WorldWideScience

Sample records for biomolecular structures functional

  1. From dynamics to structure and function of model biomolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine-Vive-Curtaz, F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to extend recent works on structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded crystals to model biomolecular systems and biological processes. The tools that we have used are neutron scattering (NS) and density functional theory (DFT) and force field (FF) based simulation method

  2. Biomolecular Structure Determination with Divide and Concur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit

    2009-03-01

    Divide and concur (D-C) is a general computational approach, designed for the solution of highly frustrated problems. Recently applied to the problems of disk packing, the kissing number problem, and 3-SAT, it was competitive or outperformed special-purpose methods.ootnotetextS. Gravel and V. Elser, Phys. Rev. E 78, 036706 (2008) We present a method for applying the D-C framework to the problem of biomolecular structure determination. From a list of geometric constraints on groups of atoms in the molecule, we construct a deterministic iterative map that efficiently searches for structures simultaneously satisfying all constraints. As our method eschews an energy function and its minimization to focus on geometric constraints, it can very naturally integrate with the geometric constraints due to chemistry and physics, experimental constraints due to NMR data or many other experimental or biological hints. We present some results of our method.

  3. Function of Amphiphilic Biomolecular Machines: Elastic Protein-based Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, Dan W.

    2000-03-01

    Elastic protein-based polymers function as biomolecular machines due to inverse temperature transitions of hydrophobic folding and assembly. The transitions occur either on raising the temperature from below to above the transition temperature, Tt, or on isothermally lowering Tt from above to below an operating temperature. The inverse temperature transition involves a decrease in entropy of the polymer component of the system on raising the temperature and a larger increase in solvent entropy on hydrophobic association. Tt depends on the quantity of hydrophobic hydration that undergoes transition to bulk water. Designed amphiphilic polymers perform free energy transductions involving the intensive variables of mechanical force, pressure, temperature, chemical potential, electrochemical potential and electromagnetic radiation and define a set of five axioms for their function as machines. The physical basis for these diverse energy conversions is competition for hydration between apolar (hydrophobic) and polar (e.g., charged) moieties. The effectiveness of these Tt-type entropic elastic protein-based machines is due to repeating peptide sequences that form regular, dynamic repeating structures and exhibit damping of backbone torsional oscillations on extension.

  4. Retroactivity in the Context of Modularly Structured Biomolecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja-Hernández, Libertad; Martínez-García, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology has intensively promoted the technical implementation of modular strategies in the fabrication of biological devices. Modules are considered as networks of reactions. The behavior displayed by biomolecular systems results from the information processes carried out by the interconnection of the involved modules. However, in natural systems, module wiring is not a free-of-charge process; as a consequence of interconnection, a reactive phenomenon called retroactivity emerges. This phenomenon is characterized by signals that propagate from downstream modules (the modules that receive the incoming signals upon interconnection) to upstream ones (the modules that send the signals upon interconnection). Such retroactivity signals, depending of their strength, may change and sometimes even disrupt the behavior of modular biomolecular systems. Thus, analysis of retroactivity effects in natural biological and biosynthetic systems is crucial to achieve a deeper understanding of how this interconnection between functionally characterized modules takes place and how it impacts the overall behavior of the involved cell. By discussing the modules interconnection in natural and synthetic biomolecular systems, we propose that such systems should be considered as quasi-modular. PMID:26137457

  5. Structure and Interactions of Isolated Biomolecular Building Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Mattanjah

    2006-03-01

    We investigate biomolecular building blocks and their clusters with each other and with water on a single molecular level. The motivation is the need to distinguish between intrinsic molecular properties and those that result from the biological environment. This is achieved by a combination of laser desorption and jet cooling, applied to aromatic amino acids, small peptides containing those, nucleobases and nucleosides. This approach is coupled with a number of laser spectroscopic techniques, including resonant multi-photon ionization, spectral hole burning and infra-red ion-dip spectroscopy. We will discuss examples illustrating how information can be obtained on spatial structure of individual biomolecules, including peptide conformations and details of DNA base-pairing.

  6. Computer Programming and Biomolecular Structure Studies: A Step beyond Internet Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likic, Vladimir A.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the experience of teaching structural bioinformatics to third year undergraduate students in a subject titled "Biomolecular Structure and Bioinformatics." Students were introduced to computer programming and used this knowledge in a practical application as an alternative to the well established Internet bioinformatics…

  7. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  8. Atomic force microscopy of self-assembled biomolecular structures and their interaction with metallic nanoparticles.

    OpenAIRE

    Gysemans, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    We applied AFM to study biomolecular wires, both out of interest in thei r biological functions and in the framework of nanotechnology based fabr ication. We have focused on two different kinds of protein wires: Insuli n fibrils and microtubules. Microtubules are an important constituent of the cytoskeleton and fulfill multiple vital functions in the cell. Insu lin fibrils on the other hand are amyloid fibrils without a clear biolog ical role, but with intriguing polymerization properties tha...

  9. Modeling Structural Dynamics of Biomolecular Complexes by Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shoji; Kanada, Ryo; Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Li, Wenfei; Kenzaki, Hiroo

    2015-12-15

    Due to hierarchic nature of biomolecular systems, their computational modeling calls for multiscale approaches, in which coarse-grained (CG) simulations are used to address long-time dynamics of large systems. Here, we review recent developments and applications of CG modeling methods, focusing on our methods primarily for proteins, DNA, and their complexes. These methods have been implemented in the CG biomolecular simulator, CafeMol. Our CG model has resolution such that ∼10 non-hydrogen atoms are grouped into one CG particle on average. For proteins, each amino acid is represented by one CG particle. For DNA, one nucleotide is simplified by three CG particles, representing sugar, phosphate, and base. The protein modeling is based on the idea that proteins have a globally funnel-like energy landscape, which is encoded in the structure-based potential energy function. We first describe two representative minimal models of proteins, called the elastic network model and the classic Go̅ model. We then present a more elaborate protein model, which extends the minimal model to incorporate sequence and context dependent local flexibility and nonlocal contacts. For DNA, we describe a model developed by de Pablo's group that was tuned to well reproduce sequence-dependent structural and thermodynamic experimental data for single- and double-stranded DNAs. Protein-DNA interactions are modeled either by the structure-based term for specific cases or by electrostatic and excluded volume terms for nonspecific cases. We also discuss the time scale mapping in CG molecular dynamics simulations. While the apparent single time step of our CGMD is about 10 times larger than that in the fully atomistic molecular dynamics for small-scale dynamics, large-scale motions can be further accelerated by two-orders of magnitude with the use of CG model and a low friction constant in Langevin dynamics. Next, we present four examples of applications. First, the classic Go̅ model was used to

  10. ssDNA-Functionalized Nanoceria: A Redox-Active Aptaswitch for Biomolecular Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Gonca; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of biomolecular binding events is a critical step for the development of biorecognition assays for diagnostics and therapeutic applications. This paper reports the design of redox-active switches based on aptamer conjugated nanoceria for detection and quantification of biomolecular recognition. It is shown that the conformational transition state of the aptamer on nanoceria, combined with the redox properties of these particles can be used to create surface based structure switchable aptasensing platforms. Changes in the redox properties at the nanoceria surface upon binding of the ssDNA and its target analyte enables rapid and highly sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions. This concept is demonstrated as a general applicable method to the colorimetric detection of DNA binding events. An example of a nanoceria aptaswitch for the colorimetric sensing of Ochratoxin A (OTA) and applicability to other targets is provided. The system can sensitively and selectivity detect as low as 0.15 × 10(-9) m OTA. This novel assay is simple in design and does not involve oligonucleotide labeling or elaborate nanoparticle modification steps. The proposed mechanism discovered here opens up a new way of designing optical sensing methods based on aptamer recognition. This approach can be broadly applicable to many bimolecular recognition processes and related applications. PMID:26844813

  11. Variational Methods for Biomolecular Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Structure, function and dynamics of many biomolecular systems can be characterized by the energetic variational principle and the corresponding systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). This principle allows us to focus on the identification of essential energetic components, the optimal parametrization of energies, and the efficient computational implementation of energy variation or minimization. Given the fact that complex biomolecular systems are structurally non-uniform and their interactions occur through contact interfaces, their free energies are associated with various interfaces as well, such as solute-solvent interface, molecular binding interface, lipid domain interface, and membrane surfaces. This fact motivates the inclusion of interface geometry, particular its curvatures, to the parametrization of free energies. Applications of such interface geometry based energetic variational principles are illustrated through three concrete topics: the multiscale modeling of biomolecular electrosta...

  12. MALDI matrices for biomolecular analysis based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarov, Michael V; Egan, T; Khabashesku, Dmitry V; Schultz, J Albert; Peng, Haiqing; Khabashesku, Valery N; Furutani, Hiroshi; Prather, Kimberley S; Wang, H-W J; Jackson, S N; Woods, Amina S

    2004-11-15

    When used in small molar ratios of matrix to analyte, derivatized fullerenes and single wall nanotubes are shown to be efficient matrices for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The mixing of an acidic functionalized fullerene with a solution of bioanalyte, depositing a dried droplet, and irradiating with a pulsed nitrogen laser yields protonated or cationized molecular ions. Derivatized fullerenes could offer several advantages over conventional MALDI matrices: a high analyte ionization efficiency, a small molar ratios (less than 1) of matrix/analyte, and a broader optical absorption spectrum, which should obviate specific wavelength lasers for MALDI acquisitions. The major disadvantage to the use of fullerenes is the isobaric interference between matrix and analyte ions; however, it is overcome by using MALDI-ion mobility time-of-flight (IM-oTOF) mass spectrometry to preseparate carbon cluster ions from bioanalyte ions prior to TOF mass analysis. However, an alternative to the dried droplet preparation of fullerene MALDI samples is the aerosolization of matrix-analyte solutions (or slurries) followed by impacting the aerosol onto a stainless surface. We also demonstrate that the fullerene matrices can be used to acquire spectra from rat brain tissue. PMID:15538798

  13. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E.;

    2014-01-01

    suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors...

  14. Biomolecular Deuteration for Neutron Structural Biology and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Devos, Juliette M; Laux, Valerie; Dunne, Orla; Forsyth, V Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Neutron scattering studies provide important information in structural biology that is not accessible using other approaches. The uniqueness of the technique, and its complementarity with X-ray scattering, is greatest when full use is made of deuterium labeling. The ability to produce tailor-made deuterium-labeled biological macromolecules allows neutron studies involving solution scattering, crystallography, reflection, and dynamics to be optimized in a manner that has major impact on the scope, quality, and throughput of work in these areas. Deuteration facilities have now been developed at many neutron centres throughout the world; these are having a crucial effect on neutron studies in the life sciences and on biologically related studies in soft matter. This chapter describes methods that have been developed for the efficient production of deuterium-labeled samples for a wide range of neutron scattering applications. Examples are given that illustrate the use of these samples for each of the main techniques. Perspectives for biological deuterium labeling are discussed in relation to developments at current facilities and those that are planned in the future.

  15. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  16. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database

  17. Combining vibrational biomolecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques for the study of response and sensitivity of molecular structures/functional groups mainly related to lipid biopolymer to various processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) combine vibrational spectroscopy with chemometric multivariate techniques to determine the effect of processing applications on molecular structural changes of lipid biopolymer that mainly related to functional groups in green- and yellow-type Crop Development Centre (CDC) pea varieties [CDC strike (green-type) vs. CDC meadow (yellow-type)] that occurred during various processing applications; (2) relatively quantify the effect of processing applications on the antisymmetric CH3 ("CH3as") and CH2 ("CH2as") (ca. 2960 and 2923 cm(-1), respectively), symmetric CH3 ("CH3s") and CH2 ("CH2s") (ca. 2873 and 2954 cm(-1), respectively) functional groups and carbonyl C=O ester (ca. 1745 cm(-1)) spectral intensities as well as their ratios of antisymmetric CH3 to antisymmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3as to CH2as), ratios of symmetric CH3 to symmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3s to CH2s), and ratios of carbonyl C=O ester peak area to total CH peak area (ratio of C=O ester to CH); and (3) illustrate non-invasive techniques to detect the sensitivity of individual molecular functional group to the various processing applications in the recently developed different types of pea varieties. The hypothesis of this research was that processing applications modified the molecular structure profiles in the processed products as opposed to original unprocessed pea seeds. The results showed that the different processing methods had different impacts on lipid molecular functional groups. Different lipid functional groups had different sensitivity to various heat processing applications. These changes were detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques which may be highly related to lipid utilization and availability. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis of original spectra (without spectral parameterization) are unable to fully distinguish the structural differences in the

  18. Combining vibrational biomolecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques for the study of response and sensitivity of molecular structures/functional groups mainly related to lipid biopolymer to various processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) combine vibrational spectroscopy with chemometric multivariate techniques to determine the effect of processing applications on molecular structural changes of lipid biopolymer that mainly related to functional groups in green- and yellow-type Crop Development Centre (CDC) pea varieties [CDC strike (green-type) vs. CDC meadow (yellow-type)] that occurred during various processing applications; (2) relatively quantify the effect of processing applications on the antisymmetric CH3 ("CH3as") and CH2 ("CH2as") (ca. 2960 and 2923 cm(-1), respectively), symmetric CH3 ("CH3s") and CH2 ("CH2s") (ca. 2873 and 2954 cm(-1), respectively) functional groups and carbonyl C=O ester (ca. 1745 cm(-1)) spectral intensities as well as their ratios of antisymmetric CH3 to antisymmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3as to CH2as), ratios of symmetric CH3 to symmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3s to CH2s), and ratios of carbonyl C=O ester peak area to total CH peak area (ratio of C=O ester to CH); and (3) illustrate non-invasive techniques to detect the sensitivity of individual molecular functional group to the various processing applications in the recently developed different types of pea varieties. The hypothesis of this research was that processing applications modified the molecular structure profiles in the processed products as opposed to original unprocessed pea seeds. The results showed that the different processing methods had different impacts on lipid molecular functional groups. Different lipid functional groups had different sensitivity to various heat processing applications. These changes were detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques which may be highly related to lipid utilization and availability. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis of original spectra (without spectral parameterization) are unable to fully distinguish the structural differences in the

