda, Yusuke; Imazato, Hideo; Yamamoto, Takako; Gomi, Shinichi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kagawa, Kenichi; Sasaki, Tetsuji; Kawamata, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we introduce a new serum-free defined medium (SPM) that supports the cultivation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) on recombinant human vitronectin-N (rhVNT-N)-coated dishes after seeding with either cell clumps or single cells. With this system, there was no need for an intervening sequential adaptation process after moving hPSCs from feeder layer-dependent conditions. We also introduce a micropatterned dish that was coated with extracellular matrix by photolithographic technology. This procedure allowed the cultivation of hPSCs on 199 individual rhVNT-N-coated small round spots (1 mm in diameter) on each 35-mm polystyrene dish (termed "patterned culture"), permitting the simultaneous formation of 199 uniform high-density small-sized colonies. This culture system supported controlled cell growth and maintenance of undifferentiated hPSCs better than dishes in which the entire surface was coated with rhVNT-N (termed "non-patterned cultures"). Non-patterned cultures produced variable, unrestricted cell proliferation with non-uniform cell growth and uneven densities in which we observed downregulated expression of some self-renewal-related markers. Comparative flow cytometric studies of the expression of pluripotency-related molecules SSEA-3 and TRA-1-60 in hPSCs from non-patterned cultures and patterned cultures supported this concept. Patterned cultures of hPSCs allowed sequential visual inspection of every hPSC colony, giving an address and number in patterned culture dishes. Several spots could be sampled for quality control tests of production batches, thereby permitting the monitoring of hPSCs in a single culture dish. Our new patterned culture system utilizing photolithography provides a robust, reproducible and controllable cell culture system and demonstrates technological advantages for the mass production of hPSCs with process quality control.

  17. Comparative studies on virus detection in acute respiratory diseases in humans by means of RIA and cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlicher, L.

    1982-01-01

    In winter 1981, 146 patients with an acute respiratory infection were examined. Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained by intranasal catheter. Comparative investigations were performed by cultivation in tissue culture and by a four-layer radioimmunoassay. In the radioimmunoassay, polystyrene beads were used as the solid phase, ginea pig antivirus immunoglobulins as the captive antibodies, rabbit anti-virus immunoglobulins as the secondary antibodies and 125 I-labelled sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B virus and parainfluenza type 1, type 2 and type 3 virus. Tissue culture seems to be more sensitive for detection of adenovirus and influenza A virus, though some infections with influenza A virus could only be diagnosed by the radioimmunoassay. In other cases (respiratory syncytial virus, influenza B virus) antigen detection by radioimmunoassay is more efficient. Presently the combination of both antigen-detection-systems still is the optimal diagnostic procedure for detecting virus infections of the respiratory tract. (orig./MG) [de

  18. From transient response of a compact photobioreactor for microalgae cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilay, Emerson; Ribeiro, Robert Luis Lara; Pulliam, Raevon; Mariano, Andre Bellin [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento em Energia Auto-Sustentavel; Ordonez, Juan Carlos [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Center for Advanced Power Systems], E-mail: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    Biofuels from microalgae are currently the subject of funded scientific research in many countries due to their high productivity of oil when compared with other crops. Microalgae can also be used in many important applications such as to obtain compounds of interest for food, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The high productivity of microalgae when compared with other crops is achieved because agricultural land is not mandatory for their cultivation, since they can be grown in open ponds, sea or vertical photo bioreactors. In this paper, a mathematical model is introduced for assessing the transient microalgae growth as a function of variable light intensity, temperature and environmental conditions in the daily cycle. Photo bioreactor geometry is considered as well. Light intensity is obtained from sun position, photo bioreactor geometry, and the installation location in the world. The photo bioreactor was discretized in space by the the volume element method. Balances of energy and species together with thermodynamics, heat transfer and chemistry empirical and theoretical correlations are applied to each volume element. Therefore, a system of ordinary differential equations with respect to time only is capable of delivering temperatures and concentrations as functions of space and time, even with a coarse mesh. The numerical results are capable of predicting the transient and steady state photo bioreactor biomass production with low computational time. Microalgae specific growth rate as a function of average light intensity inside the tubes and time was calculated. As a result, the model is expected to be a useful tool for simulation, design, and optimization of compact photo bioreactors. (author)

  19. Metal contamination of home gardens soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: Implications for human exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Roberta; Hashim, Dana; Smith, Donald R.; Guazzetti, Stefano; Donna, Filippo; Ferretti, Enrica; Curatolo, Michele; Moneta, Caterina; Beone, Gian Maria; Lucchini, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    Background For the past century, ferroalloy industries in Brescia province, Italy produced particulate emissions enriched in manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), aluminum (Al). This study assessed metal concentrations in soil and vegetables of regions with varying ferroalloy industrial activity levels. Methods Home gardens (n=63) were selected in three regions of varying ferroalloy plant activity duration in Brescia province. Total soil metal concentration and extractability were measured by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), aqua regia extraction, and modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. Unwashed and washed spinach and turnips cultivated in the same gardens were analyzed for metal concentrations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Results Median soil Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in home gardens near ferroalloy plants compared to reference home gardens. The BCR method yielded the most mobile soil fraction (the sum of extractable metals in Fractions 1 and 2) and all metal concentrations were higher in ferroalloy plant areas. Unwashed spinach showed higher metal concentrations compared to washed spinach. However, some metals in washed spinach were higher in the reference area likely due to history of agricultural product use. Over 60% of spinach samples exceeded the 2- to 4-fold Commission of European Communities and Codex Alimentarius Commission maximum Pb concentrations, and 10% of the same spinach samples exceeded 2- to 3-fold maximum Cd concentrations set by both organizations. Turnip metal concentrations were below maximum standard reference values. Conclusions Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1+F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references. We

  20. Microbial Bioreactor Development in the ALS NSCORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cary; Whitaker, Dawn; Banks, M. Katherine; Heber, Albert J.; Turco, Ronald F.; Nies, Loring F.; Alleman, James E.; Sharvelle, Sybil E.; Li, Congna; Heller, Megan

    The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training in Advanced Life Support (the ALS NSCORT), a partnership of Alabama A & M, Howard, and Purdue Universities, was established by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that will reduce the Equivalent System Mass (ESM) of regenerative processes within future space life-support systems. A key focus area of NSCORT research has been the development of efficient microbial bioreactors for treatment of human, crop, and food-process wastes while enabling resource recovery. The approach emphasizes optimizing the energy-saving advantages of hydrolytic enzymes for biomass degradation, with focus on treatment of solid wastes including crop residue, paper, food, and human metabolic wastes, treatment of greywater, cabin air, off-gases from other treatment systems, and habitat condensate. This summary includes important findings from those projects, status of technology development, and recommendations for next steps. The Plant-based Anaerobic-Aerobic Bioreactor-Linked Operation (PAABLO) system was developed to reduce crop residue while generating energy and/or food. Plant residues initially were added directly to the bioreactor, and recalcitrant residue was used as a substrate for growing plants or mushrooms. Subsequently, crop residue was first pretreated with fungi to hydrolyze polymers recalcitrant to bacteria, and leachate from the fungal beds was directed to the anaerobic digester. Exoenzymes from the fungi pre-soften fibrous plant materials, improving recovery of materials that are more easily biodegraded to methane that can be used for energy reclamation. An Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD) system was developed for biodegradable solid wastes. Objectives were to increase water and nutrient recovery, reduce waste volume, and inactivate pathogens. Operational parameters of the reactor were optimized for degradation and resource recovery while minimizing system requirements and footprint. The start-up behavior

  1. Utilisation of a Bioreactor for Culture and Expansion of Epithelial Cells without the use of Trypsin or Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Atsuko; Washington, James; Bingham, Eve L; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Feinberg, Stephen E

    2018-01-01

    To develop a bioreactor for automated culture, maintenance, and collection of normal human keratinocytes using an enzyme-free propagation method. The culture of normal human epithelial keratinocytes was compared in two culture methods - a study team-developed automated bioreactor utilising an enzyme-free passage method, and a manual culture method. Cell size, glucose utilisation, and the proliferative capacity of the two cultures were evaluated. An automated bioreactor, not using enzymes for passage, but instead using the novel Epithelial Pop Up Keratinocytes (ePUK)1 culture technique, resulted in an extended culture longevity and proliferative capacity in normal primary human keratinocytes. Daughter cells were collected up to three times per day utilising the bioreactor. The daughter cells produced by the bioreactor were smaller than daughter cells produced by the manual culture method. The proliferative capacity and health of the parent monolayer within both the bioreactor and the manual culture flask was dependent upon sufficient glucose availability. Due to the contact inhibition nature of epithelial keratinocytes, the bioreactor enabled the study of an adherent cell type soon after cytokinesis and before the cell has integrated as part of an adherent matrix. The study demonstrates that increasing the number of media changes per day as necessary, based on glucose utilisation, is necessary for prolonged longevity and functional productivity of ePUK cultures.

  2. Aujeszky's disease virus production in disposable bioreactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aujeszky's disease virus, baby hamster kidney cells, cell culture, disposable bioreactor, virus titre. Abstract. A novel, disposable-bag bioreactor system that uses wave action for mixing and transferring oxygen was evaluated for BHK 21 C13 cell line growth and Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) production. Growth kinetics of ...

  3. Membrane bioreactors for waste gas treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reij, M.W.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Hartmans, S.

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the recent development of membrane reactors for biological treatment of waste gases. In this type of bioreactor gaseous pollutants are transferred through a membrane to the liquid phase, where micro-organisms degrade the pollutants. The membrane bioreactor combines the

  4. Comparison of membrane bioreactor technology and conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper was to review the use of membrane bioreactor technology as an alternative for treating the discharged effluent from a bleached kraft mill by comparing and contrasting membrane bioreactors with conventional activated sludge systems for wastewater treatment. There are many water shortage ...

  5. Diversity of the cultivable human gut microbiome involved in gluten metabolism: isolation of microorganisms with potential interest for coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, Alberto; Herrán, Alexandra R; Nistal, Esther; Pérez-Andrés, Jenifer; Vaquero, Luis; Vivas, Santiago; Ruiz de Morales, José María G; Albillos, Silvia M; Casqueiro, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Gluten, a common component in the human diet, is capable of triggering coeliac disease pathogenesis in genetically predisposed individuals. Although the function of human digestive proteases in gluten proteins is quite well known, the role of intestinal microbiota in the metabolism of proteins is frequently underestimated. The aim of this study was the isolation and characterisation of the human gut bacteria involved in the metabolism of gluten proteins. Twenty-two human faecal samples were cultured with gluten as the principal nitrogen source, and 144 strains belonging to 35 bacterial species that may be involved in gluten metabolism in the human gut were isolated. Interestingly, 94 strains were able to metabolise gluten, 61 strains showed an extracellular proteolytic activity against gluten proteins, and several strains showed a peptidasic activity towards the 33-mer peptide, an immunogenic peptide in patients with coeliac disease. Most of the strains were classified within the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, mainly from the genera Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Clostridium and Bifidobacterium. In conclusion, the human intestine exhibits a large variety of bacteria capable of utilising gluten proteins and peptides as nutrients. These bacteria could have an important role in gluten metabolism and could offer promising new treatment modalities for coeliac disease. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Classification of cultivated plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Agricultural practice demands principles for classification, starting from the basal entity in cultivated plants: the cultivar. In establishing biosystematic relationships between wild, weedy and cultivated plants, the species concept needs re-examination. Combining of botanic classification, based

  7. Cell death induced by tamoxifen in human blood lymphocytes cultivated in vitro = Morte celular induzida pelo tamoxifeno em linfócitos humanos cultivados in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Candelária Genari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many chemotherapeutic agents with a potential against solid tumors or leukemia can cause lymphopenia. Tamoxifen (TAM is a synthetic non-steroidal anti-estrogen drug employed in female breast cancer treatment. The present study investigated the capacity of TAM to induce cell death in human lymphocytes cultivated in vitro. Lymphocytes were obtained from young (25-30 years; n = 3 and elderly women (58-77 years; n = 3 and cultivated for 24 or 48h, with or without TAM (20 ƒÊM. After the culture, cell viability, immunocytochemical response and ultrastructure were evaluated. TAM affected lymphocytes in a time- dependent manner, and cells obtained from elderly women were the most sensitive to TAM. Immunocytochemicalanalysis evidenced higher frequency of apoptosis in treated cells, and the ultrastructural study revealed autophagic vacuoles, differing from the controls. In summary, the treated lymphocytes were affected by TAM, leading to cell death by apoptosis and autophagy.Muitos agentes quimioterapicos com potencial contra tumores solidos ou leucemias podem causar linfopenia. O Tamoxifeno (TAM e um agente antiestrogeno nao-esteroidal empregado no tratamento de cancer de mama feminino. O presente trabalho investigou a capacidade do TAM em induzir morte celular em linfocitos humanos cultivados in vitro. Oslinfocitos foram obtidos de mulheres jovens (25-30 anos; n = 3 e idosas (58-77 anos; n = 3 e cultivados por 24 ou 48h, com ou sem TAM (20 ƒÊM. Apos a cultura, foram analisadas a viabilidade celular, a resposta imunocitoquimica e a ultraestrutura. Os resultados indicam que o Tamoxifeno induziu morte celular em linfocitos de ambos os grupos, entretanto, as celulas das mulheres idosas apresentaram-se mais sensiveis ao tratamento. A analise imunocitoquimica mostrou maior frequencia de apoptose nas celulas tratadas e o estudo ultraestrutural revelou vacuolos autofagicos nos linfocitos expostos ao Tamoxifeno. Em conclusao, nosso estudo revelou que o TAM

  8. Metal contamination of home garden soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: Implications for human exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferri, Roberta [Occupational Health, University of Brescia (Italy); Hashim, Dana [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (United States); Smith, Donald R. [Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Guazzetti, Stefano [Public Health Service, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Donna, Filippo [Occupational Health, University of Brescia (Italy); Ferretti, Enrica; Curatolo, Michele; Moneta, Caterina [Department of Food Chemistry, Metal Laboratory, IZSLER, Brescia (Italy); Beone, Gian Maria [Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry, Università Cattolica, Piacenza (Italy); Lucchini, Roberto G. [Occupational Health, University of Brescia (Italy); Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (United States); Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Background: For the past century, ferroalloy industries in Brescia province, Italy produced particulate emissions enriched in manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al). This study assessed metal concentrations in soil and vegetables of regions with varying ferroalloy industrial activity levels. Methods: Home gardens (n = 63) were selected in three regions of varying ferroalloy plant activity durations in Brescia province. Total soil metal concentration and extractability were measured by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), aqua regia extraction, and modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. Unwashed and washed spinach and turnips cultivated in the same gardens were analyzed for metal concentrations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: Median soil Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in home gardens near ferroalloy plants compared to reference home gardens. The BCR method yielded the most mobile soil fraction (the sum of extractable metals in Fractions 1 and 2) and all metal concentrations were higher in ferroalloy plant areas. Unwashed spinach showed higher metal concentrations compared to washed spinach. However, some metals in washed spinach were higher in the reference area likely due to history of agricultural product use. Over 60% of spinach samples exceeded the 2- to 4-fold Commission of European Communities and Codex Alimentarius Commission maximum Pb concentrations, and 10% of the same spinach samples exceeded 2- to 3-fold maximum Cd concentrations set by both organizations. Turnip metal concentrations were below maximum standard reference values. Conclusions: Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1 + F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references

  9. Metal contamination of home garden soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: Implications for human exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, Roberta; Hashim, Dana; Smith, Donald R.; Guazzetti, Stefano; Donna, Filippo; Ferretti, Enrica; Curatolo, Michele; Moneta, Caterina; Beone, Gian Maria; Lucchini, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: For the past century, ferroalloy industries in Brescia province, Italy produced particulate emissions enriched in manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al). This study assessed metal concentrations in soil and vegetables of regions with varying ferroalloy industrial activity levels. Methods: Home gardens (n = 63) were selected in three regions of varying ferroalloy plant activity durations in Brescia province. Total soil metal concentration and extractability were measured by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), aqua regia extraction, and modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. Unwashed and washed spinach and turnips cultivated in the same gardens were analyzed for metal concentrations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: Median soil Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in home gardens near ferroalloy plants compared to reference home gardens. The BCR method yielded the most mobile soil fraction (the sum of extractable metals in Fractions 1 and 2) and all metal concentrations were higher in ferroalloy plant areas. Unwashed spinach showed higher metal concentrations compared to washed spinach. However, some metals in washed spinach were higher in the reference area likely due to history of agricultural product use. Over 60% of spinach samples exceeded the 2- to 4-fold Commission of European Communities and Codex Alimentarius Commission maximum Pb concentrations, and 10% of the same spinach samples exceeded 2- to 3-fold maximum Cd concentrations set by both organizations. Turnip metal concentrations were below maximum standard reference values. Conclusions: Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1 + F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references

  10. The stress response system of proteins: Implications for bioreactor scaleup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goochee, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    Animal cells face a variety of environmental stresses in large scale bioreactors, including periodic variations in shear stress and dissolved oxygen concentration. Diagnostic techniques were developed for identifying the particular sources of environmental stresses for animal cells in a given bioreactor configuration. The mechanisms by which cells cope with such stresses was examined. The individual concentrations and synthesis rates of hundreds of intracellular proteins are affected by the extracellular environment (medium composition, dissolved oxygen concentration, ph, and level of surface shear stress). Techniques are currently being developed for quantifying the synthesis rates and concentrations of the intracellular proteins which are most sensitive to environmental stress. Previous research has demonstrated that a particular set of stress response proteins are synthesized by mammalian cells in response to temperature fluctuations, dissolved oxygen deprivation, and glucose deprivation. Recently, it was demonstrated that exposure of human kidney cells to high shear stress results in expression of a completely distinct set of intracellular proteins.

  11. Use of Orbital Shaken Disposable Bioreactors for Mammalian Cell Cultures from the Milliliter-Scale to the 1,000-Liter Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Stettler, Matthieu; de Sanctis, Dario; Perrone, Marco; Parolini, Nicola; Discacciati, Marco; de Jesus, Maria; Hacker, David; Quarteroni, Alfio; Wurm, Florian

    Driven by the commercial success of recombinant biopharmaceuticals, there is an increasing demand for novel mammalian cell culture bioreactor systems for the rapid production of biologicals that require mammalian protein processing. Recently, orbitally shaken bioreactors at scales from 50 mL to 1,000 L have been explored for the cultivation of mammalian cells and are considered to be attractive alternatives to conventional stirred-tank bioreactors because of increased flexibility and reduced costs. Adequate oxygen transfer capacity was maintained during the scale-up, and strategies to increase further oxygen transfer rates (OTR) were explored, while maintaining favorable mixing parameters and low-stress conditions for sensitive lipid membrane-enclosed cells. Investigations from process development to the engineering properties of shaken bioreactors are underway, but the feasibility of establishing a robust, standardized, and transferable technical platform for mammalian cell culture based on orbital shaking and disposable materials has been established with further optimizations and studies ongoing.

  12. Online monitoring of cartilage tissue in a novel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Burg, E.; von Buttlar, M.; Grill, W.

    2011-04-01

    Standard techniques for the analysis of biological tissues like immunohistochemical staining are typically invasive and lead to mortification of cells. Non-invasive monitoring is an important element of regenerative medicine because implants and components of implants should be 100% quality-checked with non-invasive and therefore also marker-free methods. We report on a new bioreactor for the production of collagen scaffolds seeded with Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs). It contains a computer controlled mechanical activation and ultrasonic online monitoring and has been constructed for the in situ determination of ultrasonic and rheological parameters. During the cultivation period of about two weeks the scaffold is periodically compressed by two movable pistons for improved differentiation of the MSCs. This periodic compression beneficially ensures the supply with nutrition even inside the sample. During the physiological stimuli, rheological properties are measured by means of highly sensitive load cells. In addition measurements of the speed of sound in the sample and in the culture medium, with frequencies up to 16 MHz, are performed continuously. Therefore piezoceramic transducers are attached to the pistons and emit and detect ultrasonic waves, travelling through the pistons, the sample and the culture medium. The time-of-flight (TOF) of the ultrasonic signals is determined in real time with the aid of chirped excitation and correlation procedures with a resolution of at least 10 ps. The implemented ultrasonic measurement scheme allows beside the speed of sound measurements the detection of the distance between the pistons with a resolution better than 100 nm. The developed monitoring delivers information on rigidity, fluid dynamics and velocity of sound in the sample and in the culture medium. The hermetically sealed bioreactor with its life support system provides a biocompatible environment for MSCs for long time cultivation.

  13. Denitrification 'Woodchip' Bioreactors for Productive and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, L. E.; Summerfelt, S.; Sharrer, K.; Lepine, C.; Helmers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Growing alarm about negative cascading effects of reactive nitrogen in the environment has led to multifaceted efforts to address elevated nitrate-nitrogen levels in water bodies worldwide. The best way to mitigate N-related impacts, such as hypoxic zones and human health concerns, is to convert nitrate to stable, non-reactive dinitrogen gas through the natural process of denitrification. This means denitrification technologies need to be one of our major strategies for tackling the grand challenge of managing human-induced changes to our global nitrogen cycle. While denitrification technologies have historically been focused on wastewater treatment, there is great interest in new lower-tech options for treating effluent and drainage water from one of our largest reactive nitrogen emitters -- agriculture. Denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactors are able to enhance this natural N-conversion via addition of a solid carbon source (e.g., woodchips) and through designs that facilitate development of anoxic conditions required for denitrification. Wood-based denitrification technologies such as woodchip bioreactors and 'sawdust' walls for groundwater have been shown to be effective at reducing nitrate loads in agricultural settings around the world. Designing these systems to be low-maintenance and to avoid removing land from agricultural production has been a primary focus of this "farmer-friendly" technology. This presentation provides a background on woodchip bioreactors including design considerations, N-removal performance, and current research worldwide. Woodchip bioreactors for the agricultural sector are an accessible new option to address society's interest in improving water quality while simultaneously allowing highly productive agricultural systems to continue to provide food in the face of increasing demand, changing global diets, and fluctuating weather.

  14. Time efficient way to calculate oxygen transfer areas and power input in cylindrical disposable shaken bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöckner, Wolf; Lattermann, Clemens; Pursche, Franz; Büchs, Jochen; Werner, Sören; Eibl, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Disposable orbitally shaken bioreactors are a promising alternative to stirred or wave agitated systems for mammalian and plant cell cultivation, because they provide a homogeneous and well-defined liquid distribution together with a simple and cost-efficient design. Cultivation conditions in the surface-aerated bioreactors are mainly affected by the size of the volumetric oxygen transfer area (a) and the volumetric power input (P∕VL ) that both result from the liquid distribution during shaking. Since Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-commonly applied to simulate the liquid distribution in such bioreactors-needs high computing power, this technique is poorly suited to investigate the influence of many different operating conditions in various scales. Thus, the aim of this paper is to introduce a new mathematical model for calculating the values of a and P∕VL for liquids with water-like viscosities. The model equations were derived from the balance of centrifugal and gravitational forces exerted during shaking. A good agreement was found among calculated values for a and P∕VL , CFD simulation values and empirical results. The newly proposed model enables a time efficient way to calculate the oxygen transfer areas and power input for various shaking frequencies, filling volumes and shaking and reactor diameters. All these parameters can be calculated fast and with little computing power. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Impact of Furfural on Rapid Ethanol Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Taherzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A membrane bioreactor was developed to counteract the inhibition effect of furfural in ethanol production. Furfural, a major inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolyzates, is a highly toxic substance which is formed from pentose sugars released during the acidic degradation of lignocellulosic materials. Continuous cultivations with complete cell retention were performed at a high dilution rate of 0.5 h−1. Furfural was added directly into the bioreactor by pulse injection or by addition into the feed medium to obtain furfural concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 21.8 g L−1. At all pulse injections of furfural, the yeast was able to convert the furfural very rapidly by in situ detoxification. When injecting 21.8 g L−1 furfural to the cultivation, the yeast converted it by a specific conversion rate of 0.35 g g−1 h−1. At high cell density, Saccharomyces cerevisiae could tolerate very high furfural levels without major changes in the ethanol production. During the continuous cultures when up to 17.0 g L−1 furfural was added to the inlet medium, the yeast successfully produced ethanol, whereas an increase of furfural to 18.6 and 20.6 g L−1 resulted in a rapidly decreasing ethanol production and accumulation of sugars in the permeate. This study show that continuous ethanol fermentations by total cell retention in a membrane bioreactor has a high furfural tolerance and can conduct rapid in situ detoxification of medium containing high furfural concentrations.

  16. Characterization of mixing in a novel wavy-walled bioreactor for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgen, Bahar; Chang-Mateu, I Midey; Barabino, Gilda A

    2005-12-30

    The wavy-walled bioreactor (WWB) possesses a novel geometry comprised of walls with sinusoidal waves that mimic baffles in an effort to promote mixing. This geometry provides a unique hydrodynamic environment suitable for the cultivation of mammalian cells and tissues and the investigation of fluid mechanical effects on cell and tissue growth and development. In the present study, mixing in WWB was characterized and compared to that in a conventional spinner flask (SF). The key parameters included in this characterization were mixing time, residence time distribution (RTD), and dissolved oxygen concentration during engineered cartilage tissue cultivation. Factors that influenced mixing in WWB included wave amplitude, agitation rate, and the ratio of the impeller diameter to the tank diameter (D/T). Data obtained from RTD and acid base neutralization studies confirmed the presence of different mixing zones in WWB. A theoretical comparison of WWB to a baffled spinner flask (BSF) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling predicted that while enhanced mixing was achieved in wavy-walled and BSF bioreactors, the shear stresses applied on tissue constructs were 15% lower in WWB. Improved mixing was achieved in WWB compared to the SF at similar D/T ratios, verified by improved oxygen transport and increased dispersion. However, for lower D/T ratios mixing in WWB was not necessarily improved. This study demonstrated the importance of characterization of mixing by showing the impact of even minor changes in bioreactor geometry and operating conditions. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  17. Development of methodology for the fore cast of microbiological processes under transaction to industrial cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepeshkin, G.; Bugreev, V.

    1996-01-01

    Proposals for possible cooperation with Western partners : To obtain the scale transfers method in laboratory condition of microorganisms cultivation to industrial conditions based on the parameters of spatial cultivation to industrial conditions based on the parameters of spatial heterogeneous hydrodynamics situation in bioreactors. The problem is the impossibility to count constructive elements and regimes of ferments operation which provided optimum environment for microorganisms vital functions because the hydrodynamic, biological and mass change processes are complicated. To solve the problems it is required to : - Investigate the different sides of physiology of culture-producer of Biologically Active Substances (hereinafter BAS) - Investigate the interrelation between the stirring and biological transformation in microorganism cells - Analyze and search main tendencies required to control biosynthesis (BAS) processes and reproduction of biosynthesis results at the cultivation change scale - Analyze technical properties of the reactor and the revealing of the spatial heterogeneous hydrodynamics situation at the different scales of bioreactor parameters - Investigate cinematic energy mediums field in the different bioreactor scales - Obtain the criteria dependencies estimating the irregularity of the stirrings intensity - Prepare the methodological foundations of microbiological processes forecast required to introduce to the industrial biosynthesis environment Expected results : To detect the comparable regimes of bioreactor operation in order to achieve equal production range and realize the scale-up method

  18. Cultivating Community-Responsive Future Healthcare Professionals: Using Service-Learning in Pre-Health Humanities Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Casey

    2017-12-01

    This essay argues that service-learning pedagogy is an important tool in pre-health humanities education that provides benefits to the community and produces more compassionate, culturally competent, and community-responsive future healthcare professionals. Further, beginning this approach at the baccalaureate level instills democratic and collaborative values at an earlier, crucial time in the career socialization process. The discussion focuses on learning outcomes and reciprocity between the university and community in a Medical Humanities course for junior and senior premedical students, an elective in the premedical curriculum. The course includes an experiential learning element in which students shadow physicians and a service-learning component in which students complete medically-relevant service work, working with partners such as the veteran's hospital, a hospice home, and organizations that serve individuals with disabilities. We cover topics such as narrative medicine, ethics, cross-cultural medicine, patient/practitioner relationships, the human life cycle, and the illness experience, and the writing, discussion, and reflection we engage in is enriched by the real-world experiences from which the students are able to draw. The shadowing and service experiences and the classroom texts and topics combine to form a symbiosis that leads to especially meaningful teaching and learning outcomes.

  19. Production of extracellular bifidogenic growth stimulator (BGS) from Propionibacterium shermanii using a bioreactor system with a microfiltration module and an on-line controller for lactic acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouya, Tomoaki; Tobita, Kazuhiro; Horiuchi, Masahito; Nakayama, Eri; Deguchi, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Production of a bifidogenic growth stimulator (BGS) by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii (Propionibacterium shermanii) using lactic acid as a carbon source was investigated using different cultivation methods. When a continuous bioreactor system with a filtration device was used at a dilution rate of 0.075 h(-1), the average BGS concentration was 2.4 mg/l, which corresponds to a BGS productivity per cultivation time of 1.8 x 10(-1) mg x l(-1) x h(-1). The BGS productivity per cultivation time in continuous cultivation with filtration was 1.9-fold that (9.4 x 10(-2) mg x l(-1).h(-1)) in a conventional batch cultivation. In fed-batch cultivation with feed-back control using an on-line lactic acid controller with a lactic acid biosensor, it was possible to prevent substrate inhibition by maintaining the lactic acid concentration in culture broth low at 3.3 g/l, and an enhanced BGS production (31 mg/l) was successfully attained. The BGS productivity per cultivation time (2.1x10(-1) mg x l(-1) x h(-1)) in the fed-batch cultivation with feed-back control was 2.2-fold that in the conventional batch cultivation. A new bioreactor system was developed by coupling a continuous bioreactor system with a filtration device to an on-line lactic acid controller. Using the new bioreactor system, we produced BGS continuously at a high level of 47 mg/l. The BGS productivities per cultivation time (3.5 mg.l(-1) x h(-1)) and the total volume of medium used (1.7 x 10(-1) mg x l(-1) x h(-1)) obtained in the new bioreactor system were 37-fold and 2.1-fold those in the conventional batch cultivation, respectively. These results described above clearly demonstrate the positive effects of both the continuous filtration for removal of metabolites (propionic and acetic acids) inhibitory to cell growth and feed-back control of lactic acid concentration in the culture broth on BGS production by P. shermanii. This paper is the first report on BGS production by the propionic acid

  20. Bioreactor scale-up and oxygen transfer rate in microbial processes: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ochoa, Felix; Gomez, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    In aerobic bioprocesses, oxygen is a key substrate; due to its low solubility in broths (aqueous solutions), a continuous supply is needed. The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) must be known, and if possible predicted to achieve an optimum design operation and scale-up of bioreactors. Many studies have been conducted to enhance the efficiency of oxygen transfer. The dissolved oxygen concentration in a suspension of aerobic microorganisms depends on the rate of oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the liquid, on the rate at which oxygen is transported into the cells (where it is consumed), and on the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) by the microorganism for growth, maintenance and production. The gas-liquid mass transfer in a bioprocess is strongly influenced by the hydrodynamic conditions in the bioreactors. These conditions are known to be a function of energy dissipation that depends on the operational conditions, the physicochemical properties of the culture, the geometrical parameters of the bioreactor and also on the presence of oxygen consuming cells. Stirred tank and bubble column (of various types) bioreactors are widely used in a large variety of bioprocesses (such as aerobic fermentation and biological wastewater treatments, among others). Stirred tanks bioreactors provide high values of mass and heat transfer rates and excellent mixing. In these systems, a high number of variables affect the mass transfer and mixing, but the most important among them are stirrer speed, type and number of stirrers and gas flow rate used. In bubble columns and airlifts, the low-shear environment compared to the stirred tanks has enabled successful cultivation of shear sensitive and filamentous cells. Oxygen transfer is often the rate-limiting step in the aerobic bioprocess due to the low solubility of oxygen in the medium. The correct measurement and/or prediction of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient, (k(L)a), is a crucial step in the design, operation and scale-up of

  1. Technical evaluation of photobioreactors for microalgae cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płaczek Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper undertakes the description and assessment of various solutions applied for the design of photobioreactors as the type of apparatus, which can provide high output of green algae biomass. The design of such apparatus plays an important role in the context of the concurrent fulfillment of ecological and economic requirements, which are necessary to conduct an efficient and effective technology using cheap and easily accessible resources to produce different goods. Nowadays, algae is seen as one of the most promising sustainable way to produce energy in the future (biofuels, electricity, thermal energy but technologies of biomass production and processing are still under development particularly to increase biomass and energy output. The cultivation costs in closed systems are still high, limiting their commercial applications to high-valued compounds but they can be reduced by efficient bioreactor designs, which are able to achieve high areal biomass productivities. This paper focuses on the advantages and drawbacks associated with the application of the particular types of bioreactors in algae production, description of their operation parameters and area for practical application, pointing of the constructions (tubular, flat panel, bubble column that can contribute to improvement the profitability of large-scale production.

  2. Technical evaluation of photobioreactors for microalgae cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płaczek, Małgorzata; Patyna, Agnieszka; Witczak, Stanisław

    2017-10-01

    This paper undertakes the description and assessment of various solutions applied for the design of photobioreactors as the type of apparatus, which can provide high output of green algae biomass. The design of such apparatus plays an important role in the context of the concurrent fulfillment of ecological and economic requirements, which are necessary to conduct an efficient and effective technology using cheap and easily accessible resources to produce different goods. Nowadays, algae is seen as one of the most promising sustainable way to produce energy in the future (biofuels, electricity, thermal energy) but technologies of biomass production and processing are still under development particularly to increase biomass and energy output. The cultivation costs in closed systems are still high, limiting their commercial applications to high-valued compounds but they can be reduced by efficient bioreactor designs, which are able to achieve high areal biomass productivities. This paper focuses on the advantages and drawbacks associated with the application of the particular types of bioreactors in algae production, description of their operation parameters and area for practical application, pointing of the constructions (tubular, flat panel, bubble column) that can contribute to improvement the profitability of large-scale production.

  3. Biofabrication of customized bone grafts by combination of additive manufacturing and bioreactor knowhow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Pedro F; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Vaquette, Cédryck; Baldwin, Jeremy; Chhaya, Mohit; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on an original concept of additive manufacturing for the fabrication of tissue engineered constructs (TEC), offering the possibility of concomitantly manufacturing a customized scaffold and a bioreactor chamber to any size and shape. As a proof of concept towards the development of anatomically relevant TECs, this concept was utilized for the design and fabrication of a highly porous sheep tibia scaffold around which a bioreactor chamber of similar shape was simultaneously built. The morphology of the bioreactor/scaffold device was investigated by micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy confirming the porous architecture of the sheep tibiae as opposed to the non-porous nature of the bioreactor chamber. Additionally, this study demonstrates that both the shape, as well as the inner architecture of the device can significantly impact the perfusion of fluid within the scaffold architecture. Indeed, fluid flow modelling revealed that this was of significant importance for controlling the nutrition flow pattern within the scaffold and the bioreactor chamber, avoiding the formation of stagnant flow regions detrimental for in vitro tissue development. The bioreactor/scaffold device was dynamically seeded with human primary osteoblasts and cultured under bi-directional perfusion for two and six weeks. Primary human osteoblasts were observed homogenously distributed throughout the scaffold, and were viable for the six week culture period. This work demonstrates a novel application for additive manufacturing in the development of scaffolds and bioreactors. Given the intrinsic flexibility of the additive manufacturing technology platform developed, more complex culture systems can be fabricated which would contribute to the advances in customized and patient-specific tissue engineering strategies for a wide range of applications. (paper)

  4. Biofabrication of customized bone grafts by combination of additive manufacturing and bioreactor knowhow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro F; Vaquette, Cédryck; Baldwin, Jeremy; Chhaya, Mohit; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on an original concept of additive manufacturing for the fabrication of tissue engineered constructs (TEC), offering the possibility of concomitantly manufacturing a customized scaffold and a bioreactor chamber to any size and shape. As a proof of concept towards the development of anatomically relevant TECs, this concept was utilized for the design and fabrication of a highly porous sheep tibia scaffold around which a bioreactor chamber of similar shape was simultaneously built. The morphology of the bioreactor/scaffold device was investigated by micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy confirming the porous architecture of the sheep tibiae as opposed to the non-porous nature of the bioreactor chamber. Additionally, this study demonstrates that both the shape, as well as the inner architecture of the device can significantly impact the perfusion of fluid within the scaffold architecture. Indeed, fluid flow modelling revealed that this was of significant importance for controlling the nutrition flow pattern within the scaffold and the bioreactor chamber, avoiding the formation of stagnant flow regions detrimental for in vitro tissue development. The bioreactor/scaffold device was dynamically seeded with human primary osteoblasts and cultured under bi-directional perfusion for two and six weeks. Primary human osteoblasts were observed homogenously distributed throughout the scaffold, and were viable for the six week culture period. This work demonstrates a novel application for additive manufacturing in the development of scaffolds and bioreactors. Given the intrinsic flexibility of the additive manufacturing technology platform developed, more complex culture systems can be fabricated which would contribute to the advances in customized and patient-specific tissue engineering strategies for a wide range of applications.

  5. Assessment of metal and bacterial contamination in cultivated fish and impact on human health for residents living in the Mekong Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanpiwat, Penradee; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Widmer, Kenneth; Himeno, Seiichiro; Miyataka, Hideki; Vu, Ngoc-Ut; Tran, Van-Viet; Pham, Thi-Tuyet-Ngan

    2016-11-01

    Fish is the main source of animal protein and micronutrients for inhabitants in the lower Mekong River basin. Consumption of fish in the basin ranges from 41 to 51 kg capita(-1) year(-1). Thus, concerns of human health impacts caused by daily intake of metals contained in fish, and the incidence of bacterial contamination from Listeria and Escherichia coli have been raised. This study was conducted to 1) determine concentrations of metals, fecal indicator organisms, and Listeria spp. in cultivated common diet fish, and 2) assess human health risks as results of fish consumption on a daily basis. The results showed significant impacts of metal accumulation in fish especially from the intensive aquaculture. Chemical use to promote the rapid allometric growth of fish was expected to be the explanation for this finding. Concentrations of metals contained in different fish species were not statistically different with the exceptions of Na, Mn, and Zn. This might be due to the mobility of elements in aquaculture farms. Listeria and E. coli log CFU/g were 1.36 ± 0.11 (standard error) and 1.57 ± 0.1 s.e., respectively with higher counts observed in samples collected in market sites. Lastly, for human health risk assessment via fish consumption, it was found that hazard quotients of consuming As, Cu, and Zn contained in all fish species could contribute adverse health effects to the local residents (hazard quotients higher than 1). Therefore, risk management measures must be promoted and implemented in all study areas to reduce potential risks to local Vietnamese residents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cultivation of corneal endothelial cells on a pericellular matrix prepared from human decidua-derived mesenchymal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Numata

    Full Text Available The barrier and pump functions of the corneal endothelium are essential for the maintenance of corneal transparency. Although corneal transplantation is the only current therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction, the potential of tissue-engineering techniques to provide highly efficient and less invasive therapy in comparison to corneal transplantation has been highly anticipated. However, culturing human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs is technically difficult, and there is no established culture protocol. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a pericellular matrix prepared from human decidua-derived mesenchymal cells (PCM-DM as an animal-free substrate for HCEC culture for future clinical applications. PCM-DM enhanced the adhesion of monkey CECs (MCECs via integrin, promoted cell proliferation, and suppressed apoptosis. The HCECs cultured on the PCM-DM showed a hexagonal morphology and a staining profile characteristic of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and ZO-1 at the plasma membrane in vivo, whereas the control HCECs showed a fibroblastic phenotype. The cell density of the cultured HCECs on the PCM-DM was significantly higher than that of the control cells. These results indicate that PCM-DM provides a feasible xeno-free matrix substrate and that it offers a viable in vitro expansion protocol for HCECs while maintaining cellular functions for use as a subsequent clinical intervention for tissue-engineered based therapy of corneal endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Attached cultivation for improving the biomass productivity of Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanlan; Chen, Lin; Wang, Junfeng; Chen, Yu; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Zhaohui; Liu, Tianzhong

    2015-04-01

    To improve cultivation efficiency for microalgae Spirulina platensis is related to increase its potential use as food source and as an effective alternative for CO2 fixation. The present work attempted to establish a technique, namely attached cultivation, for S. platensis. Laboratory experiments were made firstly to investigate optimal conditions on attached cultivation. The optimal conditions were found: 25 g m(-2) for initial inoculum density using electrostatic flocking cloth as substrata, light intensity lower than 200 μmol m(-2) s(-1), CO2 enriched air flow (0.5%) at a superficial aeration rate of 0.0056 m s(-1) in a NaHCO3-free Zarrouk medium. An outdoor attached cultivation bench-scale bioreactor was built and a 10d culture of S. platensis was carried out with daily harvesting. A high footprint areal biomass productivity of 60 g m(-2) d(-1) was obtained. The nutrition of S. platensis with attached cultivation is identical to that with conventional liquid cultivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Miscanthus cultivation on metal fractionation and human bioaccessibility in metal-contaminated soils: comparison between greenhouse and field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrêne, Aurélie; Kleckerová, Andrea; Pourrut, Bertrand; Nsanganwimana, Florien; Douay, Francis; Waterlot, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    The in situ stabilization of metals in soils using plants with great biomass value is a promising, cost-effective, and ecologically friendly alternative to manage metal-polluted sites. The goal of phytostabilization is to reduce the bioavailable concentrations of metals in polluted soil and thus reduce the risk to the environment and human health. In this context, this study aimed at evaluating Miscanthus × giganteus efficiency in phytostabilizing metals on three contaminated agricultural sites after short-term exposure under greenhouse conditions and after long-term exposure under field conditions. Particular attention was paid to the influence of Miscanthus cultivation on (i) Cd, Pb, and Zn fractionation using sequential extractions and (ii) metal bioaccessibility using an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion test. Data gave evidence of (i) different behaviors between the greenhouse and the field; (ii) metal redistribution in soils induced by Miscanthus culture, more specifically under field conditions; (iii) higher environmental availability for Cd than for Pb and Zn was found in both conditions; and (iv) overall, a higher bioaccessible fraction for Pb (about 80 %) and Cd (65-77 %) than for Zn (36-52 %) was recorded in the gastric phase, with a sharp decrease in the intestinal phase (18-35 % for Cd, 5-30 % for Pb, and 36-52 % for Zn). Compared to soils without culture, the results showed that phytostabilization using Miscanthus culture provided evidence for substantial effects on oral bioaccessibility of Cd, Pb, and Zn.

