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Sample records for bioorthogonal metabolic glycoengineering

  1. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules.

  2. Metabolic glycoengineering bacteria for therapeutic, recombinant protein, and metabolite production applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeui, Christopher T; Urias, Esteban; Liu, Lingshu; Mathew, Mohit P; Yarema, Kevin J

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering is a specialization of metabolic engineering that focuses on using small molecule metabolites to manipulate biosynthetic pathways responsible for oligosaccharide and glycoconjugate production. As outlined in this article, this technique has blossomed in mammalian systems over the past three decades but has made only modest progress in prokaryotes. Nevertheless, a sufficient foundation now exists to support several important applications of metabolic glycoengineering in bacteria based on methods to preferentially direct metabolic intermediates into pathways involved in lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, teichoic acid, or capsule polysaccharide production. An overview of current applications and future prospects for this technology are provided in this report.

  3. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging.

  4. Bioorthogonal metabolic labelling with acyl-CoA reporters : targeting protein acylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ourailidou, Maria E.; Zwinderman, Martijn R.H.; Dekker, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Protein acylation is an abundant post-translational modification with a pivotal role in a plethora of biological processes. To date, metabolic labelling with functionalized precursors of acyl-CoA and subsequent bio-orthogonal ligation to a complementary detection tag has offered an attractive approa

  5. Cyclopropenones for Metabolic Targeting and Sequential Bioorthogonal Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, R David; Shih, Hui-Wen; Alexander, Austin T; Mehl, Ryan A; Prescher, Jennifer A

    2017-05-31

    Cyclopropenones are attractive motifs for bioorthogonal chemistry, owing to their small size and unique modes of reactivity. Unfortunately, the fastest-reacting cyclopropenones are insufficiently stable for routine intracellular use. Here we report cyclopropenones with improved stability that maintain robust reactivity with bioorthogonal phosphines. Functionalized cyclopropenones were synthesized and their lifetimes in aqueous media and cellular environments were analyzed. The most robust cyclopropenones were further treated with a panel of phosphine probes, and reaction rates were measured. Two of the phosphine scaffolds afforded ∼100-fold rate enhancements compared to previously reported reagents. Importantly, the stabilized cyclopropenones were suitable for recombinant protein production via genetic code expansion. The products of the cyclopropenone ligation were also amenable to traceless Staudinger ligations, setting the stage for tandem labeling experiments.

  6. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation.

  7. Harnessing cancer cell metabolism for theranostic applications using metabolic glycoengineering of sialic acid in breast cancer as a pioneering example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Haitham A; AlSadek, Dina M M; El-Houseini, Motawa E; Saeui, Christopher T; Mathew, Mohit P; Yarema, Kevin J; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal cell surface display of sialic acids - a family of unusual 9-carbon sugars - is widely recognized as distinguishing feature of many types of cancer. Sialoglycans, however, typically cannot be identified with sufficiently high reproducibility and sensitivity to serve as clinically accepted biomarkers and similarly, almost all efforts to exploit cancer-specific differences in sialylation signatures for therapy remain in early stage development. In this report we provide an overview of important facets of glycosylation that contribute to cancer in general with a focus on breast cancer as an example of malignant disease characterized by aberrant sialylation. We then describe how cancer cells experience nutrient deprivation during oncogenesis and discuss how the resulting metabolic reprogramming, which endows breast cancer cells with the ability to obtain nutrients during scarcity, constitutes an "Achilles' heel" that we believe can be exploited by metabolic glycoengineering (MGE) strategies to develop new diagnostic methods and therapeutic approaches. In particular, we hypothesize that adaptations made by breast cancer cells that allow them to efficiently scavenge sialic acid during times of nutrient deprivation renders them vulnerable to MGE, which refers to the use of exogenously-supplied, non-natural monosaccharide analogues to modulate targeted aspects of glycosylation in living cells and animals. In specific, once non-natural sialosides are incorporated into the cancer "sialome" they can be exploited as epitopes for immunotherapy or as chemical tags for targeted delivery of imaging or therapeutic agents selectively to tumors.

  8. Biocompatible Azide-Alkyne "Click" Reactions for Surface Decoration of Glyco-Engineered Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Marcus; Memmel, Elisabeth; Braun, Alexandra C; Seibel, Jürgen; Meinel, Lorenz; Lühmann, Tessa

    2016-05-03

    Bio-orthogonal copper (I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has been widely used to modify azide- or alkyne-bearing monosaccharides on metabolic glyco-engineered mammalian cells. Here, we present a systematic study to elucidate the design space for the cytotoxic effects of the copper catalyst on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and on HEK 293-F cells. Monitoring membrane integrity by flow cytometry and RT-PCR analysis with apoptotic and anti-apoptotic markers elucidated the general feasibility of CuAAC, with exposure time of the CuAAC reaction mixture having the major influence on biocompatibility. A high labeling efficiency of HEK 293-F cells with a fluorescent alkyne dye was rapidly achieved by CuAAC in comparison to copper free strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The study details effective and biocompatible conditions for CuAAC-based modification of glyco-engineered cells in comparison to its copper free alternative.

  9. Systems glycobiology for glycoengineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spahn, Philipp N.; Lewis, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation serves essential functions on many proteins produced in biopharmaceutical manufacturing, making it mandatory to thoroughly consider its biogenesis during the production process. Glycoengineering efforts involve the rational design of glycosylation through adjustments in culturing...

  10. Bioorthogonal Chemical Imaging for Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Innovations in light microscopy have tremendously revolutionized the way researchers study biological systems with subcellular resolution. Although fluorescence microscopy is currently the method of choice for cellular imaging, it faces fundamental limitations for studying the vast number of small biomolecules. This is because relatively bulky fluorescent labels could introduce considerable perturbation to or even completely alter the native functions of vital small biomolecules. Hence, despite their immense functional importance, these small biomolecules remain largely undetectable by fluorescence microscopy. To address this challenge, we have developed a bioorthogonal chemical imaging platform. By coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, an emerging nonlinear Raman microscopy technique, with tiny and Raman-active vibrational probes (e.g., alkynes, nitriles and stable isotopes including 2H and 13C), bioorthogonal chemical imaging exhibits superb sensitivity, specificity, multiplicity and biocompatibility for imaging small biomolecules in live systems including tissues and organisms. Exciting biomedical applications such as imaging fatty acid metabolism related to lipotoxicity, glucose uptake and metabolism, drug trafficking, protein synthesis, DNA replication, protein degradation, RNA synthesis and tumor metabolism will be presented. This bioorthogonal chemical imaging platform is compatible with live-cell biology, thus allowing real-time imaging of small-molecule dynamics. Moreover, further chemical and spectroscopic strategies allow for multicolor bioorthogonal chemical imaging, a valuable technique in the era of "omics". We envision that the coupling of SRS microscopy with vibrational probes would do for small biomolecules what fluorescence microscopy of fluorophores has done for larger molecular species, bringing small molecules under the illumination of modern light microscopy.

  11. Coupling Bioorthogonal Chemistries with Artificial Metabolism: Intracellular Biosynthesis of Azidohomoalanine and Its Incorporation into Recombinant Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel, “single experiment” methodology based on genetic engineering of metabolic pathways for direct intracellular production of non-canonical amino acids from simple precursors, coupled with expanded genetic code. In particular, we engineered the intracellular biosynthesis of L-azidohomoalanine from O-acetyl-L-homoserine and NaN3, and achieved its direct incorporation into recombinant target proteins by AUG codon reassignment in a methionine-auxotroph E. coli strain. In our system, the host’s methionine biosynthetic pathway was first diverted towards the production of the desired non-canonical amino acid by exploiting the broad reaction specificity of recombinant pyridoxal phosphate-dependent O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum. Then, the expression of the target protein barstar, accompanied with efficient L-azidohomoalanine incorporation in place of L-methionine, was accomplished. This work stands as proof-of-principle and paves the way for additional work towards intracellular production and site-specific incorporation of biotechnologically relevant non-canonical amino acids directly from common fermentable sources.

  12. Applications of azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry in glycobiology.

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    Zhang, Xiu; Zhang, Yan

    2013-06-19

    Click chemistry is a powerful chemical reaction with excellent bioorthogonality features: biocompatible, rapid and highly specific in biological environments. For glycobiology, bioorthogonal click chemistry has created a new method for glycan non-invasive imaging in living systems, selective metabolic engineering, and offered an elite chemical handle for biological manipulation and glycomics studies. Especially the [3 + 2] dipolar cycloadditions of azides with strained alkynes and the Staudinger ligation of azides and triarylphosphines have been widely used among the extant click reactions. This review focuses on the azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry, describing the characteristics and development of these reactions, introducing some recent applications in glycobiology research, especially in glycan metabolic engineering, including glycan non-invasive imaging, glycomics studies and viral surface manipulation for drug discovery as well as other applications like activity-based protein profiling and carbohydrate microarrays.

  13. Applications of Azide-Based Bioorthogonal Click Chemistry in Glycobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Click chemistry is a powerful chemical reaction with excellent bioorthogonality features: biocompatible, rapid and highly specific in biological environments. For glycobiology, bioorthogonal click chemistry has created a new method for glycan non-invasive imaging in living systems, selective metabolic engineering, and offered an elite chemical handle for biological manipulation and glycomics studies. Especially the [3 + 2] dipolar cycloadditions of azides with strained alkynes and the Staudinger ligation of azides and triarylphosphines have been widely used among the extant click reactions. This review focuses on the azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry, describing the characteristics and development of these reactions, introducing some recent applications in glycobiology research, especially in glycan metabolic engineering, including glycan non-invasive imaging, glycomics studies and viral surface manipulation for drug discovery as well as other applications like activity-based protein profiling and carbohydrate microarrays.

  14. Kinugasa reactions in water: from green chemistry to bioorthogonal labelling.

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    Chigrinova, Mariya; MacKenzie, Douglas A; Sherratt, Allison R; Cheung, Lawrence L W; Pezacki, John Paul; Pezacki, Paul

    2015-04-16

    The Kinugasa reaction has become an efficient method for the direct synthesis of β-lactams from substituted nitrones and copper(I) acetylides. In recent years, the reaction scope has been expanded to include the use of water as the solvent, and with micelle-promoted [3+2] cycloadditions followed by rearrangement furnishing high yields of β-lactams. The high yields of stable products under aqueous conditions render the modified Kinugasa reaction amenable to metabolic labelling and bioorthogonal applications. Herein, the development of methods for use of the Kinugasa reaction in aqueous media is reviewed, with emphasis on its potential use as a bioorthogonal coupling strategy.

  15. Kinugasa Reactions in Water: From Green Chemistry to Bioorthogonal Labelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Chigrinova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Kinugasa reaction has become an efficient method for the direct synthesis of β-lactams from substituted nitrones and copper(I acetylides. In recent years, the reaction scope has been expanded to include the use of water as the solvent, and with micelle-promoted [3+2] cycloadditions followed by rearrangement furnishing high yields of β-lactams. The high yields of stable products under aqueous conditions render the modified Kinugasa reaction amenable to metabolic labelling and bioorthogonal applications. Herein, the development of methods for use of the Kinugasa reaction in aqueous media is reviewed, with emphasis on its potential use as a bioorthogonal coupling strategy.

  16. Bioorthogonal chemistry: strategies and recent development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramil, Carlo P.; Lin, Qing

    2013-01-01

    The use of covalent chemistry to track biomolecules in their native environment—a focus of bioorthogonal chemistry—has received considerable interests recently among chemical biologists and organic chemists alike. To facilitate wider adoption of bioorthogonal chemistry in biomedical research, a central effort in the last few years has been focused on the optimization of a few known bioorthogonal reactions, particularly with respective to reaction kinetics improvement, novel genetic encoding systems, and fluorogenic reactions for bioimaging. During these optimizations, three strategies have emerged, including the use of ring strain for substrate activation in the cycloaddition reactions, the discovery of new ligands and privileged substrates for accelerated metal-catalysed reactions, and the design of substrates with pre-fluorophore structures for rapid “turn-on” fluorescence after selective bioorthogonal reactions. In addition, new bioorthogonal reactions based on either modified or completely unprecedented reactant pairs have been reported. Finally, increasing attention has been directed toward the development of mutually exclusive bioorthogonal reactions and their applications in multiple labeling of a biomolecule in cell culture. In this feature article, we wish to present the recent progress in bioorthogonal reactions through the selected examples that highlight the above-mentioned strategies. Considering increasing sophistication in bioorthogonal chemistry development, we strive to project several exciting opportunities where bioorthogonal chemistry can make a unique contribution to biology in near future. PMID:24145483

  17. Bioorthogonal chemistry:a covalent strategy for the study of biological systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIM; Reyna; K.V.

    2010-01-01

    The development of genetically encoded,wavelength-tunable fluorescent proteins has provided a powerful imaging tool to the study of protein dynamics and functions in cellular and organismal biology.However,many biological functions are not directly encoded in the protein primary sequence,e.g.,dynamic regulation afforded by protein posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation.To meet this challenge,an emerging field of bioorthogonal chemistry has promised to offer a versatile strategy to selectively label a biomolecule of interest and track their dynamic regulations in its native habitat.This strategy has been successfully applied to the studies of all classes of biomolecules in living systems,including proteins,nucleic acids,carbohydrates,and lipids.Whereas the incorporation of a bioorthogonal reporter site-selectively into a biomolecule through either genetic or metabolic approaches has been well established,the development of bioorthogonal reactions that allow fast ligation of exogenous chemical probes with the bioorthogonal reporter in living systems remains in its early stage.Here,we review the recent development of bioorthogonal reactions and their applications in various biological systems,with a detailed discussion about our own work―the development of the tetrazole-based,photoinducible 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction.

  18. Progress towards bioorthogonal catalysis with organometallic compounds.

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    Völker, Timo; Dempwolff, Felix; Graumann, Peter L; Meggers, Eric

    2014-09-22

    The catalysis of bioorthogonal transformations inside living organisms is a formidable challenge--yet bears great potential for future applications in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry. We herein disclose highly active organometallic ruthenium complexes for bioorthogonal catalysis under biologically relevant conditions and inside living cells. The catalysts uncage allyl carbamate protected amines with unprecedented high turnover numbers of up to 270 cycles in the presence of water, air, and millimolar concentrations of thiols. By live-cell imaging of HeLa cells and with the aid of a caged fluorescent probe we could reveal a rapid development of intense fluorescence within the cellular cytoplasm and therefore support the proposed bioorthogonality of the catalysts. In addition, to illustrate the manifold applications of bioorthogonal catalysis, we developed a method for catalytic in-cell activation of a caged anticancer drug, which efficiently induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

  19. Bioorthogonal catalysis: Rise of the nanobots

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    Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2015-07-01

    Bioorthogonal catalysis provides new ways of mediating artificial transformations in living environs. Now, researchers have developed a nanodevice whose catalytic activity can be regulated by host-guest chemistry.

  20. Bioorthogonal chemical reporters for analyzing protein lipidation and lipid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Howard C; Wilson, John P; Charron, Guillaume

    2011-09-20

    purification of proteins labeled with lipid chemical reporters has allowed both the large-scale analysis of lipidated proteins as well as the discovery of new lipidated proteins involved in metabolism, gene expression, and innate immunity. Specific lipid reporters have also been developed to monitor the trafficking of soluble lipids; these species are enabling bioorthogonal imaging of membranes in cells and tissues. Future advances in bioorthogonal chemistry, specific lipid reporters, and spectroscopy should provide important new insight into the functional roles of lipidated proteins and membranes in biology.

  1. Systemic Fluorescence Imaging of Zebrafish Glycans with Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Paresh; Beahm, Brendan J; Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-09-21

    Vertebrate glycans constitute a large, important, and dynamic set of post-translational modifications that are notoriously difficult to manipulate and image. Although the chemical reporter strategy has been used in conjunction with bioorthogonal chemistry to image the external glycosylation state of live zebrafish and detect tumor-associated glycans in mice, the ability to image glycans systemically within a live organism has remained elusive. Here, we report a method that combines the metabolic incorporation of a cyclooctyne-functionalized sialic acid derivative with a ligation reaction of a fluorogenic tetrazine, allowing for the imaging of sialylated glycoconjugates within live zebrafish embryos.

  2. Co-opting a Bioorthogonal Reaction for Oncometabolite Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengeya, Thomas T; Garlick, Julie M; Kulkarni, Rhushikesh A; Miley, Mikayla; Roberts, Allison M; Yang, Youfeng; Crooks, Daniel R; Sourbier, Carole; Linehan, W Marston; Meier, Jordan L

    2016-12-14

    Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, including cancer. Methods to fluorescently detect metabolites have the potential to enable new approaches to cancer detection and imaging. However, fluorescent sensing methods for naturally occurring cellular metabolites are relatively unexplored. Here we report the development of a chemical approach to detect the oncometabolite fumarate. Our strategy exploits a known bioorthogonal reaction, the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrileimines and electron-poor olefins, to detect fumarate via fluorescent pyrazoline cycloadduct formation. We demonstrate hydrazonyl chlorides serve as readily accessible nitrileimine precursors, whose reactivity and spectral properties can be tuned to enable detection of fumarate and other dipolarophile metabolites. Finally, we show this reaction can be used to detect enzyme activity changes caused by mutations in fumarate hydratase, which underlie the familial cancer predisposition syndrome hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer. Our studies define a novel intersection of bioorthogonal chemistry and metabolite reactivity that may be harnessed to enable biological profiling, imaging, and diagnostic applications.

  3. Synthesis and application of water-soluble, photoswitchable cyanine dyes for bioorthogonal labeling of cell-surface carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, Alexander; Letschert, Sebastian; Memmel, Elisabeth; Sauer, Markus; Seibel, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of cyanine dyes addressing absorption wavelengths at 550 and 648 nm is reported. Alkyne functionalized dyes were used for bioorthogonal click reactions by labeling of metabolically incorporated sugar-azides on the surface of living neuroblastoma cells, which were applied to direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) for the visualization of cell-surface glycans in the nm-range.

  4. Predictive glycoengineering of biosimilars using a Markov chain glycosylation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spahn, Philipp N.; Hansen, Anders Holmgaard; Kol, Stefan;

    2016-01-01

    biogenesis. This usually implies that costly and time-consuming experimentation is required for clone identification and optimization of biosimilar glycosylation. Here, we describe a computational method that utilizes a Markov model of glycosylation to predict optimal glycoengineering strategies to obtain...

  5. Enhanced interferon-γ secretion and antitumor activity of T-lymphocytes activated by dendritic cells loaded with glycoengineered myeloma antigens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Hong; WU Qiu-ye; HU Hong-gang; LIU Ban; GUO Zhong-wu; Daniel Man-yuan Sze; HOU Jian

    2007-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy is emerging as a promising cure for cancer. However, a severe problem in this area is the immune tolerance to tumor cells and tumor-associated antigens, as evidenced by the ability of cancer to escape immune surveillance. To overcome this problem this work examined the potential of improving the antigenicity of myeloma by metabolic engineering of its cell surface carbohydrate antigens (i.e., glycoengineering) and presentation of the modified tumor antigens by dendritic cells (DCs) to generate cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs).Methods CD138+ myeloma cells were isolated from 11 multipe myeloma (MM) patients by the immunomagnetic bead method. The MM cells were treated with N-propionyl-D-mannosamine (ManNPr), a synthetic analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), the natural biosynthetic precursor of N-acetyl sialic acid (NeuNAc), to express unnatural N-propionylated sialoglycans. The giycoengineered cells were then induced to apoptosis, and the apoptotic products were added to cultured functional DCs that could present the unnatural carbohydrate antigens to autologous T-lymphocytes.Results It was found that the resultant DCs could activate CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, resulting in increased expression of T cell surface markers, including CD8CD28 and CD4CD29. Moreover, upon stimulation by glycoengineered MM cells, these DC-activated T-lymphocytes could release significantly higher levels of IFN-γ (P<0.05).Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays further showed that the stimulated T-lymphocytes were cytotoxic to glycoengineered MM cells.Conclusions This work demonstrated that glycoengineered myeloma cells were highly antigenic and the CTLs induced by the DCs loaded with the unnatural myeloma antigens were specifically cytotoxic to the glycoengineered myeloma.This may provide a new strategy for overcoming the problem of immune tolerance for the development of effective immunotherapies for MM.

  6. Development and application of bond cleavage reactions in bioorthogonal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Peng R

    2016-03-01

    Bioorthogonal chemical reactions are a thriving area of chemical research in recent years as an unprecedented technique to dissect native biological processes through chemistry-enabled strategies. However, current concepts of bioorthogonal chemistry have largely centered on 'bond formation' reactions between two mutually reactive bioorthogonal handles. Recently, in a reverse strategy, a collection of 'bond cleavage' reactions has emerged with excellent biocompatibility. These reactions have expanded our bioorthogonal chemistry repertoire, enabling an array of exciting new biological applications that range from the chemically controlled spatial and temporal activation of intracellular proteins and small-molecule drugs to the direct manipulation of intact cells under physiological conditions. Here we highlight the development and applications of these bioorthogonal cleavage reactions. Furthermore, we lay out challenges and propose future directions along this appealing avenue of research.

  7. Click Chemistry in Complex Mixtures: Bioorthogonal Bioconjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Craig S.; Finn, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    The selective chemical modification of biological molecules drives a good portion of modern drug development and fundamental biological research. While a few early examples of reactions that engage amine and thiol groups on proteins helped establish the value of such processes, the development of reactions that avoid most biological molecules so as to achieve selectivity in desired bond-forming events has revolutionized the field. We provide an update on recent developments in bioorthogonal chemistry that highlights key advances in reaction rates, biocompatibility, and applications. While not exhaustive, we hope this summary allows the reader to appreciate the rich continuing development of good chemistry that operates in the biological setting. PMID:25237856

  8. Dienophile-Modified Mannosamine Derivatives for Metabolic Labeling of Sialic Acids: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Jeremias E G A; Pfotzer, Jessica; Späte, Anne-Katrin; Wittmann, Valentin

    2017-03-20

    Sialic acids play an important role in numerous cell adhesion processes and sialylation levels are known to be altered under certain pathogenic conditions such as cancer. Metabolic glycoengineering with mannosamine derivatives is a convenient way to introduce non-natural chemical reporter groups into sialylated glycoconjugates offering the opportunity to label sialic acids using bioorthogonal ligation chemistry. The labeling intensity not only depends on the rate of the ligation reaction but also on the extent to which the natural sialic acids are replaced by the modified ones, i.e. the incorporation efficiency. Here we present a comparative study of eight mannosamine derivatives featuring terminal alkenes as chemical reporter groups that can be labeled by an inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder (DAinv) reaction. The derivatives differ in chain length as well as the type of linkage (comprising carbamates, amides, and a urea) that connects the terminal alkene to the sugar. As a general trend, increasing chain lengths result in higher DAinv reactivity and at the same time reduced incorporation efficiency. Carbamates are better accepted than amides with the same chain length; nevertheless do the latter result in more intense cell-surface staining visible in life-cell fluorescence microscopy. Finally, a urea derivative was shown to be accepted.

  9. Metabolic glycoengineering through the mammalian GalNAc salvage pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouilly, Sabrina; Piller, Véronique; Piller, Friedrich

    2012-02-01

    GalNAc is the initial sugar of mucin-type O-glycans, and is a component of several tumor antigens. The aim of this work was to determine whether synthetic GalNAc analogs could be taken up from the medium and incorporated into complex cellular O-glycans. The cell line employed was CHO ldlD, which can only use GalNAc and Gal present in the medium for the synthesis of its glycans. All GalNAc analogs with modified N-acyl groups (N-formyl, N-propionyl, N-glycolyl, N-azidoacetyl, N-bromoacetyl, and N-chloroacetyl) were incorporated into cellular O-glycans, although to different extents. The GalNAc analogs linked to Ser or Thr could be extended by the β3-galactosyltransferase glycoprotein-N-acetylgalactosamine 3β-galactosyl transferase 1 in vitro and in vivo and by α6-sialyltransferase α-N-acetylgalactosaminide-α-2,6-sialyltransferase 1. At the surface of CHO ldlD cells, all analogs were incorporated into sialylated O-glycan structures like those present on wild-type CHO cells, indicating that the GalNAc analogs do not change the overall structure of core-1 O-glycans. In addition, this study shows that the unnatural synthetic GalNAc analogs can be incorporated into human tumor cells, and that a tumor antigen modified by an analog can be readily detected by a specific antiserum. GalNAc analogs are therefore potential targets for tumor immunotherapy.

  10. Development of Bioorthogonal Reactions and Their Applications in Bioconjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Zheng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecule labeling using chemical probes with specific biological activities has played important roles for the elucidation of complicated biological processes. Selective bioconjugation strategies are highly-demanded in the construction of various small-molecule probes to explore complex biological systems. Bioorthogonal reactions that undergo fast and selective ligation under bio-compatible conditions have found diverse applications in the development of new bioconjugation strategies. The development of new bioorthogonal reactions in the past decade has been summarized with comments on their potentials as bioconjugation method in the construction of various biological probes for investigating their target biomolecules. For the applications of bioorthogonal reactions in the site-selective biomolecule conjugation, examples have been presented on the bioconjugation of protein, glycan, nucleic acids and lipids.

  11. Meter-long multiblock copolymer microfibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Han; Remy, Roddel A; Deng, Fei; Mackay, Michael E; Fox, Joseph M; Jia, Xinqiao

    2015-05-01

    High-molecular-weight multiblock copolymers are synthesized as robust polymer fibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization employing the rapid cycloaddition of s-tetrazines with strained trans-cyclooctenes. When cell-adhesive peptide is incorporated in the tetrazine monomer, the resulting protein-mimetic polymer fibers provide guidance cues for cell attachment and elongation.

  12. Glyco-engineering for biopharmaceutical production in moss bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva L. Decker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The production of recombinant biopharmaceuticals (pharmaceutical proteins is a strongly growing area in the pharmaceutical industry. While most products to date are produced in mammalian cell cultures, namely CHO cells, plant-based production systems gained increasing acceptance over the last years. Different plant systems have been established which are suitable for standardization and precise control of cultivation conditions, thus meeting the criteria for pharmaceutical production.The majority of biopharmaceuticals comprise glycoproteins. Therefore, differences in protein glycosylation between humans and plants have to be taken into account and plant-specific glycosylation has to be eliminated to avoid adverse effects on quality, safety and efficacy of the products.The basal land plant Physcomitrella patens (moss has been employed for the recombinant production of high-value therapeutic target proteins (e.g., Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Complement Factor H, monoclonal antibodies, Erythropoietin. Being genetically excellently characterized and exceptionally amenable for precise gene targeting via homologous recombination, essential steps for the optimization of moss as a bioreactor for the production of recombinant proteins have been undertaken.Here, we discuss the glyco-engineering approaches to avoid non-human N- and O-glycosylation on target proteins produced in moss bioreactors.

  13. Inactivation of a GAL4-Like Transcription Factor Improves Cell Fitness and Product Yield in Glycoengineered Pichia pastoris Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyros, Rebecca; Bukowski, John; Nelson, Stephanie; Sharkey, Nathan; Kim, Sehoon; Copeland, Victoria; Davidson, Robert C.; Chen, Ronghua; Zhuang, Jun; Sethuraman, Natarajan; Stadheim, Terrance A.

    2014-01-01

    With a completely reengineered and humanized glycosylation pathway, glycoengineered Pichia pastoris has emerged as a promising production host for the manufacture of therapeutic glycoproteins. However, the extensive genetic modifications have also negatively affected the overall fitness levels of the glycoengineered host cells. To make glycoengineered Pichia strains more compatible with a scalable industrial fermentation process, we sought to identify genetic solutions to broadly improve cell robustness during fermentation. In this study, we report that mutations within the Pichia pastoris ATT1 (PpATT1) gene (a homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL4 [ScGAL4] transcriptional activator) dramatically increased the cellular fitness levels of glycoengineered Pichia strains. We demonstrate that deletion of the PpATT1 gene enabled glycoengineered Pichia strains to improve their thermal tolerance levels, reduce their cell lysis defects, and greatly improve fermentation robustness. The extension of the duration of fermentation enabled the PpATT1-modified glycoengineered Pichia strains to increase their product yields significantly without any sacrifice in product quality. Because the ATT1 gene could be deleted from any Pichia strains, including empty hosts and protein-expressing production strains alike, we suggest that the findings described in this study are broadly applicable to any Pichia strains used for the production of therapeutic proteins, including monoclonal antibodies, Fc fusions, peptides, hormones, and growth factors. PMID:25344235

  14. Glycoengineered CD20 antibody obinutuzumab activates neutrophils and mediates phagocytosis through CD16B more efficiently than rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Josée; Da Roit, Fabio; Bologna, Luca; Ferrara, Claudia; Leusen, Jeanette H; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino

    2013-11-14

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered type 2 CD20 antibody with enhanced CD16A-binding and natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity. CD16B is highly homologous to CD16A and a major FcγR on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We show here that glycoengineered obinutuzumab or rituximab bound CD16B with approximately sevenfold higher affinity, compared with nonglycoengineered wild-type parental antibodies. Furthermore, glycoengineered obinutuzumab activated PMNs, either purified or in chronic lymphoblastic leukemia whole blood, more efficiently than wild-type rituximab. Activation resulted in a 50% increase in CD11b expression and 70% down-modulation of CD62L on neutrophils and in release of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. Activation was not accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity, but led to up to 47% phagocytosis of glycoengineered anti-CD20 opsonized chronic lymphoblastic leukemia targets by purified PMNs. Significant phagocytosis was observed in whole blood, but only in the presence of glycoengineered antibodies, and was followed by up to 50% PMN death. Finally we show, using anti-CD16B and anti-CD32A Fab and F(ab')2 fragments, that both of these receptors are involved in PMN activation, phagocytosis, and cell death induced by glycoengineered antibodies. We conclude that phagocytosis by PMNs is an additional mechanism of action of obinutuzumab mediated through its higher binding affinity for CD16B.

  15. Creation of bioorthogonal redox systems depending on nicotinamide flucytosine dinucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Debin; Wang, Lei; Hou, Shuhua; Liu, Wujun; Wang, Jinxia; Wang, Qian; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2011-12-28

    Many enzymes catalyzing biological redox chemistry depend on the omnipresent cofactor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). NAD is also involved in various nonredox processes. It remains challenging to disconnect one particular NAD-dependent reaction from all others. Here we present a bioorthogonal system that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of l-malate with a dedicated abiotic cofactor, nicotinamide flucytosine dinucleotide (NFCD). By screening the multisite saturated mutagenesis libraries of the NAD-dependent malic enzyme (ME), we identified the mutant ME-L310R/Q401C, which showed excellent activity with NFCD, yet marginal activity with NAD. We found that another synthetic cofactor, nicotinamide cytosine dinucleotide (NCD), also displayed similar activity with the ME mutants. Inspired by these observations, we mutated d-lactate dehydrogenase (DLDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) to DLDH-V152R and MDH-L6R, respectively, and both mutants showed fully active with NFCD. When coupled with DLDH-V152R, ME-L310R/Q401C required only a catalytic amount of NFCD to convert l-malate. Our results opened the window to engineer bioorthogonal redox systems for a wide variety of applications in systems biology and synthetic biology.

  16. Genetically encoded norbornene directs site-specific cellular protein labelling via a rapid bioorthogonal reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Kathrin; Davis, Lloyd; Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Deiters, Alexander; Chin, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal groups via genetic code expansion provides a powerful general strategy for site-specifically labelling proteins with any probe. However, the slow reactivity of the bioorthogonal functional groups that can be encoded genetically limits the utility of this strategy. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a norbornene amino acid using the pyrrolysyl tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. We developed a series of tetr...

  17. Artificial Chemical Reporter Targeting Strategy Using Bioorthogonal Click Reaction for Improving Active-Targeting Efficiency of Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong Yeol; Shin, Min Lee; Shim, Man Kyu; Lee, Sangmin; Na, Jin Hee; Koo, Heebeom; Lee, Hyukjin; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Kuen Yong; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2017-05-01

    Biological ligands such as aptamer, antibody, glucose, and peptide have been widely used to bind specific surface molecules or receptors in tumor cells or subcellular structures to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. However, this active-targeting strategy has limitations for tumor targeting due to inter- and intraheterogeneity of tumors. In this study, we demonstrated an alternative active-targeting strategy using metabolic engineering and bioorthogonal click reaction to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. We observed that azide-containing chemical reporters were successfully generated onto surface glycans of various tumor cells such as lung cancer (A549), brain cancer (U87), and breast cancer (BT-474, MDA-MB231, MCF-7) via metabolic engineering in vitro. In addition, we compared tumor targeting of artificial azide reporter with bicyclononyne (BCN)-conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (BCN-CNPs) and integrin αvβ3 with cyclic RGD-conjugated CNPs (cRGD-CNPs) in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence intensity of azide-reporter-targeted BCN-CNPs in tumor tissues was 1.6-fold higher and with a more uniform distribution compared to that of cRGD-CNPs. Moreover, even in the isolated heterogeneous U87 cells, BCN-CNPs could bind artificial azide reporters on tumor cells more uniformly (∼92.9%) compared to cRGD-CNPs. Therefore, the artificial azide-reporter-targeting strategy can be utilized for targeting heterogeneous tumor cells via bioorthogonal click reaction and may provide an alternative method of tumor targeting for further investigation in cancer therapy.

  18. Probing isoform-specific functions of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases using zinc finger nuclease glycoengineered SimpleCells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Kong, Yun; Steentoft, Catharina; Nudelman, Aaron S; Pedersen, Nis B; Wandall, Hans H; Mandel, Ulla; Bennett, Eric P; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik

    2012-06-19

    Our knowledge of the O-glycoproteome [N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) type] is highly limited. The O-glycoproteome is differentially regulated in cells by dynamic expression of a subset of 20 polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts), and methods to identify important functions of individual GalNAc-Ts are largely unavailable. We recently introduced SimpleCells, i.e., human cell lines made deficient in O-glycan extension by zinc finger nuclease targeting of a key gene in O-glycan elongation (Cosmc), which allows for proteome-wide discovery of O-glycoproteins. Here we have extended the SimpleCell concept to include proteome-wide discovery of unique functions of individual GalNAc-Ts. We used the GalNAc-T2 isoform implicated in dyslipidemia and the human HepG2 liver cell line to demonstrate unique functions of this isoform. We confirm that GalNAc-T2-directed site-specific O-glycosylation inhibits proprotein activation of the lipase inhibitor ANGPTL3 in HepG2 cells and further identify eight O-glycoproteins exclusively glycosylated by T2 of which one, ApoC-III, is implicated in dyslipidemia. Our study supports an essential role for GalNAc-T2 in lipid metabolism, provides serum biomarkers for GalNAc-T2 enzyme function, and validates the use of GALNT gene targeting with SimpleCells for broad discovery of disease-causing deficiencies in O-glycosylation. The presented glycoengineering strategy opens the way for proteome-wide discovery of functions of GalNAc-T isoforms and their role in congenital diseases and disorders.

  19. Glycoengineering in cancer therapeutics: a review with fucose-depleted trastuzumab as the model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listinsky, Jay J; Siegal, Gene P; Listinsky, Catherine M

    2013-03-01

    Experimentally modified trastuzumab antibodies show increased cytotoxic potency when used with human effector cells against HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cells in vitro and ex vivo. Furthermore, the superior efficacy of 'glycoengineered' trastuzumab has been confirmed in vivo utilizing a preclinical xenograft model of human HER2-amplified, trastuzumab-resistant human breast cancer. The increased cytotoxic potency coupled with other improvements are achieved by a seemingly modest change in trastuzumab's structure, that is, depletion of two α-L-fucose residues from trastuzumab's heavy chains. Fucose-free trastuzumab binds with much greater affinity to human natural killer cells. This improved binding induces much greater antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against HER2-overexpressing cells. The pharmaceutical industry has recognized the advantages of fucose-free therapeutic antibodies and has developed technologies that aim to mass produce such antibodies for human use. Here, we summarize data from multiple academic and pharmaceutical laboratories highlighting fucose depletion of antibodies as a key strategy of glycoengineering in cancer therapeutics. We use fucose-depleted trastuzumab as a model to show the advantages of this new class of anticancer agents. We predict that these advantages will translate clinically into improved therapeutics for many patients including those with HER2-overexpressing neoplasms.

  20. Glycoengineering of therapeutic antibodies enhances monocyte/macrophage-mediated phagocytosis and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Sylvia; Birk, Martina C; Klein, Christian; Gerdes, Christian; Umana, Pablo; Bacac, Marina

    2014-03-01

    Therapeutic Abs possess several clinically relevant mechanisms of action including perturbation of tumor cell signaling, activation of complement-dependent cytotoxicity, Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and induction of adaptive immunity. In view of the important role of phagocytic lineage cells in the mechanism of action of therapeutic Abs, we analyzed FcγR receptor-dependent effector functions of monocytes and macrophages triggered by glycoengineered (GE) Abs (having enhanced FcγRIIIa [CD16a] binding affinity) versus their wild-type (WT) counterparts under different experimental conditions. We first defined the precise FcγR repertoire on classical and nonclassical intermediate monocytes--M1 and M2c macrophage populations. We further show that WT and GE Abs display comparable binding and induce similar effector functions (ADCC and ADCP) in the absence of nonspecific, endogenous IgGs. However, in the presence of these IgGs (i.e., in a situation that more closely mimics physiologic conditions), GE Abs display significantly superior binding and promote stronger monocyte and macrophage activity. These data show that in addition to enhancing CD16a-dependent NK cell cytotoxicity, glycoengineering also enhances monocyte and macrophage phagocytic and cytotoxic activities through enhanced binding to CD16a under conditions that more closely resemble the physiologic setting.

  1. Towards Glycoengineering in Archaea: Replacement of Haloferax volcanii AglD with Homologous Glycosyltransferases from Other Halophilic Archaea ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Calo, Doron; Eilam, Yael; Lichtenstein, Rachel G.; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Like eukarya and bacteria, archaea also perform N-glycosylation. However, the N-linked glycans of archaeal glycoproteins present a variety not seen elsewhere. Archaea accordingly rely on N-glycosylation pathways likely involving a broad range of species-specific enzymes. To harness the enormous applied potential of such diversity for the generation of glycoproteins bearing tailored N-linked glycans, the development of an appropriate archaeal glycoengineering platform is required. With a seque...

  2. Bioorthogonal SERS Nanoprobes for Mulitplex Spectroscopic Detection, Tumor Cell Targeting, and Tissue Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junzhou; Liang, Duanwei; Jin, Qingqing; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Tang, Xinjing

    2015-09-07

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique shows extraordinary features for a range of biological and biomedical applications. Herein, a series of novel bioorthogonal SERS nanoprobes were constructed with Gold nanoflower (AuNF) and Raman reporters, the signals of which were located in a Raman-silent region of biological samples. AS1411 aptamer was also co-conjugated with AuNF through a self-assembled monolayer coverage strategy. Multiplex SERS imaging using these nanoprobes with three different bioorthogonal small-molecule Raman reporters is successfully achieved with high multiplexing capacity in a biologically Raman-silent region. These Raman nanoprobes co-conjugated with AS1411 showed high affinity for tumor cells with overexpressed nucleolin and can be used for selective tumor cell screening and tissue imaging.

  3. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  4. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Capucine L; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs.

  5. Probing the proteasome cavity in three steps: bio-orthogonal photo-reactive suicide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurink, Paul P; Florea, Bogdan I; Van der Marel, Gijs A; Kessler, Benedikt M; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2010-12-21

    Tri-functional activity-based protein probes that encompass an electrophilic trap, a photo-reactive group and a bio-orthogonal ligation handle are described. With these, and in a three-step chemical proteomics approach, proteasomal catalytic sites are covalently and irreversibly modified, followed by photocrosslinking of these to flanking subunits and Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation for visualization and identification of the resulting conjugates.

  6. Bioorthogonal click chemistry to assay mu-opioid receptor palmitoylation using 15-hexadecynoic acid and immunoprecipitation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a modification of bioorthogonal click chemistry to assay the palmitoylation of cellular proteins. This assay utilizes 15-hexadecynoic acid (15-HDYA) as a chemical probe in combination with protein immunoprecipitation using magnetic beads in order to detect S-palmitoylation of proteins of interest. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach for the mu-opioid receptor (MOR), a GPCR responsible for mediating the analgesic and addictive properties of most clinically releva...

  7. Bioorthogonal chemistry for (68) Ga radiolabelling of DOTA-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Helen L; Carroll, Laurence; Aboagye, Eric O; Spivey, Alan C

    2014-04-01

    Copper-catalysed 'click' chemistry is a highly utilised technique for radiolabelling small molecules and peptides for imaging applications. The usefulness of these reactions falls short, however, when metal catalysis is not a practically viable route; such as when using metal chelates as radioligands. Here, we describe a method for carrying out 'click-type' radiochemistry in the presence of DOTA chelates, by combining (68) Ga radiolabelling techniques with well-established bioorthogonal reactions, which do not rely upon metal catalysis.

  8. Recent Trends in Bioorthogonal Click-Radiolabeling Reactions Using Fluorine-18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Pietzsch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of positron emission tomography (PET in nuclear medicine has stimulated the extensive development of a multitude of novel and versatile bioorthogonal conjugation techniques especially for the radiolabeling of biologically active high molecular weight compounds like peptides, proteins or antibodies. Taking into consideration that the introduction of fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.8 min proceeds under harsh conditions, radiolabeling of these biologically active molecules represents an outstanding challenge and is of enormous interest. Special attention has to be paid to the method of 18F-introduction. It should proceed in a regioselective manner under mild physiological conditions, in an acceptable time span, with high yields and high specific activities. For these reasons and due to the high number of functional groups found in these compounds, a specific labeling procedure has to be developed for every bioactive macromolecule. Bioorthogonal strategies including the Cu-assisted Huisgen cycloaddition and its copper-free click variant, both Staudinger Ligations or the tetrazine-click reaction have been successfully applied and represent valuable alternatives for the selective introduction of fluorine-18 to overcome the afore mentioned obstacles. This comprehensive review deals with the progress and illustrates the latest developments in the field of bioorthogonal labeling with the focus on the preparation of radiofluorinated building blocks and tracers for molecular imaging.