  19. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  20. Advances in integrative modeling of biomolecular complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaca, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution structural information is needed in order to unveil the underlying mechanistic of biomolecular function. Due to the technical limitations or the nature of the underlying complexes, acquiring atomic resolution information is difficult for many challenging systems, while, often, low-re

  1. Controls of functional group chemistry on calcium carbonate nucleation: Insights into systematics of biomolecular innovations for skeletal mineralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, P. M.; Hamm, L. M.; Giuffre, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Living organisms produce skeletal structures within a complex matrix of organic macromolecules that guide the nucleation and growth of crystalline structures into the organic-inorganic composites we know as biominerals. This type of biomolecule-directed mineralization is an ancient process as evidenced by structures in the fossil record that date to the Ediacaran (ca. 549 Ma). Our understanding of template-directed biomineralization, however, is largely based upon assumptions from studies that: 1) qualitatively demonstrate some chemical functionalities influence the nucleating mineral phase and morphology; 2) propose proteins are the primary driver to template-directed mineralization and 3) propose the ubiquitous polysaccharides are inert components. Thus, a mechanistic basis for how the underlying chemistry of macromolecules controls nucleation kinetics and thermodynamics in template-directed nucleation is not well established. Moreover, there is not yet a good appreciation for how patterns of skeletal mineralization evolved with biochemical innovations in response to environmental changes over geologic timescales. In small steps toward understanding biochemical controls on biomineralization, we test the hypothesis that the kinetics and thermodynamics of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the functional group chemistry of macromolecules. A long-term goal is to establish the energetic basis for biochemical motifs that are seen (and not seen) at sites of calcification across the phylogenetic tree. Two types of studies were conducted. The first measured nucleation rates on model biomolecular substrates with termini that are found in proteins associated with sites of calcification (-COOH, -PO4, and -SH) and two alkanethiol chain lengths (16-C and 11-C) at a variety of chemical driving forces. The measurements show functional group chemistry and molecule conformation regulate rates by a predictable relation to interfacial

  2. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  3. Programming in Biomolecular Computation:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue;

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We identify a number of common features in programming that seem...... conspicuously absent from the literature on biomolecular computing; to partially redress this absence, we introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined...... by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only executable, but are also compilable and interpretable. It is universal: all computable functions can be computed (in natural ways...

  4. Computational methods to study the structure and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes from bioinformatics to molecular quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Since the second half of the 20th century machine computations have played a critical role in science and engineering. Computer-based techniques have become especially important in molecular biology, since they often represent the only viable way to gain insights into the behavior of a biological system as a whole. The complexity of biological systems, which usually needs to be analyzed on different time- and size-scales and with different levels of accuracy, requires the application of different approaches, ranging from comparative analysis of sequences and structural databases, to the analysis of networks of interdependence between cell components and processes, through coarse-grained modeling to atomically detailed simulations, and finally to molecular quantum mechanics. This book provides a comprehensive overview of modern computer-based techniques for computing the structure, properties and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes. The twenty-two chapters, written by scientists from all over t...

  5. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ). PMID:27023095

  6. Grid computing and biomolecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Ng, Muan Hong; Johnston, Steven; Murdock, Stuart E; Wu, Bing; Tai, Kaihsu; Fangohr, Hans; Jeffreys, Paul; Cox, Simon; Frey, Jeremy G; Sansom, Mark S P; Essex, Jonathan W

    2005-08-15

    Biomolecular computer simulations are now widely used not only in an academic setting to understand the fundamental role of molecular dynamics on biological function, but also in the industrial context to assist in drug design. In this paper, two applications of Grid computing to this area will be outlined. The first, involving the coupling of distributed computing resources to dedicated Beowulf clusters, is targeted at simulating protein conformational change using the Replica Exchange methodology. In the second, the rationale and design of a database of biomolecular simulation trajectories is described. Both applications illustrate the increasingly important role modern computational methods are playing in the life sciences.

  7. REACH coarse-grained biomolecular simulation: transferability between different protein structural classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-08-01

    Coarse graining of protein interactions provides a means of simulating large biological systems. The REACH (Realistic Extension Algorithm via Covariance Hessian) coarse-graining method, in which the force constants of a residue-scale elastic network model are calculated from the variance-covariance matrix obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, involves direct mapping between scales without the need for iterative optimization. Here, the transferability of the REACH force field is examined between protein molecules of different structural classes. As test cases, myoglobin (all alpha), plastocyanin (all beta), and dihydrofolate reductase (alpha/beta) are taken. The force constants derived are found to be closely similar in all three proteins. An MD version of REACH is presented, and low-temperature coarse-grained (CG) REACH MD simulations of the three proteins are compared with atomistic MD results. The mean-square fluctuations of the atomistic MD are well reproduced by the CGMD. Model functions for the CG interactions, derived by averaging over the three proteins, are also shown to produce fluctuations in good agreement with the atomistic MD. The results indicate that, similarly to the use of atomistic force fields, it is now possible to use a single, generic REACH force field for all protein studies, without having first to derive parameters from atomistic MD simulation for each individual system studied. The REACH method is thus likely to be a reliable way of determining spatiotemporal motion of a variety of proteins without the need for expensive computation of long atomistic MD simulations. PMID:18469078

  8. Programming in Biomolecular Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable......, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only...... in a strong sense: a universal algorithm exists, that is able to execute any program, and is not asymptotically inefficient. A prototype model has been implemented (for now in silico on a conventional computer). This work opens new perspectives on just how computation may be specified at the biological level....

  9. Proteopedia: Exciting Advances in the 3D Encyclopedia of Biomolecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilusky, Jaime; Hodis, Eran; Sussman, Joel L.

    Proteopedia is a collaborative, 3D web-encyclopedia of protein, nucleic acid and other structures. Proteopedia ( http://www.proteopedia.org ) presents 3D biomolecule structures in a broadly accessible manner to a diverse scientific audience through easy-to-use molecular visualization tools integrated into a wiki environment that anyone with a user account can edit. We describe recent advances in the web resource in the areas of content and software. In terms of content, we describe a large growth in user-added content as well as improvements in automatically-generated content for all PDB entry pages in the resource. In terms of software, we describe new features ranging from the capability to create pages hidden from public view to the capability to export pages for offline viewing. New software features also include an improved file-handling system and availability of biological assemblies of protein structures alongside their asymmetric units.

  10. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced. PMID:26647577

  11. A guide to the visual analysis and communication of biomolecular structural data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Graham T; Hertig, Samuel

    2014-10-01

    Biologists regularly face an increasingly difficult task - to effectively communicate bigger and more complex structural data using an ever-expanding suite of visualization tools. Whether presenting results to peers or educating an outreach audience, a scientist can achieve maximal impact with minimal production time by systematically identifying an audience's needs, planning solutions from a variety of visual communication techniques and then applying the most appropriate software tools. A guide to available resources that range from software tools to professional illustrators can help researchers to generate better figures and presentations tailored to any audience's needs, and enable artistically inclined scientists to create captivating outreach imagery.

  12. H++ 3.0: automating pK prediction and the preparation of biomolecular structures for atomistic molecular modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Aguilar, Boris; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2012-07-01

    The accuracy of atomistic biomolecular modeling and simulation studies depend on the accuracy of the input structures. Preparing these structures for an atomistic modeling task, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, can involve the use of a variety of different tools for: correcting errors, adding missing atoms, filling valences with hydrogens, predicting pK values for titratable amino acids, assigning predefined partial charges and radii to all atoms, and generating force field parameter/topology files for MD. Identifying, installing and effectively using the appropriate tools for each of these tasks can be difficult for novice and time-consuming for experienced users. H++ (http://biophysics.cs.vt.edu/) is a free open-source web server that automates the above key steps in the preparation of biomolecular structures for molecular modeling and simulations. H++ also performs extensive error and consistency checking, providing error/warning messages together with the suggested corrections. In addition to numerous minor improvements, the latest version of H++ includes several new capabilities and options: fix erroneous (flipped) side chain conformations for HIS, GLN and ASN, include a ligand in the input structure, process nucleic acid structures and generate a solvent box with specified number of common ions for explicit solvent MD.

  13. Structure, dynamics, and function of biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frauenfelder, H.; Berendzen, J.R.; Garcia, A.; Gupta, G.; Olah, G.A.; Terwilliger, T.C.; Trewhella, J.; Wood, C.C.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors enhanced Los Alamos' core competency in Bioscience and Biotechnology by building on present strengths in experimental techniques, theory, high-performance computing, modeling, and simulation applied to biomolecular structure, dynamics, and function. Specifically, the authors strengthened their capabilities in neutron/x-ray scattering, x-ray crystallography, NMR, laser, and optical spectroscopies. Initially they focused on supporting the Los alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the design and implementation of new neutron scattering instrumentation, they developed new methods for analysis of scattering data, and they developed new projects to study the structures of biomolecular complexes. The authors have also worked to strengthen interactions between theory and experiment, and between the biological and physical sciences. They sponsored regular meetings of members from all interested LANL technical divisions, and supported two lecture series: ''Biology for Physicists'' and ''Issues in Modern Biology''. They also supported the formation of interdisciplinary/inter-divisional teams to develop projects in science-based bioremediation and an integrated structural biology resource. Finally, they successfully worked with a multidisciplinary team to put forward the Laboratory's Genome and Beyond tactical goal.

  14. Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

  15. Bio-molecular sensors based on guided mode resonance filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M. R.; Ali, R.; Honkanen, S.; Turunen, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this work a low surface roughness and homogenous, high refractive index, and amorphous TiO2 layer on corrugated structures of diffractive optical element is coated by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) for biosensors. The design of Guided Mode Resonance Filters (GMRFs) is based on refractive indices and thicknesses of the waveguide biomolecular layers. The designed spectral shifts are calculated by Fourier Modal Method (FMM) and depend on the magnitude of the variations in refractive index of the biomolecular layer on waveguide structures. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the biomolecular sensors depends on the thickness of biomolecular layer and periodicity of the structures. The waveguide structures designed for larger periods show an enhancement in the sensitivity (nm/RIU) of the biomolecular sensor at longer wavelengths. The periodicities of nanophotonic structures are varied from 300 to 500 nm in design calculations with predominance of increase in effective index of the structure to support leaky waveguide modes.

  16. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in biomolecular signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric; Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Fontana, Walter; Krakauer, David

    2011-11-01

    We study a mechanism for reliable switching in biomolecular signal-transduction cascades. Steady bistable states are created by system-size cooperative effects in populations of proteins, in spite of the fact that the phosphorylation-state transitions of any molecule, by means of which the switch is implemented, are highly stochastic. The emergence of switching is a nonequilibrium phase transition in an energetically driven, dissipative system described by a master equation. We use operator and functional integral methods from reaction-diffusion theory to solve for the phase structure, noise spectrum, and escape trajectories and first-passage times of a class of minimal models of switches, showing how all critical properties for switch behavior can be computed within a unified framework.

  17. Flavin mononucleotide biomolecular laser: longitudinal mode structure, polarization, and temporal characteristics as probes of local chemical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, José A; Eden, J Gary

    2016-05-16

    A detailed characterization of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) biomolecular laser, optically pumped in a stable resonator, is reported here. Photoexcitation of the molecule at 355 nm results in lasing over the ~566.5-573.5 nm spectral region, and the threshold pump energy density is measured to be 110 ± 10 µJ/mm2 for a 10 mM FMN/water solution. Over twenty longitudinal modes are observed when the cavity length L and the energy pump fluence Ep are 375 µm and 300 µJ/mm2, respectively. Partial substitution of glycerol for water as the solvent results in a factor of four reduction in the threshold pump energy fluence (to 2) and a quadrupling of the slope efficiency. This effect is attributed to the O2 - mediated photoconversion of FMN molecules in the triplet state to the singlet species. For pump intensities a factor of 2.5 above threshold, the laser pulse width is ~2 ns FWHM, and the output intensity decays exponentially with a photon lifetime of 1.7 ns. The addition of glycerol to a FMN/water solution also suppresses s-polarized emission (yielding P = 0.78 ± 0.08), presumably as a result of the inhibition of FMN rotational diffusion. The sensitivity of the spectral and optical properties of this and other biomolecular lasers to the chemical environment underscores the value of coherent emission as a biochemical or biomedical diagnostic tool, particularly insofar as molecule-molecule interactions are concerned. PMID:27409906

  18. Conducting polymer based biomolecular electronic devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B D Malhotra; Rahul Singhal

    2003-08-01

    Biomolecular electronics is rapidly evolving from physics, chemistry, biology, electronics and information technology. Organic materials such as proteins, pigments and conducting polymers have been considered as alternatives for carrying out the functions that are presently being performed by semiconductor silicon. Conducting polymers such as polypyrroles, polythiophenes and polyanilines have been projected for applications for a wide range of biomolecular electronic devices such as optical, electronic, drug-delivery, memory and biosensing devices. Our group has been actively working towards the application of conducting polymers to Schottky diodes, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) devices and biosensors for the past 10 years. This paper is a review of some of the results obtained at our laboratory in the area of conducting polymer biomolecular electronics.

  19. Flourescence from Gas-Phase Biomolecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2013-01-01

    from experiments on dye-derivatised biomolecular ions that provide important information on folding/unfolding processes and local structural changes are presented. Examples included here are a model DNA duplex, the Trp-cage protein, polyproline peptides, and the cytochrome c heme protein. The chapter......This chapter deals with measurements of fluorescence from electronically excited biomolecular ions where there are no interactions with an external environment. Biomolecules with no natural fluorophores are labelled with a dye for such experiments. First, some of the advantages, but also...