  9. Jatropha cultivation in Malawi and Mozambique: impact on ecosystem services, local human well-being, and poverty alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham P. von Maltitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha-based biofuels have undergone a rapid boom-and-bust cycle in southern Africa. Despite strong initial support by governments, donors, and the private sector, there is a lack of empirical studies that compare the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of Jatropha's two dominant modes of production: large plantations and smallholder-based projects. We apply a rapid ecosystem services assessment approach to understand the impact of two Jatropha projects that are still operational despite widespread project collapse across southern Africa: a smallholder-based project (BERL, Malawi and a large plantation (Niqel, Mozambique. Our study focuses on changes in provisioning ecosystem services such as biofuel feedstock, food, and woodland products that can have important effects on human well-being locally. Qualitative information is provided for other regulating and cultural ecosystem services. Although at this stage no impact is tremendously positive or negative, both projects show some signs of viability and local poverty alleviation potential. However, their long-term sustainability is not guaranteed given low yields, uncertain markets, and some prevailing management practices.

  10. [Current researches and prospects of seedling propagation and cultivation modes of Jinxianlian].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing-Song; Ye, Shen-Yi; Zhou, Ai-Cun; Wang, Hong-Zhen; Zhang, Ai-Lian; Xu, Jian-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of on-the-spot investigation into Chinese major production bases in Fujian, Zhejiang, Jiangxi, Taiwan, Guangxi and Yunnan provinces, and based on relevant literature, the paper systematically elaborates the current researches of botanical origin, major cultivation type, seedling propagation technique as well as cultivation mode of Jinxianlian. The way of seedling breeding mainly includes aseptic seed culture, in vitro propagation, artificial seed and bioreactor propagation, etc. And the planting model mainly includes protected cultivation modes, bionic wild cultivation modes and pot cultivation modes, etc. Further discussions have also been conducted to tackle significant problems existing in the production process of Jinxianlian, based on personal studies of the authors. It has made considerable contributions for the betterment of Jinxianlian's development and improvement. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  11. Thin film bioreactors in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Scheld, H. W.

    Studies from the Skylab, SL-3 and D-1 missions have demonstrated that biological organisms grown in microgravity have changes in basic cellular functions such as DNA, mRNA and protein synthesis, cytoskeleton synthesis, glucose utilization and cellular differentiation. Since microgravity could affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells at a subcellular and molecular level, space offers us an opportunity to learn more about basic biological systems with one important variable removed. The thin film bioreactor will facilitate the handling of fluids in microgravity, under constant temperature and will allow multiple samples of cells to be grown with variable conditions. Studies on cell cultures grown in microgravity would enable us to identify and quantify changes in basic biological function in microgravity which are needed to develop new applications of orbital research and future biotechnology.

  12. Energy efficiency in membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillon, B; Martin Ruel, S; Langlais, C; Lazarova, V

    2013-01-01

    Energy consumption remains the key factor for the optimisation of the performance of membrane bioreactors (MBRs). This paper presents the results of the detailed energy audits of six full-scale MBRs operated by Suez Environnement in France, Spain and the USA based on on-site energy measurement and analysis of plant operation parameters and treatment performance. Specific energy consumption is compared for two different MBR configurations (flat sheet and hollow fibre membranes) and for plants with different design, loads and operation parameters. The aim of this project was to understand how the energy is consumed in MBR facilities and under which operating conditions, in order to finally provide guidelines and recommended practices for optimisation of MBR operation and design to reduce energy consumption and environmental impacts.

  13. Oxygen transfer in slurry bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Y; Moo-Young, M

    1991-04-25

    The oxygen transfer in bioreactors with slurries having a yield stress was investigated. The volumetric mass transfer coefficients in a 40-L bubble column with simulated fermentation broths, the Theological properties of which were represented by the Casson model, were measured. Experimental data were compared with a theoretical correlation developed on the basis of a combination of Higbie's penetration theory and Kolmogoroff's theory of isotropic turbulence. Comparisons between the proposed correlation and data for the simulated broths show good agreement. The mass transfer data for actual mycelial fermentation broths reported previously by the authors were re-examined. Their Theological data was correlated by the Bingham plastic model. The oxygen transfer rate data in the mycelial fermentation broths fit the predictions of the proposed theoretical correlation.

  14. Effect of operating conditions in production of diagnostic Salmonella Enteritidis O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody in different bioreactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz-Tamis, Duygu; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Elibol, Murat; Deliloglu-Gurhan, Saime Ismet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, different cultivation systems such as roller bottles (RB), 5-L stirred-tank bioreactor (STR), and disposable bioreactors were used to cultivate hybridoma for lab-scale production of Salmonella Enteritidis O-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb). Hybridoma cell line was cultivated in either serum-containing or serum-free medium (SFM) culture conditions. In STR, MAb production scaled up to 4 L, and production capabilities of the cells were also evaluated in different featured production systems. Moreover, the growth parameters of the cells in all production systems such as glucose consumption, lactate and ammonia production, and also MAb productivities were determined. Collected supernatants from the reactors were concentrated by a cross-flow filtration system. In conclusion, cells were not adapted to SFM in RB and STR. Therefore, less MAb titer in both STR and RB systems with SFM was observed compared to the cultures containing fetal bovine serum-supplemented medium. A higher MAb titer was gained in the membrane-aerated system compared to those in STR and RB. Although the highest MAb titer was obtained in the static membrane bioreactor system, the highest productivity was obtained in STR operated in semicontinuous mode with overlay aeration.

  15. Submerged Culture of Mushrooms in Bioreactors – Challenges, Current State-of-the-Art, and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wen Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal mushrooms have profound health-promoting benefits. Recently, a number of substances of mushroom origin have been isolated, identified and shown to have physiological activities, such as antitumor, immunomodulating, cardiovascular, antihypercholesterolemia, antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic activities. Currently, commercial products from medicinal mushrooms are mostly obtained through the field-cultivation of the fruiting body. However, in this case it is difficult to control the quality of the final product. Submerged fermentation of the mycelial form of mushroom-producing fungi has received much attention as a promising alternative for efficient production of the biomass of medicinal mushrooms and their active metabolites. However, in order for the production to be successful at industrial scale, various technical problems need to be solved, including characterization of the variations that occur during the submerged cultivation of mushrooms in bioreactors and their effects on growth and product formation. This review outlines the major factors that affect the submerged cultivation of mushrooms in bioreactors, including oxygen supply, shear and mixing, morphology and rheology, as well as two-stage cultivation strategies and high-cell-density cultivation strategies such as fed-batch fermentation.

  16. Modeling and CFD simulation of nutrient distribution in picoliter bioreactors for bacterial growth studies on single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerwalbesloh, Christoph; Grünberger, Alexander; Stute, Birgit; Weber, Sophie; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; von Lieres, Eric

    2015-11-07

    A microfluidic device for microbial single-cell cultivation of bacteria was modeled and simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics. The liquid velocity field and the mass transfer within the supply channels and cultivation chambers were calculated to gain insight in the distribution of supplied nutrients and metabolic products secreted by the cultivated bacteria. The goal was to identify potential substrate limitations or product accumulations within the cultivation device. The metabolic uptake and production rates, colony size, and growth medium composition were varied covering a wide range of operating conditions. Simulations with glucose as substrate did not show limitations within the typically used concentration range, but for alternative substrates limitations could not be ruled out. This lays the foundation for further studies and the optimization of existing picoliter bioreactor systems.

  17. Chip-based three-dimensional cell culture in perfused micro-bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Eric; Lahni, Brigitte; Thiele, David; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Welle, Alexander; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich

    2008-05-21

    We have developed a chip-based cell culture system for the three-dimensional cultivation of cells. The chip is typically manufactured from non-biodegradable polymers, e.g., polycarbonate or polymethyl methacrylate by micro injection molding, micro hot embossing or micro thermo-forming. But, it can also be manufactured from bio-degradable polymers. Its overall dimensions are 0.7 1 x 20 x 20 x 0.7 1 mm (h x w x l). The main features of the chips used are either a grid of up to 1156 cubic micro-containers (cf-chip) each the size of 120-300 x 300 x 300 micron (h x w x l) or round recesses with diameters of 300 micron and a depth of 300 micron (r-chip). The scaffold can house 10 Mio. cells in a three-dimensional configuration. For an optimal nutrient and gas supply, the chip is inserted in a bioreactor housing. The bioreactor is part of a closed sterile circulation loop that, in the simplest configuration, is additionally comprised of a roller pump and a medium reservoir with a gas supply. The bioreactor can be run in perfusion, superfusion, or even a mixed operation mode. We have successfully cultivated cell lines as well as primary cells over periods of several weeks. For rat primary liver cells we could show a preservation of organotypic functions for more than 2 weeks. For hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines we could show the induction of liver specific genes not or only slightly expressed in standard monolayer culture. The system might also be useful as a stem cell cultivation system since first differentiation experiments with stem cell lines were promising.

  18. Spirulina cultivation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo-Tang; Xiang, Wen-Zhou; Zeng, Cheng-Kui

    1998-03-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the development and many problems of Spirulina cultivation in China, points out the advantages and disadvantages of open photobioreactor system, and predicts that seawater Spirulina cultivation will be a new trend to be strengthened and emphasized due to its special physiological characteristics, easier management, lower fertilizer cost, and higher resistance to contaminants and rare pollution of chemicals.

  19. Efficacy of Bioremediation of Agricultural Runoff Using Bacterial Communities in Woodchip Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Z. H.; Leandro, M.; Silveus, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    California's agricultural sector is fundamental in the State's economic growth and is responsible for supplying a large portion of the country's produce. In order to meet the market's demand for crop production the region's agrarian landscape requires an abundance of nutrient rich irrigation. The resultant agricultural effluent is a source of increased nutrient content in California's watershed and groundwater systems, promoting eutrophication and contributing to negative impacts on local ecosystems and human health. Previous studies have examined the denitrification potential of woodchip bioreactors. However, research has been deficient regarding specific variables that may affect the remediation process. To evaluate the efficacy of woodchip bioreactors in remediating waters containing high nitrate concentrations, denitrification rates were examined and parameters such as temperature, laminar flow, and hydraulic residence times were measured to identify potential methods for increasing denitrification efficiency. By measuring the rate of denitrification in a controlled environment where potentially confounding factors can be manipulated, physical components affecting the efficiency of woodchip bioreactors were examined to assess effects. Our research suggests the implementation of woodchip bioreactors to treat agricultural runoff would significantly reduce the concentration of nitrate in agricultural effluent and contribute to the mitigation of negative impacts associated with agricultural irrigation. Future research should focus on the ability of woodchip bioreactors to successfully remediate other agricultural pollutants, such as phosphates and pesticides, to optimize the efficiency of the bioremediation process.

  20. The Effect of a p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Inhibitor on Cellular Senescence of Cultivated Human Corneal Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Akane; Okumura, Naoki; Nakahara, Makiko; Kay, EunDuck P; Koizumi, Noriko

    2017-07-01

    We have begun a clinical trial of a cell-based therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction in Japan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of a p38 MAPK inhibitor for prevention cellular senescence in cultivated human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). HCECs of 10 donor corneas were divided and cultured with or without SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor). Cell density and morphology were evaluated by phase-contrast microscopy. Expression of function-related proteins was examined by immunofluorescent staining. Cellular senescence was evaluated by SA-β-gal staining and Western blotting for p16 and p21. Senescence-associated factors were evaluated by membrane blotting array, quantitative PCR, and ELISA. Phase-contrast microscopy showed a significantly higher cell density for HCECs cultured with SB203580 than without SB203580 (2623 ± 657 cells/mm2 and 1752 ± 628 cells/mm2, respectively). The HCECs cultured with SB203580 maintained a hexagonal morphology and expressed ZO-1, N-cadherin, and Na+/K+-ATPase in the plasma membrane, whereas the control HCECs showed an altered staining pattern for these marker proteins. HCECs cultured without SB203580 showed high positive SA-β-gal staining, a low nuclear/cytoplasm ratio, and expression of p16 and p21. IL-6, IL-8, CCL2, and CXCL1 were observed at high levels in low cell density HCECs cultured without SB203580. Activation of p38 MAPK signaling due to culture stress might be a causative factor that induces cellular senescence; therefore, the use of p38 MAPK inhibitor to counteract senescence may achieve sufficient numbers of HCECs for tissue engineering therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction.

  1. Cultivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis in the Human Spaceflight Environment Leads to Alterations in the Frequency and Spectrum of Spontaneous Rifampicin-Resistance Mutations in the rpoB Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are persistent inhabitants of human spaceflight habitats and represent potential opportunistic pathogens. The effect of the human spaceflight environment on the growth and the frequency of mutations to antibiotic resistance in the model organism Staphylococcus epidermidis strain ATCC12228 was investigated. Six cultures of the test organism were cultivated in biological research in canisters-Petri dish fixation units for 122 h on orbit in the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the SpaceX-3 resupply mission. Asynchronous ground controls (GCs) consisted of identical sets of cultures cultivated for 122 h in the ISS Environmental Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. S. epidermidis exhibited significantly lower viable counts but significantly higher frequencies of mutation to rifampicin (Rif) resistance in space vs. GC cultures. The spectrum of mutations in the rpoB gene leading to Rif(R) was altered in S. epidermidis isolates cultivated in the ISS compared to GCs. The results suggest that the human spaceflight environment induces unique physiologic stresses on growing bacterial cells leading to changes in mutagenic potential.

  2. Advancing gut microbiome research using cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten OA

    2015-01-01

    Culture-independent approaches have driven the field of microbiome research and illuminated intricate relationships between the gut microbiota and human health. However, definitively associating phenotypes to specific strains or elucidating physiological interactions is challenging for metagenomic...... approaches. Recently a number of new approaches to gut microbiota cultivation have emerged through the integration of high-throughput phylogenetic mapping and new simplified cultivation methods. These methodologies are described along with their potential use within microbiome research. Deployment of novel...

  3. Plant cell culture using a novel bioreactor: the magnetically stabilized fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramble, J L; Graves, D J; Brodelius, P

    1990-01-01

    A novel bioreactor using magnetically stabilized fluidized bed (MSFB) technology has been developed that has certain advantages for cultivating cells continuously. In this system, the cells are protected from shear and are constrained to move through the fermenter in lock-step fashion by being immobilized in calcium alginate beads. The MSFB permits good mass transfer, minimizes particle collisions, and allows for the production of cells while maintaining a controlled cell residence time. Details of the experimental system are described. In addition, the experimental performance of an MSFB used to grow plant cells in batch mode is compared to the results obtained in shake flask culture.

  4. Tubular bioreactor and its application; Tubular bioreactor to sono tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, I.; Nagamune, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yuki, K. [Nikka Whisky Distilling Co. Ltd. Tokyo (Japan); Inaba, H. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-05

    The loop type tubular bioreactor (TBR) was developed where biocatalysts are trapped in the reactor by membrane module. A UF membrane or MF membrane and crossflow filtration were adopted for the membrane module, and the reactor loop was composed of four membrane modules. The reactor was operated at 2-4 m/s in membrane surface velocity and 300-400 kPa in filtration pressure. As the result of the high-density culture of lactic acid bacteria and yeast, a biomass concentration was more than 10 times that in batch culture, suggesting the remarkable enhancement of a production efficiency. As the result of the continuous fermentation of cider, the fast fermentation more than 60 times that in conventional ones was obtained together with the same quality as conventional ones. Such a fast fermentation was probably achieved by yeast suspended in the fermenter of TBR, by yeast hardly affected physico-chemically as compared with immobilized reactors, and by small effect of mass transfer on reaction systems. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Studies of Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Immune Disorders Using Synthetic Peptides and Rotating Bioreactor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Jagannadha K.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments using mouse immune-precursor cells, and observed that bioreactor culturing results in the loss of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function. The reason for the abrogation of CTL function is microgravity conditions in the bioreactor, but not the antigen per se or its MHC restriction. Similarly, we observed that allostimulation of human PBMC in the bioreactor, but not in the T flask, resulted in the blunting of both allo-CTL function and the NK activity, indicating that the microgravity-associated functional defects are not unique to the mouse system. These results provide further confirmation to the microgravity-associated immune dysfunction, and constitute ground-based confirmatory data for those related to space-travel.

  6. Heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae for pigment production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Nagarajan, Dillirani; Zhang, Quanguo; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lee, Duu-Jong

    Pigments (mainly carotenoids) are important nutraceuticals known for their potent anti-oxidant activities and have been used extensively as high end health supplements. Microalgae are the most promising sources of natural carotenoids and are devoid of the toxic effects associated with synthetic derivatives. Compared to photoautotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae in well-controlled bioreactors for pigments production has attracted much attention for commercial applications due to overcoming the difficulties associated with the supply of CO 2 and light, as well as avoiding the contamination problems and land requirements in open autotrophic culture systems. In this review, the heterotrophic metabolic potential of microalgae and their uses in pigment production are comprehensively described. Strategies to enhance pigment production under heterotrophic conditions are critically discussed and the challenges faced in heterotrophic pigment production with possible alternative solutions are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Open source software to control Bioflo bioreactors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Burdge

    Full Text Available Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW.

  8. Open Source Software to Control Bioflo Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdge, David A.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW. PMID:24667828

  9. Open source software to control Bioflo bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdge, David A; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW.

  10. The importance of bicarbonate and nonbicarbonate buffer systems in batch and continuous flow bioreactors for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aasma A; Surrao, Denver C

    2012-05-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering an optimized culture system, maintaining an appropriate extracellular environment (e.g., pH of media), can increase cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation. We have previously reported on a continuous-flow bioreactor that improves tissue growth by supplying the cells with a near infinite supply of medium. Previous studies have observed that acidic environments reduce ECM synthesis and chondrocyte proliferation. Hence, in this study we investigated the combined effects of a continuous culture system (bioreactor) together with additional buffering agents (e.g., sodium bicarbonate [NaHCO₃]) on cartilaginous tissue growth in vitro. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown in three-dimensional cultures, either in static conditions or in a continuous-flow bioreactor, in media with or without NaHCO₃. Tissue constructs cultivated in the bioreactor with NaHCO₃-supplemented media were characterized with significantly increased (p<0.05) ECM accumulation (glycosaminoglycans a 98-fold increase; collagen a 25-fold increase) and a 13-fold increase in cell proliferation, in comparison with static cultures. Additionally, constructs grown in the bioreactor with NaHCO₃-supplemented media were significantly thicker than all other constructs (p<0.05). Further, the chondrocytes from the primary construct expanded and synthesized ECM, forming a secondary construct without a separate expansion phase, with a diameter and thickness of 4 mm and 0.72 mm respectively. Tissue outgrowth was negligible in all other culturing conditions. Thus this study demonstrates the advantage of employing a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with NaHCO₃ supplemented media for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  11. Bioreactor design and optimization – a future perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    Bioreactor design and optimisation are essential in translating the experience gained from lab or pilot scale experiments to efficient production processes in industrial scale bioreactors. This article gives a future perspective on bioreactor design and optimisation, where it is foreseen that tec...

  12. Packed bed bioreactor with porous ceramic beads for animal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S; Stephanopoulos, G

    1993-01-05

    A packed bed bioreactor was investigated as means for the cultivation of mammalian cells. The packed bed is comprised of porous ceramic particles with pores sufficiently large for cell immobilization as well as for intraparticle convective flow. In this way, the transport of limiting nutrients such as oxygen can be significantly enhanced, allowing maintenance of cell viability and productivity in an environment protective of adverse shear effects. The extent of intraparticle convective medium flow was experimentally quantified relative to the reactor operating conditions, and was found to be the dominant mechanism of nutrient transport to cells immobilized in the particle interior. An approximate linear relationship was obtained between overall reactor productivity and the extent of intraparticle convection. As the latter can be controlled at the single-particle level through total flow rate control, this relationship is a useful scale-up tool for the design of bioreactors. The high cell densities and the high volumetric productivities achieved by using small lab-scale reactors underline the potential of this simple bioreactor configuration for large-scale cell culture applications.

  13. Heat and Mass Transfer Remote Control in Bioreactors of Technological Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija M. Mel’nick

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The main problems that arise when using equipment for cultivation are to ensure the heat and mass transfer processes in devices, presence of turbulent and stagnant zones, high-energy consumption, low heat transfer coefficients when working with viscous fluids. Objective. The aim of the paper is the experimental determination of the remote control heat transfer advantages in production line bioreactors using ultrasonic beam compared to contact methods. Methods. An experimental study of the heat and mass transfer process in a bioreactor on the stand with UZP-6-1 immersion unit of the ultrasonic radiator with radiation frequency 42 kHz is carried out. Results. Sound waves emitted into a liquid form a concentration zone of passable sound energy in the confocal vessel form of a cylindrical surface and force the liquid to move along the inner surface of the glass along the ascending cylindrical spiral, forming a motive flow throughout the volume, causing peripheral layers of liquid and bottom layers to move in a horizontal and vertical planes, without leaving stagnant zones. The closer to the coincidence angle is the directed ultrasonic beam the greater is the effectiveness of the driving flow. Conclusions. The use of sound waves allows obtaining a high-quality product in technological lines based on bioreactors with minimal risk for the technological process. Radiation parameters and working volume physic-mechanical properties change allow fully using the properties of resonant manifestations of the sound wave influence on the working liquid with minimal costs.

  14. Comparison of microalgae cultivation in photobioreactor, open raceway pond, and a two-stage hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh R Narala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of intensive fossil fuel usage and CO2 accumulation in the environment, research is targeted towards sustainable alternate bioenergy that can suffice the growing need for fuel and also that leaves a minimal carbon footprint. Oil production from microalgae can potentially be carried out more efficiently, leaving a smaller footprint and without competing for arable land or biodiverse landscapes. However, current algae cultivation systems and lipid induction processes must be significantly improved and are threatened by contamination with other algae or algal grazers. To address this issue, we have developed an efficient two-stage cultivation system using the marine microalga Tetraselmis sp. M8. This hybrid system combines exponential biomass production in positive pressure air lift-driven bioreactors with a separate synchronized high-lipid induction phase in nutrient deplete open raceway ponds. A comparison to either bioreactor or open raceway pond cultivation system suggests that this process potentially leads to significantly higher productivity of algal lipids. Nutrients are only added to the closed bioreactors while open raceway ponds have turnovers of only a few days, thus reducing the issue of microalgal grazers.

  15. Comparison of Microalgae Cultivation in Photobioreactor, Open Raceway Pond, and a Two-Stage Hybrid System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narala, Rakesh R.; Garg, Sourabh; Sharma, Kalpesh K.; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Deme, Miklos; Li, Yan; Schenk, Peer M.

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of intensive fossil fuel usage and CO 2 accumulation in the environment, research is targeted toward sustainable alternate bioenergy that can suffice the growing need for fuel and also that leaves a minimal carbon footprint. Oil production from microalgae can potentially be carried out more efficiently, leaving a smaller footprint and without competing for arable land or biodiverse landscapes. However, current algae cultivation systems and lipid induction processes must be significantly improved and are threatened by contamination with other algae or algal grazers. To address this issue, we have developed an efficient two-stage cultivation system using the marine microalga Tetraselmis sp. M8. This hybrid system combines exponential biomass production in positive pressure air lift-driven bioreactors with a separate synchronized high-lipid induction phase in nutrient deplete open raceway ponds. A comparison to either bioreactor or open raceway pond cultivation system suggests that this process potentially leads to significantly higher productivity of algal lipids. Nutrients are only added to the closed bioreactors, while open raceway ponds have turnovers of only a few days, thus reducing the issue of microalgal grazers.

  16. Comparison of Microalgae Cultivation in Photobioreactor, Open Raceway Pond, and a Two-Stage Hybrid System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narala, Rakesh R.; Garg, Sourabh; Sharma, Kalpesh K.; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Deme, Miklos; Li, Yan; Schenk, Peer M., E-mail: p.schenk@uq.edu.au [Algae Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    2016-08-02

    In the wake of intensive fossil fuel usage and CO{sub 2} accumulation in the environment, research is targeted toward sustainable alternate bioenergy that can suffice the growing need for fuel and also that leaves a minimal carbon footprint. Oil production from microalgae can potentially be carried out more efficiently, leaving a smaller footprint and without competing for arable land or biodiverse landscapes. However, current algae cultivation systems and lipid induction processes must be significantly improved and are threatened by contamination with other algae or algal grazers. To address this issue, we have developed an efficient two-stage cultivation system using the marine microalga Tetraselmis sp. M8. This hybrid system combines exponential biomass production in positive pressure air lift-driven bioreactors with a separate synchronized high-lipid induction phase in nutrient deplete open raceway ponds. A comparison to either bioreactor or open raceway pond cultivation system suggests that this process potentially leads to significantly higher productivity of algal lipids. Nutrients are only added to the closed bioreactors, while open raceway ponds have turnovers of only a few days, thus reducing the issue of microalgal grazers.

  17. A modular segmented-flow platform for 3D cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Karen; Förster, Tobias; Römer, Robert; Quade, Mandy; Wiedemeier, Stefan; Grodrian, Andreas; Gastrock, Gunter

    2015-07-10

    In vitro 3D cell cultivation is promised to equate tissue in vivo more realistically than 2D cell cultivation corresponding to cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, a scalable 3D cultivation platform was developed. This platform, called pipe-based bioreactors (pbb), is based on the segmented-flow technology: aqueous droplets are embedded in a water-immiscible carrier fluid. The droplet volumes range from 60 nL to 20 μL and are used as bioreactors lined up in a tubing like pearls on a string. The modular automated platform basically consists of several modules like a fluid management for a high throughput droplet generation for self-assembly or scaffold-based 3D cell cultivation, a storage module for incubation and storage, and an analysis module for monitoring cell aggregation and proliferation basing on microscopy or photometry. In this report, the self-assembly of murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to uniformly sized embryoid bodies (EBs), the cell proliferation, the cell viability as well as the influence on the cell differentiation to cardiomyocytes are described. The integration of a dosage module for medium exchange or agent addition will enable pbb as long-term 3D cell cultivation system for studying stem cell differentiation, e.g. cardiac myogenesis or for diagnostic and therapeutic testing in personalized medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Environmental Control in Flow Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giusti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The realization of physiologically-relevant advanced in vitro models is not just related to the reproduction of a three-dimensional multicellular architecture, but also to the maintenance of a cell culture environment in which parameters, such as temperature, pH, and hydrostatic pressure are finely controlled. Tunable and reproducible culture conditions are crucial for the study of environment-sensitive cells, and can also be used for mimicking pathophysiological conditions related with alterations of temperature, pressure and pH. Here, we present the SUITE (Supervising Unit for In Vitro Testing system, a platform able to monitor and adjust local environmental variables in dynamic cell culture experiments. The physical core of the control system is a mixing chamber, which can be connected to different bioreactors and acts as a media reservoir equipped with a pH meter and pressure sensors. The chamber is heated by external resistive elements and the temperature is controlled using a thermistor. A purpose-built electronic control unit gathers all data from the sensors and controls the pH and hydrostatic pressure by regulating air and CO2 overpressure and flux. The system’s modularity and the possibility of imposing different pressure conditions were used to implement a model of portal hypertension with both endothelial and hepatic cells. The results show that the SUITE platform is able to control and maintain cell culture parameters at fixed values that represent either physiological or pathological conditions. Thus, it represents a fundamental tool for the design of biomimetic in vitro models, with applications in disease modelling or toxicity testing.

  19. L-Tryptophan depletion bioreactor, a possible cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Bambauer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer therapeutic strategies knownto date are not adequate for all cancer patients. Most of them are followed by a high rate of side effects and complications. The L-tryptophan depletion bioreactor is described as a possible new method of cancer therapy. L-tryptophan is an essential amino acid which has been recognized as an important cancer nutrient and its removal can lead to destruction of the tumour. Normal human cells or tumor cells cannot synthesize L-tryptophan and therefore tumor resistance is unlikely to develop. L-tryptophan is also a constituent for different bio-molecules such as Serotonin, Melatonin, and is needed for other synthesis processes in the cell growth. L-tryptophan degrading enzymes with 3 iso-enzymes called tryptophan side chain oxydase (TSO I, II, III were isolated. The 3 iso-enzymes can be differentiated by tryptic digestion. They have different molecular weights with different effectivenesses. All the TSO enzymes have heme that can catalyze essentially similar reactions involving L-tryptophan as a substrate. The most effective TSO is the type TSO III. A column which contained TSO as a bioreactor was integrated in a plasmapheresis unit and tested it in different animals. In sheep and rabbits L-tryptophan depletion in plasma was shown at 95% and 100% rates respectively by a single pass through the bioreactor. The results in immune supprimized rats with tumors were impressive, too. In 20 different tumor cell lines there were different efficacies. Brest cancer and medulloblastoma showed the greatest efficacy of L-tryptophan degrading. The gene technology of TSO production from Pseudomonas is associated with formation of endotoxins. This disadvantage can be prevented by different washing procedures or by using fungal sources for the TSO production. TSO III is developed to treat cancer diseases successfully, and has low side effects. A combination of L-tryptophan depletion with all available cancer therapies is

  20. All-Polyamide Composite Coated-Fabric as an Alternative Material of Construction for Textile-Bioreactors (TBRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Jabbari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available All-polyamide composite coated-fabric (APCCF was used as an alternative material for the construction of textile-bioreactors (TBRs, which are prepared as a replacement of the traditional stainless steel bioreactors (SSBRs or concrete-based bioreactors. The material characteristics, as well as the fermentation process performance of the APCCF-TBR, was compared with a TBR made using the polyvinyl chloride (PVC-coated polyester fabric (PVCCF. The TBRs were used for the anaerobic fermentation process using baker’s yeast; and, for aerobic fermentation process using filamentous fungi, primarily by using waste streams from ethanol industries as the substrates. The results from the fermentation experiments were similar with those that were obtained from the cultivations that were carried out in conventional bioreactors. The techno-economic analysis conducted using a 5000 m3 APCCF-TBR for a typical fermentation facility would lead to a reduction of the annual production cost of the plant by $128,000,000 when compared to similar processes in SSBR. The comparative analyses (including mechanical and morphological studies, density measurements, thermal stability, ageing, and techno-economic analyses revealed that the APCCF is a better candidate for the material of construction of the TBR. As the APCCF is a 100% recyclable single-polymer composite, which was prepared from Nylon 66 textile production-line waste, it could be considered as an environmentally sustainable product.

  1. Projeto e construção de um bioreator para síntese orgânica assimétrica catalisada por saccharomyces cerevisiae (fermento biológico de padaria Project and construction of a bioreactor for reactions catalyzed by baker's yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Souza Pereira

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available A model for the construction of a simple and cheap apparatus to be used as bioreactor for reactions catalyzed by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae is described. The bioconversion and separation of cells from products and residual substrates are obtained at the same time. The reactions carried out in this type of reactor are faster than those catalyzed by immobilized cells. Yeast cells can be cultivated in this bioreactor operating with cell recycling at appropriated conditions using glucose and other nutrients.

  2. Optimal design of scalable photo-bioreactor for phototropic culturing of Haematococcus pluvialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Jun; Choi, Seung Phill; Kim, Byung Woo; Sim, Sang Jun

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular green microalgae, Haematococcus pluvialis, has been examined as a microbial source for the production of astaxanthin, which has been suggested as a food supplement for humans and is also prescribed as an ingredient in eye drops because of its powerful anti-oxidant properties. In this study, we estimated the effects of the slope of a V-shaped bottom design, the volumetric flow rate of air, height/diameter (H/D) ratio, and diameter of an air sparger on the performance of a photo-bioreactor. These parameters were selected because they are recognized as important factors effecting the mixing that produces increased cell density in the reactor. The mixing effect can be measured by changes in optical density in the bioreactor over a period of time. A 6 L indoor photo-bioreactor was prepared in a short time period of 24 h for the performance study. A bioreactor designed with a V-shaped bottom with a slope of 60° showed an optical density change of 0.052 at 680 nm, which was sixfold less than the change in a photo-bioreactor designed with a flat bottom. Studies exploring the effects of bioreactor configuration and a porous metal sparger with a 10 μm pore size showed the best performance at an H/D ratio of 6:1 and a sparger diameter of 1.3 cm, respectively. The optimal rate of air flow was 0.2 vvm. The indoor culture of microalgae in the photo-bioreactor was subsequently carried for an application study using the optimal values established for the important factors. The indoor culture system was composed of a light source controlled according to cell phase, a carbon dioxide feeder, a bag-type reactor with an H/D ratio of 6:1, and a temperature controller. Results demonstrated the efficient production of microalgal cells and astaxanthin in the amounts of 2.62 g/L and 78.37 mg/L, respectively, when using adequate hydrodynamic mixing. Furthermore, the optimal design of a photo-bioreactor can be applied for the phototropic culturing of other microalgae for

  3. In Vitro Cultivation of Microsporidia of Clinical Importance

    OpenAIRE

    Visvesvara, Govinda S.

    2002-01-01

    Although attempts to develop methods for the in vitro cultivation of microsporidia began as early as 1937, the interest in the culture of these organisms was confined mostly to microsporidia that infect insects. The successful cultivation in 1969 of Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a microsporidium of mammalian origin, and the subsequent identification of these organisms as agents of human disease heightened interest in the cultivation of microsporidia. I describe the methodology as well as the cell...

  4. Reimplantation of cultivated human bone cells from the posterior maxilla for sinus floor augmentation. Histological results from a randomized controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermund, N.U.; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Donatsky, O

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present randomized clinical study was to evaluate histologically whether the addition of cultivated, autogenous bone cells to a composite graft of deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) and autogenous bone (AB) for sinus floor augmentation (SFA) enhance bone formation...... compared with what achieved after SFA with DBBM + AB alone. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with remaining posterior maxillary alveolar crest height of less than 3 mm received SFA after randomization either with an DBBM and AB composite in a 1 : 1 ratio or with DBBM + AB supplemented with autogenous...... bone cells, which were cultivated from a bone biopsy harvested earlier from the tuberosity area. Four months after SFA, two cylindrical biopsies were taken from the augmented sinuses concomitantly with the implant site preparation by means of a trephine bur. An additional biopsy was taken from...

  5. The impact of biofuel poplar cultivation on ground-level ozone and premature human mortality depends on cultivar selection and planting location

    OpenAIRE

    Ashworth, Kirsti; Wild, Oliver; Eller, A.S.D.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Isoprene and other volatile organic compounds emitted from vegetation play a key role in governing the formation of ground-level ozone. Emission rates of such compounds depend critically on the plant species. Future land use change, driven by the cultivation of biofuel feedstocks, will change the distribution of plant species and hence the magnitude and distribution of emissions. Here we use relationships between biomass yield and isoprene emissions derived from experimental data for 29 comme...

  6. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the

  7. An innovative membrane bioreactor for methane biohydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, N; Soussan, L; Belleville, M-P; Sanchez, J; Charmette, C; Paolucci-Jeanjean, D

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was developed for efficient, safe microbial methane hydroxylation with Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This innovative MBR, which couples a bioreactor with two gas/liquid macroporous membrane contactors supplying the two gaseous substrates (methane and oxygen) was operated in fed-batch mode. The feasibility and the reproducibility of this new biohydroxylation process were first demonstrated. The mass transfer within this MBR was twice that observed in a batch reactor in similar conditions. The productivity reached with this MBR was 75±25mgmethanol(gdrycell)(-1)h(-1). Compared to the literature, this value is 35times higher than that obtained with the only other fed-batch membrane bioreactor reported, which was run with dense membranes, and is comparable to those obtained with bioreactors fed by bubble-spargers. However, in the latter case, an explosive gas mixture can be formed, a problem that is avoided with the MBR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Woodchip bioreactors effectively treat aquaculture effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrients, in particular nitrogen and phosphorus, can create eutrophication problems in any watershed. Preventing water quality impairment requires controlling nutrients from both point-source and non-point source discharges. Woodchip bioreactors are one relatively new approach that can be utilized ...

  9. Aujeszky's disease virus production in disposable bioreactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    1Laboratory for Cell Culture Technology and Biotransformations, 2Laboratory for Toxicology, Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, 6 Pierotti St., HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia. *Corresponding author (Fax, 385-1-46 05 065; Email, zlatko.kniewald@pbf.hr). A novel, disposable-bag bioreactor ...

  10. Denitrifying bioreactor clogging potential during wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemoheterotrophic denitrification technologies using woodchips as a solid carbon source (i.e., woodchip bioreactors) have been widely trialed for treatment of diffuse-source agricultural nitrogen pollution. There is growing interest in the use of this simple, relatively low-cost biological wastewat...

  11. Numerical simulation of fluid flow in a rotational bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganimedov, V. L.; Papaeva, E. O.; Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2017-10-01

    Application of scaffold technology for the problem of bone tissue regeneration has great prospects in modern medicine. The influence of fluid shear stress on stem cells cultivation and its differentiation into osteoblasts is the subject of intensive research. Mathematical modeling of fluid flow in bioreactor allowed us to determine the structure of flow and estimate the level of mechanical stress on cells. The series of computations for different rotation frequencies (0.083, 0.124, 0.167, 0.2 and 0.233 Hz) was performed for the laminar flow regime approximation. It was shown that the Taylor vortices in the gap between the cylinders qualitatively change the distribution of static pressure and shear stress in the region of vortices connection. It was shown that an increase in the rotation frequency leads to an increase of the unevenness in distribution of the above mentioned functions. The obtained shear stress and static pressure dependence on the rotational frequency make it possible to choose the operating mode of the reactor depending on the provided requirements. It was shown that in the range of rotation frequencies chosen in this work (0.083 < f < 0.233 Hz), the shear stress does not exceed the known literature data (0.002 - 0.1 Pa).

  12. Controlled cyclic stretch bioreactor for tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedain, Zeeshan H; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2009-09-01

    A tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV) represents the ultimate valve replacement, especially for juvenile patients given its growth potential. To date, most TEHV bioreactors have been developed based on pulsed flow of culture medium through the valve lumen to induce strain in the leaflets. Using a strategy for controlled cyclic stretching of tubular constructs reported previously, we developed a controlled cyclic stretch bioreactor for TEHVs that leads to improved tensile and compositional properties. The TEHV is mounted inside a latex tube, which is then cyclically pressurized with culture medium. The root and leaflets stretch commensurately with the latex, the stretching being dictated by the stiffer latex and thus controllable. Medium is also perfused through the lumen at a slow rate in a flow loop to provide nutrient delivery. Fibrin-based TEHVs prepared with human dermal fibroblasts were subjected to three weeks of cyclic stretching with incrementally increasing strain amplitude. The TEHV possessed the tensile stiffness and stiffness anisotropy of leaflets from sheep pulmonary valves and could withstand cyclic pulmonary pressures with similar distension as for a sheep pulmonary artery.

  13. Bioreactors in tissue engineering - principles, applications and commercial constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Groeber, Florian; Kahlig, Alexander; Kleinhans, Claudia; Walles, Heike

    2013-03-01

    Bioreactor technology is vital for tissue engineering. Usually, bioreactors are used to provide a tissue-specific physiological in vitro environment during tissue maturation. In addition to this most obvious application, bioreactors have the potential to improve the efficiency of the overall tissue-engineering concept. To date, a variety of bioreactor systems for tissue-specific applications have been developed. Of these, some systems are already commercially available. With bioreactor technology, various functional tissues of different types were generated and cultured in vitro. Nevertheless, these efforts and achievements alone have not yet led to many clinically successful tissue-engineered implants. We review possible applications for bioreactor systems within a tissue-engineering process and present basic principles and requirements for bioreactor development. Moreover, the use of bioreactor systems for the expansion of clinically relevant cell types is addressed. In contrast to cell expansion, for the generation of functional three-dimensional tissue equivalents, additional physical cues must be provided. Therefore, bioreactors for musculoskeletal tissue engineering are discussed. Finally, bioreactor technology is reviewed in the context of commercial constraints. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Polymer production by two newly isolated extremely halophilic archaea: application of a novel corrosion-resistant bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezayen, F F; Rehm, B H; Eberhardt, R; Steinbüchel, A

    2000-09-01

    A novel corrosion-resistant bioreactor composed of polyetherether ketone (PEEK), tech glass and silicium nitrite ceramics was constructed and applied for the cultivation of two newly isolated, extremely halophilic archaea producing poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (PGA), or poly(beta-hydroxy butyric acid) (PHB), respectively. These bacteria were isolated from hypersaline soil close to Aswan (Egypt). The isolate strain 40, which is related to the genus Natrialba, produced large amounts of PGA when cultivated on solid medium. Culture conditions were optimised applying the corrosion-resistant bioreactor. PGA production was dependent on NaCl concentration and occurred about at 20% (w/v) NaCl in the medium. A maximum cell density of about 1.6 g cell dry matter/l was obtained when the bioreactor was stirred and aerated in a batch fermentation process using proteose-peptone medium. The supernatant was monitored with respect to PGA formation, and after 90 h a maximum of 470 mg/l culture volume was detected by HPLC analysis. Culture conditions were optimized for the isolate 56, which accumulated PHB as intracellular granules. Batch fermentations in the stirred and aerated bioreactor applying acetate and n-butyric acid as carbon sources led to cell density of 2.28 g cell dry matter/l and a maximum PHB accumulation contributing to about 53% of cellular dry weight. About 4.6 g PHB were isolated from 10.6 g dried cells of strain 56, which exhibited a weight average molar mass of 2.3 x 10(5) g mol(-1) and a polydispersity of about 1.4.