  9. Recent trends in bioorthogonal click-radiolabeling reactions using fluorine-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretze, Marc; Pietzsch, Doreen; Mamat, Constantin

    2013-07-22

    The increasing application of positron emission tomography (PET) in nuclear medicine has stimulated the extensive development of a multitude of novel and versatile bioorthogonal conjugation techniques especially for the radiolabeling of biologically active high molecular weight compounds like peptides, proteins or antibodies. Taking into consideration that the introduction of fluorine-18 (t(1/2) = 109.8 min) proceeds under harsh conditions, radiolabeling of these biologically active molecules represents an outstanding challenge and is of enormous interest. Special attention has to be paid to the method of 18F-introduction. It should proceed in a regioselective manner under mild physiological conditions, in an acceptable time span, with high yields and high specific activities. For these reasons and due to the high number of functional groups found in these compounds, a specific labeling procedure has to be developed for every bioactive macromolecule. Bioorthogonal strategies including the Cu-assisted Huisgen cycloaddition and its copper-free click variant, both Staudinger Ligations or the tetrazine-click reaction have been successfully applied and represent valuable alternatives for the selective introduction of fluorine-18 to overcome the afore mentioned obstacles. This comprehensive review deals with the progress and illustrates the latest developments in the field of bioorthogonal labeling with the focus on the preparation of radiofluorinated building blocks and tracers for molecular imaging.

  10. Pretargeted Positron Emission Tomography Imaging That Employs Supramolecular Nanoparticles with in Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuang; Choi, Jin-Sil; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Xing, Yan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ming; Jiang, Ziyue K; Ro, Tracy; Wu, Lily; Stout, David B; Tomlinson, James S; Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Lin, Wei-Yu

    2016-01-26

    A pretargeted oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that leverages the power of supramolecular nanoparticles with in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry was demonstrated for the clinically relevant problem of tumor imaging. The advantages of this approach are that (i) the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of tumor-targeting and imaging agents can be independently altered via chemical alteration to achieve the desired in vivo performance and (ii) the interplay between the two PKs and other controllable variables confers a second layer of control toward improved PET imaging. In brief, we utilized supramolecular chemistry to synthesize tumor-targeting nanoparticles containing transcyclooctene (TCO, a bioorthogonal reactive motif), called TCO⊂SNPs. After the intravenous injection and subsequent concentration of the TCO⊂SNPs in the tumors of living mice, a small molecule containing both the complementary bioorthogonal motif (tetrazine, Tz) and a positron-emitting radioisotope ((64)Cu) was injected to react selectively and irreversibly to TCO. High-contrast PET imaging of the tumor mass was accomplished after the rapid clearance of the unreacted (64)Cu-Tz probe. Our nanoparticle approach encompasses a wider gamut of tumor types due to the use of EPR effects, which is a universal phenomenon for most solid tumors.

  11. Glycoengineering of pertuzumab and its impact on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Chen, Song; Xu, Na; Wang, Chi; Sai, Wen bo; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ying chun; Hu, Xiao jing; Tian, Hong; Gao, Xiang dong; Yao, Wen bing

    2017-01-01

    Pertuzumab is an antihuman HER2 antibody developed for HER2 positive breast cancer. Glycosylation profiles are always the important issue for antibody based therapy. Previous findings have suggested the impact of glycosylation profiles on the function of antibodies, like pharmacodynamics, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, the roles of fucose and sialic acid in the function of therapeutic antibodies still need further investigation, especially the role of sialic acid in nonfucosylated antibodies. This study focused on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pertuzumab after glycoengineering. Herein, nonfucosylated pertuzumab was produced in CHOFUT8−/− cells, and desialylated pertuzumab was generated by enzymatic hydrolysis. Present data indicated that fucose was critical for ADCC activity by influencing the interaction between pertuzumab and FcγRIIIa, nevertheless removal of sialic acid increased the ADCC and CDC activity of pertuzumab. Meanwhile, regarding to sialic acid, sialidase hydrolysis directly resulted in asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) dependent clearance in hepatic cells in vitro. The pharmacokinetic assay revealed that co-injection of asialofetuin can protect desialylated pertuzumab against ASGPRs-mediated clearance. Taken together, the present study elucidated the importance of fucose and sialic acid for pertuzumab, and also provided further understanding of the relationship of glycosylation/pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of therapeutic antibody. PMID:28397880

  12. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Metabolism KidsHealth > For Teens > Metabolism Print A A A ... food through a process called metabolism. What Is Metabolism? Metabolism (pronounced: meh-TAB-uh-lih-zem) is ...

  13. Palladium-Mediated Dealkylation of N-Propargyl-Floxuridine as a Bioorthogonal Oxygen-Independent Prodrug Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jason T.; Carragher, Neil O.; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2015-03-01

    Herein we report the development and biological screening of a bioorthogonal palladium-labile prodrug of the nucleoside analogue floxuridine, a potent antineoplastic drug used in the clinic to treat advanced cancers. N-propargylation of the N3 position of its uracil ring resulted in a vast reduction of its biological activity (~6,250-fold). Cytotoxic properties were bioorthogonally rescued in cancer cell culture by heterogeneous palladium chemistry both in normoxia and hypoxia. Within the same environment, the reported chemo-reversible prodrug exhibited up to 1,450-fold difference of cytotoxicity whether it was in the absence or presence of the extracellular palladium source, underlining the precise modulation of bioactivity enabled by this bioorthogonally-activated prodrug strategy.

  14. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul J; Elahipanah, Sina; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-24

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  15. Nitrile Oxide-Norbornene Cycloaddition as a Bioorthogonal Crosslinking Reaction for the Preparation of Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Vinh X; Zhou, Kun; Simon, George P; Forsythe, John S

    2015-10-01

    This communication describes the first application of cycloaddition between an in situ generated nitrile oxide with norbornene leading to a polymer crosslinking reaction for the preparation of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels under physiological conditions. Hydrogels with high water content and robust physical strength are readily formed within 2-5 min by a simple two-solution mixing method which allows 3D encapsulation of neuronal cells. This bioorthogonal crosslinking reaction provides a simple yet highly effective method for preparation of hydrogels to be used in bioengineering.

  16. Imaging Therapeutic PARP Inhibition In Vivo through Bioorthogonally Developed Companion Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Reiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of small-molecule poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors are currently undergoing advanced clinical trials. Determining the distribution and target inhibitory activity of these drugs in individual subjects, however, has proven problematic. Here, we used a PARP agent for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT imaging (18F-BO, which we developed based on the Olaparib scaffold using rapid bioorthogonal conjugation chemistries. We show that the bioorthogonal 18F modification of the parent molecule is simple, highly efficient, and well tolerated, resulting in a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 17.9 ± 1.1 nM. Intravital imaging showed ubiquitous distribution of the drug and uptake into cancer cells, with ultimate localization within the nucleus, all of which were inhibitable. Whole-body PET-CT imaging showed tumoral uptake of the drug, which decreased significantly, after a daily dose of Olaparib. Standard 18F-fludeoxyglucose imaging, however, failed to detect such therapy-induced changes. This research represents a step toward developing a more generic approach for the rapid codevelopment of companion imaging agents based on small-molecule therapeutic inhibitors.

  17. Development and Applications of the Copper-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC as a Bioorthogonal Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of bioorthogonal reactions has greatly broadened the scope of biomolecule labeling and detecting. Of all the bioorthogonal reactions that have been developed, the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC is the most widely applied one, mainly because of its relatively fast kinetics and high efficiency. However, the introduction of copper species to in vivo systems raises the issue of potential toxicity. In order to reduce the copper-induced toxicity and further improve the reaction kinetics and efficiency, different strategies have been adopted, including the development of diverse copper chelating ligands to assist the catalytic cycle and the development of chelating azides as reagents. Up to now, the optimization of CuAAC has facilitated its applications in labeling and identifying either specific biomolecule species or on the omics level. Herein, we mainly discuss the efforts in the development of CuAAC to better fit the bioorthogonal reaction criteria and its bioorthogonal applications both in vivo and in vitro.

  18. Development and Applications of the Copper-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) as a Bioorthogonal Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2016-10-24

    The emergence of bioorthogonal reactions has greatly broadened the scope of biomolecule labeling and detecting. Of all the bioorthogonal reactions that have been developed, the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is the most widely applied one, mainly because of its relatively fast kinetics and high efficiency. However, the introduction of copper species to in vivo systems raises the issue of potential toxicity. In order to reduce the copper-induced toxicity and further improve the reaction kinetics and efficiency, different strategies have been adopted, including the development of diverse copper chelating ligands to assist the catalytic cycle and the development of chelating azides as reagents. Up to now, the optimization of CuAAC has facilitated its applications in labeling and identifying either specific biomolecule species or on the omics level. Herein, we mainly discuss the efforts in the development of CuAAC to better fit the bioorthogonal reaction criteria and its bioorthogonal applications both in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Click-MS: Tagless Protein Enrichment Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry for Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Arne H; Borrmann, Annika; Roosjen, Mark; van Hest, Jan C M; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-12-16

    Epitope-tagging is an effective tool to facilitate protein enrichment from crude cell extracts. Traditionally, N- or C-terminal fused tags are employed, which, however, can perturb protein function. Unnatural amino acids (UAAs) harboring small reactive handles can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins, thus serving as a potential alternative for conventional protein tags. Here, we introduce Click-MS, which combines the power of site-specific UAA incorporation, bioorthogonal chemistry, and quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to specifically enrich a single protein of interest from crude mammalian cell extracts. By genetic encoding of p-azido-l-phenylalanine, the protein of interest can be selectively captured using copper-free click chemistry. We use Click-MS to enrich proteins that function in different cellular compartments, and we identify protein-protein interactions, showing the great potential of Click-MS for interaction proteomics workflows.

  20. The growing impact of bioorthogonal click chemistry on the development of radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dexing; Zeglis, Brian M; Lewis, Jason S; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2013-06-01

    Click chemistry has become a ubiquitous chemical tool with applications in nearly all areas of modern chemistry, including drug discovery, bioconjugation, and nanoscience. Radiochemistry is no exception, as the canonical Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction, and other types of bioorthogonal click ligations have had a significant impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. This review will focus on recent applications of click chemistry ligations in the preparation of imaging agents for SPECT and PET, including small molecules, peptides, and proteins labeled with radionuclides such as (18)F, (64)Cu, (111)In, and (99m)Tc.

  1. Photodynamic therapy via FRET following bioorthogonal click reaction in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bio, Moses; Rajaputra, Pallavi; You, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    Longer wavelength light (650-800nm) is desired to treat large tumors in photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, shorter wavelength light is needed in PDT for thin tumors, not to cause undesirable local side effects. We proposed a strategy for stepwise optical imaging and PDT using a bioorthogonal click chemistry and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We prepared azidyl rhodamine (Rh-N3, clickable FD) and cyclooctynyl phthalocyanine [Pc-(DIBAC), clickable PS], with which, here, we demonstrate that the non-catalytic click chemistry is rapid and efficient in cancer cells and FRET from a fluorescence dye (FD) to a photosensitizer (PS) is sufficient to generate enough singlet oxygen killing cancer cells by using shorter wavelength light. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  3. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of ob...

  4. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  5. Bio-orthogonal "click-and-release" donation of caged carbonyl sulfide (COS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Andrea K; Yang, Yang; Royzen, Maksim; Pluth, Michael D

    2017-01-24

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biomolecule with high therapeutic potential. Here we leverage the inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) click reaction between a thiocarbamate-functionalized trans-cyclooctene and a tetrazine to deliver carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is quickly converted to H2S by the uniquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), thus providing a new strategy for bio-orthogonal COS/H2S donation.

  6. Click-EM for imaging metabolically tagged nonprotein biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, John T; Adams, Stephen R; Deerinck, Thomas J; Boassa, Daniela; Rodriguez-Rivera, Frances; Palida, Sakina F; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y

    2016-06-01

    EM has long been the main technique for imaging cell structures with nanometer resolution but has lagged behind light microscopy in the crucial ability to make specific molecules stand out. Here we introduce click-EM, a labeling technique for correlative light microscopy and EM imaging of nonprotein biomolecules. In this approach, metabolic labeling substrates containing bioorthogonal functional groups are provided to cells for incorporation into biopolymers by endogenous biosynthetic machinery. The unique chemical functionality of these analogs is exploited for selective attachment of singlet oxygen-generating fluorescent dyes via bioorthogonal 'click chemistry' ligations. Illumination of dye-labeled structures generates singlet oxygen to locally catalyze the polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product that is readily imaged by EM. We describe the application of click-EM in imaging metabolically tagged DNA, RNA and lipids in cultured cells and neurons and highlight its use in tracking peptidoglycan synthesis in the Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes.

  7. Development of Bioorthogonally Degradable Linkers and Polymers Using alpha-Azidoethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Chandrasekhar Ramasubramanian

    Degradable polymers have gained a lot of attention in recent years for applications in biotechnology and medicine. External control over polymer degradation can be obtained by incorporating functional groups that cleave in the presence of triggers that would normally be absent in biological environments, i.e. are bioorthogonal. This thesis explores the use of chemically cleavable alpha-azidoethers as a new method to obtain external control over the degradation behavior of polymers. My first goal is to illustrate the potential of alpha-azidoethers toward developing cleavable linkers. We have studied the relationship between alpha-azidoether structure and hydrolytic stability, to prepare linkers that withstand background hydrolytic cleavage until they are exposed to the cleaving trigger. The cleavage kinetics of the alpha-azidoether functional group was quantified. In addition to the conventionally used tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP), dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), a previously unexplored, biocompatible reducing agent, was also evaluated as a cleaving trigger. Based on these results, we have proposed design rules for utilizing alpha-azidoethers as cleavable linkers in applications that require bioorthogonal control over linker cleavage. Secondly, the alpha-azidoether cleavable linker chemistry was implemented into the development of polymeric materials. Two different types of polymers were developed. Polyamides incorporating alpha-azidoethers along the backbone were synthesized, and their physical properties and chemically triggered degradation behavior were characterized. The degradation timescale of these polymers can be tuned simply by manipulating the concentration of the externally applied chemical trigger. The alpha-azidoether functional group was then utilized to develop a unique triggered-release polymeric adhesive for potential applications in dental adhesive formulations. A methacrylamide-phosphonate adhesive monomer incorporating an alpha

  8. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity.

  9. Scaffold Free Bio-orthogonal Assembly of 3-Dimensional Cardiac Tissue via Cell Surface Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; O’Brien, Paul J.; Elahipanah, Sina; Yousaf , Muhammad N.

    2016-01-01

    There has been tremendous interest in constructing in vitro cardiac tissue for a range of fundamental studies of cardiac development and disease and as a commercial system to evaluate therapeutic drug discovery prioritization and toxicity. Although there has been progress towards studying 2-dimensional cardiac function in vitro, there remain challenging obstacles to generate rapid and efficient scaffold-free 3-dimensional multiple cell type co-culture cardiac tissue models. Herein, we develop a programmed rapid self-assembly strategy to induce specific and stable cell-cell contacts among multiple cell types found in heart tissue to generate 3D tissues through cell-surface engineering based on liposome delivery and fusion to display bio-orthogonal functional groups from cell membranes. We generate, for the first time, a scaffold free and stable self assembled 3 cell line co-culture 3D cardiac tissue model by assembling cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblast cells via a rapid inter-cell click ligation process. We compare and analyze the function of the 3D cardiac tissue chips with 2D co-culture monolayers by assessing cardiac specific markers, electromechanical cell coupling, beating rates and evaluating drug toxicity. PMID:28008983

  10. Scaffold Free Bio-orthogonal Assembly of 3-Dimensional Cardiac Tissue via Cell Surface Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; O’Brien, Paul J.; Elahipanah, Sina; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2016-12-01

    There has been tremendous interest in constructing in vitro cardiac tissue for a range of fundamental studies of cardiac development and disease and as a commercial system to evaluate therapeutic drug discovery prioritization and toxicity. Although there has been progress towards studying 2-dimensional cardiac function in vitro, there remain challenging obstacles to generate rapid and efficient scaffold-free 3-dimensional multiple cell type co-culture cardiac tissue models. Herein, we develop a programmed rapid self-assembly strategy to induce specific and stable cell-cell contacts among multiple cell types found in heart tissue to generate 3D tissues through cell-surface engineering based on liposome delivery and fusion to display bio-orthogonal functional groups from cell membranes. We generate, for the first time, a scaffold free and stable self assembled 3 cell line co-culture 3D cardiac tissue model by assembling cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblast cells via a rapid inter-cell click ligation process. We compare and analyze the function of the 3D cardiac tissue chips with 2D co-culture monolayers by assessing cardiac specific markers, electromechanical cell coupling, beating rates and evaluating drug toxicity.

  11. (99m)Tc-bioorthogonal click chemistry reagent for in vivo pretargeted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Fernanda; Zhang, Xiuli; Shah, Manankumar; Newton-Northup, Jessica; Cabral, Pablo; Cerecetto, Hugo; Quinn, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Metal-free click chemistry has become an important tool for pretargeted approaches in the molecular imaging field. The application of bioorthogonal click chemistry between a pretargeted trans-cyclooctene (TCO) derivatized monoclonal antibody (mAb) and a (99m)Tc-modified 1,2,4,5-tetrazine for tumor imaging was examined in vitro and in vivo. The HYNIC tetrazine compound was synthesized and structurally characterized, confirming its identity. Radiolabeling studies demonstrated that the HYNIC tetrazine was labeled with (99m)Tc at an efficiency of >95% and was radiochemically stable. (99m)Tc-HYNIC tetrazine reacted with the TCO-CC49 mAb in vitro demonstrating its selective reactivity. In vivo biodistribution studies revealed non-specific liver and GI uptake due to the hydrophobic property of the compound, however pretargeted SPECT imaging studies demonstrated tumor visualization confirming the success of the cycloaddition reaction in vivo. These results demonstrated the potential of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-tetrazine for tumor imaging with pretargeted mAbs.

  12. Bio-orthogonal coupling on PEG-modified quantum dots (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Naiqian; Palui, Goutam; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2017-02-01

    We have designed two sets of aldehyde- and azide-modified ligands; these ligands also present lipoic acid anchors and PEG hydrophilic moieties (LA-PEG-CHO and LA-PEG-azide). We combined this design with a photoligation strategy to prepare QDs with good control over the fraction of intact reactive groups per nanocrystal. We first applied the extremely efficient hydrazone coupling ligation to react the QD with hydrozinopyridine, which produces a well-defined absorption feature at 354 nm ascribed to the hydrazone chromophore. We exploited this signature to measure the number of aldehyde groups per QD when the fraction of LA-PEG-CHO per nanocrystal was varied, by comparing the optical signature at 354 with the molar extinction coefficient of the chromophore. This allowed us to extract an estimate for the number of LA-PEG ligand per QDs for a few distinct size nanocrystals. We further complemented these findings with the use of NMR spectroscopy to estimate of the ligand density using well defined signatures of the terminal protons of the ligands, and found a good agreement between the two techniques. We then showed that bio-orthogonal reactions based on CLICK and hydrazone coupling can be achieved using QDs presenting a mixture of azide and CHO functions. We anticipate that this strategy could be applied other nanoparticles such as those of Au and metals and semiconductor nanocrystals.

  13. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  14. The N-linking glycosylation system from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is required for adhesion and has potential use in glycoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Janine T.; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Li, Yanwen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Vohra, Prerna; Tucker, Alexander W.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Aebi, Markus; Langford, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a mucosal respiratory pathogen causing contagious porcine pleuropneumonia. Pathogenesis studies have demonstrated a major role for the capsule, exotoxins and outer membrane proteins. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae can also glycosylate proteins, using a cytoplasmic N-linked glycosylating enzyme designated NGT, but its transcriptional arrangement and role in virulence remains unknown. We investigated the NGT locus and demonstrated that the putative transcriptional unit consists of rimO, ngt and a glycosyltransferase termed agt. From this information we used the A. pleuropneumoniae glycosylation locus to decorate an acceptor protein, within Escherichia coli, with a hexose polymer that reacted with an anti-dextran antibody. Mass spectrometry analysis of a truncated protein revealed that this operon could add up to 29 repeat units to the appropriate sequon. We demonstrated the importance of NGT in virulence, by creating deletion mutants and testing them in a novel respiratory cell line adhesion model. This study demonstrates the importance of the NGT glycosylation system for pathogenesis and its potential biotechnological application for glycoengineering. PMID:28077594

  15. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy.

  16. In Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry Enables Local Hydrogel and Systemic Pro-Drug To Treat Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The ability to activate drugs only at desired locations avoiding systemic immunosuppression and other dose limiting toxicities is highly desirable. Here we present a new approach, named local drug activation, that uses bioorthogonal chemistry to concentrate and activate systemic small molecules at a location of choice. This method is independent of endogenous cellular or environmental markers and only depends on the presence of a preimplanted biomaterial near a desired site (e.g., tumor). We demonstrate the clear therapeutic benefit with minimal side effects of this approach in mice over systemic therapy using a doxorubicin pro-drug against xenograft tumors of a type of soft tissue sarcoma (HT1080). PMID:27504494

  17. Direct and two-step bioorthogonal probes for Bruton's tyrosine kinase based on ibrutinib: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nora; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; van de Kar, Bas; Kaptein, Allard; Barf, Tjeerd; Driessen, Christoph; Filippov, Dmitri V; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; van der Stelt, Mario; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2015-05-14

    Ibrutinib is a covalent and irreversible inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) and has been approved for the treatment of haematological malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, mantle cell lymphoma and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The covalent and irreversible nature of its molecular mode of action allows identification and monitoring of its target in an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) setting. Fluorescent and biotinylated ibrutinib derivatives have appeared in the literature in recent years to monitor BTK in vitro and in situ. The work described here complements this existing methodology and pertains a comparative study on the efficacy of direct and two-step bioorthogonal ABPP of BTK.

  18. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the allele frequencies of genetic variants 373 Ala→Pro and 451 Arg→Gln of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and to explore their potential impacts on serum lipid metabolism. Methods: The genotypes in CETP codon 373 and 451 in 91 German healthy students and 409 an-

  19. Defining efficient enzyme-cofactor pairs for bioorthogonal profiling of protein methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Kabirul; Chen, Yuling; Wu, Hong; Bothwell, Ian R.; Blum, Gil J.; Zeng, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Zheng, Weihong; Min, Jinrong; Deng, Haiteng; Luo, Minkui [MSKCC; (Toronto); (Tsinghua)

    2013-11-18

    Protein methyltransferase (PMT)-mediated posttranslational modification of histone and nonhistone substrates modulates stability, localization, and interacting partners of target proteins in diverse cellular contexts. These events play critical roles in normal biological processes and are frequently deregulated in human diseases. In the course of identifying substrates of individual PMTs, bioorthogonal profiling of protein methylation (BPPM) has demonstrated its merits. In this approach, specific PMTs are engineered to process S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) analogs as cofactor surrogates and label their substrates with distinct chemical modifications for target elucidation. Despite the proof-of-concept advancement of BPPM, few efforts have been made to explore its generality. With two cancer-relevant PMTs, EuHMT1 (GLP1/KMT1D) and EuHMT2 (G9a/KMT1C), as models, we defined the key structural features of engineered PMTs and matched SAM analogs that can render the orthogonal enzyme–cofactor pairs for efficient catalysis. Here we have demonstrated that the presence of sulfonium-β-sp2 carbon and flexible, medium-sized sulfonium-δ-substituents are crucial for SAM analogs as BPPM reagents. The bulky cofactors can be accommodated by tailoring the conserved Y1211/Y1154 residues and nearby hydrophobic cavities of EuHMT1/2. Profiling proteome-wide substrates with BPPM allowed identification of >500 targets of EuHMT1/2 with representative targets validated using native EuHMT1/2 and SAM. This finding indicates that EuHMT1/2 may regulate many cellular events previously unrecognized to be modulated by methylation. The present work, therefore, paves the way to a broader application of the BPPM technology to profile methylomes of diverse PMTs and elucidate their downstream functions.

  20. Towards glycoengineering in archaea: replacement of Haloferax volcanii AglD with homologous glycosyltransferases from other halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Eilam, Yael; Lichtenstein, Rachel G; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-09-01

    Like eukarya and bacteria, archaea also perform N-glycosylation. However, the N-linked glycans of archaeal glycoproteins present a variety not seen elsewhere. Archaea accordingly rely on N-glycosylation pathways likely involving a broad range of species-specific enzymes. To harness the enormous applied potential of such diversity for the generation of glycoproteins bearing tailored N-linked glycans, the development of an appropriate archaeal glycoengineering platform is required. With a sequenced genome, a relatively well-defined N-glycosylation pathway, and molecular tools for gene manipulation, the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii (Hfx. volcanii) represents a promising candidate. Accordingly, cells lacking AglD, a glycosyltransferase involved in adding the final hexose of a pentasaccharide N-linked to the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein, were transformed to express AglD homologues from other haloarchaea. The introduction of nonnative versions of AglD led to the appearance of an S-layer glycoprotein similar to the protein from the native strain. Indeed, mass spectrometry confirmed that AglD and its homologues introduce the final hexose to the N-linked S-layer glycoprotein pentasaccharide. Heterologously expressed haloarchaeal AglD homologues contributed to N-glycosylation in Hfx. volcanii despite an apparent lack of AglD function in those haloarchaea from where the introduced homologues came. For example, although functional in Hfx. volcanii, no transcription of the Halobacterium salinarum aglD homologue, OE1482, was detected in cells of the native host grown under various conditions. Thus, at least one AglD homologue works more readily in Hfx. volcanii than in the native host. These results warrant the continued assessment of Hfx. volcanii as a glycosylation "workshop."

  1. Transient glyco-engineering to produce recombinant IgA1 with defined N- and O-glycans in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eDicker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG, less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA, which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumour activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered deltaXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that deltaXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants can be engineered towards the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans.

  2. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans.

  3. Site-specific antibody-drug conjugates: the nexus of bioorthogonal chemistry, protein engineering, and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Paresh; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-02-18

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) combine the specificity of antibodies with the potency of small molecules to create targeted drugs. Despite the simplicity of this concept, generation of clinically successful ADCs has been very difficult. Over the past several decades, scientists have learned a great deal about the constraints on antibodies, linkers, and drugs as they relate to successful construction of ADCs. Once these components are in hand, most ADCs are prepared by nonspecific modification of antibody lysine or cysteine residues with drug-linker reagents, which results in heterogeneous product mixtures that cannot be further purified. With advances in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering, there is growing interest in producing ADCs by site-specific conjugation to the antibody, yielding more homogeneous products that have demonstrated benefits over their heterogeneous counterparts in vivo. Here, we chronicle the development of a multitude of site-specific conjugation strategies for assembly of ADCs and provide a comprehensive account of key advances and their roots in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering.

  4. Glyco-engineering in Archaea: differential N-glycosylation of the S-layer glycoprotein in a transformed Haloferax volcanii strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2011-07-01

    Archaeal glycoproteins present a variety of N-linked glycans not seen elsewhere. The ability to harness the agents responsible for this unparalleled diversity offers the possibility of generating glycoproteins bearing tailored glycans, optimized for specific functions. With a well-defined N-glycosylation pathway and available genetic tools, the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii represents a suitable platform for such glyco-engineering efforts. In Hfx. volcanii, the S-layer glycoprotein is modified by an N-linked pentasaccharide. In the following, S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation was considered in cells in which AglD, the dolichol phosphate mannose synthase involved in addition of the final residue of the pentasaccharide, was replaced by a haloarchaeal homologue of AglJ, the enzyme involved in addition of the first residue of the N-linked pentasaccharide. In the engineering strain, the S-layer glycoprotein is modified by a novel N-linked glycan not found on this reporter from the parent strain. Moreover, deletion of AglD alone and introduction of the AglJ homologue from Halobacterium salinarum, OE2528R, into the deletion strain resulted in increased biosynthesis of the novel 894 Da glycan concomitant with reduced biogenesis of the pentasaccharide normally N-linked to the S-layer glycoprotein. These findings justify efforts designed to transform Hfx. volcanii into a glyco-engineering 'workshop'.

  5. Abolishment of N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation in glyco-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by double disruption of MNN4 and MNN14 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong Hun; Kang, Ji-Yeon; Gil, Jin Young; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Shin, Keun Koo; Kang, Hyun Ah; Kim, Jeong-Yoon; Kwon, Ohsuk; Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2017-04-01

    Mannosylphosphorylated glycans are found only in fungi, including yeast, and the elimination of mannosylphosphates from glycans is a prerequisite for yeast glyco-engineering to produce human-compatible glycoproteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MNN4 and MNN6 genes are known to play roles in mannosylphosphorylation, but disruption of these genes does not completely remove the mannosylphosphates in N-glycans. This study was performed to find unknown key gene(s) involved in N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation in S. cerevisiae. For this purpose, each of one MNN4 and five MNN6 homologous genes were deleted from the och1Δmnn1Δmnn4Δmnn6Δ strain, which lacks yeast-specific hyper-mannosylation and the immunogenic α(1,3)-mannose structure. N-glycan profile analysis of cell wall mannoproteins and a secretory recombinant protein produced in mutants showed that the MNN14 gene, an MNN4 paralog with unknown function, is essential for N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation. Double disruption of MNN4 and MNN14 genes was enough to eliminate N-glycan mannosylphosphorylation. Our results suggest that the S. cerevisiae och1Δmnn1Δmnn4Δmnn14Δ strain, in which all yeast-specific N-glycan structures including mannosylphosphorylation are abolished, may have promise as a useful platform for glyco-engineering to produce therapeutic glycoproteins with human-compatible N-glycans.

  6. Obinutuzumab (GA101) for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell non-hodgkin's lymphomas: a glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Valentin; Klein, Christian; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a humanized, monoclonal type II CD20 antibody modified by glycoengineering. The glycoengineered Fc portion enhances the binding affinity to the FcγRIII receptor on immune effector cells, resulting in increased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis. In addition, the type II antibody binding characteristics of obinutuzumab to CD20 lead to an efficient induction of direct non-apoptotic cell death. Preclinical data demonstrated more efficient B-cell depletion in whole blood and superior antitumor activity in xenograft models of obinutuzumab as compared to the type I CD20 antibody rituximab. In previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and comorbidities, obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil increased response rates and prolonged progression-free survival compared with rituximab plus chlorambucil. Obinutuzumab had an acceptable and manageable safety profile, with infusion-related reactions during the first infusion as the most common adverse event. Further phase I/II clinical trials have also shown promising activity in other CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Therefore, several clinical studies are planned or ongoing to investigate obinutuzumab with different combination partners in both untreated and relapsed/refractory patients with different B-cell NHL entities, which in addition to CLL include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  7. A Markov chain model for N-linked protein glycosylation--towards a low-parameter tool for model-driven glycoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Philipp N; Hansen, Anders H; Hansen, Henning G; Arnsdorf, Johnny; Kildegaard, Helene F; Lewis, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is a critical quality attribute of most recombinant biotherapeutics. Consequently, drug development requires careful control of glycoforms to meet bioactivity and biosafety requirements. However, glycoengineering can be extraordinarily difficult given the complex reaction networks underlying glycosylation and the vast number of different glycans that can be synthesized in a host cell. Computational modeling offers an intriguing option to rationally guide glycoengineering, but the high parametric demands of current modeling approaches pose challenges to their application. Here we present a novel low-parameter approach to describe glycosylation using flux-balance and Markov chain modeling. The model recapitulates the biological complexity of glycosylation, but does not require user-provided kinetic information. We use this method to predict and experimentally validate glycoprofiles on EPO, IgG as well as the endogenous secretome following glycosyltransferase knock-out in different Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Our approach offers a flexible and user-friendly platform that can serve as a basis for powerful computational engineering efforts in mammalian cell factories for biopharmaceutical production.

  8. Synthesis of polystyrene microspheres and functionalization with Pd(0) nanoparticles to perform bioorthogonal organometallic chemistry in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Johansson, Emma M V; Yusop, Rahimi M; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M; Bradley, Mark

    2012-05-31

    We have developed miniaturized heterogeneous Pd(0)-catalysts (Pd(0)-microspheres) with the ability to enter cells, stay harmlessly within the cytosol and mediate efficient bioorthogonal organometallic chemistries (e.g., allylcarbamate cleavage and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling). This approach is a major addition to the toolbox available for performing chemical reactions within cells. Here we describe a full protocol for the synthesis of the Pd(0)-microspheres from readily available starting materials (by the synthesis of size-controlled amino-functionalized polystyrene microspheres), as well as for their characterization (electron microscopy and palladium quantitation) and functional validation ('in solution' and 'in cytoplasm' conversions). From the beginning of the synthesis to functional evaluation of the catalytic device requires 5 d of work.

  9. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of obinutuzumab were applied to demonstrate a combination effect. Obinutuzumab plus bendamustine achieved superior tumor growth inhibition versus rituximab plus bendamustine and showed a statistically significant effect versus the respective single treatments. Combinations of obinutuzumab with fludarabine, chlorambucil or cyclophosphamide/vincristine demonstrated significantly superior activity to rituximab-based treatment. Obinutuzumab monotherapy was at least as effective as rituximab plus chemotherapy in vivo, and obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy was superior to the respective monotherapies. These data support further clinical investigation of obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy.

  10. Terminal alkenes as versatile chemical reporter groups for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späte, Anne-Katrin; Schart, Verena F; Schöllkopf, Sophie; Niederwieser, Andrea; Wittmann, Valentin

    2014-12-08

    The Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand (DAinv reaction) of 1,2,4,5-tetrazines with electron rich or strained alkenes was proven to be a bioorthogonal ligation reaction that proceeds fast and with high yields. An important application of the DAinv reaction is metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE) which allows the visualization of glycoconjugates in living cells. In this approach, a sugar derivative bearing a chemical reporter group is metabolically incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and subsequently derivatized with a probe by means of a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. Here, we investigated a series of new mannosamine and glucosamine derivatives with carbamate-linked side chains of varying length terminated by alkene groups and their suitability for labeling cell-surface glycans. Kinetic investigations showed that the reactivity of the alkenes in DAinv reactions increases with growing chain length. When applied to MOE, one of the compounds, peracetylated N-butenyloxycarbonylmannosamine, was especially well suited for labeling cell-surface glycans. Obviously, the length of its side chain represents the optimal balance between incorporation efficiency and speed of the labeling reaction. Sialidase treatment of the cells before the bioorthogonal labeling reaction showed that this sugar derivative is attached to the glycans in form of the corresponding sialic acid derivative and not epimerized to another hexosamine derivative to a considerable extent.

  11. First-in-Human Phase I Study of Lumretuzumab, a Glycoengineered Humanized Anti-HER3 Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients with Metastatic or Advanced HER3-Positive Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meulendijks, Didier; Jacob, Wolfgang; Martinez-Garcia, Maria

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: A first-in-human phase I study was conducted to characterize safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of lumretuzumab, a humanized and glycoengineered anti-HER3 monoclonal antibody, in patients with advanced cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Twenty......-time curve up to the last measurable concentration (AUClast) of lumretuzumab increased more than dose proportionally from 100 mg up to 400 mg. Linear PK was observed with doses ≥ 400 mg q2w indicating target-mediated drug disposition saturation. Downregulation of HER3 membranous protein was observed in on......-treatment tumor biopsies from 200 mg, and was maximal at and above 400 mg. An ex vivo assay demonstrated increased activation potential of peripheral NK lymphocytes with lumretuzumab compared with a non-glycoengineered anti-HER3 antibody. Ten patients (21.3%) had stable disease and remained on study at a median...

  12. Rapid detection, discovery, and identification of post-translationally myristoylated proteins during apoptosis using a bio-orthogonal azidomyristate analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dale D O; Vilas, Gonzalo L; Prescher, Jennifer A; Rajaiah, Gurram; Falck, John R; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Berthiaume, Luc G

    2008-03-01

    Myristoylation is the attachment of the 14-carbon fatty acid myristate to the N-terminal glycine residue of proteins. Typically a co-translational modification, myristoylation of proapoptotic cysteinyl-aspartyl proteases (caspase)-cleaved Bid and PAK2 was also shown to occur post-translationally and is essential for their proper localization and proapoptotic function. Progress in the identification and characterization of myristoylated proteins has been impeded by the long exposure times required to monitor incorporation of radioactive myristate into proteins (typically 1-3 months). Consequently, we developed a nonradioactive detection methodology in which a bio-orthogonal azidomyristate analog is specifically incorporated co- or post-translationally into proteins at N-terminal glycines, chemoselectively ligated to tagged triarylphosphines and detected by Western blotting with short exposure times (seconds to minutes). This represents over a million-fold signal amplification in comparison to using radioactive labeling methods. Using rational prediction analysis to recognize putative internal myristoylation sites in caspase-cleaved proteins combined with our nonradioactive chemical detection method, we identify 5 new post-translationally myristoylatable proteins (PKC epsilon, CD-IC2, Bap31, MST3, and the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase). We also demonstrate that 15 proteins undergo post-translational myristoylation in apoptotic Jurkat T cells. This suggests that post-translational myristoylation of caspase-cleaved proteins represents a novel mechanism widely used to regulate cell death.

  13. Phase 1 study results of the type II glycoengineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in B-cell lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Gilles; Morschhauser, Franck; Lamy, Thierry; Milpied, Noel; Thieblemont, Catherine; Tilly, Hervé; Bieska, Gabi; Asikanius, Elina; Carlile, David; Birkett, Joe; Pisa, Pavel; Cartron, Guillaume

    2012-05-31

    Whereas the chimeric type I anti-CD20 Ab rituximab has improved outcomes for patients with B-cell malignancies significantly, many patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remain incurable. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 type II Ab that has demonstrated superior activity against type I Abs in vitro and in preclinical studies. In the present study, we evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of GA101 in a phase 1 study of 21 patients with heavily pretreated, relapsed, or refractory CD20(+) indolent NHL. Patients received GA101 in a dose-escalating fashion (3 per cohort, range 50/100-1200/2000 mg) for 8 × 21-day cycles. The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grades 1 and 2 (114 of 132 total AEs). Seven patients reported a total of 18 grade 3 or 4 AEs. Infusion-related reactions were the most common AE, with most occurring during the first infusion and resolving with appropriate management. Three patients experienced grade 3 or 4 drug-related infusion-related reactions. The best overall response was 43%, with 5 complete responses and 4 partial responses. Data from this study suggest that GA101 was well tolerated and demonstrated encouraging activity in patients with previously treated NHL up to doses of 2000 mg. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00517530.

  14. Crystallization of a fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase expressed from glycoengineered Pichia pastoris for X-ray and neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dell, William B.; Swartz, Paul D.; Weiss, Kevin L.; Meilleur, Flora

    2017-01-19

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are carbohydrate-disrupting enzymes secreted by bacteria and fungi that break glycosidic bondsviaan oxidative mechanism. Fungal LPMOs typically act on cellulose and can enhance the efficiency of cellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes that release soluble sugars for bioethanol production or other industrial uses. The enzyme PMO-2 fromNeurospora crassa(NcPMO-2) was heterologously expressed inPichia pastoristo facilitate crystallographic studies of the fungal LPMO mechanism. Diffraction resolution and crystal morphology were improved by expressingNcPMO-2 from a glycoengineered strain ofP. pastorisand by the use of crystal seeding methods, respectively. These improvements resulted in high-resolution (1.20 Å) X-ray diffraction data collection at 100 K and the production of a largeNcPMO-2 crystal suitable for room-temperature neutron diffraction data collection to 2.12 Å resolution.

  15. Freely turning over palmitate in erythrocyte membrane proteins is not responsible for the anchoring of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton: a study with bio-orthogonal chemical probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Hannoush, Rami N; Risso, Angela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2013-03-01

    Erythrocyte lipid rafts are anchored to the underlying spectrin membrane skeleton [A. Ciana, C. Achilli, C. Balduini, G. Minetti, On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1808 (2011) 183-190]. The nature of this linkage and the molecules involved are poorly understood. The interaction is sensitive to the increase in pH and ionic strength induced by carbonate. Given the role of palmitoylation in modulating the partitioning of certain proteins between various sub-cellular compartments and the plasma membrane, we asked whether palmitoylation of p55, a peripheral protein located at the junctional complex between spectrin-actin-protein 4.1 that anchors the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer via the transmembrane protein glycophorin C, could contribute to the anchoring of lipid rafts to the membrane skeleton. We adopted a new, non-radioactive method for studying protein palmitoylation, based on bio-orthogonal chemical analogues of fatty acids, containing an omega-alkynyl group, to metabolically label cell proteins, which are then revealed by a "click chemistry" reaction of the alkynyl moiety with an azide-containing reporter tag. We show that the membrane localization and palmitoylation levels of p55 did not change after carbonate treatment. 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin, two known palmitoylation inhibitors, completely inhibited p55 palmitoylation, and protein palmitoyl thioesterase-1 (PPT1) reduced it, without affecting the association between lipid rafts and membrane-skeleton, indicating, on the one hand, that p55 palmitoylation is enzymatic, and, on the other, that it is not involved in the modulation of the linkage of lipid rafts to the membrane-skeleton.