  20. Assembly of single wall carbon nanotube-metal nanohybrids using biomolecular components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Nyon; Slocik, Joseph M.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2010-08-01

    Biomaterials such as nucleic acids and proteins can be exploited to create higher order structures. The biomolecular components such as DNA and peptides have been used to assemble nanoparticles with high fidelity. Here, we use DNA and peptides, and their preferential interaction with inorganic and carbon nanomaterials to form homogeneous hybrids. The enhanced binding of Pt ions to both DNA and peptide functionalized nanoparticles mediates the assembly of carbon nanotubes functionalized with DNA with peptide coated gold nanoparticles.

  1. Structure network analysis to gain insights into GPCR function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesca; Felline, Angelo; Raimondi, Francesco; Seeber, Michele

    2016-04-15

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are allosteric proteins whose functioning fundamentals are the communication between the two poles of the helix bundle. Protein structure network (PSN) analysis is one of the graph theory-based approaches currently used to investigate the structural communication in biomolecular systems. Information on system's dynamics can be provided by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations or coarse grained elastic network models paired with normal mode analysis (ENM-NMA). The present review article describes the application of PSN analysis to uncover the structural communication in G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Strategies to highlight changes in structural communication upon misfolding, dimerization and activation are described. Focus is put on the ENM-NMA-based strategy applied to the crystallographic structures of rhodopsin in its inactive (dark) and signalling active (meta II (MII)) states, highlighting changes in structure network and centrality of the retinal chromophore in differentiating the inactive and active states of the receptor. PMID:27068978

  2. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  3. Purely Functional Structured Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Obua, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The idea of functional programming has played a big role in shaping today's landscape of mainstream programming languages. Another concept that dominates the current programming style is Dijkstra's structured programming. Both concepts have been successfully married, for example in the programming language Scala. This paper proposes how the same can be achieved for structured programming and PURELY functional programming via the notion of LINEAR SCOPE. One advantage of this proposal is that mainstream programmers can reap the benefits of purely functional programming like easily exploitable parallelism while using familiar structured programming syntax and without knowing concepts like monads. A second advantage is that professional purely functional programmers can often avoid hard to read functional code by using structured programming syntax that is often easier to parse mentally.

  4. Purely Functional Structured Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Obua, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The idea of functional programming has played a big role in shaping today's landscape of mainstream programming languages. Another concept that dominates the current programming style is Dijkstra's structured programming. Both concepts have been successfully married, for example in the programming language Scala. This paper proposes how the same can be achieved for structured programming and PURELY functional programming via the notion of LINEAR SCOPE. One advantage of this proposal is that m...

  5. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  6. Application of Nanodiamonds in Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cheng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanodiamond (ND with biomolecular mass spectrometry (MS makes rapid, sensitive detection of biopolymers from complex biosamples feasible. Due to its chemical inertness, optical transparency and biocompatibility, the advantage of NDs in MS study is unique. Furthermore, functionalization on the surfaces of NDs expands their application in the fields of proteomics and genomics for specific requirements greatly. This review presents methods of MS analysis based on solid phase extraction and elution on NDs and different application examples including peptide, protein, DNA, glycan and others. Owing to the quick development of nanotechnology, surface chemistry, new MS methods and the intense interest in proteomics and genomics, a huge increase of their applications in biomolecular MS analysis in the near future can be predicted.

  7. Improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of biomolecular systems plays an essential role in understanding biological processes, such as ionic flow across channels, protein modification or interaction, and cell signaling. The continuum model described by the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations has made great contributions towards simulation of these processes. However, the model has shortcomings in its commonly used form and cannot capture (or cannot accurately capture) some important physical properties of biological systems. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the continuum model to account for discrete particle interactions and to make progress in numerical methods to provide accurate and efficient simulation. This review will summarize recent main improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems, with focus on the size-modified models, the coupling of the classical density functional theory and PNP equations, the coupling of polar and nonpolar interactions, and numerical progress.

  8. Visualization of confocal microscopic biomolecular data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanping; Moorhead, Robert J., II

    2005-04-01

    Biomolecular visualization facilitates insightful interpretation of molecular structures and complex mechanisms underlying bio-chemical processes. Effective visualization techniques are required to deal with confocal microscopic biomolecular data in which intricate structures, fine features, and obscure patterns might be overlooked without sophisticated data processing and image synthesis. This paper presents major challenges in visualizing confocal microscopic biomolecular data, followed by a survey of related work. We then introduce a case study conducted to investigate the interaction between two proteins contained in a budding yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae by embedding custom modules in Amira. The multi-channel confocal microscopic volume data was first processed using an exponential operator to correct z-drop artifacts introduced during data acquisition. Channel correlation was then exploited to extract the overlap between the proteins as a new channel to represent the interaction while a statistical method was employed to compute the intensity of interaction to locate hot spots. To take advantage of crisp surface representation of region boundaries by iso-surfaces and visually pleasing translucent delineation of dense volumes by volume rendering, we adopted hybrid rendering that incorporates these two methods to display clear-cut protein boundaries, amorphous interior materials, and the scattered interaction in the same view volume with suppressed and highlighted parts selected by the user. The highlighted overlap helped biologists learn where the interaction happens and how it spreads, particularly when the volume was investigated in an immersive Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) for intuitive comprehension of the data.

  9. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir;

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...

  10. Coassembly of aromatic dipeptides into biomolecular necklaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuran, Sivan; Razvag, Yair; Reches, Meital

    2012-11-27

    This paper describes the formation of complex peptide-based structures by the coassembly of two simple peptides, the diphenylalanine peptide and its tert-butyl dicarbonate (Boc) protected analogue. Each of these peptides can self-assemble into a distinct architecture: the diphenylalanine peptide into tubular structures and its analogue into spheres. Integrated together, these peptides coassemble into a construction of beaded strings, where spherical assemblies are connected by elongated elements. Electron and scanning force microscopy demonstrated the morphology of these structures, which we termed "biomolecular necklaces". Additional experiments indicated the reversibility of the coassembly process and the stability of the structures. Furthermore, we suggest a possible mechanism of formation for the biomolecular necklaces. Our suggestion is based on the necklace model for polyelectrolyte chains, which proposes that a necklace structure appears as a result of counterion condensation on the backbone of a polyelectrolyte. Overall, the approach of coassembly, demonstrated using aromatic peptides, can be adapted to any peptides and may lead to the development and discovery of new self-assembled architectures formed by peptides and other biomolecules. PMID:23061818

  11. The HADDOCK web server for data-driven biomolecular docking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, S.J.; van Dijk, M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Computational docking is the prediction or modeling of the three-dimensional structure of a biomolecular complex, starting from the structures of the individual molecules in their free, unbound form. HADDOC K is a popular docking program that takes a datadriven approach to docking, with support for

  12. Nanotube-Based Chemical and Biomolecular Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Koh; B.Kim; S.Hong; H.Lim; H.C.Choi

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief review about recent results regarding carbon nanotube (CNT)-based chemical and biomolecular sensors. For the fabrication of CNT-based sensors, devices containing CNT channels between two metal electrodes are first fabricated usually via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process or "surface programmed assembly" method. Then, the CNT surfaces are often functionalized to enhance the selectivity of the sensors. Using this process, highly-sensitive CNT-based sensors can be fabricated for the selective detection of various chemical and biological molecules such as hydrogen, ammonia, carbon monoxide, chlorine gas, DNA, glucose, alcohol, and proteins.

  13. Micro and Nanotechnologies Enhanced Biomolecular Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tza-Huei Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This editorial summarizes some of the recent advances of micro and nanotechnology-based tools and devices for biomolecular detection. These include the incorporation of nanomaterials into a sensor surface or directly interfacing with molecular probes to enhance target detection via more rapid and sensitive responses, and the use of self-assembled organic/inorganic nanocomposites that inhibit exceptional spectroscopic properties to enable facile homogenous assays with efficient binding kinetics. Discussions also include some insight into microfluidic principles behind the development of an integrated sample preparation and biosensor platform toward a miniaturized and fully functional system for point of care applications.

  14. Azurin for Biomolecular Electronics: a Reliability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, Alessandro; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Calabi, Franco; Arima, Valentina; Cingolani, Roberto; Corni, Stefano; Di Felice, Rosa; De Rienzo, Francesca; Rinaldi, Ross

    2005-09-01

    The metalloprotein azurin, used in biomolecular electronics, is investigated with respect to its resilience to high electric fields and ambient conditions, which are crucial reliability issues. Concerning the effect of electric fields, two models of different complexity agree indicating an unexpectedly high robustness. Experiments in device-like conditions confirm that no structural modifications occur, according to fluorescence spectra, even after a 40-min exposure to tens of MV/m. Ageing is then investigated experimentally, at ambient conditions and without field, over several days. Only a small conformational rearrangement is observed in the first tens of hours, followed by an equilibrium state.

  15. Biomolecular Modification of Inorganic Crystal Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Yoreo, J J

    2007-04-27

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures are an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over materials synthesis. Conversely, the failure to prevent or limit tissue mineralization in the vascular, skeletal, and urinary systems is a common source of disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which organisms direct or limit crystallization has long been a central challenge to the biomineralization community. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for either inhibiting crystallization or initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineralizing surfaces. In particular, biomolecules that present carboxyl groups to the growing crystal have been implicated as primary modulators of growth. Here we review the results from a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling (MM) studies to investigate the effect of specific interactions between carboxylate-rich biomolecules and atomic steps on crystal surfaces during the growth of carbonates, oxalates and phosphates of calcium. Specifically, we how the growth kinetics and morphology depend on the concentration of additives that include citrate, simple amino acids, synthetic Asp-rich polypeptides, and naturally occurring Asp-rich proteins found in both functional and pathological mineral tissues. The results reveal a consistent picture of shape modification in which stereochemical matching of modifiers to specific atomic steps drives shape modification. Inhibition and other changes in growth kinetics are shown to be due to a range of mechanisms that depend on chemistry and molecular size. Some effects are well described by classic crystal growth theories, but others, such as step acceleration due to peptide charge and hydrophylicity, were previously unrealized

  16. Multi-functional composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  17. Multi-functional composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  18. Improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiao; Ben-Zhuo, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of biomolecular systems plays an essential role in understanding biological processes, such as ionic flow across channels, protein modification or interaction, and cell signaling. The continuum model described by the Poisson- Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations has made great contributions towards simulation of these processes. However, the model has shortcomings in its commonly used form and cannot capture (or cannot accurately capture) some important physical properties of the biological systems. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the continuum model to account for discrete particle interactions and to make progress in numerical methods to provide accurate and efficient simulations. This review will summarize recent main improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems, with focus on the size-modified models, the coupling of the classical density functional theory and the PNP equations, the coupling of polar and nonpolar interactions, and numerical progress. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91230106) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences Program for Cross & Cooperative Team of the Science & Technology Innovation.

  19. Structural stability versus conformational sampling in biomolecular systems: Why is the charge transfer efficiency in G4-DNA better than in double-stranded DNA?

    OpenAIRE

    Woiczikowski, P. Benjamin; Kubař, Tomáš; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Elstner, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    The electrical conduction properties of G4-DNA are investigated using a hybrid approach, which combines electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the formulation of an effective tight-binding model Hamiltonian. Charge transport is studied by computing transmission functions along the MD trajectories. Though G4-DNA is structurally more stable than double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), our results strongly suggest that the potential improvement of the electrical transpo...

  20. Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wenyu; Bryson, David I.; Crumpton, Jason B.; Wynn, Jessica; Santos, Webster L.

    2013-01-01

    On-bead high-throughput screening of a medium-sized (1000_2000 Da) branched peptideboronic acid (BPBA) library consisting of 46 656 unique sequences against HIV-1 RRE RNA generated peptides with binding affinities in the low micromolar range. In particular, BPBA1 had a Kd of 1.4 _M with RRE IIB, preference for RNA over DNA (27 fold), and selectivity of up to >75 fold against a panel of RRE IIB variants. Structure_activity studies suggest that the boronic acid moiety and ͐branching in peptide...

  1. Biomolecular simulation on thousands of processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James Christopher

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation is a generally applicable method for the study of biomolecular aggregates of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. As experimental techniques have revealed the structures of larger and more complex biomolecular machines, the time required to complete even a single meaningful simulation of such systems has become prohibitive. We have developed the program NAMD to simulate systems of 50,000--500,000 atoms efficiently with full electrostatics on parallel computers with 1000 and more processors. NAMD's scalability is achieved through latency tolerant adaptive message-driven execution and measurement-based load balancing. NAMD is implemented in C++ and uses object-oriented design and threads to shield the basic algorithms from the necessary complexity of high-performance parallel execution. Apolipoprotein A-I is the primary protein constituent of high density lipoprotein particles, which transport cholesterol in the bloodstream. In collaboration with A. Jonas, we have constructed and simulated models of the nascent discoidal form of these particles, providing theoretical insight to the debate regarding the lipid-bound structure of the protein. Recently, S. Sligar and coworkers have created 10 nm phospholipid bilayer nanoparticles comprising a small lipid bilayer disk solubilized by synthetic membrane scaffold proteins derived from apolipoprotein A-I. Membrane proteins may be embedded in the water-soluble disks, with various medical and technological applications. We are working to develop variant scaffold proteins that produce disks of greater size, stability, and homogeneity. Our simulations have demonstrated a significant deviation from idealized cylindrical structure, and are being used in the interpretation of small angle x-ray scattering data.