  15. Transforming Inundated Rice Cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindraban, P.S.; Hengsdijk, H.; Cao, W.; Shi, Q.; Thiyagarajan, T.M.; Krogt, van der W.; Wardana, P.I.

    2006-01-01

    Almost 90% of global rice is produced under inundated conditions, i.e. in fields with a standing water layer of 5 to 15 cm during the major part of the growing season. Recently, inundated rice cultivation has come under pressure due to declining availability of water and labour, increasing demand

  16. An experimental investigation of the multiphase flows in a photobioreactor for algae cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zifeng; Hu, Hui; Del Ninno, Matteo; Wen, Zhiyou

    2011-11-01

    Algal biomass is a promising feedstock for biofuels production, with photobioreactors being one of the major cultivation systems for algal cells. Light absorption, fluid dynamics, and algal metabolism are three key factors in determining the overall performance of a photobioreactor. The behavior of the multiphase flow (i.e., liquid phase - water, gas phase - CO2 and O2, and solid phase - algal cells) and turbulent mixing inside the reactor are the core connecting the three factors together. One of the major challenges in the optimal design of photobioreactors for algae cultivation is the lack of in-depth understanding of the characteristics of the multiphase flows and turbulent mixing. In this study, we present a comprehensive experimental study to investigate the effects of turbulent mixing in photobioreactors on the performance of a photobioreactor for algae cultivation. A high-resolution particle image velocity (PIV) system is used to achieve time-resolved, in-situ flow field measurements to quantify the turbulent mixing of the multiphase flows inside the bioreactor, while algal cultures are also grown in the same reactor with the same experimental settings. The mixing characteristics of the multiphase flow are correlated with the algal growth performance in the bioreactors to elucidate the underlying physics to explore/optimize design paradigms for the optimization of photobioreactor designs for algae cultivation.

  17. Optimization of complex medium composition for heterotrophic cultivation of Euglena gracilis and paramylon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivušić, Franjo; Šantek, Božidar

    2015-06-01

    Heterotrophic cultivation of Euglena gracilis was carried out on synthetic (Hutner medium) and complex cultivation media in order to optimize production of β-1,3-glucan (paramylon). For preparation of complex media, various industrial by-products (e.g., molasses, corn steep solid, yeast extract, and beef extract) were used with or without addition of pure compounds [glucose, galactose, fructose, lactose, maltose, sucrose, and (NH4)2HPO4]. Heterotrophic cultivation of E. gracilis was performed in Erlenmeyer flasks and additionally confirmed during research in the stirred tank bioreactor. The results clearly show that E. gracilis can easily metabolize glucose and fructose as carbon sources and corn steep solid as complex nitrogen and growth factors source for biomass growth and paramylon synthesis. Furthermore, it was also proved that addition of (NH4)2HPO4, beef extract, or gibberellic acid did not have positive effect on the biomass growth and paramylon synthesis. After optimization of complex medium composition and verification in the stirred tank bioreactor, it was concluded that medium composed of glucose (20 g/L) and corn steep solid (30 g/L) is the most suitable complex medium for industrial cultivation of E. gracilis and paramylon production.

  18. Incorporation of Tongkat Ali and Ginseng extracts from mass propagated roots derived from bioreactor technology as supplements in energy chocolate confectionery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seri Cempaka Mohd Yusof; Sobri Hussein; Salmah Moosa; Salahbiah Badul Majid; Azhar Mohammad; Foziah Ali; Shafii Khamis; Rusli Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia) and Ginseng (Panax ginseng) are well known herbs among Asians and have been sought after by Europeans and others for the benefits to health, especially as aphrodisiac and nourishing stimulants. They have high antioxidant level and were reported to be used in the treatment of type II diabetes, as well as for sexual dysfunction in men. Since Tongkat Ali and Ginseng are difficult to cultivate and have a long cultivation period, the bioreactor technology is the alternative method to produce huge amount of raw materials for the herbal industry and continuous supply of standardized raw materials that is not affected by geographical and environmental factors, soil less and free from pesticides and other contaminants. Tongkat Ali and Ginseng extracts from mass propagated roots derived from bioreactor technology have similar profiles as extracts derived from normal cultivation. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (LC-MS) profiles showed presence of active compounds in the Tongkat Ali and Ginseng extracts from the mass propagated roots. Cytotoxicity test using the brine shrimp (Artemia salina Leach) lethality assay, revealed that higher concentration of Tongkat Ali and Ginseng extracts from mass propagated roots did not kill or affect the brine shrimps, implying that the extracts were safe for consumption. Incorporation of combination of Tongkat Ali and Ginseng total extracts from mass propagated roots derived from bioreactor technology energy chocolate confectionery was accepted by the panelists in sensory evaluation and showed that the chocolate product has good potential as a carrier besides beverages and capsules. (author)

  19. Seasonal variation of biomass and oil production of the oleaginous diatom Fistulifera sp. in outdoor vertical bubble column and raceway-type bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Reiko; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of industrial biodiesel production, outdoor mass cultivation of the marine oleaginous diatom, Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580, was conducted in bench-scale photobioreactors (∼200 L, raceway- and column-types) and seasonal variation of biomass and oil content were monitored. Through three seasons (from spring to autumn), the microalgae showed steady growth and oil accumulation in both reactors in spite of fluctuating temperature and solar irradiation. When comparing the both reactors, the column-type bioreactor was better with regard to energy conversion efficiency compared to the raceway-type bioreactor. The areal oil productivity of 3.23 g/m(2)/day is comparable or even higher level as compared with the one from other oleaginous microalgae prepared in outdoor mass cultivation. Furthermore, repeated batch culture experiments resulted in success at least 5 cycles. Through the experimental period, little bacterial contamination was observed while protozoal contamination was a fatal issue. The microalgal cell was robust enough to be handled by an automated pump system in inoculation and harvesting processes, and cell adhesion to the bioreactor wall was not observed. These beneficial features could realize ease of oil production and system maintenance. These findings ensure promising innovation by means of outdoor mass cultivation with this strain toward biodiesel production. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of Biofuel Poplar Cultivation on Ground-Level Ozone and Premature Human Mortality Depends on Cultivar Selection and Planting Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Kirsti; Wild, Oliver; Eller, Allyson S D; Hewitt, C Nick

    2015-07-21

    Isoprene and other volatile organic compounds emitted from vegetation play a key role in governing the formation of ground-level ozone. Emission rates of such compounds depend critically on the plant species. The cultivation of biofuel feedstocks will contribute to future land use change, altering the distribution of plant species and hence the magnitude and distribution of emissions. Here we use relationships between biomass yield and isoprene emissions derived from experimental data for 29 commercially available poplar hybrids to assess the impact that the large-scale cultivation of poplar for use as a biofuel feedstock will have on air quality, specifically ground-level ozone concentrations, in Europe. We show that the increases in ground-level ozone across Europe will increase the number of premature deaths attributable to ozone pollution each year by up to 6%. Substantial crop losses (up to ∼9 Mt y(-1) of wheat and maize) are also projected. We further demonstrate that these impacts are strongly dependent on the location of the poplar plantations, due to the prevailing meteorology, the population density, and the dominant crop type of the region. Our findings indicate the need for a concerted and centralized decision-making process that considers all aspects of future land use change in Europe, and not just the effect on greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. Development of Fed-Batch Cultivation Strategy for Efficient Oxytetracycline Production by Streptomyces rimosus at Semi-Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Ahmed Elsayed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTOxytetracycline (OTC production byStreptomyces rimosus was studied in batch and fed-batch cultures in shake flask and bioreactor levels using semi-defined medium. First, the effect of glucose concentration on OTC production and growth kinetics was studied intensively. The optimal glucose concentration in the medium was 15 g/L. Higher glucose concentrations supported higher biomass production by less volumetric and specific antibiotic production. Based on these data, cultivations were carried out at semi-industrial scale 15 L bioreactor in batch culture. At bioreactor level, cell growth and OTC production were higher compared to the shake flask culture by about 18 and 38%, respectively. During the bioreactor cultivation, glucose was totally consumed after only 48 h. Thus, the fed-batch experiment was designed for mono-glucose feeding and complete medium feeding to increase the OTC production by overcoming carbon limitations. The results showed that the fed-batch culture using constant glucose feeding strategy with rate of 0.33 g/L/h produced 1072 mg/L. On the other hand, feeding with complete medium resulted in 45% higher biomass but less OTC production by about 26% compared to mono-glucose fed culture. A further improvement in this process was achieved in by keeping the dissolved oxygen (DO value at 60% saturation by cascading the glucose feeding pump with the DO controller. The later feeding strategy resulted in higher antibiotic production, reaching 1414 mg/L after 108 h.

  2. The development and application of high throughput cultivation technology in bioprocess development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Quan; Liu, Xiuxia; Yang, Yankun; Li, Lu; Harvey, Linda; McNeil, Brian; Bai, Zhonghu

    2014-12-20

    This review focuses on recent progress in the technology of high throughput (HTP) cultivation and its increasing application in quality by design (QbD) -driven bioprocess development. Several practical HTP strategies aimed at shortening process development (PD) timelines from DNA to large scale processes involving commercially available HTP technology platforms, including microtiter plate (MTP) culture, micro-scale bioreactors, and in parallel fermentation systems, etc., are critically reviewed in detail. This discussion focuses upon the relative strengths and weaknesses or limitations of each of these platforms in this context. Emerging prototypes of micro-bioreactors reported recently, such as milliliter (mL) scale stirred tank bioreactors, and microfludics integrated micro-scale bioreactors, and their potential for practical application in QbD-driven HTP process development are also critically appraised. The overall aim of such technology is to rapidly gain process insights, and since the analytical technology deployed in HTP systems is critically important to the achievement of this aim, this rapidly developing area is discussed. Finally, general future trends are critically reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigations concerning the use of membrane bioreactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger-Oehn, H.; Universitaet fuer Bodenkulturen, Wien; Braun, R.; Universitaet fuer Bodenkulturen, Wien

    1994-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor systems are increasingly being used to clean leachates from landfills. Besides being compact they can, especially, be easily combined with further cleaning techniques. The paper first of all gives an overview on landfill leachate cleaning standards in Austria. A combination of processes is applied where the membrane bioreactor forms a preferred element. Finally, results are presented which should help with the dimensioning of membrane bioreactors. (orig.) [de

  4. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  5. Biotransformation of diazepam in a clinically relevant flat membrane bioreactor model using primary porcine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maringka, Michael; Giri, Shibashish; Nieber, Karen; Acikgöz, Ali; Bader, Augustinus

    2011-06-01

    In vitro biotransformation of drug using commercial culture medium with serum may not be the ideal culture medium for clinical application in extracorporeal bioartificial liver support (BAL) systems. In these systems, patient's blood or plasma is plumbed to primary hepatocytes within a seeded bioreactor, creating interaction between plasma and seeded hepatocytes. To address this situation, we investigated the biotransformation potential of diazepam in primary porcine hepatocytes with a flat membrane bioreactor (FMB); we used human plasma exposure and serum-free media in organotypical double gel culture model for long-term culture. We investigated diazepam clearance and all major metabolites of diazepam, such as oxazepam, temazepam, and desmethyldiazepam, in conventional single gel and organotypical sandwich models and compared them to the FMB model. Diazepam elimination was higher in double gel cultures with exposure to both SF 3 medium conditions and plasma, when compared to the single gel model in a Petri dish. It was observed that in the FMB, diazepam elimination was stable at about 3 pg/h/cell in plasma and SF 3 exposure. Oxazepam synthesis in the bioreactor was approximately one quarter less than in the Petri dish, but there were no differences between N-desmethyldiazepam and temazepam synthesis in double gel culture. In the flat membrane bioreactor, there was no decrease in the biotransformation of diazepam in plasma exposure compared with the control group. Our results suggest that this plasma exposure bioreactor may offer a useful approach in clinical use of extracorporeal BAL, as well as for drug metabolite investigation into toxicological research. © 2010 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  6. Bioreactor Yields Extracts for Skin Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center researchers created a unique rotating-wall bioreactor that simulates microgravity conditions, spurring innovations in drug development and medical research. Renuèll Int'l Inc., based in Aventure, Florida, licensed the technology and used it to produce a healing skin care product, RE`JUVEL. In a Food and Drug Administration test, RE`JUVEL substantially increased skin moisture and elasticity while reducing dark blotches and wrinkles.

  7. [Dendrobium officinale stereoscopic cultivation method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jin-Ping; Dong, Hong-Xiu; Liao, Xin-Yan; Zhu, Yu-Qiu; Li, Hui

    2014-12-01

    The study is aimed to make the most of available space of Dendrobium officinale cultivation facility, reveal the yield and functional components variation of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale, and improve quality, yield and efficiency. The agronomic traits and yield variation of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale were studied by operating field experiment. The content of polysaccharide and extractum were determined by using phenol-sulfuric acid method and 2010 edition of "Chinese Pharmacopoeia" Appendix X A. The results showed that the land utilization of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale increased 2.74 times, the stems, leaves and their total fresh or dry weight in unit area of stereoscopic cultivated D. officinale were all heavier than those of the ground cultivated ones. There was no significant difference in polysaccharide content between stereoscopic cultivation and ground cultivation. But the extractum content and total content of polysaccharide and extractum were significantly higher than those of the ground cultivated ones. In additional, the polysaccharide content and total content of polysaccharide and extractum from the top two levels of stereoscopic culture matrix were significantly higher than that of the ones from the other levels and ground cultivation. Steroscopic cultivation can effectively improves the utilization of space and yield, while the total content of polysaccharides and extractum were significantly higher than that of the ground cultivated ones. The significant difference in Dendrobium polysaccharides among the plants from different height of stereo- scopic culture matrix may be associated with light factor.

  8. Genetic Algorithmic Optimization of PHB Production by a Mixed Culture in an Optimally Dispersed Fed-batch Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap R. Patnaik

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB is an energy-storage polymer whose properties are similar to those of chemical polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene. Moreover, PHB is biodegradable, absorbed by human tissues and less energy-consuming than synthetic polymers. Although Ralstonia eutropha is widely used to synthesize PHB, it is inefficient in utilizing glucose and similar sugars. Therefore a co-culture of R. eutropha and Lactobacillus delbrueckii is preferred since the latter can convert glucose to lactate, which R. eutropha can metabolize easily. Tohyama et al. [24] maximized PHB production in a well-mixed fed-batch bioreactor with glucose and (NH42SO4 as the primary substrates. Since production-scale bioreactors often deviate from ideal laboratory-scale reactors, a large bioreactor was simulated by means of a dispersion model with the kinetics determined by Tohyama et al. [24] and dispersion set at an optimum Peclet number of 20 [32]. The time-dependent feed rates of the two substrates were determined through a genetic algorithm (GA to maximize PHB production. This bioreactor produced 22.2% more PHB per liter and 12.8% more cell mass than achieved by Tohyama et al. [24]. These results, and similar observations with other fermentations, indicate the feasibility of enhancing the efficiency of large nonideal bioreactors through GA optimizations.

  9. Transition in nori cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delaney, Alyne

    2011-01-01

    Consumers throughout the world have gained familiarity with the seaweed nori (porphyra spp) thanks to the popularity of Asian cuisine, particularly Japanese sushi. Few actually know much about the people who produce this seaweed, however. This article presents qualitative social science research...... undertaken in Northeastern Japan among a community of nori cultivators on their production process and cultural way of life. Natural scientists acknowledge that in order to manage natural resources, it is actually the resource users who must be managed. In order to manage resource users, with the goals...... of social and environmental sustainability, we must understand both society and cultural institutions. With this in mind, this article focuses on the division of labor among cultivators, particularly along gender lines and the impacts, on a cultural level, of technological change on nori production...

  10. Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Justin N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09

    Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

  11. Cultivating an entrepreneurial mindset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Sandra A

    2013-01-01

    Now as never before, familiar challenges require bold, novel approaches. Registered dietitians will benefit by cultivating an entrepreneurial mindset that involves being comfortable with uncertainty, learning to take calculated risks, and daring to just try it. An entrepreneur is someone who takes risks to create something new, usually in business. But the entrepreneurial mindset is available to anyone prepared to rely only on their own abilities for their economic security and expect no opportunity without first creating value for others.

  12. Cultivating strategic thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author presents an overview of strategic leadership and offers approaches for cultivating strategic thinking skills.

  13. Pilot scale harvesting, separation and drying of microalgae biomass from compact photo-bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Alberto Tadeu Martins; Luz Junior, Luiz Fernando de Lima [Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: luzjr@ufpr.br; Mariano, Andre Bellin; Ghidini, Luiz Francisco Correa; Gnoatto, Victor Eduardo; Locatelli Junior, Vilson; Mello, Thiago Carvalho de; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho [Nucleo de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento em Energia Autossustentavel (NPDEAS). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil)], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br

    2010-07-01

    Bio diesel produced from microalgae lipids is gaining a substantial ground in the search for renewable energy sources. In order to optimize the operating conditions of a continuous process, several experiments were realized, both in laboratory and pilot scale. The microalgae cultivation can be conducted in a photo-bioreactor, a closed system which allows parameters control and necessarily involves the aquatic environment. Because of that, the use of separation unit operations is required. The process starts in a proposed compact photo-bioreactor, which consist of a chain of transparent tubes with 6 cm of diameter arranged in parallel where the cultivation media circulate with the help of a pump. This arrangement offers a closed culture with less risk of contamination and maintains a minimum contact with the environment. The microalgae grow inside the pipes under incidence of ambient light. In this paper, harvesting, separation and drying were studied, as part of the processes of a sustainable energy plant under construction at UFPR, as shown in Fig. 1. To control the production in a photo-bioreactor in continuous system, it is necessary to monitor the concentration of microalgae growth in suspension. To measure the cell concentration in this equipment, an optic sensor has been developed. The microalgae biomass separation from the culture media is achieved by microalgae flocculation. Several cultivation situations have been tested with different NaOH concentrations, increasing the pH to 10. The system was kept under agitation during the addition by an air pump into the tank. Thereafter the system was maintained static. After a short time, it was observed that the microalgae coagulated and settled. The clarified part water was removed, remaining a concentrated microalgae suspension. Our results suggest that pH increase is a suitable methodology for microalgae separation from the growth suspension. The microalgae sedimentation time was recorded, which allowed the

  14. COUPLING OF MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR AND OZONATION FOR REMOVAL OF ANTIBIOTICS FROM HOSPITAL WASTEWATER

    OpenAIRE

    Bui Xuan Thanh; Quyen Vo Thi Kim; Phuc Luu Vinh; Tin Nguyen Thanh; Hien Vo Thi Dieu; Thanh Cao Ngoc Dan; Quoc Tuc Dinh

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic residues in the environment and their potential toxic effects have been considered as one of the emerging research area in the environmental field. Their continuous introduction in our environment may increase their negative impacts on human health.  In this study, the eliminations of antibiotic such as Norfloxacin (NOR), Ciprofloxacin (CIP), Ofloxacin (OFL) and Sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) in wastewater of hospital were processed by membrane bioreactor (MBR) coupled with ozonation proce...

  15. Cultivation and irradiation of human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with platelet lysate for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture; Cultivo e irradiacao de fibroblastos humanos em meio enriquecido com lisado de plaquetas para obtencao de camada de sustentacao em culturas de celulas da epiderme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshito, Daniele

    2011-07-01

    For over 30 years, the use of culture medium, enriched with bovine serum, and murines fibroblasts, with the rate of proliferation controlled by irradiation or by share anticarcinogenic drugs, has been playing successfully its role in assisting in the development of keratinocytes in culture, for clinical purposes. However, currently there is a growing concern about the possibility of transmitting prions and animals viruses to transplanted patients. Taking into account this concern, the present work aims to cultivate human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with human platelets lysate and determine the irradiation dose of these cells, for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture. For carrying out the proposed objective, platelets lysis has standardized, this lysate was used for human fibroblasts cultivation and the irradiation dose enough to inhibit its duplication was evaluated. Human keratinocytes were cultivated in these feeder layers, in culture medium enriched with the lysate. With these results we conclude that the 10% platelets lysate promoted a better adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts and in all dose levels tested (60 to 300 Gy), these had their mitotic activity inactivated by ionizing irradiation, being that the feeder layers obtained with doses from 70 to 150 Gy were those that provided the best development of keratinocytes in medium containing 2.5% of human platelet lysate. Therefore, it was possible to standardize both the cultivation of human fibroblasts as its inactivation for use as feeder layer in culture of keratinocytes, so as to eliminate xenobiotics components. (author)

  16. Effect of the main physic-chemical parameters on the somatic embryogenesis at bioreactors scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel de Feria

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The bioreactors has been mainly developed for the production of biomass, for that that the glasses for the culture of the different vegetable species with propagation ends, they have had to be adapted in function of the specific requirements of each process and cultivation. This way and because a universal team doesn’t exist for all the applications, the bioreactors has been object of modifications in their components in dependence of the requirements of each species. He has also been proven that the internal configuration of the culture glass influences in a decisive way on the production and later development of the somatic embryos. Therefore, it is necessary to solve the current technological limitations and to study the effect of the main culture parameters to be able to use this technology type like an alternative for the mass propagation of plants. Different systems have been evaluated of agitation-aeration and designs have been proven that generate drops hydrodynamic forces inside the culture glass, guaranteeing the quality and viability of the culture in suspension, as well as the formation and multiplication of the somatic embryos. They have been studied for several cultures the effects that cause the main physical-chemical parameters in the propagation via somatic embryogenesis to bioreactors scale. They have been defined methodologies and work strategies that combine this culture parameters and they allow to control and to obtain in way stable productions of somatic embryos able to germinate and to transform into plants and these results definitively will allow to take to commercial scale the employment of this technology for the propagation in vitro of many species of economic interest. configuration, pH Keywords: agitation, aeration, dissolved oxygen, internal

  17. Improved functional expression of recombinant human ether-a-go-go (hERG K+ channels by cultivation at reduced temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Bruce

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HERG potassium channel blockade is the major cause for drug-induced long QT syndrome, which sometimes cause cardiac disrhythmias and sudden death. There is a strong interest in the pharmaceutical industry to develop high quality medium to high-throughput assays for detecting compounds with potential cardiac liability at the earliest stages of drug development. Cultivation of cells at lower temperature has been used to improve the folding and membrane localization of trafficking defective hERG mutant proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of lower temperature maintenance on wild type hERG expression and assay performance. Results Wild type hERG was stably expressed in CHO-K1 cells, with the majority of channel protein being located in the cytoplasm, but relatively little on the cell surface. Expression at both locations was increased several-fold by cultivation at lower growth temperatures. Intracellular hERG protein levels were highest at 27°C and this correlated with maximal 3H-dofetilide binding activity. In contrast, the expression of functionally active cell surface-associated hERG measured by patch clamp electrophysiology was optimal at 30°C. The majority of the cytoplasmic hERG protein was associated with the membranes of cytoplasmic vesicles, which markedly increased in quantity and size at lower temperatures or in the presence of the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin. Incubation with the endocytic trafficking blocker, nocodazole, led to an increase in hERG activity at 37°C, but not at 30°C. Conclusion Our results are consistent with the concept that maintenance of cells at reduced temperature can be used to boost the functional expression of difficult-to-express membrane proteins and improve the quality of assays for medium to high-throughput compound screening. In addition, these results shed some light on the trafficking of hERG protein under these growth conditions.

  18. Pharmaceutical proteins produced in plant bioreactor in recent years ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant bioreactor, also called molecular farming, has enormous potential to produce recombinant proteins infinitely. Products expressed in plants have natural physico-chemical properties and bioactivities. Plant bioreactor could be a safe, economic and convenient production system, and can been widely applied in ...

  19. 40 CFR 258.41 - Project XL Bioreactor Landfill Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Project XL Bioreactor Landfill Projects. 258.41 Section 258.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Design Criteria § 258.41 Project XL Bioreactor...

  20. Construction of a Simple Multipurpose Airlift Bioreactor and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The total volume of the bioreactor was 3.9 L with a working volume of 3.0 L. Mixing was achieved by aeration using mechanically operated gasoline-powered air compressor. Mixing efficiency and thus dissolved oxygen concentrations can be controlled by adjusting the aeration rate. The efficacy of the bioreactor was ...

  1. Wastewater treatments by membrane bioreactors (MBR); Bioreactores de membrana (MBR) para la depuracion de aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardino Ferre, R.

    2001-07-01

    Wastewater treatments by membrane bioreactors (MBR), are a good alternative of treatment to the conventional processes when wish to obtain very high quality of the treated water or to try high load contaminants in low flow. Simultaneously, the article explains the significant reduction of the wastewater treatment plant space, eliminating the secondary septic tank. (Author) 7 refs.

  2. First use of the WAVE™ disposable rocking bioreactor for enhanced bioproduct synthesis by N2 -fixing cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirés, Samuel; Alvarez-Roa, Carlos; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-03-01

    WAVE™ rocking disposable bioreactors have been successfully utilized for bioproduct development from bacteria, yeast, microalgae, and animal and plant cells but not from cyanobacteria so far. N2 -fixing cyanobacteria represent a prolific bioproducts source with reduced cultivation costs. In this study, 1 L cultures of the N2 -fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis grown diazotrophically in the WAVE™ bioreactor exhibited increased phosphate consumption and 37-70% higher CO2 fixation rates than those grown in conventional bubbled suspension (BS) batch cultures. This generated 40-80% increased biomass productivities in the WAVE™ bioreactor reaching 60 mg L(-1)  day(-1) when supplemented with 10% CO2 . Consequently, WAVE™ generated 36-153% more protein, lipid, and carbohydrate than BS, including 47-100% increased productivity of phycocyanin and stearidonic acid (SA) with relevant biomedical applications. While the type of culture system (BS or WAVE(TM) ) did not affect the biochemical profile of cyanobacterial biomass, 10% CO2 supplementation induced a significant decrease in fatty acids and phycocyanin contents (mg g(-1)  DW). Therefore, for commercial applications, the CO2 supplementation of WAVE™ should be optimized for each targeted bioproduct separately. This study opens possibilities for upgrading the WAVE™ systems to photobioreactors (PBRs) for bioproduct development from cyanobacteria, with opportunities and challenges critically evaluated herein. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Simulation of temperature effect on microalgae culture in a tubular photo bioreactor for local solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriar, M.; Deb, Ujjwal Kumar; Rahman, Kazi Afzalur

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae based biofuel is now an emerging source of renewable energy alternative to the fossil fuel. This paper aims to present computational model of microalgae culture taking effect of solar irradiance and corresponding temperature in a photo bioreactor (PBR). As microalgae is a photosynthetic microorganism, so irradiance of sunlight is one of the important limiting factors for the proper growth of microalgae cells as temperature is associated with it. We consider the transient behaviour of temperature inside the photo bioreactor for a microalgae culture. The optimum range of temperature for outdoor cultivation of microalgae is about 16-35°c and out of this range the cell growth inhibits. Many correlations have already been established to investigate the heat transfer phenomena inside a tubular PBR. However, none of them are validated yet numerically by using a user defined function in a simulated model. A horizontal tubular PBR length 20.5m with radius 0.05m has taken account to investigate the temperature effect for the growth of microalgae cell. As the solar irradiance varies at any geographic latitude for a year so an empirical relation is established between local solar irradiance and temperature to simulate the effect. From our simulation, we observed that the growth of microalgae has a significant effect of temperature and the solar irradiance of our locality is suitable for the culture of microalgae.

  4. Ultrastructure and viral metagenome of bacteriophages from an anaerobic methane oxidizing Methylomirabilis bioreactor enrichment culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gambelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With its capacity for anaerobic methane oxidation and denitrification, the bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera plays an important role in natural ecosystems. Its unique physiology can be exploited for more sustainable wastewater treatment technologies. However, operational stability of full-scale bioreactors can experience setbacks due to, for example, bacteriophage blooms. By shaping microbial communities through mortality, horizontal gene transfer and metabolic reprogramming, bacteriophages are important players in most ecosystems. Here, we analysed an infected Methylomirabilis sp. bioreactor enrichment culture using (advanced electron microscopy, viral metagenomics and bioinformatics. Electron micrographs revealed four different viral morphotypes, one of which was observed to infect Methylomirabilis cells. The infected cells contained densely packed ~55 nm icosahedral bacteriophage particles with a putative internal membrane. Various stages of virion assembly were observed. Moreover, during the bacteriophage replication, the host cytoplasmic membrane appeared extremely patchy, which suggests that the bacteriophages may use host bacterial lipids to build their own putative internal membrane. The viral metagenome contained 1.87 million base pairs of assembled viral sequences, from which five putative complete viral genomes were assembled and manually annotated. Using bioinformatics analyses, we could not identify which viral genome belonged to the Methylomirabilis- infecting bacteriophage, in part because the obtained viral genome sequences were novel and unique to this reactor system. Taken together these results show that new bacteriophages can be detected in anaerobic cultivation systems and that the effect of bacteriophages on the microbial community in these systems is a topic for further study.

  5. Fed-batch bioreactor production of mannosylerythritol lipids secreted by Pseudozyma aphidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, U; Nguyen, L A; Roeper, H; Koch, H; Lang, S

    2005-09-01

    Two strains of Pseudozyma aphidis, DSM 70725 and DSM 14930, were used for the bioreactor production of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs). Foam formation interfered substantially with the cultivation process. Soybean oil was simultaneously employed as both carbon source and anti-foam agent. Primary MEL formation occurred after nitrate limitation. After a first short time-period of nitrate limitation and further nitrate addition, MELs were secreted in spite of nitrate excess. The sedimentation of MEL-enriched beads indicated enhanced product formation. Maximum yield, productivity and yield coefficient of 165 g l(-1), 13.9 g l(-1) day(-1) and 0.92 g g(-1) were achieved using strain DSM 14930 with additional substrate-feeding (glucose, sodium nitrate, yeast extract) and a foam-controlled soybean oil supply.

  6. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios

    2012-01-01

    modelling. In this paper, the vast literature on hydrodynamic and integrated modelling in MBR is critically reviewed. Hydrodynamic models are used at different scales and focus mainly on fouling and only little on system design/optimisation. Integrated models also focus on fouling although the ones......Membrane bioreactor technology exists for a couple of decades, but has not yet overwhelmed the market due to some serious drawbacks of which operational cost due to fouling is the major contributor. Knowledge buildup and optimisation for such complex systems can heavily benefit from mathematical...

  7. Comparison of biomass from integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating recalcitrant organics: Importance of attached biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunkai; Shi, Yijing; Xue, Jinkai; Zhang, Yanyan; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Liu, Yang

    2017-03-15

    This study compared microbial characteristics and oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) treatment performance of five types of microbial biomass (MBBR-biofilm, IFAS-biofilm, IFAS-floc, MBR-aerobic-floc, and MBR-anoxic-floc) cultivated from three types of bioreactors (MBBR, IFAS, and MBR) in batch experiments. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium, acid extractable fraction (AEF), and naphthenic acids (NAs) removals efficiencies were distinctly different between suspended and attached bacterial aggregates and between aerobic and anoxic suspended flocs. MBR-aerobic-floc and MBR-anoxic-floc demonstrated COD removal efficiencies higher than microbial aggregates obtained from MBBR and IFAS, MBBR and IFAS biofilm had higher AEF removal efficiencies than those obtained using flocs. MBBR-biofilm demonstrated the most efficient NAs removal from OSPW. NAs degradation efficiency was highly dependent on the carbon number and NA cyclization number according to UPLC/HRMS analysis. Mono- and di-oxidized NAs were the dominant oxy-NA species in OSPW samples. Microbial analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) indicated that the bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance was significantly higher in the batch bioreactors with suspended flocs than in those with biofilm, the NSR gene abundance in the MBR-anoxic bioreactor was significantly lower than that in aerobic batch bioreactors, and denitrifiers were more abundant in the suspended phase of the activated sludge flocs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodiversity, evolution and adaptation of cultivated crops

    OpenAIRE

    Vigouroux, Yves; Barnaud, Adeline; Scarcelli, Nora; Thuillet, Anne-Céline

    2011-01-01

    The human diet depends on very few crops. Current diversity in these crops is the result of a long interaction between farmers and cultivated plants, and their environment. Man largely shaped crop biodiversity from the domestication period 12,000 B.P. to the development of improved varieties during the last century. We illustrate this process through a detailed analysis of the domestication and early diffusion of maize. In smallholder agricultural systems, farmers still have a major impact on...

  9. A Newly Defined and Xeno-Free Culture Medium Supports Every-Other-Day Medium Replacement in the Generation and Long-Term Cultivation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian Baghbaderani, Behnam; Tian, Xinghui; Scotty Cadet, Jean; Shah, Kevan; Walde, Amy; Tran, Huan; Kovarcik, Don Paul; Clarke, Diana; Fellner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) present an unprecedented opportunity to advance human health by offering an alternative and renewable cell resource for cellular therapeutics and regenerative medicine. The present demand for high quality hPSCs for use in both research and clinical studies underscores the need to develop technologies that will simplify the cultivation process and control variability. Here we describe the development of a robust, defined and xeno-free hPSC medium that supports reliable propagation of hPSCs and generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from multiple somatic cell types; long-term serial subculturing of hPSCs with every-other-day (EOD) medium replacement; and banking fully characterized hPSCs. The hPSCs cultured in this medium for over 40 passages are genetically stable, retain high expression levels of the pluripotency markers TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-3/4 and SSEA-4, and readily differentiate into ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Importantly, the medium plays an integral role in establishing a cGMP-compliant process for the manufacturing of hiPSCs that can be used for generation of clinically relevant cell types for cell replacement therapy applications.

  10. Evaluation of a New Temporary Immersion Bioreactor System for Micropropagation of Cultivars of Eucalyptus, Birch and Fir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Businge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of liquid instead of solid culture medium for the micropropagation of plants offers advantages such as better access to medium components and scalability through possible automation of the processes. The objective of this work was to compare a new temporary immersion bioreactor (TIB to solid medium culture for the micropropagation of a selection of tree species micropropagated for commercial use: Nordmann fir (Abies nordmanniana (Steven Spach, Eucalyptus (E. grandis x E. urophylla, Downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh, and Curly birch (Betula pendula var. carelica. Cultivation of explants in the TIB resulted in a significant increase of multiplication rate and fresh weight of Eucalyptus and B. pendula, but not Betula pubescens. In addition, the fresh weight of embryogenic tissue and the maturation frequency of somatic embryos increased significantly when an embryogenic cell line of A. nordmanniana was cultivated in the TIB compared to solid culture medium. These results demonstrate the potential for scaling up and automating micropropagation by shoot multiplication and somatic embryogenesis in commercial tree species using a temporary immersion bioreactor.

  11. The use of microalgae as method for phosphorus removal from a human derived waste stream. From a lab scale to a household scale cultivation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veele, Willemien

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In this research the possibility of two different microalgae species to remove phosphorus (P) from anaerobically digested human excreta has been investigated. This research was performed on two different levels of scale. First research was perfor

  12. Decolorization of textile dyes in an air-lift bioreactor inoculated with Bjerkandera adusta OBR105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodaneath, Hong; Lee, Jung-In; Yang, Seung-Ok; Jung, Hyekyeng; Ryu, Hee Wook; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-09-19

    A new decolorizing white-rot fungus, OBR105, was isolated from Mount Odae in South Korea and identified by the morphological characterization of its fruit body and spores and partial 18s rDNA sequences. The ligninolytic enzyme activity of OBR105 was studied to characterize their decolorizing mechanism using a spectrophotometric enzyme assay. For the evaluation of the decolorization capacity of OBR105, the isolate was incubated in an erlenmeyer flask and in an airlifte bioreator with potato dextrose broth (PDB) medium supplemented with each dye. In addition, the decolorization efficiency of real textile wastewater was evaluated in an airlift bioreactor inoculated with the isolate. The isolate was identified as Bjerkandera adusta and had ligninolytic enzymes such as laccase, lignin peroxidase (LiP), and Mn-dependent peroxidase (MnP). Its LiP activity was higher than its MnP and laccase activities. B. adusta OBR105 successfully decolorized reactive dyes (red 120, blue 4, orange 16, and black 5) and acid dyes (red 114, blue 62, orange 7, and black 172). B. adusta OBR105 decolorized 91-99% of 200 mg L -1 of each dye (except acid orange 7) within 3 days in a PDB medium at 28°C, pH 5, and 150 rpm. This fungus decolorized only 45% of 200 mg L -1 acid orange 7 (single azo-type dye) within 3 days, and the decolorization efficiency did not increase by prolonging the cultivation time. In the air-lift bioreactor, B. adusta OBR105 displayed a high decolorization capacity, greater than 90%, for 3 acid dyes (red 114, blue 62, and black 172) and 1 reactive dye (blue 4) within 10-15 h of treatment. B. adusta OBR105 could decolorize real textile wastewater in the air-lift bioreactor. This result suggests that an air-lift reactor employing B. adusta OBR105 is a promising bioreactor for the treatment of dye wastewater.

  13. MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR TREATMENT OF RECALCITRANT WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprihatin Suprihatin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The low biodegradable wastewaters remain a challenge in wastewater treatment technology. The performance of membrane bioreactor systems with submerged hollow fiber micro- and ultrafiltration membrane modules were examined for purifying recalcitrant wastewaters of leachate of a municipal solid waste open dumping site and effluent of pulp and paper mill. The use of MF and UF membrane bioreactor systems showed an efficient treatment for both types wastewaters with COD reduction of 80-90%. The membrane process achieved the desirable effects of maintaining reasonably high biomass concentration and long sludge retention time, while producing a colloid or particle free effluent. For pulp and paper mill effluent a specific sludge production of 0.11 kg MLSS/kg COD removed was achieved. A permeate flux of about 5 L/m²h could be achieved with the submerged microfiltration membrane. Experiments using ultrafiltration membrane produced relatively low permeate fluxes of 2 L/m²h. By applying periodical backwash, the flux could be improved significantly. It was indicated that the particle or colloid deposition on membrane surface was suppressed by backwash, but reformation of deposit was not effectively be prevented by shear-rate effect of aeration. Particle and colloid started to accumulate soon after backwash. Construction of membrane module and operation mode played a critical role in achieving the effectiveness of aeration in minimizing deposit formation on the membrane surface.

  14. Production and partial characterization of alkaline feruloyl esterases by Fusarium oxysporum during submerged batch cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topakas, E.; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Production of feruloyl esterases (FAEs) by Fusarium oxysporum was enhanced by optimization of initial pH of the culture medium, the type and concentration of nitrogen and carbon source. Submerged batch cultivation in a laboratory bioreactor (17 1) produced activity at 82 nkat g(-1) dry substrate...... (corn cobs) which compared favorably to those reported for the other microorganisms. Use of de-esterified corn cobs as carbon source decreased FAE production by 5.5-fold compared to untreated corn cobs even though ferulic acid (FA) was added to the concentration found in alkali-extracts of corn cobs...

  15. Process technology of luwak coffee through bioreactor utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadipernata, M.; Nugraha, S.

    2018-01-01

    Indonesia has an advantage in producing exotic coffee that is Luwak coffee. Luwak coffee is produced from the fermentation process in digestion of civet. Luwak coffee production is still limited due to the difficulty level in the use of civet animals as the only medium of Luwak coffee making. The research was conducted by developing technology of luwak coffee production through bioreactor utilization and addition the bacteria isolate from gastric of civet. The process conditions in the bioreactor which include temperature, pH, and bacteria isolate of civet are adjusted to the process that occurs in civet digestion, including peristaltic movement on the stomach and small intestine of the civet will be replaced by the use of propellers that rotate on the bioreactor. The result of research showed that proximat analysis data of artificial/bioreactor luwak coffee did not significant different with original luwak coffee. However, the original luwak coffee has higher content of caffeine compared to bioreactor luwak coffee. Based on the cuping test the bioreactor luwak coffee has a value of 84.375, while the original luwak coffee is 84.875. As the result, bioreactor luwak coffee has excellent taste that similiar with original luwak coffee taste.