  16. Non-invasive stem cell tracking in hindlimb ischemia animal model using bio-orthogonal copper-free click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Si Yeon; Lee, Sangmin; Lee, Jangwook; Yhee, Ji Young; Yoon, Hwa In; Park, Soon-Jung; Koo, Heebeom; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Hyukjin; Cho, Yong Woo; Kang, Sun Woong; Lee, Sang-Yup; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-10-28

    Labeling of stem cells aims to distinguish transplanted cells from host cells, understand in vivo fate of transplanted cells, particularly important in stem cell therapy. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are considered as an emerging therapeutic option for tissue regeneration, but much remains to be understood regarding the in vivo evidence. In this study, a simple and efficient cell labeling method for labeling and tracking of stem cells was developed based on bio-orthogonal copper-free click chemistry, and it was applied in a mouse hindlimb ischemia model. The human ASCs were treated with tetra-acetylated N-azidoacetyl-d-mannosamine (Ac4ManNAz) to generate glycoprotein with unnatural azide groups on the cell surface, and the generated azide groups were fluorescently labeled by specific binding of dibenzylcyclooctyne-conjugated Cy5 (DBCO-Cy5). The safe and long-term labeling of the hASCs by this method was first investigated in vitro. Then the DBCO-Cy5-hASCs were transplanted into the hindlimb ischemia mice model, and we could monitor and track in vivo fate of the cells using optical imaging system. We could clearly observe the migration potent of the hASCs toward the ischemic lesion. This approach to design and tailor new method for labeling of stem cells may be useful to provide better understanding on the therapeutic effects of transplanted stem cells into the target diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In situ forming hydrogels via catalyst-free and bioorthogonal "tetrazole-alkene" photo-click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yaping; Deng, Chao; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-08-12

    In situ forming hydrogels were developed from 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-methacrylate (PEG-4-MA) and -tetrazole (PEG-4-Tet) derivatives through catalyst-free and bioorthogonal "tetrazole-alkene" photo-click chemistry. PEG-4-MA and PEG-4-Tet (Mn = 10 kg/mol) were soluble at 37 °C in phosphate buffer (PB, pH 7.4, 10 mM) at total polymer concentrations ranging from 20 to 60 wt % but formed fluorescent hydrogels upon 365 nm UV irradiation at an intensity of 20.6, 30.7, or 60 mW/cm(2). The gelation times ranged from ca. 50 s to 5 min, and storage moduli varied from 0.65 to 25.2 kPa depending on polymer concentrations and degrees of Tet substitution in PEG-4-Tet conjugates. The cell experiments via an indirect contact assay demonstrated that these "tetrazole-alkene" photo-click PEG hydrogels were noncytotoxic. The high specificity of photo-click reaction renders thus obtained PEG hydrogels particularly interesting for controlled protein release. Notably, in vitro release studies showed that cytochrome c (CC), γ-globulins (Ig), and recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) all were released from PEG hydrogels in a sustained and quantitative manner over a period of 14-20 days. Importantly, released CC and rhIL-2 exhibited comparable biological activities to native CC and rhIL-2, respectively. These results confirm that "tetrazole-alkene" photo-click reaction is highly compatible with these loaded proteins. This photo-controlled, specific, efficient, and catalyst-free click chemistry provides a new and versatile strategy to in situ forming hydrogels that hold tremendous potentials for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  18. An efficient bioorthogonal strategy using CuAAC click chemistry for radiofluorinations of SNEW peptides and the role of copper depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretze, Marc; Kuchar, Manuela; Bergmann, Ralf; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2013-06-01

    The EphB2 receptor is known to be overexpressed in various types of cancer and is therefore a promising target for tumor cell imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). In this regard, imaging could facilitate the early detection of EphB2-overexpressing tumors, monitoring responses to therapy directed toward EphB2, and thus improvement in patient outcomes. We report the synthesis and evaluation of several fluorine-18-labeled peptides containing the SNEW amino acid motif, with high affinity for the EphB2 receptor, for their potential as radiotracers in the non-invasive imaging of cancer using PET. For the purposes of radiofluorination, EphB2-antagonistic SNEW peptides were varied at the C terminus by the introduction of L-cysteine, and further by alkyne- or azide-modified amino acids. In addition, two novel bifunctional and bioorthogonal labeling building blocks [(18)F]AFP and [(18)F]BFP were applied, and their capacity to introduce fluorine-18 was compared with that of the established building block [(18)F]FBAM. Copper-assisted Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, which belongs to the set of bioorthogonal click chemistry reactions, was used to introduce both novel building blocks into azide- or alkyne-modified SNEW peptides under mild conditions. Finally, the depletion of copper immediately after radiolabeling is a highly important step of this novel methodology.

  19. Metabolic monosaccharides altered cell responses to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering has been used to manipulate the glycochemistry of cell surfaces and thus the cell/cell interaction, cell adhesion, and cell migration. However, potential application of glycoengineering in pharmaceutical sciences has not been studied until recently. Here, we reported that Ac(4)ManNAc, an analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), could affect cell responses to anticancer drugs. Although cells from different tissues and organs responded to Ac(4)ManNAc treatment differently, treated cells with increased sialic acid contents showed dramatically reduced sensitivity (up to 130 times) to anti-cancer drugs as tested on various drugs with distinct chemical structures and acting mechanisms. Neither increased P-glycoprotein activity nor decreased drug uptake was observed during the course of Ac(4)ManNAc treatment. However, greatly altered intracellular drug distributions were observed. Most intracellular daunorubicin was found in the perinuclear region, but not the expected nuclei in the Ac(4)ManNAc treated cells. Since sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides were synthesized in the Golgi, intracellular glycans affected intracellular signal transduction and drug distributions seem to be the main reason for Ac(4)ManNAc affected cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. It was interesting to find that although Ac(4)ManNAc treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) maintained the same sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil, the IC(50) value of 5-Fluorouracil to the same Ac(4)ManNAc treated normal cells (MCF-10A) was increased by more than 20 times. Thus, this Ac(4)ManNAc treatment enlarged drug response difference between normal and tumor cells provides a unique opportunity to further improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs.

  20. Preparation of tetrazine-containing [2 + 1] complexes of (99m)Tc and in vivo targeting using bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Abdolreza; Janzen, Nancy; Czorny, Shannon; Ungard, Robert G; Miladinovic, Tanya; Singh, Gurmit; Valliant, John F

    2017-06-22

    The aim of this work was to synthesize and evaluate [2 + 1] (99m)Tc(i) polypyridine complexes containing tetrazines, which along with the corresponding Re(i) complexes, represent a new class of isostructural nuclear and turn-on luminescent probes that can be derivatized and targeted using bioorthogonal chemistry. To this end, [2 + 1] complexes of (99m)Tc(i) of the type [(99m)Tc(CO)3(N^N)(L)] (N^N = bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPS) or 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy)), where the monodentate ligand (L) was a tetrazine linked to the metal through an imidazole derivative, were prepared. The desired products were obtained in nearly quantitative radiochemical yield by adding [(99m)Tc(CO)3(N^N)(OH2)](n) to the imidazole-tetrazine ligand and heating at 60 °C for 30 min. Measurement of the reaction kinetics between the tetrazine and (E)-cyclooct-4-enol revealed a second-order rate constant of 8.6 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) at 37 °C, which is suitable for in vivo applications that require rapid coupling. Stability studies showed that the metal complexes were resistant to ligand challenge and exhibited reasonable protein binding in vitro. Biodistribution studies of the more water-soluble BPS derivative in normal mice, one hour after administration of a bisphosphonate derivative of trans-cyclooctene (TCO-BP), revealed high activity concentrations in the knee (9.3 ± 0.3 %ID g(-1)) and shoulder (5.3 ± 0.7 %ID g(-1)). Using the same pretargeting approach, SPECT/CT imaging showed that the [2 + 1] tetrazine complex localized to implanted skeletal tumors. This is the first report of the preparation of (99m)Tc complexes of BPS and demonstration that their tetrazine derivatives can be used to prepare targeted imaging probes by employing bioorthogonal chemistry.

  1. Unnatural Amino Acid Mediated Protein Bioorthogonal Labeling%基于非天然氨基酸的蛋白质生物正交标记

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李劼; 王杰; 陈鹏

    2012-01-01

    生物正交化学反应正日益成为在活体内对生物大分子进行特异标记的一种有效方法.最近涌现出的一个突出的例子是将金属钯催化的碳碳偶联反应这一在有机合成领域具有里程碑意义的反应拓展到生物大分子的标记上.在活细胞上进行生物正交反应的一个先决条件是需要将参与这类反应的正交官能团特异地引入到目标生物大分子当中.遗传密码子拓展技术是将多种生物正交活性基团引入到蛋白质当中的一种先进的手段;最近发展出的基于吡咯赖氨酸氨酰合成酶和tRNA的体系能够将携带有生物正交官能团的非天然氨基酸有效地引入到原核生物、真核生物,甚至是动物体内的蛋白质上.在这一展望中,我们首先介绍在生物正交反应和遗传密码子拓展这两个领域内的研究前沿与进展.接着我们将讨论将这些新发展的研究工具,尤其是基于钯催化的生物正交反应和基于吡咯赖氨酸氨酰合成酶的遗传密码子拓展技术,应用于标记和修饰哺乳动物细胞蛋白质上的优势和诱人前景.生物相兼容性更好的正交反应和更为灵活的非天然氨基酸引入技术必将有力地增强和拓宽人们在活细胞环境下特异操纵蛋白质的能力.%The bioorthogonal chemistry has become a valuable tool for specific labeling of biomolecules in living systems. One emerging example is to convert the palladium-mediated carbon-carbon bond formation reaction, a landmark reaction in organic synthesis, into the biocompatible reaction for biomolecule modifications. A prerequisite to enable such reactions to be executed on biological samples is to incorporate the corresponding bioorthogonal functional groups into target biomolecules. The genetic code expansion strategy is a leading technology on introducing diverse bioorthogonal functionalities into pro- teins, and the most recently developed pyrrolysine system can now allow

  2. Glycoengineered Monoclonal Antibodies with Homogeneous Glycan (M3, G0, G2, and A2 Using a Chemoenzymatic Approach Have Different Affinities for FcγRIIIa and Variable Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kurogochi

    Full Text Available Many therapeutic antibodies have been developed, and IgG antibodies have been extensively generated in various cell expression systems. IgG antibodies contain N-glycans at the constant region of the heavy chain (Fc domain, and their N-glycosylation patterns differ during various processes or among cell expression systems. The Fc N-glycan can modulate the effector functions of IgG antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. To control Fc N-glycans, we performed a rearrangement of Fc N-glycans from a heterogeneous N-glycosylation pattern to homogeneous N-glycans using chemoenzymatic approaches with two types of endo-β-N-acetyl glucosaminidases (ENG'ases, one that works as a hydrolase to cleave all heterogeneous N-glycans, another that is used as a glycosynthase to generate homogeneous N-glycans. As starting materials, we used an anti-Her2 antibody produced in transgenic silkworm cocoon, which consists of non-fucosylated pauci-mannose type (Man2-3GlcNAc2, high-mannose type (Man4-9GlcNAc2, and complex type (Man3GlcNAc3-4 N-glycans. As a result of the cleavage of several ENG'ases (endoS, endoM, endoD, endoH, and endoLL, the heterogeneous glycans on antibodies were fully transformed into homogeneous-GlcNAc by a combination of endoS, endoD, and endoLL. Next, the desired N-glycans (M3; Man3GlcNAc1, G0; GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, G2; Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, A2; NeuAc2Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1 were transferred from the corresponding oxazolines to the GlcNAc residue on the intact anti-Her2 antibody with an ENG'ase mutant (endoS-D233Q, and the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody was obtained. The binding assay of anti-Her2 antibody with homogenous N-glycans with FcγRIIIa-V158 showed that the glycoform influenced the affinity for FcγRIIIa-V158. In addition, the ADCC assay for the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody (mAb-M3, mAb-G0, mAb-G2, and mAb-A2 was performed using SKBR-3 and BT-474 as target

  3. High-sensitive bioorthogonal SERS tag for live cancer cell imaging by self-assembling core-satellites structure gold-silver nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Zhang, Ling; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2017-09-01

    A novel, high-sensitivity, biocompatible SERS tag with core-shell structure based on gold nanoparticles containing alkynyl molecule core -silver nanoparticle satellites shell was fabricated for the first time to be used for live cancer cells Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging. (E)-2-((4-(phenylethynyl)benzylidene) amino) ethanethiol (PBAT) synthesized facilely in our lab is the Raman-silence region reporter which is advantage for bioorthogonal SERS cell imaging. In order to enhance the intensity of the Raman tags for live cancer cell imaging, a series of news measures have been adopted. Firstly, reporter molecules of the PBAT were added twice, which is embedded in the gold core with the reduction of tetrachloroaurate and then PBAT is conjugated again on disperse gold nanoparticles (PBAT-Au). Furthermore, numerous Ag nanoparticles self-assembly were densely arranged around PBAT-Au core surface (PBAT- Au@Ag), just like a circle of satellites cluster, which produce obvious "hot spots" effects enhancing the signal of the Raman tags enormously. Finally, Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and polydopamine (PDA) coated on the PBAT- Au@Ag successively, defined as (PBAT-Au@Ag@BSA@PDA), which make as-synthesized nanocomposites own features of bio-compatibility and facilitates antibody modification. Compared with Au@PBAT@PDA, PBAT-Au@Ag@BSA@PDA with core-shell satellites structure showed 10-fold increase in the Raman signals intensity. Moreover, PBAT-Au@Ag@BSA@PDA nanocomposites were successfully applied in the Raman imaging of human glioma cells (U251) by the recognition of the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). All experimental results demonstrated that the nanocomposites have high value and huge potential application in the live cancer cells imaging and biomedical diagnostics in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioorthogonal Catalysis: A General Method To Evaluate Metal-Catalyzed Reactions in Real Time in Living Systems Using a Cellular Luciferase Reporter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Trantow, Brian M; Waymouth, Robert M; Wender, Paul A

    2016-02-17

    The development of abiological catalysts that can function in biological systems is an emerging subject of importance with significant ramifications in synthetic chemistry and the life sciences. Herein we report a biocompatible ruthenium complex [Cp(MQA)Ru(C3H5)](+)PF6(-) 2 (Cp = cyclopentadienyl, MQA = 4-methoxyquinoline-2-carboxylate) and a general analytical method for evaluating its performance in real time based on a luciferase reporter system amenable to high throughput screening in cells and by extension to evaluation in luciferase transgenic animals. Precatalyst 2 activates alloc-protected aminoluciferin 4b, a bioluminescence pro-probe, and releases the active luminophore, aminoluciferin (4a), in the presence of luciferase-transfected cells. The formation and enzymatic turnover of 4a, an overall process selected because it emulates pro-drug activation and drug turnover by an intracellular target, is evaluated in real time by photon counting as 4a is converted by intracellular luciferase to oxyaminoluciferin and light. Interestingly, while the catalytic conversion (activation) of 4b to 4a in water produces multiple products, the presence of biological nucleophiles such as thiols prevents byproduct formation and provides almost exclusively luminophore 4a. Our studies show that precatalyst 2 activates 4b extracellularly, exhibits low toxicity at concentrations relevant to catalysis, and is comparably effective in two different cell lines. This proof of concept study shows that precatalyst 2 is a promising lead for bioorthogonal catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy, similarly activatable pro-drugs. More generally, this study provides an analytical method to measure abiological catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy with our earlier studies on pro-Taxol, similarly activatable pro-drugs in real time using a coupled biological catalyst that mediates a bioluminescent readout, providing tools for the study of imaging signal amplification

  5. Ublituximab (TG-1101), a novel glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibody, in combination with ibrutinib is safe and highly active in patients with relapsed and/or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: results of a phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Jeff P; Farber, Charles M; Mahadevan, Daruka; Schreeder, Marshall T; Brooks, Heather D; Kolibaba, Kathryn S; Fanning, Suzanne; Klein, Leonard; Greenwald, Daniel R; Sportelli, Peter; Miskin, Hari P; Weiss, Michael S; Burke, John M

    2017-02-01

    Ibrutinib is effective in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); however, treatment resistance remains a problem. Ublituximab is a novel, glycoengineered anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with single-agent activity in relapsed CLL. We report the results of a phase 2 study evaluating combination therapy with ibrutinib and ublituximab in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients received ibrutinib 420 mg once daily. Ublituximab was administered on days 1, 8 and 15 of cycle 1 followed by day 1 of cycles 2-6. Response assessments were completed at cycles 3 and 6; patients then continued on ibrutinib monotherapy per standard of care. Forty-one of 45 enrolled patients were evaluable for efficacy. Safety was consistent with prior experience for each drug, with infusion reactions the most prevalent adverse event. Combination therapy resulted in an overall response rate (ORR) of 88% at 6 months. In the 20 patients with high-risk features (17p or 11q deletions or TP53 mutation) and evaluable for efficacy, the ORR was 95%, with three patients (15%) achieving negative minimal residual disease. Median time to response was 8 weeks. Ublituximab in combination with ibrutinib resulted in rapid and high response rates. The long-term clinical benefit of ublituximab will be defined by an ongoing phase 3 trial (NCT 02301156).

  6. Direct imaging of glycans in Arabidopsis roots via click labeling of metabolically incorporated azido-monosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Jorin; Berghuis, Nathalja; Cramer, Dario; Geurts, Rene; Zuilhof, Han; Wennekes, Tom

    2016-10-10

    Carbohydrates, also called glycans, play a crucial but not fully understood role in plant health and development. The non-template driven formation of glycans makes it impossible to image them in vivo with genetically encoded fluorescent tags and related molecular biology approaches. A solution to this problem is the use of tailor-made glycan analogs that are metabolically incorporated by the plant into its glycans. These metabolically incorporated probes can be visualized, but techniques documented so far use toxic copper-catalyzed labeling. To further expand our knowledge of plant glycobiology by direct imaging of its glycans via this method, there is need for novel click-compatible glycan analogs for plants that can be bioorthogonally labelled via copper-free techniques. Arabidopsis seedlings were incubated with azido-containing monosaccharide analogs of N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, L-fucose, and L-arabinofuranose. These azido-monosaccharides were metabolically incorporated in plant cell wall glycans of Arabidopsis seedlings. Control experiments indicated active metabolic incorporation of the azido-monosaccharide analogs into glycans rather than through non-specific absorption of the glycan analogs onto the plant cell wall. Successful copper-free labeling reactions were performed, namely an inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction using an incorporated N-acetylglucosamine analog, and a strain-promoted azide-alkyne click reaction. All evaluated azido-monosaccharide analogs were observed to be non-toxic at the used concentrations under normal growth conditions. Our results for the metabolic incorporation and fluorescent labeling of these azido-monosaccharide analogs expand the possibilities for studying plant glycans by direct imaging. Overall we successfully evaluated five azido-monosaccharide analogs for their ability to be metabolically incorporated in Arabidopsis roots and their imaging after fluorescent labeling. This expands

  7. Bioorthogonal phase-directed copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (PDCuAAC) coupling of selectively cross-linked superoxide dismutase dimers produces a fully active bis-dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siren, Erika M J; Singh, Serena; Kluger, Ronald

    2015-10-28

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a 32 kDa dimeric enzyme that actively removes a toxic oxygen species within red cells. The acellular protein itself does not survive circulation as it is filtered through the kidney. Conjugating the protein to another SOD should increase the size of the dual protein above the threshold for filtration by the kidney, making the material a potential therapeutic in circulation. Site-selective chemical cross-linking of SOD introduces a bioorthogonal azide group on the cross-link so that two SODs react efficiently with a bis-alkyne through phase-directed copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (PDCuAAC). The modification has a negligible effect on the catalytic activity of the constituent proteins. Consistent with the retained activity, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy indicates that the secondary structures of the proteins are similar to that of the native protein.

  8. An azide-modified nucleoside for metabolic labeling of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Anne B; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2014-04-14

    Metabolic incorporation of azido nucleoside analogues into living cells can enable sensitive detection of DNA replication through copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) "click" reactions. One major limitation to this approach is the poor chemical stability of nucleoside derivatives containing an aryl azide group. For example, 5-azido-2'-deoxyuridine (AdU) exhibits a 4 h half-life in water, and it gives little or no detectable labeling of cellular DNA. In contrast, the benzylic azide 5-(azidomethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (AmdU) is stable in solution at 37 °C, and it gives robust labeling of cellular DNA upon addition of fluorescent alkyne derivatives. In addition to providing the first examples of metabolic incorporation into and imaging of azide groups in cellular DNA, these results highlight the general importance of assessing azide group stability in bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Dynamic metabolic labeling of DNA in vivo with arabinosyl nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Anne B; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2011-12-20

    Commonly used metabolic labels for DNA, including 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and BrdU, are toxic antimetabolites that cause DNA instability, necrosis, and cell-cycle arrest. In addition to perturbing biological function, these properties can prevent metabolic labeling studies where subsequent tissue survival is needed. To bypass the metabolic pathways responsible for toxicity, while maintaining the ability to be metabolically incorporated into DNA, we synthesized and evaluated a small family of arabinofuranosyl-ethynyluracil derivatives. Among these, (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-5-ethynyluridine (F-ara-EdU) exhibited selective DNA labeling, yet had a minimal impact on genome function in diverse tissue types. Metabolic incorporation of F-ara-EdU into DNA was readily detectable using copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne "click" reactions with fluorescent azides. F-ara-EdU is less toxic than both BrdU and EdU, and it can be detected with greater sensitivity in experiments where long-term cell survival and/or deep-tissue imaging are desired. In contrast to previously reported 2'-arabino modified nucleosides and EdU, F-ara-EdU causes little or no cellular arrest or DNA synthesis inhibition. F-ara-EdU is therefore ideally suited for pulse-chase experiments aimed at "birth dating" DNA in vivo. As a demonstration, Zebrafish embryos were microinjected with F-ara-EdU at the one-cell stage and chased by BrdU at 10 h after fertilization. Following 3 d of development, complex patterns of quiescent/senescent cells containing only F-ara-EdU were observed in larvae along the dorsal side of the notochord and epithelia. Arabinosyl nucleoside derivatives therefore provide unique and effective means to introduce bioorthogonal functional groups into DNA for diverse applications in basic research, biotechnology, and drug discovery.

  10. Metabolic acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acidosis - metabolic ... Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not ... the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ...

  11. Metabolic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  12. Metabolic Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The BMP checks your blood sugar, calcium, and ... as creatinine to check your kidney function. The CMP includes all of those tests, as well as ...

  13. Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or ...

  14. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  15. [Metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Masanori; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is consisted of hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, is one of the most significant lifestyle-related disorders that lead to cardiovascular diseases. Among many upstream factors that are related to metabolic syndrome, obesity, especially visceral obesity, plays an essential role in its pathogenesis. In recent studies, possible mechanisms which connect obesity to metabolic syndrome have been elucidated, such as inflammation, abnormal secretion of adipokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome; and illustrate how visceral obesity contributes to, and how the treatments for obesity act on metabolic syndrome.

  16. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  17. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  18. Expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-immunoglobulin G1 Fc fusion protein in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris%人Ⅱ型肿瘤坏死因子受体-免疫球蛋白G1Fc融合蛋白在糖基工程化毕赤酵母中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高新; 宋海峰; 林殿海; 杨小盼; 万德友; 陈枢青

    2012-01-01

    Objective To express the tumor necrosis factor receptor-immunoglobulin Gl Fc fusion ( TNFR-Fc ) in Pichia pastoris and study the effect of N-glycoengineered process on the protein bioactⅣity. Methods The cDNA encoding TNFR-Fc fusion protein was subcloned into pPIC6αA vector to construct the expression plasmid pPIC6-TF that was transformed into the GSB, a glycoengineered P. pastoris strain. Positive colonies were selected by YPD culture containing blasti-cidin and further screened by induced expression on cellulose acetate and nitrocellulose membrane with HRP labeled human IgG. The TNFR-Fc/GSB57 strain, whose expression level was higher, was cultured in 10L fermentor. Purified TNFR-Fc was obtained by Protein A affinity chromatography from the fermentation. Results BioactⅣity analysis showed that the purified protein could neutralize the cytotoxicity of 5×104U /L TNFα to L929 cells ( EC50 1.48 μmol/L). Conclusion The activity of recombinant TNFR-Fc expressed in glycoengineered P. pastoris is higher than that of the wild type one, but still lower than that expressed in CHO. N-glycan should be further modified.%目的 在糖基工程化毕赤酵母中表达人Ⅱ型肿瘤坏死因子受体-免疫球蛋白G1 Fc融合蛋白(tumor necrosis factor receptor-immunoglobulin G1 Fc fusion,TNFR-Fc),考察糖基工程化过程对其活性的影响.方法 将编码TNFR-Fc的cDNA序列插入毕赤酵母表达载体pPIC6αA中,构建重组表达质粒pPIC6-TF.用表达质粒转染N-糖基化工程改造的毕赤酵母菌株GSB,在含有杀稻瘟菌素的YPD平板上进行筛选.然后再使用HRP标记的羊抗人IgG在醋酸-硝酸纤维素双层膜上进行斑点印迹(dot-blot)筛选.选择表达量较高的工程菌株TNFR-Fc/GSB57进行高密度培养,通过Protein A亲和层析从发酵上清中纯化融合蛋白,利用鼠L929细胞对融合蛋白的抗TNFα活性进行分析.结果 通过筛选获得了表达人Ⅱ型肿瘤坏死因子受体-Fc融合蛋白的表达

  19. Metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Salim

    2007-01-01

    Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortality despite improvement in acid-base parameters. Further studies are required to determine the optimal treatment strategies for acute metabolic acidosis.

  20. 6-alkynyl fucose is a bioorthogonal analog for O-fucosylation of epidermal growth factor-like repeats and thrombospondin type-1 repeats by protein O-fucosyltransferases 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shareffi, Esam; Chaubard, Jean-Luc; Leonhard-Melief, Christina; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Wong, Chi-Huey; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2013-02-01

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) and protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (Pofut2) add O-linked fucose at distinct consensus sequences in properly folded epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats and thrombospondin type-1 (TSR) repeats, respectively. Glycan chain elongation past O-fucose can occur to yield a tetrasaccharide on EGF repeats and a disaccharide on TSRs. Elimination of Pofut1 in mice causes embryonic lethality with Notch-like phenotypes demonstrating that O-fucosylation of Notch is essential for its function. Similarly, elimination of Pofut2 results in an early embryonic lethal phenotype in mice, although the molecular mechanism for the lethality is unknown. The recent development of sugar analogs has revolutionized the study of glycans by providing a convenient method for labeling and tracking glycosylation. In order to study O-fucosylation, we took advantage of the recently developed reporter, 6-alkynyl fucose. Using the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), or "click" reaction, azido-biotin allows tagging and detection of 6AF-modified proteins. Here we examine whether proteins containing EGF repeats or TSRs with O-fucose consensus sequences are specifically modified with 6AF in cell culture. Using mass spectrometry (MS), we demonstrate that 6AF is efficiently incorporated onto the appropriate consensus sequences on EGF repeats and TSRs. Furthermore, the elongation of the O-fucose monosaccharide on EGF repeats and TSRs is not hampered when 6AF is used. These results show that 6AF is efficiently utilized in a truly bioorthogonal manner by Pofut1, Pofut2 and the enzymes that elongate O-fucose, providing evidence that 6AF is a significant new tool in the study of protein O-fucosylation.

  1. Regioisomeric SCFA attachment to hexosamines separates metabolic flux from cytotoxicity and MUC1 suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Udayanath; Campbell, Christopher T; Elmouelhi, Noha; Weier, Christopher A; Sampathkumar, S-Gopalan; Choi, Sean S; Yarema, Kevin J

    2008-04-18

    Chemical biology studies, exemplified by metabolic glycoengineering experiments that employ short chain fatty acid (SCFA)-hexosamine monosaccharide hybrid molecules, often suffer from off-target effects. Here we demonstrate that systematic structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies can deconvolute multiple biological activities of SCFA-hexosamine analogues by demonstrating that triacylated monosaccharides, including both n-butyrate- and acetate-modified ManNAc analogues, had dramatically different activities depending on whether the free hydroxyl group was at the C1 or C6 position. The C1-OH (hemiacetal) analogues enhanced growth inhibition in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and suppressed expression of MUC1, which are attractive properties for an anticancer agent. By contrast, C6-OH analogues supported high metabolic flux into the sialic acid pathway with negligible growth inhibition or toxicity, which are desirable properties for glycan labeling in healthy cells. Importantly, these SAR were general, applying to other hexosamines ( e.g., GlcNAc) and non-natural sugar "scaffolds" ( e.g., ManNLev). From a practical standpoint, the ability to separate toxicity from flux will facilitate the use of MOE analogues for cancer treatment and glycomics applications, respectively. Mechanistically, these findings overturn the premise that the bioactivities of SCFA-monosaccharide hybrid molecules result from their hydrolysis products ( e.g., n-butyrate, which acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and ManNAc, which activates sialic acid biosynthesis); instead the SAR establish that inherent properties of partially acylated hexosamines supersede the cellular responses supported by either the acyl or monosaccharide moieties.

  2. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance syndrome, low HDL cholesterol, Metabolic Syndrome, overweight, syndrome x, type 2 diabetes Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Women January 2005 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  5. Lipid Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008393 Effects of angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor blocker on triglyceride metabolism in the liver: experiment with Zucker fatty rats. RAN Jianmin(冉建民), et al. Dept Endocrinol, Guangzhou Red Cross Hosp, 4th Hosp Med Coll, Jinan Univ, Guangzhou 510220. Natl Med J China 2008;88(22):1557-1561. Objective To investigate the effects of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) on triglyceride (TG) metabolism and mechanism thereof.

  6. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  7. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  8. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  9. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  10. Bioorthogonal probes for imaging sterols in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Cindy Y; Nedelcu, Daniel; Lopez, Lyle V; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Welti, Ruth; Salic, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol is a fundamental lipid component of eukaryotic membranes and a precursor of potent signaling molecules, such as oxysterols and steroid hormones. Cholesterol and oxysterols are also essential for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Despite their importance, the use of imaging sterols in cells is currently very limited. We introduce a robust and versatile method for sterol microscopy based on C19 alkyne cholesterol and oxysterol analogues. These sterol analogues are fully functional; they rescue growth of cholesterol auxotrophic cells and faithfully recapitulate the multiple roles that sterols play in Hedgehog signal transduction. Alkyne sterol analogues incorporate efficiently into cellular membranes and can be imaged with high resolution after copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction with fluorescent azides. We demonstrate the use of alkyne sterol probes for visualizing the subcellular distribution of cholesterol and for two-color imaging of sterols and choline phospholipids. Our imaging strategy should be broadly applicable to studying the role of sterols in normal physiology and disease.

  11. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  12. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  13. Profiling metabolic networks to study cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Karsten; Metallo, Christian M

    2013-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of unregulated cell growth and survival, and tumors reprogram biochemical pathways to aid these processes. New capabilities in the computational and bioanalytical characterization of metabolism have now emerged, facilitating the identification of unique metabolic dependencies that arise in specific cancers. By understanding the metabolic phenotype of cancers as a function of their oncogenic profiles, metabolic engineering may be applied to design synthetically lethal therapies for some tumors. This process begins with accurate measurement of metabolic fluxes. Here we review advanced methods of quantifying pathway activity and highlight specific examples where these approaches have uncovered potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Metabolism disrupting chemicals and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, Jerrold J; Blumberg, Bruce; Cave, Mathew; Machtinger, Ronit; Mantovani, Alberto; Mendez, Michelle A; Nadal, Angel; Palanza, Paola; Panzica, Giancarlo; Sargis, Robert; Vandenberg, Laura N; Vom Saal, Frederick

    2017-03-01

    The recent epidemics of metabolic diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes(T2D), liver lipid disorders and metabolic syndrome have largely been attributed to genetic background and changes in diet, exercise and aging. However, there is now considerable evidence that other environmental factors may contribute to the rapid increase in the incidence of these metabolic diseases. This review will examine changes to the incidence of obesity, T2D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the contribution of genetics to these disorders and describe the role of the endocrine system in these metabolic disorders. It will then specifically focus on the role of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the etiology of obesity, T2D and NAFLD while finally integrating the information on EDCs on multiple metabolic disorders that could lead to metabolic syndrome. We will specifically examine evidence linking EDC exposures during critical periods of development with metabolic diseases that manifest later in life and across generations.

  15. Mangiferin modulation of metabolism and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Ekaterina Vladimirovna; Chi, Yuling

    2016-09-10

    The recent emergence of a worldwide epidemic of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes, demands effective strategy to develop nutraceuticals or pharmaceuticals to halt this trend. Natural products have long been and continue to be an attractive source of nutritional and pharmacological therapeutics. One such natural product is mangiferin (MGF), the predominant constituent of extracts of the mango plant Mangifera indica L. Reports on biological and pharmacological effects of MGF increased exponentially in recent years. MGF has documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies indicate that it modulates multiple biological processes involved in metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. MGF has been shown to improve metabolic abnormalities and disorders in animal models and humans. This review focuses on the recently reported biological and pharmacological effects of MGF on metabolism and metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(5):492-503, 2016.

  16. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  17. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Daanen, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced metabolism. van Marken Lichtenbelt WD, Daanen HA. Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesi

  18. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Lipid metabolism disorders, such as Gaucher disease and Tay-Sachs disease, involve lipids. Lipids are fats or fat-like substances. They ...

  19. Mineral metabolism in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Pineda Martos, Carmen María

    2014-01-01

    The present Doctoral Thesis wa metabolism in the feline species. Through a series of studies, the relationship between calcium metabolism and the main hormones involved in it has been determined metabolism during the juvenile stage of growing cats effects linked to feeding calculolytic diets on feline mineral metabolism. The first part of the work was aimed the quantification of intact (I-PTH) and whole PTH) and to characterize the dynamics of PTH secretion, including ...

  20. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  1. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Evan [American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  2. Systems Biology of Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2017-06-20

    Metabolism is highly complex and involves thousands of different connected reactions; it is therefore necessary to use mathematical models for holistic studies. The use of mathematical models in biology is referred to as systems biology. In this review, the principles of systems biology are described, and two different types of mathematical models used for studying metabolism are discussed: kinetic models and genome-scale metabolic models. The use of different omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and fluxomics, for studying metabolism is presented. Finally, the application of systems biology for analyzing global regulatory structures, engineering the metabolism of cell factories, and analyzing human diseases is discussed.

  3. Sustained metabolic scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C C; Nagy, K A; Diamond, J

    1990-03-01

    Sustained metabolic rates (SusMR) are time-averaged metabolic rates that are measured in free-ranging animals maintaining constant body mass over periods long enough that metabolism is fueled by food intake rather than by transient depletion of energy reserves. Many authors have suggested that SusMR of various wild animal species are only a few times resting (basal or standard) metabolic rates (RMR). We test this conclusion by analyzing all 37 species (humans, 31 other endothermic vertebrates, and 5 ectothermic vertebrates) for which SusMR and RMR had both been measured. For all species, the ratio of SusMR to RMR, which we term sustained metabolic scope, is less than 7; most values fall between 1.5 and 5. Some of these values, such as those for Tour de France cyclists and breeding birds, are surely close to sustainable metabolic ceilings for the species studied. That is, metabolic rates higher than 7 times RMR apparently cannot be sustained indefinitely. These observations pose several questions: whether the proximate physiological causes of metabolic ceilings reside in the digestive tract's ability to process food or in each tissue's metabolic capacity; whether ceiling values are independent of the mode of energy expenditure; whether ceilings are set by single limiting physiological capacities or by coadjusted clusters of capacities (symmorphosis); what the ultimate evolutionary causes of metabolic ceilings are; and how metabolic ceilings may limit animals' reproductive effort, foraging behavior, and geographic distribution.

  4. Metabolic enzymes link morphine withdrawal with metabolic disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Jiang; Jing Li; Lan Ma

    2007-01-01

    @@ Energy metabolism is a fundamental biological process that is vital for the survival of all species. Disorders in the metabolic system result in deficiency or redundancy of certain nutrients, including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, etc. Abnormality of the energy metabolism system leads to a number of metabolic diseases, such as the metabolic syndrome. Broadly speaking, the term "metabolic diseases" now tends to be widened to the category that refers to all diseases with metabolism disorder.

  5. Engineering Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-03-10

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eSachdev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevaleirnt and costly conditions.The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogensis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise.

  7. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Stachowiak; Tomasz Pertyński; Magdalena Pertyńska-Marczewska

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopaus...

  8. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  9. Genetic and metabolic engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Yang,Yea-Tyng; Bennett, George N.; San, Ka-yiu

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology techniques, analytical methods and mathematical tools have led to a growing interest in using metabolic engineering to redirect metabolic fluxes for industrial and medical purposes. Metabolic engineering is referred to as the directed improvement of cellular properties through the modification of specific biochemical reactions or the introduction of new ones, with the use of recombinant DNA technology (Stephanopoulos, 1999). This multidisciplinary field dr...

  10. Inflammation and metabolic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2017-03-15

    Excessive feeding is associated with an increase in the incidence of chronic metabolic diseases, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic disturbance induces chronic low-grade inflammation in metabolically-important organs, such as the liver and adipose tissue. Many of the inflammatory signalling pathways are directly triggered by nutrients. The pro-inflammatory mediators in adipocytes and macrophages infiltrating adipose tissue promote both local and systemic pro-inflammatory status. Metabolic cardiomyopathy is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by structural and functional alterations and interstitial fibrosis without coronary artery disease or hypertension. In the early stage of metabolic cardiomyopathy, metabolic disturbance is not accompanied by substantial changes in myocardial structure and cardiac function. However, metabolic disturbance induces subcellular low-grade inflammation in the heart, and in turn, subcellular component abnormalities, such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and impaired calcium handling, leading to impaired myocardial relaxation. In the advanced stage, the vicious cycle of subcellular component abnormalities, inflammatory cell infiltration, and neurohumoral activation induces cardiomyocyte injury and death, and cardiac fibrosis, resulting in impairment of both diastolic and systolic functions. This review discusses some recent advances in understanding involvement of inflammation in metabolic cardiomyopathy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. What is Nutrition & Metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Richard D; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2004-08-17

    A new Open Access journal, Nutrition & Metabolism (N&M) will publish articles that integrate nutrition with biochemistry and molecular biology. The open access process is chosen to provide rapid and accessible dissemination of new results and perspectives in a field that is of great current interest. Manuscripts in all areas of nutritional biochemistry will be considered but three areas of particular interest are lipoprotein metabolism, amino acids as metabolic signals, and the effect of macronutrient composition of diet on health. The need for the journal is identified in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemias and related diseases, and a sudden increase in popular diets, as well as renewed interest in intermediary metabolism.

  12. Mathematical modelling of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Mathematical models of the cellular metabolism have a special interest within biotechnology. Many different kinds of commercially important products are derived from the cell factory, and metabolic engineering can be applied to improve existing production processes, as well as to make new processes...... available. Both stoichiometric and kinetic models have been used to investigate the metabolism, which has resulted in defining the optimal fermentation conditions, as well as in directing the genetic changes to be introduced in order to obtain a good producer strain or cell line. With the increasing...... availability of genomic information and powerful analytical techniques, mathematical models also serve as a tool for understanding the cellular metabolism and physiology....

  13. Fluoroacetylcarnitine: metabolism and metabolic effects in mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, J.; Davis, E.J.

    1973-01-01

    The metabolism and metabolic effects of fluoroacetylcarnitine have been investigated. Carnitineacetyltransferase transfers the fluoro-acetyl group of fluoroacetylcarnitine nearly as rapidly to CoA as the acetyl group of acetylcarnitine. Fluorocitrate is then formed by citrate synthase, but this second reaction is relatively slow. The fluorocitrate formed intramitochondrially inhibits the metabolism of citrate. In heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria the accumulated citrate inhibits citrate synthesis and the ..beta..-oxidation of fatty acids. Free acetate is formed, presumably because accumulated acetyl-CoA is hydrolyzed. In liver mitochondria the accumulation of citrate leads to a relatively increased rate of ketogenesis. Increased ketogenesis is obtained also upon the addition of citrate to the reaction mixture.

  14. Attractor metabolic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso M De la Fuente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a Systemic Metabolic Structure in the cell, characterized by a set of different enzymatic reactions always locked into active states (metabolic core while the rest of the catalytic processes are only intermittently active. This global metabolic structure was verified for Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it seems to be a common key feature to all cellular organisms. In concordance with these observations, the cell can be considered a complex metabolic network which mainly integrates a large ensemble of self-organized multienzymatic complexes interconnected by substrate fluxes and regulatory signals, where multiple autonomous oscillatory and quasi-stationary catalytic patterns simultaneously emerge. The network adjusts the internal metabolic activities to the external change by means of flux plasticity and structural plasticity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to research the systemic mechanisms involved in the regulation of the cellular enzymatic activity we have studied different catalytic activities of a dissipative metabolic network under different external stimuli. The emergent biochemical data have been analysed using statistical mechanic tools, studying some macroscopic properties such as the global information and the energy of the system. We have also obtained an equivalent Hopfield network using a Boltzmann machine. Our main result shows that the dissipative metabolic network can behave as an attractor metabolic network. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have found that the systemic enzymatic activities are governed by attractors with capacity to store functional metabolic patterns which can be correctly recovered from specific input stimuli. The network attractors regulate the catalytic patterns

  15. 甲醇-山梨醇混合碳源诱导提高抗HER2抗体在糖基工程毕赤酵母中的表达%Co-Feeding Strategy of Methanol and Sorbitol to Improve Produc-tion of Anti-HER2 Monoclonal Antibody in Glycoengineered Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高爱荣; 刘波; 唱韶红; 巩新; 徐敏锐; 徐威; 吴军

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In this work, a study of the fermentation technique of engineered antibodies in glycosyl-ation engineered yeast using anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody(mAb) as model was presented. Methods: The opti-mal methanol induction concentration was confirmed by flask trial. The antigen binding affinity of anti-HER2 mAb was tested with the high HER2 expression breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. The methanol/sorbitol co-feeding in-duction strategy for antibody production was carried out in a 5 L bioreactor on the basis of flask experiment. The medium was collected and subjected to purification with cation exchange chromatography. The molecular weight was analyzed by reducing and non-reducing SDS-PAGE. The antibody was identified by Western blotting and the purity was determined by Lowry method. Results: The highest expression level of anti-HER2 antibody was in-duced by 0.5% methanol in flask culture. Expressed antibody can bind to antigen on the cell surface of the SK-BR-3. The production of antibody in methanol/sorbitol co-feeding fermentation reached about 0.6 g/L, which was about ten times than in flask culture. The molecular weight of antibody was 1.5×105 in non-reducing SDS- PAGE which demonstrates that light chain and heavy chain could be assembled the right antibody structure. The final concentration of the antibody was 0.365 g/L after one step purification by cation exchange chromatography. Conclu-sion: Using the co-feeding strategy in 5 L bioreactor, the production of antibody expressed in glycoengineering Pi-chia pastoris was improved and this will be reference for a platform of large-scale antibody fermentation.%目的::以抗HER2抗体为模型,研究抗体在糖基工程酵母菌中的表达及工程菌发酵技术。方法:首先通过摇瓶试验分析诱导用甲醇浓度对抗体表达的影响,并用高表达HER2的SK-BR-3细胞分析抗HER2抗体的抗原结合活性。以此为基础,在5 L发酵罐中研究甲醇-山梨醇混

  16. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic respon

  17. Circadian Systems and Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    1999-01-01

    Circadian systems direct many metabolic parameters and, at the same time, they appear to be exquisitely shielded from metabolic variations. Although the recent decade of circadian research has brought insights into how circadian periodicity may be generated at the molecular level, little is known ab

  18. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  19. Disorders of fructose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froesch, E R

    1976-11-01

    There are fundamental differences between the metabolic fate of fructose and of glucose. Whereas the metabolism of glucose is controlled by hormones such as insulin, fructose uptake and phosphorylation in the liver occurs independently of hormones and its ultimate metabolic fate is unpredictable. Essential fructosuria, a harmless inherited anomaly of fructose metabolism, is the least harmful of the disorders of fructose metabolism. Hereditary fructose intolerance and fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency are discussed in greater detail with regard to biochemical abnormalities and clinical aspects. HFI is most serious in bottle-fed infants who cannot reject their sucrose-containing diet. Patients with HFI will have no clinical symptoms if kept on a fructose-free diet. In contrast, patients with fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency can tolerate frucose. However, severe infections precipitate attacks of hypoglycaemia and lactic acidosis.