  2. On the use of time-averaging restraints when deriving biomolecular structure from [Formula: see text]-coupling values obtained from NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Deriving molecular structure from [Formula: see text]-couplings obtained from NMR experiments is a challenge due to (1) the uncertainty in the Karplus relation [Formula: see text] connecting a [Formula: see text]-coupling value to a torsional angle [Formula: see text], (2) the need to account for the averaging inherent to the measurement of [Formula: see text]-couplings, and (3) the sampling road blocks that may emerge due to the multiple-valuedness of the inverse function [Formula: see text] of the function [Formula: see text]. Ways to properly handle these issues in structure refinement of biomolecules are discussed and illustrated using the protein hen egg white lysozyme as example. PMID:27627888

  3. Micro- and nanodevices integrated with biomolecular probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Icoz, Kutay; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biomolecules, proteins and cells interact with their surroundings and other biological entities has become the fundamental design criterion for most biomedical micro- and nanodevices. Advances in biology, medicine, and nanofabrication technologies complement each other and allow us to engineer new tools based on biomolecules utilized as probes. Engineered micro/nanosystems and biomolecules in nature have remarkably robust compatibility in terms of function, size, and physical properties. This article presents the state of the art in micro- and nanoscale devices designed and fabricated with biomolecular probes as their vital constituents. General design and fabrication concepts are presented and three major platform technologies are highlighted: microcantilevers, micro/nanopillars, and microfluidics. Overview of each technology, typical fabrication details, and application areas are presented by emphasizing significant achievements, current challenges, and future opportunities. PMID:26363089

  4. Interacting with the biomolecular solvent accessible surface via a haptic feedback device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From the 1950s computer based renderings of molecules have been produced to aid researchers in their understanding of biomolecular structure and function. A major consideration for any molecular graphics software is the ability to visualise the three dimensional structure of the molecule. Traditionally, this was accomplished via stereoscopic pairs of images and later realised with three dimensional display technologies. Using a haptic feedback device in combination with molecular graphics has the potential to enhance three dimensional visualisation. Although haptic feedback devices have been used to feel the interaction forces during molecular docking they have not been used explicitly as an aid to visualisation. Results A haptic rendering application for biomolecular visualisation has been developed that allows the user to gain three-dimensional awareness of the shape of a biomolecule. By using a water molecule as the probe, modelled as an oxygen atom having hard-sphere interactions with the biomolecule, the process of exploration has the further benefit of being able to determine regions on the molecular surface that are accessible to the solvent. This gives insight into how awkward it is for a water molecule to gain access to or escape from channels and cavities, indicating possible entropic bottlenecks. In the case of liver alcohol dehydrogenase bound to the inhibitor SAD, it was found that there is a channel just wide enough for a single water molecule to pass through. Placing the probe coincident with crystallographic water molecules suggests that they are sometimes located within small pockets that provide a sterically stable environment irrespective of hydrogen bonding considerations. Conclusion By using the software, named HaptiMol ISAS (available from http://www.haptimol.co.uk, one can explore the accessible surface of biomolecules using a three-dimensional input device to gain insights into the shape and water

  5. RECENT PROGRESS IN BIOMOLECULAR NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Structural genomics and proteomics were born from the understanding that functions of a protein are dictated by its 3D structure and dynamics. To understand protein functions on a genomic scale, we must know protein structures on a genomic scale. High resolution NMR can be used for this purpose. Traditional multidimensional NMR structure determination protocols become ineffective for structural genomics since to obtain a structure of a small protein of 15kD requires many months of painstaking spectral analysis and modeling. Recent advances in magnet and probe technology and in experimental methods have expanded the range of proteins amenable to structure determination and make the large scale structure determination possible. These advances are (1) effective expression systems for protein production, (2) introduction of cryoprobe, (3) structure determination with the use of the minimal amount of structural restraints obtained from the chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, NOEs, and computer modeling. In this talk,Iwill briefly outline these developments and related works done in our NMR lab.

  6. Structural Chemistry of Functional Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ This innovative research group on structural chemistry of functional materials was approved by NSFC in 2005.Headed by Prof.HONG Maochun, the team consists of several young research scientists from the CAS Fujian Institute of Research on the Structures of Matter, including Profs CAO Rong, LU Canzhong, GUO Guocong, CHEN Zhongning, MAO Jianggao Mao and CHEN Ling.

  7. Physics at the biomolecular interface fundamentals for molecular targeted therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses primarily on the role of interfacial forces in understanding biological phenomena at the molecular scale. By providing a suitable statistical mechanical apparatus to handle the biomolecular interface, the book becomes uniquely positioned to address core problems in molecular biophysics. It highlights the importance of interfacial tension in delineating a solution to the protein folding problem, in unravelling the physico-chemical basis of enzyme catalysis and protein associations, and in rationally designing molecular targeted therapies. Thus grounded in fundamental science, the book develops a powerful technological platform for drug discovery, while it is set to inspire scientists at any level in their careers determined to address the major challenges in molecular biophysics. The acknowledgment of how exquisitely the structure and dynamics of proteins and their aqueous environment are related attests to the overdue recognition that biomolecular phenomena cannot be effectively understood w...

  8. Microwave spectroscopy of biomolecular building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José L; López, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Microwave spectroscopy, considered as the most definitive gas phase structural probe, is able to distinguish between different conformational structures of a molecule, because they have unique spectroscopic constants and give rise to distinct individual rotational spectra.Previously, application of this technique was limited to molecular specimens possessing appreciable vapor pressures, thus discarding the possibility of studying many other molecules of biological importance, in particular those with high melting points, which had a tendency to undergo thermal reactions, and ultimately degradation, upon heating.Nowadays, the combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy techniques, in supersonic jets, has enabled the gas-phase study of such systems. In this chapter, these techniques, including broadband spectroscopy, as well as results of their application into the study of the conformational panorama and structure of biomolecular building blocks, such as amino acids, nucleic bases, and monosaccharides, are briefly discussed, and with them, the tools for conformational assignation - rotational constants, nuclear quadrupole coupling interaction, and dipole moment. PMID:25721775

  9. Biomolecular detection employing the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos A; Daaboul, George G; Ahn, Sunmin; Reddington, Alexander P; Monroe, Margo R; Zhang, Xirui; Irani, Rostem J; Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline A; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Goldberg, Bennett B; Connor, John H; Ünlü, M Selim

    2011-01-01

    The sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions has use in many fields and industries such as basic biology and microbiology, environmental/agricultural/biodefense monitoring, nanobiotechnology, and more. For diagnostic applications, monitoring (detecting) the presence, absence, or abnormal expression of targeted proteomic or genomic biomarkers found in patient samples can be used to determine treatment approaches or therapy efficacy. In the research arena, information on molecular affinities and specificities are useful for fully characterizing the systems under investigation. Many of the current systems employed to determine molecular concentrations or affinities rely on the use of labels. Examples of these systems include immunoassays such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, gel electrophoresis assays, and mass spectrometry (MS). Generally, these labels are fluorescent, radiological, or colorimetric in nature and are directly or indirectly attached to the molecular target of interest. Though the use of labels is widely accepted and has some benefits, there are drawbacks which are stimulating the development of new label-free methods for measuring these interactions. These drawbacks include practical facets such as increased assay cost, reagent lifespan and usability, storage and safety concerns, wasted time and effort in labelling, and variability among the different reagents due to the labelling processes or labels themselves. On a scientific research basis, the use of these labels can also introduce difficulties such as concerns with effects on protein functionality/structure due to the presence of the attached labels and the inability to directly measure the interactions in real time. Presented here is the use of a new label-free optical biosensor that is amenable to microarray studies, termed the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), for detecting proteins, DNA, antigenic material

  10. Unitarity Corrections and Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gay-Ducati, M B

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the color dipole picture for the description of the deep inelastic process, mainly the structure functions which are driven directly by the gluon distribution. Estimates for those functions are obtained using the effective dipole cross section given by the Glauber-Mueller approach in QCD, encoding the corrections due to the unitarity effects associated with the saturation phenomenon. Frame invariance is verified in the calculations of the observables when analysing the experimental data.

  11. Structure functions and parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J. [Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom); Roberts, R.G. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1995-07-01

    The MRS parton distribution analysis is described. The latest sets are shown to give an excellent description of a wide range of deep-inelastic and other hard scattering data. Two important theoretical issues-the behavior of the distributions at small x and the flavor structure of the quark sea-are discussed in detail. A comparison with the new structure function data from HERA is made, and the outlook for the future is discussed.

  12. The dipole model structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an approach to the evolution of the valence structure functions based on the Colour Dipole Cascade Model for deep inelastic lepto-production. We show that this approach leads to an evolution equation similar to the DGLAP equation. In our approach the dependence on Q2 is however much weaker and the evolution levels out at high Q2. (orig.)

  13. Shape of hadron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis that, in the leading twist approximation and to all orders of perturbative QCD, there exists a momentum scale Q02 at which hadrons are pure valence quark (or antiquark) bound states gives good results for nucleon, pion, and kaon structure functions. 2 figures

  14. Proton structure functions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Bruno

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  15. Factor XIII: Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Verena; Kohler, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    Over the last two decades, it became evident that factor XIII (FXIII) is not only a crucial determinant of clot characteristics but also has potentially important functions in many various fields such as bone biology, immunity, and adipogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize the latest findings regarding structure and function of FXIII. In regard to FXIII structure, much progress has been made recently to understand how its subunits are held together. In the A subunit, the activation peptide has a crucial role in the formation of FXIII-A2 dimers. In the B subunit, Sushi domains that are involved in binding to the A subunit and in B2 dimer formation have been identified. In regard to FXIII function, interactions with immune cells and the complement system have been described. A novel function of FXIII-A in adipogenesis has been suggested. The role of FXIII-A in osteoblast differentiation has been further investigated; however, a novel double knockout mouse deficient in both FXIII-A and transglutaminase 2 showed normal bone formation. Thus, more research, in particular, into the cellular functions of FXIII-A is still required. PMID:27019464

  16. Structure and Function of Glucansucrases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, B. W.; Vujičić-Žagar, A.

    2008-03-01

    Glucansucrases are relatively large (~160 kDa) extracellular enzymes produced by lactic acid bacteria. Using sucrose as a substrate they synthesize high molecular mass glucose polymers, called α-glucans, which allow the bacteria to adhere to surfaces and create a biofilm. The glucan polymers are of importance for the food and dairy industry as thickening and jellying agents. An overview is given of the current insights into the structure and functioning of these and related enzymes.

  17. Tissue Factor Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulius Butenas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor (TF is an integral membrane protein that is essential to life. It is a component of the factor VIIa-TF complex enzyme and plays a primary role in both normal hemostasis and thrombosis. With a vascular injury, TF becomes exposed to blood and binds plasma factor VIIa, and the resulting complex initiates a series of enzymatic reactions leading to clot formation and vascular sealing. Many cells, both healthy, and tumor cells, produce detectable amounts of TF, especially when they are stimulated by various agents. Despite the relative simplicity and small size of TF, there are numerous contradictory reports about the synthesis and presentation of TF on blood cells and circulation in normal blood either on microparticles or as a soluble protein. Another subject of controversy is related to the structure/function of TF. It has been almost commonly accepted that cell-surface-associated TF has low (if any activity, that is, is “encrypted” and requires specific conditions/reagents to become active, that is, “decrypted.” However there is a lack of agreement related to the mechanism and processes leading to alterations in TF function. In this paper TF structure, presentation, and function, and controversies concerning these features are discussed.

  18. Supramolecular Structure and Function 9

    CERN Document Server

    Pifat-Mrzljak, Greta

    2007-01-01

    The book is based on International Summer Schools on Biophysics held in Croatia which, contrary to other workshops centered mainly on one topic or technique, has very broad scope providing advanced training in areas related to biophysics. This volume is presenting papers in the field of biophysics for studying biological phenomena by using physical methods (NMR, EPR, FTIR, Mass Spectrometry, etc.) and/or concepts (predictions of protein-protein interactions, virtual ligand screening etc.). The interrelationship of supramolecular structures and there functions is enlightened by applications of principals of these physical methods in the biophysical and molecular biology context.

  19. Structure and function of aggrecan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Aggrecan is the major proteoglycan in the articular cartilage. This molecule is important in the proper functioning of articular cartilage because it provides a hydrated gel structure (via its interaction with hyaluronan and link protein) that endows the cartilage with load-bearing properties. It is also crucial in chondroskeletal morphogenesis during development. Aggrecan is a multimodular molecule expressed by chondrocytes. Its core protein is composed of three globular domains (Gl, G2, and G3) and a large extended region (CS) between G2 and G3 for glycosaminoglycan chain attachment. G1 comprises the amino terminus of the core protein. This domain has the same structural motif as link protein. Functionally, the G1 domain interacts with hyaluronan acid and link protein, forming stable ternary complexes in the extracellular matrix.G2 is homologous to the tandem repeats of G1 and of link protein and is involved in product processing. G3makes up the carboxyl terminus of the core protein. It enhances glycosaminoglycan modification and product secretion. Aggrecan plays an important role in mediating chondrocyte-chondrocyte and chondrocyte-matrix interactions through its ability to bind hyaluronan.

  20. Development of an informatics infrastructure for data exchange of biomolecular simulations: Architecture, data models and ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, J C; Roe, D R; Eilbeck, K; Cheatham Iii, T E; Facelli, J C

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations aim to simulate structure, dynamics, interactions, and energetics of complex biomolecular systems. With the recent advances in hardware, it is now possible to use more complex and accurate models, but also reach time scales that are biologically significant. Molecular simulations have become a standard tool for toxicology and pharmacology research, but organizing and sharing data - both within the same organization and among different ones - remains a substantial challenge. In this paper we review our recent work leading to the development of a comprehensive informatics infrastructure to facilitate the organization and exchange of biomolecular simulations data. Our efforts include the design of data models and dictionary tools that allow the standardization of the metadata used to describe the biomedical simulations, the development of a thesaurus and ontology for computational reasoning when searching for biomolecular simulations in distributed environments, and the development of systems based on these models to manage and share the data at a large scale (iBIOMES), and within smaller groups of researchers at laboratory scale (iBIOMES Lite), that take advantage of the standardization of the meta data used to describe biomolecular simulations. PMID:26387907

  1. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Harris, Michelle A; Chang, Wesley S; Dent, Erik W; Nordheim, Erik V; Franzen, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326-335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  2. Recent applications of AC electrokinetics in biomolecular analysis on microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    AC electrokinetics is a generic term that refers to an induced motion of particles and fluids under nonuniform AC electric fields. The AC electric fields are formed by application of AC voltages to microelectrodes, which can be easily integrated into microfluidic devices by standard microfabrication techniques. Moreover, the magnitude of the motion is large enough to control the mass transfer on the devices. These advantages are attractive for biomolecular analysis on the microfluidic devices, in which the characteristics of small space and microfluidics have been mainly employed. In this review, I describe recent applications of AC electrokinetics in biomolecular analysis on microfluidic devices. The applications include fluid pumping and mixing by AC electrokinetic flow, and manipulation of biomolecules such as DNA and proteins by various AC electrokinetic techniques. Future prospects for highly functional biomolecular analysis on microfluidic devices with the aid of AC electrokinetics are also discussed.