  16. Disposable Bioreactors for Plant Micropropagation and Mass Plant Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducos, Jean-Paul; Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier

    Different types of bioreactors are used at Nestlé R&D Centre - Tours for mass propagation of selected plant varieties by somatic embryogenesis and for large scale culture of plants cells to produce metabolites or recombinant proteins. Recent studies have been directed to cut down the production costs of these two processes by developing disposable cell culture systems. Vegetative propagation of elite plant varieties is achieved through somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium. A pilot scale process has recently been set up for the industrial propagation of Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee). The current production capacity is 3.0 million embryos per year. The pre-germination of the embryos was previously conducted by temporary immersion in liquid medium in 10-L glass bioreactors. An improved process has been developed using a 10-L disposable bioreactor consisting of a bag containing a rigid plastic box ('Box-in-Bag' bioreactor), insuring, amongst other advantages, a higher light transmittance to the biomass due to its horizontal design. For large scale cell culture, two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors have been developed from 10 to 100 L working volumes, validated with several plant species ('Wave and Undertow' and 'Slug Bubble' bioreactors). The advantages and the limits of these new types of bioreactor are discussed, based mainly on our own experience on coffee somatic embryogenesis and mass cell culture of soya and tobacco.

  17. Starting from grape cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, A

    1992-06-01

    Rapid population growth can only be stopped by lowering the fertility rate. The UNFPA recommends improving the employment opportunities for women as the single best way of achieving this reduction. An example of this phenomenon is the grape cultivation in the Nordeste (Northeastern) region of Brazil. This area is the poorest part of Brazil and has the highest proportion of indigent people. These people have been deforesting the Amazon in search of a better life. What they have done is sterilize the land and turned a tropical rain forest into a desert. In an effort to reverse this trend, grape cultivation has been introduced in an area called Petrolina. The area is very dry with less than 500 mm of precipitation annually. They do have access to a 5000 square kilometer artificial lake (the largest in the world) and the 3rd largest river in Brazil (the Sao Francisco). In an effort to avoid using agricultural medicines, the vines are fertilized with organic matter created on the farm and little or no pesticides are used since pests do not live in such an arid region. It has taken 20 years of trial and error, but the quality of the grapes is now very high and is competitive on the world market. Because of climate and location, harvesting is done year round which increases the productivity of the land. The farm managers have found that married women make the best workers and have the highest level of productivity. Age at 1st marriage averages 24-25, compared with 15-16 for unemployed women in the same area. The fertility rate averages 50% of that for unemployed women in the same area. Agricultural development offers the best opportunity for the women of developing countries. It can pay a high wage, reduce fertility, and replant desert areas.

  18. An Update to Space Biomedical Research: Tissue Engineering in Microgravity Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Barzegari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The severe need for constructing replacement tissues in organ transplantation has necessitated the development of tissue engineering approaches and bioreactors that can bring these approaches to reality. The inherent limitations of conventional bioreactors in generating realistic tissue constructs led to the devise of the microgravity tissue engineering that uses Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV bioreactors initially developed by NASA. Methods: In this review article, we intend to highlight some major advances and accomplishments in the rapidly-growing field of tissue engineering that could not be achieved without using microgravity. Results: Research is now focused on assembly of 3 dimensional (3D tissue fragments from various cell types in human body such as chondrocytes, osteoblasts, embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, hepatocytes and pancreas islet cells. Hepatocytes cultured under microgravity are now being used in extracorporeal bioartificial liver devices. Tissue constructs can be used not only in organ replacement therapy, but also in pharmaco-toxicology and food safety assessment. 3D models of various cancers may be used in studying cancer development and biology or in high-throughput screening of anticancer drug candidates. Finally, 3D heterogeneous assemblies from cancer/immune cells provide models for immunotherapy of cancer. Conclusion: Tissue engineering in (simulated microgravity has been one of the stunning impacts of space research on biomedical sciences and their applications on earth.

  19. A Pulsatile Bioreactor for Conditioning of Tissue-Engineered Cardiovascular Constructs under Endoscopic Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassil Akra

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart valve disease (HVD is a globally increasing problem and accounts for thousands of deaths yearly. Currently end-stage HVD can only be treated by total valve replacement, however with major drawbacks. To overcome the limitations of conventional substitutes, a new clinical approach based on cell colonization of artificially manufactured heart valves has been developed. Even though this attempt seems promising, a confluent and stable cell layer has not yet been achieved due to the high stresses present in this area of the human heart. This study describes a bioreactor with a new approach to cell conditioning of tissue engineered heart valves. The bioreactor provides a low pulsatile flow that grants the correct opening and closing of the valve without high shear stresses. The flow rate can be regulated allowing a steady and sensitive conditioning process. Furthermore, the correct functioning of the valve can be monitored by endoscope surveillance in real-time. The tubeless and modular design allows an accurate, simple and faultless assembly of the reactor in a laminar flow chamber. It can be concluded that the bioreactor provides a strong tool for dynamic pre-conditioning and monitoring of colonized heart valve prostheses physiologically exposed to shear stress.

  20. Micrometeorological principles of protected cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protected cultivation is a broad term commonly used among producers of specialty crops. Techniques can range from complex fixed structures to field site selection, to straightforward cultural practices in the field. This introduction to the ASHS workshop "Protected cultivation for fruit crops" consi...

  1. Fundamentals of membrane bioreactors materials, systems and membrane fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical, carefully researched, up-to-date summary of membranes for membrane bioreactors. It presents a comprehensive and self-contained outline of the fundamentals of membrane bioreactors, especially their relevance as an advanced water treatment technology. This outline helps to bring the technology to the readers’ attention, and positions the critical topic of membrane fouling as one of the key impediments to its more widescale adoption. The target readership includes researchers and industrial practitioners with an interest in membrane bioreactors.

  2. Comparative performance between intermittently cyclic activated sludge-membrane bioreactor and anoxic/aerobic-membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Lan; Yu, Shui-Li; Shi, Wen-Xin; Bao, Rui-Ling; Zhao, Qing; Zuo, Xing-Tao

    2009-09-01

    A process of intermittently cyclic activated sludge-membrane bioreactor (ICAS-MBR) was developed to enhance the performance of biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), which was constructed under sequencing anoxic/anaerobic/aerobic condition. The performance between ICAS-MBR and conventional anoxic/aerobic-membrane bioreactor (A/O-MBR) in terms of phosphorus removal, nitrification performance and microbial aspects were investigated in this study. The experimental results indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency in ICAS-MBR process increased from 65% to 83% when compared with A/O-MBR. It was also found that the COD removal efficiencies of the two processes were over 94%, and NH(4)(+)-N and TN average removal efficiencies were 96% and 69% in ICAS-MBR and 96% and 78% in A/O-MBR, respectively. Furthermore, micrographs observation obtained confirmed the succession and diversification of microorganisms in the two systems followed a similar regularity.

  3. Biochar from commercially cultivated seaweed for soil amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, David A.; Paul, Nicholas A.; Dworjanyn, Symon A.; Bird, Michael I.; de Nys, Rocky

    2015-01-01

    Seaweed cultivation is a high growth industry that is primarily targeted at human food and hydrocolloid markets. However, seaweed biomass also offers a feedstock for the production of nutrient-rich biochar for soil amelioration. We provide the first data of biochar yield and characteristics from intensively cultivated seaweeds (Saccharina, Undaria and Sargassum ? brown seaweeds, and Gracilaria, Kappaphycus and Eucheuma ? red seaweeds). While there is some variability in biochar properties as ...

  4. Long-term in vitro cultivation of Borrelia miyamotoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margos, Gabriele; Stockmeier, Sylvia; Hizo-Teufel, Cecilia; Hepner, Sabrina; Fish, Durland; Dautel, Hans; Sing, Andreas; Dzaferovic, Eldina; Rieger, Melissa; Jungnick, Sabrina; Binder, Katrin; Straubinger, Reinhard K; Fingerle, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Borrelia are fastidious bacteria some of which are difficult to grow in vitro. Here, we report a method for successful continuous in vitro cultivation of the emerging pathogen Borrelia miyamotoi. The type and quantity of serum as well as the atmosphere were critical for successful in vitro cultivation. Optimal growth was achieved using 50% pooled human serum and an atmosphere of 6% CO2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. To Globalise or Not to Globalise? "Inward-Looking Youth" as Scapegoats for Japan's Failure to Secure and Cultivate "Global Human Resources"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In Japan in recent years, there has been much discussion of the need for global human resources alongside criticism of Japanese youth as having an "inward-looking" ("uchimuki") orientation. Drawing out the contradictions apparent in a youth apparently reluctant to leave Japan and companies, universities and government seemingly…

  6. Repeated biotransformation of glycerol to 1,3-dihydroxyacetone by immobilized cells of Gluconobacter oxydans with glycerol- and urea-feeding strategy in a bubble column bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhong-Ce; Tian, Sheng-Ying; Ruan, Li-Juan; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2017-06-01

    Some inorganic nitrogen sources and amino acids instead of yeast extract, which resulted in trouble of product purification, were introduced for 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA) production by biotransformation with Gluconobacter oxydans. The results showed that urea is an optimal nitrogen source. Furthermore, the effects of glycerol- and urea-feeding strategies for DHA production by immobilized cells in a home-made bubble column bioreactor were optimized. Cells immobilization was prepared by cultivation in the bioreactor packed with porous ceramics, and then the broth was removed. Then, repeated biotransformation by continuous-feeding of glycerol and urea was developed. Up to 96.4±4.1g/L of average DHA concentration with 94.8±2.2% of average conversion rate of glycerol to DHA was achieved after 12 cycles of run. Near colorless DHA solution with few impurities was obtained and the production cost could be decreased. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biodiversity, evolution and adaptation of cultivated crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Yves; Barnaud, Adeline; Scarcelli, Nora; Thuillet, Anne-Céline

    2011-05-01

    The human diet depends on very few crops. Current diversity in these crops is the result of a long interaction between farmers and cultivated plants, and their environment. Man largely shaped crop biodiversity from the domestication period 12,000 B.P. to the development of improved varieties during the last century. We illustrate this process through a detailed analysis of the domestication and early diffusion of maize. In smallholder agricultural systems, farmers still have a major impact on crop diversity today. We review several examples of the major impact of man on current diversity. Finally, biodiversity is considered to be an asset for adaptation to current environmental changes. We describe the evolution of pearl millet in West Africa, where average rainfall has decreased over the last forty years. Diversity in cultivated varieties has certainly helped this crop to adapt to climate variation. Copyright © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomphalaria species distribution and its effect on human Schistosoma mansoni infection in an irrigated area used for rice cultivation in northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delmany Moitinho Barboza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of irrigated areas for the spread of schistosomiasis is of worldwide concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate the spatial distribution of the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria in an area highly endemic for schistosomiasis due to Schistosoma mansoni, evaluating the relationship between irrigation and types of natural water sources on one hand, and the influence of place and time of water exposure on the intensity of human infection on the other. A geographical information system (GIS was used to map the distribution of the intermediate snail hosts in Ilha das Flores, Sergipe, Brazil, combined with a clinical/epidemiological survey. We observed a direct correlation between the intensity of human infection with S. mansoni and irrigation projects. Malacological studies to identify snail species and infection rates showed that B. glabrata is the main species responsible for human schistosomiasis in the municipality, but that B. straminea also plays a role. Our results provide evidence for a competitive selection between the two snail species in rice fields with a predominance of B. glabrata in irrigation systems and B. straminea in natural water sources.

  9. The Origin of Flooded Rice Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi IKEHASHI

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice cultivation has long been considered to have originated from seeding of annual types of wild rice somewhere in subtropics, tropics or in the Yangtze River basin. That idea, however, contains a fatally weak point, when we consider the tremendous difficulty for primitive human to seed any cereal crop in the warm and humid climate, where weed thrives all year round. Instead of the accepted theory, we have to see a reality that vegetative propagation of edible plants is a dominant form of agriculture in such regions. The possibility is discussed that Job's tears and rice, two cereal crops unique to the region, might have been developed via vegetative propagation to obtain materials for medicine or herb tea in backyard gardens prior to cereal production. This idea is supported by the fact that rice in temperate regions is still perennial in its growth habit and that such backyard gardens with transplanted taro can still be seen from Yunnan Province of China to Laos. Thanks to detailed survey of wild rice throughout China for 1970–1980, it is now confirmed that a set of clones of wild rice exist in shallow swamps in Jiangxi Province, an area with severe winter cold. In early summer ancient farmers may have divided the sprouting buds and spread them by transplanting into flooded shallow marsh. Such way of propagation might have faster improved less productive rice through a better genetic potential for response to human interference than quick fixation in seed propagation, because vegetative parts are heterogeneous. Obviously, such a primitive manner of rice cultivation did include the essential parts of rice farming, i.e., nursery bed, transplanting in flooded field of shallow marsh like. Transfer from the primitive nursery to true nursery by seed may have later allowed rice cultivation to be extended to northern regions. In thus devised flooded cultivation there were a series of unique advantages, i.e.; continuous cropping of rice in a same

  10. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips.

  11. Water reuse by membrane bioreactors (MBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.; Huete, E.; Martinez, L. C.; Torres, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows an up-to date overview of the use of membrane bioreactor (MBR) to obtain water treated for reusing it. Considering the existing rules. it has been presented a summary of published studies in which the quality of the effluent is analyzed in terms on physico-chemical and biological parameters. Furthermore, MBR results are compared with the conventional treatment ones. Due to the suitability of MBR technology for removing pathogens, particular attention has been paid to disinfection process and the mechanism that govern it. Results from reviewed studies of MBR have showed equal or better quality of water treated than conventional treatments (activated sludge plus disinfection tertiary treatment by the addition of antibacterial agents). (Author) 32 refs.

  12. Start-up Strategy for Continuous Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. da Costa

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - The start-up of continuous bioreactors is solved as an optimal control problem. The choice of the dilution rate as the control variable reduces the dimension of the system by making the use of the global balance equation unnecessary for the solution of the optimization problem. Therefore, for systems described by four or less mass balance equations, it is always possible to obtain an analytical expression for the singular arc as a function of only the state variables. The steady state conditions are shown to satisfy the singular arc expression and, based on this knowledge, a feeding strategy is proposed which leads the reactor from an initial state to the steady state of maximum productivity

  13. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals. PMID:27322258

  14. Integrated foam fractionation for heterologous rhamnolipid production with recombinant Pseudomonas putida in a bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuker, Janina; Steier, Anke; Wittgens, Andreas; Rosenau, Frank; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Heterologeous production of rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas putida is characterized by advantages of a non-pathogenic host and avoidance of the native quorum sensing regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Yet, downstream processing is a major problem in rhamnolipid production and increases in complexity at low rhamnolipid titers and when using chemical foam control. This leaves the necessity of a simple concentrating and purification method. Foam fractionation is an elegant method for in situ product removal when producing microbial surfactants. However, up to now in situ foam fractionation is nearly exclusively reported for the production of surfactin with Bacillus subtilis. So far no cultivation integrated foam fractionation process for rhamnolipid production has been reported. This is probably due to excessive bacterial foam enrichment in that system. In this article a simple integrated foam fractionation process is reported for heterologous rhamnolipid production in a bioreactor with easily manageable bacterial foam enrichments. Rhamnolipids were highly concentrated in the foam during the cultivation process with enrichment factors up to 200. The described process was evaluated at different pH, media compositions and temperatures. Foam fractionation processes were characterized by calculating procedural parameter including rhamnolipid and bacterial enrichment, rhamnolipid recovery, YX/S, YP/X, and specific as well as volumetric productivities. Comparing foam fractionation parameters of the rhamnolipid process with the surfactin process a high effectiveness of the integrated foam fractionation for rhamnolipid production was demonstrated.

  15. Bioreactors for lignocellulose conversion into fermentable sugars for production of high added value products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Rossana; Ventorino, Valeria; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomasses derived from dedicated crops and agro-industrial residual materials are promising renewable resources for the production of fuels and other added value bioproducts. Due to the tolerance to a wide range of environments, the dedicated crops can be cultivated on marginal lands, avoiding conflict with food production and having beneficial effects on the environment. Besides, the agro-industrial residual materials represent an abundant, available, and cheap source of bioproducts that completely cut out the economical and environmental issues related to the cultivation of energy crops. Different processing steps like pretreatment, hydrolysis and microbial fermentation are needed to convert biomass into added value bioproducts. The reactor configuration, the operative conditions, and the operation mode of the conversion processes are crucial parameters for a high yield and productivity of the biomass bioconversion process. This review summarizes the last progresses in the bioreactor field, with main attention on the new configurations and the agitation systems, for conversion of dedicated energy crops (Arundo donax) and residual materials (corn stover, wheat straw, mesquite wood, agave bagasse, fruit and citrus peel wastes, sunflower seed hull, switchgrass, poplar sawdust, cogon grass, sugarcane bagasse, sunflower seed hull, and poplar wood) into sugars and ethanol. The main novelty of this review is its focus on reactor components and properties.

  16. CULTIVATION OF LEPTOSPIRAE II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalheim, O. H. V.; Wilson, J. B.

    1964-01-01

    Stalheim, O. H. V. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and J. B. Wilson. Cultivation of leptospirae. II. Growth and lysis in synthetic medium. J. Bacteriol. 88:55–59. 1964.—Differences were found in the ability of leptospirae to grow in a synthetic medium; 43 strains, consisting of 16 serotypes, were tested and designated as either type I or type II. Type I leptospirae did not grow; type II grew and could be subcultured. The lytic effect of several lipids was measured with Leptospira pomona and L. canicola as representatives of type I and II leptospirae, respectively. L. pomona organisms were rapidly lysed by the monoolein of the synthetic medium and by other lipids as well; L. canicola cells were consistently more resistant. Although both organisms incorporated similar amounts of label when incubated in the presence of oleic-1-C14 acid, only L. canicola grew in a modified, nonlytic synthetic medium. No differences were found in susceptibility to lysis between virulent and avirulent L. canicola organisms. Mutant type I leptospirae grown in synthetic medium had increased resistance to lysis by surface-active agents; they were poorly agglutinated by antiserum. The role of protein in the growth and antigenicity of type I leptospirae is discussed. PMID:14197906

  17. Isolation and Cultivation of Anaerobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aragao Börner, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play important roles in different biotechnological processes. Their complex metabolism and special cultivation requirements have led to less isolated representatives in comparison to their aerobic counterparts.In view of that, the isolation and cultivation of anaerobic...... microorganisms is still a promising venture, and conventional methodologies as well as considerations and modifications are presented here. An insight into new methodologies and devices as well as a discussion on future perspectives for the cultivation of anaerobes may open the prospects of the exploitation...... of these microorganisms as a source for biotechnology....

  18. Tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages: a simple and efficient method for the generation and long-term cultivation as non-adherent cells in a serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, R J; Hurley, E L; Epstein, D A; Pauly, J L

    1992-01-01

    We report a simple and efficient culture procedure for the generation of tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages (MAC). In this method, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, isolated using a conventional Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient procedure, are cultured as a heterogenous leukocyte population in Teflon or other hydrophobic cultureware, in a commercially available serum-free culture medium (M-SFM) that has been formulated specifically for the cultivation and ex vivo stimulation of human monocytes and MAC, and in the absence of exogenous mitogens, antigens, cytokines or other stimulants. This procedure features a negative-selection technique that takes advantage of the differential survival of blood leukocytes. Using the prescribed in vitro conditions, lymphocytes survived relatively poorly, whereas monocytes differentiated in the absence of exogenous stimulants into mature tumour-cytolytic MAC. The MAC were present as non-adherent, single cells that expressed good viability (greater than 95%) for a prolonged period (greater than 60 days). When compared to conventional procedures for generating MAC, the prescribed technique is thought to offer several important advantages in that it: (a) eliminates the tedious and cumbersome monocyte isolation procedures, thus providing a significant savings not only in time and money but also in eliminating repetitive cell manipulations that have often been associated with damage to monocyte morphology and/or function; (b) reduces the loss of monocyte subsets that are not recovered during specific isolation procedures; (c) facilitates harvesting a single cell, non-adherent suspension of immunocompetent MAC suitable for various examinations including analyses defining MAC morphology, cytochemistry, phenotype and function; and (d) eliminates variability and artifacts associated with different sera that are utilised frequently as medium supplements. The utility of the prescribed method is illustrated by the

  19. Model-based high cell density cultivation of Rhodospirillum rubrum under respiratory dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Lisa; Grammel, Hartmut

    2010-03-01

    The potential of facultative photosynthetic bacteria as producers of photosynthetic pigments, vitamins, coenzymes and other valuable products has been recognized for decades. However, mass cultivation under photosynthetic conditions is generally inefficient due to the inevitable limitation of light supply when cell densities become very high. The previous development of a new cultivation process for maximal expression of photosynthetic genes under semi-aerobic dark conditions in common bioreactors offers a new perspective for utilizing the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum for large-scale applications. Based on this cultivation system, the present study aimed in determining the maximal achievable cell density of R. rubrum in a bioreactor, thereby providing a major milestone on the way to industrial bioprocesses. As a starting point, we focus on aerobic growth due to higher growth rates and more facile process control under this condition, with the option to extend the process by an anaerobic production phase. Process design and optimization were supported by an unstructured computational process model, based on mixed-substrate kinetics. Key parameters for growth and process control were determined in shake-flask experiments or estimated by simulation studies. For fed-batch cultivation, a computer-controlled exponential feed algorithm in combination with a pH-stat element was implemented. As a result, a maximal cell density of 59 g cell dry weight (CDW) L(-1) was obtained, representing so far not attainable cell densities for photosynthetic bacteria. The applied exponential fed-batch methodology therefore enters a range which is commonly employed for industrial applications with microbial cells. The biochemical analysis of high cell density cultures revealed metabolic imbalances, such as the accumulation and excretion of tetrapyrrole intermediates of the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. MODELING OF AUTOMATION PROCESSES CONCERNING CROP CULTIVATION BY AVIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Ryabkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers modeling of automation processes concerning crop cultivation by aviation. Processes that take place in three interconnected environments: human, technical and movable air objects are described by a model which is based on a set theory. Stochastic network theory of mass service systems for description of human-machine system of real time is proposed in the paper.

  1. High-density mammalian cell cultures in stirred-tank bioreactor without external pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sen; Chen, Hao

    2016-08-10

    Maintaining desired pH is a necessity for optimal cell growth and protein production. It is typically achieved through a two-sided pH control loop on the bioreactor controller. Here we investigated cell culture processes with minimum or no pH control and demonstrated that high-density mammalian cell cultures could be maintained for long-term protein production without pH control. The intrinsic interactions between pCO2, lactate, and pH were leveraged to maintain culture pH. Fed-batch cultures at the same lower pH limit of 6.75 but different upper pH limits (7.05, 7.30, 7.45, 7.65) were evaluated in the 3L bioreactors and comparable results were obtained. Neither CO2 sparging nor base addition was required to control pH in the pH range of 6.75-7.65. The impact of sparger configurations (drilled hole sparger vs. frit sparger) and scales (3L vs. 200L) on CO2 accumulation and culture pH was also demonstrated. The same principle was applied in two perfusion cultures with steady state cell densities at 42.5±3.3 or 68.3±6.0×10(6)cells/mL with low cell specific perfusion rates (15±2 to 23±3pL/cell/day), achieving up to 1.9±0.1g/L/day bioreactor productivity. Culture pH level in the 3L perfusion bioreactors was steadily maintained by controlling the residual lactate and pCO2 levels without the requirement of external pH control for up to 40days with consistent productivity and product quality. Furthermore, culture pH could be potentially modulated via adjusting residual glucose levels and CO2 stripping capability in perfusion cultures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a systematic study was performed to evaluate the long-term cell cultivation and protein production in stirred-tank bioreactors without external pH control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Co-Production of Fungal Biomass Derived Constituents and Ethanol from Citrus Wastes Free Sugars without Auxiliary Nutrients in Airlift Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Satari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential of two zygomycetes fungi, Mucor indicus and Rhizopus oryzae, in assimilating citrus waste free sugars (CWFS and producing fungal chitosan, oil, and protein as well as ethanol was investigated. Extraction of free sugars from citrus waste can reduce its environmental impact by decreasing the possibility of wild microorganisms growth and formation of bad odors, a typical problem facing the citrus industries. A total sugar concentration of 25.1 g/L was obtained by water extraction of citrus waste at room temperature, used for fungal cultivation in shake flasks and airlift bioreactor with no additional nutrients. In shake flasks cultivations, the fungi were only able to assimilate glucose, while fructose remained almost intact. In contrast, the cultivation of M. indicus and R. oryzae in the four-liter airlift bioreactor resulted in the consumption of almost all sugars and production of 250 and 280 g fungal biomass per kg of consumed sugar, respectively. These biomasses correspondingly contained 40% and 51% protein and 9.8% and 4.4% oil. Furthermore, the fungal cell walls, obtained after removing the alkali soluble fraction of the fungi, contained 0.61 and 0.69 g chitin and chitosan per g of cell wall for M. indicus and R. oryzae, respectively. Moreover, the maximum ethanol yield of 36% and 18% was obtained from M. indicus and R. oryzae, respectively. Furthermore, that M. indicus grew as clump mycelia in the airlift bioreactor, while R. oryzae formed spherical suspended pellets, is a promising feature towards industrialization of the process.

  3. Construction and fed-batch cultivation of Candida famata with enhanced riboflavin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn; Lyzak, Oleksy; Yatsyshyn, Valentyna; Kluz, Maciej; Sibirny, Vladimir; Puchalski, Czeslaw; Sibirny, Andriy

    2014-02-20

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is an essential nutrition component serving as a precursor of coenzymes FMN and FAD that are involved mostly in reactions of oxidative metabolism. Riboflavin is produced in commercial scale and is used in feed and food industries, and in medicine. The yeast Candida famata (Candida flareri) belongs to the group of so called "flavinogenic yeasts" which overproduce riboflavin under iron limitation. Three genes SEF1, RIB1 and RIB7 coding for a putative transcription factor, GTP cyclohydrolase II and riboflavin synthase, respectively were simultaneously overexpressed in the background of a non-reverting riboflavin producing mutant AF-4, obtained earlier in our laboratory using methods of classical selection (Dmytruk et al. (2011), Metabolic Engineering 13, 82-88). Cultivation conditions of the constructed strain were optimized for shake-flasks and bioreactor cultivations. The constructed strain accumulated up to 16.4g/L of riboflavin in optimized medium in a 7L laboratory bioreactor during fed-batch fermentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phylogeography of the wild and cultivated stimulant plant qat (Catha edulis, Celastraceae) in areas of historical cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembrock, Luke R; Simmons, Mark P; Richards, Christopher M; Reeves, Patrick A; Reilley, Ann; Curto, Manuel A; Meimberg, Harald; Ngugi, Grace; Demissew, Sebsebe; Al Khulaidi, Abdul Wali; Al-Thobhani, Mansoor; Simpson, Sheron; Varisco, Daniel M

    2017-04-01

    Qat ( Catha edulis , Celastraceae) is a woody plant species cultivated for its stimulant alkaloids. Qat is important to the economy and culture in large regions of Ethiopia, Kenya, and Yemen. Despite the importance of this species, the wild origins and dispersal of cultivars have only been described in often contradictory historical documents. We examined the wild origins, human-mediated dispersal, and genetic divergence of cultivated qat compared to wild qat. We sampled 17 SSR markers and 1561 wild and cultivated individuals across the historical areas of qat cultivation. On the basis of genetic structure inferred using Bayesian and nonparametric methods, two centers of origin in Kenya and one in Ethiopia were found for cultivated qat. The centers of origin in Ethiopia and northeast of Mt. Kenya are the primary sources of cultivated qat genotypes. Qat cultivated in Yemen is derived from Ethiopian genotypes rather than Yemeni wild populations. Cultivated qat with a wild Kenyan origin has not spread to Ethiopia or Yemen, whereas a small minority of qat cultivated in Kenya originated in Ethiopia. Hybrid genotypes with both Ethiopian and Kenyan parentage are present in northern Kenya. Ethiopian cultivars have diverged from their wild relatives, whereas Kenyan qat has diverged less. This pattern of divergence could be caused by the extinction of the wild-source qat populations in Ethiopia due to deforestation, undersampling, and/or artificial selection for agronomically important traits. © 2017 Tembrock et al. Published by the Botanical Society of America. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons public domain license (CC0 1.0).

  5. High cell density media for Escherichia coli are generally designed for aerobic cultivations – consequences for large-scale bioprocesses and shake flask cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the cultivation of Escherichia coli in bioreactors trace element solutions are generally designed for optimal growth under aerobic conditions. They do normally not contain selenium and nickel. Molybdenum is only contained in few of them. These elements are part of the formate hydrogen lyase (FHL complex which is induced under anaerobic conditions. As it is generally known that oxygen limitation appears in shake flask cultures and locally in large-scale bioreactors, function of the FHL complex may influence the process behaviour. Formate has been described to accumulate in large-scale cultures and may have toxic effects on E. coli. Although the anaerobic metabolism of E. coli is well studied, reference data which estimate the impact of the FHL complex on bioprocesses of E. coli with oxygen limitation have so far not been published, but are important for a better process understanding. Results Two sets of fed-batch cultures with conditions triggering oxygen limitation and formate accumulation were performed. Permanent oxygen limitation which is typical for shake flask cultures was caused in a bioreactor by reduction of the agitation rate. Transient oxygen limitation, which has been described to eventually occur in the feed-zone of large-scale bioreactors, was mimicked in a two-compartment scale-down bioreactor consisting of a stirred tank reactor and a plug flow reactor (PFR with continuous glucose feeding into the PFR. In both models formate accumulated up to about 20 mM in the culture medium without addition of selenium, molybdenum and nickel. By addition of these trace elements the formate accumulation decreased below the level observed in well-mixed laboratory-scale cultures. Interestingly, addition of the extra trace elements caused accumulation of large amounts of lactate and reduced biomass yield in the simulator with permanent oxygen limitation, but not in the scale-down two-compartment bioreactor. Conclusion The

  6. Evaluation of microwell based systems and miniature bioreactors for rapid cell culture bioprocess development and scale-up

    OpenAIRE

    Sani, M. H. B.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of antibodies for human therapy has driven rational approaches to accelerate bioprocess development in producing cost effective and highly productive antibodies. The potential of microwell based systems and miniature bioreactors (MBR) to mimic the scalability and operations of conventional bench reactors are seen as an alternative. This study has investigated the microtitre plate (MTP), microMatrix and MBR (HEL-BioXplore) as scale-down mimic for rapid and accu...

  7. [Study of shear rate in modified airlift nitrifying bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ren-cun; Zheng, Ping

    2006-06-01

    The characteristics of shear rate in an airlift nitrifying bioreactor and its influencing factors were studied. The results showed that the shear rate was different in different sections of the bioreactor. With inlet gas flowrate at 430 approximately 2700 L x h(-1), the overall shear rate was (0.702 approximately 3.13) x 10(5) s(-1), shear rate in riser was (1.07 approximately 31.3) x 10(5) s(-1) and in gas-liquid separator was (1.12 approximately 25.0) x 10(5) s(-1), respectively. It indicates that the highest shear rates prevailed in the riser part of bioreactor. The operational variables and the bioreactor configurations exerted a significant influence on the shear level of the bioreactor. When inlet gas flowrate was raised from 1300 to 2700 L x h(-1), shear rate in riser and separator ascended first and then descended subsequently. The diameter of draft tube (d) was negatively correlated with shear rate. When the draft tube with diameter of 5.5 cm was installed, the shear rates in riser, separator and overall shear rate were 85.5%, 82.3% and 80.6%, respectively less as compared with that with diameter of 4.0 cm. The number of static mixers (N) was positively correlated with the shear rate. When d was set at 4.0 cm, with N of 10 and 39, the shear rates in riser were 6.14 and 7.97 times higher respectively, than that of conventional bioreactor. The ratio of maximum local shear rate to overall shear rate was 3.68 approximately 7.66, and the homogeneity of the shear field in airlift bioreactors could be improved if d and N were set at 5.5 cm and 10 approximately 13, respectively.

  8. A versatile miniature bioreactor and its application to bioelectrochemistry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloke, A; Rubenwolf, S; Bücking, C; Gescher, J; Kerzenmacher, S; Zengerle, R; von Stetten, F

    2010-08-15

    Often, reproducible investigations on bio-microsystems essentially require a flexible but well-defined experimental setup, which in its features corresponds to a bioreactor. We therefore developed a miniature bioreactor with a volume in the range of a few millilitre that is assembled by alternate stacking of individual polycarbonate elements and silicone gaskets. All the necessary supply pipes are incorporated as bore holes or cavities within the individual elements. Their combination allows for a bioreactor assembly that is easily adaptable in size and functionality to experimental demands. It allows for controlling oxygen transfer as well as the monitoring of dissolved oxygen concentration and pH-value. The system provides access for media exchange or sterile sampling. A mass transfer coefficient for oxygen (k(L)a) of 4.3x10(-3) s(-1) at a flow rate of only 15 ml min(-1) and a mixing time of 1.5s at a flow rate of 11 ml min(-1) were observed for the modular bioreactor. Single reactor chambers can be interconnected via ion-conductive membranes to form a two-chamber test setup for investigations on electrochemical systems such as fuel cells or sensors. The versatile applicability of this modular and flexible bioreactor was demonstrated by recording a growth curve of Escherichia coli (including monitoring of pH and oxygen) saturation, and also as by two bioelectrochemical experiments. In the first electrochemical experiment the use of the bioreactor enabled a direct comparison of electrode materials for a laccase-catalyzed oxygen reduction electrode. In a second experiment, the bioreactor was utilized to characterize the influence of outer membrane cytochromes on the performance of Shewanella oneidensis in a microbial fuel cell. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  10. Anaerobic membrane bio-reactors for severe industrial effluents and urban spill waters : The AMBROSIUS project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Lier, J.B.; Ozgun, H.; Ersahin, M.E.; Dereli, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors, combination of membrane and anaerobic processes become more and more attractive and feasible. In anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs), biomass and particulate organic matter are physically retained inside the reactor,

  11. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  12. Cultivating Africa's Future

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    help to reduce costs for small-scale producers and redirect food crops currently used as livestock feed toward human consumption. Implementing partners: International. Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology,. Kenya, and Makerere University, Uganda. Other partners: Egerton University,. Kenya; Sanergy Ltd, Kenya; and.

  13. [Enrichment of extracellular DNA from the cultivation medium of human peripheral blood mononuclears with genomic CpG rich fragments results in increased cell production of IL-6 and TNF-a via activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranskii, A I; Kostyuk, S V; Kalashnikova, E A; Veiko, N N

    2016-03-01

    Previously, it was found that blood plasma extracellular DNA (ecDNA) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is enriched with CpG-rich genomic DNA fragments, which contain TLR9 ligands (Veiko et al., 2006). In this study we have demonstrated that ecDNA of a RA patient and model fragments added to a cultivation medium of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy donors stimulate expression of genes for the TLR9-MyD88-NF-kB signaling pathway; this leads to a significant increase in concentrations of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-a in the cultivation medium. Human genomic DNA non-enriched with the CpG sequences did not stimulate IL-6 and TNF-a synthesis in PBMC. A scheme explaining the potential role ecDNA in the induction and maintenance of increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokines under conditions damaging the human cells has been proposed.

  14. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A; Shtern, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, H w , and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as H w varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small H w , the AMF effect dominates. As H w increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors. (paper)

  15. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-05-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment.

  16. Mechanisms and Effectivity of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mining-influenced water (MIW) is the main environmental challenges associated with the mining industry. Passive MIW remediation can be achieved through microbial activity in sulfate-reducing bioreactors (SRBRs), but their actual removal rates depend on different factors, one of which is the substrate composition. Chitinous materials have demonstrated high metal removal rates, particularly for the two recalcitrant MIW contaminants Zn and Mn, but their removal mechanisms need further study. We studied Cd, Fe, Zn, and Mn removal in bioactive and abiotic SRBRs to elucidate the metal removal mechanisms and the differences in metal and sulfate removal rates using a chitinous material as substrate. We found that sulfate-reducing bacteria are effective in increasing metal and sulfate removal rates and duration of operation in SRBRs, and that the main mechanism involved was metal precipitation as sulfides. The solid residues provided evidence of the presence of sulfides in the bioactive column, more specifically ZnS, according to XPS analysis. The feasibility of passive treatments with a chitinous substrate could be an important option for MIW remediation. Mining influenced water (MIW) remediation is still one of the top priorities for the agency because it addresses the most important environmental problem associated with the mining industry and that affects thousands of communities in the U.S. and worldwide. In this paper, the MIW bioremediation mechanisms are studied

  17. Functional study on two artificial liver bioreactors with collagen gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Bing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo improve the hollow fiber bioreactor of artificial liver. MethodsRat hepatocytes mixed with collagen solution were injected into the external cavity of a hollow fiber reactor to construct a bioreactor of hepatocytes suspended in collagen gel (group Ⅰ. Other rat hepatocytes suspended in solution were injected into the external cavity of a hollow fiber reactor with a layer of collagen on the wall of the external cavity to construct a bioreactor of collagen layer and hepatocytes (group Ⅱ. For each group, the culture solution circulated through the internal cavity of the hollow fiber bioreactor; the bioreactor was put in a culture box for 9 d, and the culture solution in the internal cavity was exchanged for new one every 24 h; the concentrations of albumin (Alb, urea, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the culture solution samples were measured to examine the hepatocyte function of the bioreactor. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 130. Continuous data were expressed as mean±SD, and comparison between groups was made by paired t test. ResultsFor groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, Alb levels reached peak values on day 3 of culture (1.41±0.08 g/L and 0.65±0.05 g/L; from day 3 to 9, group I had a significantly higher Alb level than group Ⅱ (t>7.572, P<0.01. For groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, urea levels reached peak values on days 3 and 5 of culture (1.73±0.14 mmol/L and 1.56±0.18 mmol/L; from days 5 to 9, group I had a significantly higher urea level than group Ⅱ (t>8.418, P<0.01. For groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, LDH levels reached peak values on day 9 of culture (32.03±9.13 U/L and 70.17±25.28 U/L; from days 1 to 9, group I had a significantly lower LDH level than group Ⅱ(t>5.633, P<0.01. Therefore, the bioreactor of hepatocytes suspended in collagen gel (group Ⅰ showed a better hepatocyte function and less hepatic enzyme leakage compared with the bioreactor of collagen layer and hepatocytes (group Ⅱ. Conclusion

  18. Development of Novel Textile Bioreactor for Anaerobic Utilization of Flocculating Yeast for Ethanol Production

    OpenAIRE

    Osadolor, Osagie; Lennartsson, Patrik; Taherzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Process development, cheaper bioreactor cost, and faster fermentation rate can aid in reducing the cost of fermentation. In this article, these ideas were combined in developing a previously introduced textile bioreactor for ethanol production. The bioreactor was developed to utilize flocculating yeast for ethanol production under anaerobic conditions. A mixing system, which works without aerators, spargers, or impellers, but utilizes the liquid content in the bioreactor for suspending the fl...

  19. Operation of a fluidized-bed bioreactor for denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancher, C.W.; Taylor, P.A.; Napier, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Two denitrification fluidized-bed bioreactors of the same length (i.e., 5 m) but with different inside diameters (i.e., 5 and 10 cm) have been operated on feed ranging in nitrate concentration from 200 to 2000 g/m 3 ; thus far, good agreement has been obtained. Two 10-cm-ID bioreactors operating in series have also been tested; the results are in accordance with predicted results based on the performance of a 5-cm-ID bioreactor. The overall denitrification rate in the dual 10-cm-ID bioreactor system was found to be 23 kg N(NO 3 - )/day-m 3 using feed with a nitrate concentration of 1800 g/m 3 . Data obtained in operating-temperature tests indicate that the maximum denitrification rate is achieved between 22 and 30 0 C. These data will form the basis of the design of our mobile pilot plant which consists of dual 20-cm-ID by 7.3-m-long bioreactors

  20. Staying alive! Sensors used for monitoring cell health in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, P; Farrell, A; Bones, J; Twomey, K

    2018-01-01

    Current and next generation sensors such as pH, dissolved oxygen (dO) and temperature sensors that will help drive the use of single-use bioreactors in industry are reviewed. The current trend in bioreactor use is shifting from the traditional fixed bioreactors to the use of single-use bioreactors (SUBs). However as the shift in paradigm occurs there is now a greater need for sensor technology to play 'catch up' with the innovation of bioreactor technology. Many of the sensors still in use today rely on technology created in the 1960's such as the Clark-type dissolved oxygen sensor or glass pH electrodes. This is due to the strict requirements of sensors to monitor bioprocesses resulting in the use of traditional well understood methods, making it difficult to incorporate new sensor technology into industry. A number of advances in sensor technology have been achieved in recent years, a few of these advances and future research will also be discussed in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of an autotrophic bioreactor microbial consortium degrading thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew Paul; Spurr, Liam Patrick; Gan, Han Ming; Moreau, John William

    2017-07-01

    Thiocyanate (SCN - ) forms as a by-product of cyanidation during gold ore processing and can be degraded by a variety of microorganisms utilizing it as an energy, nitrogen, sulphur and/or carbon source. In complex consortia inhabiting bioreactor systems, a range of metabolisms are sustained by SCN - degradation; however, despite the addition or presence of labile carbon sources in most bioreactor designs to date, autotrophic bacteria have been found to dominate key metabolic functions. In this study, we cultured an autotrophic SCN - -degrading consortium directly from gold mine tailings. In a batch-mode bioreactor experiment, this consortium degraded 22 mM SCN - , accumulating ammonium (NH 4 + ) and sulphate (SO 4 2- ) as the major end products. The consortium consisted of a diverse microbial community comprised of chemolithoautotrophic members, and despite the absence of an added organic carbon substrate, a significant population of heterotrophic bacteria. The role of eukaryotes in bioreactor systems is often poorly understood; however, we found their 18S rRNA genes to be most closely related to sequences from bacterivorous Amoebozoa. Through combined chemical and phylogenetic analyses, we were able to infer roles for key microbial consortium members during SCN - biodegradation. This study provides a basis for understanding the behaviour of a SCN - degrading bioreactor under autotrophic conditions, an anticipated approach to remediating SCN - at contemporary gold mines.