  20. Primary Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Flux Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    his chapter introduces the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) or stoichiometry-based MFA, and describes the quantitative basis for MFA. It discusses the catabolic pathways in which free energy is produced to drive the cell-building anabolic pathways. An overview of these primary pathways provides...

  1. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  2. Metabolic disorders in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Grzegorz; Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance - IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus - T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  3. Regulation of lipid metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng LI

    2011-01-01

    @@ Lipids including cholesterol, phospholipids, fatty acids and triacylglycerols are important cellular constituents involved in membrane structure, energy homeostasis and many biological processes such as signal transduction, organelle development and cell differentiation.Recently, the area of lipid metabolism has drawn a great deal of attention due to its emerging role in the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis and liver steatosis.We decided to organize a special issue of Frontiers in Biology focusing on our current understanding of lipid metabolism.

  4. A Metabolic Switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    Our muscles are metabolically flexible, i.e., they are capable of `switching' between two types of oxidation: (1) when fasting, a predominantly lipid oxidation with high rates of fatty acid uptake, and (2) when fed, suppression of lipid oxidation in favour of increased glucose uptake, oxidation...... and storage, in response to insulin. One of the many manifestations of obesity and Type 2 diabetes is an insulin resistance of the skeletal muscles, which suppresses this metabolic switch. This talk describes recent development of a low-dimensional system of ODEs that model the metabolic switch, displaying...

  5. Sirtuins, Metabolism and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eMartinez-Pastor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available More than a decade ago, sirtuins were discovered as a highly conserved family of NAD+-dependent enzymes that extend lifespan in lower organisms. In mammals, sirtuins are key regulators of stress responses and metabolism, influencing a range of diseases, including diabetes, neurodegeneration and cancer. In recent years, new functions of sirtuins have been characterized, uncovering the underlying mechanisms of their multifaceted role in metabolism. Here, we specifically review recent progress on the role of sirtuins in DNA repair and energy metabolism, further discussing the implication of sirtuins in the biology of cancer.

  6. Vitamin D metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deluca, H.F.

    1977-01-01

    During the past decade, an explosion of information has become available on the metabolism and function of vitamin D which is of great importance to clinicians in the treatment of metabolic bone disease. We have learned that vitamin D is the precursor of at least one hormone and that this hormone carries out functions in calcium and phosphorus metabolism bringing about mineralization of bone on one hand, and the prevention of hypocalcaemic tetany on the other. It may also function in the prevention of such degenerative bone diseases as osteoporosis. An important analogue of this hormone, 1..cap alpha..-hydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ has been prepared and is used successfully in the treatment of a variety of clinical conditions. This presentation will summarize these findings and their possible implications in these metabolic bone diseases.

  7. What is Nutrition & Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinman Richard D

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new Open Access journal, Nutrition & Metabolism (N&M will publish articles that integrate nutrition with biochemistry and molecular biology. The open access process is chosen to provide rapid and accessible dissemination of new results and perspectives in a field that is of great current interest. Manuscripts in all areas of nutritional biochemistry will be considered but three areas of particular interest are lipoprotein metabolism, amino acids as metabolic signals, and the effect of macronutrient composition of diet on health. The need for the journal is identified in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemias and related diseases, and a sudden increase in popular diets, as well as renewed interest in intermediary metabolism.

  8. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  9. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  10. Sleep & the metabolic syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lam, Jamie C M; Ip, Mary S M

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is an essential part of our daily living, and sleep disturbances may intervene with the biological and physiological processes in human body leading to the development of metabolic dysfunction...

  11. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  12. [Metabolic syndrome and melatonin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, S I; Molchanov, A Iu; Golichenkov, V A; Burlakova, O V; Suprunenko, E S; Savchenko, E S

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by the following symptoms: obesity, AH, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance. Pathophysiologically, MS is underlain by disorders of many biochemical and physiological processes, such as elevated levels of low density lipoproteins, hyperstimulation of pancreatic b-cells, increased insulin secretion, substitution of lipid metabolism for carbohydrate one, overgrowth of adipose tissue, excess production of adiponectin, leptin and other signal molecules and a rise in their local intravascular concentration, weight gain. Endogenous and exogenous melatonin inhibits these pathophysiological mechanisms, normalizes metabolism, equilibrates insulin secretion, prevents pancreatic hyperfunction, phosphorylates insulin receptors, inactivates active oxygen and nitrogen species including those produced in LDLP metabolism. Melatonin has specific MT1 and MT2 receptors localized in all body cells. Due to this, it exerts combined preventive action in patients with MS. Recently, melatonin has been reported to have therapeutic effect in MS; it may be recommended to treat this condition.

  13. Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for disorders of endocrine glands other than the thyroid, compared to 3.1 percent of visits made by women. The rate of visits due to metabolic and immunity disorders was also higher among men than women (2. ...

  14. Hypothalamic Hormones and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Thio, Liu Lin

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is an effective treatment for medically intractable epilepsy and may have antiepileptogenic, neuroprotective, and antitumor properties. While on a ketogenic diet, the body obtains most of its calories from fat rather than carbohydrates. This dramatic change in caloric composition results in a unique metabolic state. In turn, these changes in caloric composition and metabolism alter some of the neurohormones that participate in the complex neuronal network regulating energy ...

  15. Tumor cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of metabolic adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoek, M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we study how organisms adapt their metabolism to a changing environment. Metabolic adaptation occurs at different timescales. Organisms adapt their metabolism via metabolic regulation, which happens in the order of minutes to hours and via evolution, which takes many generations. Here

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of metabolic adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoek, M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we study how organisms adapt their metabolism to a changing environment. Metabolic adaptation occurs at different timescales. Organisms adapt their metabolism via metabolic regulation, which happens in the order of minutes to hours and via evolution, which takes many generations. Here

  18. Metabolism, temperature, and ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Maskrey, Michael

    2011-10-01

    In mammals and birds, all oxygen used (VO2) must pass through the lungs; hence, some degree of coupling between VO2 and pulmonary ventilation (VE) is highly predictable. Nevertheless, VE is also involved with CO2 elimination, a task that is often in conflict with the convection of O2. In hot or cold conditions, the relationship between VE and VO2 includes the participation of the respiratory apparatus to the control of body temperature and water balance. Some compromise among these tasks is achieved through changes in breathing pattern, uncoupling changes in alveolar ventilation from VE. This article examines primarily the relationship between VE and VO2 under thermal stimuli. In the process, it considers how the relationship is influenced by hypoxia, hypercapnia or changes in metabolic level. The shuffling of tasks in emergency situations illustrates that the constraints on VE-VO2 for the protection of blood gases have ample room for flexibility. However, when other priorities do not interfere with the primary goal of gas exchange, VE follows metabolic rate quite closely. The fact that arterial CO2 remains stable when metabolism is changed by the most diverse circumstances (moderate exercise, cold, cold and exercise combined, variations in body size, caloric intake, age, time of the day, hormones, drugs, etc.) makes it unlikely that VE and metabolism are controlled in parallel by the condition responsible for the metabolic change. Rather, some observations support the view that the gaseous component of metabolic rate, probably CO2, may provide the link between the metabolic level and VE.

  19. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutrition and metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albornoz López, Raúl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The exact etiology is unclear, although it is known thatthere is a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, dietary habits play an important role in the treatment and prevention of this condition. General classic recommendations include control of obesity, increased physical activity, decreased intake of saturated fat and cholesterol, reduced intake of simple sugars and increased intake of fruits and vegetables. It has been studied the influence of diets low in carbohydrates, diets rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, fiber intake, the Mediterranean diet and the glycemic index in relation to metabolic syndrome.Other nutrients recently studied are the micronutrients (magnesium and calcium, soy and other phytochemicals. Evidence suggests that a healthy diet like the Mediterranean protects against metabolic syndrome,caracterized for a low content in saturated and trans fat, high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, balanced intake of carbohydrates and high in fiber, fruits and vegetables. There is more controversy about the type of diet of choice for the control ofmetabolic syndrome (low-carbohydrate diets or lowfat, needing more studies on the role of soy and other phytochemicals.

  1. Apelin and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal eBertrand

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of adipokines identified over the past years has allowed considering white adipose tissue as a secretory organ closely integrated into overall physiological and metabolic control. Apelin, an ubiquitous peptide was known to exert different physiological effects mainly on the cardiovascular system and the regulation of fluid homeostasis until its identification as an adipokine. This has increased its broad range of action and apelin now appears clearly as a new player in energy metabolism alongside leptin and adiponectin. Apelin has been shown to act on glucose and lipid metabolism but also to modulate insulin secretion. Moreover, different studies in both animals and humans have shown that plasma apelin concentrations are usually increased during obesity and type 2 diabetes. This mini-review will focus on the various systemic apelin effects on energy metabolism by addressing its mechanisms of action. The advances concerning the role of apelin in metabolic diseases in relation with the recent reports on apelin concentrations in obese and/or diabetic subjects will also be discussed.

  2. Metabolism of phencyclidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoag, M.K.P.

    1987-01-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) is a drug of abuse which may produce, in some users, a persistent schizophreniform psychosis. The possibility that long term effects of PCP are mediated by metabolic activation of the parent compound to reactive species is consistent with the demonstration of metabolism-dependent covalent binding of radiolabeled PCP in vivo and in vitro to macromolecules in rodent lung, liver, and kidney. Formation of the electrophilic iminium ion metabolite of PCP is believed to be critical for covalent binding since binding was inhibited by cyanide ion at concentrations which did not inhibit metabolism of PCP but did trap the iminium ion to form the corresponding alpha-aminonitrile. The present studies were designed to characterize further the biological fate of PCP by identifying possible macromolecular targets of the reactive metabolite(s).

  3. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christopher J; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research.

  4. Metabolism and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Marlen; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    The generation of neurons in the developing and adult mammalian brain by neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) depends on a tight control of NSPC activity and neuronal differentiation that is regulated by a plethora of intrinsic and extrinsic molecular cues. Besides well-studied morphogenic signaling pathways and transcriptional codes that govern the distinct developmental steps from the dividing NSPC to a functional neuron, a critical role of cellular metabolism to determine the functional properties of NSPCs and newborn neurons has been recently identified. Here, we review advances in our understanding of how metabolism affects NSPC behavior and subsequent neuronal differentiation and suggest how metabolism may serve as a common signal integrator to ensure life-long addition of new neurons in the mammalian brain.

  5. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  6. Endocannabinoids and Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta-Cherifi, Blandine; Cota, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is known to exert regulatory control on essentially every aspect related to the search for, and the intake, metabolism and storage of calories, and consequently it represents a potential pharmacotherapeutic target for obesity, diabetes and eating disorders. While the clinical use of the first generation of cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor blockers has been halted due to the psychiatric side effects that their use occasioned, recent research in animals and humans has provided new knowledge on the mechanisms of actions of the ECS in the regulation of eating behavior, energy balance, and metabolism. In this review, we discuss these recent advances and how they may allow targeting the ECS in a more specific and selective manner for the future development of therapies against obesity, metabolic syndrome, and eating disorders.

  7. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  8. Metabolic changes in malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, P W

    2005-10-01

    This paper is concerned with malnutrition caused by inadequate intake of all the major nutrients rather than deficiency diseases relating to a single micronutrient. Three common situations are recognised: young children in third world countries with protein-energy malnutrition; adults in the same countries who are chronically adapted to subsisting on marginally inadequate diets; and patients who become malnourished as a result of chronic diseases. In all these situations infectious diseases are often also present, and this complicates the interpretation of biochemical and physiological observations. The metabolic response to starvation is primarily concerned with maintaining a supply of water-soluble substrates to supply energy to the brain. Thus there is an initial rise in metabolic rate, reflecting gluconeogenic activity. As fasting progresses, gluconeogenesis is suppressed to minimise muscle protein breakdown and ketones become the main fuel for the brain. With chronic underfeeding the basal metabolic rate per cell appears to fall, but the mechanistic basis for this is not clear. The main adaptation to chronic energy deficiency is slow growth and low adult body size, although the reduction in energy requirement achieved by this is partially offset by the preservation of the more metabolically active organs at the expense of muscle, which has a lower metabolic rate. The interaction between malnutrition and the metabolic response to trauma has been studied using an animal model. The rise in energy expenditure and urinary nitrogen excretion following surgery were significantly attenuated in malnourished rats, suggesting that malnutrition impairs the ability of the body to mobilise substrates to support inflammatory and reparative processes. However, the healing process in wounded muscle remained unimpaired in malnutrition, suggesting that this process has a high biological priority.

  9. Hypothyroidism in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypothyroidism are well established forerunners of atherogenic cardiovascular disease. Considerable overlap occurs in the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance has been studied as the basic pathogenic mechanism in metabolic syndrome. [1] This cross sectional study intended to assess thyroid function in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with metabolic syndrome who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III criteria [ 3 out of 5 criteria positive namely blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm hg or on antihypertensive medications, fasting plasma glucose > 100 mg/dl or on anti-diabetic medications, fasting triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C 102 cms in men and 88 cms in women] were included in the study group. [2] Fifty patients who had no features of metabolic syndrome (0 out of 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome were included in the control group. Patients with liver disorders, renal disorders, congestive cardiac failure, pregnant women, patients on oral contraceptive pills, statins and other medications that alter thyroid functions and lipid levels and those who are under treatment for any thyroid related disorder were excluded from the study. Acutely ill patients were excluded taking into account sick euthyroid syndrome. Patients were subjected to anthropometry, evaluation of vital parameters, lipid and thyroid profile along with other routine laboratory parameters. Students t-test, Chi square test and linear regression, multiple logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the 100 patients in study group, 55 were females (55% and 45 were males (45%. Of the 50

  10. Toxic and Metabolic Myelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio José; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. It is most commonly caused by its compression by neoplasms, degenerative disc disease, trauma, or infection. Less common causes of myelopathy include spinal cord tumors, infection, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, vascular, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Conditions affecting the spinal cord must be recognized as early as possible to prevent progression that may lead to permanent disability. Biopsy is rarely performed, thus the diagnosis and management rely on patient׳s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings. Here we review the clinical presentations, pathophysiological mechanisms, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of myelopathies related to metabolic or toxic etiologies.

  11. Metabolic Factors in Fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Hargreaves

    2006-01-01

    Increased non-oxidative and oxidative ATP production via metabolic pathways in skeletal muscle is essential for the maintenance of force and power production during exercise. However, substrate depletion and accumulation of metabolic byproducts are potential causes of fatigue. Reduced PCr availability can limit power production during sprint exercise, whereas carbohydrate depletion is a major limitation to endurance performance. During sprint exercise increased Pi and H+ may contribute to fatigue, and during prolonged strenuous exercise, the accumulation of NH3, reactive oxygen species, and heat can limit performance. Appropriate training programs and nutritional interventions are potential strategies to enhance fatigue resistance and exercise performance.

  12. Sleep and Metabolism: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and its disorders are increasingly becoming important in our sleep deprived society. Sleep is intricately connected to various hormonal and metabolic processes in the body and is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Research shows that sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may have profound metabolic and cardiovascular implications. Sleep deprivation, sleep disordered breathing, and circadian misalignment are believed to cause metabolic dysregulation through myriad pathways involving sympathetic overstimulation, hormonal imbalance, and subclinical inflammation. This paper reviews sleep and metabolism, and how sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may be altering human metabolism.

  13. Metabolism at Evolutionary Optimal States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraes Rabbers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is generally required for cellular maintenance and for the generation of offspring under conditions that support growth. The rates, yields (efficiencies, adaptation time and robustness of metabolism are therefore key determinants of cellular fitness. For biotechnological applications and our understanding of the evolution of metabolism, it is necessary to figure out how the functional system properties of metabolism can be optimized, via adjustments of the kinetics and expression of enzymes, and by rewiring metabolism. The trade-offs that can occur during such optimizations then indicate fundamental limits to evolutionary innovations and bioengineering. In this paper, we review several theoretical and experimental findings about mechanisms for metabolic optimization.

  14. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  15. ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    2006162 Change of vascular endothelial function in patients with disorders of glucose metabolism. ZHANG Songjing,(张松菁),et al. Dept Endocrinol ,1st Hosp, Fujian Med Univ ,Fuzhou 350005. Chin J Endocrinol Metab 2006;22(1): 11 - 14. Objective: To observe the changes of the endothelium - dependent vasodilation ( EDF) and serum superoxide

  16. Sterol metabolism of insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, F.J.; Wientjens, W.H.J.M.

    1967-01-01

    This article surveys the present knowledge of the sterol metabolism of insects. It is emphasized that a high degree of purity of the dietary sterols and the climination of the influence of symbionts are essential to present ambiguity in interpreting results. It is pointed out that a sharp distinctio

  17. Lipoprotein(a) metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an atherogenic lipoprotein. The metabolism of this lipoprotein is still not well understood. It has long been known that the plasma concentration of Lp(a) is highly heritable, with its genetic determinants located in the apo(a) locus and regulating the rate of hepatic apo(a...

  18. Ghrelin and Metabolic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios J. Pournaras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. Ghrelin has been implicated to play a role in the success of these procedures. Furthermore, these operations have been used to study the gut-brain axis. This article explores this interaction, reviewing the available data on changes in ghrelin levels after different surgical procedures.

  19. Methanogenesis: Syntrophic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieber, J.R.; McInerney, M.J.; Plugge, C.M.; Schink, B.; Gunsales, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    "Water is life!" All active cellular systems require water as the medium and solvent of their metabolic activities. Hydrophobic compounds and structures, which tend to exclude water, though providing inter alia excellent sources of energy and a means of biological compartmentalization, present

  20. Glial metabolism of valine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murín, Radovan; Mohammadi, Ghasem; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hamprecht, Bernd

    2009-07-01

    The three essential amino acids, valine, leucine and isoleucine, constitute the group of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). BCAAs are rapidly taken up into the brain parenchyma, where they serve several distinct functions including that as fuel material in brain energy metabolism. As one function of astrocytes is considered the production of fuel molecules that support the energy metabolism of adjacent neural cells in brain. Astroglia-rich primary cultures (APC) were shown to rapidly dispose of the BCAAs, including valine, contained in the culture medium. While the metabolisms of leucine and isoleucine by APC have already been studied in detail, some aspects of valine metabolism remained to be determined. Therefore, in the present study an NMR analysis was performed to identify the (13)C-labelled metabolites that are generated by APC during catabolism of [U-(13)C]valine and that are subsequently released into the incubation medium. The results presented show that APC (1) are potently disposing of the valine contained in the incubation medium; (2) are capable of degrading valine to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle member succinyl-CoA; and (3) release into the extracellular milieu valine catabolites and compounds generated from them such as [U-(13)C]2-oxoisovalerate, [U-(13)C]3-hydroxyisobutyrate, [U-(13)C]2-methylmalonate, [U-(13)C]isobutyrate, and [U-(13)C]propionate as well as several TCA cycle-dependent metabolites including lactate.

  1. Prebiotic metabolic networks?

    OpenAIRE

    Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    A prebiotic origin of metabolism has been proposed as one of several scenarios for the origin of life. In their recent work, Ralser and colleagues (Keller et al, 2014) observe an enzyme‐free, metabolism‐like reaction network under conditions reproducing a possible prebiotic environment.

  2. Sucrose Metabolism in Plastids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, N.; Turk, S.C.H.J.; Dun, van K.P.M.; Hulleman, H.D.; Visser, R.G.F.; Weisbeek, P.J.; Smeekens, S.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The question whether sucrose (Suc) is present inside plastids has been long debated. Low Suc levels were reported to be present inside isolated chloroplasts, but these were argued to be artifacts of the isolation procedures used. We have introduced Suc-metabolizing enzymes in plastids and our experi

  3. Prebiotic metabolic networks?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A prebiotic origin of metabolism has been proposed as one of several scenarios for the origin of life. In their recent work, Ralser and colleagues (Keller et al, 2014) observe an enzyme‐free, metabolism‐like reaction network under conditions reproducing a possible prebiotic environment.

  4. Methanogenesis: Syntrophic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieber, J.R.; McInerney, M.J.; Plugge, C.M.; Schink, B.; Gunsales, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    "Water is life!" All active cellular systems require water as the medium and solvent of their metabolic activities. Hydrophobic compounds and structures, which tend to exclude water, though providing inter alia excellent sources of energy and a means of biological compartmentalization, present probl

  5. Rethinking Guard Cell Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelia, Diana; Lawson, Tracy

    2016-11-01

    Stomata control gaseous fluxes between the internal leaf air spaces and the external atmosphere and, therefore, play a pivotal role in regulating CO2 uptake for photosynthesis as well as water loss through transpiration. Guard cells, which flank the stomata, undergo adjustments in volume, resulting in changes in pore aperture. Stomatal opening is mediated by the complex regulation of ion transport and solute biosynthesis. Ion transport is exceptionally well understood, whereas our knowledge of guard cell metabolism remains limited, despite several decades of research. In this review, we evaluate the current literature on metabolism in guard cells, particularly the roles of starch, sucrose, and malate. We explore the possible origins of sucrose, including guard cell photosynthesis, and discuss new evidence that points to multiple processes and plasticity in guard cell metabolism that enable these cells to function effectively to maintain optimal stomatal aperture. We also discuss the new tools, techniques, and approaches available for further exploring and potentially manipulating guard cell metabolism to improve plant water use and productivity. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the road to heart disease and type 2 diabetes . Kids with metabolic syndrome have at least three of ... previous 1 • 2 • 3 • 4 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Diabetes Center Acanthosis Nigricans Overweight and Obesity Can Diabetes ...

  7. Diversified glucosinolate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisch, Tina; Motawie, Mohammed Saddik; Olsen, Carl Erik;

    2015-01-01

    were biosynthesized from methionine. The biosynthesis of alliarinoside was shown not to bifurcate from sinigrin biosynthesis at the oxime level in contrast to the general scheme for hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis. Instead, the aglucon of alliarinoside was formed from metabolism of sinigrin...

  8. Dysregulated metabolism contributes to oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschey, Matthew D.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Diehl, Anna Mae E.; Drew, Janice E.; Frezza, Christian; Green, Michelle F.; Jones, Lee W.; Ko, Young H.; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A.; Locasale, Jason W.; Longo, Valter D.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; McDonnell, Eoin; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Michelotti, Gregory; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Poore, Brad; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Sivanand, Sharanya; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by unrestrained cellular proliferation. In order to sustain growth, cancer cells undergo a complex metabolic rearrangement characterized by changes in metabolic pathways involved in energy production and biosynthetic processes. The relevance of the metabolic transformation of cancer cells has been recently included in the updated version of the review “Hallmarks of Cancer”, where the dysregulation of cellular metabolism was included as an emerging hallmark. While several lines of evidence suggest that metabolic rewiring is orchestrated by the concerted action of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, in some circumstances altered metabolism can play a primary role in oncogenesis. Recently, mutations of cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes involved in key metabolic pathways have been associated with hereditary and sporadic forms of cancer. Together, these results suggest that aberrant metabolism, once seen just as an epiphenomenon of oncogenic reprogramming, plays a key role in oncogenesis with the power to control both genetic and epigenetic events in cells. In this review, we discuss the relationship between metabolism and cancer, as part of a larger effort to identify a broad-spectrum of therapeutic approaches. We focus on major alterations in nutrient metabolism and the emerging link between metabolism and epigenetics. Finally, we discuss potential strategies to manipulate metabolism in cancer and tradeoffs that should be considered. More research on the suite of metabolic alterations in cancer holds the potential to discover novel approaches to treat it. PMID:26454069

  9. Hypoxamirs and Mitochondrial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrill, Katherine A.; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Chronic hypoxia can drive maladaptive responses in numerous organ systems, leading to a multitude of chronic mammalian diseases. Oxygen homeostasis is intimately linked with mitochondrial metabolism, and dysfunction in these systems can combine to form the backbone of hypoxic-ischemic injury in multiple tissue beds. Increased appreciation of the crucial roles of hypoxia-associated miRNA (hypoxamirs) in metabolism adds a new dimension to our understanding of the regulation of hypoxia-induced disease. Recent Advances: Myriad factors related to glycolysis (e.g., aldolase A and hexokinase II), tricarboxylic acid cycle function (e.g., glutaminase and iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein 1/2), and apoptosis (e.g., p53) have been recently implicated as targets of hypoxamirs. In addition, several hypoxamirs have been implicated in the regulation of the master transcription factor of hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, clarifying how the cellular program of hypoxia is sustained and resolved. Critical Issues: Central to the discussion of metabolic change in hypoxia is the Warburg effect, a shift toward anaerobic metabolism that persists after normal oxygen levels have been restored. Many newly discovered targets of hypoxia-driven microRNA converge on pathways known to be involved in this pathological phenomenon and the apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with it. Future Directions: The often synergistic functions of miRNA may make them ideal therapeutic targets. The use of antisense inhibitors is currently being considered in diseases in which hypoxia and metabolic dysregulation predominate. In addition, exploration of pleiotripic miRNA functions will likely continue to offer unique insights into the mechanistic relationships of their downstream target pathways and associated hypoxic phenotypes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1189–1201. PMID:24111795

  10. SIRT1 and energy metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Li

    2013-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is the most conserved mammalian NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that has emerged as a key metabolic sensor in various metabolic tissues.In response to different environmental stimuli,SIRT1 directly links the cellular metabolic status to the chromatin structure and the regulation of gene expression,thereby modulating a variety of cellular processes such as energy metabolism and stress response.Recent studies have shown that SIRT1 controls both glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver,promotes fat mobilization and stimulates brown remodeling of the white fat in white adipose tissue,controls insulin secretion in the pancreas,senses nutrient availability in the hypothalamus,influences obesityinduced inflammation in macrophages,and modulates the activity of circadian clock in metabolic tissues.This review focuses on the role of SIRT1 in regulating energy metabolism at different metabolic tissues.

  11. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated? Heart-healthy lifestyle changes are the first line of treatment for metabolic syndrome. If heart-healthy lifestyle changes aren’t enough, ...

  12. Autophagy research: Lessons from metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Meijer

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy research continues to expand exponentially. Clearly autophagy and metabolism are intimately connected; however, the rapid expansion of research into this topic inevitably brings the risk that important basic knowledge of metabolism will be overlooked when considering experimental data. Unf

  13. Metabolic Syndrome, Androgens, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and met...

  14. Metabolic syndrome and professional aptitude

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota Rębak; Edyta Suliga; Stanisław Głuszek

    2016-01-01

    The development of civilisation has resulted in a growing problem of metabolic diseases, including metabolic syndrome. Scientific studies show that this disease is an epidemic of the 21st century. Metabolic syndrome is a collection of mutually related metabolic factors, such as obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, lipid disorders, arterial hypertension, and pro-inflammatory and prothrombotic state, increasing the risk of the development of atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes, and their cardio...

  15. Metabolism of hyperthermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönheit, P; Schäfer, T

    1995-01-01

    Hyperthermophiles are characterized by a temperature optimum for growth between 80 and 110°C. They are considered to represent the most ancient phenotype of living organisms and thus their metabolic design might reflect the situation at an early stage of evolution. Their modes of metabolism are diverse and include chemolithoautotrophic and chemoorganoheterotrophic. No extant phototrophic hyperthermophiles are known. Lithotrophic energy metabolism is mostly anaerobic or microaerophilic and based on the oxidation of H2 or S coupled to the reduction of S, SO inf4 (sup2-) , CO2 and NO inf3 (sup-) but rarely to O2. the substrates are derived from volcanic activities in hyperthermophilic habitats. The lithotrophic energy metabolism of hyperthermophiles appears to be similar to that of mesophiles. Autotrophic CO2 fixation proceeds via the reductive citric acid cycle, considered to be one of the first metabolic cycles, and via the reductive acetyl-CoA/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. The Calvin cycle has not been found in hyperthermophiles (or any Archaea). Organotrophic metabolism mainly involves peptides and sugars as substrates, which are either oxidized to CO2 by external electron acceptors or fermented to acetate and other products. Sugar catabolism in hyperthermophiles involves non-phosphorylated versions of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and modified versions of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The 'classical' Embden-Meyerhof pathway is present in hyperthermophilic Bacteria (Thermotoga) but not in Archaea. All hyperthermophiles (and Archaea) tested so far utilize pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase for acetyl-CoA formation from pyruvate. Acetyl-CoA oxidation in anaerobic sulphur-reducing and aerobic hyperthermophiles proceeds via the citric acid cycle; in the hyperthermophilic sulphate-reducer Archaeoglobus an oxidative acetyl-CoA/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway is operative. Acetate formation from acetyl-CoA in Archaea, including hyperthermophiles, is

  16. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  17. Neuroendocrine control of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliczkowska-Plaksej, J; Milewicz, A; Jakubowska, J

    2012-03-01

    Metabolism is controlled through homeostatic system consisting of central centers, gut hormones, hormones from adipose tissue and the other hormonal axes. This cooperation is based on cross-talk between central and peripheral signals. Among them the hypothalamus plays a crucial role, with interconnected nuclei forming neuronal circuits. Other regions in the brain, such as the brain stem, the endocannabinoid system, the vagal afferents, are also involved in energy balance. The second component is peripheral source of signals--the gastrointestinal tract hormones. Additionally, adipokines from adipose tissue, thyrotropic, gonadotropic and somatotropic axes play a role in energy homeostasis. Knowledge about all components of this neuroendocrine circuit will be helpful in developing novel therapeutic approaches against the metabolic syndrome and its components.

  18. Autophagy, Metabolism, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eileen; Mehnert, Janice M; Chan, Chang S

    2015-11-15

    Macroautophagy (autophagy hereafter) captures intracellular proteins and organelles and degrades them in lysosomes. The degradation breakdown products are released from lysosomes and recycled into metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Basal autophagy provides protein and organelle quality control by eliminating damaged cellular components. Starvation-induced autophagy recycles intracellular components into metabolic pathways to sustain mitochondrial metabolic function and energy homeostasis. Recycling by autophagy is essential for yeast and mammals to survive starvation through intracellular nutrient scavenging. Autophagy suppresses degenerative diseases and has a context-dependent role in cancer. In some models, cancer initiation is suppressed by autophagy. By preventing the toxic accumulation of damaged protein and organelles, particularly mitochondria, autophagy limits oxidative stress, chronic tissue damage, and oncogenic signaling, which suppresses cancer initiation. This suggests a role for autophagy stimulation in cancer prevention, although the role of autophagy in the suppression of human cancer is unclear. In contrast, some cancers induce autophagy and are dependent on autophagy for survival. Much in the way that autophagy promotes survival in starvation, cancers can use autophagy-mediated recycling to maintain mitochondrial function and energy homeostasis to meet the elevated metabolic demand of growth and proliferation. Thus, autophagy inhibition may be beneficial for cancer therapy. Moreover, tumors are more autophagy-dependent than normal tissues, suggesting that there is a therapeutic window. Despite these insights, many important unanswered questions remain about the exact mechanisms of autophagy-mediated cancer suppression and promotion, how relevant these observations are to humans, and whether the autophagy pathway can be modulated therapeutically in cancer. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Cell Death and Cancer Therapy."

  19. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wenyi Xu; Fengzhong Wang; Zhongsheng Yu; Fengjiao Xin

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the proce...

  20. Metabolism and Brain Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suely Kazue Nagahashi Marie; Sueli Mieko Oba Shinjo

    2011-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism is one of the main processes affected during the transition from normal to cancer cells, and it is a crucial determinant of cell proliferation or cell death. As a support for rapid proliferation, cancer cells choose to use glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen (Warburg effect) to fuel macromolecules for the synthesis of nucleotides, fatty acids, and amino acids for the accelerated mitosis, rather than fuel the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylati...

  1. Analytics for metabolic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Petzold

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants while deep omics analysis provide a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research.

  2. Genetics of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stančáková, Alena; Laakso, Markku

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic traits associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to play key roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS. The MetS has a significant genetic component, and therefore linkage analysis, candidate gene approach, and genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been applied in the search of gene variants for the MetS. A few variants have been identified, located mostly in or near genes regulating lipid metabolism. GWA studies for the individual components of the MetS have reported several loci having pleiotropic effects on multiple MetS-related traits. Genetic studies have provided so far only limited evidence for a common genetic background of the MetS. Epigenetic factors (DNA methylation and histone modification) are likely to play important roles in the pathogenesis of the MetS, and they might mediate the effects of environmental exposures on the risk of the MetS. Further research is needed to clarify the role of genetic variation and epigenetic mechanisms in the development of the MetS.

  3. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christopher J.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research. PMID:26442249

  4. Dysregulated lipid metabolism in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of lipid metabolism has been increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer cells. The changes of expression and activity of lipid metabolizing enzymes are directly regulated by the activity of oncogenic signals. The dependence of tumor cells on the dysregulated lipid metabolism suggests that proteins involved in this process are excellent chemotherapeutic targets for cancer treatment. There are currently several drugs under development or in clinical trials that are based on specifically targeting the altered lipid metabolic pathways in cancer cells. Further understanding of dysregulated lipid metabolism and its associated signaling pathways will help us to better design efficient cancer therapeutic strategy.

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of Bioorthogonal Chemistries for Surface Functionalization of Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2012-01-01

    We present here a highly efficient and chemoselective liposome functionalization method based on oxime bond formation between a hydroxylamine and an aldehyde-modified lipid component. We have conducted a systematic and quantitative comparison of this new approach with other state-of-the-art...... affinity between the peptide and the liposome surface. These studies demonstrate the importance of hoosing the correct chemistry in order to obtain a quantitative surface functionalization of liposomes....

  6. Metabolic pathways of trichothecenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghua; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Huang, Lingli; Kuca, Kamil; Yuan, Zonghui

    2010-05-01

    Trichothecenes are a group of mycotoxins mainly produced by the fungi of Fusarium genus. Consumers are particularly concerned over the toxicity and food safety of trichothecenes and their metabolites from food-producing animals. The metabolism of T-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), fusarenon-X (FX), diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), 3-acetyldeoxy-nivalenol (3-aDON), and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-aDON) in rodents, swine, ruminants, poultry, and humans are reviewed in this article. Metabolic pathways of these mycotoxins are very different. The major metabolic pathways of T-2 toxin in animals are hydrolysis, hydroxylation, de-epoxidation, and conjugation. After being transformed to HT-2 toxin, it undergoes further hydroxylation at C-3' to yield 3'-hydroxy-HT-2 toxin, which is considered as an activation pathway, whereas transformation from T-2 to T-2 tetraol is an inactivation pathway in animals. The typical metabolites of T-2 toxin in animals are HT-2 toxin, T-2 triol, T-2 tetraol, neosolaniol (NEO), 3'-hydroxy-HT-2, and 3'-hydroxy-T-2, whereas HT-2 toxin is the main metabolite in humans. De-epoxidation is an important pathway for detoxification in animals. De-epoxy products, DOM-1, and de-epoxy-NIV are the main metabolites of DON and NIV in most animals, respectively. However, the two metabolites are not found in humans. Deacetyl can occur rapidly on the acetyl derivatives, 3-aDON, 15-aDON, and FX. DAS is metabolized in animals to 15-monoacetoxyscirpenol (15-MAS) via C-4 deacetylation and then transformed to scirpentriol (SCP) via C-15 deacetylation. Finally, the epoxy is lost, yielding de-epoxy-SCP. De-epoxy-15-MAS is also the main metabolite of DAS. 15-MAS is the main metabolite in human skin. The review on the metabolism of trichothecenes will help one to well understand the fate of these toxins' future in animals and humans, as well as provide basic information for the risk assessment of them for food safety.

  7. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang, E-mail: deliang.guo@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center & Arthur G James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH 43012 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  8. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deliang Guo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation.

  9. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of metabolism by using metabolic network topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    therefore developed an algorithm that is based on hypothesis-driven data analysis to uncover the transcriptional regulatory architecture of metabolic networks. By using information on the metabolic network topology from genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, we show that it is possible to reveal patterns...... in the metabolic network that follow a common transcriptional response. Thus, the algorithm enables identification of so-called reporter metabolites (metabolites around which the most significant transcriptional changes occur) and a set of connected genes with significant and coordinated response to genetic...... changes induced by complex regulatory mechanisms coordinating the activity of different metabolic pathways. It is difficult to map such global transcriptional responses by using traditional methods, because many genes in the metabolic network have relatively small changes at their transcription level. We...

  10. Gut microbiome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Rezaie, Peyman; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mobarhan, Majid Ghayour; Ferns, Gordon A

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome contributes approximately 2kg of the whole body weight, and recent studies suggest that gut microbiota has a profound effect on human metabolism, potentially contributing to several features of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is defined by a clustering of metabolic disorders that include central adiposity with visceral fat accumulation, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia and non-optimal blood pressure levels. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that around 20-25 percent of the world's adult population has metabolic syndrome. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the existing data linking gut microbiome with metabolic syndrome. Existing evidence from studies both in animals and humans support a link between gut microbiome and various components of metabolic syndrome. Possible pathways include involvement with energy homeostasis and metabolic processes, modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways, interferences with the immune system, and interference with the renin-angiotensin system. Modification of gut microbiota via prebiotics, probiotics or other dietary interventions has provided evidence to support a possible beneficial effect of interventions targeting gut microbiota modulation to treat components or complications of metabolic syndrome.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Khromilev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is a major problem of public health and health care system, with rising prevalence in the world. There is evidence that obesity, as the main component of MS, is strongly associated with the presence of gestational complications: fetal growth retardation, fetal macrosomia, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, stillbirth and perinatal death. The underlying mechanisms of this association are actively investigated nowadays. The importance of MS in pregnancy is also determined by the increase of the risk of venous trombosis.

  12. Metabolism and Endocrinology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009039 A survey of glucose and lipid metabolism and concomitant diseases among inpatients in Guangdong province. TANG Kuanxiao(唐宽晓), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 3rd Affili Hosp, Sun Yat-sen Univ, Guangzhou 510630. Chin J Intern Med 2009;48(3):196-200. Objectives To investigate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of dyslipidemia as well as its treatment and influence on accompanying diseases in impaired glucose status among inpatients. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the inpatients registered in ten university hospitals of Guangdong, China during the week before the Diabetes Day in 2004.

  13. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  14. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  15. Metabolic syndrome, diet and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Norman, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with a range of metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These compound risks result in a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and possibly increased cardiovascular (CV) disease. As the cardiometabolic risk of PCOS is shared amongst the different diagnostic systems, all women with PCOS should undergo metabolic surveillance though the precise approach differs between guidelines. Lifestyle interventions consisting of increased physical activity and caloric restriction have been shown to improve both metabolic and reproductive outcomes. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery may be considered in resistant metabolic disease. Issues requiring further research include the natural history of PCOS-associated metabolic disease, absolute CV risk and comparative efficacy of lifestyle interventions.

  16. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  17. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, N

    1982-09-01

    The pathways of purine biosynthesis and degradation have been elucidated during the last 30 years; the regulation of the mechanisms involved is not yet fully understood, particularly with respect to quantitative aspects. Research into inborn errors of purine metabolism has provided valuable insights into purine synthesis and salvage pathways. Nutrition experiments using purine-free formula diets and supplements with defined purine sources permit precise descriptions of the influence of various dietary purines on uric acid formation. Supplements of dietary purines produce dose-proportional increases in plasma uric acid concentrations, uric acid pool size and renal uric acid excretion. The magnitude of these increases depends on the type of purine compound administered, which may limit the value of food tables for human dietetics. Purine content of food must be related not only to weight but also to energy and to protein, particularly if new foodstuffs or a vegetarian diet are ingested. Dietary purines appear to influence the biosynthesis of pyrimidines. In contrast to dietary purines, pyrimidines in the diet, if administered as nucleosides or nucleotides, are utilized in animals for the synthesis of nucleic acids. Much further work is necessary for a better understanding of the inter-relationships of purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

  18. Biochemical Hypermedia: Galactose Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animations of biochemical processes and virtual laboratory environments lead to true molecular simulations. The use of interactive software’s in education can improve cognitive capacity, better learning and, mainly, it makes information acquisition easier. Material and Methods: This work presents the development of a biochemical hypermedia to understanding of the galactose metabolism. It was developed with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. Results and Discussion: A step by step animation process shows the enzymatic reactions of galactose conversion to glucose-1-phosphate (to glycogen synthesis, glucose-6-phosphate (glycolysis intermediary, UDP-galactose (substrate to mucopolysaccharides synthesis and collagen’s glycosylation. There are navigation guide that allow scrolling the mouse over the names of the components of enzymatic reactions of via the metabolism of galactose. Thus, explanatory text box, chemical structures and animation of the actions of enzymes appear to navigator. Upon completion of the module, the user’s response to the proposed exercise can be checked immediately through text box with interactive content of the answer. Conclusion: This hypermedia was presented for undergraduate students (UFSC who revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the theme.