  3. Structures and Functions of Oligosaccharins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, Peter

    1995-12-01

    We have made considerable progress during the 2.5 year funding period just ending in our studies of the structures and functions of oligosaccharide signal molecules (oligosaccharins). We have emphasized studies of the enzymes that solubilize, process, and degrade oligosaccharins and of the proteins that inhibit those enzymes. We have been especially interested in elucidating how oligosaccharins and their processing enzymes participate in determining the outcome of challenges to plants by pathogenic microbes. We have studied, to a lesser extent, the roles of oligosaccharins in plant growth and development. Abstracts of papers describing results acquired with support from this grant that have been published, submitted, or in preparation are presented to summarize the progress made during the last two and one half years. The report highlights the most important contributions made in our oiigosaccharin research during this time period, and the corresponding abstract is referenced. Results of work in progress are described primarily in conjunction with our application for continued support.

  4. Structure Functions in Semihadronic Tau Decays

    OpenAIRE

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Finkemeier, Markus; Mirkes, Erwin; Urech, Res

    1996-01-01

    We review a variety of topics related to hadronic structure functions in exclusive semihadronic tau decays. We introduce the concept of structure functions and summarize the most important concepts. We then calculate the decay $\\tau \\to 3 \\pi \

  5. Programming in Biomolecular Computation: Programs, Self-Interpretation and Visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Simonsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We identify a number of common features in programming that seem conspicuously absent from the literature on biomolecular computing; to partially redress this absence, we introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only executable, but are also compilable and interpretable. It is universal: all computable functions can be computed (in natural ways and without arcane encodings of data and algorithm; it is also uniform: new ``hardware'' is not needed to solve new problems; and (last but not least it is Turing complete in a strong sense: a universal algorithm exists, that is able to execute any program, and is not asymptotically inefficient.

  6. Structure Function Estimated From Histological Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Aiguo; O'Brien, William D

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasonic scattering is determined by not only the properties of individual scatterers but also the correlation among scatterer positions. The role of scatterer spatial correlation is significant for dense medium, but has not been fully understood. The effect of scatterer spatial correlation may be modeled by the structure function as a frequency-dependent factor in the backscatter coefficient (BSC) expression. The structure function has been previously estimated from the BSC data. The aim of this study is to estimate the structure function from histology to test if the acoustically estimated structure function is indeed caused by the scatterer spatial distribution. Hematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections from dense cell pellet biophantoms were digitized. The scatterer positions were determined manually from the histological images. The structure function was calculated from the extracted scatterer positions. The structure function obtained from histology showed reasonable agreement in the shape but not in the amplitude, compared with the structure function previously estimated from the backscattered data. Fitting a polydisperse structure function model to the histologically estimated structure function yielded relatively accurate cell radius estimates ([Formula: see text]). Furthermore, two types of mouse tumors that have similar cell size and shape but distinct cell spatial distributions were studied, where the backscattered data were shown to be related to the cell spatial distribution through the structure function estimated from histology. In conclusion, the agreement between acoustically estimated and histologically estimated structure functions suggests that the acoustically estimated structure function is related to the scatterer spatial distribution.

  7. Conformation of bovine submaxillary mucin layers on hydrophobic surface as studied by biomolecular probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Madsen, Jan Busk; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the conformational changes of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) adsorbed on a hydrophobic surface (polystyrene (PS)) as a function of concentration in bulk solution (up to 2mg/mL) have been investigated with biomolecular probe-based approaches, including bicinchoninic acid (BC...

  8. Soft nanotechnology: "structure" vs. "function".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M; Lipomi, Darren J

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a perspective on "soft nanotechnology"; that is, the branch of nanotechnology concerned with the synthesis and properties of organic and organometallic nanostructures, and with nanofabrication using techniques in which soft components play key roles. It begins with a brief history of soft nanotechnology. This history has followed a path involving a gradual shift from the promise of revolutionary electronics, nanorobotics, and other futuristic concepts, to the realization of evolutionary improvements in the technology for current challenges in information technology, medicine, and sustainability. Soft nanoscience is an area that is occupied principally by chemists, and is in many ways indistinguishable from "nanochemistry". The paper identifies the natural tendency of its practitioners--exemplified by the speakers at this Faraday Discussion--to focus on synthesis and structure, rather than on function and application, of nanostructures. Soft nanotechnology has the potential to apply to a wide variety of large-scale applied (information technology, healthcare cost reduction, sustainability, energy) and fundamental (molecular biochemistry, cell biology, charge transport in organic matter) problems.

  9. MPBEC, a Matlab Program for Biomolecular Electrostatic Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Perez, Sandra; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most used and efficient approaches to compute electrostatic properties of biological systems is to numerically solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. There are several software packages available that solve the PB equation for molecules in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Most of these software packages are useful for scientists with specialized training and expertise in computational biophysics. However, the user is usually required to manually take several important choices, depending on the complexity of the biological system, to successfully obtain the numerical solution of the PB equation. This may become an obstacle for researchers, experimentalists, even students with no special training in computational methodologies. Aiming to overcome this limitation, in this article we present MPBEC, a free, cross-platform, open-source software that provides non-experts in the field an easy and efficient way to perform biomolecular electrostatic calculations on single processor computers. MPBEC is a Matlab script based on the Adaptative Poisson-Boltzmann Solver, one of the most popular approaches used to solve the PB equation. MPBEC does not require any user programming, text editing or extensive statistical skills, and comes with detailed user-guide documentation. As a unique feature, MPBEC includes a useful graphical user interface (GUI) application which helps and guides users to configure and setup the optimal parameters and approximations to successfully perform the required biomolecular electrostatic calculations. The GUI also incorporates visualization tools to facilitate users pre- and post-analysis of structural and electrical properties of biomolecules.

  10. Unraveling the biomolecular snapshots of mitosis in healthy and cancer cells using plasmonically-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkanvalappil, Sajanlal R; Hira, Steven M; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2014-11-12

    Owing to the dynamic and complex nature of mitosis, precise and timely executions of biomolecular events are critical for high fidelity cell division. In this context, visualization of such complex events at the molecular level can provide vital information on the biomolecular processes in abnormal cells. Here, we explored the plasmonically enhanced light scattering properties of functionalized gold nanocubes (AuNCs) together with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to unravel the complex and dynamic biological processes involved in mitosis of healthy and cancerous cells from its molecular perspectives. By monitoring various stages of mitosis using SERS, we noticed that relatively high rate of conversion of mitotic proteins from their α-helix structure to β-sheet conformation is likely in the cancer cells during meta-, ana-, and telophases. Unique biochemical modifications to the lipid and amino acid moieties, associated with the observed protein conformational modifications, were also identified. However, in healthy cells, the existence of proteins in their β conformation was momentary and was largely in the α-helix form. The role of abnormal conformational modifications of mitotic proteins on the development of anomalous mitotic activities was further confirmed by looking at plasmonic nanoparticle-induced cytokinesis failure in cancer cells. Our findings illustrate the vast possibilities of SERS in real-time tracking of complex, subtle, and momentary modifications of biomolecules in live cells, which could provide new insights to the role of protein conformation dynamics during mitosis on the development of cancer and many other diseases.

  11. Flu BM2 structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Timothy A

    2009-01-01

    Flu viruses package essential functions into a small integral membrane protein known as M2. Such small membrane proteins represent major challenges for structural biology. A new study presented in this issue details the structure and functions of the influenza B M2 protein through the use of functional domain–specific solution NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Diffusion Monte Carlo applied to weak interactions - hydrogen bonding and aromatic stacking in (bio-)molecular model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M.; Ireta, J.; Scheffler, M.; Filippi, C.

    2006-03-01

    Dispersion (Van der Waals) forces are important in many molecular phenomena such as self-assembly of molecular crystals or peptide folding. Calculating this nonlocal correlation effect requires accurate electronic structure methods. Usual density-functional theory with generalized gradient functionals (GGA-DFT) fails unless empirical corrections are added that still need extensive validation. Quantum chemical methods like MP2 and coupled cluster are more accurate, yet limited to rather small systems by their unfavorable computational scaling. Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) can provide accurate molecular total energies and remains feasible also for larger systems. Here we apply the fixed-node DMC method to (bio-)molecular model systems where dispersion forces are significant: (dimethyl-) formamide and benzene dimers, and adenine-thymine DNA base pairs. Our DMC binding energies agree well with data from coupled cluster (CCSD(T)), in particular for stacked geometries where GGA-DFT fails qualitatively and MP2 predicts too strong binding.

  13. 核磁共振、X射线小角散射以及计算机模拟相结合构建生物大分子复合物的结构模型%Determining Structural Models of Biomolecular Complexes Integrating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Computational Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭俊辉; 赵德彪; 文彬; 张志勇

    2015-01-01

    Structural biology has been paying more attention on biomolecular complexes over the past decades, since they are crucial for many biological processes. Among these techniques for structural determination, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has its advantage when dealing with biomolecules with high flexibility in solution. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a very important complementary technique that provides information on global shape of biomolecules. For biomolecular complexes, it can be much easier to determine atomic structures of individual subunits through NMR. In addition, NMR can also provide other structural information, such as the interface and orientations between subunits, and long range distance and angular restraints. Therefore, to construct structural models of biomolecular complexes, it would be very appropriate to combine experimental restraints obtained through NMR and low-resolution shape information from SAXS by utilizing computational tools, which is the main topic of this review.%近年来,结构生物学研究越来越注重生物大分子复合物的解析,因为许多重要生物学过程都离不开复合物的参与.溶液核磁共振是目前重要的结构解析方法之一.X射线小角散射(SAXS)作为一种新的结构生物学实验手段,近年来发展迅速.SAXS 能提供生物大分子复合物的较低分辨率结构信息,而核磁共振能解析复合物中各个亚基的原子分辨率结构.此外,通过核磁共振还能得到亚基之间的界面、取向以及距离信息.因此近年来通过计算机模拟,整合核磁共振和 SAXS 不同分辨率的结构信息,可以用来搭建生物大分子复合物的结构模型.该综述重点介绍这方面的研究进展.

  14. Nuclear effects in the structure functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Marco; E Oset; S K Singh

    2003-11-01

    By using a relativistic framework and accurate nuclear spectral function the structure functions 2 and 3 of deep inelastic charged lepton and neutrino scattering are calculated in nuclei and results are presented.

  15. The structure and function of cartilage proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Roughley

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage contains a variety of proteoglycans that are essential for its normal function. These include aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican. Each proteoglycan serves several functions that are determined by both its core protein and its glycosaminoglycan chains. This review discusses the structure/function relationships of the cartilage proteoglycans, and the manner in which perturbations in proteoglycan structure or abundance can adversely affect tissue function.

  16. Systematic evaluation of bundled SPC water for biomolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Srinivasa M; Kuhn, Alexander B; Schäfer, Lars V

    2015-04-01

    In bundled SPC water models, the relative motion of groups of four water molecules is restrained by distance-dependent potentials. Bundled SPC models have been used in hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA/CG) multiscale simulations, since they enable to couple atomistic SPC water with supra-molecular CG water models that effectively represent more than a single water molecule. In the present work, we systematically validated and critically tested bundled SPC water models as solvent for biomolecular simulations. To that aim, we investigated both thermodynamic and structural properties of various biomolecular systems through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force of dimerization of pairs of amino acid side chains as well as hydration free energies of single side chains obtained with bundled SPC and standard (unrestrained) SPC water agree closely with each other and with experimental data. Decomposition of the hydration free energies into enthalpic and entropic contributions reveals that in bundled SPC, this favorable agreement of the free energies is due to a larger degree of error compensation between hydration enthalpy and entropy. The Ramachandran maps of Ala3, Ala5, and Ala7 peptides are similar in bundled and unrestrained SPC, whereas for the (GS)2 peptide, bundled water leads to a slight overpopulation of extended conformations. Analysis of the end-to-end distance autocorrelation times of the Ala5 and (GS)2 peptides shows that sampling in more viscous bundled SPC water is about two times slower. Pronounced differences between the water models were found for the structure of a coiled-coil dimer, which is instable in bundled SPC but not in standard SPC. In addition, the hydration of the active site of the serine protease α-chymotrypsin depends on the water model. Bundled SPC leads to an increased hydration of the active site region, more hydrogen bonds between water and catalytic triad residues, and a significantly slower exchange of water

  17. Structure and Function of Lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Jakob

    the water-lipid interface, structural movements occurring during activation have been difficult to probeexperimentally. In this work, novel variants of TlL were constructed based on rational design with amutated lid-region in order to elucidate the impact of the lid-residue composition and characteristics...

  18. Predicting protein structure classes from function predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, I.; Rahnenfuhrer, J.; de Lichtenberg, Ulrik;

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to using the information contained in sequence-to-function prediction data in order to recognize protein template classes, a critical step in predicting protein structure. The data on which our method is based comprise probabilities of functional categories; for given......-to-structure prediction methods....

  19. Correlation Functions and Glass Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Y.; Nehaoua, N.; Telghemti, B.; Guemid, S.; Deraddji, N. E.; Belkhir, H.; Mekki, D. E.

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the use of molecular dynamics (MD) and the code of Dl Poly, in order to study the structure of fluoride glass after melting and quenching. We are realized the processing phase liquid-phase, simulating rapid quenching at different speeds to see the effect of quenching rate on the operation of the devitrification. This technique of simulation has become a powerful tool for investigating the microscopic behaviour of matter as well as for calculating macroscopic observable quantities. As basic results, we calculated the interatomic distance, angles and statistics, which help us to know the geometric form and the structure of PbF2. These results are in experimental agreement to those reported in literature.