  2. Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) Using Membrane Bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mohd Azoddein; Hazlan Haris; Faten Ahada Mohd Azli

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is the largest producer and exporter of palm oil. Palm oil mill effluent (POME) which is highly polluting effluent is becoming a major problem to environment as if it not being treated well before discharged based on standard limit imposed by The Malaysian Department of Environment (DOE) for effluent discharged. Samples from mixing ponds which act as activated sludge are collected and being analyze using water analyzer method to obtain parameters such as BOD, COD, suspended solid, turbidity and pH. Wastewater samples from facultative ponds are also being analyzed than mix with activated sludge treated in the bioreactor. Results from lab-scale bioreactor are used in membrane bioreactor pilot plant system to treat the wastewater. Results from bioreactor treatment in pilot plant scale show a decrement 61.2 % of BOD and 58.9 % of COD, suspended solid and turbidity are also reducing up with pH in range of 5-9. After the wastewater was treated in the ultrafiltration membrane system, high quality water with total of deterioration for all parameter are up to 99.9 % and pH up to 7.39. This results show that the membrane bioreactor (MBR) treatment system are highly effective in treating POME. (author)

  3. A New Integrated Lab-on-a-Chip System for Fast Dynamic Study of Mammalian Cells under Physiological Conditions in Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Ping Zeng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and its dynamics it is essential to achieve rapid sampling, fast quenching of metabolism and the removal of extracellular metabolites. Common manual sample preparation methods and protocols for cells are time-consuming and often lead to the loss of physiological conditions. In this work, we present a microchip-bioreactor setup which provides an integrated and rapid sample preparation of mammalian cells. The lab-on-a-chip system consists of five connected units that allow sample treatment, mixing and incubation of the cells, followed by cell separation and simultaneous exchange of media within seconds. This microsystem is directly integrated into a bioreactor for mammalian cell cultivation. By applying overpressure (2 bar onto the bioreactor, this setup allows pulsation free, defined, fast, and continuous sampling. Experiments evince that Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO-K1 can be separated from the culture broth and transferred into a new medium efficiently. Furthermore, this setup permits the treatment of cells for a defined time (9 s or 18 s which can be utilized for pulse experiments, quenching of cell metabolism, and/or another defined chemical treatment. Proof of concept experiments were performed using glutamine containing medium for pulse experiments. Continuous sampling of cells showed a high reproducibility over a period of 18 h.

  4. Cultivating Human Capabilities in Venturesome Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Padraig

    2013-01-01

    The notion of competencies has been a familiar feature of educational reform policies for decades. In this essay, Padraig Hogan begins by highlighting the contrasting notion of capabilities, pioneered by the research of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. An educational variant of the notion of capabilities then becomes the basis for exploring…

  5. Controlling docks by stubble cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Dierauer, Hansueli; Siegrist, Franziska; Weidmann, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    The stubble cultivation cuts the dock roots below growth points. The vegetative plant parts are then cut off from the water and nutrient supply, and regrowth is inhibited. Practical recommendation • Summer dock treatment is especially worthwhile in dry summers with catch crop cultivation and after early maturing crops (winter barley, whole-crop silage) or with an early tillage of grass-clover. • After grass-clover lay or cereal harvest, undercut the dock plants at a depth of 12-15 cm...

  6. Effects of nitrogen source availability and bioreactor operating strategies on lutein production with Scenedesmus obliquus FSP-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Xie, Youping; Chan, Ming-Chang; Liu, Chen-Chun; Chen, Chun-Yen; Lee, Duu-Jong; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the effects of the type and concentration of nitrogen sources on the cell growth and lutein content of an isolated microalga Scenedesmus obliquus FSP-3 were investigated. With batch culture, the highest lutein content (4.61 mg/g) and lutein productivity (4.35 mg/L/day) were obtained when using 8.0 mM calcium nitrate as the nitrogen source. With this best nitrogen source condition, the microalgae cultivation was performed using two bioreactor strategies (namely, semi-continuous and two-stage operations) to further enhance the lutein content and productivity. Using semi-continuous operation with a 10% medium replacement ratio could obtain the highest biomass productivity (1304.8 mg/L/day) and lutein productivity (6.01 mg/L/day). This performance is better than most related studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The design and optimization for light-algae bioreactor controller based on Artificial Neural Network-Model Predictive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dawei; Liu, Hong; Yang, Chenliang; Hu, Enzhu

    As a subsystem of the bioregenerative life support system (BLSS), light-algae bioreactor (LABR) has properties of high reaction rate, efficiently synthesizing microalgal biomass, absorbing CO2 and releasing O2, so it is significant for BLSS to provide food and maintain gas balance. In order to manipulate the LABR properly, it has been designed as a closed-loop control system, and technology of Artificial Neural Network-Model Predictive Control (ANN-MPC) is applied to design the controller for LABR in which green microalgae, Spirulina platensis is cultivated continuously. The conclusion is drawn by computer simulation that ANN-MPC controller can intelligently learn the complicated dynamic performances of LABR, and automatically, robustly and self-adaptively regulate the light intensity illuminating on the LABR, hence make the growth of microalgae in the LABR be changed in line with the references, meanwhile provide appropriate damping to improve markedly the transient response performance of LABR.

  8. Performance of an intermittent agitation rotating drum type bioreactor for solid-state fermentation of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeris, E; Iniotaki, F; Topakas, E; Christakopoulos, P; Kekos, D; Macris, B J

    2003-02-01

    A laboratory bioreactor, designed for solid-state fermentation of thermophilic microorganisms, was operated for production of cellulases and hemicellulases by the thermophilic fungus Thermoascus aurantiacus. The suitability of the apparatus for the effective control of important operating variables affecting growth of microbes in solid-state cultivation was determined. Application of the optimum conditions found for the moisture content of the medium, growth temperature and airflow rate produced enzyme yields of 1709 U endoglucanase, 4 U cellobiohydrolase, 79 U beta-glucosidase, 5.5 U FPA, 4490 U xylanase and 45 U beta-xylosidase per g of dry wheat straw. The correlation between microorganism growth and production of enzymes was efficiently described by the Le Duy kinetic model.

  9. Enhancing inhibited fermentations through a dynamic electro-membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres; Garde, Arvid; Rype, Jens-Ulrik

    produced in the bioreactor) with hydroxide ions, which maintained a pH close to optimal growing conditions. The ion-exchange was in turn regulated by a PID control unit, which adjusted the electrical current output between the REED electrodes to match the growing production speed of lactic acid, which......, it is interesting to reveal to which extend the REED module can facilitate the pH control in the fermenter. In this case, the membrane and reactor unit interactions are exploited to substantially increase the lactate productivity and substrate utilization compared to a conventional fermentation with a crude control...... of pH. Experiments using multiple stacks with asynchronical current reversal intervals for improved pH stability were carried out in a bioreactor connected to a REED system. The REED was used for control of the pH process parameter of the bioreactor through exchanging the lactate ions (from lactic acid...

  10. Biological reduction of nitrate wastewater using fluidized-bed bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Hancher, C.W.; Patton, B.D.; Kowalchuk, M.

    1981-01-01

    There are a number of nitrate-containing wastewater sources, as concentrated as 30 wt % NO 3 - and as large as 2000 m 3 /d, in the nuclear fuel cycle as well as in many commercial processes such as fertilizer production, paper manufacturing, and metal finishing. These nitrate-containing wastewater sources can be successfully biologically denitrified to meet discharge standards in the range of 10 to 20 gN(NO 3 - )/m 3 by the use of a fluidized-bed bioreactor. The major strain of denitrification bacteria is Pseudomonas which was derived from garden soil. In the fluidized-bed bioreactor the bacteria are allowed to attach to 0.25 to 0.50-mm-diam coal particles, which are fluidized by the upward flow of influent wastewater. Maintaining the bacteria-to-coal weight ratio at approximately 1:10 results in a bioreactor bacteria loading of greater than 20,000 g/m 3 . A description is given of the results of two biodenitrification R and D pilot plant programs based on the use of fluidized bioreactors capable of operating at nitrate levels up to 7000 g/m 3 and achieving denitrification rates as high as 80 gN(NO 3 - )/d per liter of empty bioreactor volume. The first of these pilot plant programs consisted of two 0.2-m-diam bioreactors, each with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 208 liters, operating in series. The second pilot plant was used to determine the diameter dependence of the reactors by using a 0.5-m-diam reactor with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 1200 liters. These pilot plants operated for a period of six months and two months respectively, while using both a synthetic waste and the actual waste from a gaseous diffusion plant operated by Goodyear Atomic Corporation

  11. ANAEROBIC MEMBRANE BIOREACTORS FOR DOMESTIC WASTEWATER TREATMENT. PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The operation of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SAnMBRs for domestic wastewaters treatment was studied in laboratory scale, with the objective to define sustainable filtration conditions of the suspensions along the process. During continuous experiments, the organic matter degradation by anaerobic way showed an average DQOT removal of 85% and 93%. Indeed, the degradation generated biogas after 12 days of operation and its relative methane composition was of 60% after 25 days of operation. Additionally, the comparison between membrane bioreactors (MBRs performance in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in filterability terms, reported that both systems behave similarly once reached the stationary state.

  12. Hydraulic Behavior in The Downflow Hanging Sponge Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izarul Machdar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Performance efficiency in a Downflow Hanging Sponge (DHS bioreactor is associated with the amount of time that a wastewater remains in the bioreactor. The bioreactor is considered as a plug flow reactor and its hydraulic residence time (HRT depends on the void volume of packing material and the flow rate. In this study, hydraulic behavior of DHS bioreactor was investigated by using tracer method. Two types of sponge module covers, cylindrical plastic frame (module-1 and plastic hair roller (module-2, were investigated and compared. A concentrated NaCl solution used as an inert tracer and input as a pulse at the inlet of DHS bioreactor. Analysis of the residence time distribution (RTD curves provided interpretation of the index distribution or holdup water (active volume, the degree of short-circuiting, number of tanks in series (the plug flow characteristic, and the dispersion number. It was found that the actual HRT was primarily shorter than theoretical HRT of each test. Holdup water of the DHS bioreactor ranged from 60% to 97% and 36% to 60% of module-1 and module-2, respectively. Eventhough module-1 has higher effective volume than module-2, result showed that the dispersion numbers of the two modules were not significant difference. Furthermore, N-values were found larger at a higher flow rate. It was concluded that a DHS bioreactor design should incorporated a combination of water distributor system, higher loading rate at startup process to generate a hydraulic behavior closer to an ideal plug flow.ABSTRAKEfisiensi unjuk kerja bioreactor Downflow Hanging Sponge (DHS berkaitan dengan lamanya waktu tinggal limbah berada di dalam bioreaktor tersebut. Bioreaktor DHS dianggap sebagai seuatu reaktor aliran sumbat (plug flow dimana waktu tinggal hidraulik (HRT tergantung pada volume pori material isian dan laju alir. Dua jenis modul digunakan dalam penelitian ini, yang diberi nama dengan module-1 dan module-2 untuk melihat pengaruh jenis modul

  13. The Intention of General Education in Taiwan's Universities: To Cultivate the Holistic Person

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Huang; Hsu, Jen-Pin; Ye, Yan-Hong

    2018-01-01

    The cultivation of the holistic person has always been a topic of concern for general education in Taiwan's universities. Hopefully students can attain a more perfect human nature. So the question is how to practice general education to cultivate the holistic person. This is the focus of this article. After reading and analyzing related studies,…

  14. Cultivation of Agaricus bisporus on wheat straw and waste tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-17

    Dec 17, 2007 ... Key words: Wheat straw, waste tea leaves, dry matter, protein, carbohydrate. INTRODUCTION. Cultivation of edible mushrooms with agricultural residues, such as rice and wheat straw, is a value-added process to convert these materials, which are otherwise considered to be wastes, into human food ...

  15. Microfluidic reactor for continuous cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Astrid; Magdanz, Veronika; Rasch, Detlev; Demming, Stefanie; Aliasghar Zadeh, Shobeir; Segura, Rodrigo; Kähler, Christian; Radespiel, Rolf; Büttgenbach, Stephanus; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Krull, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    A diffusion-based microreactor system operated with a reaction volume of 8 μL is presented and characterized to intensify the process understanding in microscale cultivations. Its potential as screening tool for biological processes is evaluated. The advantage of the designed microbioreactor is the use for the continuous cultivation mode by integrating online measurement technique for dissolved oxygen (DO) and optical density (OD). A further advantage is the broaden application for biological systems. The bioreactor geometry was chosen to achieve homogeneous flow during continuous process operation. The device consisted of a microstructured top layer made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), which was designed and fabricated using UV-depth and soft lithography assembled with a glass bottom. CFD simulation data used for geometry design were verified via microparticle-image-velocimetry (μPIV). In the used microreactor geometry no concentration gradients occurred along the entire reaction volume because of rapid diffusive mixing, the homogeneous medium flow inside the growth chamber of the microreactor could be realized. Undesirable bubble formation before and during operation was reduced by using degassed medium as well as moistened and moderate incident air flow above the gas permeable PDMS membrane. Because of this a passive oxygen supply of the culture medium in the device is ensured by diffusion through the PDMS membrane. The oxygen supply itself was monitored online via integrated DO sensors based on a fluorescent dye complex. An adequate overall volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient K(L)a as well as mechanical stability of the device were accomplished for a membrane thickness of 300 μm. Experimental investigations considering measurements of OD (online) and several metabolite concentrations (offline) in a modified Verduyn medium. The used model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae DSM 2155 tended to strong reactor wall growth resembling a biofilm. © 2010

  16. Mass Cultivation of Freshwater Microalgae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Masojídek, Jiří; Torzillo, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2014), s. 1-13 ISSN 0000-0000 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0059 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : microalgae * mass cultivation * bio-active compounds Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  17. Cultivation and uses of cucurbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultivated cucurbits have spread through trade and exploration from their respective Old and New World centers of origin to the six arable continents and are important in local, regional and world trade. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), melon (Cucumis melo L.), pumpkin, squash and gourd (Cucurbita spp...

  18. A Methodological Examination of Cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Considers two issues in cultivation research. Examines relationships between television exposure and positive statements of social perceptions, and tests a model of instrumental media uses and effects. Finds television exposure to be unrelated to social attitudes, while program selectivity is related to all social attitudes except interpersonal…

  19. The growth and saponin production of Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq. A. DC. (Chinese bellflower hairy roots cultures maintained in shake flasks and mist bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Urbańska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth and saponin accumulation were measured in two lines of transgenic hairy roots of Platycodon grandiflorum, Pl 6 and Pl 17, cultured for 8 weeks in 250-ml shake flasks containing 50 ml of hormone-free woody plant medium supplemented with 40 g/l sucrose and in the Pl 17 line cultured for 12 weeks in a 5-l mist bioreactor containing 1.5 l of the same medium. With both methods, the growth of transgenic hairy roots was assessed as both fresh and dry weight and the biomass growth was correlated with the conductivity and sucrose uptake. The accumulation of saponins was measured and compared with that in roots derived from the field cultivation. The saponin concentrations were significantly higher in the two hairy root lines cultured in shake flasks [6.92 g/100 g d.w. (g% and 5.82 g% in Pl 6 and Pl 17, respectively] and the line cultured in the bioreactor (5.93 g% than in the roots derived from the field cultivation (4.02 g%. The results suggest that cultures of P. grandiflorum hairy roots may be a valuable source for obtaining saponins.

  20. Genetic similarity among Tunisian cultivated olive estimated through SSR markers

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelhamid, S.; Grati_kamoun, N.; Marra, F.; Caruso, T.

    2013-01-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L. subsp. europaea var. europaea) is one of the oldest fruit tree in the Mediterranean basin, and is cultivated for oil and canned fruit. Part of this interest is driven by the economic importance of olive oil which is increasing throughout the world due to its beneficial effect to human health. In Tunisia, olive has great socio-economic importance, with more than 60 millions olive trees cultivated for olive oil production including a wide range of cultivars which are wid...

  1. Application of biofilm bioreactors in white biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, K; Lakatos, M; Schlegel, C; Strieth, D; Kuhne, S; Ulber, R

    2014-01-01

    The production of valuable compounds in industrial biotechnology is commonly done by cultivation of suspended cells or use of (immobilized) enzymes rather than using microorganisms in an immobilized state. Within the field of wastewater as well as odor treatment the application of immobilized cells is a proven technique. The cells are entrapped in a matrix of extracellular polymeric compounds produced by themselves. The surface-associated agglomerate of encapsulated cells is termed biofilm. In comparison to common immobilization techniques, toxic effects of compounds used for cell entrapment may be neglected. Although the economic impact of biofilm processes used for the production of valuable compounds is negligible, many prospective approaches were examined in the laboratory and on a pilot scale. This review gives an overview of biofilm reactors applied to the production of valuable compounds. Moreover, the characteristics of the utilized materials are discussed with respect to support of surface-attached microbial growth.

  2. Production of halophilic proteins using Haloferax volcanii H1895 in a stirred-tank bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Strillinger, Eva

    2015-10-01

    The success of biotechnological processes is based on the availability of efficient and highly specific biocatalysts, which can satisfy industrial demands. Extreme and remote environments like the deep brine pools of the Red Sea represent highly interesting habitats for the discovery of novel halophilic and thermophilic enzymes. Haloferax volcanii constitutes a suitable expression system for halophilic enzymes obtained from such brine pools. We developed a batch process for the cultivation of H. volcanii H1895 in controlled stirred-tank bioreactors utilising knockouts of components of the flagella assembly system. The standard medium Hv-YPC was supplemented to reach a higher cell density. Without protein expression, cell dry weight reaches 10 g L−1. Two halophilic alcohol dehydrogenases were expressed under the control of the tryptophanase promoter p.tna with 16.8 and 3.2 mg gCDW −1, respectively, at a maximum cell dry weight of 6.5 g L−1. Protein expression was induced by the addition of l-tryptophan. Investigation of various expression strategies leads to an optimised two-step induction protocol introducing 6 mM l-tryptophan at an OD650 of 0.4 followed by incubation for 16 h and a second induction step with 3 mM l-tryptophan followed by a final incubation time of 4 h. Compared with the uncontrolled shaker-flask cultivations used until date, dry cell mass concentrations were improved by a factor of more than 5 and cell-specific enzyme activities showed an up to 28-fold increased yield of the heterologous proteins.

  3. Sustainable intensification of cultivated pastures using multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rangeland and wildlife parks) for guidelines to implementing this approach in cultivated pasture. In rangeland or natural grassland ... Keywords: animal production, biodiversity, cultivated pastures, foraging ecology, plant–herbivore interactions ...

  4. Type of in vitro cultivation influences cytoadhesion, knob structure, protein localization and transcriptome profile of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilly, Ann-Kathrin; Thiede, Jenny; Metwally, Nahla; Lubiana, Pedro; Bachmann, Anna; Roeder, Thomas; Rockliffe, Nichola; Lorenzen, Stephan; Tannich, Egbert; Gutsmann, Thomas; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2015-11-16

    In vitro cultivation of Plasmodium falciparum is critical for studying the biology of this parasite. However, it is likely that different in vitro cultivation conditions influence various aspects of the parasite's life cycle. In the present study two P. falciparum isolates were cultivated using the two most common methods, in which AlbuMAX or human serum as additives are used, and the results were compared. The type of cultivation influenced the knob structure of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). IEs cultivated with AlbuMAX had fewer knobs than those cultivated with human serum. Furthermore, knob size varied between isolates and is also depended on the culture medium. In addition, there was a greater reduction in the cytoadhesion of IEs to various endothelial receptors in the presence of AlbuMAX than in the presence of human serum. Surprisingly, cytoadhesion did not correlate with the presence or absence of knobs. Greater numbers of the variant surface antigen families RIFIN, STEVOR, and PfMC-2TM were found at the IE membrane when cultivated in the presence of AlbuMAX. Moreover, the type of cultivation had a marked influence on the transcriptome profile. Compared with cultivation with human serum, cultivation with AlbuMAX increased the expression of approximately 500-870 genes.

  5. Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors For Cost-Effective Municipal Water Reuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özgün, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology has been increasingly researched for municipal wastewater treatment as a means to produce nutrient-rich, solids free effluents with low levels of pathogens, while occupying a small footprint. An AnMBR can be used not only for on-site

  6. Shell of Planet Earth – Global Batch Bioreactor.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanika, Jiří; Šolcová, Olga; Kaštánek, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 11 (2017), s. 1959-1965 ISSN 0930-7516 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : critical raw materials * global batch bioreactor * planet earth Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 2.051, year: 2016

  7. [Study on energy dissipation in modified airlift bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ren-Cun; Zheng, Ping

    2005-09-01

    The effects of operational variables and reactor configurations (e.g. diameter of draft tube and the number of static mixers) on energy loss in modified airlift bioreactor were investigated at the first time. The results showed that improving the structure of draft tube could reduce energy loss in the bioreactor. When the diameter of draft tube and the number of static mixers were 4.0cm and 39, respectively, the total energy loss in the modified bioreactor was the least among all the configurations and 23.6% less than that of the conventional counterpart at the same air flowrate. The energy consumption for aeration was the smallest (43.9% less than that of the conventional counterpart) when the diameter of draft tube and the number of static mixers were 5.5cm and 13, respectively. The highest energy dissipation (70% - 80%) occurred in the riser, the bottom zone (about 20%) took the second place and the separator (less than 10%) took the third place. The energy dissipation in the downcomer was neglectable under the conditions in the research. When the energy loss per unit volume was considered, bottom zone stood the first place. It was implied that the riser was the most important zone to cut down the energy loss of the bioreactor and some attention should also be paid to the bottom zone.

  8. Membrane bioreactor biomass characteristics and microbial yield at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, a laboratory-scale MBR and SBR were operated in parallel and at very low MCRTs (3 d, 2 d, 1 d and 0.5 d) to assess the relative bioreactor performance, biomass characteristics, and microbial yield. This study confirmed that the MBR maintains higher solids levels and better overall effluent quality than ...

  9. Anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactors for high strength wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersahin, M.E.; Gimenez Garcia, J.B.; Ozgun, H.; Tao, Y.; Van Lier, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory scale external anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) treating high strength wastewater was operated to assess the effect of gas sparging velocity and organic loading rate on removal efficiency and dynamic membrane (DM) filtration characteristics. An increase in gas sparging

  10. Effect of temperature shocks on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.; Satpradit, O.A.; Bentem, van A.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Temmink, B.G.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature is known to influence the biological performance of conventional activated sludge systems. In membrane bioreactors (MBRs), temperature not only affects the bioconversion process but is also shown to have an effect on the membrane performance. Four phenomena are generally reported to

  11. The kinetics of crossflow dynamic membrane bioreactor | Li | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crossflow dynamic membrane bioreactor (CDMBR) kinetics was investigated by treating caprolactam wastewater over a period of 180 d. The removal efficiencies of organic substances and nitrogen averaged over 99% and 80%, respectively. The observed sludge yield was only 0.14 g SS·g-1 COD·d-1 at an SRT of 30 d ...

  12. Introducing Textiles as Material of Construction of Ethanol Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osagie A. Osadolor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional materials for constructing bioreactors for ethanol production are stainless and cladded carbon steel because of the corrosive behaviour of the fermenting media. As an alternative and cheaper material of construction, a novel textile bioreactor was developed and examined. The textile, coated with several layers to withstand the pressure, resist the chemicals inside the reactor and to be gas-proof was welded to form a 30 L lab reactor. The reactor had excellent performance for fermentative production of bioethanol from sugar using baker’s yeast. Experiments with temperature and mixing as process parameters were performed. No bacterial contamination was observed. Bioethanol was produced for all conditions considered with the optimum fermentation time of 15 h and ethanol yield of 0.48 g/g sucrose. The need for mixing and temperature control can be eliminated. Using a textile bioreactor at room temperature of 22 °C without mixing required 2.5 times longer retention time to produce bioethanol than at 30 °C with mixing. This will reduce the fermentation investment cost by 26% for an ethanol plant with capacity of 100,000 m3 ethanol/y. Also, replacing one 1300 m3 stainless steel reactor with 1300 m3 of the textile bioreactor in this plant will reduce the fermentation investment cost by 19%.

  13. Pharmaceutical proteins produced in plant bioreactor in recent years ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant bioreactor could be a safe, economic and convenient production system, and can been widely applied in industries and agricultures, especially in the life science and pharmaceutical industry. The application of transgenic plant in the production of vaccines, antibodies and pharmaceutical proteins has become a hot ...

  14. Modelling and characterization of an airlift-loop bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, P.

    1987-01-01

    An airlift-loop reactor is a bioreactor for aerobic biotechnological processes. The special feature of the ALR is the recirculation of the liquid through a downcomer connecting the top and the bottom of the main bubbling section. Due to the high circulation-flow rate, efficient mixing and

  15. BIOREACTOR WITH LID FOR EASY ACCESS TO INCUBATION CAVITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible....

  16. Progress in cultivation-independent phyllosphere microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas; Ruppel, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Most microorganisms of the phyllosphere are nonculturable in commonly used media and culture conditions, as are those in other natural environments. This review queries the reasons for their 'noncultivability' and assesses developments in phyllospere microbiology that have been achieved cultivation independently over the last 4 years. Analyses of total microbial communities have revealed a comprehensive microbial diversity. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and metagenomic sequencing were applied to investigate plant species, location and season as variables affecting the composition of these communities. In continuation to culture-based enzymatic and metabolic studies with individual isolates, metaproteogenomic approaches reveal a great potential to study the physiology of microbial communities in situ. Culture-independent microbiological technologies as well advances in plant genetics and biochemistry provide methodological preconditions for exploring the interactions between plants and their microbiome in the phyllosphere. Improving and combining cultivation and culture-independent techniques can contribute to a better understanding of the phyllosphere ecology. This is essential, for example, to avoid human-pathogenic bacteria in plant food. © 2013 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  17. Fungal cultivation on glass-beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, Henriette

    Transcription of various bioactive compounds and enzymes are dependent on fungal cultivation method. In this study we cultivate Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium solani on glass-beads with liquid media in petri dishes as an easy and inexpensive cultivation method, that resembles in secondary...

  18. Numerical investigation of a bubble-column photo-bioreactor design for biodiesel production from microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, I.H.; Lee, I.B.; Hwang, H.S.; Hong, S.W.; Bitog, J.P.; Kwon, K.S.; Choi, J.S.; Song, S.H. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Democratic People' s Republic of). Dept. of Rural Systems Engineering and Research Inst. for Agriculture and Life Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Biodiesel made from vegetable oil is among the most desirable of renewable energy sources because it can be a substitute for diesel oil. However, biodiesel from soybean or corn can be confronted with a food crisis. Microalgae is a new biodiesel source which contains high oil lipids with a high growth rate, and which also offers value-added products from the residue, such as cosmetics, health functional food or pharmaceuticals. Microalgae are best cultivated in photo-bioreactors (PBRs) where light, nutrients, carbon dioxide and temperature can be controlled. Despite the current availability of PBRs, only a few can be practically used for mass production. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used in this study to design an optimum bubble-column PBR for mass production of microalgae. Multi-phase models including bubble movement, meshes and time step independent tests were considered to develop the 3-dimensional CFD model. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) tests were used to enhance and validate the model. Different types of PBRs were simulated and compared quantitatively with the microalgae's growth model.

  19. A tracer liquid image velocimetry for multi-layer radial flow in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Bao; Liang, Jiu-Xing; Luo, Yu-Xi; Yan, Jia

    2015-02-13

    This paper presents a Tracer Liquid Image Velocimetry (TLIV) for multi-layer radial flow in bioreactors used for cells cultivation of tissue engineering. The goal of this approach is to use simple devices to get good measuring precision, specialized for the case in which the uniform level of fluid shear stress was required while fluid velocity varied smoothly. Compared to the widely used Particles Image Velocimetry (PIV), this method adopted a bit of liquid as tracer, without the need of laser source. Sub-pixel positioning algorithm was used to overcome the adverse effects of the tracer liquid deformation. In addition, a neighborhood smoothing algorithm was used to restrict the measurement perturbation caused by diffusion. Experiments were carried out in a parallel plates flow chamber. And mathematical models of the flow chamber and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation were separately employed to validate the measurement precision of TLIV. The mean relative error between the simulated and measured data can be less than 2%, while in similar validations using PIV, the error was around 8.8%. TLIV avoided the contradiction between the particles' visibility and following performance with tested fluid, which is difficult to overcome in PIV. And TLIV is easier to popularize for its simple experimental condition and low cost.

  20. A Novel Through-Thickness Perfusion Bioreactor for the Generation of Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineered Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gilbert

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize our designed through-thickness perfusion bioreactor which could generate large scaffold-free tissue engineered cartilage constructs. The hypothesis being that through-thickness perfusion could accelerate maturation of scaffold-free tissue engineered cartilage, grown in transwell culture inserts large enough to repair typical size chondral lesions in the human knee. Internal cell culture media temperature and pH were examined over time, upon implementation of the bioreactor perfusion system inside a CO2 incubator, to ensure adequate regulation conducive to cell viability. Results indicate that temperature and pH both equilibrate within approximately 3 h. The bioreactor was tested for its efficacy to support formation of 4.5 cm2 constructs by porcine neonatal chondrocytes. Tests were conducted under three conditions: immediate perfusion with flow from bottom to top, immediate perfusion with media flow from top to bottom, and bottom to top perfusion after four weeks of static culture, giving the cells time to self-aggregate into a consolidated construct prior to perfusion. The best cell culture results were obtained when perfusion was delayed for four weeks relative to the immediate perfusion of the other methods, and this should be further investigated.

  1. Lactic acid Production with in situ Extraction in Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Ghafouri Taleghani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Lactic acid is widely used in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The major problems associated with lactic acid production are substrate and end-product inhibition, and by-product formation. Membrane technologyrepresents one of the most effective processes for lactic acid production. The aim of this work is to increase cell density and lactic acid productivity due to reduced inhibition effect of substrate and product in membrane bioreactor.Material and Methods: In this work, lactic acid was produced from lactose in membrane bioreactor. A laboratory scale membrane bioreactor was designed and fabricated. Five types of commercial membranes were tested at the same operating conditions (transmembrane pressure: 500 KPa and temperature: 25°C. The effects of initial lactose concentration and dilution rate on biomass growth, lactic acid production and substrate utilization were evaluated.Results and Conclusion: The high lactose retention of 79% v v-1 and low lactic acid retention of 22% v v-1 were obtained with NF1 membrane; therefore, this membrane was selected for membrane bioreactor. The maximal productivity of 17.1 g l-1 h-1 was obtainedwith the lactic acid concentration of 71.5 g l-1 at the dilution rate of 0.24 h−1. The maximum concentration of lactic acid was obtained at the dilution rate of 0.04 h−1. The inhibiting effect of lactic acid was not observed at high initial lactose concentration. The critical lactose concentration at which the cell growth severely hampered was 150 g l-1. This study proved that membrane bioreactor had great advantages such as elimination of substrate and product inhibition, high concentration of process substrate, high cell density,and high lactic acid productivity.Conflict of interest: There is no conflict of interest.

  2. Design and validation of a clinical-scale bioreactor for long-term isolated lung culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Jonathan M; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Kitano, Kentaro; Yasuda, Atsushi; Gilpin, Sarah E; Mathisen, Douglas J; Ott, Harald C

    2015-06-01

    The primary treatment for end-stage lung disease is lung transplantation. However, donor organ shortage remains a major barrier for many patients. In recent years, techniques for maintaining lungs ex vivo for evaluation and short-term (culture system becomes apparent. Herein we describe a novel clinical scale bioreactor capable of maintaining functional porcine and human lungs for at least 72 h in isolated lung culture (ILC). The fully automated, computer controlled, sterile, closed circuit system enables physiologic pulsatile perfusion and negative pressure ventilation, while gas exchange function, and metabolism can be evaluated. Creation of this stable, biomimetic long-term culture environment will enable advanced interventions in both donor lungs and engineered grafts of human scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transfer of an expression YAC into goat fetal fibroblasts by cell fusion for mammary gland bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xufeng; Wu Guoxiang; Chen, Jian-Quan; Zhang Aimin; Liu Siguo; Jiao Binghua; Cheng Guoxiang

    2005-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) as transgenes in transgenic animals are likely to ensure optimal expression levels. Microinjection of YACs is the exclusive technique used to produce YACs transgenic livestock so far. However, low efficiency and high cost are its critical restrictive factors. In this study, we presented a novel procedure to produce YACs transgenic livestock as mammary gland bioreactor. A targeting vector, containing the gene of interest-a human serum albumin minigene (intron 1, 2), yeast selectable marker (G418R), and mammalian cell resistance marker (neo r ), replaced the α-lactalbumin gene in a 210 kb human α-lactalbumin YAC by homogeneous recombination in yeasts. The chimeric YAC was introduced into goat fetal fibroblasts using polyethylene glycol-mediated spheroplast fusion. PCR and Southern analysis showed that intact YAC was integrated in the genome of resistant cells. Perhaps, it may offer a cell-based route by nuclear transfer to produce YACs transgenic livestock

  4. Cyclic uniaxial compression of human stem cells seeded on a bone biomimetic nanocomposite decreases anti-osteogenic commitment evoked by shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Walter; Schneider, Isabelle; Hess, Samuel C; Stark, Wendelin J; Märsmann, Sonja; Brunelli, Marzia; Calcagni, Maurizio; Cinelli, Paolo; Buschmann, Johanna

    2018-04-05

    Chemical supplementation of culture media to induce differentiation of adult stem cells seeded on a scaffold may mask other differentiation triggers such as scaffold stiffness, chemical composition or mechanical stimulation. However, stem cells can be differentiated towards osteoblasts without any supplementation given an appropriate osteogenic scaffold and an adequate mechanical stimulation. Electrospun meshes of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid and amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (PLGA/aCaP) in a weight ratio of 60:40 were seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and cultured in DMEM. After two weeks of static cultivation, they were either further cultivated statically for another two weeks (group 1), or placed in a Bose® bioreactor with a flow rate per area of 0.16 mL cm -2 min 1 (group 2). Furthermore, group 3 was also cultivated under perfusion, however, with an additional uniaxial cyclic compression. Stiffness of the scaffolds was assessed as a function of time. After a total of four weeks, minimum stem cell criteria markers as well as typical markers for osteogenesis, endothelial cell differentiation, adipogenesis and chondrogenesis were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, cell distribution within the scaffolds by histology and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Dynamic conditions (perfusion ± uniaxial cyclic compression) significantly upregulated gene and protein expression of PPAR-γ-2 compared to static cultivation, while osteogenic markers were slightly downregulated. However, the compression in the perfusion bioreactor favored osteogenesis compared to mere perfusion as indicated by upregulation of ALP, Runx2 and collagen I. This behavior was not only attributed to the compressive load, but also to the significant increase in stiffness of the scaffold. Furthermore, CD105 was significantly upregulated under compression. Although an osteogenic electrospun composite material with an organic (PLGA) and an inorganic phase

  5. Exploring the Cultivable Ectocarpus Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    KleinJan, Hetty; Jeanthon, Christian; Boyen, Catherine; Dittami, Simon M.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal areas form the major habitat of brown macroalgae, photosynthetic multicellular eukaryotes that have great ecological value and industrial potential. Macroalgal growth, development, and physiology are influenced by the microbial community they accommodate. Studying the algal microbiome should thus increase our fundamental understanding of algal biology and may help to improve culturing efforts. Currently, a freshwater strain of the brown macroalga Ectocarpus subulatus is being developed as a model organism for brown macroalgal physiology and algal microbiome studies. It can grow in high and low salinities depending on which microbes it hosts. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. Cultivation of Ectocarpus-associated bacteria is the first step toward the development of a model system for in vitro functional studies of brown macroalgal–bacterial interactions during abiotic stress. The main aim of the present study is thus to provide an extensive collection of cultivable E. subulatus-associated bacteria. To meet the variety of metabolic demands of Ectocarpus-associated bacteria, several isolation techniques were applied, i.e., direct plating and dilution-to-extinction cultivation techniques, each with chemically defined and undefined bacterial growth media. Algal tissue and algal growth media were directly used as inoculum, or they were pretreated with antibiotics, by filtration, or by digestion of algal cell walls. In total, 388 isolates were identified falling into 33 genera (46 distinct strains), of which Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Bosea (Alphaproteobacteria), and Limnobacter (Betaproteobacteria) were the most abundant. Comparisons with 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding data showed that culturability in this study was remarkably high (∼50%), although several cultivable strains were not detected or only present in extremely low abundance in the libraries. These undetected bacteria could be considered as part of the

  6. Hydroponic cultivation of Oncidium baueri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Brandstetter Rodrigues

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, orchid cultivation has been increasing steadily over the last few years and contributing significantly to the economy. It has been reported that several vegetable crops and ornamentals have been successfully grown by soilless cultivation. The orchid Oncidium baueri Lindl. is grown on pot substrates. Nevertheless, hydroponics is an excellent alternative, especially for the production of cut flowers and bare root plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the development of Oncidium baueri on two soilless systems: (a pots containing Amafibra® coconut fiber, carbonized rice husk, and pine bark (1:1:1 irrigated with nutrient solution every 15 d; and (b a nutrient film technique (NFT hydroponic system irrigated with nutrient solution daily. Shoot height, pseudobulb diameter, and number of sprouts were evaluated monthly. The number of flowering plants, number of flowers, dry mass of shoots, and dry mass of roots were evaluated 11 months after onset of experiment. The pot cultivation system yielded more flowers and higher values for all vegetative parameters than the NFT hydroponic system.

  7. An anaerobic bioreactor system for biobutanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paekkilae, J.; Hillukkala, T.; Myllykoski, L.; Keiski, R.L. (Univ. of Oulu, Dept. of Process and Environmental Engineering (Finland)). email: johanna.pakkila@oulu.fi

    2009-07-01

    evaporation, perstraction, pervaporation and reverse osmosis with high selectivity are the most promising product recovery techniques despite of the tendency for clogging and fouling. Process development to achieve an economical and efficient production process have been done also by genetic strain manipulation, regulation of substrate utilization and butanol production, by using cell immobilization or cell recycling, and by using different kinds of product recovery techniques. The aim of this research was to design and build a system for the anaerobic bacteria cultivation. The purpose was to discover suitable cultivation conditions for strict anaerobic clostridia bacteria

  8. Spatial and temporal dynamics of shifting cultivation in the middle-Amazonas river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovac, Catarina Conte; Dutrieux, Loic; Siti, Latifah; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Bongers, Frans

    2017-01-01

    Shifting cultivation is the main land-use system transforming landscapes in riverine Amazonia. Increased concentration of the human population around villages and increasing market integration during the last decades may be causing agricultural intensification. Studies have shown that agricultural

  9. Sparged animal cell bioreactors: mechanism of cell damage and Pluronic F-68 protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murhammer, D W; Goochee, C F

    1990-01-01

    Pluronic F-68 is a widely used protective agent in sparged animal cell bioreactors. In this study, the attachment-independent Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cell line was used to explore the mechanism of this protective effect and the nature of cell damage in sparged bioreactors. First, bubble incorporation via cavitation or vortexing was induced by increasing the agitation rate in a surface-aerated bioreactor; insect cells were rapidly killed under these conditions of the absence of polyols. Supplementing the medium with 0.2% (w/v) Pluronic F-68, however, fully protected the cells. Next, cell growth was compared in two airlift bioreactors with similar geometry but different sparger design; one of these bioreactors consisted of a thin membrane distributor, while the other consisted of a porous stainless steel distributor. The flow rates and bubble sizes were comparable in the two bioreactors. Supplementing the medium with 0.2% (w/v) Pluronic F-68 provided full protection to cells growing in the bioreactor with the membrane distributor but provided essentially no protection in the bioreactor with the stainless steel distributor. These results strongly suggest that cell damage can occur in the vicinity of the gas distributor. In addition, these results demonstrate that bubble size and gas flow rate are not the only important considerations of cell damage in sparged bioreactors. A model of cell death in sparged bioreactors is presented.

  10. Cultivating the Deep Subsurface Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, C. P.; Osburn, M. R.; Flynn, T. M.; Masterson, A.; Kruger, B.