  19. Posttransplant Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shadab Siddiqui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is a cluster of metabolic derangements associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. MS has become a major health concern worldwide and is considered to be the etiology of the current epidemic of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition to cardiovascular disease, the presence of MS is also closely associated with other comorbidities including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. The prevalence of MS in patients with cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease is not well established and difficult to ascertain. Following liver transplant, the prevalence of MS is estimated to be 44–58%. The main factors associated with posttransplant MS are posttransplant diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. In addition to developing NAFLD, posttransplant MS is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality that is 2.5 times that of the age- and sex-matched individuals. Additionally, the presence of posttransplant MS has been associated with rapid progression to fibrosis in individuals transplanted for HCV cirrhosis. There is an urgent need for well-designed prospective studies to fully delineate the natural history and risk factors associated with posttransplant MS. Until then, early recognition, prevention, and treatment of its components are vital in improving outcomes in liver transplant recipients.

  20. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  1. Pharmacogenetics of olanzapine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Mao Mao; Dahl, Marja-Liisa

    2013-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, display large interindividual variation leading to multiple-fold differences in drug exposure between patients at a given dose. This variation in turn gives rise to the need for individualized dosing in order to avoid concentration-dependent adverse effects or therapeutic failure. Genetically determined differences in olanzapine metabolism represent a less studied source of variability in comparison to environmental and physiological factors. In this review, we summarize available in vitro and in vivo data addressing the influence of polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes on olanzapine serum exposure. The polymorphic CYP2D6 enzyme appears to have no significant influence on olanzapine steady-state serum concentrations. The formation of the various olanzapine metabolites is influenced by polymorphisms in the genes coding for CYP1A2, CYP1A expression regulator AHR, UGT1A4 and UGT2B10, as well as FMO3. An impact on steady-state olanzapine serum concentrations has been suggested for variants of CYP1A2 and UGT1A4, with somewhat conflicting findings. The potential involvement of FMO1 and CYP3A43 in olanzapine disposition has also been suggested but needs future validation.

  2. Oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Praveen; Mishra, Sandhya; Ajmera, Peeyush; Mathur, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    As antioxidants play a protective role in the pathophysiology of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, understanding the physiological status of antioxidant concentration among people at high risk for developing these conditions, such as Metabolic Syndrome, is of interest. In present study out of 187 first degree non-diabetic relatives and 192 non-diabetic spouses, 33.1% and 19.7% were found to have metabolic syndrome respectively. Subjects with metabolic syndrome (≥3 risk factors) had poor a...

  3. Brain glutamate metabolism during metabolic alkalosis and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, R C; Hoop, B; Kazemi, H

    1992-12-01

    Glutamate modifies ventilation by altering neural excitability centrally. Metabolic acid-base perturbations may also alter cerebral glutamate metabolism locally and thus affect ventilation. Therefore, the effect of metabolic acid-base perturbations on central nervous system glutamate metabolism was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs under normal acid-base conditions and during isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid transfer rates of radiotracer [13N]ammonia and of [13N]glutamine synthesized de novo via the reaction glutamate+NH3-->glutamine in brain glia were measured during normal acid-base conditions and after 90 min of acute isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid [13N]ammonia and [13N]glutamine transfer rates decreased in metabolic acidosis. Maximal glial glutamine efflux rate jm equals 85.6 +/- 9.5 (SE) mumol.l-1 x min-1 in all animals. No difference in jm was observed in metabolic alkalosis or acidosis. Mean cerebral cortical glutamate concentration was significantly lower in acidosis [7.01 +/- 0.45 (SE) mumol/g brain tissue] and tended to be larger in alkalosis, compared with 7.97 +/- 0.89 mumol/g in normal acid-base conditions. There was a similar change in cerebral cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration. Within the limits of the present method and measurements, the results suggest that acute metabolic acidosis but not alkalosis reduces glial glutamine efflux, corresponding to changes in cerebral cortical glutamate metabolism. These results suggest that glutamatergic mechanisms may contribute to central respiratory control in metabolic acidosis.

  4. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics.

  5. Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Yeon Hur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the energy extraction and in the control of local or systemic immunity. Gut microbiota and its disturbance also appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases including metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, etc. In the metabolic point of view, gut microbiota can modulate lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content and the production of short-chain fatty acids that affect food intake, inflammatory tone, or insulin signaling. Several strategies have been developed to change gut microbiota such as prebiotics, probiotics, certain antidiabetic drugs or fecal microbiota transplantation, which have diverse effects on body metabolism and on the development of metabolic disorders.

  6. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  7. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  8. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  9. Metabolic interrelationships software application: Interactive learning tool for intermediary metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie); M. Doets (Mathijs); J.M.J. Lamers (Jos); J.F. Koster (Johan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe developed and implemented the software application titled Metabolic Interrelationships as a self-learning and -teaching tool for intermediary metabolism. It is used by undergraduate medical students in an integrated organ systems-based and disease-oriented core curriculum, which start

  10. Metabolic interrelationships software application: Interactive learning tool for intermediary metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie); M. Doets (Mathijs); J.M.J. Lamers (Jos); J.F. Koster (Johan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe developed and implemented the software application titled Metabolic Interrelationships as a self-learning and -teaching tool for intermediary metabolism. It is used by undergraduate medical students in an integrated organ systems-based and disease-oriented core curriculum, which

  11. Structural control of metabolic flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Sajitz-Hermstein

    Full Text Available Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA. We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC. This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign "share of control" to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions.

  12. Metabolism during hypodynamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federov, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    Physical immobilization, inaction due to space travel, a sedentary occupation, or bed confinement due to a chronic illness elicit similar alternations in the metabolism of man and animals (rat, rabbit, dog, mouse). After a preliminary period of weight loss, there is eventually weight gain due to increased lipid storage. Protein catabolism is enhanced and anabolism depressed, with elevated urinary excretion of amino acids, creatine, and ammonia. Glycogen stores are depleted and glyconeogenesis is accelerated. Polyuria develops with subsequent redistribution of body fluids in which the blood volume of the systemic circulation is decreased and that of pulmonary circulation increased. This results in depressed production of vasopressin by the posterior pituitary which further enhances urinary water and salt loss.

  13. The metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetSy) is increasingly common in Australia. It is associated with the rise in obesity and lifestyle risk behaviours. It is also controversial - its value in predicting cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk and in guiding therapy has been challenged. This article aims to provide advice on the diagnosis of the MetSy and the principles for its prevention and management in the context of primary care, taking into consideration aetiological factors and the complexity of managing its constituent risk factors. Diagnosis of the MetSy is useful in focusing attention on central adiposity and insulin resistance as risk factors both for the syndrome, and cardiovascular and diabetes morbidity and mortality. Its assessment requires measurement of waist circumference - a simple but seldom performed procedure in general practice. The most essential components for the prevention and management of the MetSy are measures to change diet and physical activity in order to achieve and sustain weight loss.

  14. Regulation of Terpene Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Croteau

    2004-03-14

    OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

  15. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  16. Renal metabolism of calcitonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, R.E.; Hjelle, J.T.; Mahoney, C.; Deftos, L.J.; Lisker, W.; Kato, P.; Rabkin, R.

    1988-04-01

    The kidneys account for approximately two-thirds of the metabolism of calcitonin, but relatively little is known regarding the details thereof. To further characterize this process, we examined the renal handling and metabolism of human calcitonin (hCT) by the isolated perfused rat kidney. We also studied the degradation of radiolabeled salmon calcitonin (sCT) by subcellular fractions prepared from isolated rabbit proximal tubules. The total renal (organ) clearance of immunoreactive hCT by the isolated kidney was 1.96 +/- 0.18 ml/min. This was independent of the perfusate total calcium concentration from 5.5 to 10.2 mg/dl. Total renal clearance exceeded the glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 0.68 +/- 0.05 ml/min), indicating filtration-independent removal. Urinary calcitonin clearance as a fraction of GFR averaged 2.6%. Gel filtration chromatography of medium from isolated kidneys perfused with /sup 125/I-labeled sCT showed the principal degradation products to be low molecular weight forms eluting with monoiodotyrosine. Intermediate size products were not detected. In the subcellular fractionation experiments, when carried out at pH 5.0, calcitonin hydrolysis exclusively followed the activities of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. Typically, at pH 7.5, 42% of total degradation occurred in the region of the brush-border enzyme alanyl aminopeptidase and 29% occurred in the region of the cytosolic enzyme phosphoglucomutase. Although 9% of the calcitonin-degrading activity was associated with basolateral membrane fractions, most of this activity could be accounted for by the presence of brush-border membranes.

  17. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbuba Rahman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs.

  18. Selected Metabolic Responses to Skateboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; Hunt, Ian; Stickley, Christopher D.; Kimura, Iris F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the popularity of skateboarding worldwide, the authors believe that no previous studies have investigated the metabolic demands associated with recreational participation in the sport. Although metabolic equivalents (METs) for skateboarding were published in textbooks, the source of these values is unclear. Therefore, the rise in…

  19. Multidimensional optimality of microbial metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuetz, Robert; Zamboni, Nicola; Zampieri, Mattia; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Although the network topology of metabolism is well known, understanding the principles that govern the distribution of fluxes through metabolism lags behind. Experimentally, these fluxes can be measured by (13)C-flux analysis, and there has been a long-standing interest in understanding this functi

  20. Metabolic alterations in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Assessing metabolic risk in dialysis patients, three main aspects are important: a) the pathophysiologic effects of metabolic disturbances as known from the general population are unlikely to completely reverse once patients reach dialysis. b) Specific additional problems related to chronic kidney d

  1. Sex steroids and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers Leuven, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lipoprotein metabolism is involved in atherogenesis. Female sex-hormones have substantial effects on both lipoprotein metabolism and the vessel wall. Cholesterol, one of the major lipids in lipoproteins, is both the substrate for, and the target of, the steroidal sex hormones.

  2. Estrogen Signaling in Metabolic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosário Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is extensive evidence supporting the interference of inflammatory activation with metabolism. Obesity, mainly visceral obesity, is associated with a low-grade inflammatory state, triggered by metabolic surplus where specialized metabolic cells such as adipocytes activate cellular stress initiating and sustaining the inflammatory program. The increasing prevalence of obesity, resulting in increased cardiometabolic risk and precipitating illness such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, fatty liver, cirrhosis, and certain types of cancer, constitutes a good example of this association. The metabolic actions of estrogens have been studied extensively and there is also accumulating evidence that estrogens influence immune processes. However, the connection between these two fields of estrogen actions has been underacknowledged since little attention has been drawn towards the possible action of estrogens on the modulation of metabolism through their anti-inflammatory properties. In the present paper, we summarize knowledge on the modification inflammatory processes by estrogens with impact on metabolism and highlight major research questions on the field. Understanding the regulation of metabolic inflammation by estrogens may provide the basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to the management of metabolic dysfunctions.

  3. Metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an obesity-associated collection of disorders, each of which contributes to cardiovascular risk. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS contribute to the interrelationship between metabolic syndrome and salt-sensitive hypertension, which are both caused by obesity and excess salt consumption and are major threats to health in developed countries. ROS can induce insulin resistance, which is indispensable for the progression of metabolic syndrome, and salt-sensitive hypertension stimulates ROS production, thereby promoting the development of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, ROS activate mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and the sympathetic nervous system, which can contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome and salt-sensitive hypertension. Salt-induced progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is also accelerated in animal models with metabolic syndrome, probably owing to further stimulation of ROS overproduction and subsequent ROS-induced MR activation and sympathetic excitation. Therefore, ROS contribute to the progression of the metabolic syndrome itself and to the CVD accompanying it, particularly in conjunction with excessive salt consumption.

  4. Metabolic alterations in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Assessing metabolic risk in dialysis patients, three main aspects are important: a) the pathophysiologic effects of metabolic disturbances as known from the general population are unlikely to completely reverse once patients reach dialysis. b) Specific additional problems related to chronic kidney

  5. Lysophosphatidylinositol Signalling and Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsul A. Arifin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is a chemical process used by cells to transform food-derived nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, into chemical and thermal energy. Whenever an alteration of this process occurs, the chemical balance within the cells is impaired and this can affect their growth and response to the environment, leading to the development of a metabolic disease. Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several metabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidaemia, is increasingly common in modern society. Metabolic syndrome, as well as other diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Cellular lipids are the major component of cell membranes; they represent also a valuable source of energy and therefore play a crucial role for both cellular and physiological energy homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the lysophospholipid mediator lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI and its receptor G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55 in metabolic diseases. LPI is a bioactive lipid generated by phospholipase A (PLA family of lipases which is believed to play an important role in several diseases. Indeed LPI can affect various functions such as cell growth, differentiation and motility in a number of cell-types. Recently published data suggest that LPI plays an important role in different physiological and pathological contexts, including a role in metabolism and glucose homeostasis.

  6. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Hasan, Mohammad Rubayet

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26437434

  7. Gait Dynamics and Locomotor Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    26 47. Taylor CR, Heglund NC, Maloiy GMO . Energetics and mechanics of terrestrial locomotion. I. Metabolic energy consumption as a function of...San Diego, CA: Academic Press, 1994. 110 47. Taylor CR, Heglund NC, Maloiy GMO . Energetics and mechanics of terrestrial locomotion. I. Metabolic

  8. [Hypovitaminosis D and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñambres, Inka; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Metabolic syndrome and hypovitaminosis D are 2 diseases with high prevalence that share several risk factors, while epidemiological evidence shows they are associated. Although the mechanisms involved in this association are not well established, hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. However, the apparent ineffectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome components, as well as the limited information about the effect of improving metabolic syndrome components on vitamin D concentrations, does not clarify the direction and the mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between these 2 pathologies. Overall, because of the high prevalence and the epidemiological association between both diseases, hypovitaminosis D could be considered a component of the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Retinoid Metabolism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Rhee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoid acid is a metabolite of vitamin A and functions as an important factor in cell survival, differentiation and death. Most previous studies on retinoid metabolism have focused on its association with cancer, hematologic and dermatologic disorders. Given the special concern over the recent increase in the prevalence of diabetes worldwide, the role of retinoid metabolism on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in the human body is of marked importance. Therefore, in this issue, we review the literature on the association of retinoid metabolism with glucose tolerance, with regard to insulin secretion, pancreatic autoimmunity, insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism. Further, we tried to assess the possibility of using retinoids as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetes.

  10. Metabolic regulation of circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Michael J; Hearn, Timothy J; Bell, Laura J; Hannah, Matthew A; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks are 24-h timekeeping mechanisms, which have evolved in plants, animals, fungi and bacteria to anticipate changes in light and temperature associated with the rotation of the Earth. The current paradigm to explain how biological clocks provide timing information is based on multiple interlocking transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFL), which drive rhythmic gene expression and circadian behaviour of growth and physiology. Metabolism is an important circadian output, which in plants includes photosynthesis, starch metabolism, nutrient assimilation and redox homeostasis. There is increasing evidence in a range of organisms that these metabolic outputs can also contribute to circadian timing and might also comprise independent circadian oscillators. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms of circadian regulation of metabolism by TTFL and consider increasing evidence that rhythmic metabolism contributes to the circadian network. We highlight how this might be relevant to plant circadian clock function.

  11. [Hypertension and the metabolic syndrome.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    risk associated with increased blood pressure. As the definition of the metabolic syndrome is based on dichotomization of cardiovascular risk factors with a continuously increasing risk, it cannot match risk stratification tools like the HeartScore for calculation of prognosis. However, the metabolic......The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  12. CIDE proteins and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Zhou, Linkang; Li, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Lipid homeostasis is maintained through the coordination of lipid metabolism in various tissues, including adipose tissue and the liver. The disruption of lipid homeostasis often results in the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, liver steatosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor 45-like effector family proteins, including Cidea, Cideb, and Fsp27 (Cidec), are emerging as important regulators of various lipid metabolic pathways and play pivotal roles in the development of metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the latest cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor 45-like effector protein discoveries related to the control of lipid metabolism, with emphasis on the role of these proteins in lipid droplet growth in adipocytes and in the regulation of very low-density lipoprotein lipidation and maturation in hepatocytes.

  13. Vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna

    2017-03-01

    A vast majority of menopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, the mean duration of which may be up to 7-10 years. In addition to a decreased quality of life, vasomotor symptoms may have an impact on overall health. Vasomotor symptoms are associated with overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and sympathetic overdrive in turn is associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Menopausal hot flushes have a complex relationship to different features of the metabolic syndrome and not all data point towards an association between vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Thus, it is still unclear whether vasomotor symptoms are an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Research in this area is constantly evolving and we present here the most recent data on the possible association between menopausal vasomotor symptoms and the metabolic syndrome.

  14. [EEG manifestations in metabolic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2005-09-01

    Normal brain function depends on normal neuronal metabolism, which is closely related to systemic homeostasis of metabolites, such as glucose, electrolytes, amino acids and ammonia. "Metabolic encephalopathy" indicates diffuse brain dysfunction caused by various systemic derangements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used to evaluate metabolic encephalopathy since 1937, when Berger first observed slow brain activity induced by hypoglycemia. EEG is most useful in differentiating organic from psychiatric conditions, identifying epileptogenicity, and providing information about the degree of cortical or subcortical dysfunction. In metabolic encephalopathy, EEG evolution generally correlates well with the severity of encephalopathy. However, EEG has little specificity in differentiating etiologies in metabolic encephalopathy. For example, though triphasic waves are most frequently mentioned in hepatic encephalopathy, they can also be seen in uremic encephalopathy, or even in aged psychiatric patients treated with lithium. Spike-and-waves may appear in hyper- or hypo-glycemia, uremic encephalopathy, or vitamin deficiencies, etc. Common principles of EEG changes in metabolic encephalopathy are (1) varied degrees of slowing, (2) assorted mixtures of epileptic discharge, (3) high incidence of triphasic waves, and (4), as a rule, reversibility after treatment of underlying causes. There are some exceptions to the above descriptions in specific metabolic disorders and EEG manifestations are highly individualized.

  15. Martial Arts and Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Hamasaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of martial arts are practiced worldwide, each with various intensities of physical activity. These disciplines are potentially an effective exercise therapy for metabolic diseases. Tai chi is the most well-studied style of martial arts and has shown evidence of its effect on metabolic diseases; however, little evidence is available regarding the association between other styles of martial arts and metabolic health. To summarize and evaluate the effects of martial arts on metabolic diseases, eligible articles were searched by using Pubmed. To date, systematic reviews provide no definite conclusion on the effectiveness of tai chi for treating metabolic diseases because of a small numbers of subjects, short durations of clinical trials, and some biases involved in testing. However, there are several clinical studies on subjects with metabolic diseases, which show that tai chi improves obesity, glycemic control, blood pressure control, and lipid profiles. Currently, some limited evidence suggests that other martial arts, such as kung fu and karate, may be beneficial for body composition, glycemic control, and arterial stiffness. To clarify the effectiveness of martial arts for treating metabolic diseases, well-designed prospective studies, preferably with a larger number of subjects and of longer duration, are warranted.

  16. Metabolic syndrome and eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Stanley; Mohamed Abdul, Riswana Banu Binte; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Wong, Tien Y; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming a worldwide medical and public health challenge as it has been seen increasing in prevalence over the years. Age-related eye diseases, the leading cause of blindness globally and visual impairment in developed countries, are also on the rise due to aging of the population. Many of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been shown to be associated with these eye diseases. However, the association of metabolic syndrome with eye diseases is not clear. In this review, we reviewed the evidence for associations between metabolic syndrome and certain ocular diseases in populations. We also reviewed the association of individual metabolic syndrome components with ocular diseases due to a paucity of research in this area. Besides, we also summarised the current understanding of etiological mechanisms of how metabolic syndrome or the individual components lead to these ocular diseases. With increasing evidence of such associations, it may be important to identify patients who are at risk of developing metabolic syndrome as prompt treatment and intervention may potentially decrease the risk of developing certain ocular diseases.

  17. Lactate metabolism in acute uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverve, Xavier; Mustafa, Iqbal; Novak, Ivan; Krouzecky, Ales; Rokyta, Richard; Matejovic, Martin; Ichai, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Lactate is a key metabolite that is produced by every cell and oxidized by most of them, provided that they do contain mitochondria. Its metabolism is connected to energetic homeostasis and the cellular redox state. It is well recognized as an indicator of severe outcome in severely ill patients, however, it is not a detrimental factor per se. Conversely, some recent data tend even to indicate a beneficial effect in several metabolic disorders. Although the liver has long been recognized as a key organ in lactate homeostasis, the kidney also plays a major role as a gluconeogenic organ significantly involved in the glucose-lactate cycle. In acute renal failure, sodium lactate is widely used as a buffer in replacement fluids because the anion (lactate - ) is metabolized and the cation (Na + ) remains, leading to decreased water dissociation and proton concentration. The metabolic disorders related to acute renal failure or associated with it, such as liver failure, may affect lactate metabolism, and therefore they are often regarded as limiting factors for the use of lactate-containing fluids in such patients. By investigating endogenous lactate production in severe septic patients with acute renal failure, we found that an acute exogenous load of lactate did not affect the basal endogenous lactate production and metabolism. This indicates that exogenous lactate is well metabolized even in patients suffering from acute renal failure and severe sepsis with a compromised hemodynamic status.

  18. Xenobiotic Metabolism and Gut Microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anubhav; Srinivasan, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to numerous xenobiotics, a majority of which are in the form of pharmaceuticals. Apart from human enzymes, recent studies have indicated the role of the gut bacterial community (microbiome) in metabolizing xenobiotics. However, little is known about the contribution of the plethora of gut microbiome in xenobiotic metabolism. The present study reports the results of analyses on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in various human gut microbiomes. A total of 397 available gut metagenomes from individuals of varying age groups from 8 nationalities were analyzed. Based on the diversities and abundances of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various bacterial taxa were classified into three groups, namely, least versatile, intermediately versatile and highly versatile xenobiotic metabolizers. Most interestingly, specific relationships were observed between the overall drug consumption profile and the abundance and diversity of the xenobiotic metabolizing repertoire in various geographies. The obtained differential abundance patterns of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and bacterial genera harboring them, suggest their links to pharmacokinetic variations among individuals. Additional analyses of a few well studied classes of drug modifying enzymes (DMEs) also indicate geographic as well as age specific trends. PMID:27695034

  19. MicroRNAs in Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara; Geiger, Julian; Madsen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have within the past decade emerged as key regulators of metabolic homeostasis. Major tissues in intermediary metabolism important during development of the metabolic syndrome, such as β-cells, liver, skeletal and heart muscle as well as adipose tissue have all been shown to be...... diabetes and atherosclerosis stresses their potential as therapeutic targets. This review emphasizes current ideas and controversies within miRNA research in metabolism. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have within the past decade emerged as key regulators of metabolic homeostasis. Major tissues in intermediary metabolism important during development of the metabolic syndrome, such as β-cells, liver, skeletal and heart muscle as well as adipose tissue have all been shown...... to be affected by miRNAs. In the pancreatic β-cell a number of miRNAs are important in maintaining the balance between differentiation and proliferation (miR-200 and miR-29 families) and insulin exocytosis in the differentiated state is controlled by miR-7, miR-375 and miR-335. MiR-33a and -33b play crucial...

  20. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  1. Physics of metabolic organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusup, Marko; Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago; Labinac, Velimir; Marn, Nina; Wang, Zhen; Klanjšček, Tin

    2016-09-09

    We review the most comprehensive metabolic theory of life existing to date. A special focus is given to the thermodynamic roots of this theory and to implications that the laws of physics-such as the conservation of mass and energy-have on all life. Both the theoretical foundations and biological applications are covered. Hitherto, the foundations were more accessible to physicists or mathematicians, and the applications to biologists, causing a dichotomy in what always should have been a single body of work. To bridge the gap between the two aspects of the same theory, we (i) adhere to the theoretical formalism, (ii) try to minimize the amount of information that a reader needs to process, but also (iii) invoke examples from biology to motivate the introduction of new concepts and to justify the assumptions made, and (iv) show how the careful formalism of the general theory enables modular, self-consistent extensions that capture important features of the species and the problem in question. Perhaps the most difficult among the introduced concepts, the utilization (or mobilization) energy flow, is given particular attention in the form of an original and considerably simplified derivation. Specific examples illustrate a range of possible applications-from energy budgets of individual organisms, to population dynamics, to ecotoxicology.

  2. Physics of metabolic organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusup, Marko; Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago; Labinac, Velimir; Marn, Nina; Wang, Zhen; Klanjšček, Tin

    2017-03-01

    We review the most comprehensive metabolic theory of life existing to date. A special focus is given to the thermodynamic roots of this theory and to implications that the laws of physics-such as the conservation of mass and energy-have on all life. Both the theoretical foundations and biological applications are covered. Hitherto, the foundations were more accessible to physicists or mathematicians, and the applications to biologists, causing a dichotomy in what always should have been a single body of work. To bridge the gap between the two aspects of the same theory, we (i) adhere to the theoretical formalism, (ii) try to minimize the amount of information that a reader needs to process, but also (iii) invoke examples from biology to motivate the introduction of new concepts and to justify the assumptions made, and (iv) show how the careful formalism of the general theory enables modular, self-consistent extensions that capture important features of the species and the problem in question. Perhaps the most difficult among the introduced concepts, the utilization (or mobilization) energy flow, is given particular attention in the form of an original and considerably simplified derivation. Specific examples illustrate a range of possible applications-from energy budgets of individual organisms, to population dynamics, to ecotoxicology.

  3. Regulation of sphingomyelin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienias, Kamil; Fiedorowicz, Anna; Sadowska, Anna; Prokopiuk, Sławomir; Car, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Sphingolipids (SFs) represent a large class of lipids playing diverse functions in a vast number of physiological and pathological processes. Sphingomyelin (SM) is the most abundant SF in the cell, with ubiquitous distribution within mammalian tissues, and particularly high levels in the Central Nervous System (CNS). SM is an essential element of plasma membrane (PM) and its levels are crucial for the cell function. SM content in a cell is strictly regulated by the enzymes of SM metabolic pathways, which activities create a balance between SM synthesis and degradation. The de novo synthesis via SM synthases (SMSs) in the last step of the multi-stage process is the most important pathway of SM formation in a cell. The SM hydrolysis by sphingomyelinases (SMases) increases the concentration of ceramide (Cer), a bioactive molecule, which is involved in cellular proliferation, growth and apoptosis. By controlling the levels of SM and Cer, SMSs and SMases maintain cellular homeostasis. Enzymes of SM cycle exhibit unique properties and diverse tissue distribution. Disturbances in their activities were observed in many CNS pathologies. This review characterizes the physiological roles of SM and enzymes controlling SM levels as well as their involvement in selected pathologies of the Central Nervous System, such as ischemia/hypoxia, Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), depression, schizophrenia and Niemann Pick disease (NPD). Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. MicroRNAs in Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottiers, Veerle; Näär, Anders M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as key regulators of metabolism. For example, miR-33a and b play a crucial role in controlling cholesterol and lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes, the SREBP transcription factors. Metabolic miRNAs such as miR-103 and miR-107 regulate insulin and glucose homeostasis, while others, such as miR-34a, may be key regulators of hepatic lipid homeostasis. The discovery of circulating miRNAs has highlighted their potential as both endocrine signalling molecules and disease markers. Dysregulation of miRNAs may contribute to metabolic abnormalities, suggesting that miRNAs may potentially serve as therapeutic targets to ameliorate cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:22436747

  5. Brain Regulation of Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun; Kim, Min Seon

    2016-12-01

    In healthy individuals, energy intake is in balance with energy expenditure, which helps to maintain a normal body weight. The brain's inability to control energy homeostasis underlies the pathology of hyperphagia and obesity. The brain detects body energy excess and deficit by sensing the levels of circulating metabolic hormones and nutrients and by receiving metabolic information from the periphery via the autonomic nervous system. A specialized neuronal network coordinates energy intake behavior and the metabolic processes affecting energy expenditure. Here, we briefly review neuronal mechanisms by which our body maintains energy balance.

  6. Citrate Metabolism by Pediococcus halophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Kanbe, Chiyuki; Uchida, Kinji

    1987-01-01

    Several strains of non-citrate-metabolizing Pediococcus halophilus have previously been isolated from soy sauce mash or moromi. The factors controlling the metabolism of citrate in soy pediococci were studied. All the soy pediococcal strains tested which failed to decompose citrate did not possess citrate lyase [citrate (pro-3S)-lyase; EC 4.1.3.6] activity. In P. halophilus, citrate lyase was an inducible enzyme, and the optimum pH for activity was 7.0. The metabolism of citrate in P. halophi...

  7. Retinoic acid and iron metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Sayal, Kirtimaan

    2014-01-01

    tuberculosis controlling molecules in the days to come. Iron has proven to be essential for pathogenesis of tuberculosis and retinoic acid is known to influence the iron metabolism pathway. Retenoic acid is also known to exhibit antitubercular effect in in vivo system. Therefore there is every possibility...... that retinoic acid by affecting the iron metabolism pathway exhibits its antimycobacterial effect. These aspects are reviewed in the present manuscript for understanding the antimycobacterial role of retinoic acid in the context of iron metabolism and other immunological aspects....

  8. Human metabolic atlas: an online resource for human metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornputtapong, Natapol; Nookaew, Intawat; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) provide comprehensive understanding of human metabolism, which is of great value to the biomedical research community. To make this kind of data easily accessible to the public, we have designed and deployed the human metabolic atlas (HMA) website (http://www.metabolicatlas.org). This online resource provides comprehensive information about human metabolism, including the results of metabolic network analyses. We hope that it can also serve as an information exchange interface for human metabolism knowledge within the research community. The HMA consists of three major components: Repository, Hreed (Human REaction Entities Database) and Atlas. Repository is a collection of GEMs for specific human cell types and human-related microorganisms in SBML (System Biology Markup Language) format. The current release consists of several types of GEMs: a generic human GEM, 82 GEMs for normal cell types, 16 GEMs for different cancer cell types, 2 curated GEMs and 5 GEMs for human gut bacteria. Hreed contains detailed information about biochemical reactions. A web interface for Hreed facilitates an access to the Hreed reaction data, which can be easily retrieved by using specific keywords or names of related genes, proteins, compounds and cross-references. Atlas web interface can be used for visualization of the GEMs collection overlaid on KEGG metabolic pathway maps with a zoom/pan user interface. The HMA is a unique tool for studying human metabolism, ranging in scope from an individual cell, to a specific organ, to the overall human body. This resource is freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

  9. Plant Metabolic Modeling: Achieving New Insight into Metabolism and Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghalian, Kambiz; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Schreiber, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Models are used to represent aspects of the real world for specific purposes, and mathematical models have opened up new approaches in studying the behavior and complexity of biological systems. However, modeling is often time-consuming and requires significant computational resources for data development, data analysis, and simulation. Computational modeling has been successfully applied as an aid for metabolic engineering in microorganisms. But such model-based approaches have only recently been extended to plant metabolic engineering, mainly due to greater pathway complexity in plants and their highly compartmentalized cellular structure. Recent progress in plant systems biology and bioinformatics has begun to disentangle this complexity and facilitate the creation of efficient plant metabolic models. This review highlights several aspects of plant metabolic modeling in the context of understanding, predicting and modifying complex plant metabolism. We discuss opportunities for engineering photosynthetic carbon metabolism, sucrose synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in leaves and oil synthesis in seeds and the application of metabolic modeling to the study of plant acclimation to the environment. The aim of the review is to offer a current perspective for plant biologists without requiring specialized knowledge of bioinformatics or systems biology. PMID:25344492

  10. Redesigned Human Metabolic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Bruce; Jeng, Frank; Lange, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A design has been formulated for a proposed improved version of an apparatus that simulates atmospheric effects of human respiration by introducing controlled amounts of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and heat into the air. Denoted a human metabolic simulator (HMS), the apparatus is used for testing life-support equipment when human test subjects are not available. The prior version of the HMS, to be replaced, was designed to simulate the respiratory effects of as many as four persons. It exploits the catalytic combustion of methyl acetate, for which the respiratory quotient (the molar ratio of carbon dioxide produced to oxygen consumed) is very close to the human respiratory quotient of about 0.86. The design of the improved HMS provides for simulation of the respiratory effects of as many as eight persons at various levels of activity. The design would also increase safety by eliminating the use of combustion. The improved HMS (see figure) would include a computer that would exert overall control. The computer would calculate the required amounts of oxygen removal, carbon dioxide addition, water addition, and heat addition by use of empirical equations for metabolic profiles of respiration and heat. A blower would circulate air between the HMS and a chamber containing a life-support system to be tested. With the help of feedback from a mass flowmeter, the blower speed would be adjusted to regulate the rate of flow according to the number of persons to be simulated and to a temperature-regulation requirement (the air temperature would indirectly depend on the rate of flow, among other parameters). Oxygen would be removed from the circulating air by means of a commercially available molecular sieve configured as an oxygen concentrator. Oxygen, argon, and trace amounts of nitrogen would pass through a bed in the molecular sieve while carbon dioxide, the majority of nitrogen, and other trace gases would be trapped by the bed and subsequently returned to the chamber. If

  11. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R Cunningham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS. Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Escasany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in female nurses in the Hospital Juan A. Fernandez (HJAF, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and to determine whether work, rest, diet, and health, are predictive of it.Materials and methods: For the first objective, a descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study was conducted, and for the second, a multivariate cross-sectional observational multivariate analysis was made comparing independent samples. A total of 192 nurses were studied between October 2008 and March 2009. They completed a questionnaire that include indicators that could be predictors of MS. Anthropometric measurements, including blood pressure were taken, was well as a blood sample to analyze fasting glucose, HDL-C and plasma triglycerides.Results: It was found that 35% and 41% of nurses were overweight and obese, respectively. A total of 92% had centro-abdominal obesity. The prevalence of MS found was 33.3% (95%CI, 26.7 to 40.5. Those who had this disease were between 53±9 years. Statistically significant differences were found in the bivariate analysis between MS and the variables, age, length of service, time worked during night shift, and academic studies.Conclusions: The prevalence of MS was 64/192 in HJAF nurses (33.3% I 95%CI, 26.7-40.5. There were no statistically significant differences with the indicators of, age, “time worked during night shift”, and “studies”. These results suggest that age is the most important variable in predicting the onset of MS in the population of nurses.

  13. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  14. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels. PMID:25652634

  15. Context-dependent metabolic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Oyarzún, Diego; Picó, Jesús; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Cells adapt their metabolism to survive changes in their environment. We present a framework for the construction and analysis of metabolic reaction networks that can be tailored to reflect different environmental conditions. Using context-dependent flux distributions from Flux Balance Analysis (FBA), we produce directed networks with weighted links representing the amount of metabolite flowing from a source reaction to a target reaction per unit time. Such networks are analyzed with tools from network theory to reveal salient features of metabolite flows in each biological context. We illustrate our approach with the directed network of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli, and study its properties in four relevant biological scenarios. Our results show that both flow and network structure depend drastically on the environment: networks produced from the same metabolic model in different contexts have different edges, components, and flow communities, capturing the biological re-routing of metab...

  16. Metabolic control of renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2013-01-01

    One emerging topic in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) research is the direct local control of renin synthesis and release by endogenous metabolic intermediates. During the past few years, our laboratory has characterized the localization and signaling of the novel metabolic receptor GPR91 in the normal and diabetic kidney and established GPR91 as a new, direct link between high glucose and RAS activation in diabetes. GPR91 (also called SUCNR1) binds tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate succinate which can rapidly accumulate in the local tissue environment when energy supply and demand are out of balance. In a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with metabolic stress, succinate signaling via GPR91 appears to be an important mediator or modulator of renin secretion. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the control of renin release by molecules of endogenous metabolic pathways with the main focus on succinate/GPR91.

  17. Gait Dynamics and Locomotor Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    field settings from simple technologies such as gps monitors and pedometers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Locomotion, gait, metabolism, body size, load...a reduction in exercise intensity. REFERENCES: 1. Alexander, RM. Sprinting and endurance for runners and cyclists . American Journal of

  18. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omprakash Mittapalli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc. through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  19. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis

  20. Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to Earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

  1. Metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Vipin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important for a dentist to be well informed and updated on the latest research on the association of oral and systemic health. Of late, the metabolic syndrome has gained importance in dental literature, and metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease have been linked. Metabolic syndrome (MeS is a group of three or more (up to five interrelated metabolic abnormalities, which increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Also, both MeS and periodontal disease may be linked through a common pathophysiological pathway. Some studies have been conducted to show such an association and additional studies are required to establish this association. A dental surgeon can play a major role in evaluating patients with MeS and thus prevent the development of overt cardiovascular disease.

  2. Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

  3. Multidimensional optimality of microbial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Robert; Zamboni, Nicola; Zampieri, Mattia; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2012-05-04

    Although the network topology of metabolism is well known, understanding the principles that govern the distribution of fluxes through metabolism lags behind. Experimentally, these fluxes can be measured by (13)C-flux analysis, and there has been a long-standing interest in understanding this functional network operation from an evolutionary perspective. On the basis of (13)C-determined fluxes from nine bacteria and multi-objective optimization theory, we show that metabolism operates close to the Pareto-optimal surface of a three-dimensional space defined by competing objectives. Consistent with flux data from evolved Escherichia coli, we propose that flux states evolve under the trade-off between two principles: optimality under one given condition and minimal adjustment between conditions. These principles form the forces by which evolution shapes metabolic fluxes in microorganisms' environmental context.

  4. Can you boost your metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... M, Jeukendrup A, King NA, Blundell JE. The relationship between substrate metabolism, exercise, and appetite control: Does glycogen availability influence the motivation to eat, energy intake or food choice? Sports Med . 2011;41(6):507-521. PMID: 21615191 www. ...

  5. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidala, Praveen; Jones, Susan C; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2011-03-18

    Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc.) through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases) towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance) with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  6. Adipose Tissue Metabolism During Hypobaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Chattopadhyay

    1974-10-01

    Full Text Available Possible factors affecting the metabolism of adipose tissue under hypobaric conditions have been reviewed. The hormonal changes brought into play under hypoxic stress generally stress generally increase the adipose tissue lipolysis.

  7. Metabolic-hydaulic model Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data contained in this workbook were compiled to investigate the relationship between hydrology of the Colorado River and ecosystem metabolism parameters (i.e.,...

  8. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Submariner Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    metabolism the Wilkerson Point System, for glucose values, used in conjunction with patterns of insulin response described by Kraft(4) serves as the means...amount of exercise and carbohydrate metabolism characteristics occurred in both submariners and non-submariners. An inverse relationship also seems to...individuals(7). In the present study a significant negative correlation was also found between exercise vs one and two hour postprandial glucose and two hour

  9. Tailoring the metabolism against mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Motter, Adilson E.; Almaas, Eivind; Barabasi, Albert Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    In the post-genomic era, organisms can be modelled at the whole-cell level in silico via steady state methods to describe their metabolic capabilities. We use two such methods, Flux Balance Analysis and Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment to explore the behavior of cells (of E. coli and S. cerevisiae) after severe mutations. We propose experimentally feasible ways of modifying the underlying biochemical reaction network of a mutant cell such that cell functionality, in particular growth rate, is significantly improved.

  10. Evolution of metabolic network organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonchev Danail

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of metabolic networks across species is a key to understanding how evolutionary pressures shape these networks. By selecting taxa representative of different lineages or lifestyles and using a comprehensive set of descriptors of the structure and complexity of their metabolic networks, one can highlight both qualitative and quantitative differences in the metabolic organization of species subject to distinct evolutionary paths or environmental constraints. Results We used a novel representation of metabolic networks, termed network of interacting pathways or NIP, to focus on the modular, high-level organization of the metabolic capabilities of the cell. Using machine learning techniques we identified the most relevant aspects of cellular organization that change under evolutionary pressures. We considered the transitions from prokarya to eukarya (with a focus on the transitions among the archaea, bacteria and eukarya, from unicellular to multicellular eukarya, from free living to host-associated bacteria, from anaerobic to aerobic, as well as the acquisition of cell motility or growth in an environment of various levels of salinity or temperature. Intuitively, we expect organisms with more complex lifestyles to have more complex and robust metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time that such organisms are not only characterized by larger, denser networks of metabolic pathways but also have more efficiently organized cross communications, as revealed by subtle changes in network topology. These changes are unevenly distributed among metabolic pathways, with specific categories of pathways being promoted to more central locations as an answer to environmental constraints. Conclusions Combining methods from graph theory and machine learning, we have shown here that evolutionary pressures not only affects gene and protein sequences, but also specific details of the complex wiring of functional modules

  11. Metabolism of verruculogen in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, K P; Day, J. B.; Mantle, P. G.; Rodrigues, L

    1982-01-01

    Radiolabeled verruculogen was detected in a wide range of body tissues 6 min after intravenous administration, but after a further 20 min it was mainly being excreted via the biliary route. In isolated liver perfusion, [14C]verruculogen was rapidly taken up by the liver and metabolized completely, principally to the related tremorgen TR-2 but also to a desoxy derivative of verruculogen. In addition, a smaller amount of an isomer of TR-2 was detected. These metabolic products were excreted in ...

  12. Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kyu Yeon Hur; Myung-Shik Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the energy extraction and in the control of local or systemic immunity. Gut microbiota and its disturbance also appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases including metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, etc. In the metabolic point of view, gut microbiota can modulate lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content and the production of short-chain fatty acids that affect food intake, inflammatory tone, or...

  13. Metabolic management of brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael A; Marsh, Jeremy; Shelton, Laura M; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Mukherjee, Purna

    2011-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults. Conventional therapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful in providing long-term management. As primarily a metabolic disease, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate) for energy under reduced glucose, malignant brain tumors are strongly dependent on glycolysis for energy. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome and normal mitochondria can effectively transition from one energy state to another. Mutations restrict genomic and metabolic flexibility thus making tumor cells more vulnerable to energy stress than normal cells. We propose an alternative approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and metabolically challenged tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in mice and humans treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are presented for the metabolic management of brain cancer.