  20. Scalable Molecular Dynamics for Large Biomolecular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Brunner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an optimized parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems, implemented in the production-quality molecular dynamics program NAMD. With an object-based hybrid force and spatial decomposition scheme, and an aggressive measurement-based predictive load balancing framework, we have attained speeds and speedups that are much higher than any reported in literature so far. The paper first summarizes the broad methodology we are pursuing, and the basic parallelization scheme we used. It then describes the optimizations that were instrumental in increasing performance, and presents performance results on benchmark simulations.

  1. The biomolecular corona of nanoparticles in circulating biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, D.; Caracciolo, G.; Digiacomo, L.; Colapicchioni, V.; Palchetti, S.; Capriotti, A. L.; Cavaliere, C.; Zenezini Chiozzi, R.; Puglisi, A.; Laganà, A.

    2015-08-01

    When nanoparticles come into contact with biological media, they are covered by a biomolecular `corona', which confers a new identity to the particles. In all the studies reported so far nanoparticles are incubated with isolated plasma or serum that are used as a model for protein adsorption. Anyway, bodily fluids are dynamic in nature so the question arises on whether the incubation protocol, i.e. dynamic vs. static incubation, could affect the composition and structure of the biomolecular corona. Here we let multicomponent liposomes interact with fetal bovine serum (FBS) both statically and dynamically, i.e. in contact with circulating FBS (~40 cm s-1). The structure and composition of the liposome-protein corona, as determined by dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic light scattering and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, were found to be dependent on the incubation protocol. Specifically, following dynamic exposure to FBS, multicomponent liposomes were less enriched in complement proteins and appreciably more enriched in apolipoproteins and acute phase proteins (e.g. alpha-1-antitrypsin and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H3) that are involved in relevant interactions between nanoparticles and living systems. Supported by our results, we speculate that efficient predictive modeling of nanoparticle behavior in vivo will require accurate knowledge of nanoparticle-specific protein fingerprints in circulating biological media.When nanoparticles come into contact with biological media, they are covered by a biomolecular `corona', which confers a new identity to the particles. In all the studies reported so far nanoparticles are incubated with isolated plasma or serum that are used as a model for protein adsorption. Anyway, bodily fluids are dynamic in nature so the question arises on whether the incubation protocol, i.e. dynamic vs. static incubation, could affect the composition and structure of the biomolecular corona. Here we let

  2. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  3. Insights into cancer severity from biomolecular interaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Singh, Gurdeep; Betts, Matthew J.; Apic, Gordana; Vukotic, Ranka; Andreone, Pietro; Stein, Lincoln; Russell, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    To attain a deeper understanding of diseases like cancer, it is critical to couple genetics with biomolecular mechanisms. High-throughput sequencing has identified thousands of somatic mutations across dozens of cancers, and there is a pressing need to identify the few that are pathologically relevant. Here we use protein structure and interaction data to interrogate nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations, identifying a set of 213 molecular interfaces (protein-protein, -small molecule or –nucleic acid) most often perturbed in cancer, highlighting several potentially novel cancer genes. Over half of these interfaces involve protein-small-molecule interactions highlighting their overall importance in cancer. We found distinct differences in the predominance of perturbed interfaces between cancers and histological subtypes and presence or absence of certain interfaces appears to correlate with cancer severity. PMID:27698488

  4. WAY TO DETERMINE STIFFNESS FUNCTION OF STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-ming; GAI Bing-zheng

    2005-01-01

    For calculating the stiffness function of a structure, the differential equation of the vibration of the structure was divided into the differential equation on the original stiffness function that was known, and Fredholm integral equation of the first kind on the undetermined stiffness function that was unknown. And the stable solutions of the integral equation, when the smooth factor was equal to zero, was solved by the extrapolation with p smooth factors. So the stiffness function of the structure is obtained. Applied examples show that the method is feasible and effective.

  5. Pion structure function in nuclear medium

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    1995-01-01

    We study the pion structure function in nuclear medium using the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model, and its implication for the nuclear pion enhancement of the sea quark distribution in nuclei. By using the operator product expansion, medium effect of the nuclear matter is incorporated in calculations of the twist-2 operators. We find density dependence of the pion structure function is rather weak around the nuclear matter density. We also discuss how the medium modification of the pion structure...

  6. Structural Induction Principles for Functional Programmers

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, James

    2013-01-01

    User defined recursive types are a fundamental feature of modern functional programming languages like Haskell, Clean, and the ML family of languages. Properties of programs defined by recursion on the structure of recursive types are generally proved by structural induction on the type. It is well known in the theorem proving community how to generate structural induction principles from data type declarations. These methods deserve to be better know in the functional programming community. ...

  7. The LIGNUM functional-structural tree model

    OpenAIRE

    Perttunen, Jari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to construct a single tree model that builds a bridge between traditional process based tree models and detailed, three-dimensional architectural tree models. The result of the thesis, the functional-structural tree model LIGNUM, integrates both the functional and the structural aspects of woody arborescent plants in a single generic modelling framework. The thesis consists of five articles and the summary part. The first article presents the model structure of...

  8. Biomolecular detection with a thin membrane transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Misun; Shin, Jaeha; Kim, June-Hyung; Kim, Ilchaek; Choi, Junbo; Lee, Nahum; Kim, Byung-Gee; Lee, Junghoon

    2008-06-01

    We present a thin membrane transducer (TMT) that can detect nucleic acid based biomolecular reactions including DNA hybridization and protein recognition by aptamers. Specific molecular interactions on an extremely thin and flexible membrane surface cause the deflection of the membrane due to surface stress change which can be measured by a compact capacitive circuit. A gold-coated thin PDMS membrane assembled with metal patterned glass substrate is used to realize the capacitive detection. It is demonstrated that perfect match and mismatch hybridizations can be sharply discriminated with a 16-mer DNA oligonucleotide immobilized on the gold-coated surface. While the mismatched sample caused little capacitance change, the perfectly matched sample caused a well-defined capacitance decrease vs. time due to an upward deformation of the membrane by a compressive surface stress. Additionally, the TMT demonstrated the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) capabilities which enabled a detection of mismatching base pairs in the middle of the sequence. It is intriguing that the increase of capacitance, therefore a downward deflection due to tensile stress, was observed with the internal double mismatch hybridization. We further present the detection of thrombin protein through ligand-receptor type recognition with 15-mer thrombin aptamer as a receptor. Key aspects of this detection such as the effect of concentration variation are investigated. This capacitive thin membrane transducer presents a completely new approach for detecting biomolecular reactions with high sensitivity and specificity without molecular labelling and optical measurement. PMID:18497914

  9. Changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure in functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheel, Hanne; Farré, Ricard

    2013-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia is an extremely common disorder of gastrointestinal function. The disorder is thought to be heterogeneous, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying varied symptom patterns. A diversity of changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure has been described in functional dyspepsia. These involve alterations in the stomach, such as impaired accommodation, delayed gastric emptying and hypersensitivity, and alterations in the duodenum, such as increased sensitivity to duodenal acid and/or lipids and low-grade inflammation. In this Review, we summarize all these abnormalities in an attempt to provide an integrated overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms in functional dyspepsia. PMID:23318268

  10. The structure and function of catalytic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Before the discovery of ribozymes,RNA had been proposed to function as a catalyst,based on the discovery that RNA folded into high-ordered structures as protein did.This hypothesis was confirmed in the 1980s,after the discovery of Tetrahymena group I intron and RNase P ribozyme.There have been about ten ribozymes identified during the past thirty years,as well as the fact that ribosomes function as ribozymes.Advances have been made in understanding the structures and functions of ribozymes,with numerous crystal structures resolved in the past years.Here we review the structure-function relationship of both small and large ribozymes,especially the structural basis of their catalysis.

  11. The structure and function of catalytic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU QiJia; HUANG Lin; ZHANG Yi

    2009-01-01

    Before the discovery of ribozymes, RNA had been proposed to function as a catalyst, based on the discovery that RNA folded into high-ordered structures as protein did. This hypothesis was confirmed in the 1980s, after the discovery of Tetrahymena group I intron and RNase P ribozyme. There have been about ten ribozymes identified during the past thirty years, as well as the fact that ribosomes function as ribozymes. Advances have been made in understanding the structures and functions of ribozymes, with numerous crystal structures resolved in the past years. Here we review the structure-function re-lationship of both small and large ribozymes, especially the structural basis of their catalysis.

  12. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doster, W.; Nakagawa, H.; Appavou, M. S.

    2013-07-01

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at Td from the collective (α) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (β) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature Tg. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature Td.

  13. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doster, W. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nakagawa, H. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Appavou, M. S. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-28

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at T{sub d} from the collective (α) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (β) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature T{sub g}. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature T{sub d}.

  14. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at Td from the collective (α) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (β) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature Tg. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature Td

  15. Four RNA families with functional transient structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5' flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5' UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM. All

  16. Calculation of moments of structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress on the lattice computation of low moments of both the unpolarised and polarised nucleon structure functions is reviewed with particular emphasis on continuum and chiral extrapolations and comparison between quenched and unquenched fermions. (orig.)

  17. Structure functions near the chiral limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute hadron masses and the lowest moments of unpolarized and polarized nucleon structure functions down to pion masses of 300 MeV, in an effort to make unambiguous predictions at the physical light quark mass. (orig.)

  18. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kumano, S

    2016-01-01

    We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrino-oscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function $b_1$ is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact ...

  19. New Parametrizations for the Photon Structure Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last year four new parametrizations of the Hadronic Photon Structure Function at Next to Leading Order have appeared. In this talk, I briefly review the main features of the three of them: the FFNSCJK, CJK and AFG. (author)

  20. Structural and functional properties of designed globins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yasuhiro Isogai; Anna Ishii; Manabu Ishida; Masahiro Mukai; Motonori Ota; Ken Nishikawa; Tetsutaro Iizuka

    2000-06-01

    De novo design of artificial proteins is an essential approach to elucidate the principles of protein architecture and to understand specific functions of natural proteins and also to yield novel molecules for medical and industrial aims. We have designed artificial sequences of 153 amino acids to fit the main-chain framework of the sperm whale myoglobin structure based on the knowledge-based energy functions to evaluate the compatibility between protein tertiary structures and amino acid sequences. The synthesized artificial globins bind a single heme per protein molecule as designed, which show well-defined electrochemical and spectroscopic features characteristic of proteins with a low-spin heme. Redox and ligand binding reactions of the artificial heme proteins were investigated and these heme-related functions were found to vary with their structural uniqueness. Relationships between the structural and functional properties are discussed.

  1. A Cook Book of Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2015-01-01

    The structure function is a useful quantity to characterize wavefront distortions. We derive expressions for the structure functions of the averaged wavefront phase and slopes. The expressions are valid within the inertial range of atmospheric turbulence, and are meant to serve as engineering formulae when reconstructing profiles of the atmospheric turbulence, specifically in the context of atmospheric profiling instruments (e.g. SLODAR and S-DIMM+) and multi-conjugate adaptive optical systems.

  2. Recent Structure Function Results from CCFR

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, B T; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; De Barbaro, L; De Barbaro, P; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M; Vaitaitis, A G; Yang, U K; Yu, J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2000-01-01

    A new structure function analysis of CCFR deep inelastic nu-N and nubar-N scattering data is presented for previously unexplored kinematic regions down to Bjorken x=0.0045 and Q^2=0.3 GeV^2. Comparisons to charged lepton scattering data from NMC and E665 experiments are made and the behavior of the structure function F2_nu is studied in the limit Q^2 -> 0

  3. Zinc finger structure-function in Ikaros

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marvin; A; Payne

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger motif was used as a vehicle for the initial discovery of Ikaros in the context of T-cell differentiation and has been central to all subsequent analyses of Ikaros function.The Ikaros gene is alternately spliced to produce several isoforms that confer diversity of function and consequently have complicated analysis of the function of Ikaros in vivo.Key features of Ikaros in vivo function are associated with six C2H2 zinc fingers;four of which are alternately incorporated in the production of the various Ikaros isoforms.Although no complete structures are available for the Ikaros protein or any of its family members,considerable evidence has accumulated about the structure of zinc fingers and the role that this structure plays in the functions of the Ikaros family of proteins.This review summarizes the structural aspects of Ikaros zinc fingers,individually,and in tandem to provide a structural context for Ikaros function and to provide a structural basis to inform the design of future experiments with Ikaros and its family members.

  4. Bridge- and Solvent-Mediated Intramolecular Electronic Communications in Ubiquinone-Based Biomolecular Wires

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiao-Yuan; Ma, Wei; Zhou, Hao; Cao, Xiao-Ming; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Intramolecular electronic communications of molecular wires play a crucial role for developing molecular devices. In the present work, we describe different degrees of intramolecular electronic communications in the redox processes of three ubiquinone-based biomolecular wires (Bis-CoQ0s) evaluated by electrochemistry and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods in different solvents. We found that the bridges linkers have a significant effect on the electronic communications between the two pe...

  5. Markov propagation of allosteric effects in biomolecular systems: application to GroEL–GroES

    OpenAIRE

    Chennubhotla, Chakra; Bahar, Ivet

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for elucidating the potential pathways of allosteric communication in biomolecular systems. The methodology, based on Markov propagation of ‘information' across the structure, permits us to partition the network of interactions into soft clusters distinguished by their coherent stochastics. Probabilistic participation of residues in these clusters defines the communication patterns inherent to the network architecture. Application to bacterial chaperonin complex ...

  6. Structure and Structure-activity Relationship of Functional Organic Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Research theme The group is made up of junior scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Elemento-organic Chemistry, Nankai University.The scientists focus their studis on the structure and structure-activity relationship of functional organic molecules not only because it has been the basis of their research, but also because the functional study of organic compounds is now a major scientific issue for organic chemists around the world.