    2017-12-01

    Subterranean ecosystems are poorly understood because many microbes detected in metagenomic surveys are only distantly related to characterized isolates. Cultivating microorganisms from the deep subsurface is challenging due to its inaccessibility and potential for contamination. The Deep Mine Microbial Observatory (DeMMO) in Lead, SD however, offers access to deep microbial life via pristine fracture fluids in bedrock to a depth of 1478 m. The metabolic landscape of DeMMO was previously characterized via thermodynamic modeling coupled with genomic data, illustrating the potential for microbial inhabitants of DeMMO to utilize mineral substrates as energy sources. Here, we employ field and lab based cultivation approaches with pure minerals to link phylogeny to metabolism at DeMMO. Fracture fluids were directed through reactors filled with Fe3O4, Fe2O3, FeS2, MnO2, and FeCO3 at two sites (610 m and 1478 m) for 2 months prior to harvesting for subsequent analyses. We examined mineralogical, geochemical, and microbiological composition of the reactors via DNA sequencing, microscopy, lipid biomarker characterization, and bulk C and N isotope ratios to determine the influence of mineralogy on biofilm community development. Pre-characterized mineral chips were imaged via SEM to assay microbial growth; preliminary results suggest MnO2, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3 were most conducive to colonization. Solid materials from reactors were used as inoculum for batch cultivation experiments. Media designed to mimic fracture fluid chemistry was supplemented with mineral substrates targeting metal reducers. DNA sequences and microscopy of iron oxide-rich biofilms and fracture fluids suggest iron oxidation is a major energy source at redox transition zones where anaerobic fluids meet more oxidizing conditions. We utilized these biofilms and fluids as inoculum in gradient cultivation experiments targeting microaerophilic iron oxidizers. Cultivation of microbes endemic to DeMMO, a system

  11. Microalgae: cultivation techniques and wastewater phycoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Marcondes M; Hoeltz, Michele; Moraes, Maria S A; Schneider, Rosana C S

    2015-01-01

    Generation of liquid and gaseous effluents is associated with almost all anthropogenic activities. The discharge of these effluents into the environment without treatment has reduced the availability and quality of natural resources, representing a serious threat to the balance of different ecosystems and human health. Universal access to water and global warming are topics of intense concern and are listed as priorities in the vast majority of global scientific, social and political guidelines. Conventional techniques to treat liquid and gaseous effluents pose economic and/or environmental limitations that prevent their use in certain applications. The technique of phycoremediation, which uses microalgae, macroalgae, and cyanobacteria for the removal or biotransformation of pollutants, is an emerging technology that has been highlighted due to its economic viability and environmental sustainability. This literature review discusses different techniques of microalgae cultivation and their use in the phycoremediation of contaminants in wastewater.

  12. Cultivation of Pichia pastoris carrying the scFv anti LDL (- antibody fragment. Effect of preculture carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Andres Diaz Arias

    Full Text Available Abstract Antibodies and antibody fragments are nowadays among the most important biotechnological products, and Pichia pastoris is one of the most important vectors to produce them as well as other recombinant proteins. The conditions to effectively cultivate a P. pastoris strain previously genetically modified to produce the single-chain variable fragment anti low density lipoprotein (- under the control of the alcohol oxidase promoter have been investigated in this study. In particular, it was evaluated if, and eventually how, the carbon source (glucose or glycerol used in the preculture preceding cryopreservation in 20% glycerol influences both cell and antibody fragment productions either in flasks or in bioreactor. Although in flasks the volumetric productivity of the antibody fragment secreted by cells precultured, cryopreserved and reactivated in glycerol was 42.9% higher compared with cells precultured in glucose, the use of glycerol in bioreactor led to a remarkable shortening of the lag phase, thereby increasing it by no less than thrice compared to flasks. These results are quite promising in comparison with those reported in the literature for possible future industrial applications of this cultivation, taking into account that the overall process time was reduced by around 8 h.

  13. Outdoor Cultivation of Marine Diatoms for Year-Round Production of Biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Nojima, Daisuke; Nonoyama, Tomomi; Ikeda, Kiichi; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-25

    Biofuel production using microalgae is believed to have the advantage of continuous year-round production over crop plants, which have strong seasonality. However, actual year-round production of microalgal lipids using outdoor mass cultivation has rarely been demonstrated. In our previous study, it was demonstrated that the oleaginous diatom, Fistulifera solaris , was culturable in outdoor bioreactors from spring to autumn, whereas biomass and lipid production in winter failed because F. solaris did not grow below 15 °C. Therefore, another candidate strain that is culturable in winter is required. In this study, a cold-tolerant diatom, Mayamaea sp. JPCC CTDA0820, was selected as a promising candidate for biofuel production in winter. Laboratory-scale characterization revealed that this diatom was culturable at temperatures as low as 10 °C. Subsequently, F. solaris (April-October) and Mayamaea sp. JPCC CTDA0820 (November-March) were cultured in outdoor open-pond bioreactors, wherein year-round production of diatom lipids was successfully demonstrated. The maximal values of areal productivities of biomass and lipids reached to 9.79 and 1.80 g/(m² day) for F. solaris , and 8.62 and 0.92 g/(m² day) for Mayamaea sp. JPCC CTDA0820, respectively. With the combined use of these two diatom species, stable year-round production of microalgal lipids became possible.

  14. Using a medium of free amino acids to produce penicillin g acylase in fed-batch cultivations of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Silva

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of penicillin G acylase (PGA, an important industrial enzyme from a wild strain of Bacillus megaterium using a pool of free amino acids as substrate was studied in a bench-scale bioreactor. Experiments carried out in shakers showed that the substitution of casein for free amino acids in the presence of cheese whey was the culture medium that provided the highest productivity. Several cultivations were carried out in a bioreactor operated in either batch or fed-batch mode. Batch runs showed that enzyme production is associated with microorganism growth. The following set of amino acids was preferentially consumed: Ala, Arg, Asp, Gly, Lys, Ser, Thr and Trp. On the other hand, the rates of consumption of His, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Pro, Tyr and Val were lower.

  15. Data Driven Modeling for Monitoring and Control of Industrial Fed-Batch Cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonné, Dennis; Alvarez, María Antonieta; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2014-01-01

    A systematic methodology for development of a set of discrete-time sequence models for batch control based on historical and online operating data is presented and investigated experimentally. The modeling is based on the two independent characteristic time dimensions of batch processing, being...... convergence of iterative learning control is combined with the closed-loop performance of model predictive control to form an optimal controller aiming to ensure reliable and reproducible operation of the batch process. This learning model predictive controller may also be used for optimizing control through...... optimization of the bioreactor operations model. The modeling and preliminary control performance is demonstrated on an industrial fed-batch protein cultivation production process. The presented methods lend themselves directly for application as Process Analytical Technologies....

  16. Energy and greenhouse gas life cycle assessment and cost analysis of aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems: Influence of scale, population density, climate, and methane recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study calculated the energy and greenhouse gas life cycle and cost profiles of transitional aerobic membrane bioreactors (AeMBR) and anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). Membrane bioreactors (MBR) represent a promising technology for decentralized wastewater treatment and...

  17. Long-term outdoor cultivation by perfusing spent medium for biodiesel production from Chlorella minutissima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung Ho; Kwon, Min Chul; Choi, Woon Yong; Seo, Yong Chang; Kim, Ga Bin; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Shin Young; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2010-08-01

    A unique perfusion process was developed to maintain high concentrations of marine alga, Chlorella minutissima. This method is based on recycling cells by continuous feeding with warm spent sea water from nuclear power plants, which has very similar properties as sea water. A temperature of at least 30 degrees C in a 200 L photo-bioreactor was maintained in this system by perfusion of the thermal plume for 80 days in the coldest season. The maximum cell concentration and total lipid content was 8.3 g-dry wt./L and 23.2 %, w/w, respectively, under mixotrophic conditions. Lipid production was found to be due to a partially or non-growth related process, which implies that large amounts of biomass are needed for a high accumulation of lipids within the cells. At perfusion rates greater than 1.5 L/h, the temperature of the medium inside the reactor was around 30 degrees C, which was optimal for cell growth. For this system, a perfusion rate of 2.8 L/h was determined to be optimal for maintaining rapid cell growth and lipid production during outdoor cultivation. It was absolutely necessary to maintain the appropriate perfusion rate so that the medium temperature was optimal for cell growth. In addition, the lipids produced using this process were shown to be feasible for biodiesel production since the lipid composition of C. minutissima grown under these conditions consisted of 17 % (w/w) of C(16) and 47% (w/w) of C(18). The combined results of this study clearly demonstrated that the discharged energy of the thermal plume could be reused to cultivate marine alga by maintaining a relatively constant temperature in an outdoor photo-bioreactor without the need for supplying any extra energy, which could allow for cheap production of biodiesel from waste energy. Copyright 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Outdoor and indoor cultivation of Spirulina platensis in the extreme south of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Michele R; Costa, Jorge A V

    2008-01-01

    Water supplemented with 10% or 20% (v/v) of Zarrouk medium was used to cultivate Spirulina platensis in closed and open bioreactors under controlled conditions (30 degrees C, 32.5 micromol m(-2) s(-1), 12 h light/dark photoperiod) and in a greenhouse (9.4 to 46 degrees C, up to 2800 micromol m(-2) s(-1), variable day length photoperiod) using different initial biomass concentrations (X0) in the extreme south of Brazil (32.05 degrees S, 52.11 degrees W). Under controlled conditions the maximum specific growth rate (micromax) was 0.102 d(-1), the biomass doubling time (t(d)) was 6.8 d, the maximum dry biomass concentration (Xmax) was 1.94 g L(-1) and the maximum productivity (Pmax) was 0.059 g L(-)1 d(-1), while the corresponding values in the greenhouse experiments were micromax = 0.322 d(-1), t(d) = 2.2 d, Xmax = 1.73 g L(-1) and Pmax = 0.112 g L(-1) d(-1). Under controlled conditions the highest values for these parameters occurred when X0 = 0.15 g L(-1), while in the greenhouse X0 = 0.4 g L(-1) produced the highest values. These results show that the cultivation of S. platensis in greenhouses in the extreme south of Brazil is technically viable and that the S. platensis inoculum and the concentration of Zarrouk medium can be combined in such a way as to obtain growth and productivity parameters comparable, or superior, to those occurring in bioreactors under controlled conditions of temperature, illuminance and photoperiod.

  19. Growth and recombinant protein expression with Escherichia coli in different batch cultivation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortsch, Ralf; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2011-04-01

    Parallel operated milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactors were applied for recombinant protein expression studies in simple batch experiments without pH titration. An enzymatic glucose release system (EnBase), a complex medium, and the frequently used LB and TB media were compared with regard to growth of Escherichia coli and recombinant protein expression (alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Lactobacillus brevis and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Candida boidinii). Dissolved oxygen and pH were recorded online, optical densities were measured at-line, and the activities of ADH and FDH were analyzed offline. Best growth was observed in a complex medium with maximum dry cell weight concentrations of 14 g L(-1). EnBase cultivations enabled final dry cell weight concentrations between 6 and 8 g L(-1). The pH remained nearly constant in EnBase cultivations due to the continuous glucose release, showing the usefulness of this glucose release system especially for pH-sensitive bioprocesses. Cell-specific enzyme activities varied considerably depending on the different media used. Maximum specific ADH activities were measured with the complex medium, 6 h after induction with IPTG, whereas the highest specific FDH activities were achieved with the EnBase medium at low glucose release profiles 24 h after induction. Hence, depending on the recombinant protein, different medium compositions, times for induction, and times for cell harvest have to be evaluated to achieve efficient expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli. A rapid experimental evaluation can easily be performed with parallel batch operated small-scale stirred tank bioreactors.

  20. Solar Pond devices: free energy or bioreactors for Artemia biomass production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Luisa; Sousa, João; Marques, Ana; Tavares, Célia; Giestas, Margarida

    2009-08-01

    The recent exponential growth in industrial aquaculture has led to a huge increase in Artemia biomass production in order to meet increased fish production needs. The present study explores the potential use of salt gradient solar ponds (SGSPs) for production of Artemia nauplii. An SGSP is a basin of water where solar energy is trapped and collected via an artificially imposed gradient. Three zones can be identified in an SGSP: upper and lower zones, which are both convective, and a middle zone, which is intended to be non-convective. The latter acts as a transparent insulation layer and allows for storage of solar energy at the bottom, where it is available for use. The combination of salt, temperature and high transparency could make SGSPs promising bioreactors for the production of Artemia nauplii. Using particle image velocymetry (PIV) and Shadowgraph visualisation techniques, the behaviour of Artemia nauplii under critical cultivation parameters (namely, salinity, temperature and light) was monitored to determine movement velocity, and how movement of Artemia affects the salt gradient. It was observed that Artemia nauplii constantly follow light, irrespective of adverse salinity and/or temperature conditions. However, despite the substantial displacement of Artemia following the light source, the salt gradient is not disrupted. The suitability of SGSPs as bioreactors for Artemia biomass production was then tested. The results were disappointing, probably due to the lack of sufficient O(2) for Artemia survival and growth. Follow-up trials were conducted aimed at using the SGSP as a green and economically attractive energy source to induce faster hatching of cysts and improved Artemia nauplii growth. The results of these trials, and a case study of Artemia nauplii production using an SGSP, are presented. The authors constructed a Solar Pond device, which they suggest as a novel way of supplying thermal energy for Artemia biomass production in an aquaculture

  1. Improving Former Shifted Cultivation Land Using Wetland Cultivation in Kapuas District, Central Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi Wahyudi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Degraded forest area in Kalimantan could be caused by shifted cultivation activity that be conducted by local peoples in the surrounding forest areas. Efforts to improve the former shifted cultivation area (non productive land is developing the settled cultivation by use of irrigation system, better paddy seed, land processing, fertilizing, spraying pesticide, weeding, and better acces to the market. Local peoples, especially in Kalimantan, has been depended their food on the shifted cultivation pattern since the long time ago. This tradition could cause forest damage, forest fire, forest degradation, deforestation, and lose out of children education because they were following shifted cultivation activity although its space is very far from their home. This research was aimed to improve former shifted cultivation lands using wetland cultivation in order to improve land productivity and to support food security in the local community. This research was administratively located in Tanjung Rendan Village, Kapuas Hulu Sub-Ddistrict, Kapuas District, Central Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. Data of rice yield from settled cultivation and shifted cultivation were got from 15 households that was taking by random at 2010 to 2011. Homogeneity test, analysis of variants, and least significant different (LSD test using SPSS 15.0 for Windows. Result of this research showed that paddy yield at settled cultivation was significantly different and better than shifted cultivation at 0.05 level. LSD test also indicated that all paddy yields from settled cultivation were significantly different compare to shifted cultivation at the 0.05 level. The community in Tanjung Rendan Villages preferred settled cultivation than shifted cultivation, especially due to higher paddy production. Profit for settled cultivation was IDR10.95 million ha-1, meanwhile profit for shifted cultivation was just IDR 2.81 million ha-1 only. Settled cultivation pattern could to improve

  2. [Adaptation of coimmobilized Rhodococcus cells to oil hydrocarbons in a column bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrennikova, M K; Kuiukina, M S; Krivoruchko, A V; Ivshina, I B

    2014-01-01

    The possible adaptation of the association of Rhodococcus ruber and Rhodococcus opacus strains immobilized on modified sawdust to oil hydrocarbons in a column bioreactor was investigated. In the bioreactor, the bacterial population showed higher hydrocarbon and antibiotic resistance accompanied by the changes in cell surface properties (hydrophobicity, electrokinetic potential) and in the content of cellular lipids and biosurfactants. The possibility of using adapted Rhodococcus strains for the purification of oil-polluted water in the bioreactor was demonstrated.

  3. A Novel Modular Bioreactor to In Vitro Study the Hepatic Sinusoid

    OpenAIRE

    Illa, Xavi; Vila, Sergi; Yeste, Jose; Peralta, Carmen; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; Villa, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    We describe a unique, versatile bioreactor consisting of two plates and a modified commercial porous membrane suitable for in vitro analysis of the liver sinusoid. The modular bioreactor allows i) excellent control of the cell seeding process; ii) cell culture under controlled shear stress stimulus, and; iii) individual analysis of each cell type upon completion of the experiment. The advantages of the bioreactor detailed here are derived from the modification of a commercial porous membrane ...

  4. Using computational fluid dynamics to characterize and improve bioreactor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William J

    2008-04-01

    CFD (computational fluid dynamics) has been used to model upstream bioprocessing steps such as fermentation and homogenization. The focus of these studies has oftentimes been to characterize single-phase (liquid) flow and hydrodynamic shear. In the actual bioprocessing operations, however, there are at least two phases (cells and liquid) present. In the bioreactor, the gas bubbles constitute a third phase. More recent CFD models have considered the momentum and mass transfer that occurs between the phases. This review summarizes studies from the biochemical and biomedical literature relating to the use of CFD to model the performance of a variety of bioreactor types. Particular emphasis will be placed on describing current methods for handling multi-phase flow involving animal cells and/or gas bubbles.

  5. Treatment of textile wastewater with membrane bioreactor: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Chen, Jingyu; Navaratna, Dimuth; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Shu, Li

    2016-03-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology has been used widely for various industrial wastewater treatments due to its distinct advantages over conventional bioreactors. Treatment of textile wastewater using MBR has been investigated as a simple, reliable and cost-effective process with a significant removal of contaminants. However, a major drawback in the operation of MBR is membrane fouling, which leads to the decline in permeate flux and therefore requires membrane cleaning. This eventually decreases the lifespan of the membrane. In this paper, the application of aerobic and anaerobic MBR for textile wastewater treatment as well as fouling and control of fouling in MBR processes have been reviewed. It has been found that long sludge retention time increases the degradation of pollutants by allowing slow growing microorganisms to establish but also contributes to membrane fouling. Further research aspects of MBR for textile wastewater treatment are also considered for sustainable operations of the process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics, Process Parameters, and Inner Components of Anaerobic Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Abdelgadir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB, namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT, Organic Loading Rate (OLR, and sludge retention time (SRT were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive.

  7. Bioreactors for development of tissue engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joel L; Steen, Julie A; Koudy Williams, J; Jordan, James E; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2010-11-01

    Millions of people worldwide are diagnosed each year with valvular heart disease, resulting in hundreds of thousands of valve replacement operations. Prosthetic valve replacements are designed to correct narrowing or backflow through the valvular orifice. Although commonly used, these therapies have serious disadvantages including morbidity associated with long-term anticoagulation and limited durability necessitating repeat operations. The ideal substitute would be widely available and technically implantable for most cardiac surgeons, have normal hemodynamic performance, low risk for structural degeneration, thrombo-embolism and endocarditis, and growth potential for pediatric patients. Tissue engineered heart valves hold promise as a viable substitute to outperform existing valve replacements. An essential component to the development of tissue engineered heart valves is a bioreactor. It is inside the bioreactor that the scaffold and cells are gradually conditioned to the biochemical and mechanical environment of the valve to be replaced.

  8. Bioreactor activated graft material for early implant fixation in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek Henriksen, Susan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The combined incubation of a composite scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells in a perfusion bioreactor could make up a novel hybrid graft material with optimal properties for early fixation of implant to bone. The aim of this study was to create a bioreactor activated graft (BAG...... in each sheep. The concentric gap (2 mm) surrounding the implant was filled with 1) BAG (autogenous), 2) granules, 3) granules+bone marrow aspirate (BMA, autologous) or 4) allograft. The sheep were euthanized after 6 weeks. Distal femurs were removed and implant-bone samples were divided in two parts...... calculated to assess implant fixation. Results were assessed by One-way ANOVA. P-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results One sheep in group 1 had to be euthanized after 4 weeks (excluded). One implant in each group was loosened and could not undergo push-out test (excluded). Group 1...

  9. Waste to Energy Potential - A High Concentration Anaerobic Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    process • bacteria consume approximately 50-70% of the solids placed in the bioreactor and, generate a biogas • What do you get? • Biogas that can be...Symposium & Exhibition Objectives of the Demo • Establish the inoculation/startup procedures • Optimize presorting requirements • Evaluate biogas ...quality • Establish biogas pre-conditioning requirements • Understand the cause of upset conditions • Determine – optimal mixture of feedstock

  10. Instrumentation, control, and automation for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Durán Pinzón, Freddy; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; FERRER, J.

    2015-01-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON® , Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was designed and operated for urban wastewater treatment. An instrumentation, control, and automation (ICA) system was designed and implemented for proper process performance. Several single-input-single-output (SISO) feedback control loops based on conventional on off and PID algorithms were implemented to control the follo...

  11. Design and validation of a biomechanical bioreactor for cartilage tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, V; Panadero, J A; Ribeiro, C; Sencadas, V; Rocha, J G; Gomez Ribelles, J L; Lanceros-Méndez, S

    2016-04-01

    Specific tissues, such as cartilage, undergo mechanical solicitation under their normal performance in human body. In this sense, it seems necessary that proper tissue engineering strategies of these tissues should incorporate mechanical solicitations during cell culture, in order to properly evaluate the influence of the mechanical stimulus. This work reports on a user-friendly bioreactor suitable for applying controlled mechanical stimulation--amplitude and frequency--to three-dimensional scaffolds. Its design and main components are described, as well as its operation characteristics. The modular design allows easy cleaning and operating under laminar hood. Different protocols for the sterilization of the hermetic enclosure are tested and ensure lack of observable contaminations, complying with the requirements to be used for cell culture. The cell viability study was performed with KUM5 cells.

  12. Mercury removal from water streams through the ion exchange membrane bioreactor concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmen, Adrian; Vergel, Dario; Fradinho, Joana; Reis, Maria A M; Crespo, João G; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2014-01-15

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal that causes human health problems and environmental contamination. In this study, an ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB) process was developed to achieve Hg(II) removal from drinking water and industrial effluents. Hg(II) transport through a cation exchange membrane was coupled with its bioreduction to Hg(0) in order to achieve Hg removal from concentrated streams, with minimal production of contaminated by-products observed. This study involves (1) membrane selection, (2) demonstration of process effectiveness for removing Hg from drinking water to below the 1ppb recommended limit, and (3) process application for treatment of concentrated water streams, where >98% of the Hg was removed, and the throughput of contaminated water was optimised through membrane pre-treatment. The IEMB process represents a novel mercury treatment technology with minimal generation of contaminated waste, thereby reducing the overall environmental impact of the process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of aeration frequency on leachate quality and waste in simulated hybrid bioreactor landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae Hac; Ma, Zeyu; Jin, Xiao; Xu, Qiyong

    2016-12-01

    Research has been conducted to investigate the effects of daily aeration frequency on leachate quality and waste settlement in simulated hybrid landfill bioreactors. Four laboratory-scale reactors were constructed and operated for about 10 months to simulate different bioreactor operations, including one anaerobic bioreactor and three hybrid bioreactors with different aeration frequencies (one, two, and four times per day). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5 ) reduced more than 96% of the initial concentrations in all aerated bioreactors. The differences of COD and BOD 5 reductions among tested aeration frequencies were relatively small. For ammonia nitrogen, the higher aeration frequency (two or four times per day) resulted in the quicker reduction. Overall, the concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn) decreased over time except Cd and Pb. The reduction of redox-sensitive metal concentrations (Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu) was greater in aerated bioreactors than in anaerobic bioreactor. Settlement of municipal solid waste (MSW) was enhanced with higher frequency of aeration events (four times per day). In recent years, hybird bioreactor landfill technology has gained a lot of attention. Appropriate aeration rate is crucial for hybrid bioreactor operation, but few studies have been done and different results were obtained. Research was conducted to investigate the effects of daily aeration frequency on leachate quality and waste settlement. Results indicated that aeration can effectively accelerate waste stabilization and remove organic carbon concentration and total nitrogen in the leachate.

  14. Development of a Mechanically Versatile Bioreactor System as a Cellular Microgravity Countermeasure for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective of this research project is to develop a compact, mechanically versatile bioreactor capable of producing desired local mechanical environments...

  15. NETS FOR PEACH PROTECTED CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Schettini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the radiometric properties of coloured nets used to protect a peach cultivation. The modifications of the solar spectral distribution, mainly in the R and FR wavelength band, influence plant photomorphogenesis by means of the phytochrome and cryptochrome. The phytochrome response is characterized in terms of radiation rate in the red wavelengths (R, 600-700 nm to that in the farred radiation (FR, 700-800 nm, i.e. the R/FR ratio. The effects of the blue radiation (B, 400-500 nm is investigated by the ratio between the blue radiation and the far-red radiation, i.e. the B/FR ratio. A BLUE net, a RED net, a YELLOW net, a PEARL net, a GREY net and a NEUTRAL net were tested in Bari (Italy, latitude 41° 05’ N. Peach trees were located in pots inside the greenhouses and in open field. The growth of the trees cultivated in open field was lower in comparison to the growth of the trees grown under the nets. The RED, PEARL, YELLOW and GREY nets increased the growth of the trees more than the other nets. The nets positively influenced the fruit characteristics, such as fruit weight and flesh firmness.

  16. Biogas production from citrus waste by membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikandari, Rachma; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-08-27

    Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF) membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in the membranes, while freely suspended digesting bacteria were present in the culture as well. In this membrane bioreactor (MBR), the free digesting bacteria digested the citrus wastes and produced soluble compounds, which could pass through the membrane and converted to biogas by the encapsulated cell. As a control experiment, similar digestions were carried out in bioreactors containing the identical amount of just free cells. The experiments were carried out in thermophilic conditions at 55 °C, and hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The organic loading rate (OLR) was started with 0.3 kg VS/m3/day and gradually increased to 3 kg VS/m3/day. The results show that at the highest OLR, MBR was successful to produce methane at 0.33 Nm3/kg VS, while the traditional free cell reactor reduced its methane production to 0.05 Nm3/kg VS. Approximately 73% of the theoretical methane yield was achieved using the membrane bioreactor.

  17. The Flow in a Model Rotating-Wall Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marc K.; Neitzel, G. Paul

    1997-11-01

    Aggregates of mammalian cells can be grown on artificial polymer constructs in a reactor vessel in order to produce high-quality tissue for medical applications. The growth and differentiation of these cells is greatly affected by the fluid flow and mass transfer within the bioreactor. The surface shear stress on the constructs is an especially important quantity of interest. Here, we consider a bioreactor in the form of two concentric, independently-rotating cylinders with the axis of rotation in a horizontal plane. We shall examine the flow around a model tissue construct in the form of a disk fixed in the flow produced by the rotating walls of the bioreactor. Using CFD techniques, we shall determine the flow field and the surface shear stress distribution on the construct as a function of the wall velocities, the Reynolds number of the flow, and the construct size and position. The results will be compared to the PIV measurements of this system reported by Brown & Neitzel(1997 Meeting of the APS/DFD.).

  18. Scale-up of cell culture bioreactors using biomechatronic design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik; Björkman, Mats

    2012-08-01

    Scale-up of cell culture bioreactors is a challenging engineering work that requires wide competence in cell biology, mechanical engineering and bioprocess design. In this article, a new approach for cell culture bioreactor scale-up is suggested that is based on biomechatronic design methodology. The approach differs from traditional biochemical engineering methodology by applying a sequential design procedure where the needs of the users and alternative design solutions are systematically analysed. The procedure is based on the biological and technical functions of the scaled-up bioreactor that are derived in functional maps, concept generation charts and scoring and interaction matrices. Basic reactor engineering properties, such as mass and heat transfer and kinetics are integrated in the procedure. The methodology results in the generation of alternative design solutions that are thoroughly ranked with help of the user needs. Examples from monoclonal antibodies and recombinant protein production illuminate the steps of the procedure. The methodology provides engineering teams with additional tools that can significantly facilitate the design of new production methods for cell culture processes. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Biological Nutrient Removal in an Intermittently Aerated Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Derco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The extension of biological processes from carbonaceous impurities removal to nitrogen and phosphorus removal had an impact on the biological system configuration. The system must be well designed, optimized, and operated at its optimum in order to meet the ever more stringent effluent standards. An intermittently aerated completely mixed lab-scale activated sludge bioreactor (IACMB has been used for modelling biological processes of nutrients removal. Concerning the nitrogen removal, the operating cycles 15–30 (15 minutes of aeration, 30 minutes of only mixing without aeration and 30–30 were tested. For the experiments with luxury uptake processes, the operating cycles 15–45, 15–90, 30–60 and 15–75 were used. The cycle 15–75 was the most satisfactory with convenient lengths of aerobic, anoxic, and anaerobic period, high efficiency of the nitrification and denitrification processes, and significant decrease in phosphorus concentration. The results have shown that the intermittently aerated bioreactors are suitable for nitrogen removal as well as luxury uptake of phosphorus. The main advantage is high flexibility in maintenance and control of biochemical environments in the bioreactor.

  20. Biogas Production from Citrus Waste by Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachma Wikandari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in the membranes, while freely suspended digesting bacteria were present in the culture as well. In this membrane bioreactor (MBR, the free digesting bacteria digested the citrus wastes and produced soluble compounds, which could pass through the membrane and converted to biogas by the encapsulated cell. As a control experiment, similar digestions were carried out in bioreactors containing the identical amount of just free cells. The experiments were carried out in thermophilic conditions at 55 °C, and hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The organic loading rate (OLR was started with 0.3 kg VS/m3/day and gradually increased to 3 kg VS/m3/day. The results show that at the highest OLR, MBR was successful to produce methane at 0.33 Nm3/kg VS, while the traditional free cell reactor reduced its methane production to 0.05 Nm3/kg VS. Approximately 73% of the theoretical methane yield was achieved using the membrane bioreactor.

  1. Wastewater treatment in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Stefania; Crispino, Nedda A; Farina, Roberto; Mattioli, Davide; Ferraris, Marco; Spagni, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Although most membrane bioreactors are used under aerobic conditions, over the last few years there has been increased interest in their application for anaerobic processes. This paper presents the results obtained when a bench-scale submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor was used for the treatment of wastewaters generated in the agro-food industry. The reactor was fed with synthetic wastewater consisting of cheese whey and sucrose, and volumetric organic loading rates (OLRs) ranging from 1.5 to 13 kgCOD/(m(3)*d) were applied. Under the operating conditions studied, the maximum applicable OLR was between 6 and 10 gCOD/(g*L), which fell within the ranges of the high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment systems, while high concentrations of volatile fatty acids were produced at higher OLR rates. With an OLR of 1.5-10 gCOD/(g*L), the reactor showed 94% COD removal, whereas this value dropped to 33% with the highest applied OLR of 13 gCOD/(g*L). The study therefore confirms that membrane bioreactors can be used for anaerobic wastewater treatment.

  2. Membrane Bioreactors for Pharmaceutical Applications: Optically Pure Enantiomers Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, Emma; Mazzei, Rosalinda; Giorno, Lidietta

    2017-01-01

    In biological systems, recognition at molecular level is governed by chiral interactions. Therefore, optical isomers have very different effect in natural systems. For example, one can have beneficial effect while the other can be very harmful. For these reasons, chiral drugs nowadays are mainly admitted in the optically pure form. Given these requirements, it is clear why demand for chiral drugs has grown dramatically and the singleenantiomer drug segment has become an important part of the overall pharmaceutical market. As a consequence, the development of new chiral separation techniques is a very hot topic in both academic research and industrial innovation. Membrane bioreactors have proven their feasibility in the production of optically pure enantiomers by combining enantiospecific biochemical reactions with mass transport through membranes. The principles and the applications of enantioselective membrane bioreactors in kinetic resolution for pharmaceutical applications will be discussed. Various membrane bioreactors configurations and operation mode will be illustrated. The type of enzymes utilized to produce chiral drugs or their intermediates will be also reported. Multistep syntheses, conducted in sequential reactions catalysed by spatially aligned biocatalysts, as promising technology for the synthesis of fine chemicals will be highlighted. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Immunological analysis of aerobic bioreactor bovine theileriosis vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Habibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the pilot production of aerobic bioreactor tropical theileriosis vaccine was optimized with the aim of immunological assays for further mass production.We have shown earlier the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH assay could be used for evaluating the immunity and memory cells against specific Theileria antigen in vaccinated animals. In addition, TNF-α is the principle cytokine in modulating the cytotoxic activity of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL. Immunological analysis of the vaccine was performed by using two cell mediated immunity (CMI in vitro and in vivo DTH test (Theilerin and TNF-α assay.The results of immune responses of susceptible immunized cattle by bioreactor vaccine in comparison with conventional flask vaccine revealed a significant stimulation of immune cells by transcription of high level of TNF-α and positive reaction against Theileria antigen in Theilerin skin test (DTH.The equal immunological results achieved in both above mentioned vaccines verified the satisfactory immunity for aerobic bioreactor theileriosis vaccine for advance mass vaccination in the field on a large-scale.

  4. [Optimization of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus cultivation process--producer of hyaluronic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepilov, R N; Beloded, A V; Samoĭlenko, I I

    2013-01-01

    Selection of high-mucoid morphotype of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (Streptococcus zooepidemicus) and study of its morphological, physiological, biochemical and technological characteristics for providing increased secretion of hyaluronic acid (HA). Submerged cultivation was performed in 100 ml glass flasks without baffles or in 1.5 or 10 1 laboratory bioreactors. LB and MRS media were used for cultivation. Mutagenesis was carried out by UV exposure with consequent selection of mucoid phenotype. HA was determined by carbazole method or after exhaustive acid hydrolysis by reaction of N-acetylglucosamine with Morgan-Elson reagent. Total hyaluronidase activity was evaluated by viscosimeter. Determination of cell and capsule size, ability to ferment carbohydrates and other microbiological, physiological and biochemical tests were performed by standard techniques. Instability of capsule phenotype of S. zooepidemicus B-8014 strain was revealed that is explained most probably by formation under certain conditions of bacterial hyaluronidase. This is confirmed by a reduction of HA concentration in cultural medium at pre- and stationary growth phases. Mucoid strain S. zooepidemicus KB-04 was obtained by mutagenesis with subsequent selection that is characterized by increased capsules. The strain was studied for HA formation. Optimization of growth medium composition, physical-chemical conditions and modes of cultivation allowed to significantly increase HA yield. The studies of morphologic, physiologic, biochemical and technological characteristics of the high-mucoid S. zooepidemicus KB-04 strain obtained by mutagenesis with consequent selection were performed, conditions of its cultivation and composition of growth mediu by carbon source and content of bivalent metal ions were optimized.

  5. Scenario Analysis of Rice Cultivation in Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athira Hari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice is the staple food crop of Kerala. At present only 12% of the gross cropped area in the state is under paddy. The paddy fields in Kerala are constantly getting converted for other purposes. A steady decline in the area under rice cultivation occurred from 1980s onwards. This paper studies the changing trend in rice cultivation and provides the factors leading to shifting of rice cultivation.

  6. Comparison between moving bed-membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems: influence of wastewater salinity variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Trapani, Daniele; Di Bella, Gaetano; Mannina, Giorgio; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2014-06-01

    Two pilot plant systems were investigated for the treatment of wastewater subject to a gradual increase of salinity. In particular, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a moving bed biofilm membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR) were analyzed. Carbon and ammonium removal, kinetic constants and membranes fouling rates have been assessed. Both plants showed very high efficiency in terms of carbon and ammonium removal and the gradual salinity increase led to a good acclimation of the biomass, as confirmed by the respirometric tests. Significant biofilm detachments from carriers were experienced, which contributed to increase the irreversible superficial cake deposition. However, this aspect prevented the pore fouling tendency in the membrane module of MB-MBR system. On the contrary, the MBR pilot, even showing a lower irreversible cake deposition, was characterized by a higher pore fouling tendency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with GC-MS as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool for monitoring the cultivation of C. tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghader, Masoud; Shokoufi, Nader; Es-Haghi, Ali; Kargosha, Kazem

    2018-02-06

    Vaccine production is a biological process in which variation in time and output is inevitable. Thus, the application of Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) will be important in this regard. Headspace solid - phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with GC-MS can be used as a PAT for process monitoring. This method is suitable to chemical profiling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from microorganisms. Tetanus is a lethal disease caused by Clostridium tetani (C. tetani) bacterium and vaccination is an ultimate way to prevent this disease. In this paper, SPME fiber was used for the investigation of VOCs emerging from C. tetani during cultivation. Different types of VOCs such as sulfur-containing compounds were identified and some of them were selected as biomarkers for bioreactor monitoring during vaccine production. In the second step, the portable dynamic air sampling (PDAS) device was used as an interface for sampling VOCs by SPME fibers. The sampling procedure was optimized by face-centered central composite design (FC-CCD). The optimized sampling time and inlet gas flow rates were 10 min and 2 m L s -1 , respectively. PDAS was mounted in exhausted gas line of bioreactor and 42 samples of VOCs were prepared by SPME fibers in 7 days during incubation. Simultaneously, pH and optical density (OD) were evaluated to cultivation process which showed good correlations with the identified VOCs (>80%). This method could be used for VOCs sampling from off-gas of a bioreactor to monitoring of the cultivation process. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Bioreactor and substrate selection for solid-state cultivation of the malaria mosquito control agent Metarhizium anisopliae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukelen, van F.R.; Haemers, S.; Wijffels, R.H.; Rinzema, A.

    2011-01-01

    Metarhizium anisopliae spores are a promising alternative to chemical insecticides against malaria mosquitoes. In-house application resulting in infection of mosquitoes with the fungus can strongly contribute to reducing malaria transmission. For such application, fungal spores need to be produced

  9. Start-up of membrane bioreactor and hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor: kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Díaz, J C; Poyatos, J M

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBR) system was studied as an alternative solution to conventional activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors. This paper shows the results obtained from three laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants working in parallel in the start-up and steady states. The first wastewater treatment plant was a MBR, the second one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system containing carriers both in anoxic and aerobic zones of the bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBRa), and the last one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system which contained carriers only in the aerobic zone (hybrid MBBR-MBRb). The reactors operated with a hydraulic retention time of 30.40 h. A kinetic study for characterizing heterotrophic biomass was carried out and organic matter and nutrients removals were evaluated. The heterotrophic biomass of the hybrid MBBR-MBRb showed the best kinetic performance in the steady state, with yield coefficient for heterotrophic biomass=0.30246 mg volatile suspended solids per mg chemical oxygen demand, maximum specific growth rate for heterotrophic biomass=0.00308 h(-1) and half-saturation coefficient for organic matter=3.54908 mg O2 L(-1). The removal of organic matter was supported by the kinetic study of heterotrophic biomass.

  10. [The Theory and Practice of Health Cultivation Qigong Exercise in Traditional Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Ying

    2015-12-01

    The health cultivation qigong exercise in traditional Chinese medicine refers to a traditional, integrated method of illness prevention and body strengthening, which promotes the functions of qi and the blood, smooths the meridians (energy channels), and balances the viscera and bowels through the regulation of the mind, the breathing, and the body. The concept of using qi to cultivate human life is part of the health cultivation practices of ancient Chinese codes and of Chinese medicine. This concept includes the principles, methods, essences, and clinical applications of the practice. In addition, traditional health cultivation references the concepts of yinyang, viscera and bowels, qi and blood, meridians, and essential energy spirit theory in order to explain the human biological phenomena, the theoretical and practical perspectives of qigong, and the basis of the treatment principle. The health cultivation qigong exercise of Chinese medicine utilizes the concept of the "unity of nature and human beings" in traditional Chinese thinking in its practice, which emphasizes the conformity to nature and seasons. In order to fully leverage the benefits from the purpose of health cultivation in qigong practice, the priority is to understand the health cultivation mechanism, the essentials/matters, and the precautions of qigong practices. Recently, the evidence regarding both the biological and the psychological benefits of qigong practices have been demonstrated in numbers of research articles. In particular, qigong is currently considered to be one of the best mild exercises that is suited to all age groups. Professional nurses are suggested to include the health cultivation qigong exercise as part of activities that target health improvement and illness prevention. Due to the diversity in qigong as practiced by different health cultivation qigong exercise sects, it is essential to accumulate more clinical evidence by conducting greater numbers of rigorous studies

  11. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  12. Development of an Autonomous, Dual Chamber Bioreactor for the Growth of 3-Dimensional Epithelial-Stromal Tissues in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Wettergreen, Matthew A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a novel, autonomous bioreactor that can provide for the growth and maintenance in microgravity of 3-D organotypic epithelial-stromal cultures that require an air-liquid interface. These complex 3-D tissue models accurately represent the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics observed in normal human epithelial tissues, including the skin, esophagus, lung, breast, pancreas, and colon. However, because of their precise and complex culture requirements, including that of an air-liquid interface, these 3-D models have yet to be utilized for life sciences research aboard the International Space Station. The development of a bioreactor for these cultures will provide the capability to perform biological research on the ISS using these realistic, tissue-like human epithelial-stromal cell models and will contribute significantly to advances in fundamental space biology research on questions regarding microgravity effects on normal tissue development, aging, cancer, and other disease processes. It will also allow for the study of how combined stressors, such as microgravity with radiation and nutritional deficiencies, affect multiple biological processes and will provide a platform for conducting countermeasure investigations on the ISS without the use of animal models. The technology will be autonomous and consist of a cell culture chamber that provides for air-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-air exchanges within the chambers while maintaining the growth and development of the biological samples. The bioreactor will support multiple tissue types and its modular design will provide for incorporation of add-on capabilities such as microfluidics drug delivery, media sampling, and in situ biomarker analysis. Preliminary flight testing of the hardware will be conducted on a parabolic platform through NASA's Flight Opportunities Program.

  13. Mixotrophic cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production: status and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghan; Yang, Haizhen; Wang, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Biodiesel from microalgae provides a promising alternative for biofuel production. Microalgae can be produced under three major cultivation modes, namely photoautotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic cultivation, and mixotrophic cultivation. Potentials and practices of biodiesel production from microalgae have been demonstrated mostly focusing on photoautotrophic cultivation; mixotrophic cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production has rarely been reviewed. This paper summarizes the mechanisms and virtues of mixotrophic microalgae cultivation through comparison with other major cultivation modes. Influencing factors of microalgal biodiesel production under mixotrophic cultivation are presented, development of combining microalgal biodiesel production with wastewater treatment is especially reviewed, and bottlenecks and strategies for future commercial production are also identified.