  14. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  15. Metabolic regulation of insulin secretion.

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    Keane, Kevin; Newsholme, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of metabolic fuel homeostasis is a critical function of β-cells, which are located in the islets of Langerhans of the animal pancreas. Impairment of this β-cell function is a hallmark of pancreatic β-cell failure and may lead to development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. β-Cells are essentially "fuel sensors" that monitor and react to elevated nutrient load by releasing insulin. This response involves metabolic activation and generation of metabolic coupling factors (MCFs) that relay the nutrient signal throughout the cell and induce insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Glucose is the most important insulin secretagogue as it is the primary fuel source in food. Glucose metabolism is central to generation of MCFs that lead to insulin release, most notably ATP. In addition, other classes of nutrients are able to augment insulin secretion and these include members of the lipid and amino acid family of nutrients. Therefore, it is important to investigate the interplay between glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolism, as it is this mixed nutrient sensing that generate the MCFs required for insulin exocytosis. The mechanisms by which these nutrients are metabolized to generate MCFs, and how they impact on β-cell insulin release and function, are discussed in detail in this article.

  16. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Paoletti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Rodolfo Paoletti1,2, Chiara Bolego1, Andrea Poli2, Andrea Cignarella1,31Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy; 2Nutrition Foundation of Italy (NFI, Milan; 3Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches.Keywords: metabolic syndrome, systemic inflammation, coronary artery disease

  17. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

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    Abdullah M Alshehri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The constellation of dyslipidemia (hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and central obesity is now classified as metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X. In the past few years, several expert groups have attempted to set forth simple diagnostic criteria for use in clinical practice to identify patients who manifest the multiple components of the metabolic syndrome. These criteria have varied somewhat in specific elements, but in general, they include a combination of multiple and metabolic risk factors. The most widely recognized of the metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics, commonly manifest a prothrombotic state as well as and a proinflammatory state. Atherogenic dyslipidemia consists of an aggregation of lipoprotein abnormalities including elevated serum triglyceride and apolipoprotein B (apoB, increased small LDL particles, and a reduced level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C. The metabolic syndrome is often referred to as if it were a discrete entity with a single cause. Available data suggest that it truly is a syndrome, ie, a grouping of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk factors, that probably has more than one cause. Regardless of cause, the syndrome identifies individuals at an elevated risk for ASCVD. The magnitude of the increased risk can vary according to the components of the syndrome present as well as the other, non-metabolic syndrome risk factors in a particular person.

  18. Sleep apnoea and metabolic dysfunction

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    Maria R. Bonsignore

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a highly prevalent condition often associated with central obesity. In the past few years, several studies have analysed the potential independent contribution of OSA to the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities, including type 2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. New perspectives in OSA patient care have been opened by the promotion of lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise programmes that could improve both OSA and the metabolic profile. The rich clinical literature on this subject, together with the growing amount of data on pathophysiological mechanisms provided by animal studies using the chronic intermittent hypoxia model, urged the organising Committee of the Sleep and Breathing meeting to organise a session on sleep apnoea and metabolic dysfunction, in collaboration with the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. This review summarises the state-of-the-art lectures presented in the session, more specifically the relationship between OSA and diabetes, the role of OSA in the metabolic consequences of obesity, and the effects of lifestyle interventions on nocturnal respiratory disturbances and the metabolic profile in OSA patients.

  19. Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    2007164 Diagnosis, treatment and long-term following up of 223 patients with hyperphenylalaninemia detected by neonatal screening programs. YE Jun(叶军), et al. Xinhua Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ Med Sch, Shanghai Instit Pediatr Res, Shanghai 200092. Chin J Prev Med 2007;41(3);189-192. Objective To investigate the incidence of hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) caused by different etiologic factors in China and the relationship between the phenylalanine and mental development of patients with HPAs who were diagnosed by neonatal screening and early treated. Methods Two hundred and twenty-three patients with HPA detected by neonatal screening programs were refered to us at the age of (41±27) days after birth. The differential diagnosis was performed by BH4 (20 mg/kg) loading test, urinary pterin analysis and dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) activity determination respectively. The control of phenylalanine (Phe) metabolism, growth and mental development were evaluated in all treated patients. Related gene mutation analysis was performed in some patients. Results One hundred and twenty nine of 223 patients (57.8%) were diagnosed as phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency (PAHD), 64 patients (28.7%) as BH4 responsive PAHD, 30 patients (13.5%) as 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase deficiency (PTSD). One hundred and forty-nine patients were followed at age of 4 m-22 y in our clinic. The 136 of 149 patients were treated according to different etiology at the age of 1.6 m(0.5~3.5 m) after birth. Thirteen patients were followed up without the need for treatment. All patients had normal growth development. One hundred and eight (79.4%) of 136 treated patients had normal mental development. The negative correlation(r=-0.439, P<0.01) between IQ and average Phe levels were observed in 58 patients. Twenty-eight patients were able to go to primary school or even university. Nine kinds of PTS gene mutations were found in 9 cases with PTSD, among which 286G→A and 259C→T were most

  20. Regulation of Carbohydrate Metabolism, Lipid Metabolism, and Protein Metabolism by AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Yeliz; Beauloye, Christophe; Horman, Sandrine; Bertrand, Luc

    This chapter summarizes AMPK function in the regulation of substrate and energy metabolism with the main emphasis on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, protein turnover, mitochondrial biogenesis, and whole-body energy homeostasis. AMPK acts as whole-body energy sensor and integrates different signaling pathway to meet both cellular and body energy requirements while inhibiting energy-consuming processes but also activating energy-producing ones. AMPK mainly promotes glucose and fatty acid catabolism, whereas it prevents protein, glycogen, and fatty acid synthesis.

  1. Analysis of metabolic flux using dynamic labelling and metabolic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, A R; Morgan, J A

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes and the capacity to modulate them are a crucial component of the ability of the plant cell to react to environmental perturbations. Our ability to quantify them and to attain information concerning the regulatory mechanisms that control them is therefore essential to understand and influence metabolic networks. For all but the simplest of flux measurements labelling methods have proven to be the most informative. Both steady-state and dynamic labelling approaches have been adopted in the study of plant metabolism. Here the conceptual basis of these complementary approaches, as well as their historical application in microbial, mammalian and plant sciences, is reviewed, and an update on technical developments in label distribution analyses is provided. This is supported by illustrative cases studies involving the kinetic modelling of secondary metabolism. One issue that is particularly complex in the analysis of plant fluxes is the extensive compartmentation of the plant cell. This problem is discussed from both theoretical and experimental perspectives, and the current approaches used to address it are assessed. Finally, current limitations and future perspectives of kinetic modelling of plant metabolism are discussed.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms and drug metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Dolžan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is estimated that genetic factors account for 15–30 % of variability in drug response, however for some drugs this may be the major determinant in drug response. Pharmacogenetics aims to identify genetic sources of variability in response to drugs by studying genetic variations affecting drug metabolizing enzymes, transporters and drug targets thus causing interindividual variability in drug levels (pharmacokinetics, drug response (pharmacodynamics and side effects. Extensive information on genetic variability in drug metabolizing enzymes, transporters and targets is available from public databases. Drugs are metabolized in two phases. In Phase I drug is metabolically activated to reactive electrophilic form, mostly by cytochromes P450 (CYPs, to be conjugated to some endogenous compound by Phase II enzymes: UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs, N-acetyl-transferases (NATs, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, or others. Genetic polymorphism of many enzymes involved in this process leads to inter-individual variations in metabolism and pharmacokinetics of drugs and could therefore influence drug response. Genetic polymorphism is the occurrence of two or more alleles at a given locus of which the rare allele has a frequency of at least 1 % or more in a given population. The understanding of a patient’s genotype and its corresponding effect on drug response could help distinguish between responders and non-responders of a specific drug treatment and help to choose the most effective drug and optimal dose. A large number of different methodologies have been developed for genotyping, however at present predictive genotyping for drug metabolizing enzymes does not occur routinely in the clinical practice.Conclusions: There is increasing evidence that genotyping for polymorphic drug metabolizing enzymes, in particular CYPs has potential to improve drug therapy and achieve higher response rates and reduced adverse effects. Open questions

  3. Analog regulation of metabolic demand

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    Muskhelishvili Georgi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3D structure of the chromosome of the model organism Escherichia coli is one key component of its gene regulatory machinery. This type of regulation mediated by topological transitions of the chromosomal DNA can be thought of as an analog control, complementing the digital control, i.e. the network of regulation mediated by dedicated transcription factors. It is known that alterations in the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA lead to a rich pattern of differential expressed genes. Using a network approach, we analyze these expression changes for wild type E. coli and mutants lacking nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs from a metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network perspective. Results We find a significantly higher correspondence between gene expression and metabolism for the wild type expression changes compared to mutants in NAPs, indicating that supercoiling induces meaningful metabolic adjustments. As soon as the underlying regulatory machinery is impeded (as for the NAP mutants, this coherence between expression changes and the metabolic network is substantially reduced. This effect is even more pronounced, when we compute a wild type metabolic flux distribution using flux balance analysis and restrict our analysis to active reactions. Furthermore, we are able to show that the regulatory control exhibited by DNA supercoiling is not mediated by the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN, as the consistency of the expression changes with the TRN logic of activation and suppression is strongly reduced in the wild type in comparison to the mutants. Conclusions So far, the rich patterns of gene expression changes induced by alterations of the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA have been difficult to interpret. Here we characterize the effective networks formed by supercoiling-induced gene expression changes mapped onto reconstructions of E. coli's metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network. Our

  4. [Lead compound optimization strategy (1)--changing metabolic pathways and optimizing metabolism stability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Liu, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Lead compound optimization plays an important role in new drug discovery and development. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways can modulate pharmacokinetic properties, prolong the half life, improve metabolism stability and bioavailability of lead compounds. The strategies for changing metabolic pathways and improving metabolism stability are reviewed. These methods include blocking metabolic site, reduing lipophilicity, changing ring size, bioisosterism, and prodrug.

  5. Response to trauma and metabolic changes: posttraumatic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şimşek, Turgay; Şimşek, Hayal Uzelli; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2014-01-01

    Stress response caused by events such as surgical trauma includes endocrine, metabolic and immunological changes. Stress hormones and cytokines play a role in these reactions. More reactions are induced by greater stress, ultimately leading to greater catabolic effects. Cuthbertson reported the characteristic response that occurs in trauma patients: protein and fat consumption and protection of body fluids and electrolytes because of hypermetabolism in the early period. The oxygen and energy requirement increases in proportion to the severity of trauma. The awareness of alterations in amino acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism changes in surgical patients is important in determining metabolic and nutritional support. The main metabolic change in response to injury that leads to a series of reactions is the reduction of the normal anabolic effect of insulin, i.e. the development of insulin resistance. Free fatty acids are primary sources of energy after trauma. Triglycerides meet 50 to 80 % of the consumed energy after trauma and in critical illness. Surgical stress and trauma result in a reduction in protein synthesis and moderate protein degradation. Severe trauma, burns and sepsis result in increased protein degradation. The aim of glucose administration to surgical patients during fasting is to reduce proteolysis and to prevent loss of muscle mass. In major stress such as sepsis and trauma, it is important both to reduce the catabolic response that is the key to faster healing after surgery and to obtain a balanced metabolism in the shortest possible time with minimum loss. For these reasons, the details of metabolic response to trauma should be known in managing these situations and patients should be treated accordingly.

  6. Metabolic Cost of Experimental Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James T.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Although the type and duration of activity during decompression was well documented, the metabolic cost of 1665 subject-exposures with 8 activity profiles from 17 altitude decompression sickness (DCS) protocols at Brooks City-Base, TX from 1983-2005 was not determined. Female and male human volunteers (30 planned, 4 completed) performed activity profiles matching those 8 activity profiles at ground level with continuous monitoring of metabolic cost. A Cosmed K4b2 Cardio Pulmonary Exercise Testing device was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2) during the profiles. The results show levels of metabolic cost to the females for the profiles tested varied from 4.3 to 25.5 ml/kg/min and from 3.0 to 12.0 ml/kg/min to the males. The increase in VO2 from seated rest to the most strenuous of the 8 activity profiles was 3.6-fold for the females and 2.8-fold for the males. These preliminary data on 4 subjects indicate close agreement of oxygen uptake for activity performed during many subject-exposures as published earlier. The relatively low average oxygen uptake required to perform the most strenuous activity may imply the need for adjustment of modeling efforts using metabolic cost as a risk factor. Better definition of metabolic cost during exposure to altitude, a critical factor in DCS risk, may allow refinement of DCS prediction models.

  7. Gut microbiota and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Marasco, Giovanni; Taddia, Martina; Colecchia, Antonio

    2014-11-21

    Gut microbiota exerts a significant role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, as confirmed by studies conducted both on humans and animal models. Gut microbial composition and functions are strongly influenced by diet. This complex intestinal "superorganism" seems to affect host metabolic balance modulating energy absorption, gut motility, appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as hepatic fatty storage. An impairment of the fine balance between gut microbes and host's immune system could culminate in the intestinal translocation of bacterial fragments and the development of "metabolic endotoxemia", leading to systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. Diet induced weight-loss and bariatric surgery promote significant changes of gut microbial composition, that seem to affect the success, or the inefficacy, of treatment strategies. Manipulation of gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics could reduce intestinal low grade inflammation and improve gut barrier integrity, thus, ameliorating metabolic balance and promoting weight loss. However, further evidence is needed to better understand their clinical impact and therapeutic use.

  8. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  9. Nutrition, epigenetics, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Li, Defa; Li, Ning; Dindot, Scott V; Satterfield, M Carey; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-07-15

    Epidemiological and animal studies have demonstrated a close link between maternal nutrition and chronic metabolic disease in children and adults. Compelling experimental results also indicate that adverse effects of intrauterine growth restriction on offspring can be carried forward to subsequent generations through covalent modifications of DNA and core histones. DNA methylation is catalyzed by S-adenosylmethionine-dependent DNA methyltransferases. Methylation, demethylation, acetylation, and deacetylation of histone proteins are performed by histone methyltransferase, histone demethylase, histone acetyltransferase, and histone deacetyltransferase, respectively. Histone activities are also influenced by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, ADP-ribosylation, sumoylation, and glycosylation. Metabolism of amino acids (glycine, histidine, methionine, and serine) and vitamins (B6, B12, and folate) plays a key role in provision of methyl donors for DNA and protein methylation. Disruption of epigenetic mechanisms can result in oxidative stress, obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and vascular dysfunction in animals and humans. Despite a recognized role for epigenetics in fetal programming of metabolic syndrome, research on therapies is still in its infancy. Possible interventions include: 1) inhibition of DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and microRNA expression; 2) targeting epigenetically disturbed metabolic pathways; and 3) dietary supplementation with functional amino acids, vitamins, and phytochemicals. Much work is needed with animal models to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for the roles of specific nutrients in fetal and neonatal programming. Such new knowledge is crucial to design effective therapeutic strategies for preventing and treating metabolic abnormalities in offspring born to mothers with a previous experience of malnutrition.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  11. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  12. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  13. Cancer Metabolism: A Modeling Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    requires both the advancement of experimental technologies for more comprehensive measurement of omics as well as the advancement of robust computational methods for accurate analysis of the generated data. Here, we review cancer-associated reprogramming of metabolism and highlight the capability of genome...... suggest that utilization of amino acids and lipids contributes significantly to cancer cell metabolism. Also recent progresses in our understanding of carcinogenesis have revealed that cancer is a complex disease and cannot be understood through simple investigation of genetic mutations of cancerous cells....... Cancer cells present in complex tumor tissues communicate with the surrounding microenvironment and develop traits which promote their growth, survival, and metastasis. Decoding the full scope and targeting dysregulated metabolic pathways that support neoplastic transformations and their preservation...

  14. Metabolic traits of pathogenic streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenborg, Jörg; Goethe, Ralph

    2016-11-01

    Invasive and noninvasive diseases caused by facultative pathogenic streptococci depend on their equipment with virulence factors and on their ability to sense and adapt to changing nutrients in different host environments. The knowledge of the principal metabolic mechanisms which allow these bacteria to recognize and utilize nutrients in host habitats is a prerequisite for our understanding of streptococcal pathogenicity and the development of novel control strategies. This review aims to summarize and compare the central carbohydrate metabolic and amino acid biosynthetic pathways of a selected group of streptococcal species, all belonging to the naso-oropharyngeal microbiome in humans and/or animals. We also discuss the urgent need of comprehensive metabolomics approaches for a better understanding of the streptococcal metabolism during host-pathogen interaction. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. DNA methylation in metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Zierath, Juleen R

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that controls gene expression in physiologic and pathologic states. Metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity are associated with profound alterations in gene expression that are caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recent reports...... have provided evidence that environmental factors at all ages could modify DNA methylation in somatic tissues, which suggests that DNA methylation is a more dynamic process than previously appreciated. Because of the importance of lifestyle factors in metabolic disorders, DNA methylation provides...... a mechanism by which environmental factors, including diet and exercise, can modify genetic predisposition to disease. This article considers the current evidence that defines a role for DNA methylation in metabolic disorders....

  16. Exercise in the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension that is occurring in increasing frequency across the global population. Although there is some controversy about its diagnostic criteria, oxidative stress, which is defined as imbalance between the production and inactivation of reactive oxygen species, has a major pathophysiological role in all the components of this disease. Oxidative stress and consequent inflammation induce insulin resistance, which likely links the various components of this disease. We briefly review the role of oxidative stress as a major component of the metabolic syndrome and then discuss the impact of exercise on these pathophysiological pathways. Included in this paper is the effect of exercise in reducing fat-induced inflammation, blood pressure, and improving muscular metabolism.

  17. Energy metabolism during human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsum, Elisabet; Löf, Marie

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes information regarding how human energy metabolism is affected by pregnancy, and current estimates of energy requirements during pregnancy are presented. Such estimates can be calculated using either increases in basal metabolic rate (BMR) or increases in total energy expenditure (TEE). The two modes of calculation give similar results for a complete pregnancy but different distributions of energy requirements in the three trimesters. Recent information is presented regarding the effect of pregnancy on BMR, TEE, diet-induced thermogenesis, and physical activity. The validity of energy intake (EI) data recently assessed in well-nourished pregnant women was evaluated using information regarding energy metabolism during pregnancy. The results show that underreporting of EI is common during pregnancy and indicate that additional longitudinal studies, taking the total energy budget during pregnancy into account, are needed to satisfactorily define energy requirements during the three trimesters of gestation.

  18. Public goods and metabolic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Herwig; Bruggeman, Frank J; Molenaar, Douwe; Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Teusink, Bas

    2016-06-01

    Microbial growth can be characterized by a limited set of macroscopic parameters such as growth rate, biomass yield and substrate affinity. Different culturing protocols for laboratory evolution have been developed to select mutant strains that have one specific macroscopic growth parameter improved. Some of those mutant strains display tradeoffs between growth parameters and changed metabolic strategies, for example, a shift from respiration to fermentation. Here we discuss recent studies suggesting that metabolic strategies and growth parameter tradeoffs originate from a common set of physicochemical and cellular constraints, associated with the allocation of intracellular resources over biosynthetic processes, mostly protein synthesis. This knowledge will give insight in ecological and biological concepts and can be used for metabolic and evolutionary engineering strategies.

  19. Complexity of vitamin E metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisa Schm?lz; Marc Birringer; Stefan Lorkowski; Maria Wallert

    2016-01-01

    Bioavailability of vitamin E is influenced by several factors, most are highlighted in this review. While gender, age and genetic constitution influence vitamin E bioavailability but cannot be modified, life-style and intake of vitamin E can be. Numerous factors must be taken into account however, i.e., when vitamin E is orally administrated, the food matrix may contain competing nutrients. The complex metabolic processes comprise intestinal absorption, vascular transport, hepatic sorting by intracellular binding proteins, such as the significant α-tocopherol-transfer protein, and hepatic metabolism. The coordinated changes involved in the hepatic metabolism of vitamin E provide an effective physiological pathway to protect tissues against the excessive accumulation of, in particular, non-α-tocopherol forms. Metabolism of vitamin E begins with one cycle of CYP4F2/CYP3A4-dependent ω-hydroxylation followed by five cycles of subsequent β-oxidation, and forms the water-soluble end-product carboxyethylhydroxychroman. All known hepatic metabolites can be conjugated and are excreted, depending on the length of their sidechain, either via urine or feces. The physiological handling of vitamin E underlies kinetics which vary between the different vitamin E forms. Here, saturation of the side-chain and also substitution of the chromanol ring system are important. Most of the metabolic reactions and processes that are involved with vitamin E are also shared by other fat soluble vitamins. Influencing interactions with other nutrients such as vitamin K or pharmaceuticals are also covered by this review. All these processes modulate the formation of vitamin E metabolites and their concentrations in tissues and body fluids. Differences in metabolism might be responsible for the discrepancies that have been observed in studies performed in vivo and in vitro using vitamin E as a supplement or nutrient. To evaluate individual vitamin E status, the analytical procedures used for

  20. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  1. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  2. Metabolism of verruculogen in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, K P; Day, J B; Mantle, P G; Rodrigues, L

    1982-03-01

    Radiolabeled verruculogen was detected in a wide range of body tissues 6 min after intravenous administration, but after a further 20 min it was mainly being excreted via the biliary route. In isolated liver perfusion, [14C]verruculogen was rapidly taken up by the liver and metabolized completely, principally to the related tremorgen TR-2 but also to a desoxy derivative of verruculogen. In addition, a smaller amount of an isomer of TR-2 was detected. These metabolic products were excreted in the bile.

  3. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    been used as scaffolds for analysis of high throughput data to allow mechanistic interpretation of changes in expression. Finally, GEMs allow quantitative flux predictions using flux balance analysis (FBA). Here we critically review the requirements for successful FBA simulations of cancer cells......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...... of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome...

  4. Metabolic analysis of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) berries from extreme genotypes reveals hallmarks for fruit starch metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nardozza, Simona; Boldingh, Helen L; Osorio, Sonia; Höhne, Melanie; Wohlers, Mark; Gleave, Andrew P; MacRae, Elspeth A; Richardson, Annette C; Atkinson, Ross G; Sulpice, Ronan; Fernie, Alisdair R; Clearwater, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    ... deliciosa genotypes contrasting in starch concentration and size, this study identified the metabolic changes occurring during kiwifruit development, including the metabolic hallmarks of starch accumulation and turnover...

  5. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-01-01

    .... We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells...

  6. Artificial Promoters for Metabolic Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    In this article, we review some of the expression systems that are available for Metabolic Control Analysis and Metabolic Engineering, and examine their advantages and disadvantages in different contexts. In a recent approach, artificial promoters for modulating gene expression in micro-organisms......In this article, we review some of the expression systems that are available for Metabolic Control Analysis and Metabolic Engineering, and examine their advantages and disadvantages in different contexts. In a recent approach, artificial promoters for modulating gene expression in micro......-organisms were constructed using synthetic degenerated oligonucleotides. From this work, a promoter library was obtained for Lactococcus lactis, containing numerous individual promoters and covering a wide range of promoter activities. Importantly, the range of promoter activities was covered in small steps...... of activity change. Promoter libraries generated by this approach allow for optimization of gene expression and for experimental control analysis in a wide range of biological systems by choosing from the promoter library promoters giving, e.g., 25%, 50%, 200%, and 400% of the normal expression level...

  7. Genetic determinants for metabolic abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric patients often use psychotropic drugs. Apart from frequent problems regarding lack of efficacy, use of these drugs also often results in (severe) adverse effects. The use of (atypical) antipsychotic drugs in particular can give rise to weight gain and metabolic deregulation regarding glu

  8. Metabolic engineering in methanotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, MG; Puri, AW; Lidstrom, ME

    2015-05-01

    Methane, as natural gas or biogas, is the least expensive source of carbon for (bio)chemical synthesis. Scalable biological upgrading of this simple alkane to chemicals and fuels can bring new sustainable solutions to a number of industries with large environmental footprints, such as natural gas/petroleum production, landfills, wastewater treatment, and livestock. Microbial biocatalysis with methane as a feedstock has been pursued off and on for almost a half century, with little enduring success. Today, biological engineering and systems biology provide new opportunities for metabolic system modulation and give new optimism to the concept of a methane-based bio-industry. Here we present an overview of the most recent advances pertaining to metabolic engineering of microbial methane utilization. Some ideas concerning metabolic improvements for production of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, two main precursors for bioconversion, are presented. We also discuss main gaps in the current knowledge of aerobic methane utilization, which must be solved in order to release the full potential of methane-based biosystems. (C) 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolism of phthalates in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2007-01-01

    phthalates, but our knowledge about metabolic distribution in the body and other biological fluids, including breast milk, is limited. Compared to urine, human breast milk contains relatively more of the hydrophobic phthalates, such as di-n-butyl phthalate and the longer-branched, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate...

  10. SIRT1 and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mac-Marcjanek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Both obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, two major components of metabolic syndrome, become healthepidemics in the world. Over the past decade, advances in understanding the role of some regulators participatingin lipid and carbohydrate homeostasis have been made.Of them, SIRT1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast Sir2 protein has been identified. SIRT1 is a nuclearNAD+-dependent deacetylase that targets many transcriptional modulators, including PPAR-α and -γ (peroxisomeproliferator-activated receptors α and γ, PGC-1α (PPAR-γ coactivator-1α, FOXO (forkhead box O proteins,and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, thereby this enzyme mediates a wide range of physiological processes like apoptosis,fat metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and neurodegeneration.In this article, we discuss how SIRT1 regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and insulin secretion indifferent metabolic organs/tissue, including liver, muscle, pancreas, and fat. Additionally, the role of this enzymein reduction of inflammatory signalling is highlighted.

  11. Alcohol abuse and glycoconjugate metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Chojnowska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between alcohol consumption and glycoconjugate metabolism is complex and multidimensional. This review summarizes the advances in basic and clinical research on the molecular and cellular events involved in the metabolic effects of alcohol on glycoconjugates (glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. We summarize the action of ethanol, acetaldehyde, reactive oxygen species (ROS, nonoxidative metabolite of alcohol — fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, and the ethanol-water competition mechanism, on glycoconjugate biosynthesis, modification, transport and secretion, as well as on elimination and catabolism processes. As the majority of changes in the cellular metabolism of glycoconjugates are generally ascribed to alterations in synthesis, transport, glycosylation and secretion, the degradation and elimination processes, of which the former occurs also in extracellular matrix, seem to be underappreciated. The pathomechanisms are additionally complicated by the fact that the effect of alcohol intoxication on the glycoconjugate metabolism depends not only on the duration of ethanol exposure, but also demonstrates dose- and regional-sensitivity. Further research is needed to bridge the gap in transdisciplinary research and enhance our understanding of alcohol- and glycoconjugate-related diseases.

  12. Alcohol abuse and glycoconjugate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Zalewska, Anna; Szulc, Agata; Kępka, Alina; Minarowska, Alina; Wojewódzka-Żelezniakowicz, Marzena; Konarzewska, Beata; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2012-04-24

    The relationship between alcohol consumption and glycoconjugate metabolism is complex and multidimensional. This review summarizes the advances in basic and clinical research on the molecular and cellular events involved in the metabolic effects of alcohol on glycoconjugates (glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans). We summarize the action of ethanol, acetaldehyde, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nonoxidative metabolite of alcohol--fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), and the ethanol-water competition mechanism, on glycoconjugate biosynthesis, modification, transport and secretion, as well as on elimination and catabolism processes. As the majority of changes in the cellular metabolism of glycoconjugates are generally ascribed to alterations in synthesis, transport, glycosylation and secretion, the degradation and elimination processes, of which the former occurs also in extracellular matrix, seem to be underappreciated. The pathomechanisms are additionally complicated by the fact that the effect of alcohol intoxication on the glycoconjugate metabolism depends not only on the duration of ethanol exposure, but also demonstrates dose- and regional-sensitivity. Further research is needed to bridge the gap in transdisciplinary research and enhance our understanding of alcohol- and glycoconjugate-related diseases.

  13. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos; V; Rizos; Moses; S; Elisaf

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro-and macrovascular disease.Moreover,increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance.As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical.However,the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism.Indeed,angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis.Calcium channel blockers(CCBs)have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism.However,some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis.On the other hand,diuretics andβ-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism.Of note,carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of theβ-blockers class,being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis.The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may,to an extent,compromise their cardiovascular protective role.As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment,especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes.

  14. Bone scintigraphy and metabolic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mari' , C.; Catafau, A.; Carrio' , I. [Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelone (Spain). Serv. of Nuclear Medicine

    1999-09-01

    The paper discusses the main clinical value of bone scan in metabolic bone disease: its detection of focal conditions or focal complications of such generalized disease, its most common use of being the detection of fractures in osteoporosis, pseudo fractures in osteomalacia and the evaluation of Paget's disease.

  15. Vitamin D metabolism and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, H.F.

    1978-05-15

    A general review of the biological functions of vitamin D and the metabolism of vitamin D are given in order to elucidate the biochemical possibilities of calcipdiol. The biochemical mechanisms of calcipdiol use in the treatment of skeletal system diseases are discussed. (DS)

  16. Metabolic networks: beyond the graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Andrés; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Drugs are devised to enter into the metabolism of an organism in order to produce a desired effect. From the chemical point of view, cellular metabolism is constituted by a complex network of reactions transforming metabolites one in each other. Knowledge on the structure of this network could help to develop novel methods for drug design, and to comprehend the root of known unexpected side effects. Many large-scale studies on the structure of metabolic networks have been developed following models based on different kinds of graphs as the fundamental image of the reaction network. Graphs models, however, comport wrong assumptions regarding the structure of reaction networks that may lead into wrong conclusions if they are not taken into account. In this article we critically review some graph-theoretical approaches to the analysis of centrality, vulnerability and modularity of metabolic networks, analyzing their limitations in estimating these key network properties, consider some proposals explicit or implicitly based on directed hypergraphs regarding their ability to overcome these issues, and review some recent implementation improvements that make the application of these models in increasingly large networks a viable option.

  17. Does Metabolically Healthy Obesity Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Cornejo-Pareja, Isabel; Tinahones, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between obesity and other metabolic diseases have been deeply studied. However, there are clinical inconsistencies, exceptions to the paradigm of “more fat means more metabolic disease”, and the subjects in this condition are referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO).They have long-standing obesity and morbid obesity but can be considered healthy despite their high degree of obesity. We describe the variable definitions of MHO, the underlying mechanisms that can explain the existence of this phenotype caused by greater adipose tissue inflammation or the different capacity for adipose tissue expansion and functionality apart from other unknown mechanisms. We analyze whether these subjects improve after an intervention (traditional lifestyle recommendations or bariatric surgery) or if they stay healthy as the years pass. MHO is common among the obese population and constitutes a unique subset of characteristics that reduce metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors despite the presence of excessive fat mass. The protective factors that grant a healthier profile to individuals with MHO are being elucidated. PMID:27258304

  18. Metabolic diversity in apple germplasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, S.A.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Chibon, P.Y.F.R.P.; Maliepaard, C.A.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Jacobsen, E.; Schouten, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    We analysed metabolic diversity in apples from wild species, elite material and a F1 population, using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS). The evaluated elite material appeared to have strongly reduced levels of phenolic compounds, down to 1% of the concentrations in the investigat

  19. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-11-16

    Metabolic engineering emerged 20 years ago as the discipline occupied with the directed modification of metabolic pathways for the microbial synthesis of various products. As such, it deals with the engineering (design, construction, and optimization) of native as well as non-natural routes of product synthesis, aided in this task by the availability of synthetic DNA, the core enabling technology of synthetic biology. The two fields, however, only partially overlap in their interest in pathway engineering. While fabrication of biobricks, synthetic cells, genetic circuits, and nonlinear cell dynamics, along with pathway engineering, have occupied researchers in the field of synthetic biology, the sum total of these areas does not constitute a coherent definition of synthetic biology with a distinct intellectual foundation and well-defined areas of application. This paper reviews the origins of the two fields and advances two distinct paradigms for each of them: that of unit operations for metabolic engineering and electronic circuits for synthetic biology. In this context, metabolic engineering is about engineering cell factories for the biological manufacturing of chemical and pharmaceutical products, whereas the main focus of synthetic biology is fundamental biological research facilitated by the use of synthetic DNA and genetic circuits.

  20. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis i

  1. Metabolic polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G; Stanley, L A; Sim, E; Strange, R C; Wolf, C R

    1995-01-01

    The vast majority of cancers arise as a consequence of exposure to environmental agents that are toxic or mutagenic. In response to this, all higher organisms have evolved complex mechanisms by which they can protect themselves from environmental challenge. In many cases, this involves an adaptive response in which the levels of expression of enzymes active in the metabolism and detoxification of the foreign chemical are induced. The best characterized of these enzyme systems are the cytochrome P450s, the GSTs and the NATs. An unfortunate consequence of many of these reactions, however, is the creation of a toxic or mutagenic reaction product from chemicals that require metabolic activation before realizing their full carcinogenic potential. Altered expression of one or more of these drug metabolizing enzymes can therefore be predicted to have profound toxicological consequences. Genetic polymorphisms with well defined associated phenotypes have now been characterized in P450, GST and NAT genes. Indeed, many of these polymorphisms have been associated with decreased or increased metabolism of many tumour promoters and chemical carcinogens and hence offer protection against or increased susceptibility to many distinct tumour types.

  2. Urban metabolism: a review of research methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Urban metabolism analysis has become an important tool for the study of urban ecosystems. The problems of large metabolic throughput, low metabolic efficiency, and disordered metabolic processes are a major cause of unhealthy urban systems. In this paper, I summarize the international research on urban metabolism, and describe the progress that has been made in terms of research methodologies. I also review the methods used in accounting for and evaluating material and energy flows in urban metabolic processes, simulation of these flows using a network model, and practical applications of these methods. Based on this review of the literature, I propose directions for future research, and particularly the need to study the urban carbon metabolism because of the modern context of global climate change. Moreover, I recommend more research on the optimal regulation of urban metabolic systems.

  3. Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provider. How is metabolic syndrome diagnosed? To diagnose metabolic syndrome, most doctors look for the presence of three or more of these components: Central or abdominal obesity (measured by waist circumference): Men - greater than 40 ...

  4. Neck Circumference and Cardio- Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nagendran Vijaya; Ismail, Mohammed H.; P, Mahesha; M, Girish; Tripathy, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background: Only few studies about neck circumference (NC) as a measure of cardio metabolic syndrome available from India. Study was conducted to establish an association between neck circumference and cardio metabolic syndrome.

  5. Metabolic Risk Factors in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, David I.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    The biology of prostate cancer is influenced by the metabolic profile of each individual. We examine the evidence available interlinking prostate cancer with obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic syndrome components.

  6. Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Mediterranean diet and the metabolic syndrome Background: The metabolic syndrome refers to a clustering of risk factors including abdominal obesity, hyperglycaemia, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia, and hypertension and it is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus type 2 and

  7. Genetic-Metabolic Coupling for Targeted Metabolic Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardinale, Stefano; Tueros Farfan, Felipe Gonzalo; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Production of chemicals in microbes often employs potent biosynthetic enzymes, which can interact with the microbial native metabolism to affect cell fitness and product yield. However, production optimization largely relies on data collected from wild-type strains in the absence of metabolic...... pertur-bations, thus limiting their relevance to specific conditions. Here, we address this issue by coupling cell fitness to the production of thiamine diphosphate in Escherichia coli using a synthetic RNA biosensor. We use this strategy to interrogate a library of transposon mutants and elucidate...... the native gene network influencing both cell fitness and thiamine production. Ultimately, we identify effectors of the OxyR-Fur stress response that limit thiamine biosynthesis via alternative regulation of iron storage and Fe-S cluster inclusion in enzymes. This study presents a new approach...

  8. Congenital metabolic diseases: Diagnosis and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wapnir, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains eight parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: The Heritage of Sir Archibald Garrod; New Approaches to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Genetic Disease; Achievements, New Trends, and Policies in the Detection of Inborn Errors of Metabolism; Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism; Diseases of Energy Metabolism; Problems of Abnormal Storage Diseases; Inherited Diseases of Membrane Transport and Receptors; and Inborn Errors of Purine Metabolism and Urea Synthesis.

  9. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, Birgitta E.; Anna-Lena Lamprecht; Bernhard Steffen; Blank, Lars M.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in ...

  10. Insulin signaling meets mitochondria in metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Tseng, Yolanda; White, Morris F.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin controls nutrient and metabolic homeostasis via the IRS–PI3K–AKT signaling cascade that targets FOXO1 and mTOR. Mitochondria, as the prime metabolic platform, malfunction during insulin resistance in metabolic diseases. However, the molecular link between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction remains undefined. Here we review recent studies on insulin action and the mechanistic association with mitochondrial metabolism. These studies suggest that insulin signaling underpins...

  11. Hypothyroidism and possible association with Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Shahid; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Ahmad, Mushir; Nagtilak, Suryakant; Ahmad, Naved

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid dysfunctions are the most common forms of endocrine disorder in our country, Thyroid hormones perform a wide array of metabolic functions including regulation of lipids, carbohydrates, protein and electrolytes and mineral metabolism, Thyroid hormones are major regulatory hormones that controls the rate of metabolic function and alteration in the levels of thyroid hormones may be associated with metabolic syndromeAim: The study was performed to investigate the association b...

  12. Parma consensus statement on metabolic disruptors

    OpenAIRE

    Heindel, Jerrold J.; Frederick S Vom Saal; Blumberg, Bruce; Bovolin, Patrizia; Calamandrei, Gemma; Ceresini, Graziano; Cohn, Barbara A.; Fabbri, Elena; Gioiosa, Laura; Kassotis, Christopher; Legler, Juliette; La Merrill, Michele; Rizzir, Laura; Machtinger, Ronit; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Heindel et al. A multidisciplinary group of experts gathered in Parma Italy for a workshop hosted by the University of Parma, May 16-18, 2014 to address concerns about the potential relationship between environmental metabolic disrupting chemicals, obesity and related metabolic disorders. The objectives of the workshop were to: 1. Review findings related to the role of environmental chemicals, referred to as "metabolic disruptors", in obesity and metabolic syndrome with special attenti...

  13. It must be my metabolism: Metabolic control of mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M Small

    2014-07-01

    relationship between the reinforcing potency of sugared solutions and the metabolic effects that follow their consumption (16, also see the abstract of I. de Araujo. We therefore hypothesized that metabolic response provides the critical signal necessary to condition preference. To test this prediction in humans we designed a flavor nutrient conditioning study in which participants first rated their liking for novel flavored beverages and then, over a three week-long conditioning protocol, alternately ingested one of the flavored beverages with 112.5 kcal from maltodextrin, a tasteless and odorless polysaccharide that breaks down into glucose, and another flavored beverage with no calories added. Plasma glucose was measured before and after each of the drinks’ consumption as a proxy measure of metabolic response, assuming that glucose oxidation depends upon the level of circulating glucose. For each participant flavor-calorie pairings were held constant but the identity of the conditioned flavors were counterbalanced across participants. Following the exposure phase, participants’ liking of, and brain responses to, non-caloric versions of the flavors were assessed. We predicted that change in plasma glucose produced by beverage consumption during the exposure sessions would be associated with neural responses in dopamine source and target regions to the calorie predictive flavor. As predicted, response in the ventral striatum and hypothalamus to the calorie-predictive flavor (CS+ vs. non the noncaloric-predictive flavor (CS- was strongly associated with the changes in plasma glucose levels produced by ingestion of these same beverages when consumed previously either with (CS+ or without (CS- calories (17. Specifically, the greater the increase in circulating glucose occurring post ingestion of the beverage containing 112.5 kcal from maltodextrin versus the noncaloric drink, the stronger was the brain response to the CS+ compared to the CS- flavor. Importantly, because each

  14. Metabolic markers in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Colombini, Alessandra; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lubkowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise induces adaptations in metabolism considered beneficial for health. Athletic performance is linked to adaptations, training, and correct nutrition in individuals with genetic traits that can facilitate such adaptations. Intense and continuous exercise, training, and competitions, however, can induce changes in the serum concentrations of numerous laboratory parameters. When these modifications, especially elevated laboratory levels, result outside the reference range, further examinations are ordered or participation in training and competition is discontinued or sports practice loses its appeal. In order to correctly interpret commonly used laboratory data, laboratory professionals and sport physicians need to know the behavior of laboratory parameters during and after practice and competition. We reviewed the literature on liver, kidney, muscle, heart, energy, and bone parameters in athletes with a view to increase the knowledge about clinical chemistry applied to sport and to stimulate studies in this field. In liver metabolism, the interpretation of serum aminotransferases concentration in athletes should consider the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) from muscle and of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) mainly from the liver, when bilirubin can be elevated because of continuous hemolysis, which is typical of exercise. Muscle metabolism parameters such as creatine kinase (CK) are typically increased after exercise. This parameter can be used to interpret the physiological release of CK from muscle, its altered release due to rhabdomyolysis, or incomplete recovery due to overreaching or trauma. Cardiac markers are released during exercise, and especially endurance training. Increases in these markers should not simply be interpreted as a signal of cardiac damage or wall stress but rather as a sign of regulation of myocardial adaptation. Renal function can be followed in athletes by measuring serum creatinine concentration, but it should

  15. Cholesterol metabolism and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, S A; Cerda, S; Wilkinson, J

    1993-01-01

    While epidemiologic and concordant experimental data indicate a direct relationship between dietary fat (and presumably caloric) intake and the development of colon cancer, the effect of dietary cholesterol on this disease is still not clear. However, there appears to be a developing literature concerning an inverse relationship between serum and plasma cholesterol levels, and the risk for colon cancer. Findings that low serum cholesterol levels are apparent as early as ten years prior to the detection of colon cancer implies that sub clinical disease is probably not involved initially in this process. The possibility of low serum cholesterol as a bio-marker was considered in epidemiologic studies which focused upon obese men with lower than normal serum cholesterol levels who were found to be at increased risk to colon cancer. While the relationship between low serum cholesterol and colonic or intestinal cholesterol metabolism is presently not understood, current genetic studies provide a promising though as yet unexplored potential association. Alterations which occur during the developmental progression of colonic cancer include changes in chromosome 5, which also carries two genes vital to the biosynthesis and regulation of systemic and cellular cholesterol metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA R). Regulation of cholesterol metabolism in intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro varies from that seen in normal fibroblasts or hepatocytes in terms of exogenous sources of cholesterol and how these sources regulate internal synthesis. Colonic cancer cells have been used to assess small bowel enterocyte cholesterol metabolism, which has been possible because of their ability to differentiate in culture, however information regarding true colonic enterocyte cholesterol metabolism is relatively scarce. Colonic cancer cells have been shown to possess a diminished or nonexistent ability to use

  16. Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Diseases: Pharmacological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of studies show that alterations in intestinal microbiota are linked with metabolic diseases. Here, we propose that intestinal microbiota regulation by polyphenols may be an important mechanism underlying their therapeutic benefits for metabolic diseases. This helps elucidate the intriguing pharmacology of polyphenols and optimize the treatment of metabolic diseases.