  7. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  8. Biomolecular Markers in Cancer of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daris Ferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tongue cancer is increasing worldwide, and its aggressiveness remains high regardless of treatment. Genetic changes and the expression of abnormal proteins have been frequently reported in the case of head and neck cancers, but the little information that has been published concerning tongue tumours is often contradictory. This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with clinical behaviour and prognosis. Most of these proteins are associated with nodal stage, tumour progression and metastases, but there is still controversy concerning their impact on disease-free and overall survival, and treatment response. More extensive clinical studies are needed to identify the patterns of molecular alterations and the most reliable predictors in order to develop tailored anti-tumour strategies based on the targeting of hypoxia markers, vascular and lymphangiogenic factors, epidermal growth factor receptors, intracytoplasmatic signalling and apoptosis.

  9. Sub-structures in hadrons and proton structure functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz; Khorramian, Ali N.

    2001-04-01

    We calculate the partonic structure of constituent quark in the Next-to-Leading Order. Using a convolution method, Structure function of proton is presented. While the constituent quark structure is generated purely perturbatively and accounts for the most part of the hadronic structure, there is a few percent contributions coming from the nonperturbative sector in the hadronic structure. This contribution plays the key role in explaining the SU(2) symmetry breaking of the nucleon sea and the observed violation of Gottfried sum rule. Excellent agreement with data in a wide range of x = [10 -6, 1] and Q2 = [0.5, 5000] GeV2 for Fp2 is reached.

  10. Structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.

    1989-07-13

    We calculate the structure functions of an isoscalar nuclear target for the deep inelastic scattering by leptons in an extended version of the chiral bag model which incorporates the qanti q structure of the pions in the cloud. Bjorken scaling and Regge behavior are satisfied. The model calculation reproduces the low-x behavior of the data but fails to explain the medium- to large-x behavior. Evolution of the quark structure functions seem inevitable to attempt a connection between the low-energy models and the high-energy behavior of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.).

  11. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Saito, K; Watanabe, T

    2010-01-01

    For understanding an anomalous nuclear effect experimentally observed for the beryllium-9 nucleus at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), clustering aspects are studied in structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering by using momentum distributions calculated in antisymmetrized (or fermionic) molecular dynamics (AMD) and also in a simple shell model for comparison. According to the AMD, the Be-9 nucleus consists of two alpha-like clusters with a surrounding neutron. The clustering produces high-momentum components in nuclear wave functions, which affects nuclear modifications of the structure functions. We investigated whether clustering features could appear in the structure function F_2 of Be-9 along with studies for other light nuclei. We found that nuclear modifications of F_2 are similar in both AMD and shell models within our simple convolution description although there are slight differences in Be-9. It indicates that the anomalous Be-9 result should be explain...

  12. Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Planes, Antoni; Saxena, Avadh

    2005-01-01

    Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials addresses three distinct but related topics: (i) magnetoelastic materials such as magnetic martensites and magnetic shape memory alloys, (ii) the magnetocaloric effect related to magnetostructural transitions, and (iii) colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) and related magnanites. The goal is to identify common underlying principles in these classes of materials that are relevant for optimizing various functionalities. The emergence of apparently different magnetic/structural phenomena in disparate classes of materials clearly points to a need for common concepts in order to achieve a broader understanding of the interplay between magnetism and structure in this general class of new functional materials exhibiting ever more complex microstructure and function. The topic is interdisciplinary in nature and the contributors correspondingly include physicists, materials scientists and engineers. Likewise the book will appeal to scientists from all these areas.

  13. The proteome: structure, function and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Keiran; Kelley, Lawrence A; Islam, Suhail A; MacCallum, Robert M; Muller, Arne; Pazos, Florencio; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2006-03-29

    This paper reports two studies to model the inter-relationships between protein sequence, structure and function. First, an automated pipeline to provide a structural annotation of proteomes in the major genomes is described. The results are stored in a database at Imperial College, London (3D-GENOMICS) that can be accessed at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk. Analysis of the assignments to structural superfamilies provides evolutionary insights. 3D-GENOMICS is being integrated with related proteome annotation data at University College London and the European Bioinformatics Institute in a project known as e-protein (http://www.e-protein.org/). The second topic is motivated by the developments in structural genomics projects in which the structure of a protein is determined prior to knowledge of its function. We have developed a new approach PHUNCTIONER that uses the gene ontology (GO) classification to supervise the extraction of the sequence signal responsible for protein function from a structure-based sequence alignment. Using GO we can obtain profiles for a range of specificities described in the ontology. In the region of low sequence similarity (around 15%), our method is more accurate than assignment from the closest structural homologue. The method is also able to identify the specific residues associated with the function of the protein family.

  14. Hadronic Structure Functions from the Universal and the Basic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, F.

    2005-04-01

    It is shown that there is a basic structure common to all hadrons, which is generated perturbatively in QCD. Basically, it is a valence quark with its own cloud of quarks and gluons, a quasi-particle that we will call it a valon. In the valon representation, structure functions of nucleon and pion are calculated and is shown that there is an excellent agreement between the data and the model results in a wide range of kinematics. Calculation of the polarized structure functions also shows that there is a sizeable orbital angular momentum contribution to the spin of a valon coming from the partonic cloud.

  15. Effect of antibody modifications on its biomolecular binding as determined by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar

    2012-02-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based procedure was developed to determine the effect of antibody modifications on its biomolecular binding behavior. Mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) was immobilized on a protein A-functionalized gold-coated SPR chip. Goat anti-mouse IgG and its various commercially available modifications (i.e., conjugated with atto 550, atto 647, tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate [TRITC], horseradish peroxidase [HRP], or biotin) were employed in exactly the same concentration for the detection of mouse IgG. The various modifications of goat anti-mouse IgG decreased its biomolecular binding to mouse IgG in the order of unmodified>HRP-labeled>atto 550-labeled>biotinylated>TRITC-labeled>atto 647-labeled. PMID:22093612

  16. GRASPs in Golgi Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan eZhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus is a central intracellular membrane organelle for trafficking and modification of proteins and lipids. Its basic structure is a stack of tightly aligned flat cisternae. In mammalian cells, dozens of stacks are concentrated in the pericentriolar region and laterally connected to form a ribbon. Despite extensive research in the last decades, how this unique structure is formed and why its formation is important for proper Golgi functioning remain largely unknown. The Golgi ReAssembly Stacking Proteins, GRASP65 and GRASP55, are so far the only proteins shown to function in Golgi stacking. They are peripheral membrane proteins on the cytoplasmic face of the Golgi cisternae that form trans-oligomers through their N-terminal GRASP domain, and thereby function as the glue to stick adjacent cisternae together into a stack and to link Golgi stacks into a ribbon. Depletion of GRASPs in cells disrupts the Golgi structure and results in accelerated protein trafficking and defective glycosylation. In this minireview we summarize our current knowledge on how GRASPs function in Golgi structure formation and discuss why Golgi structure formation is important for its function.

  17. Phenomenological study of the nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the deep inelastic scattering. Its purpose is the development of phenomenological models describing experimental results on unpolarized (F2) and polarized (g1) nucleon structure functions in the wide range of the kinematical domain. Special attention is paid to the small-x behaviour of F2 and to the link between deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction process. The investigation of the Pomeron in deep inelastic scattering shows that one single Pomeron compatible with the Froissard-Martin limit can account for all the present HERA data. A phenomenological model of the proton structure function is developed, based on a two-component structure including various features expected from both perturbative quantum chromodynamics and non perturbative Regge theory. A link with the photoproduction process is provided. A detailed analysis of the perturbative components, based on the Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations is presented. Taking into account the different parton distribution, this approach allows to describe data on proton and neutron structure functions, on deep inelastic neutrino scattering, and to reproduce the gluons distribution extracted by the ZEUS collaboration. The model is applied to the polarized deep inelastic scattering and the axial anomaly effect appearing both in the description of results on the spin dependent structure functions gp,n,d and in the interpretation of the nucleon spin structure is discussed. (J.S.). 260 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs., 6 appends

  18. Changes in biomolecular profile in a single nucleolus during cell fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N; Pliss, Artem; Prasad, Paras N

    2014-11-01

    Fixation of biological sample is an essential technique applied in order to "freeze" in time the intracellular molecular content. However, fixation induces changes of the cellular molecular structure, which mask physiological distribution of biomolecules and bias interpretation of results. Accurate, sensitive, and comprehensive characterization of changes in biomolecular composition, occurring during fixation, is crucial for proper analysis of experimental data. Here we apply biomolecular component analysis for Raman spectra measured in the same nucleoli of HeLa cells before and after fixation by either formaldehyde solution or by chilled ethanol. It is found that fixation in formaldehyde does not strongly affect the Raman spectra of nucleolar biomolecular components, but may significantly decrease the nucleolar RNA concentration. At the same time, ethanol fixation leads to a proportional increase (up to 40%) in concentrations of nucleolar proteins and RNA, most likely due to cell shrinkage occurring in the presence of coagulant fixative. Ethanol fixation also triggers changes in composition of nucleolar proteome, as indicated by an overall reduction of the α-helical structure of proteins and increase in the concentration of proteins containing the β-sheet conformation. We conclude that cross-linking fixation is a more appropriate protocol for mapping of proteins in situ. At the same time, ethanol fixation is preferential for studies of RNA-containing macromolecules. We supplemented our quantitative Raman spectroscopic measurements with mapping of the protein and lipid macromolecular groups in live and fixed cells using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering nonlinear optical imaging.

  19. Condutância molecular e biomolecular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gama A. Arnóbio S. da

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of molecular conductance is discussed in terms of the propagation of an electronic interaction, between electron donor and acceptor groups, through the bonds of a molecular structure where these groups are embedded. The electronic interaction propagation is described by a Green's function matrix element, in a donor-bridge-acceptor molecular system reduced to a two-level representation.

  20. Structural methods for studying IRES function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S; Costantino, David A; Filbin, Megan E; Hammond, John; Pfingsten, Jennifer S

    2007-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) substitute RNA sequences for some or all of the canonical translation initiation protein factors. Therefore, an important component of understanding IRES function is a description of the three-dimensional structure of the IRES RNA underlying this mechanism. This includes determining the degree to which the RNA folds, the global RNA architecture, and higher resolution information when warranted. Knowledge of the RNA structural features guides ongoing mechanistic and functional studies. In this chapter, we present a roadmap to structurally characterize a folded RNA, beginning from initial studies to define the overall architecture and leading to high-resolution structural studies. The experimental strategy presented here is not unique to IRES RNAs but is adaptable to virtually any RNA of interest, although characterization of RNA-protein interactions requires additional methods. Because IRES RNAs have a specific function, we present specific ways in which the data are interpreted to gain insight into that function. We provide protocols for key experiments that are particularly useful for studying IRES RNA structure and that provide a framework onto which additional approaches are integrated. The protocols we present are solution hydroxyl radical probing, RNase T1 probing, native gel electrophoresis, sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, and strategies to engineer RNA for crystallization and to obtain initial crystals. PMID:17913644

  1. DIS structure functions from the saturation model

    OpenAIRE

    Golec-Biernat, K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a description of inclusive and diffractive structure functions in DIS at small $x$, using a model based on high energy factorization. In this model the two processes have physical interpretation in terms of the virtual photon wave function and the dipole cross section. We postulate the dipole cross section form in a way in which unitarity is taken into account. A good description of data (including DIS diffraction) is obtained after determining three parameters of the dipole cross ...

  2. PREFACE: India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Mitsuyoshi; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2012-04-01

    The 'India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation' (IJWBME 2011) will be held on 7-10 December 2011 at EGRET Himeji, Himeji, Hyogo, Japan. This workshop was held for the first time on 17-19 December 2009 at NPL, New Delhi. Keeping in mind the importance of organic nanotechnology and biomolecular electronics for environmental preservation and their anticipated impact on the economics of both the developing and the developed world, IJWBME 2009 was jointly organized by the Department of Biological Functions, Graduate School of Life Sciences and Systems Engineering, the Kyushu Institute of Technology (KIT), Kitakyushu, Japan, and the Department of Science & Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics (DSTCBE), National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Much progress in the field of biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation is expected for the 21st Century. Organic optoelectronic devices, such as organic electroluminescent devices, organic thin-film transistors, organic sensors, biological systems and so on have especially attracted much attention. The main purpose of this workshop is to provide an opportunity for researchers interested in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation, to come together in an informal and friendly atmosphere and exchange technical knowledge and experience. We are sure that this workshop will be very useful and fruitful for all participants in summarizing the recent progress in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation and preparing new ground for the next generation. Many papers have been submitted from India and Japan and more than 30 papers have been accepted for presentation. The main topics of interest are as follows: Bioelectronics Biomolecular Electronics Fabrication Techniques Self-assembled Monolayers Nano-sensors Environmental Monitoring Organic Devices

  3. [Structure and functions of glutathione transferases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedets, O M

    2014-01-01

    Data about classification, nomenclature, structure, substrate specificity and role of many glutathione transferase's isoenzymes in cell functions have been summarised. The enzyme has been discovered more than 50 years ago. This family of proteins is updated continuously. It has very different composition and will have demand for system analysis for many years.

  4. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  5. Functional-structural modelling in Gramineae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournier, C.; Andrieu, B.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Evers, J.B.; Drouet, D.; Escobar-Gutierriez, A.J.; Vos, J.

    2007-01-01

    The Gramineae have been a pioneer group among non-woody plants to be modelled with the approach of functional-structural plant modelling (FSPM). During the past decade, models have focussed on morphological aspects of plant development. They now provide crop scientists with general guidelines for bu

  6. Tagged nuclear structure functions with $HERMES$

    OpenAIRE

    Silvano SimulaINFN - Sezione Sanita'

    2014-01-01

    The production of slow nucleons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering off nuclei, $A(e, e'N)X$, is analyzed for kinematical conditions accessible at $HERA$ with the $HERMES$ detector. The sensitivity of the semi-inclusive cross section to possible medium-dependent modifications of the nucleon structure function is illustrated.