  14. Expanded algal cultivation can reverse key planetary boundary transgressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Calahan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Humanity is degrading multiple ecosystem services, potentially irreversibly. Two of the most important human impacts are excess agricultural nutrient loading in our fresh and estuarine waters and excess carbon dioxide in our oceans and atmosphere. Large-scale global intervention is required to slow, halt, and eventually reverse these stresses. Cultivating attached polyculture algae within controlled open-field photobioreactors is a practical technique for exploiting the ubiquity and high primary productivity of algae to capture and recycle the pollutants driving humanity into unsafe regimes of biogeochemical cycling, ocean acidification, and global warming. Expanded globally and appropriately distributed, algal cultivation is capable of removing excess nutrients from global environments, while additionally sequestering appreciable excess carbon. While obviously a major capital and operational investment, such a project is comparable in magnitude to the construction and maintenance of the global road transportation network. Beyond direct amelioration of critical threats, expanded algal cultivation would produce a major new commodity flow of biomass, potentially useful either as a valuable organic commodity itself, or used to reduce the scale of the problem by improving soils, slowing or reversing the loss of arable land. A 100 year project to expand algal cultivation to completely recycle excess global agricultural N and P would, when fully operational, require gross global expenses no greater than $2.3 × 1012 yr−1, (3.0% of the 2016 global domestic product and less than 1.9 × 107 ha (4.7 × 107 ac, 0.38% of the land area used globally to grow food. The biomass generated embodies renewable energy equivalent to 2.8% of global primary energy production.

  15. Submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms: bioprocesses and products (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms belonging to higher Basidiomycetes are an immensely rich yet largely untapped resource of useful, easily accessible, natural compounds with various biological activities that may promote human well-being. The medicinal properties are found in various cellular components and secondary metabolites (polysaccharides, proteins and their complexes, phenolic compounds, polyketides, triterpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, nucleotides, etc.), which have been isolated and identified from the fruiting bodies, culture mycelium, and culture broth of mushrooms. Some of these compounds have cholesterol-lowering, anti-diabetic, antioxidant, antitumor, immunomodulating, antimicrobial, and antiviral activities ready for industrial trials and further commercialization, while others are in various stages of development. Recently, the submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms has received a great deal of attention as a promising and reproducible alternative for the efficient production of mushroom mycelium and metabolites. Submerged cultivation of mushrooms has significant industrial potential, but its success on a commercial scale depends on increasing product yields and development of novel production systems that address the problems associated with this technique of mushroom cultivation. In spite of many researchers' efforts for the production of bioactive metabolites by mushrooms, the physiological and engineering aspects of submerged cultures are still far from being thoroughly studied. The vast majority of studies have focused on polysaccharide and ganoderic acid production in submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms, and very little has been written so far on the antioxidant and hemagglutinating activity of submerged mushroom cultures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the present state of the art and future prospects of submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms to produce mycelium and bioactive metabolites, and to make a

  16. Cultivation of Angelica archangelica Linn.: evaluation for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Addition of manure (leaf litter in particular) and polyhouse cultivation further improved the yield. Economical viability of the cultivation was also observed and presented here. Keywords: Seedlings, economic yield, profit, observations, polyhouse. International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences Vol. 2 (4) 2008: pp.

  17. Modern, sustainable, protected greenhouse cultivation in Algeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.; Speetjens, S.L.; Ruijs, M.N.A.; Bruins, M.A.; Sapounas, A.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the project was to analyse the structure and technology level of protected cultivation in Algeria, which were followed by recommendations for improvements (technical, cultivation and economic aspects) of existing and newly built greenhouses. Further, in discussion with Dutch and Algerian

  18. Multiple outcomes of cultivation in the Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Laura Vang; Reenberg, Anette

    2015-01-01

    A default assumption about the Sahel is that farmers consider food provision for the family as the sole reason for cultivation. The degree to which this ‘cultivation for food’ assumption has been embedded in the scientific literature on land use changes is signified by the fact that hardly any...

  19. Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Researchers will take a pragmatic approach to dealing with the livelihood issues of the cultivators and the health of the ecosystem, and assess the effects of increasing population pressure and market forces. The idea is to share good policies and practices related to shifting cultivation and alternative options through ...

  20. Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development Options in the Eastern Himalayas. Shifting ... pressure and market forces. The idea is to share good policies and practices related to shifting cultivation and alternative options through regional exchange. ... Les chaînes de valeur comme leviers stratégiques.

  1. Specific cell cultivation on nanofibrous layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jiří; Mareková, Dana; Martinová, L.; Hobzová, Radka; Kostecká, Petra; Lubasová, D.; Lesný, Petr; Přádný, Martin; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 76, - (2010), s. 139-142 ISSN 1662-0356. [International Conferences on Modern Materials & Technologies , Forum on New Materials /5./. Montecatini Terme, 13.06.2010-18.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/07/1129; GA AV ČR KJB400500902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : hepatocytes * hepatal bioreactor * bioartifical liver assist device Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  2. Enzymatic detachment of therapeutic mesenchymal stromal cells grown on glass carriers in a bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzig, Denise; Schmiermund, Alexandra; P Grace, Pablo; Elseberg, Christiane; Weber, Christian; Czermak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapies require the in vitro expansion of adherent cells such as mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in bioreactor systems or other culture environments, followed by cell harvest. As hMSCs are strictly adherent cells, cell harvest requires cell detachment. The use of hMSCs for cell therapy requires GMP production in accordance with the guidelines for advanced therapeutic medical products. Therefore, several GMP-conform available proteolytic enzymes were investigated for their ability to promote hMSC detachment. An allogeneic hMSC cell line (hMSC-TERT) that is used in clinical trials in the form of alginate cell capsules was chosen as a model. This study investigated the influence of several factors on the outcome of proteolytic hMSC-TERT detachment. Therefore, hMSC-TERT detachment was analyzed in different cultivation systems (static, dynamic) and in combination with further cell processing including encapsulation. Only two of the commercially available enzymes (AccutaseTM, TrypZeanTM) that fulfill all process requirements (commercial availability, cost, GMP conditions during manufacturing and non-animal origin) are found to be generally suitable for detaching hMSC-TERT. Combining cell detachment with encapsulation demonstrated a high impact of the experimental set up on cell damage. It was preferable to reduce the temperature during detachment and limit the detachment time to a maximum of 20 minutes. Cell detachment in static systems was not comparable with detachment in dynamic systems. Detachment yields in dynamic systems were lower and cell damage was higher for the same experimental conditions. Finally, only TrypZeanTM seemed to be suitable for the detachment of hMSC-TERT from dynamic reactor systems.

  3. Paddy field – A natural sequential anaerobic–aerobic bioreactor for polychlorinated biphenyls transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chen; Yu, Chunna; Shen, Chaofeng; Tang, Xianjin; Qin, Zhihui; Yang, Kai; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Huang, Ronglang; Shi, Huixiang

    2014-01-01

    The environmental pollution and health risks caused by the improper disposal of electric and electronic waste (e-waste) have become urgent issues for the developing countries. One of the typical pollutants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), is commonly found in farmland in Taizhou, a major hotspot of e-waste recycling in China. This study investigated the amount of PCB residue in local farmlands. Biotransformation of PCBs was further studied under different water management conditions in paddy field with or without rice cultivation, with a special focus on the alternating flooded and drying processes. It was found that paddy field improved the attenuation of PCBs, especially for highly chlorinated congeners. In the microcosm experiment, 40% or more of the initial total PCBs was removed after sequential flood–drying treatments, compared to less than 10% in the sterilized control and 20% in the constant-drying system. Variation in the quantity of PCBs degrading and dechlorinating bacterial groups were closely related to the alteration of anaerobic–aerobic conditions. These results suggested that alternating anoxic–oxic environment in paddy field led to the sequential aerobic–anaerobic transformation of PCBs, which provided a favorable environment for natural PCB attenuation. - Highlights: • Paddy fields hold significantly lower level of PCBs than drylands, especially highly-chlorinated PCBs. • Microbial dechlorination of PCBs is favored under flooded conditions in paddy field. • Aerobic biodegradation of PCBs is benefited under dry conditions in paddy field. • PCBs dechlorination rate is accelerated in rice planted paddy field compared to the unplanted one. • Alternating anoxic–oxic environment in paddy field led to the sequential aerobic–anaerobic transformation of PCBs. - Alternating anoxic–oxic environment led to the sequential aerobic–anaerobic transformation of PCBs in paddy field, which could act as a natural sequential anaerobic

  4. Application of a stir-tank bioreactor for perfusion culture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maximum growth rate occurred on Day 18. Under the given perfusion medium feed rate, the bioreactor operated smoothly, maintaining a relatively stable concentration of 20 g l-1 through continuous cell harvest. The bioreactor we used could be an efficient cell culture system and demonstrates industrial potential.

  5. Hydrogel/poly-dimethylsiloxane hybrid bioreactor facilitating 3D cell culturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, Bart; Luttge, Regina

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a hydrogel/poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) hybrid bioreactor. The bioreactor enables a low shear stress 3D culture by integrating a hydrogel as a barrier into a PDMS casing. The use of PDMS allows the reversible adhesion of the device to a commercially available microelectrode

  6. Define of internal recirculation coefficient for biological wastewater treatment in anoxic and aerobic bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossinskyi, Volodymyr

    2018-02-01

    The biological wastewater treatment technologies in anoxic and aerobic bioreactors with recycle of sludge mixture are used for the effective removal of organic compounds from wastewater. The change rate of sludge mixture recirculation between bioreactors leads to a change and redistribution of concentrations of organic compounds in sludge mixture in bioreactors and change hydrodynamic regimes in bioreactors. Determination of the coefficient of internal recirculation of sludge mixture between bioreactors is important for the choice of technological parameters of biological treatment (wastewater treatment duration in anoxic and aerobic bioreactors, flow capacity of recirculation pumps). Determination of the coefficient of internal recirculation of sludge mixture requires integrated consideration of hydrodynamic parameter (flow rate), kinetic parameter (rate of oxidation of organic compounds) and physical-chemical parameter of wastewater (concentration of organic compounds). The conducted numerical experiment from the proposed mathematical equations allowed to obtain analytical dependences of the coefficient of internal recirculation sludge mixture between bioreactors on the concentration of organic compounds in wastewater, the duration of wastewater treatment in bioreactors.

  7. Milking microalga Dunaliella salina for Beta-carotene production in two-phase bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hejazi, M.; Holwerda, E.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    A new method was developed for production of beta-carotene from Dunaliella salina. Cells were grown in low light intensity and then transferred to a production bioreactor illuminated at a higher light intensity. It was a two-phase bioreactor consisting of an aqueous and a biocompatible organic

  8. Electrical stimulation for enhanced denitrification in woodchip bioreactors: Opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodchip bioreactors are being implemented for the removal of nitrates in groundwater and tile water drainage. However, low nitrate removals in denitrifying woodchip bioreactors have been observed for short hydraulic retention time (HRT) and low water temperature (< 10ºC). One potential approach to ...

  9. Modeling and mitigation of denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactor phosphorus releases during treatment of aquaculture wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactors designed to remove nitrate from agricultural waters may either be phosphorus sources or sinks. A 24 d batch test showed woodchip leaching is an important source of phosphorus during bioreactor start-up with a leaching potential of approximately 20 -30 mg P per ...

  10. Optimizing hydraulic retention times in denitrifying woodchip bioreactors treating recirculating aquaculture system wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performance of wood-based denitrifying bioreactors to treat high-nitrate wastewaters from aquaculture systems has not previously been demonstrated. Four pilot-scale woodchip bioreactors (approximately 1:10 scale) were constructed and operated for 268 d to determine the optimal range of design hy...

  11. Application of bioreactor design principles and multivariate analysis for development of cell culture scale down models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tescione, Lia; Lambropoulos, James; Paranandi, Madhava Ram; Makagiansar, Helena; Ryll, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A bench scale cell culture model representative of manufacturing scale (2,000 L) was developed based on oxygen mass transfer principles, for a CHO-based process producing a recombinant human protein. Cell culture performance differences across scales are characterized most often by sub-optimal performance in manufacturing scale bioreactors. By contrast in this study, reduced growth rates were observed at bench scale during the initial model development. Bioreactor models based on power per unit volume (P/V), volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kL a), and oxygen transfer rate (OTR) were evaluated to address this scale performance difference. Lower viable cell densities observed for the P/V model were attributed to higher sparge rates and reduced oxygen mass transfer efficiency (kL a) of the small scale hole spargers. Increasing the sparger kL a by decreasing the pore size resulted in a further decrease in growth at bench scale. Due to sensitivity of the cell line to gas sparge rate and bubble size that was revealed by the P/V and kL a models, an OTR model based on oxygen enrichment and increased P/V was selected that generated endpoint sparge rates representative of 2,000 L scale. This final bench scale model generated similar growth rates as manufacturing. In order to take into account other routinely monitored process parameters besides growth, a multivariate statistical approach was applied to demonstrate validity of the small scale model. After the model was selected based on univariate and multivariate analysis, product quality was generated and verified to fall within the 95% confidence limit of the multivariate model. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Production of Laccase by Recombinant Yarrowia lipolytica from Molasses: Bioprocess Development Using Statistical Modeling and Increase Productivity in Shake-Flask and Bioreactor Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, Farshad; Moradi, Marzieh; Madzak, Catherine; Jolivalt, Claude

    2017-03-01

    Laccases are used in numerous applications, from green degradation of various xenobiotic compounds, waste detoxification, textile dye bleaching, and delignification of lignocellulose materials to biofuel production. In this study, the recombinant Yarrowia lipolytica YL4 strain carrying the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor laccase IIIb gene was used for laccase production from beet molasses as an agro-industrial residue. Response surface methodology was used to statistical optimization of the production of laccase by Y. lipolytica using an industrial medium containing molasses which allows a six times increase in laccase activity compared to primary medium contains glucose after 144 h. In bioreactor cultivation after 48 h, laccase production reached to 3.7- and 22.5-fold more than optimized and primary media in shake-flask cultures, respectively. Laccase productivity in bioreactor (0.0937 U/h) was higher than shake-flask culture (0.0084 U/h). The present study provides valuable information about statistical optimization of bioprocess development for cost-effective production of laccase and other heterologous proteins in Y. lipolytica from beet molasses as sole carbon source, thus allowing the valorization and decreasing environmental pollution of this agro-industrial waste.

  13. Development of an in situ detachment protocol of Vero cells grown on Cytodex1 microcarriers under animal component-free conditions in stirred bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourou, Samia; Riahi, Nesrine; Majoul, Samy; Trabelsi, Khaled; Kallel, Héla

    2013-08-01

    Subcultivation of Vero cells grown in a proprietary animal component-free medium named IPT-AFM, on microcarriers, was studied. TrypLE Select, a non-animal-derived protease, was used as an alternative to trypsin for cell passaging. We first studied the effect of increasing concentrations of TrypLE Select toward cell growth and then studied the inactivation of the protease using either soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) or the soy hydrolysate Hypep 1510, in six-well plates. Data showed that cell growth was impaired by residual level of TrypLE Select; STI was identified as an efficient agent to neutralize this effect. To restore cell growth and inactivate TrypLE Select, STI should be added to the medium at least at 0.2 g L(-1). Cells were also grown in spinner flask on 2 g L(-1) Cytodex1 in IPT-AFM. In these conditions, the cell detachment yield was equal to 78 ± 8 %. Furthermore, cells exhibited a typical growth profile when using the dislodged cells to seed a new culture. A cell detachment yield of 70 ± 19 % was also achieved when the cells were grown in a 2-L stirred bioreactor in IPT-AFM, on 3 g L(-1) Cytodex1. This protocol can be of great interest to scale-up the process of Vero cells cultivation in IPT-AFM on Cytodex1 from one stirred bioreactor culture to another.

  14. Online optimal experimental re-design in robotic parallel fed-batch cultivation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Bournazou, M N; Barz, T; Nickel, D B; Lopez Cárdenas, D C; Glauche, F; Knepper, A; Neubauer, P

    2017-03-01

    We present an integrated framework for the online optimal experimental re-design applied to parallel nonlinear dynamic processes that aims to precisely estimate the parameter set of macro kinetic growth models with minimal experimental effort. This provides a systematic solution for rapid validation of a specific model to new strains, mutants, or products. In biosciences, this is especially important as model identification is a long and laborious process which is continuing to limit the use of mathematical modeling in this field. The strength of this approach is demonstrated by fitting a macro-kinetic differential equation model for Escherichia coli fed-batch processes after 6 h of cultivation. The system includes two fully-automated liquid handling robots; one containing eight mini-bioreactors and another used for automated at-line analyses, which allows for the immediate use of the available data in the modeling environment. As a result, the experiment can be continually re-designed while the cultivations are running using the information generated by periodical parameter estimations. The advantages of an online re-computation of the optimal experiment are proven by a 50-fold lower average coefficient of variation on the parameter estimates compared to the sequential method (4.83% instead of 235.86%). The success obtained in such a complex system is a further step towards a more efficient computer aided bioprocess development. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 610-619. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The utilization of natural soda resource of Ordos in the cultivation of Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yanfei; Yang, Haibo; Meng, Yingying; Liu, Jiao; Shen, Peili; Wu, Peichun; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis oceanica is famous for its strong environmental adaptability and oil-richness, especially high eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content. In this report, the possibility and cultivation parameters for N. oceanica using natural crude soda were testified and compared with seawater culture. To keep a suitable salinity range, different ratio of sea salt addition into soda lake water were used and the growth, lipid content, Fv/Fm and fatty acids profiling were inspected with nitrogen repletion or depletion. The results showed the best performance were achieved while 18g/L (salinity 25‰) sea salt was added into crude soda solution. The μmax and EPA content in fatty acids were 0.72/0.42 and 36%/23% in 500mL/100L bioreactor cultivations respectively, which maintained a relative high productivity to other reports. By comparing the growth and operations with Spirulina production, the feasibility of N. Oceanica in Ordos was proved on both technical and economical point of view. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Overview of parameters influencing biomass and bioreactor performance used for extracellular ligninase production from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seteno Ntwampe

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The production of extracellular enzymes is gaining momentum as commercial interests seek alternative ways to improve the productivity in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Early research studies looked at improving batch bioreactor operational challenges; however, the use of continuous cultures was indicated to be favourable. This led to a new approach developed to produce extracellular enzymes continuously using fixed-film bioreactors from biofilms immobilised on polymeric and inorganic membranes. In this review, the performance of P. chrysosporium biomass, evaluated in terms of ligninase production using different bioreactor operation conditions, is highlighted. Furthermore, the limitations related to the implementation of optimised batch culture conditions to continuous fixed-film bioreactors are discussed. DO transportation, trace element toxicity and lipid peroxidation effects on P. chrysosporium biomass in fixed-film bioreactors operated for elongated periods, are also discussed.

  17. Dependency of microalgal production on biomass and the relationship to yield and bioreactor scale-up for biofuels: A statistical analysis of 60+ years of algal bioreactor data

    OpenAIRE

    Granata, Timothy (Autor/in)

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1950's, research has been undertaken to promote algal biofuel as a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. Most commercial production of microalgae is done in open systems, such as raceways flumes but especially, ponds. There has also been substantial work to develop closed, photo-bioreactors on a commercial scale. This paper statistically analyzed 290 studies of microalgal bioreactors to determine the interdependence of biological and physical factors. Forty genera in 5 classes an...

  18. Performance of aerobic granular sludge in different bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia; Chen, Zhonglin; Shen, Jimin; Wang, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Inoculated sludge from the Brewery wastewater treatment plant was cultured in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The granular sludge was then used to process the artificial simulation wastewater to compare the performance and efficiency of the granular sludge in organic matter removal by using SBR and granular membrane bioreactor (GMBR). Results showed that the granular sludge in the SBR exhibited desirable characteristics and good removal efficiency. The mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and the sludge volume index (SVI) were approximately 2.56 g/L and 78.13 mL/g, respectively, and it exhibited a satisfactory settling ability. The removal efficiency of the resulting chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH3-N and total phosphorus (TP) reached 89.35%, 96.49% and 83.76%, respectively. The removal efficiency of both nitrate nitrogen and total nitrogen (TN) reached 90%. The performance of the granular sludge as well as the removal efficiency of the organic matter in the GMBR was subsequently observed. Results showed that the process influenced the characteristics and microbial biomass of the granular sludge. The SVI and the MLSS were about 175.82 mL/g and 1.14 g/L, respectively. The removal efficiency of COD and TP increased to 93.17% and 90.42%, respectively. The removal efficiency of NH3-N was slightly affected, whereas that of both nitrate nitrogen and TN increased to 95%. In this study, the physical properties and the removal efficiency of granular sludge in different bioreactors were compared. The comparison demonstrated that granulation membrane bioreactors perform more efficiently compared with SBR in wastewater treatment for organic matter removal.

  19. The art of cultivation (på kinesisk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauxner, Malene

    2007-01-01

    different ways of cultivating the earth - for plants or for animals, as a farmer or as a shepherd. In its manmade form the language talks about initiative, growth, innovation, control and action. In its untouched, apparently natural form it talks about self-regulation, balance, ripeness and existence...... architecture, whether the beautiful and true lies in what people have added and created or in the apparently  naturally arisen. The answer has been that the preference of the inter-war period was apparently created by nature, formulated in a language that was the result of a pastoral form of cultivation...... and music and the admiration for the self-sown and natural. After the end of the Second World War, one was left with the painful experience that human nature was unreliable and dangerous if it were let loose. After the Allies decision to build new welfare-democracies with people at the centre the solution...

  20. Anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor and process for wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Amy, Gary

    2015-07-09

    An anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor (AnEMBR) can include a vessel into which wastewater can be introduced, an anode electrode in the vessel suitable for supporting electrochemically active microorganisms (EAB, also can be referred to as anode reducing bacteria, exoelectrogens, or electricigens) that oxidize organic compounds in the wastewater, and a cathode membrane electrode in the vessel, which is configured to pass a treated liquid through the membrane while retaining the electrochemically active microorganisms and the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (for example, the key functional microbial communities, including EAB, methanogens and possible synergistic fermenters) in the vessel. The cathode membrane electrode can be suitable for catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction to generate hydro en.

  1. Human embryonic stem cells differentiate into functional renal proximal tubular-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Karl M; Tasnim, Farah; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Annegret; Ni, Ming; Gao, Shujun; Gopalan, Began; Zink, Daniele; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-04-01

    Renal cells are used in basic research, disease models, tissue engineering, drug screening, and in vitro toxicology. In order to provide a reliable source of human renal cells, we developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into renal epithelial cells. The differentiated stem cells expressed markers characteristic of renal proximal tubular cells and their precursors, whereas markers of other renal cell types were not expressed or expressed at low levels. Marker expression patterns of these differentiated stem cells and in vitro cultivated primary human renal proximal tubular cells were comparable. The differentiated stem cells showed morphological and functional characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells, and generated tubular structures in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the differentiated stem cells contributed in organ cultures for the formation of simple epithelia in the kidney cortex. Bioreactor experiments showed that these cells retained their functional characteristics under conditions as applied in bioartificial kidneys. Thus, our results show that human embryonic stem cells can differentiate into renal proximal tubular-like cells. Our approach would provide a source for human renal proximal tubular cells that are not affected by problems associated with immortalized cell lines or primary cells.

  2. The carbon starvation response of Aspergillus niger during submerged cultivation: Insights from the transcriptome and secretome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitsche Benjamin M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi are confronted with changes and limitations of their carbon source during growth in their natural habitats and during industrial applications. To survive life-threatening starvation conditions, carbon from endogenous resources becomes mobilized to fuel maintenance and self-propagation. Key to understand the underlying cellular processes is the system-wide analysis of fungal starvation responses in a temporal and spatial resolution. The knowledge deduced is important for the development of optimized industrial production processes. Results This study describes the physiological, morphological and genome-wide transcriptional changes caused by prolonged carbon starvation during submerged batch cultivation of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. Bioreactor cultivation supported highly reproducible growth conditions and monitoring of physiological parameters. Changes in hyphal growth and morphology were analyzed at distinct cultivation phases using automated image analysis. The Affymetrix GeneChip platform was used to establish genome-wide transcriptional profiles for three selected time points during prolonged carbon starvation. Compared to the exponential growth transcriptome, about 50% (7,292 of all genes displayed differential gene expression during at least one of the starvation time points. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology, Pfam domain and KEGG pathway annotations uncovered autophagy and asexual reproduction as major global transcriptional trends. Induced transcription of genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes was accompanied by increased secretion of hydrolases including chitinases, glucanases, proteases and phospholipases as identified by mass spectrometry. Conclusions This study is the first system-wide analysis of the carbon starvation response in a filamentous fungus. Morphological, transcriptomic and secretomic analyses identified key events important for fungal survival and their chronology. The

  3. A bioreactor approach to investigate the linkage between methane oxidation and nitrate/nitrite reduction in the pelagic oxic-anoxic transition zone of the central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Jakobs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification has been provided for different freshwater environments, whereas the significance of this process for the marine realm has not been adequately investigated. The goal of this study was to investigate the methane-related reduction of nitrate/nitrite in a marine environment (salinity 8.5. A water sample was collected from the oxic-anoxic transition zone of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea and the microorganisms contained therein were cultivated in a bioreactor under hypoxic conditions (0.5 µM O2. To enrich the microorganisms involved in the coupled process the bioreactor was continuously sparged with methane as the sole energy and carbon source and simultaneously supplied with a nutrient solution rich in nitrate and nitrite. The bioreactor experiment showed a relationship between the turnover of methane and the concomitant concentration decrease of nitrite and nitrate at the early stage of the experiment. This relationship indicates the role of methanotrophs, which may support heterotrophic denitrifiers by the release of organic compounds as an energy source. Besides, a mixture of uncultured microorganisms, aerobic methanotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria were identified in the enrichment culture. Microbial incorporation of nitrite and methane was proven on the cellular and gene levels via 15NO2- / 13CH4 incubation experiments and subsequent analyses with nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS and stable isotope probing (SIP. The NanoSIMS showed the incorporation of 15N in almost all the bacteria and in 9% of those there was a concomitant enrichment in 13C. The relatively low abundance of methane-consuming bacteria in the bioreactor was further reflected in specific fatty acids indicative for type I methanotrophic bacteria. Based on pmoA gene analyses, this bacterium is different from the one that was identified as the only key player of methane oxidation in

  4. Farm Deployable Microbial Bioreactor for Fuel Ethanol Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okeke, Benedict [Auburn Univ., Montgomery AL (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Research was conducted to develop a farm and field deployable microbial bioreactor for bioethanol production from biomass. Experiments were conducted to select the most efficient microorganisms for conversion of plant fiber to sugars for fermentation to ethanol. Mixtures of biomass and surface soil samples were collected from selected sites in Alabama black belt counties (Macon, Sumter, Choctaw, Dallas, Montgomery, Lowndes) and other areas within the state of Alabama. Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of culture parameters on key biomass saccharifying enzymes (cellulase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase and beta-xylosidase). A wide-scale sampling of locally-grown fruits in Central Alabama was embarked to isolate potential xylose fermenting microorganisms. Yeast isolates were evaluated for xylose fermentation. Selected microorganisms were characterized by DNA based methods. Factors affecting enzyme production and biomass saccharification were examined and optimized in the laboratory. Methods of biomass pretreatment were compared. Co-production of amylolytic enzymes with celluloytic-xylanolytic enzymes was evaluated; and co-saccharification of a combination of biomass, and starch-rich materials was examined. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with and without pre-saccharifcation was studied. Whole culture broth and filtered culture broth simultaneous saccahrifcation and fermentation were compared. A bioreactor system was designed and constructed to employ laboratory results for scale up of biomass saccharification.

  5. Bioreactor production of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, David R; Harrell, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Serotypical application of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors to gene therapy (type 1) and prophylactic vaccines (types 1 and 2) has garnered substantial clinical interest recently. HSV vectors and amplicons have also been employed as helper virus constructs for manufacture of the dependovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV). Large quantities of infectious HSV stocks are requisite for these therapeutic applications, requiring a scalable vector manufacturing and processing platform comprised of unit operations which accommodate the fragility of HSV. In this study, production of a replication deficient rHSV-1 vector bearing the rep and cap genes of AAV-2 (denoted rHSV-rep2/cap2) was investigated. Adaptation of rHSV production from T225 flasks to a packed bed, fed-batch bioreactor permitted an 1100-fold increment in total vector production without a decrease in specific vector yield (pfu/cell). The fed-batch bioreactor system afforded a rHSV-rep2/cap2 vector recovery of 2.8 x 10(12) pfu. The recovered vector was concentrated by tangential flow filtration (TFF), permitting vector stocks to be formulated at greater than 1.5 x 10(9) pfu/mL.

  6. Characterization of Microbial Communities Found in Bioreactor Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowe, Candice

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine microbial communities of simulated wastewater effluent from hollow fiber membrane bioreactors collected from the Space Life Science Laboratory and Texas Technical University. Microbes were characterized using quantitative polymerase chain reaction where a total count of bacteria and fungi were determined. The primers that were used to determine the total count of bacteria and fungi were targeted for 16S rDNA genes and the internal transcribed spacer, respectively. PCR products were detected with SYBR Green I fluorescent dye and a melting curve analysis was performed to identify unique melt profiles resulting from DNA sequence variations from each species of the community. Results from both the total bacteria and total fungi count assays showed that distinct populations were present in isolates from these bioreactors. This was exhibited by variation in the number of peaks observed on the melting curve analysis graph. Further analysis of these results using species-specific primers will shed light on exactly which microbes are present in these effluents. Information gained from this study will enable the design of a system that can efficiently monitor microbes that play a role in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in wastewater on the International Space Station to assist in the design of a sustainable system capable of converting this nutrient.

  7. Heterotrophic microalgae cultivation to synergize biodiesel production with waste remediation: progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Rohit, M V; Chiranjeevi, P; Chandra, Rashmi; Navaneeth, B

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are inexhaustible feedstock for synthesis of biodiesel rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and valuable bioactive compounds. Their cultivation is critical in sustaining the global economy in terms of human consumption of food and fuel. When compared to autotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic systems are more suitable for producing high cell densities of microalgae for accumulation of large quantities of lipids (triacylglycerols) which can be converted into biodiesel. Consorted efforts are made in this communication to converge recent literature on heterotrophic cultivation systems with simultaneous wastewater treatment and algal oil production. Challenges faced during large scale production and limiting factors which hinder the microalgae growth are enumerated. A strategic deployment of integrated closed loop biorefinery concept with multi-product recovery is proposed to exploit the full potential of algal systems. Sustainable algae cultivation is essential to produce biofuels leading to green future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Soilless cultivation system for functional food crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahamad Sahali Mardi; Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Ahmad Nazrul Abd Wahid; Abdul Razak Ruslan; Hazlina Abdullah

    2007-01-01

    This soilless cultivation system is based on the fertigation system and cultivation technologies using Functional Plant Cultivation System (FPCS). EBARA Japan has been studying on the cultivation conditions in order to enhance the function of decease risk reduction in plants. Through the research and development activities, EBARA found the possibilities on the enhancement of functions. Quality and quantity of the products in term of bioactive compounds present in the plants may be affected by unforeseen environmental conditions, such as temperature, strong light and UV radiation. The main objective to develop this system is, to support? Functional Food Industry? as newly emerging field in agriculture business. To success the system, needs comprehensive applying agriculture biotechnologies, health biotechnologies and also information technologies, in agriculture. By this system, production of valuable bioactive compounds is an advantage, because the market size of functional food is increasing more and more in the future. (Author)

  9. Lincomycin, cultivation of producing strains and biosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spížek, Jaroslav; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (2004), s. 510-519 ISSN 0175-7598 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lincomycin * cultivation * biosynthesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.358, year: 2004

  10. Engineering Escherichia coli to increase plasmid DNA production in high cell-density cultivations in batch mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Gheorghe M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmid DNA (pDNA is a promising molecule for therapeutic applications. pDNA is produced by Escherichia coli in high cell-density cultivations (HCDC using fed-batch mode. The typical limitations of such cultivations, including metabolic deviations like aerobic acetate production due to the existence of substrate gradients in large-scale bioreactors, remain as serious challenges for fast and effective pDNA production. We have previously demonstrated that the substitution of the phosphotransferase system by the over-expressed galactose permease for glucose uptake in E. coli (strain VH33 allows efficient growth, while strongly decreases acetate production. In the present work, additional genetic modifications were made to VH33 to further improve pDNA production. Several genes were deleted from strain VH33: the recA, deoR, nupG and endA genes were inactivated independently and in combination. The performance of the mutant strains was evaluated in shake flasks for the production of a 6.1 kb plasmid bearing an antigen gene against mumps. The best producer strain was cultivated in lab-scale bioreactors using 100 g/L of glucose to achieve HCDC in batch mode. For comparison, the widely used commercial strain DH5α, carrying the same plasmid, was also cultivated under the same conditions. Results The various mutations tested had different effects on the specific growth rate, glucose uptake rate, and pDNA yields (YP/X. The triple mutant VH33 Δ (recA deoR nupG accumulated low amounts of acetate and resulted in the best YP/X (4.22 mg/g, whereas YP/X of strain VH33 only reached 1.16 mg/g. When cultivated at high glucose concentrations, the triple mutant strain produced 186 mg/L of pDNA, 40 g/L of biomass and only 2.2 g/L of acetate. In contrast, DH5α produced only 70 mg/L of pDNA and accumulated 9.5 g/L of acetate. Furthermore, the supercoiled fraction of the pDNA produced by the triple mutant was nearly constant

  11. Increased rate of chondrocyte aggregation in a wavy-walled bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Ericka M; Bilgen, Bahar; Carrier, Rebecca L; Barabino, Gilda A

    2004-12-20

    A novel wavy-walled bioreactor designed to enhance mixing at controlled shear stress levels was used to culture chondrocytes in suspension. Chondrocyte aggregation in suspensions mixed at 30, 50, and 80 rpm was characterized in the wavy-walled bioreactor and compared with that in conventional smooth-walled and baffled-walled spinner flask bioreactors. Aggregation was characterized in terms of the percentage of cells that aggregated over time, and aggregate size changes over time. The kinetics of chondrocyte aggregation observed in the bioreactors was composed of two phases: early aggregation between 0 and 2 h of culture, and late aggregation between 3 and 24 h of culture. At 50 rpm, the kinetics of early aggregation in the wavy-walled bioreactor was approximately 25% and 65% faster, respectively, than those in the smooth-walled and baffled-walled spinner flask bioreactors. During the late aggregation phase, the kinetics of aggregation in the wavy-walled bioreactor were approximately 45% and 65% faster, respectively, than in the smooth-walled and baffled-walled spinner flasks. The observed improved kinetics of chondrocyte aggregation was obtained at no cost to the cell survival rate. Results of computerized image analysis suggest that chondrocyte aggregation occurred initially by the formation of new aggregates via cell-cell interactions and later by the joining of small aggregates into larger cell clumps. Aggregates appeared to grow for only a couple of hours in culture before reaching a steady size, possibly determined by limitations imposed by the hydrodynamic environment. These results suggest that the novel geometry of the wavy-walled bioreactor generates a hydrodynamic environment distinct from those traditionally used to culture engineered cartilage. Such differences may be useful in studies aimed at distinguishing the effects of the hydrodynamic environment on tissue-engineered cartilage. Characterizing the wavy-walled bioreactor's hydrodynamic environment

  12. Degradation Processes of Pesticides Used in Potato Cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, M; Barchańska, H; Turek, M

    Potato is one of the most important crops, after maize, rice and wheat. Its global production is about 300 million tons per year and is constantly increasing. It grows in temperate climate and is used as a source of starch, food, and in breeding industry.Potato cultivation requires application of numerous agro-technical products, including pesticides, since it can be affected by insects, weeds, fungi, and viruses. In the European Union the most frequently used pesticides in potato cultivations check are: thiamethoxam, lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin (insecticides), rimsulfuron (herbicide) and metalaxyl (fungicide).Application of pesticides improves crop efficiency, however, as pesticides are not totally selective, it affects also non-target organisms. Moreover, the agrochemicals may accumulate in crops and, as a consequence, negatively influence the quality of food products and consumer health. Additional risks of plant protection products are related to their derivatives, that are created both in the environment (soil, water) and in plant organisms, since many of these compounds may exhibit toxic effects.This article is devoted to the degradation processes of pesticides used in potato crop protection. Attention is also paid to the toxicity of both parent compounds and their degradation products for living organisms, including humans. Information about the level of pesticide contamination in the environment (water, soil) and accumulation level in edible plants complement the current knowledge about the risks associated with widespread use of thiamethoxam, lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin, rimsulfuron and metalaxyl in potato cultivation.

  13. Preliminary Study on Biosynthesis of Bacterial Nanocellulose Tubes in a Novel Double-Silicone-Tube Bioreactor for Potential Vascular Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng; Wei, Bin; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) has demonstrated a tempting prospect for applications in substitute of small blood vessels. However, present technology is inefficient in production and BNC tubes have a layered structure that may bring danger after implanting. Double oxygen-permeable silicone tubes in different diameters were therefore used as a tube-shape mold and also as oxygenated supports to construct a novel bioreactor for production of the tubular BNC materials. Double cannula technology was used to produce tubular BNC via cultivations with Acetobacter xylinum, and Kombucha, a symbiosis of acetic acid bacteria and yeasts. The results indicated that Kombucha gave higher yield and productivity of BNC than A. xylinum. Bacterial nanocellulose was simultaneously synthesized both on the inner surface of the outer silicone tube and on the outer surface of the inner silicone tube. Finally, the nano BNC fibrils from two directions formed a BNC tube with good structural integrity. Scanning electron microscopy inspection showed that the tubular BNC had a multilayer structure in the beginning but finally it disappeared and an intact BNC tube formed. The mechanical properties of BNC tubes were comparable with the reported value in literatures, demonstrating a great potential in vascular implants or in functional substitutes in biomedicine.

  14. Efficient Production Process for Food Grade Acetic Acid by Acetobacter aceti in Shake Flask and in Bioreactor Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M. Awad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid is one of the important weak acids which had long history in chemical industries. This weak organic acid has been widely used as one of the key intermediate for many chemical, detergent, wood and food industries. The production of this acid is mainly carried out using submerged fermentation system and the standard strain Acetobacter aceti. In the present work, six different media were chosen from the literatures and tested for acetic acid production. The highest acetic acid production was produced in medium composed of glucose, yeast extract and peptone. The composition of this medium was optimized by changing the concentration of medium components. The optimized medium was composed of (g/L: glucose, 100; yeast extract, 12 and peptone 5 and yielded 53 g/L acetic acid in shake flask after 144 h fermentation. Further optimization in the production process was achieved by transferring the process to semi-industrial scale 16-L stirred tank bioreactor and cultivation under controlled pH condition. Under fully aerobic conditions, the production of acetic acid reached maximal concentration of about 76 g/L and 51 g/L for uncontrolled and controlled pH cultures, respectively.

  15. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97% and thickness (−50%, and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition.

  16. Preliminary Study on Biosynthesis of Bacterial Nanocellulose Tubes in a Novel Double-Silicone-Tube Bioreactor for Potential Vascular Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC has demonstrated a tempting prospect for applications in substitute of small blood vessels. However, present technology is inefficient in production and BNC tubes have a layered structure that may bring danger after implanting. Double oxygen-permeable silicone tubes in different diameters were therefore used as a tube-shape mold and also as oxygenated supports to construct a novel bioreactor for production of the tubular BNC materials. Double cannula technology was used to produce tubular BNC via cultivations with Acetobacter xylinum, and Kombucha, a symbiosis of acetic acid bacteria and yeasts. The results indicated that Kombucha gave higher yield and productivity of BNC than A. xylinum. Bacterial nanocellulose was simultaneously synthesized both on the inner surface of the outer silicone tube and on the outer surface of the inner silicone tube. Finally, the nano BNC fibrils from two directions formed a BNC tube with good structural integrity. Scanning electron microscopy inspection showed that the tubular BNC had a multilayer structure in the beginning but finally it disappeared and an intact BNC tube formed. The mechanical properties of BNC tubes were comparable with the reported value in literatures, demonstrating a great potential in vascular implants or in functional substitutes in biomedicine.