  17. Can resveratrol help to maintain metabolic health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, P.; Timmers, S.

    2014-01-01

    The number of people suffering from metabolic diseases is dramatically increasing worldwide. This stresses the need for new therapeutic strategies to combat this growing epidemic of metabolic diseases. A reduced mitochondrial function is one of the characteristics of metabolic diseases and therefore

  18. Can resveratrol help to maintain metabolic health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, P.; Timmers, S.

    2014-01-01

    The number of people suffering from metabolic diseases is dramatically increasing worldwide. This stresses the need for new therapeutic strategies to combat this growing epidemic of metabolic diseases. A reduced mitochondrial function is one of the characteristics of metabolic diseases and therefore

  19. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    -exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-exome sequencing of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 'exome chip' studies pointing to novel genes in LDL metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic loci for ATP-binding cassette...... transporters G5 and G8, Niemann-Pick C1-Like protein 1, sortilin-1, ABO blood-group glycosyltransferases, myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase have all consistently been associated with LDL cholesterol levels and/or coronary artery disease in GWAS. Whole...

  20. [Copper metabolism and genetic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Norikazu

    2016-07-01

    Copper is one of essential trace elements. Copper deficiency lead to growth and developmental failure and/or neurological dysfunction. However, excess copper is also problems for human life. There are two disorders of inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes disease and Wilson disease. Menkes disease is an X linked recessive disorder with copper deficiency and Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder with copper accumulation. These both disorders result from the defective functioning of copper transport P-type ATPase, ATP7A of Menkes disease and ATP7B of Wilson disease. In this paper, the author describes about copper metabolism of human, and clinical feature, diagnosis and treatment of Menkes disease and Wilson disease.

  1. Spontaneous emergence of a metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, R.J.; Farmer, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Santa Fe Inst., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Networks of catalyzed reactions with nonlinear feedback have been proposed to play an important role in the origin of life. We investigate this possibility in a polymer chemistry with catalyzed cleavage and condensation reactions. We study the properties of a well-stirred reactor driven away from equilibrium by the flow of mass. Under appropriate non-equilibrium conditions. The nonlinear feedback of the reaction network focuses the material of the system into a few specific polymer species. The network of catalytic reactions digests'' the material of its environment, incorporating it into its own form. We call the result an autocatalytic metabolism. Under some variations it persists almost unchanged, while in other cases it dies. We argue that the dynamical stability of autocatalytic metabolisms gives them regenerative properties that allow them to repair themselves and to propagate through time. 43 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Metabolism of phthalates in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2007-01-01

    on the foetal testis and they are similar to those seen in humans with testicular dysgenesis syndrome. Therefore, exposure of the human foetus and infants to phthalates via maternal exposure is a matter of concern. The metabolic pathways of phthalate metabolites excreted in human urine are partly known for some......Phthalates are synthetic compounds widely used as plasticisers, solvents and additives in many consumer products. Several animal studies have shown that some phthalates possess endocrine disrupting effects. Some of the effects of phthalates seen in rats are due to testosterone lowering effects...... phthalates, but our knowledge about metabolic distribution in the body and other biological fluids, including breast milk, is limited. Compared to urine, human breast milk contains relatively more of the hydrophobic phthalates, such as di-n-butyl phthalate and the longer-branched, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate...

  3. Metabolic responses during postprandial exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jie; Raines, Emily; Rosenberg, Joseph; Ratamess, Nicholas; Naclerio, Fernando; Faigenbaum, Avery

    2013-01-01

    To examine metabolic interaction between meal and exercise, 10 men and 10 women completed three trials: (1) exercise (E), (2) consumption of a meal (M), and (3) consumption of a meal followed by exercise (M+E). All trials commenced after an overnight fast and were preceded by a rest period in which resting metabolic rate (RMR) was determined. The meal contained 721 kilocalories composed of 41%, 36%, and 23% of carbohydrate, lipids, and protein, respectively. Exercise protocol consisted of three continuous 10-minute cycling at 50%, 60%, and 70% VO2peak. Measurement began 60 min after the start of the meal and included VO2 that was used to determine meal-induced thermogenesis (MIT). VO2 was greater (p exercise at 50% VO2peak than at rest. It appears that postprandial exercise of mild intensities can potentiate MIT, thereby provoking a greater increase in energy expenditure.

  4. Metabolic encephalopathy in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindawy, A; Gouda, A; El-Ayyadi, A; Megahed, H; Bazaraa, H

    2007-01-01

    Fatty Acid Oxidation disorders represent an expanding group of inborn errors of metabolism. Clinical manifestations include episodic encephalopathy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye like episodes, hepatic, muscular, cardiac affection and sudden death. Analysis of urinary organic acids and plasma fatty acids of 44 clinically suspected patients by Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry revealed 4 cases of Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), 3 cases of Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 9 cases of multiple defects of acyl-CoA dehydrogenation in addition to 3 patients with other metabolic disorders. Timely detection of these disorders including screening for MCADD can have a favorable impact on the outcome of these patients (Tab. 11, Fig. 3, Ref. 24) Full Text (Free, PDF).

  5. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  6. Peroxisome Metabolism and Cellular Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titorenko, Vladimir I.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The essential role of peroxisomes in fatty acid oxidation, anaplerotic metabolism, and hydrogen peroxide turnover is well established. Recent findings suggest these and other related biochemical processes governed by the organelle may also play a critical role in regulating cellular aging. The goal of this review is to summarize and integrate into a model, the evidence that peroxisome metabolism actually helps define the replicative and chronological age of a eukaryotic cell. In this model, peroxisomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are seen as altering organelle biogenesis and function, and eliciting changes in the dynamic communication networks that exist between peroxisomes and other cellular compartments. At low levels, peroxisomal ROS activate an anti-aging program in the cell; at concentrations beyond a specific threshold, a pro-aging course is triggered. PMID:21083858

  7. Cholesterol metabolism in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasinska, Joanna M; Hayden, Michael R

    2011-09-06

    The CNS is rich in cholesterol, which is essential for neuronal development and survival, synapse maturation, and optimal synaptic activity. Alterations in brain cholesterol homeostasis are linked to neurodegeneration. Studies have demonstrated that Huntington disease (HD), a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting from polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein, is associated with changes in cellular cholesterol metabolism. Emerging evidence from human and animal studies indicates that attenuated brain sterol synthesis and accumulation of cholesterol in neuronal membranes represent two distinct mechanisms occurring in the presence of mutant huntingtin that influence neuronal survival. Increased knowledge of how changes in intraneuronal cholesterol metabolism influence the pathogenesis of HD will provide insights into the potential application of brain cholesterol regulation as a therapeutic strategy for this devastating disease.

  8. Metabolic potential of endophytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brader, Günter; Compant, Stéphane; Mitter, Birgit; Trognitz, Friederike; Sessitsch, Angela

    2014-06-01

    The bacterial endophytic microbiome promotes plant growth and health and beneficial effects are in many cases mediated and characterized by metabolic interactions. Recent advances have been made in regard to metabolite production by plant microsymbionts showing that they may produce a range of different types of metabolites. These substances play a role in defense and competition, but may also be needed for specific interaction and communication with the plant host. Furthermore, few examples of bilateral metabolite production are known and endophytes may modulate plant metabolite synthesis as well. We have just started to understand such metabolic interactions between plants and endophytes, however, further research is needed to more efficiently make use of beneficial plant-microbe interactions and to reduce pathogen infestation as well as to reveal novel bioactive substances of commercial interest. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Organizational Actions of Metabolic Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Bouret, Sebastien G.

    2013-01-01

    Brain development is a complex and dynamic process, and many environmental factors have been found to influence the normal development of neural pathways. Cumulative evidence suggests that metabolic hormones that regulate the hypothalamic circuits that control energy homeostasis function in much the same way that sex steroids act on sexually dimorphic circuits. For example, although the effects of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin were originally thought to be limited to the neural control...

  10. Industry as a metabolic activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Smart, B.(SUPA - School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom)

    1992-01-01

    The concept of "industrial economic metabolism" can provide a bridge to better understanding between environmentalists and industry. In nature each individual or species reacts to natural stimuli, competing with others for resources, extending its domain until it loses comparative advantage and comes to equilibrium with an adjacent competitor. Those species that succeed over time flourish; those that do not, diminish or disappear. Nature's rule book has no moral or ethical ingredient beyond s...

  11. Amylin regulation of carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A; Pittner, R; Gedulin, B; Vine, W; Rink, T

    1995-05-01

    This review describes how amylin may work in the control of carbohydrate metabolism by actions on gastric emptying and on muscle glycogen metabolism. Amylin, which is co-secreted with insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in response to nutrient stimuli, affects both carbohydrate absorption and carbohydrate disposal. Amylin appears to regulate carbohydrate metabolism as a partner to insulin. Defending fuel stores tends to be hierarchical; plasma glucose is defended first, then muscle glycogen, then liver glycogen, then fat. Fuel stores are replenished by both incorporating ingested nutrient and by translocating nutrient stores among body sites. Lactate may better be regarded as a vector of fuel transfer rather than a 'dead end' in metabolism. Amylin can promote the translocation of lactate from muscle to liver. The amylin effect, illustrated by the simultaneous decrease in muscle glycogen and increase in liver glycogen [53, 56], is similar to the catecholamine effect observed by Cori et al. [57]. Amylin thus may be important in maintaining liver glycogen stores via the Cori cycle and the 'indirect' glycogen synthesis pathway [58,59]. Unlike catecholamines, amylin does not mobilize fat or impede insulin action in adipose tissue [30,35]. It can supply lactate to the liver, and because lactate is a preferred lipogenic substrate [60], may thereby favour fat storage. Amylin may also help to control carbohydrate absorption via an 'entero-insular loop' to ensure that absorption from the gut remains within the regulatory limits for carbohydrate disposal by peripheral tissues. This regulatory system is essential for normal control of plasma glucose and appears to be disrupted in type-1 diabetes, an amylin-deficient state.

  12. Metabolic syndrome in children (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yue-E; Zhang, Chong-Lin; Zhen, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and increased blood pressure. The prevalence of MetS is on the increase worldwide owing to the epidemic of overweight and obesity. The risk of prevalence of MetS greatly increases during adulthood for those children exposed to cardiometabolic risk factors in their early lives. MetS has also been associated with liver fat accumulation in child...

  13. Phytoestrogens and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, Alois; Medjakovic, Svjetlana

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are a diverse class of non-steroidal compounds that have an affinity for estrogen receptors α and β, for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family and for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Examples of phytoestrogens include prenylated flavonoids, isoflavones, coumestans and lignans. Many phytoestrogens counteract the cellular derailments that are responsible for the development of metabolic syndrome. Here we propose a mechanism of action which is based on five pillars/principles. First, phytoestrogens are involved in the downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as COX-2 and iNOS, by activating PPAR and by inhibiting IκB activation. Second, they increase reverse cholesterol transport, which is mediated by PPARγ. Third, phytoestrogens increase insulin sensitivity, which is mediated via PPARα. Fourth, they exert antioxidant effects by activating antioxidant genes through KEAP. Fifth, phytoestrogens increase energy expenditure by affecting AMP-activated kinase signaling cascades, which are responsible for the inhibition of adipogenesis. In addition to these effects, which have been demonstrated in vivo and in clinical trials, other effects, such as eNOS activation, may also be important. Some plant extracts from soy, red clover or licorice can be described as panPPAR activators. Fetal programming for metabolic syndrome has been hypothesized; thus, the consumption of dietary phytoestrogens during pregnancy may be relevant. Extracts from soy, red clover or licorice oil have potential as plant-derived medicines that could be used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome, a disease linked to hyperandrogenism and obesity, although clinical trials have not yet been conducted. Phytoestrogens may help prevent metabolic syndrome, although intervention studies will be always be ambiguous, because physical activity and reduced calorie consumption also have a significant impact. Nevertheless, extracts rich in phytoestrogens may be an

  14. Prisoner's dilemma in cancer metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    Full Text Available As tumors outgrow their blood supply and become oxygen deprived, they switch to less energetically efficient but oxygen-independent anaerobic glucose metabolism. However, cancer cells maintain glycolytic phenotype even in the areas of ample oxygen supply (Warburg effect. It has been hypothesized that the competitive advantage that glycolytic cells get over aerobic cells is achieved through secretion of lactic acid, which is a by-product of glycolysis. It creates acidic microenvironment around the tumor that can be toxic to normal somatic cells. This interaction can be seen as a prisoner's dilemma: from the point of view of metabolic payoffs, it is better for cells to cooperate and become better competitors but neither cell has an incentive to unilaterally change its metabolic strategy. In this paper a novel mathematical technique, which allows reducing an otherwise infinitely dimensional system to low dimensionality, is used to demonstrate that changing the environment can take the cells out of this equilibrium and that it is cooperation that can in fact lead to the cell population committing evolutionary suicide.

  15. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the preponderance of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery procedures have negative skeletal effects that persist beyond the first year of surgery, and that these effects vary by surgical type. The long-term clinical implications and current clinical recommendations are presented. Further study is required to determine mechanisms of bone loss after bariatric surgery. Although early studies focused on calcium/vitamin D metabolism and mechanical unloading of the skeleton, it seems likely that surgically-induced changes in the hormonal and metabolic profile may be responsible for the skeletal phenotypes observed after bariatric surgery. PMID:24677277

  16. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xing Liu; Hai-Tao Niu; Shu-Yang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target.Data Sources:This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30,2015.Articles were selected using the following search temps:"Intestinal microbiota","trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)","trimethylamine (TMA)","cardiovascular",and "atherosclerosis".Study Selection:Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis.Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included.Results:A new CVD risk factor,TMAO,was recently identified.It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota,resulting in TMA release.TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver.Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD,particularly atherosclerosis;however,the details of this relationship remain unclear.Conclusions:Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management.

  17. Sirtuins Link Inflammation and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidula T. Vachharajani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins (SIRT, first discovered in yeast as NAD+ dependent epigenetic and metabolic regulators, have comparable activities in human physiology and disease. Mounting evidence supports that the seven-member mammalian sirtuin family (SIRT1–7 guard homeostasis by sensing bioenergy needs and responding by making alterations in the cell nutrients. Sirtuins play a critical role in restoring homeostasis during stress responses. Inflammation is designed to “defend and mend” against the invading organisms. Emerging evidence supports that metabolism and bioenergy reprogramming direct the sequential course of inflammation; failure of homeostasis retrieval results in many chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. Anabolic glycolysis quickly induced (compared to oxidative phosphorylation for ROS and ATP generation is needed for immune activation to “defend” against invading microorganisms. Lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, essential for cellular protection/hibernation and cell survival in order to “mend,” leads to immune repression. Acute/chronic inflammations are linked to altered glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, at least in part, by NAD+ dependent function of sirtuins. Therapeutically targeting sirtuins may provide a new class of inflammation and immune regulators. This review discusses how sirtuins integrate metabolism, bioenergetics, and immunity during inflammation and how sirtuin-directed treatment improves outcome in chronic inflammatory diseases and in the extreme stress response of sepsis.

  18. Metabolic alkalosis: pathogenesis and physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tarantino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis is an acid-base disorder frequently encountered in hospitalised patients, particularly those in critical conditions and is not infrequently complicated by mixed acid-base disorders. This disorder can have serious clinical consequences, especially on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. The disorder’s gravity is partly due to the precarious nature of the defence and compensation processes the body is able to provide to combat the alteration in the blood’s pH. Metabolic alkalosis is just one, secondary component of a complex water and electrolyte balance disorder, on which the maintenance of the acid-base disorder depends. Metabolic alkalosis can be a complication of various somewhat diverse conditions and is often common in hospital settings. A multitude of pathophysiological factors contribute to maintaining the acid-base disorder: these factors influence and feed one another. As the resolution of the acid-base disorder depends on the correction of these factors, it is essential to know their exact mechanisms in order to undertake the most appropriate therapeutic action.

  19. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh eDolatshahi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems.

  20. Identification of Metabolic Pathway Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi, Sepideh; Voit, Eberhard O

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of parameters in even moderately large biological systems is a significant challenge. This challenge is greatly exacerbated if the mathematical formats of appropriate process descriptions are unknown. To address this challenge, the method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE) was proposed for the analysis of metabolic time series data. Under ideal conditions, the first phase of DFE yields numerical representations of all fluxes within a metabolic pathway system, either as values at each time point or as plots against their substrates and modulators. However, this numerical result does not reveal the mathematical format of each flux. Thus, the second phase of DFE selects functional formats that are consistent with the numerical trends obtained from the first phase. While greatly facilitating metabolic data analysis, DFE is only directly applicable if the pathway system contains as many dependent variables as fluxes. Because most actual systems contain more fluxes than metabolite pools, this requirement is seldom satisfied. Auxiliary methods have been proposed to alleviate this issue, but they are not general. Here we propose strategies that extend DFE toward general, slightly underdetermined pathway systems.

  1. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel ePrax

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopologue profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds.

  2. Metabolic regulation by p53 family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkers, Celia R; Maddocks, Oliver D K; Cheung, Eric C; Mor, Inbal; Vousden, Karen H

    2013-11-05

    The function of p53 is best understood in response to genotoxic stress, but increasing evidence suggests that p53 also plays a key role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. p53 and its family members directly influence various metabolic pathways, enabling cells to respond to metabolic stress. These functions are likely to be important for restraining the development of cancer but could also have a profound effect on the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. A better understanding of the metabolic functions of p53 family members may aid in the identification of therapeutic targets and reveal novel uses for p53-modulating drugs.

  3. A Quick Reference on Hyperchloremic Metabolic Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funes, Silvia; de Morais, Helio Autran

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis results from an increase in the concentration of a strong anion. Metabolic acidosis is divided into hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and high anion gap acidosis based on the changes in the anion gap. Hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is the result of chloride retention, excessive loss of sodium relative to chloride, or excessive gain of chloride relative to sodium. Clinical signs are related to the underlying disease that accompanies the metabolic acidosis. Treatment of hyperchloremic acidosis is based on addressing the underlying disease process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipid metabolism in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Muñiz, Francisco J.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Publications are scarce in the way in chich metabolic processes are affected by the ingestion of heated fats used to prepare food. Similarly studies measuring metabolic effects of the consumption on fried food are poorly known. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize information on frying fats and frying foods upon lipid metabolism in experimental animals. Food consumption is equivalent or even higher when oils or the fat content of frying foods are poorly alterated decreasing their acceptability when their alteration degree increase. After 4hr. experiment the digestibility and absorption coefficients of a single dosis of thermooxidized oils were significantly decreased in rats, however the digestive utilization of frying thermooxidized oils included in diets showed very little change in comparison with unused oils by feeding trials on rats. Feeding rats different frying fats induced a slight hypercholesterolemic effect being the magnitude of this effect related to the linoleic decrease in diet produced by frying. However HDL, the main rat-cholesterol carrier, also increased, thus the serum cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio did not change. Results suggest that rats fed frying fats adapt their lipoprotein metabolism increasing the number of HDL particles. Deep fat frying deeply changed the fatty acid composition of foods, being possible to increase their n-9 or n-6 fatty acid and to decrease the saturated fatty acid contents by frying. When olive oil-and sunflower oil-fried sardines were used as the only protein and fat sources of rats-diets in order to prevent the dietary hypercholesterolemia it was provided that both fried-sardine diets showed a powerful check effect on the cholesterol raising effect induced by dietary cholesterol. The negative effect of feeding rats cholesterol plus bovine bile to induce hypercholesterolemia on some cell-damage markers such as lactate dehydrogenase, transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, was

  5. ER stress and hepatic lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiping eZhou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an important player in regulating protein synthesis and lipid metabolism. Perturbation of ER homeostasis, referred as ER stress, has been linked to numerous pathological conditions, such as inflammation, cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. The liver plays a central role in regulating nutrient and lipid metabolism. Accumulating evidence implicates that ER stress disrupts lipid metabolism and induces hepatic lipotoxicity. Here, we review the major ER stress signaling pathways, how ER stress contributes to the dysregulation of hepatic lipid metabolism, and the potential causative mechanisms of ER stress in hepatic lipotoxicity. Understanding the role of ER stress in hepatic metabolism may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for metabolic diseases.

  6. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonidis, E; Price, ND

    2015-01-13

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  7. Current perspectives between metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micucci, Carla; Valli, Debora; Matacchione, Giulia; Catalano, Alfonso

    2016-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies linked metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer. Although metabolic syndrome may not necessarily cause cancer, it is linked to poorer cancer outcomes including increased risk of recurrence and overall mortality. This review tends to discuss the major biological and physiological alterations involved in the increase of incidence and mortality of cancer patients affected by metabolic syndrome. We focus on metabolic syndrome-associated visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) pathway as well as estrogen signaling and inflammation. Several of these factors are also involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. A better understanding of the link between metabolic syndrome and cancer may provide new insight about oncogenesis. Moreover, prevention of metabolic syndrome - related alterations may be an important aspect in the management of cancer patients during simultaneous palliative care.

  8. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D

    2015-03-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  9. Metabolism pathways in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozovski, Uri; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Barzilai, Merav; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell metabolism have been studied by several investigators. Unlike normal B lymphocytes or other leukemia cells, CLL cells, like adipocytes, store lipids and utilize free fatty acids (FFA) to produce chemical energy. None of the recently identified mutations in CLL directly affects metabolic pathways, suggesting that genetic alterations do not directly contribute to CLL cells' metabolic reprogramming. Conversely, recent data suggest that activation of STAT3 or downregulation of microRNA-125 levels plays a crucial role in the utilization of FFA to meet the CLL cells' metabolic needs. STAT3, known to be constitutively activated in CLL, increases the levels of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) that mediates lipoprotein uptake and shifts the CLL cells' metabolism towards utilization of FFA. Herein, we review the evidence for altered lipid metabolism, increased mitochondrial activity and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CLL cells, and discuss the possible therapeutic strategies to inhibit lipid metabolism pathways in patient with CLL.

  10. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    7.1 Nutritional disorder2003038 An epidemiological study on vitamin K deficiency bleeding in infants under six months. ZHOU Fengrong(周凤荣), et al.Dept Child Health, Shandong Prov Matern Childed Health Instit, Jinan 250014. Chin J Prev Med 2002;36(5):305 - 307.Objective: To understand the incidence and relevant affecting factors of infant vitamin K deficiency bleeding

  11. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    4.1 Nutritional disorder2003271 Iron status and effect of early iron supplementation of sub-clinical iron deficiency in rural school-age children from mountainous areas of Beijing.LIN Xiaoming(林晓明),et al.Dept Nutr & Food Hyg, Public Health Sch Peking Univ, Beijing 100083. Chin J Prev Med 2003;37(2): 115-118.

  12. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    4.1 Nutrition imbalance 2006024 Effect of multiple micronutrients supplementation on anti - oxidative activity and oxidized DNA damage of lymphocytes in children ZHANG Ming ( 张明), Nutrit Dept, Weifang People Hosp, Weifang 261041. Chin J Epidemiol 2005 ;26(4) :268 -272. Objective:To examine the effect of multiple micronutrients supplementation on anti - oxidative activity and decreasing oxidized DNA damage of lymphocytes in Chinese children. Methods:82 healthy children in rural areas, aged 9-11 years, were selected and randomized into group receiving supplements and control group with 41 in

  13. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products.

  14. Modulating carbohydrate–protein interactions through glycoengineering of monoclonal antibodies to impact cancer physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Austin W.T.; Li, Shangzhong; Spahn, Philipp N.

    2016-01-01

    Diverse glycans on proteins impact cell and organism physiology, along with drug activity. Since many protein-based biotherapeutics are glycosylated and these glycans have biological activity, there is a desire to engineer glycosylation for recombinant protein-based biotherapeutics. Engineered gl...

  15. Glycoengineering of Chinese hamster ovary cells for enhanced erythropoietin N-glycan branching and sialylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Bojiao; Gao, Yuan; Chung, Cheng-yu

    2015-01-01

    -glycosylation of recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO), a human α2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6Gal1) was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Sialylation increased on both EPO and CHO cellular proteins as observed by SNA lectin analysis, and HPLC profiling revealed that the sialic acid content of total glycans on EPO......EPO from these engineered cells was increased ∼45% higher with tetra-sialylation accounting for ∼10% of total sugar chains compared to ∼3% for the wild-type parental CHO-K1. In this way, coordinated overexpression of these three glycosyltransferases for the first time in model CHO-K1 cell lines provides...

  16. Exploiting the Campylobacter jejuni protein glycosylation system for glycoengineering vaccines and diagnostic tools directed against brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwashkiw Jeremy A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune responses directed towards surface polysaccharides conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing colonization and infection of bacterial pathogens. Presently, the production of these conjugate vaccines requires intricate synthetic chemistry for obtaining, activating, and attaching the polysaccharides to protein carriers. Glycoproteins generated by engineering bacterial glycosylation machineries have been proposed to be a viable alternative to traditional conjugation methods. Results In this work we expressed the C. jejuni oligosaccharyltansferase (OTase PglB, responsible for N-linked protein glycosylation together with a suitable acceptor protein (AcrA in Yersinia enterocolitica O9 cells. MS analysis of the acceptor protein demonstrated the transfer of a polymer of N-formylperosamine to AcrA in vivo. Because Y. enterocolitica O9 and Brucella abortus share an identical O polysaccharide structure, we explored the application of the resulting glycoprotein in vaccinology and diagnostics of brucellosis, one of the most common zoonotic diseases with over half a million new cases annually. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG response that recognized the O antigen of Brucella, although this response was not protective against a challenge with a virulent B. abortus strain. The recombinant glycoprotein coated onto magnetic beads was efficient in differentiating between naïve and infected bovine sera. Conclusion Bacterial engineered glycoproteins show promising applications for the development on an array of diagnostics and immunoprotective opportunities in the future.

  17. A novel low-parameter computational model to aid in-silico glycoengineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spahn, Philipp N.; Hansen, Anders Holmgaard; Hansen, Henning Gram

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is a key post-translational modification that can affect critical properties of proteins produced in biopharmaceutical manufacturing, such as stability, therapeutic efficacy or immunogenicity. However, unlike a protein's amino acid sequence, glycosylation is hard to engineer since...

  18. Mining the O-glycoproteome using zinc-finger nuclease-glycoengineered SimpleCell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Vester-Christensen, Malene B;

    2011-01-01

    -glycopeptides from total cell lysates using lectin chromatography and nanoflow liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) with electron transfer dissociation fragmentation. We identified >100 O-glycoproteins with >350 O-glycan sites (the great majority previously unidentified), including a GalNAc O......-glycan linkage to a tyrosine residue. The SimpleCell method should facilitate analyses of important functions of protein glycosylation. The strategy is also applicable to other O-glycoproteomes....

  19. Glycoengineering of Human Cell Lines Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Gene Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography is a powerful technique for isolation of glycoproteins carrying a specific glycan structure of interest. However, the enormous diversity of glycans present on the cell surface, as well as on individual proteins, makes it difficult to isolate an entire glycoproteome...... with one or even a series of lectins. Here we present a technique to generate cell lines with homogenous truncated O-glycans using zinc finger nuclease gene targeting. Because of their simplified O-glycoproteome, the cells have been named SimpleCells. Glycoproteins from SimpleCells can be isolated...... in a single purification step by lectin chromatography performed on a long lectin column. This protocol describes Zinc finger nuclease gene targeting of human cells to simplify the glycoproteome, as well as lectin chromatography and isolation of glycopeptides from total cell lysates of SimpleCells....

  20. Metabolic fingerprint of dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) in microbial-mammalian co-metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuan; Slupsky, Carolyn M

    2014-12-01

    There is growing awareness that intestinal microbiota alters the energy harvesting capacity of the host and regulates metabolism. It has been postulated that intestinal microbiota are able to degrade unabsorbed dietary components and transform xenobiotic compounds. The resulting microbial metabolites derived from the gastrointestinal tract can potentially enter the circulation system, which, in turn, affects host metabolism. Yet, the metabolic capacity of intestinal microbiota and its interaction with mammalian metabolism remains largely unexplored. Here, we review a metabolic pathway that integrates the microbial catabolism of methionine with mammalian metabolism of methanethiol (MT), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which together provide evidence that supports the microbial origin of dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) in the human metabolome. Understanding the pathway of DMSO2 co-metabolism expends our knowledge of microbial-derived metabolites and motivates future metabolomics-based studies on ascertaining the metabolic consequences of intestinal microbiota on human health, including detoxification processes and sulfur xenobiotic metabolism.

  1. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  2. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Grady, J; Schwender, J; Shachar-Hill, Y; Morgan, JA

    2012-03-26

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (CO2)-C-13 dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  3. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Grady J.; Schwender J.; Shachar-Hill, Y.; Morgan, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on {sup 13}CO{sub 2} dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  4. Ensemble Kinetic Modeling of Metabolic Networks from Dynamic Metabolic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengjie Jia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic modeling of metabolic pathways has important applications in metabolic engineering, but significant challenges still remain. The difficulties faced vary from finding best-fit parameters in a highly multidimensional search space to incomplete parameter identifiability. To meet some of these challenges, an ensemble modeling method is developed for characterizing a subset of kinetic parameters that give statistically equivalent goodness-of-fit to time series concentration data. The method is based on the incremental identification approach, where the parameter estimation is done in a step-wise manner. Numerical efficacy is achieved by reducing the dimensionality of parameter space and using efficient random parameter exploration algorithms. The shift toward using model ensembles, instead of the traditional “best-fit” models, is necessary to directly account for model uncertainty during the application of such models. The performance of the ensemble modeling approach has been demonstrated in the modeling of a generic branched pathway and the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using generalized mass action (GMA kinetics.

  5. Dyslipidemic drugs in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheelu S Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metabolic syndrome predisposes to diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Statins reduce cardiovascular events, so all metabolic syndrome patients should be evaluated for dyslipidemia. Many patients fail to achieve lipid goals with statin monotherapy. Co-administration of ezetimibe (EZE and atorvastatin (ATV may enable more patients to achievelow-density lipoproteincholesterol (LDL-C goal while avoiding risks of high-dose statin monotherapy. Materials and Methods: The present study compares rosuvastatin (Rsv with a combination of (Atv and (Eze. Metabolic syndrome patients, 30-70 years with LDL-C ≥130 mg/dl and a 10-year CHD risk score of 10% were randomized to double-blind treatment with (Rsv 5 mg (n = 67 or (Atv 10 mg+(Eze 10 mg (n = 68 for 12 weeks. Results: LDL-C reduced significantly; (32.3% and 30.3%, P < 0.001 in (Atv+(Eze and (Rsv, respectively, but there was no significant difference between two arms. More patients achieved LDL-C goal of ≤100 mg/dl with (Atv+(Eze compared to (Rsv (65% vs. 58%, P < 0.05. Triglycerides (TG were reduced more with (Atv+(Eze compared to (Rsv (28.1% and 21.4%, P < 0.001. Greater increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C was observed with (Atv+(Eze. Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion: This study shows that the combination of (Atv+(Eze has more efficacy and comparable safety to that of (Rsv.

  6. Engineering triterpene metabolism in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuiqin; Jiang, Zuodong; Kempinski, Chase; Eric Nybo, S; Husodo, Satrio; Williams, Robert; Chappell, Joe

    2012-09-01

    Terpenes comprise a distinct class of natural products that serve a diverse range of physiological functions, provide for interactions between plants and their environment and represent a resource for many kinds of practical applications. To better appreciate the importance of terpenes to overall growth and development, and to create a production capacity for specific terpenes of industrial interest, we have pioneered the development of strategies for diverting carbon flow from the native terpene biosynthetic pathways operating in the cytosol and plastid compartments of tobacco for the generation of specific classes of terpenes. In the current work, we demonstrate how difficult it is to divert the 5-carbon intermediates DMAPP and IPP from the mevalonate pathway operating in the cytoplasm for triterpene biosynthesis, yet diversion of the same intermediates from the methylerythritol phosphate pathway operating in the plastid compartment leads to the accumulation of very high levels of the triterpene squalene. This was assessed by the co-expression of an avian farnesyl diphosphate synthase and yeast squalene synthase genes targeting metabolism in the cytoplasm or chloroplast. We also evaluated the possibility of directing this metabolism to the secretory trichomes of tobacco by comparing the effects of trichome-specific gene promoters to strong, constitutive viral promoters. Surprisingly, when transgene expression was directed to trichomes, high-level squalene accumulation was observed, but overall plant growth and physiology were reduced up to 80 % of the non-transgenic controls. Our results support the notion that the biosynthesis of a desired terpene can be dramatically improved by directing that metabolism to a non-native cellular compartment, thus avoiding regulatory mechanisms that might attenuate carbon flux within an engineered pathway.

  7. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules such as those found in coal, by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd genes of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains. 1 tab.

  8. Metabolic bone disease of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy E. Rustico, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic bone disease (MBD of prematurity remains a significant problem for preterm, chronically ill neonates. The definition and recommendations for screening and treatment of MBD vary in the literature. A recent American Academy of Pediatrics Consensus Statement may help close the gap in institutional variation, but evidence based practice guidelines remain obscure due to lack of normative data and clinical trials for preterm infants. This review highlights mineral homeostasis physiology, current recommendations in screening and monitoring, prevention and treatment strategies, and an added perspective of a bone health team serving a high volume referral neonatal intensive care center.

  9. Novel Adipokines and Bone Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a serious social issue nowadays. Both the high morbidity and its common complication osteoporotic fracture load a heavy burden on the whole society. The adipose tissue is the biggest endocrinology organ that has a different function on the bone. The adipocytes are differentiated from the same cell lineage with osteoblast, and they can secrete multiple adipokines with various functions on bone remolding. Recently, several novel adipokines have been identified and investigated thoroughly. In this paper, we would like to highlight the complicated relation between the bone metabolism and the novel adipokines, and it may provide us with a new target for prediction and treatment of osteoporosis.

  10. CACODYLIC ACID (DMAV): METABOLISM AND ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cacodylic acid (DMAV) issue paper discusses the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the various arsenical chemicals; evaluates the appropriate dataset to quantify the potential cancer risk to the organic arsenical herbicides; provides an evaluation of the mode of carcinogenic action (MOA) for DMAV including a consideration of the key events for bladder tumor formation in rats, other potential modes of action; and also considers the human relevance of the proposed animal MOA. As part of tolerance reassessment under the Food Quality Protection Act for the August 3, 2006 deadline, the hazard of cacodylic acid is being reassessed.

  11. Adenosine, Energy Metabolism, and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available While the exact function of sleep remains unknown, it is evident that sleep was developed early in phylogenesis and represents an ancient and vital strategy for survival. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the function of sleep is associated with energy metabolism, saving of energy, and replenishment of energy stores. Prolonged wakefulness induces signs of energy depletion in the brain, while experimentally induced, local energy depletion induces increase in sleep, similarly as would a period of prolonged wakefulness. The key molecule in the induction of sleep appears to be adenosine, which induces sleep locally in the basal forebrain.

  12. ER Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Zha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a rapidly emerging field of interest in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Recent studies have shown that chronic activation of ER stress is closely linked to dysregulation of lipid metabolism in several metabolically important cells including hepatocytes, macrophages, β-cells, and adipocytes. Adipocytes are one of the major cell types involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Recent advances in dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism indicate that activation of ER stress plays a central role in regulating adipocyte function. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of the potential role of ER stress in lipid metabolism in adipocytes. In addition, we touch upon the interaction of ER stress and autophagy as well as inflammation. Inhibition of ER stress has the potential of decreasing the pathology in adipose tissue that is seen with energy overbalance.

  13. Metabolic remodeling in chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing WANG; Tao GUO

    2013-01-01

    Although the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) has made enormous progress over the past decades,CHF is still a tremendous medical and societal burden.Metabolic remodeling might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CHF.The characteristics and mechanisms of metabolic remodeling remained unclear,and the main hypothesis might include the changes in the availability of metabolic substrate and the decline of metabolic capability.In the early phases of the disease,metabolism shifts toward carbohydrate utilization from fatty acids (FAs) oxidation.Along with the progress of the disease,the increasing level of the hyperadrenergic state and insulin resistance cause the changes that shift back to a greater FA uptake and oxidation.In addition,a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence suggests that the improvement in the metabolic capability is likely to be more significant than the selection of the substrate.

  14. Some metabolic effects of overeating in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, S L; Seaton, T B; Campbell, R G

    1986-12-01

    Metabolic responses to 20 days of overeating were examined in five healthy volunteers. Overfeeding caused a variable increase (1-18%) in basal metabolic rate but no change in metabolic rate during light exercise. Postprandial resting metabolic rate was 8-40% higher (mean 18%) during overeating. The increase in oxygen consumption during a norepinephrine infusion was the same before (20 +/- 2%) and after (17 +/- 3%) overfeeding. Overfeeding elevated basal insulin concentrations in all subjects and increased the insulin response to intravenous glucose in four of five subjects. Overfeeding did not significantly alter mean serum T3 concentrations or erythrocyte 86Rb uptake (an index of Na+,K+-ATPase activity). These data do not confirm reports that overfeeding increases metabolic rate more during exercise than during rest. They also suggest that the increase in resting metabolic rate during overfeeding is not caused by increased responsiveness to norepinephrine or increased serum T3 concentrations.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Fujihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities and is defined as the presence of three or more of the following factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose. Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifested in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Adipose tissue, particularly visceral fat, is an important metabolic tissue as it secretes systemic factors that alter the immunologic, metabolic, and endocrine milieu and also promotes insulin resistance. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross-talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, adipocytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and progression. This paper synthesizes the evidence on key molecular mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link.

  16. Metabolic pathways regulated by p63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candi, Eleonora; Smirnov, Artem; Panatta, Emanuele; Lena, Anna Maria; Novelli, Flavia; Mancini, Mara; Viticchiè, Giuditta; Piro, Maria Cristina; Di Daniele, Nicola; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Melino, Gerry

    2017-01-15

    The transcription factor p63 belongs to the p53-family and is a master regulator of proliferative potential, lineage specification, and differentiation in epithelia during development and tissue homeostasis. In cancer, p63 contribution is isoform-specific, with both oncogenic and tumour suppressive roles attributed, for ΔNp63 and TAp63, respectively. Recently, p53 and TAp73, in line with other tumour suppressor genes, have emerged as important regulators of energy metabolism and metabolic reprogramming in cancer. To date, p63 contributions in controlling energy metabolism have been partially investigated; given the extensive interaction of the p53 family members, these studies have potential implications in tumour cells for metabolic reprogramming. Here, we review the role of p63 isoforms, TAp63 and ΔNp63, in controlling cell metabolism, focusing on their specific metabolic target genes and their physiological/functional context of action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic syndrome in bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To review the data with respect to prevalence and risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS in bipolar disorder patients. Electronic searches were done in PUBMED, Google Scholar and Science direct. From 2004 to June 2011, 34 articles were found which reported on the prevalence of MetS. The sample size of these studies varied from 15 to 822 patients, and the rates of MetS vary widely from 16.7% to 67% across different studies. None of the sociodemographic variable has emerged as a consistent risk factor for MetS. Among the clinical variables longer duration of illness, bipolar disorder- I, with greater number of lifetime depressive and manic episodes, and with more severe and difficult-to-treat index affective episode, with depression at onset and during acute episodes, lower in severity of mania during the index episode, later age of onset at first manic episode, later age at first treatment for the first treatment for both phases, less healthy diet as rated by patients themselves, absence of physical activity and family history of diabetes mellitus have been reported as clinical risk factors of MetS. Data suggests that metabolic syndrome is fairly prevalent in bipolar disorder patients.

  18. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Yuezhou Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies. Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category.

  19. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  20. Burns, metabolism and nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça Machado, N; Gragnani, A; Masako Ferreira, L

    2011-01-01

    To review the nutritional evaluation in burned patient, considering the literature descriptions of nutritional evaluation and energy requirements of these patients. Thermal injury is the traumatic event with the highest metabolic response in critically ill patients. Various mathematical formulas have been developed to estimate nutritional requirements in burned patient. Indirect Calorimetry is the only method considered gold standard for measuring caloric expenditure. A survey of the literature and data was collected based on official data bases, LILACS, EMBASE and PubMed. The metabolic changes involved in hypermetabolism are designed to supply energy to support immune function, brain activity, wound healing, and preservation of body tissues. Body weight is considered the easiest indicator and perhaps the best to assess the nutritional status. The most common formulas utilized in these patients are the Curreri, Pennisi, Schofield, Ireton-Jones, Harris-Benedict and the ASPEN recommendations. For children is the Mayes and World Health Organization formula. The majority of mathematical formulas overestimate the nutritional needs. The regular use of Indirect Calorimetry supplies adequate nutritional support to the burn patient. The traditional nutritional evaluation considers anthropometry, biochemical markers and estimation of nutritional requirements. The weight provides a basis for decisions that are established in the clinical context. Classic parameters can be adapted to intensive care environment. The use of Indirect Calorimetry is crucial to ensure the safety of the nutritional support of burn patients and this should be widely encouraged.