  17. Preliminary Study on Biosynthesis of Bacterial Nanocellulose Tubes in a Novel Double-Silicone-Tube Bioreactor for Potential Vascular Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bin; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) has demonstrated a tempting prospect for applications in substitute of small blood vessels. However, present technology is inefficient in production and BNC tubes have a layered structure that may bring danger after implanting. Double oxygen-permeable silicone tubes in different diameters were therefore used as a tube-shape mold and also as oxygenated supports to construct a novel bioreactor for production of the tubular BNC materials. Double cannula technology was used to produce tubular BNC via cultivations with Acetobacter xylinum, and Kombucha, a symbiosis of acetic acid bacteria and yeasts. The results indicated that Kombucha gave higher yield and productivity of BNC than A. xylinum. Bacterial nanocellulose was simultaneously synthesized both on the inner surface of the outer silicone tube and on the outer surface of the inner silicone tube. Finally, the nano BNC fibrils from two directions formed a BNC tube with good structural integrity. Scanning electron microscopy inspection showed that the tubular BNC had a multilayer structure in the beginning but finally it disappeared and an intact BNC tube formed. The mechanical properties of BNC tubes were comparable with the reported value in literatures, demonstrating a great potential in vascular implants or in functional substitutes in biomedicine. PMID:26090420

  18. Production of Biomass-Degrading Multienzyme Complexes under Solid-State Fermentation of Soybean Meal Using a Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitcosque, Gabriela L; Fonseca, Rafael F; Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Ursula Fabiola; Bertucci Neto, Victor; Couri, Sonia; Farinas, Cristiane S

    2012-01-01

    Biomass-degrading enzymes are one of the most costly inputs affecting the economic viability of the biochemical route for biomass conversion into biofuels. This work evaluates the effects of operational conditions on biomass-degrading multienzyme production by a selected strain of Aspergillus niger. The fungus was cultivated under solid-state fermentation (SSF) of soybean meal, using an instrumented lab-scale bioreactor equipped with an on-line automated monitoring and control system. The effects of air flow rate, inlet air relative humidity, and initial substrate moisture content on multienzyme (FPase, endoglucanase, and xylanase) production were evaluated using a statistical design methodology. Highest production of FPase (0.55 IU/g), endoglucanase (35.1 IU/g), and xylanase (47.7 IU/g) was achieved using an initial substrate moisture content of 84%, an inlet air humidity of 70%, and a flow rate of 24 mL/min. The enzymatic complex was then used to hydrolyze a lignocellulosic biomass, releasing 4.4 g/L of glucose after 36 hours of saccharification of 50 g/L pretreated sugar cane bagasse. These results demonstrate the potential application of enzymes produced under SSF, thus contributing to generate the necessary technological advances to increase the efficiency of the use of biomass as a renewable energy source.

  19. Production of Biomass-Degrading Multienzyme Complexes under Solid-State Fermentation of Soybean Meal Using a Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela L. Vitcosque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass-degrading enzymes are one of the most costly inputs affecting the economic viability of the biochemical route for biomass conversion into biofuels. This work evaluates the effects of operational conditions on biomass-degrading multienzyme production by a selected strain of Aspergillus niger. The fungus was cultivated under solid-state fermentation (SSF of soybean meal, using an instrumented lab-scale bioreactor equipped with an on-line automated monitoring and control system. The effects of air flow rate, inlet air relative humidity, and initial substrate moisture content on multienzyme (FPase, endoglucanase, and xylanase production were evaluated using a statistical design methodology. Highest production of FPase (0.55 IU/g, endoglucanase (35.1 IU/g, and xylanase (47.7 IU/g was achieved using an initial substrate moisture content of 84%, an inlet air humidity of 70%, and a flow rate of 24 mL/min. The enzymatic complex was then used to hydrolyze a lignocellulosic biomass, releasing 4.4 g/L of glucose after 36 hours of saccharification of 50 g/L pretreated sugar cane bagasse. These results demonstrate the potential application of enzymes produced under SSF, thus contributing to generate the necessary technological advances to increase the efficiency of the use of biomass as a renewable energy source.

  20. [Historical research on cinchona cultivation in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagumo, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Cinchona is one of the most important medicinal plants as it contains quinine, a potent medicine for malaria. In this review, I reveal the history of cinchona introduction and cultivation in Japan. Cinchona was first introduced to Japan in 1876 from Java based on the proposal submitted by Takeaki Enomoto to the Meiji government. However, the cultivation attempt ended in failure. Later in 1922, Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co. succeeded for the first time in cultivating cinchona in Taiwan, which was then under Japanese colonial rule, and in manufacturing quinine from the cinchona tree in 1934. This was a historic feat in Japan, completing an entire process from cinchona cultivation to quinine manufacture all within the confines of the country. To commemorate this undertaking, the company dedicated a cinchona log harvested for the first time to the Imperial court. It was revealed that a log of unknown origin, which had been left untouched for years at Hoshi University, was the cinchona log from the time of commemoration. Yasusada Tashiro (1856-1928), who has made a great contribution to cinchona cultivation in Japan for over 50 years, led Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co. to success in cultivation.

  1. Analysis of Gene Expression Signatures for Osteogenic 3D Perfusion-Bioreactor Cell Cultures Based on a Multifactorial DoE Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Papantoniou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of multifactorial design of experiments (DoE in tissue engineering bioprocess development will contribute to the robust manufacturing of tissue engineered constructs by linking their quality characteristics to bioprocess operating parameters. In this work, perfusion bioreactors were used for the in vitro culture and osteogenic differentiation of human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs seeded on three-dimensional titanium (Ti alloy scaffolds. A CaP-supplemented medium was used to induce differentiation of the cultured hPDCs. A two-level, three-factor fractional factorial design was employed to evaluate a range of bioreactor operating conditions by changing the levels of the following parameters: flow rate (0.5–2 mL/min, cell culture duration (7–21 days and cell seeding density (1.5 × 103–3 × 103 cells/cm2. This approach allowed for evaluating the individual impact of the aforementioned process parameters upon a range of genes that are related to the osteogenic lineage, such as collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, osterix, osteopontin and osteocalcin. Furthermore, by overlaying gene-specific response surfaces, an integrated operating process space was highlighted within which predetermined values of the six genes of interest (i.e., gene signature could be minimally met over the course of the bioreactor culture time.

  2. A microfluidic bioreactor with integrated transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement electrodes for evaluation of renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Nicholas; Desai, Ravi R; Fleischman, Aaron J; Roy, Shuvo; Humes, H David; Fissell, William H

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a bilayer microfluidic system with integrated transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement electrodes to evaluate kidney epithelial cells under physiologically relevant fluid flow conditions. The bioreactor consists of apical and basolateral fluidic chambers connected via a transparent microporous membrane. The top chamber contains microfluidic channels to perfuse the apical surface of the cells. The bottom chamber acts as a reservoir for transport across the cell layer and provides support for the membrane. TEER electrodes were integrated into the device to monitor cell growth and evaluate cell-cell tight junction integrity. Immunofluorescence staining was performed within the microchannels for ZO-1 tight junction protein and acetylated α-tubulin (primary cilia) using human renal epithelial cells (HREC) and MDCK cells. HREC were stained for cytoskeletal F-actin and exhibited disassembly of cytosolic F-actin stress fibers when exposed to shear stress. TEER was monitored over time under normal culture conditions and after disruption of the tight junctions using low Ca(2+) medium. The transport rate of a fluorescently labeled tracer molecule (FITC-inulin) was measured before and after Ca(2+) switch and a decrease in TEER corresponded with a large increase in paracellular inulin transport. This bioreactor design provides an instrumented platform with physiologically meaningful flow conditions to study various epithelial cell transport processes. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Commissioning of Research Bioreactor made in Korea with Malaysian Environment Adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Jamil Hashim; Mohd Azmi Sidid Omar

    2011-01-01

    Bioreactor is equipment used by researcher in Agrotechnology and Biosciences department (BAB) as a scientific approach to get a scale up of product. Headed by one of the senior researcher in the department, an effort has been made to upscale the project by using MTDC fund. The technology platform has been acquired from South Korea. Some modification has to be made to cater for the need of a research bioreactor to be established for Nuclear Malaysia Agency. This research bioreactor is to emulate a tissue culture product in a bigger scale bio processing, pharmaceutical biotechnology and industrial production. (author)

  4. Tissue engineering bioreactor systems for applying physical and electrical stimulations to cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, GyuHyun; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-05-01

    Bioreactor systems in tissue engineering applications provide various types of stimulation to mimic the tissues in vitro and in vivo. Various bioreactors have been designed to induce high cellular activities, including initial cell attachment, cell growth, and differentiation. Although cell-stimulation processes exert mostly positive effects on cellular responses, in some cases such stimulation can also have a negative effect on cultured cells. In this review, we discuss various types of bioreactor and the positive and negative effects of stimulation (physical, chemical, and electrical) on various cultured cell types. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Environmental profile of paddy rice cultivation with different straw management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, Alessandra; Bacenetti, Jacopo; González-García, Sara; Vercesi, Annamaria; Bocchi, Stefano; Fiala, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Italy is the most important European country in terms of paddy rice production. North Italian districts such as Vercelli, Pavia, Novara, and Milano are known as some of the world's most advanced rice cultivation sites. In 2013 Italian rice cultivation represented about 50% of all European rice production by area, and paddy fields extended for over 216,000 ha. Cultivation of rice involves different agricultural activities which have environmental impacts mainly due to fossil fuels and agrochemical requirements as well as the methane emission associated with the fermentation of organic material in the flooded rice fields. In order to assess the environmental consequences of rice production in the District of Vercelli, the cultivation practices most frequently carried out were inventoried and evaluated. The general approach of this study was not only to gather the inventory data for rice production and quantify their environmental impacts, but also to identify the key environmental factors where special attention must be paid. Life Cycle Assessment methodology was applied in this study from a cradle-to-farm gate perspective. The environmental profile was analyzed in terms of seven different impact categories: climate change, ozone depletion, human toxicity, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, and fossil depletion. Regarding straw management, two different scenarios (burial into the soil of the straw versus harvesting) were compared. The analysis showed that the environmental impact was mainly due to field emissions, the fuel consumption needed for the mechanization of field operations, and the drying of the paddy rice. The comparison between the two scenarios highlighted that the collection of the straw improves the environmental performance of rice production except that for freshwater eutrophication. To improve the environmental performance of rice production, solutions to save fossil fuel and reduce the emissions from

  6. Effects of superficial gas velocity on process dynamics in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, T. T.; Kumar, B.

    2014-06-01

    Present work analyzes the flow hydrodynamics and mass transfer mechanisms in double Rushton and CD-6 impeller on wide range (0.0075-0.25 m/s) of superficial gas velocity ( v g) in a gas-liquid phase bioreactor by employing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The volume averaged velocity magnitude and dissipation rate are found higher with increasing superficial gas velocity. Higher relative power draw ( P g/ P 0) is predicted in CD-6 than the Rushton impeller but no significant difference in volume averaged mass transfer coefficient ( k L a) observed between these two types of impeller. The ratio of power draw with mass transfer coefficient has been found higher in CD-6 impeller (25-50 %) than the Rushton impeller.

  7. Characterizing the fluid dynamics of the inverted frustoconical shaking bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Likuan; Zhang, Xueting; Cheng, Kai; Lv, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lei; Meng, Qingyong; Yuan, Shujie; Song, Boyan; Wang, Zhenlong

    2018-01-05

    The authors conducted a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to calculate the flow field in the inverted frustoconical shaking bioreactor with 5 L working volume (IFSB-5L). The CFD models were established for the IFSB-5L at different operating conditions (different shaking speeds and filling volumes) and validated by comparison of the liquid height distribution in the agitated IFSB-5L. The "out of phase" operating conditions were characterized by analyzing the flow field in the IFSB-5L at different filling volumes and shaking speeds. The values of volumetric power consumption (P/V L ) and volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k L a) were determined from simulated and experimental results, respectively. Finally, the operating condition effect on P/V L and k L a was investigated. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Microfluidic bioreactors for culture of non-adherent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic bioreactors (μBR) are becoming increasingly popular for cell culture, sample preparation and analysis in case of routine genetic and clinical diagnostics. We present a novel μBR for non-adherent cells designed to mimic in vivo perfusion of cells based on diffusion of media through...... a sandwiched membrane. The culture chamber and perfusion chamber are separated by a sandwiched membrane and each chamber has separate inlet/outlets for easy loading/unloading of cells and perfusion of the media. The perfusion of media and exchange of nutrients occur through the sandwiched membrane, which...... was also verified with simulations. Finally, we present the application of this device for cytogenetic sample preparation, whereby we culture and arrest peripheral T-lymphocytes in metaphase and later fix them in the μBR. The expansion of T-lymphocytes from an unknown patient sample was quantified by means...

  9. Synthesis of supermacroporous cryogel for bioreactors continuous starch hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Ederson Paulo Xavier; de Oliveira, Jocilane Pereira; de Carvalho, Lorendane Millena; Brandi, Igor Viana; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Sousa; de Carvalho, Gleidson Giordano Pinto; Cota, Junio; Mara Aparecida de Carvalho, Bruna

    2017-11-01

    A bioreactor was built by means of immobilizing alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae by encapsulation, through cryopolymerization of acrylamide monomers for the continuous starch hydrolysis. The starch hydrolysis was evaluated regarding pH, the concentration of immobilized amylase on cryogel, the concentration of starch solution and temperature. The maximum value for starch hydrolysis was achieved at pH 5.0, concentration of immobilized enzyme 111.44 mg amylase /g cryogel , concentration of starch solution 45 g/L and temperature of 35°C. The immobilized enzyme showed a conversion ratio ranging from 68.2 to 97.37%, depending on the pH and temperature employed. Thus, our results suggest that the alpha-amylase from A. oryzae immobilized on cryogel monoliths represents a potential process for industrial production of maltose from starch hydrolysis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Experiments and Simulations of a Spinner-Flask Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucosky, Philippe; Osorio, Diego; Neitzel, G. Paul

    2001-11-01

    Spinner-flask bioreactors are used for the culture of living tissues; specifically, we investigate a configuration used for producing articular cartilage. Laboratory measurements are made in a model spinner flask employing index-of-refraction matching and particle-image velocimetry to determine mean-flow and turbulence quantities for a time-periodic turbulent flow; the periodicity of the flow requires the use of phase-locked ensemble averaging. Companion numerical simulations have been performed using the commercial package Fluent. The stir-bar region is handled with a separate, moving grid. Results to be presented from both experiment and simulation are in reasonably good agreement with one another. Suggestions for the improvement of both approaches will be discussed, along with the implications of the results for cartilage growth in spinner flasks.

  11. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  12. Optimal Homogenization of Perfusion Flows in Microfluidic Bio-Reactors: A Numerical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Dufva, Martin; Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in small-scale bio-reactors has increased dramatically. To ensure homogeneous conditions within the complete area of perfused microfluidic bio-reactors, we develop a general design of a continually feed bio-reactor with uniform perfusion flow. This is achieved...... by introducing a specific type of perfusion inlet to the reaction area. The geometry of these inlets are found using the methods of topology optimization and shape optimization. The results are compared with two different analytic models, from which a general parametric description of the design is obtained...... and tested numerically. Such a parametric description will generally be beneficial for the design of a broad range of microfluidic bioreactors used for, e. g., cell culturing and analysis and in feeding bio-arrays....

  13. Use of G3-DHS Bioreactor for Secondary Treatment of Septic Tank Desludging Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izarul Machdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study was done for the use of the third-generation of downflow hanging sponge (G3-DHS bioreactor for secondary treatment of septic tank desludging wastewater. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prospective system of G3-DHS bioreactor to be applied in Indonesia. During experiment, the G3-DHS bioreactor kept a relatively high dissolved oxygen concentration under natural aeration. At a relatively short hydraulic retention (HRT of 3 h, the G3-DHS bioreactor could remove up to 21% (SD 15% of total COD, 21% (SD = 7% of filtered-COD, 58% (SD = 24% of unfiltered-BOD, and 33% (SD = 24% of ammonium removal. The final effluent had an unfiltered-BOD of only 46 mg.L-1 (SD = 20 mg.L-1 that it was below the Indonesian standard (unfiltered-BOD = 100 mg.L-1 for thresholds of domestic wastewater treatment plants effluent.

  14. Bioreactors as Engineering Support to Treat Cardiac Muscle and Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Massai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. The inability of fully differentiated, load-bearing cardiovascular tissues to in vivo regenerate and the limitations of the current treatment therapies greatly motivate the efforts of cardiovascular tissue engineering to become an effective clinical strategy for injured heart and vessels. For the effective production of organized and functional cardiovascular engineered constructs in vitro, a suitable dynamic environment is essential, and can be achieved and maintained within bioreactors. Bioreactors are technological devices that, while monitoring and controlling the culture environment and stimulating the construct, attempt to mimic the physiological milieu. In this study, a review of the current state of the art of bioreactor solutions for cardiovascular tissue engineering is presented, with emphasis on bioreactors and biophysical stimuli adopted for investigating the mechanisms influencing cardiovascular tissue development, and for eventually generating suitable cardiovascular tissue replacements.

  15. Influence of phosphorus precipitation on permeability and soluble microbial product concentration in a membrane bioreactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gómez, M.; Dvořák, L.; Růžičková, I.; Wanner, J.; Holba, Marek; Sýkorová, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 129, Feb 2013 (2013), s. 164-169 ISSN 0960-8524 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : membrane bioreactor * coagulant adition * soluble microbial products Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.039, year: 2013

  16. Method and Apparatus for a Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J. (Inventor); Geffert, Sandra K. (Inventor); Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A bioreactor and method that permits continuous and simultaneous short, moderate, or long term cell culturing of one or more cell types or tissue in a laminar flow configuration is disclosed, where the bioreactor supports at least two laminar flow zones, which are isolated by laminar flow without the need for physical barriers between the zones. The bioreactors of this invention are ideally suited for studying short, moderate and long term studies of cell cultures and the response of cell cultures to one or more stressors such as pharmaceuticals, hypoxia, pathogens, or any other stressor. The bioreactors of this invention are also ideally suited for short, moderate or long term cell culturing with periodic cell harvesting and/or medium processing for secreted cellular components.

  17. Determining the effect of solid and liquid vectors on the gaseous interfacial area and oxygen transfer rates in two-phase partitioning bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijano, Guillermo; Rocha-Rios, Jose; Hernandez, Maria; Villaverde, Santiago; Revah, Sergio; Munoz, Raul; Thalasso, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    The effect of liquid and solid transfer vectors (silicone oil and Desmopan, respectively) on the gaseous interfacial area (a g ) was evaluated in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) using fresh mineral salt medium and the cultivation broth of a toluene degradation culture (Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E cultures continuously cultivated with and without silicone oil at low toluene loading rates). Higher values of a g were recorded in the presence of both silicone oil and Desmopan compared to the values obtained in the absence of a vector, regardless of the aqueous medium tested (1.6 and 3 times higher, respectively, using fresh mineral salt medium). These improvements in a g were well correlated to the oxygen mass transfer enhancements supported by the vectors (1.3 and 2.5 for liquid and solid vectors, respectively, using fresh medium). In this context, oxygen transfer rates of 2.5 g O 2 L -1 h -1 and 1.3 g O 2 L -1 h -1 were recorded in the presence of Desmopan and silicone oil, respectively, which are in agreement with previously reported values in literature. These results suggest that mass transfer enhancements in TPPBs might correspond to an increase in a g rather than to the establishment of a high-performance gas/vector/water transfer pathway.

  18. Determining the effect of solid and liquid vectors on the gaseous interfacial area and oxygen transfer rates in two-phase partitioning bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijano, Guillermo [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Biotecnologia y Bioingenieria, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav), Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rocha-Rios, Jose [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica (IPH), Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez, Maria; Villaverde, Santiago [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Revah, Sergio [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, c/o IPH, UAM-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Munoz, Raul, E-mail: mutora@iq.uva.es [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Thalasso, Frederic [Departamento de Biotecnologia y Bioingenieria, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav), Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    The effect of liquid and solid transfer vectors (silicone oil and Desmopan, respectively) on the gaseous interfacial area (a{sub g}) was evaluated in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) using fresh mineral salt medium and the cultivation broth of a toluene degradation culture (Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E cultures continuously cultivated with and without silicone oil at low toluene loading rates). Higher values of a{sub g} were recorded in the presence of both silicone oil and Desmopan compared to the values obtained in the absence of a vector, regardless of the aqueous medium tested (1.6 and 3 times higher, respectively, using fresh mineral salt medium). These improvements in a{sub g} were well correlated to the oxygen mass transfer enhancements supported by the vectors (1.3 and 2.5 for liquid and solid vectors, respectively, using fresh medium). In this context, oxygen transfer rates of 2.5 g O{sub 2} L{sup -1} h{sup -1} and 1.3 g O{sub 2} L{sup -1} h{sup -1} were recorded in the presence of Desmopan and silicone oil, respectively, which are in agreement with previously reported values in literature. These results suggest that mass transfer enhancements in TPPBs might correspond to an increase in a{sub g} rather than to the establishment of a high-performance gas/vector/water transfer pathway.

  19. Optimization of lytic phage manufacturing in bioreactor using monolithic supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Franc; Ciringer, Mateja; Jančar, Janez; Raspor, Peter; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2011-08-01

    A process for manufacturing large quantities of lytic bacteriophages was developed. Determination of cultivation termination was found to be essential to achieve high phage quantity and purity. When optimal cultivation termination is missed, phage fraction was found to be highly contaminated with deoxyribonucleic acid released from Escherichia coli cells. Besides, an already established method for monitoring of phage cultivation based on optical density, where its peak indicates point when maximal phage titer is achieved, a new indirect chromatographic method using methacrylate monoliths is proposed for on-line estimation of phage titer. It is based on the measurement of released E. coli deoxyribonucleic acid and shows high correlation with phage titer obtained from plaque assay. Its main advantage is that the information is obtained within few minutes. In addition, the same method can also be used to determine purity of a final phage fraction. Two strategies to obtain highly pure phage fractions are proposed: an immediate purification of phage lysate using monolithic columns or an addition of EDTA before chromatographic purification. The developed protocol was shown to give phage purity above 90% and it is completed within one working day including cultivation and phage titer in the final formulation using developed chromatographic method. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Growth and death of animal cells in bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.

    1996-01-01


    Animal-cell cultivation is becoming increasingly important especially for the area of hunian- health products. The products range from vaccines to therapeutic proteins and the cells themselves. The therapeutic application of proteins puts high demands upon their quality with respect to

  1. Mangrove Cultivation For Dealing With Coastal Abrasion Case Study Of Karangsong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimatuzzahroh, Feti; Hadi, Sudharto P.; Purnaweni, Hartuti

    2018-02-01

    Coastal abrasion is consequence from destructive waves and sea current. One of cause is human intervention. The effort to solve of abrasion is by mangrove cultivation. Mangroves are halophyte plant that can restrain the sea wave. Mangrove cultivation required participation community that give awareness the importance of mangrove in coastal sustainability. Mangroves in coastal Karangsong, Indramayu west java, in 2007 was through abrasion approximately 127.30 ha. Mangrove cultivation in Karangsong has been replanting since 1998 to 2003, but there was no maintenance and management. In 2007 until 2015 Karangsong replanting mangroves and has been succeed. Karangsong became the center of mangrove study for west java area in 2015. This achievement is result of cooperation between community, NGO, and local government. In addition, this effort made not only overcome the abrasion problem but also give community awareness about the importance of mangrove cultivation in preventing coastal abrasion throughout community development. This paper reviews abrasion in Karangsong and the impact for local community and empowerment in mangrove cultivation. To achieve the success mangrove cultivation required community development approach from planning process, planting, maintenance and management.

  2. Evaluation of Phytodesalination Potential of Vegetated Bioreactors Treating Greenhouse Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Fatehi Pouladi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The dissolved salt ions that are not absorbed during irrigation of greenhouse crops are gradually accumulated in the nutrient solution resulting in levels of salinity high enough to damage the crops. This water salinity presents operational and environmental challenges as the nutrient-rich greenhouse effluent should be discharged to the environment when deemed unsuited for irrigation. In this pilot-scale study, the potential of passive salt reduction (phytodesalination in gravel and wood-chip flow-through reactors was evaluated using seven plant species including Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani, Andropogon gerardii, Typha angustifolia, Elymus canadensis, Panicum virgatum, Spartina pectinata and Distichlis spicata along with an unplanted control reactor. While the unplanted system outperformed the planted units with gravel media, the wood-chip bioreactors with S. tabernaemontani and S. pectinata improved the greenhouse effluent reducing the solution conductivity (EC by a maximum of 15% (average = 7%. S. tabernaemontani and D. spicata showed higher accumulated contents of Na+ and Cl− in comparison with T. angustifolia and S. pectinata. Overall, S. tabernaemontani was selected as the most capable species in the wood-chip bioreactors for its better salt management via EC reduction and salt accumulation. It was however concluded that further treatment would be required for the greenhouse effluent to meet the stringent irrigation water quality guidelines in order not to pose any adverse effects on sensitive crops. Finally, the present hydraulic residence time (HRT = 3.7 days and the solution salinity concentration were identified as the potential factors that may be limiting the efficiency of plant salt uptake, emphasizing the need for conducting more research on the optimization and enhancement of passive desalination systems for the greenhouse effluent.

  3. Osmotic stress on nitrification in an airlift bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Rencun; Zheng Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar; Hu Baolan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification was studied in a lab-scale internal-loop airlift-nitrifying reactor. The reactor slowly adapted to the escalating osmotic pressure during 270 days operation. The conditions were reversed to the initial stage upon full inhibition of the process. Keeping influent ammonium concentration constant at 420 mg N L -1 and hydraulic retention time at 20.7 h, with gradual increase in osmotic pressure from 4.3 to 18.8 x 10 5 Pa by adding sodium sulphate, the ammonium removal efficiencies of the nitrifying bioreactor were maintained at 93-100%. Further increase in osmotic pressure up to 19.2 x 10 5 Pa resulted in drop of the ammonium conversion to 69.2%. The osmotic pressure caused abrupt inhibition of nitrification without any alarm and the critical osmotic pressure value causing inhibition remained between 18.8 and 19.2 x 10 5 Pa. Nitrite oxidizers were found more sensitive to osmotic stress as compared with ammonia oxidizers, leading to nitrite accumulation up to 61.7% in the reactor. The performance of bioreactor recovered gradually upon lowering the osmotic pressure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy indicated that osmotic stress resulted in simplification of the nitrifying bacterial populations in the activated sludge as the cellular size reduced; the inner membrane became thinner and some unknown inclusions appeared within the cells. The microbial morphology and cellular structure restored upon relieving the osmotic pressure. Addition of potassium relieved the effect of osmotic pressure upon nitrification. Results demonstrate that the nitrifying reactor possesses the potential to treat ammonium-rich brines after acclimatization

  4. Passaging protocols for mammalian neural stem cells in suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arindom; Kallos, Michael S; Behie, Leo A

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSC) offer great promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. As a consequence of the large numbers of cells that will be needed for drug testing and transplantation studies, it is necessary to develop protocols for the large-scale expansion of mammalian NSC. Neural stem cells and early progenitor cells can be expanded in vitro as aggregates in controlled bioreactors using carefully designed media. The first objective of this study was to determine if it is possible to maintain a population of murine neural stem and progenitor cells as aggregates in suspension culture bioreactors over extended periods of time. We discovered that serial passaging of a mixture of aggregates sizes resulted in high viabilities, high viable cell densities, and good control of aggregate diameter. When the NSC aggregates were serially subcultured three times without mechanical dissociation, a total multiplication ratio of 2.9 x 10(3) was achieved over a period of 12 days, whereas the aggregate size was controlled (mean diameter less than 150 microm) below levels at which necrosis would occur. Moreover, cell densities of 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL were repeatedly achieved in batch culture with viabilities exceeding 80%. The second objective was to examine the proliferative potential of single cells shed from the surface of these aggregates. We found that the single cells, when subcultured, retained the capacity to generate new aggregates, gave rise to cultures with high viable cell densities and were able to differentiate into all of the primary cell phenotypes in the central nervous system.

  5. Alternative substrates for higher mushrooms mycelia cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TETIANA KRUPODOROVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of 29 species of higher mushroom mycelia on alternative substrates – wastes of Ukrainian oil-fat industry, has been investigated. The amount of mushroom mycelia obtaining on 12 investigated substrates varied significantly, from 1.0 g/L to 22.9 g/L on the 14th day of cultivation. The superficial cultivation adopted in this study allows for easy to choose appropriate medium (substrate for mycelia production. Alternative substrates (compared to glucose-peptone-yeast medium were selected for all studied species, from soybean cake – most suitable for the mycelial growth of 24 species, to walnut cake − suitable only for 2 species. The utilization of substrates has been evaluated by biological efficiency. The best index of biological efficiency varied from 19.0% to 41.6% depending on the mushroom species. It was established high biological efficiency of mycelia cultivation on substrates: wheat seed cake – Pleurotus djamor, Lyophyllum shimeji, Crinipellis schevczenkovi, Phellinus igniarius, Spongipellis litschaueri; oat seed cake – Ganoderma applanatum and G. lucidum; soybean cake – Hohenbuehelia myxotricha, Trametes versicolor, Morchella esculenta, Cordyceps sinensis, C. militaris, and Agrocybe aegerita; rape seed cake – Auriporia aurea; camelina seed cake – Fomes fomentarius. The cultivation of these species are perspective as a biotechnological process of agricultural wastes converted into mycelia, which could be used in different forms of products with therapeutic action: powder or tablets nutraceuticals or ingredients for functional foods.

  6. Environmental and nutritional requirements for tea cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiboland Roghieh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tea (Camellia sinensis is an important beverage crop cultivated in the tropics and subtropics under acid soil conditions. Increased awareness of the health-promoting properties of the tea beverage has led to an increase in its level of consumption over the last decades. Tea production contributes significantly to the economy of several tea-cultivating countries in Asia and Africa. Environmental constrains, particularly water deficiency due to inadequate and/or poorly distributed rainfall, seriously limit tea production in the majority of tea-producing countries. It is also predicted that global climate change will have a considerable adverse impact on tea production in the near future. Application of fertilizers for higher production and increased quality and quantity of tea is a common agricultural practice, but due to its environmental consequences, such as groundwater pollution, the rate of fertilizer application needs to be reconsidered. Cultivation of tea under humid conditions renders it highly susceptible to pathogens and pest attacks. Application of pesticides and fungicides adversely affects the quality of tea and increases health risks of the tea beverage. Organic cultivation as an agricultural practice without using synthetic fertilizers and other chemical additives such as pesticides and fungicides is a sustainable and eco-friendly approach to producing healthy tea. A growing number of tea-producing countries are joining organic tea cultivation programmes in order to improve the quality and to maintain the health benefits of the tea produced.

  7. Process Design and Application of Aerobic Hybrid Bioreactor in the Treatment of Municipal Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Sushovan Sarkar; Debabrata Mazumder

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid bioreactor having both suspended-growth and attached-growth bacteria is found a novel and excellent bioreactor system for treating the municipal wastewater containing inhibitory substrates too. In this reactor a fraction of substrate is used by suspended biomass and the remaining by attached biomass resulting in the competition between the two growths for the substrate. The combination of suspended and attached growth provides the system with enhanced biomass conce...

  8. A comparative study of leachate quality and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiyong; Tian, Ying; Wang, Shen; Ko, Jae Hac, E-mail: jaehacko@pkusz.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Temporary aeration shortened the initial acid inhibition phase for methanogens. • COD decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactor than that in the anaerobic control. • Methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. • MSW settlement increased with increasing the frequency of intermittent aeration. - Abstract: Research has been conducted to compare leachate characterization and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactor landfills with typical Chinese municipal solid waste (MSW). Three laboratory-scale reactors, an anaerobic (A1) and two hybrid bioreactors (C1 and C2), were constructed and operated for about 10 months. The hybrid bioreactors were operated in an aerobic–anaerobic mode with different aeration frequencies by providing air into the upper layer of waste. Results showed that the temporary aeration into the upper layer aided methane generation by shortening the initial acidogenic phase because of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) reduction and pH increase. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactors, but the concentrations of ammonia–nitrogen in the hybrid bioreactors were greater than those in the anaerobic control. Methanogenic conditions were established within 75 d and 60 d in C1 and C2, respectively. However, high aeration frequency led to the consumption of organic matters by aerobic degradation and resulted in reducing accumulative methane volume. The temporary aeration enhanced waste settlement and the settlement increased with increasing the frequency of aeration. Methane production was inhibited in the anaerobic control; however, the total methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. As for MSW with high content of food waste, leachate recirculation right after aeration stopped was not recommended due to VFA inhibition for methanogens.

  9. Overview of parameters influencing biomass and bioreactor performance used for extracellular ligninase production from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    OpenAIRE

    Seteno Ntwampe; Faysol Chowdhury; Marshall Sheldon; Heinrich Volschenk

    2010-01-01

    The production of extracellular enzymes is gaining momentum as commercial interests seek alternative ways to improve the productivity in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Early research studies looked at improving batch bioreactor operational challenges; however, the use of continuous cultures was indicated to be favourable. This led to a new approach developed to produce extracellular enzymes continuously using fixed-film bioreactors from biofilms immobilised on polymeric and ...

  10. Mathematical modeling of the integrated process of mercury bioremediation in the industrial bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Głuszcz, Paweł; Petera, Jerzy; Ledakowicz, Stanisław

    2010-01-01

    The mathematical model of the integrated process of mercury contaminated wastewater bioremediation in a fixed-bed industrial bioreactor is presented. An activated carbon packing in the bioreactor plays the role of an adsorbent for ionic mercury and at the same time of a carrier material for immobilization of mercury-reducing bacteria. The model includes three basic stages of the bioremediation process: mass transfer in the liquid phase, adsorption of mercury onto activated carbon and ionic me...

  11. Determination of a scale-up factor from mixing time studies in orbitally shaken bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Tissot Stéphanie

    2010-01-01

    Efficient mixing in bioreactors is essential in order to avoid concentration gradients which can be harmful for mammalian cells. To study mixing and its scalability in orbitally shaken cylindrical bioreactors we measured mixing times in containers with nominal volumes from 2 to 1500 L with a colorimetric method using two pH indicators. Four operating parameters were tested: the liquid height the shaking diameter the agitation rate and the inner diameter of the container. The mixing time decre...

  12. Hydrodynamic performance of a three-phase airlift bioreactor with an enlarged degassing zone

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente, A. A.; Teixeira, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of biotechnological processes is complex. So far, few studies were made with bioreactors of the airlift type with an enlarged degassing zone. In this work, the influence of solids loading, solids specific gravity and draught tube dimensions on mixing and circulation times and critical air flow rate for an internal loop airlift bioreactor with an enlarged sedimentation/degassing zone is studied. The results indicate that the critical air flow rate as well as the mixing ...

  13. Scale-up analysis for a CHO cell culture process in large-scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zizhuo; Kenty, Brian M; Li, Zheng Jian; Lee, Steven S

    2009-07-01

    Bioprocess scale-up is a fundamental component of process development in the biotechnology industry. When scaling up a mammalian cell culture process, it is important to consider factors such as mixing time, oxygen transfer, and carbon dioxide removal. In this study, cell-free mixing studies were performed in production scale 5,000-L bioreactors to evaluate scale-up issues. Using the current bioreactor configuration, the 5,000-L bioreactor had a lower oxygen transfer coefficient, longer mixing time, and lower carbon dioxide removal rate than that was observed in bench scale 5- and 20-L bioreactors. The oxygen transfer threshold analysis indicates that the current 5,000-L configuration can only support a maximum viable cell density of 7 x 10(6) cells mL(-1). Moreover, experiments using a dual probe technique demonstrated that pH and dissolved oxygen gradients may exist in 5,000-L bioreactors using the current configuration. Empirical equations were developed to predict mixing time, oxygen transfer coefficient, and carbon dioxide removal rate under different mixing-related engineering parameters in the 5,000-L bioreactors. These equations indicate that increasing bottom air sparging rate is more efficient than increasing power input in improving oxygen transfer and carbon dioxide removal. Furthermore, as the liquid volume increases in a production bioreactor operated in fed-batch mode, bulk mixing becomes a challenge. The mixing studies suggest that the engineering parameters related to bulk mixing and carbon dioxide removal in the 5,000-L bioreactors may need optimizing to mitigate the risk of different performance upon process scale-up. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. An engineering characterisation of shaken bioreactors: flow, mixing and suspension dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, G.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis describes an experimental investigation of the flow, mixing and suspension dynamics in cylindrical orbitally shaken bioreactors (OSRs). Amongst the plethora of bioreactor types and geometries available for cell culture, the OSR is ubiquitous in bioprocess research and development. Offering a well defined liquid-gas interface, high throughput potential and experimental flexibility, it is the vessel of choice in early bioprocess research, either as microtiter-plates, Erlenmeyer flask...

  15. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become more attractive and feasible, due to advantages provided by the combination with regard to developments for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. The major drawbacks of MBR technology are related w...

  16. Relationship between 137Cs concentration and cultivated history on loessial hillslopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoyan; Tian Junliang; Yang Mingyi; Liu Puling

    2005-01-01

    There are close linkages between soil loss degree and soil disturbance degree by human. So it is a key problem to know that how human activity affects soil loss. To analyse the correlation of 137 Cs loss degree with hillslopes' cultivated histories, the concentrations of 137 Cs on different kinds of loessial hillslopes with different cultivated histories, abandoned ages and different patterns of reforestation are studied. The result shows that there is a linear relationship among 137 Cs areal concentrations, cultivation ages and slope gradients. the regressive equation is as follows: X=2356.79-22.77 t-35.53 S. Variant coefficient of 137 Cs areal concentration is 80.11% among hillslopes with different abandonment ages. It is also deduced that 137 Cs areal concentration is affected primarily by abandonment ages of hillslopes. The 137 Cs loss rates of hillslopes with different vegetation restoration manners show significant differences, as a whole, autogenic restoration 137 Cs area concentrations on hillslopes. (authors)

  17. Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS) for Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Imhoff; Ramin Yazdani; Don Augenstein; Harold Bentley; Pei Chiu

    2010-04-30

    Methane is an important contributor to global warming with a total climate forcing estimated to be close to 20% that of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past two decades. The largest anthropogenic source of methane in the US is 'conventional' landfills, which account for over 30% of anthropogenic emissions. While controlling greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily focus on large CO2 sources, attention to reducing CH4 emissions from landfills can result in significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost. For example, the use of 'controlled' or bioreactor landfilling has been estimated to reduce annual US greenhouse emissions by about 15-30 million tons of CO2 carbon (equivalent) at costs between $3-13/ton carbon. In this project we developed or advanced new management approaches, landfill designs, and landfill operating procedures for bioreactor landfills. These advances are needed to address lingering concerns about bioreactor landfills (e.g., efficient collection of increased CH4 generation) in the waste management industry, concerns that hamper bioreactor implementation and the consequent reductions in CH4 emissions. Collectively, the advances described in this report should result in better control of bioreactor landfills and reductions in CH4 emissions. Several advances are important components of an Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS).

  18. Evaluation of Productivity of Zymotis Solid-State Bioreactor Based on Total Reactor Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar F. von Meien

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a method of analyzing the performance of solid-state fermentation bioreactors is described. The method is used to investigate the optimal value for the spacing between the cooling plates of the Zymotis bioreactor, using simulated fermentation data supplied by a mathematical model. The Zymotis bioreactor has good potential for those solid-state fermentation processes in which the substrate bed must remain static. The current work addresses two design parameters introduced by the presence of the internal heat transfer plates: the width of the heat transfer plate, which is governed by the amount of heat to be removed and the pressure drop of the cooling water, and the spacing between these heat transfer plates. In order to analyze the performance of the bioreactor a productivity term is introduced that takes into account the volume occupied within the bioreactor by the heat transfer plates. As part of this analysis, it is shown that, for logistic growth kinetics, the time at which the biomass reaches 90 % of its maximum possible value is a good estimate of the optimum harvesting time for maximizing productivity. Application of the productivity analysis to the simulated fermentation results suggests that, with typical fast growing fungi ( = 0.324 h–1, the optimal spacing between heat transfer plates is of the order of 6 cm. The general applicability of this approach to evaluate the productivity of solid-state bioreactors is demonstrated.

  19. Removal of pharmaceuticals from synthetic wastewater in an aerobic granular sludge membrane bioreactor and determination of the bioreactor microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Chun; Shen, Ji-Min; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Zhao, Xia; Xu, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Five types of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) substances were selected as pollutants in this study. The effects of the removal of these pollutants and the microbial succession process in a granular sludge membrane bioreactor (GMBR) were investigated. Results showed that wastewater containing PPCPs influenced the performance of granular sludge. The removal of the five PPCPs from the GMBR had different effects. The removal rates of prednisolone, norfloxacin and naproxen reached 98.5, 87.8 and 84 %, respectively. The degradation effect in the GMBR system was relatively lower for sulphamethoxazole and ibuprofen, with removal efficiency rates of 79.8 and 63.3 %, respectively. Furthermore, the microbial community structure and diversity variation of the GMBR were analysed via high-throughput sequencing technology. The results indicated the structural and functional succession of the microbial community based on the GMBR process. The results indicate the key features of bacteria with an important role in drug degradation.

  20. Independent origins of cultivated coconut (Cocos nucifera L. in the old world tropics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee F Gunn

    Full Text Available As a portable source of food, water, fuel, and construction materials, the coconut (Cocos nucifera L. played a fundamental role in human migrations and the development of civilization across the humid tropics. Here we investigated the coconut's domestication history and its population genetic structure as it relates to human dispersal patterns. A sample of 1,322 coconut accessions, representing the geographical and phenotypic diversity of the species, was examined using ten microsatellite loci. Bayesian analyses reveal two highly genetically differentiated subpopulations that correspond to the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic oceanic basins. This pattern suggests independent origins of coconut cultivation in these two world regions, with persistent population structure on a global scale despite long-term human cultivation and dispersal. Pacific coconuts show additional genetic substructure corresponding to phenotypic and geographical subgroups; moreover, the traits that are most clearly associated with selection under human cultivation (dwarf habit, self-pollination, and "niu vai" fruit morphology arose only in the Pacific. Coconuts that show evidence of genetic admixture between the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic groups occur primarily in the southwestern Indian Ocean. This pattern is consistent with human introductions of Pacific coconuts along the ancient Austronesian trade route connecting Madagascar to Southeast Asia. Admixture in coastal east Africa may also reflect later historic Arab trading along the Indian Ocean coastline. We propose two geographical origins of coconut cultivation: island Southeast Asia and southern margins of the Indian subcontinent.