  1. Benzodiazepine metabolism: an analytical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Mercolini, Laura; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are currently among the most frequently prescribed drugs all over the world. They act as anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics, amnesics, antiepileptics and muscle relaxants. Despite their common chemical scaffold, these drugs differ in their pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. In particular, they are biotransformed by different cytochrome P450 isoforms and also by different UDP-glucuronosyltransferase subtypes. The most important studies on the metabolic characteristics of several 1,4-benzodiazepines, carried out from 1998 onwards, are reported and briefly discussed in this review. Moreover, the analytical methods related to these studies are also described and commented upon and their most important characteristics are highlighted. Most methods are based on liquid chromatography, which provides wide applicability and good analytical performance granting high precision, accuracy and feasibility. Mass spectrometry is gaining widespread acceptance, particularly if the matrix is very complex and variable, such as human or animal blood. However, spectrophotometric detection is still used for this purpose and can grant sufficient selectivity and sensitivity when coupled to suitable sample pre-treatment procedures. A monograph is included for each of the following benzodiazepines: alprazolam, bromazepam, brotizolam, clotiazepam, diazepam, etizolam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, midazolam, oxazepam and triazolam.

  2. Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Destroys Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Melamed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis.The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum’s walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful toolfor pathophysiological therapeutic approaches for various gastrointestinal disorders. There is strong research and practical evidence that restoring the HCO3 - capacity in the blood can improve digestion.

  3. Novel metabolic pathways in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2011-06-01

    The Archaea harbor many metabolic pathways that differ to previously recognized classical pathways. Glycolysis is carried out by modified versions of the Embden-Meyerhof and Entner-Doudoroff pathways. Thermophilic archaea have recently been found to harbor a bi-functional fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase/phosphatase for gluconeogenesis. A number of novel pentose-degrading pathways have also been recently identified. In terms of anabolic metabolism, a pathway for acetate assimilation, the methylaspartate cycle, and two CO2-fixing pathways, the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle and the dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle, have been elucidated. As for biosynthetic pathways, recent studies have clarified the enzymes responsible for several steps involved in the biosynthesis of inositol phospholipids, polyamine, coenzyme A, flavin adeninedinucleotide and heme. By examining the presence/absence of homologs of these enzymes on genome sequences, we have found that the majority of these enzymes and pathways are specific to the Archaea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolism of phthalates in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2007-07-01

    Phthalates are synthetic compounds widely used as plasticisers, solvents and additives in many consumer products. Several animal studies have shown that some phthalates possess endocrine disrupting effects. Some of the effects of phthalates seen in rats are due to testosterone lowering effects on the foetal testis and they are similar to those seen in humans with testicular dysgenesis syndrome. Therefore, exposure of the human foetus and infants to phthalates via maternal exposure is a matter of concern. The metabolic pathways of phthalate metabolites excreted in human urine are partly known for some phthalates, but our knowledge about metabolic distribution in the body and other biological fluids, including breast milk, is limited. Compared to urine, human breast milk contains relatively more of the hydrophobic phthalates, such as di-n-butyl phthalate and the longer-branched, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DiNP); and their monoester metabolites. Urine, however, contains relatively more of the secondary metabolites of DEHP and DiNP, as well as the monoester phthalates of the more short-branched phthalates. This differential distribution is of special concern as, in particular, the hydrophobic phthalates and their metabolites are shown to have adverse effects following in utero and lactational exposures in animal studies.

  5. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Allan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain.

  6. Chronic metabolic acidosis destroys pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Peter; Melamed, Felix

    2014-11-28

    One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis. The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum's walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful tool for pathophysiological therapeutic approaches for various gastrointestinal disorders. There is strong research and practical evidence that restoring the HCO3(-) capacity in the blood can improve digestion.

  7. Simulating metabolism with statistical thermodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Cannon

    Full Text Available New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed.

  8. Simulating metabolism with statistical thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William R

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Donatella; Rutigliano, Grazia; Baroni, Stefano; Landi, Paola; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2014-08-01

    Major depression is associated with a 4-fold increased risk for premature death, largely accounted by cardiovascular disease (CVD). The relationship between depression and CVD is thought to be mediated by the so-called metabolic syndrome (MeS). Epidemiological studies have consistently demonstrated a co-occurrence of depression with MeS components, ie, visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Although the exact mechanisms linking MeS to depression are unclear, different hypotheses have been put forward. On the one hand, MeS could be the hallmark of the unhealthy lifestyle habits of depressed patients. On the other, MeS and depression might share common alterations of the stress system, including the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the autonomic nervous system, the immune system, and platelet and endothelial function. Both the conditions induce a low grade chronic inflammatory state that, in turn, leads to increased oxidative and nitrosative (O&NS) damage of neurons, pancreatic cells, and endothelium. Recently, neurobiological research revealed that peripheral hormones, such as leptin and ghrelin, which are classically involved in homeostatic energy balance, may play a role in mood regulation. Metabolic risk should be routinely assessed in depressed patients and taken into account in therapeutic decisions. Alternative targets should be considered for innovative antidepressant agents, including cytokines and their receptors, intracellular inflammatory mediators, glucocorticoids receptors, O&NS pathways, and peripheral mediators.

  10. The origin of intermediary metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morowitz, H. J.; Kostelnik, J. D.; Yang, J.; Cody, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    The core of intermediary metabolism in autotrophs is the citric acid cycle. In a certain group of chemoautotrophs, the reductive citric acid cycle is an engine of synthesis, taking in CO(2) and synthesizing the molecules of the cycle. We have examined the chemistry of a model system of C, H, and O that starts with carbon dioxide and reductants and uses redox couples as the energy source. To inquire into the reaction networks that might emerge, we start with the largest available database of organic molecules, Beilstein on-line, and prune by a set of physical and chemical constraints applicable to the model system. From the 3.5 million entries in Beilstein we emerge with 153 molecules that contain all 11 members of the reductive citric acid cycle. A small number of selection rules generates a very constrained subset, suggesting that this is the type of reaction model that will prove useful in the study of biogenesis. The model indicates that the metabolism shown in the universal chart of pathways may be central to the origin of life, is emergent from organic chemistry, and may be unique.

  11. The metabolic syndrome and adipocytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2006-05-22

    Visceral fat accumulation has been shown to play crucial roles in the development of cardiovascular disease as well as the development of obesity-related disorders such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and hypertension and the so-called metabolic syndrome. Given these clinical findings, adipocytes functions have been intensively investigated in the past 10 years, and have been revealed to act as endocrine cells that have been termed adipocytokines, which secrete various bioactive substances. Among adipocytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and heparin binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor are produced in adipocytes as well as other organs, and may contribute to the development of vascular diseases. Visfatin has been identified as a visceral-fat-specific protein that might be involved in the development of obesity-related diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. On the contrary to these adipocytokines, adiponectin, an adipose-tissue-specific, collagen-like protein, has been noted as an important antiatherogenic and antidiabetic protein, or as an anti-inflammatory protein. The functions of adipocytokine secretion might be regulated dynamically by nutritional state. Visceral fat accumulation causes dysregulation of adipocyte functions, including oversecretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and heparin binding epidermal growth factor-like growth and hyposecretion of adiponectin, which results in the development of a variety of metabolic and circulatory diseases. In this review, the importance of adipocytokines, especially focusing on adiponectin is discussed with respect to cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Deciphering transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine metabolism during Arabidopsis seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovici, Ruthie; Fait, Aaron; Zhu, Xiaohong; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Feldmesser, Ester; Fernie, Alisdair R; Galili, Gad

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine (Lys) metabolism, we utilized developing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds as a system in which Lys synthesis could be stimulated developmentally without application of chemicals and coupled this to a T-DNA insertion knockout mutation impaired in Lys catabolism. This seed-specific metabolic perturbation stimulated Lys accumulation starting from the initiation of storage reserve accumulation. Our results revealed that the response of seed metabolism to the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was relatively minor; however, that which was observable operated in a modular manner. They also demonstrated that Lys metabolism is strongly associated with the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle while largely disconnected from other metabolic networks. In contrast, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was strongly associated with gene networks, stimulating the expression of hundreds of genes controlling anabolic processes that are associated with plant performance and vigor while suppressing a small number of genes associated with plant stress interactions. The most pronounced effect of the developmentally inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was an induction of expression of a large set of genes encoding ribosomal proteins as well as genes encoding translation initiation and elongation factors, all of which are associated with protein synthesis. With respect to metabolic regulation, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was primarily associated with altered expression of genes belonging to networks of amino acids and sugar metabolism. The combined data are discussed within the context of network interactions both between and within metabolic and transcriptional control systems.

  13. Genetics of metabolic syndrome and related traits

    OpenAIRE

    Henneman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of metabolic syndrome are addressed. The focus involves questions concerning the genetics of obesity, TG and cholesterol and hyperglycemia. Since we hypothesized that obesity is the most important trigger of metabolic impairment, the MetS definition in this thesis was chosen to include the obesity measure waist circumference as an essential component. In the study described in chapter 2, the heritability of the metabolic syndrome was addressed and compared to th...

  14. Metabolic P systems for biochemical dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo Manca

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic P systems are a special class of P systems which seem to be adequate for expressing biological phenomena, especially, metabolism and signaling transduction. Basic motivations for their introduction are given and their main aspects are explained by means of an example of biological modeling. A new kind of regulation mechanism is outlined, which could be the basis for a more efficient construction of computational models from experimental data of specific metabolic processes.

  15. Toxic metabolic syndrome associated with HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2006-01-01

    (HAART) may encounter the HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), which attenuates patient compliance to this treatment. HALS is characterised by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This review depicts the metabolic abnormalities associated...... with HAART by describing the key cell and organ systems that are involved, emphasising the role of insulin resistance. An opinion on the remedies available to treat the metabolic abnormalities and phenotype of HALS is provided....

  16. Exercise Intensity Modulation of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lira, Fábio S.; Carnevali, Luiz C; Zanchi, Nelo E.; Ronaldo VT. Santos; Jean Marc Lavoie; Marília Seelaender

    2012-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in the liver is complex and involves the synthesis and secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), ketone bodies, and high rates of fatty acid oxidation, synthesis, and esterification. Exercise training induces several changes in lipid metabolism in the liver and affects VLDL secretion and fatty acid oxidation. These alterations are even more conspicuous in disease, as in obesity, and cancer cachexia. Our understanding of the mechanisms leading to metabolic adaptations...

  17. Thyroid disorders and bone mineral metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases have widespread systemic manifestations including their effect on bone metabolism. On one hand, the effects of thyrotoxicosis including subclinical disease have received wide attention from researchers over the last century as it an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. On the other hand, hypothyroidism has received lesser attention as its effect on bone mineral metabolism is minimal. Therefore, this review will primarily focus on thyrotoxicosis and its impact on bone mineral metabolism.

  18. Fifteen years experience: Egyptian metabolic lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekram M. Fateen

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: This study illustrates the experience of the reference metabolic lab in Egypt over 15 years. The lab began metabolic disorder screening by using simple diagnostic techniques like thin layer chromatography and colored tests in urine which by time updated and upgraded the methods to diagnose a wide range of disorders. This study shows the most common diagnosed inherited inborn errors of metabolism among the Egyptian population.

  19. Flux-dependent graphs for metabolic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Bosque, Gabriel; Oyarzún, Diego; Picó, Jesús; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Cells adapt their metabolic fluxes in response to changes in the environment. We present a systematic flux-based framework for the construction of graphs to represent organism-wide metabolic networks. Our graphs encode the directionality of metabolic fluxes via links that represent the flow of metabolites from source to target reactions. The methodology can be applied in the absence of a specific biological context by modelling fluxes as probabilities, or tailored to different environmental c...

  20. The metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjiyannakis, Stasia

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in adults. It emerges when a person’s predisposition for insulin resistance is worsened by increasing central obesity and is largely confined to the overweight population. The United States National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III report proposed a set of criteria for the clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome...

  1. Scaling of Metabolic Scaling within Physical Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. Glazier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Both the slope and elevation of scaling relationships between log metabolic rate and log body size vary taxonomically and in relation to physiological or developmental state, ecological lifestyle and environmental conditions. Here I discuss how the recently proposed metabolic-level boundaries hypothesis (MLBH provides a useful conceptual framework for explaining and predicting much, but not all of this variation. This hypothesis is based on three major assumptions: (1 various processes related to body volume and surface area exert state-dependent effects on the scaling slope for metabolic rate in relation to body mass; (2 the elevation and slope of metabolic scaling relationships are linked; and (3 both intrinsic (anatomical, biochemical and physiological and extrinsic (ecological factors can affect metabolic scaling. According to the MLBH, the diversity of metabolic scaling relationships occurs within physical boundary limits related to body volume and surface area. Within these limits, specific metabolic scaling slopes can be predicted from the metabolic level (or scaling elevation of a species or group of species. In essence, metabolic scaling itself scales with metabolic level, which is in turn contingent on various intrinsic and extrinsic conditions operating in physiological or evolutionary time. The MLBH represents a “meta-mechanism” or collection of multiple, specific mechanisms that have contingent, state-dependent effects. As such, the MLBH is Darwinian in approach (the theory of natural selection is also meta-mechanistic, in contrast to currently influential metabolic scaling theory that is Newtonian in approach (i.e., based on unitary deterministic laws. Furthermore, the MLBH can be viewed as part of a more general theory that includes other mechanisms that may also affect metabolic scaling.

  2. Formate metabolism in fetal and neonatal sheep

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    By virtue of its role in nucleotide synthesis, as well as the provision of methyl groups for vital methylation reactions, one-carbon metabolism plays a crucial role in growth and development. Formate, a critical albeit neglected component of one-carbon metabolism, occurs extracellularly and may provide insights into cellular events. We examined formate metabolism in chronically cannulated fetal sheep (gestation days 119–121, equivalent to mid-third trimester in humans) and in their mothers as...

  3. Disposition and Metabolism of Investigational New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED N EL MDISPOSITION AND METABOLISM OF INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUGS rN4 MRI PROJECT NO. 4266-B FINAL REPORT By Thomas E. Shellenberger September 1982...documents. Ii I DISPOSITION AND METABOLISM OF INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUGS [RI PROJECT NO. 4266-B [FINAL REPORT BY Thomas E. Shellenberger September 1982...the Army, Contract No. DAMD-17-76-C-6059, MRI Project No. 4266-B, "Disposition and Metabolism of Investigational New Drugs ." The work was supported by

  4. Evidence for central regulation of glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michelle; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Hawkins, Meredith

    2013-12-06

    Evidence for central regulation of glucose homeostasis is accumulating from both animal and human studies. Central nutrient and hormone sensing in the hypothalamus appears to coordinate regulation of whole body metabolism. Central signals activate ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, thereby down-regulating glucose production, likely through vagal efferent signals. Recent human studies are consistent with this hypothesis. The contributions of direct and central inputs to metabolic regulation are likely of comparable magnitude, with somewhat delayed central effects and more rapid peripheral effects. Understanding central regulation of glucose metabolism could promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches for such metabolic conditions as diabetes mellitus.

  5. Chemical basis of metabolic network organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the metabolic networks of the three domains of life consist of different constituents and metabolic pathways, they exhibit the same scale-free organization. This phenomenon has been hypothetically explained by preferential attachment principle that the new-recruited metabolites attach preferentially to those that are already well connected. However, since metabolites are usually small molecules and metabolic processes are basically chemical reactions, we speculate that the metabolic network organization may have a chemical basis. In this paper, chemoinformatic analyses on metabolic networks of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed. It was found that there exist qualitative and quantitative correlations between network topology and chemical properties of metabolites. The metabolites with larger degrees of connectivity (hubs are of relatively stronger polarity. This suggests that metabolic networks are chemically organized to a certain extent, which was further elucidated in terms of high concentrations required by metabolic hubs to drive a variety of reactions. This finding not only provides a chemical explanation to the preferential attachment principle for metabolic network expansion, but also has important implications for metabolic network design and metabolite concentration prediction.

  6. Evolutionary models of metabolism, behaviour and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Alasdair I

    2010-12-27

    I explore the relationship between metabolism and personality by establishing how selection acts on metabolic rate and risk-taking in the context of a trade-off between energy and predation. Using a simple time budget model, I show that a high resting metabolic rate is not necessarily associated with a high daily energy expenditure. The metabolic rate that minimizes the time spent foraging does not maximize the net gain rate while foraging, and it is not always advantageous for animals to have a higher metabolic rate when food availability is high. A model based on minimizing the ratio of mortality rate to net gain rate is used to determine how a willingness to take risks should be correlated with metabolic rate. My results establish that it is not always advantageous for animals to take greater risks when metabolic rate is high. When foraging intensity and metabolic rate coevolve, I show that in a particular case different combinations of foraging intensity and metabolic rate can have equal fitness.

  7. Metabolic Flexibility: Hibernation, Torpor, and Estivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, James F

    2016-03-15

    Many environmental conditions can constrain the ability of animals to obtain sufficient food energy, or transform that food energy into useful chemical forms. To survive extended periods under such conditions animals must suppress metabolic rate to conserve energy, water, or oxygen. Amongst small endotherms, this metabolic suppression is accompanied by and, in some cases, facilitated by a decrease in core body temperature-hibernation or daily torpor-though significant metabolic suppression can be achieved even with only modest cooling. Within some ectotherms, winter metabolic suppression exceeds the passive effects of cooling. During dry seasons, estivating ectotherms can reduce metabolism without changes in body temperature, conserving energy reserves, and reducing gas exchange and its inevitable loss of water vapor. This overview explores the similarities and differences of metabolic suppression among these states within adult animals (excluding developmental diapause), and integrates levels of organization from the whole animal to the genome, where possible. Several similarities among these states are highlighted, including patterns and regulation of metabolic balance, fuel use, and mitochondrial metabolism. Differences among models are also apparent, particularly in whether the metabolic suppression is intrinsic to the tissue or depends on the whole-animal response. While in these hypometabolic states, tissues from many animals are tolerant of hypoxia/anoxia, ischemia/reperfusion, and disuse. These natural models may, therefore, serve as valuable and instructive models for biomedical research.

  8. Serum metabolic biomarkers distinguish metabolically healthy peripherally obese from unhealthy centrally obese individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Weidong; Wang, Yongbo; Pedram, Pardis; Cahill, Farrell; Zhai, Guangju; Randell, Edward; Gulliver, Wayne; Sun, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic abnormalities are more associated with central obesity than peripheral obesity, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study was to identify serum metabolic biomarkers which distinguish metabolically unhealthy centrally obese (MUCO) from metabolically healthy peripherally obese (MHPO) individuals. Methods A two-stage case–control study design was employed. In the discovery stage, 20 individuals (10 MHPO and 10 MUCO) were included and in the followi...

  9. 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis: An Accurate Approach to Demystify Microbial Metabolism for Biochemical Production

    OpenAIRE

    Weihua Guo; Jiayuan Sheng; Xueyang Feng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering of various industrial microorganisms to produce chemicals, fuels, and drugs has raised interest since it is environmentally friendly, sustainable, and independent of nonrenewable resources. However, microbial metabolism is so complex that only a few metabolic engineering efforts have been able to achieve a satisfactory yield, titer or productivity of the target chemicals for industrial commercialization. In order to overcome this challenge, 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (1...

  10. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and gallstone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ying; Qiao, Qiao-Hua; Zhang, Shan-Chun; Chen, Yu-Hao; Chao, Guan-Qun; Fang, Li-Zheng

    2012-08-21

    To investigate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the development of gallstone disease (GSD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in 7570 subjects (4978 men aged 45.0 ± 8.8 years, and 2592 women aged 45.3 ± 9.5 years) enrolled from the physical check-up center of the hospital. The subjects included 918 patients with gallstones (653 men and 265 women) and 6652 healthy controls (4325 men and 2327 women) without gallstones. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and serum lipids and lipoproteins levels were measured. Colorimetric method was used to measure cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Dextrose oxidizing enzyme method was used to measure FPG. Subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire that enquired about the information on demographic data, age, gender, histories of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and chronic liver disease and so on. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. Gallstones were defined by the presence of strong intraluminal echoes that were gravity-dependent or attenuated ultrasound transmission. Among the 7570 subjects, the prevalence of the gallstone disease was 12.1% (13.1% in men and 10.2% in women). BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and serum triglyceride (TG) in cases group were higher than in controls, while serum high-density lipid was lower than in controls. There were significant differences in the waist circumference, blood pressure, FPG and TG between cases and controls. In an age-adjusted logistic regression model, metabolic syndrome was associated with gallstone disease. The age-adjusted odds ratio of MetS for GSD in men was 1.29 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.52; P = 0.0030], and 1.68 (95% CI, 1.26-2.25; P = 0.0004) in women; the overall age-adjusted odds ratio of

  12. Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Pitch, Nancy D.; Lewis, Mark E.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lichter, Michael J.; Stuk, Peter M.; Diedrick, Dale M.; Valentine, Russell W.; Pettegrew, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    The Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis (PUMA) is an instrument that measures several quantities indicative of human metabolic function. Specifically, this instrument makes time-resolved measurements of temperature, pressure, flow, and the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in breath during both inhalation and exhalation. Portable instruments for measuring these quantities have been commercially available, but the response times of those instruments are too long to enable temporal resolution of phenomena on the time scales of human respiration cycles. In contrast, the response time of the PUMA is significantly shorter than characteristic times of human respiration phenomena, making it possible to analyze varying metabolic parameters, not only on sequential breath cycles but also at successive phases of inhalation and exhalation within the same breath cycle. In operation, the PUMA is positioned to sample breath near the subject s mouth. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors are used for three of the measurements: a miniature pressure transducer for pressure, a thermistor for temperature, and an ultrasonic sensor for flow. Sensors developed at Glenn Research Center are used for measuring the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide: The carbon dioxide sensor exploits the relatively strong absorption of infrared light by carbon dioxide. Light from an infrared source passes through the stream of inhaled or exhaled gas and is focused on an infrared- sensitive photodetector. The oxygen sensor exploits the effect of oxygen in quenching the fluorescence of ruthenium-doped organic molecules in a dye on the tip of an optical fiber. A blue laser diode is used to excite the fluorescence, and the optical fiber carries the fluorescent light to a photodiode, the temporal variation of the output of which bears a known relationship with the rate of quenching of fluorescence and, hence, with the partial pressure of oxygen. The outputs of the sensors are digitized

  13. Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Bas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Metabolic syndrome has gained increased attention in the last century after researchers identified its important role in cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Despite limited research into the relationship between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer (PCa, the precise relationship has not been elucidated due to lack of research into the specific factors associated with PCa. To fill this research gap, we evaluated the incidence of PCa in patients with metabolic syndrome and the relationship between metabolic syndrome and the parameters of PCa. Material and Method: We retrospectively evaluated the biochemical analyses of the serum parameters and pathological reports of 102 PCa patients diagnosed by transrectal ultrasound. After determining the incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with PCa, we divided the patients into two groups, those with and without a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. We then compared the serum PSA level, age, total prostate volume, Gleason score, triglyceride (TG level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (HDL-C, blood pressure, and fasting glucose level of the two groups. Results: We included 102 patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer in the present study. Among the 102 patients, 18 (17.6% were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. While the PSA levels of the PCa patients were found to be significantly lower in those with metabolic syndrome compared to those without metabolic syndrome (P=0.04, no difference was found between the groups regarding the other components of PCa (P>0.05. Discussion: Serum PSA level was found to be significantly lower in those with metabolic syndrome. This result leads us to consider whether prostate biopsy should be performed in patients with metabolic syndrome who have lower PSA levels than the levels currently specified for biopsy. Further research into the parameters of PCa needs to be conducted to confirm our findings.

  14. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    This grant focused on the mechanisms of metabolic changes associated with unweighting atrophy and reduced growth of hind limb muscles of juvenile rats. Metabolic studies included a number of different areas. Amino acid metabolic studies placed particular emphasis on glutamine and branched-chain amino acid metabolism. These studies were an outgrowth of understanding stress effects and the role of glucocorticoids in these animals. Investigations on protein metabolism were largely concerned with selective loss of myofibrillar proteins and the role of muscle proteolysis. These investigations lead to finding important differences from denervation and atrophy and to define the roles of cytosolic versus lysosomal proteolysis in these atrophy models. A major outgrowth of these studies was demonstrating an ability to prevent atrophy of the unweighted muscle for at least 24 hours. A large amount of work concentrated on carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation by insulin and catecholamines. Measurements focused on glucose transport, glycogen metabolism, and glucose oxidation. The grant was used to develop an important new in situ approach for studying protein metabolism, glucose transport, and hormonal effects which involves intramuscular injection of various agents for up to 24 hours. Another important consequence of this project was the development and flight of Physiological-Anatomical Rodent Experiment-1 (PARE-1), which was launched aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in September 1991. Detailed descriptions of these studies can be found in the 30 peer-reviewed publications, 15 non-reviewed publications, 4 reviews and 33 abstracts (total 82 publications) which were or are scheduled to be published as a result of this project. A listing of these publications grouped by area (i.e. amino acid metabolism, protein metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and space flight studies) are included.

  15. Paraneoplastic endocrine-metabolic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grandi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The paraneoplastic syndromes (PS are characterized by the presence of biochemical alterations, signs and symptoms expressive of cancer distance action into the patient’s organism. Sometimes these syndromes can precede the evidence of malignancy even of some years or can correspond to cancer relapse. PS, even being characterized by general symptoms (fever, anorexia, cachexia, may occur with neurological, rheumathological, osteoarticular, vascular, haematological, nephrological and endocrinological/metabolic symptoms; the latter ones are discussed in this article. AIM OF THE STUDY Here we will focus on the most common PS: paraneoplastic hypercalcemia, inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH and paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Our work can be useful in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of paraneoplastic syndromes.

  16. Metabolic fate of hallucinogenic NBOMes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Petersen, Sebastian; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Gillings, Nic

    2016-01-01

    2,5-dimethoxy-N-benzylphenethylamines (NBOMes) are very potent 5-HT2AR agonists. Illicit use of these psychedelic compounds has emerged in recent years, and several fatalities have been linked to their recreational use. In its [11C]-labelled form, one NBOMe (25B-NBOMe) was recently developed...... as a PET-ligand for clinical investigations of the 5HT2AR ([11C]Cimbi-36). Herein, we have identified the phase I and phase II metabolites of 25B-NBOMe in pigs as well as in humans. We find that the primary route of metabolism is 5'-demethylation, followed by conjugation to glucuronic acid. [11C...

  17. Metabolic syndrome and gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ying Chen; Qiao-Hua Qiao; Shan-Chun Zhang; Yu-Hao Chen; Guan-Qun Chao; Li-Zheng Fang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the development of gallstone disease (GSD).METHODS:A cross-sectional study was conducted in 7570 subjects (4978 men aged 45.0 ± 8.8 years,and 2592 women aged 45.3 ± 9.5 years) enrolled from the physical check-up center of the hospital.The subjects included 918 patients with gallstones (653 men and 265 women) and 6652 healthy controls (4325 men and 2327 women) without gallstones.Body mass index (BMI),waist circumference,blood pressure,fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and serum lipids and lipoproteins levels were measured.Colorimetric method was used to measure cholesterol,high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).Dextrose oxidizing enzyme method was used to measure FPG.Subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire that enquired about the information on demographic data,age,gender,histories of diabetes mellitus,hypertension,and chronic liver disease and so on.Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel Ⅲ (ATP Ⅲ) criteria.Gallstones were defined by the presence of strong intraluminal echoes that were gravity-dependent or attenuated ultrasound transmission.RESULTS:Among the 7570 subjects,the prevalence of the gallstone disease was 12.1% (13.1% in men and 10.2% in women).BMI,waist circumference,systolic blood pressure,diastolic blood pressure,fasting blood glucose and serum triglyceride (TG) in cases group were higher than in controls,while serum high-density lipid was lower than in controls.There were significant differences in the waist circumference,blood pressure,FPG and TG between cases and controls.In an ageadjusted logistic regression model,metabolic syndrome was associated with gallstone disease.The age-adjusted odds ratio of MetS for GSD in men was 1.29 [95%confidence interval (CI),1.09-1.52; P =0.0030],and 1.68 (95% CI,1.26-2.25; P =0.0004) in women; the overall age-adjusted odds ratio of MetS for

  18. Humanoid Flight Metabolic Simulator Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) has identified several areas of technology that will require significant improvements in terms of performance, capacity, and efficiency, in order to make a manned mission to Mars possible. These include crew vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), EVA suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and Information Systems, autonomous environmental monitoring, radiation exposure monitoring and protection, and vehicle thermal control systems (TCS). (MADMACS) in a Suit can be configured to simulate human metabolism, consuming crew resources (oxygen) in the process. In addition to providing support for testing Life Support on unmanned flights, MADMACS will also support testing of suit thermal controls, and monitor radiation exposure, body zone temperatures, moisture, and loads.

  19. Metabolic scaling: consensus or controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheatley Denys N

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between body mass (M and standard metabolic rate (B among living organisms remains controversial, though it is widely accepted that in many cases B is approximately proportional to the three-quarters power of M. Results The biological significance of the straight-line plots obtained over wide ranges of species when B is plotted against log M remains a matter of debate. In this article we review the values ascribed to the gradients of such graphs (typically 0.75, according to the majority view, and we assess various attempts to explain the allometric power-law phenomenon, placing emphasis on the most recent publications. Conclusion Although many of the models that have been advanced have significant attractions, none can be accepted without serious reservations, and the possibility that no one model can fit all cases has to be more seriously entertained.

  20. Metabolic hypothesis for human altriciality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsworth, Holly M; Warrener, Anna G; Deacon, Terrence; Ellison, Peter T; Pontzer, Herman

    2012-09-18

    The classic anthropological hypothesis known as the "obstetrical dilemma" is a well-known explanation for human altriciality, a condition that has significant implications for human social and behavioral evolution. The hypothesis holds that antagonistic selection for a large neonatal brain and a narrow, bipedal-adapted birth canal poses a problem for childbirth; the hominin "solution" is to truncate gestation, resulting in an altricial neonate. This explanation for human altriciality based on pelvic constraints persists despite data linking human life history to that of other species. Here, we present evidence that challenges the importance of pelvic morphology and mechanics in the evolution of human gestation and altriciality. Instead, our analyses suggest that limits to maternal metabolism are the primary constraints on human gestation length and fetal growth. Although pelvic remodeling and encephalization during hominin evolution contributed to the present parturitional difficulty, there is little evidence that pelvic constraints have altered the timing of birth.

  1. Metabolic effects of smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kindred K; Zopey, Mohan; Friedman, Theodore C

    2016-05-01

    Smoking continues to be the leading cause of preventable death in the USA, despite the vast and widely publicized knowledge about the negative health effects of tobacco smoking. Data show that smoking cessation is often accompanied by weight gain and an improvement in insulin sensitivity over time. However, paradoxically, post-cessation-related obesity might contribute to insulin resistance. Furthermore, post-cessation weight gain is reportedly the number one reason why smokers, especially women, fail to initiate smoking cessation or relapse after initiating smoking cessation. In this Review, we discuss the metabolic effects of stopping smoking and highlight future considerations for smoking cessation programs and therapies to be designed with an emphasis on reducing post-cessation weight gain.

  2. Obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kathryn Buchanan; Lemberg, Louis

    2003-03-01

    The prevalence of marked obesity is increasing rapidly among adults and has more than doubled in 10 years. Sixty-one percent of the adult population of the United States is overweight or obese. Americans are the fattest people on earth. Paradoxically these increases in the numbers of persons who are obese or overweight have occurred during recent years when Americans have been preoccupied with numerous dietary programs, diet products, weight control, health clubs, home exercise equipment, and physical fitness videos, each "guaranteed" to bring rapid results. Overweight and obesity are also world problems. The World Health Organization estimates that 1 billion people around the world are now overweight or obese. Westernization of diets has been part of the problem. Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are being replaced by readily accessible foods high in saturated fat, sugar, and refined carbohydrates. Since class 3 obesity (morbid or extreme obesity) is associated with the most severe health complications, the incidence of hypertension, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and peripheral vascular disease will increase substantially in the future. Recently, obesity alone has been implicated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and CHF. The metabolic syndrome associated with abdominal obesity, which includes insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and elevated CRP levels, identifies subjects who have an increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Twenty to 25% of the adult population in the United States have the metabolic syndrome, and in some older groups this prevalence approaches 50%. The prevalence of overweight children in the United States has also been increasing dramatically, especially among non-Hispanic blacks and Mexican-American adolescents. Overweight children usually become overweight adults. Atherosclerosis begins in childhood. The degree of atherosclerotic changes in children and young adults can be correlated with the presence of the same risk

  3. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  4. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Gylling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%–10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein

  5. Thyroid hormone metabolism in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darras V.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH receptors preferentially bind 3.5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3. Therefore the metabolism of thyroxine (T4 secreted by the thyroid gland in peripheral tissues, resulting in the production and degradation of receptor-active T3, plays a major role in thyroid function. The most important metabolic pathway for THs is deiodination. Another important pathway is sulfation, which is a reversible pathway that has been shown to interact with TH deiodination efficiency. The enzymes catalysing TH deiodination consist of three types. Type 1 deiodinase (D1 catalyses both outer ring (ORD and inner ring deiodinalion (IRD. Type II deiodinase (D2 only catalyses ORD while type III (D3 only catalyses IRD. The three chicken deiodinase cDNAs have been cloned recently. These enzymes all belong to the family of selenoproteins. Ontogenetic studies show that the availability of deiodinases is regulated in a tissue specific and developmental stage dependent way. Characteristic for the chicken is the presence of very high levels off, inactivating D3 enzyme in the embryonic liver. Hepatic D3 is subject to acute regulation in a number of situations. Both growth hormone and glucocorticoid injection rapidly decrease hepatic D3 levels, hereby increasing plasma T3 without affecting hepatic D1 levels. The inhibition of D3 seems to be regulated mainly at the level of D3 gene transcription. The effect of growth hormone on D3 expression persists throughout life, while glucocorticoids start to inhibit hepatic D1 expression in posthatch chickens. Food restriction in growing chickens increases hepatic D3 levels. This contributes to the decrease in plasma T3 necessary to reduce energy loss. Refeeding restores hepatic D3 and plasma T3 to control levels within a few hours. It can be concluded that the tissue and time dependent regulation of the balance between TH activating and inactivating enzymes plays an essential role in the control of local T3 availability and hence in

  6. RESISTANT HYPERTENSION IN A PATIENT WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    O. M. Drapkina; J. S. Sibgatullina

    2016-01-01

    Clinical case of resistant hypertension in a patient with metabolic syndrome is presented. Features of hypertension in metabolic syndrome and features of metabolic syndrome in women of pre- and postmenopausal age are also considered. Understanding the features of metabolic syndrome in women, as well as features of hypertension and metabolic syndrome will improve the results of treatment in patients with resistant hypertension.

  7. Gene therapy in disorders of lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, Stefan F C; Twisk, Jaap; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2007-01-01

    Current pharmacologic interventions in lipid metabolism are insufficient in a subset of patients at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In particular, several monogenetic disorders of lipid metabolism with diverse clinical complications are beyond treatment to date. Somatic gene transfer is a

  8. Engineering of sugar metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Weia Arianne

    2008-01-01

    Short English Summary Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the dairy industry. This thesis decribes the genetic engineering performed on the sugar metabolism of L. lactis. Besides our fundamental interest for sugar metabolism and its regulation in L. lactis, this project had the int

  9. L-Fucose metabolism in camplobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a gastrointestinal pathogen once considered asaccharolytic, but now known to metabolize fucose. Strains with the fuc locus encode enzymes for fucose uptake and metabolism and show a competitive colonization advantage in the piglet disease model. C. jejuni NCTC11168 shows redu...

  10. Cardiac manifestations of inborn errors of metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangeliou, A.; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, K.; Daphnis, E.; Ganotakis, E.; Vavouranakis, I.; Michailidou, H.; Hitoglou-Makedou, A.; Nicolaidou, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Varlamis, G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency and type of cardiac manifestations in a defined group of patients with inborn errors of metabolism. This paper also explores the key role of cardiac manifestations in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism in daily practice. METHODS: O

  11. Metabolic acidosis: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Jeffrey A; Madias, Nicolaos E

    2010-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis is characterized by a primary reduction in serum bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) concentration, a secondary decrease in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) of approximately 1 mmHg for every 1 mmol/l fall in serum HCO(3)(-) concentration, and a reduction in blood pH. Acute forms (lasting minutes to several days) and chronic forms (lasting weeks to years) of the disorder can occur, for which the underlying cause/s and resulting adverse effects may differ. Acute forms of metabolic acidosis most frequently result from the overproduction of organic acids such as ketoacids or lactic acid; by contrast, chronic metabolic acidosis often reflects bicarbonate wasting and/or impaired renal acidification. The calculation of the serum anion gap, calculated as [Na(+)] - ([HCO(3)(-)] + [Cl(-)]), aids diagnosis by classifying the disorders into categories of normal (hyperchloremic) anion gap or elevated anion gap. These categories can overlap, however. Adverse effects of acute metabolic acidosis primarily include decreased cardiac output, arterial dilatation with hypotension, altered oxygen delivery, decreased ATP production, predisposition to arrhythmias, and impairment of the immune response. The main adverse effects of chronic metabolic acidosis are increased muscle degradation and abnormal bone metabolism. Using base to treat acute metabolic acidosis is controversial because of a lack of definitive benefit and because of potential complications. By contrast, the administration of base for the treatment of chronic metabolic acidosis is associated with improved cellular function and few complications.

  12. Metabolic Abnormalities in Children with Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Childhood asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and the latter is also contributing to increasing rates of related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. Yet, the relationship between asthma, obesity, and abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism is not well understood, nor has it been adequately explored in children.

  13. Correlated FLIM and PLIM for cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, A.; Breymayer, J.; Kalinina, S.

    2016-03-01

    Correlated imaging of phosphorescence and fluorescence lifetime parameters of metabolic markers is a challenge for direct investigating mechanisms related to cell metabolism and oxygen tension. A large variety of clinical phenotypes is associated with mitochondrial defects accomplished with changes in cell metabolism. In many cases the hypoxic microenvironment of cancer cells shifts metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to anaerobic or aerobic glycolysis, a process known as "Warburg" effect. Also during stem cell differentiation a switch in cell metabolism is observed. A defective mitochondrial function associated with hypoxia has been invoked in many complex disorders such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimers disease, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, tissue inflammation and cancer. Cellular responses to oxygen tension have been studied extensively, optical imaging techniques based on time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) to detect the underlying metabolic mechanisms are therefore of prominent interest. They offer the possibility by inspecting fluorescence decay characteristics of intrinsic coenzymes to directly image metabolic pathways. Moreover oxygen tension can be determined by considering the phosphorescence lifetime of a phosphorescent probe. The combination of both fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of coenzymes like NADH and FAD and phosphorescence lifetime (PLIM) of phosphorescent dyes could provide valuable information about correlation of metabolic pathways and oxygen tension.

  14. Elements of the Cellular Metabolic Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Martínez De La Fuente

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies have shown the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by the DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes. Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in the self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by the specific input stimuli. The Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in the covalent post-translational modulation so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. Both the metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes and the enzymatic covalent modifications of determined molecules (structural dynamic processes seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory. Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory. The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell.

  15. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic...

  16. The metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Esther C.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th; Gietema, Jourik A.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, as a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, may represent an important connection between cancer treatment and its common late effect of cardiovascular disease. Insight into the aetiology of the metabolic syndrome after cancer treatment might help to identify and treat cance

  17. Genetics of metabolic syndrome and related traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of metabolic syndrome are addressed. The focus involves questions concerning the genetics of obesity, TG and cholesterol and hyperglycemia. Since we hypothesized that obesity is the most important trigger of metabolic impairment, the MetS definition in this thesis was

  18. Abnormal erythrocyte metabolism in hepatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J R; Kay, N E; Gottlieb, A J; Oski, F A

    1975-12-01

    Erythrocyte (RBC) metabolic studies were done on 114 patients with severe hepatic disease. Heinz body formation after incubation of RBCs with acetyl phenylhydrazine was found to be significantly higher in patients than in controls. RBC-reduced glutathione levels were lower than those of controls both before and after incubation with acetyl phenylhydrazine, and patients with the highest Heinz body counts had the lowest reduced glutathione levels. RBC methylene blue-stimulated hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt metabolism and glucose recycling through the shunt were significantly lower in patients with active hepatic disease than in controls. There was no difference in resting HMP shunt activity or in resting recycling of glucose. Despite impairment of shunt metabolism, total glucose consumption was greater in patients than in controls. The patients with the lowest stimulated HMP shunt metabolism and glucose recycling had the highest Heinz body counts, lowest reduced glutathione, and highest total glucose consumption. A continuum of abnormal shunt metabolism was seen, from a mild reduction of stimulated HMP shunt activity to a severe combined decrease in both the HMP shunt and glucose recycling. When measured, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and transketolase were normal or increased. Sequential studies were done on 11 patients who had abnormal metabolic studies. Coincident with improvement of HMP shunt metabolism, the Heinz body counts became lower, reduced glutathione higher, hematocrit higher, and liver function improved. Impaired HMP shunt metabolism appears to be a common, acquired RBC abnormality in patients with severe, active liver disease.

  19. Textbook Errors & Misconceptions in Biology: Cell Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    The idea that errors and misconceptions in biology textbooks are often slow to be discovered and corrected is discussed. Selected errors, misconceptions, and topics of confusion about cell metabolism are described. Fermentation, respiration, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, uniformity of catabolism, and metabolic pathways as models are…

  20. Metabolic aspects of acromegaly and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quabbe, H J; Plöckinger, U

    1996-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) affects virtually all facets of metabolism. This review concentrates on the effects of GH excess on carbohydrate, lipid, and bone metabolism, and on body composition. The effect of treatment with the somatostatin analog, octreotide, on the gastrointestinal-pancreatic axis is also discussed.