  7. Structural Functionalism as a Heuristic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcott, John H.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that structural functionalism as a method for conducting fieldwork and as a format for the analysis of ethnographic data remains a powerful model, one that is easily understood by professional educators. As a heuristic device, functionalist theory can help in the solution of a problem that is otherwise incapable of theoretical…

  8. Rational Design of Biomolecular Templates for Synthesizing Multifunctional Noble Metal Nanoclusters toward Personalized Theranostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Mok, Beverly Y L; Loh, Xian Jun; Tan, Yen Nee

    2016-08-01

    Biomolecule-templated or biotemplated metal nanoclusters (NCs) are ultrasmall (<2 nm) metal (Au, Ag) particles stabilized by a certain type of biomolecular template (e.g., peptides, proteins, and DNA). Due to their unique physiochemical properties, biotemplated metal NCs have been widely used in sensing, imaging, delivery and therapy. The overwhelming applications in these individual areas imply the great promise of harnessing biotemplated metal NCs in more advanced biomedical aspects such as theranostics. Although applications of biotemplated metal NCs as theranostic agents are trending, the rational design of biomolecular templates suitable for the synthesis of multifunctional metal NCs for theranostics is comparatively underexplored. This progress report first identifies the essential attributes of biotemplated metal NCs for theranostics by reviewing the state-of-art applications in each of the four modalities of theranostics, namely sensing, imaging, delivery and therapy. To achieve high efficacy in these modalities, we elucidate the design principles underlying the use of biomolecules (proteins, peptides and nucleic acids) to control the NC size, emission color and surface chemistries for post-functionalization of therapeutic moieties. We then propose a unified strategy to engineer biomolecular templates that combine all these modalities to produce multifunctional biotemplated metal NCs that can serve as the next-generation personalized theranostic agents.

  9. Biomolecular Force Field Parameterization via Atoms-in-Molecule Electron Density Partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Daniel J; Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Payne, Mike C; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-05-10

    Molecular mechanics force fields, which are commonly used in biomolecular modeling and computer-aided drug design, typically treat nonbonded interactions using a limited library of empirical parameters that are developed for small molecules. This approach does not account for polarization in larger molecules or proteins, and the parametrization process is labor-intensive. Using linear-scaling density functional theory and atoms-in-molecule electron density partitioning, environment-specific charges and Lennard-Jones parameters are derived directly from quantum mechanical calculations for use in biomolecular modeling of organic and biomolecular systems. The proposed methods significantly reduce the number of empirical parameters needed to construct molecular mechanics force fields, naturally include polarization effects in charge and Lennard-Jones parameters, and scale well to systems comprised of thousands of atoms, including proteins. The feasibility and benefits of this approach are demonstrated by computing free energies of hydration, properties of pure liquids, and the relative binding free energies of indole and benzofuran to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. PMID:27057643

  10. Generalized functions, convergence structures, and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pap, Endre; Pilipović, Stevan; Vladimirov, Vasilij; International Conference "Generalized functions, convergence structures and their applications" (GFCA-87)

    1988-01-01

    This Proceedings consists of a collection of papers presented at the International Conference "Generalized functions, convergence structures and their applications" held from June 23-27, 1987 in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia (GFCA-87): 71 participants from 21 countr~es from allover the world took part in the Conference. Proceedings reflects the work of the Conference. Plenary lectures of J. Burzyk, J. F. Colombeau, W. Gahler, H. Keiter, H. Komatsu, B. Stankovic, H. G. Tillman, V. S. Vladimirov provide an up-to-date account of the cur­ rent state of the subject. All these lectures, except H. G. Tillman's, are published in this volume. The published communications give the contemporary problems and achievements in the theory of generalized functions, in the theory of convergence structures and in their applications, specially in the theory of partial differential equations and in the mathematical physics. New approaches to the theory of generalized functions are presented, moti­ vated by concrete problems of applicat...

  11. Sub-structures in hadrons and proton structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the partonic structure of constituent quark in the Next-to-Leading Order. Using a convolution method, Structure function of proton is presented. While the constituent quark structure is generated purely perturbatively and accounts for the most part of the hadronic structure, there is a few percent contributions coming from the nonperturbative sector in the hadronic structure. This contribution plays the key role in explaining the SU(2) symmetry breaking of the nucleon sea and the observed violation of Gottfried sum rule. Excellent agreement with data in a wide range of x = [10-6, 1] and Q2 = [0.5, 5000] GeV2 for Fp2 is reached

  12. Biomolecular transport and separation in nanotubular networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Stevens, Mark Jackson (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Robinson, David B.; Branda, Steven S.; Zendejas, Frank; Meagher, Robert J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Hayden, Carl C.; Sinha, Anupama; Abate, Elisa; Wang, Julia; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Haiqing (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-09-01

    Cell membranes are dynamic substrates that achieve a diverse array of functions through multi-scale reconfigurations. We explore the morphological changes that occur upon protein interaction to model membrane systems that induce deformation of their planar structure to yield nanotube assemblies. In the two examples shown in this report we will describe the use of membrane adhesion and particle trajectory to form lipid nanotubes via mechanical stretching, and protein adsorption onto domains and the induction of membrane curvature through steric pressure. Through this work the relationship between membrane bending rigidity, protein affinity, and line tension of phase separated structures were examined and their relationship in biological membranes explored.

  13. Integrated Spintronic Platforms for Biomolecular Recognition Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, V. C.; Cardoso, F. A.; Loureiro, J.; Mercier, M.; Germano, J.; Cardoso, S.; Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, L. P.; Sousa, L.; Piedade, M. S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2008-06-01

    This paper covers recent developments in magnetoresistive based biochip platforms fabricated at INESC-MN, and their application to the detection and quantification of pathogenic waterborn microorganisms in water samples for human consumption. Such platforms are intended to give response to the increasing concern related to microbial contaminated water sources. The presented results concern the development of biological active DNA chips and protein chips and the demonstration of the detection capability of the present platforms. Two platforms are described, one including spintronic sensors only (spin-valve based or magnetic tunnel junction based), and the other, a fully scalable platform where each probe site consists of a MTJ in series with a thin film diode (TFD). Two microfluidic systems are described, for cell separation and concentration, and finally, the read out and control integrated electronics are described, allowing the realization of bioassays with a portable point of care unit. The present platforms already allow the detection of complementary biomolecular target recognition with 1 pM concentration.

  14. A multiscale modeling approach for biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowling, Alan, E-mail: bowling@uta.edu; Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi.haghshenasjaryani@mavs.uta.edu [The University of Texas at Arlington, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (United States)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a new multiscale molecular dynamic model for investigating the effects of external interactions, such as contact and impact, during stepping and docking of motor proteins and other biomolecular systems. The model retains the mass properties ensuring that the result satisfies Newton’s second law. This idea is presented using a simple particle model to facilitate discussion of the rigid body model; however, the particle model does provide insights into particle dynamics at the nanoscale. The resulting three-dimensional model predicts a significant decrease in the effect of the random forces associated with Brownian motion. This conclusion runs contrary to the widely accepted notion that the motor protein’s movements are primarily the result of thermal effects. This work focuses on the mechanical aspects of protein locomotion; the effect ATP hydrolysis is estimated as internal forces acting on the mechanical model. In addition, the proposed model can be numerically integrated in a reasonable amount of time. Herein, the differences between the motion predicted by the old and new modeling approaches are compared using a simplified model of myosin V.

  15. Structure and function of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Christophe; Brandt, Ulrich; Hunte, Carola; Zickermann, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest and most complicated enzyme of the respiratory chain. Fourteen central subunits represent the minimal form of complex I and can be assigned to functional modules for NADH oxidation, ubiquinone reduction, and proton pumping. In addition, the mitochondrial enzyme comprises some 30 accessory subunits surrounding the central subunits that are not directly associated with energy conservation. Complex I is known to release deleterious oxygen radicals (ROS) and its dysfunction has been linked to a number of hereditary and degenerative diseases. We here review recent progress in structure determination, and in understanding the role of accessory subunits and functional analysis of mitochondrial complex I. For the central subunits, structures provide insight into the arrangement of functional modules including the substrate binding sites, redox-centers and putative proton channels and pump sites. Only for two of the accessory subunits, detailed structures are available. Nevertheless, many of them could be localized in the overall structure of complex I, but most of these assignments have to be considered tentative. Strikingly, redox reactions and proton pumping machinery are spatially completely separated and the site of reduction for the hydrophobic substrate ubiquinone is found deeply buried in the hydrophilic domain of the complex. The X-ray structure of complex I from Yarrowia lipolytica provides clues supporting the previously proposed two-state stabilization change mechanism, in which ubiquinone redox chemistry induces conformational states and thereby drives proton pumping. The same structural rearrangements may explain the active/deactive transition of complex I implying an integrated mechanistic model for energy conversion and regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26921811

  16. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo;

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protein...... level and localization, and to the first indications of NAC participation in transcription factor networks. The recent determination of the DNA and protein binding NAC domain structure offers insight into the molecular functions of the protein family. Research into NAC transcription factors has...

  17. A programmable biomolecular computing machine with bacterial phenotype output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoy, Elizaveta; Lavid, Noa; Soreni-Harari, Michal; Shoham, Yuval; Keinan, Ehud

    2007-07-23

    The main advantage of autonomous biomolecular computing devices over electronic computers is their ability to interact directly with biological systems. No interface is required since all components of molecular computers, including hardware, software, input, and output are molecules that interact in solution along a cascade of programmable chemical events. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the output of a computation preduced by a molecular finite automaton can be a visible bacterial phenotype. Our 2-symbol-2-state finite automaton utilized linear double-stranded DNA inputs that were prepared by inserting a string of six base pair symbols into the lacZ gene on the pUC18 plasmid. The computation resulted in a circular plasmid that differed from the original pUC18 by either a 9 base pair (accepting state) or 11 base pair insert (unaccepting state) within the lacZ alpha region gene. Upon transformation and expression of the resultant plasmids in E. coli, the accepting state was represented by production of functional beta-galactosidase and formation of blue colonies on X-gal medium. In contrast, the unaccepting state was represented by white colonies due to a shift in the open reading frame of lacZ. PMID:17562552

  18. Longitudinal Structure Function FL from Charm Structure Function F2c

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Rezaei; G.R.Boroun

    2013-01-01

    We predict the effect of the charm structure function on the longitudinal structure function at small x.In NLO analysis we find that the hard Pomeron behavior gives a good description of FL and Fkc (k =2,L) at small x values.We conclude that a direct relation between FL∝ F2c would provide useful information on how to measure longitudinal structure function at high Q2 values.Having checked that this model gives a good description of the data,when compared with other models.

  19. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  20. Structure and function of endothelial caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Radu-Virgil

    2002-06-01

    Caveolae are spherical invaginations of the plasma membrane and associated vesicles that are found at high surface densities in most cells, endothelia included. Their structural framework has been shown to consist of oligomerized caveolin molecules interacting with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolae have been involved in many cellular functions such as endocytosis, signal transduction, mechano-transduction, potocytosis, and cholesterol trafficking. Some confusion still persists in the field with respect to the relationship between caveolae and the lipid rafts, which have been involved in many of the above functions. In addition to all these, endothelial caveolae have been involved in capillary permeability by their participation in the process of transcytosis. This short review will focus on their structure and components, methods used to determine these components, and the role of caveolae in the transendothelial exchanges between blood plasma and the interstitial fluid. PMID:12112442

  1. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is an acute inflammatory demyelinating condition of the optic nerve characterised by transient visual loss and eye pain. ON is the presenting symptom in 20% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and the 15 year risk of developing MS after ON is about 50%. Decline in vision...... resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... will have very few or no clinical symptoms, or it could be due to compensatory mechanisms in the visual pathway or the visual cortex. In order to understand the pathophysiology and recovery processes in ON it is essential to have sensitive methods to asses both structure and function. These methods...

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases: Function, structure, and inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a key member of the phosphoinositide family. PI4P defines the membranes of Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN) and regulates trafficking to and from the Golgi. Humans have two type II PI4Ks (α and β) and two type III enzymes (α and β). Recently, the crystal structures were solved for both type II and type III kinase revealing atomic details of their function. Importantly, the type III PI4Ks are hijacked by +RNA viruses to create so-called membranous web, an extensively phosphorylated and modified membrane system dedicated to their replication. Therefore, selective and potent inhibitors of PI4Ks have been developed as potential antiviral agents. Here we focus on the structure and function of PI4Ks and their potential in human medicine

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases: Function, structure, and inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boura, Evzen, E-mail: boura@uochb.cas.cz; Nencka, Radim, E-mail: nencka@uochb.cas.cz

    2015-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a key member of the phosphoinositide family. PI4P defines the membranes of Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN) and regulates trafficking to and from the Golgi. Humans have two type II PI4Ks (α and β) and two type III enzymes (α and β). Recently, the crystal structures were solved for both type II and type III kinase revealing atomic details of their function. Importantly, the type III PI4Ks are hijacked by +RNA viruses to create so-called membranous web, an extensively phosphorylated and modified membrane system dedicated to their replication. Therefore, selective and potent inhibitors of PI4Ks have been developed as potential antiviral agents. Here we focus on the structure and function of PI4Ks and their potential in human medicine.

  4. Structure function calculations for Ostwald Ripening processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Razi A.

    1990-01-01

    A program for computing the structure function for configurations involved in Ostwald Ripening was written. The basic algorithms are derived from a mathematical analysis of a two-dimensional model system developed by Bortz, et. al. (1974). While it is expected that the values form the computer simulations will reflect Ostwald Ripening, at this point the program is still being tested. Some preliminary runs seem to justify the expectations.

  5. Truncated Moment Analysis of Nucleon Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Psaker; W. Melnitchouk; M. E. Christy; C. E. Keppel

    2007-11-16

    We employ a novel new approach using "truncated" moments, or integrals of structure functions over restricted regions of x, to study local quark-hadron duality, and the degree to which individual resonance regions are dominated by leading twists. Because truncated moments obey the same Q^2 evolution equations as the leading twist parton distributions, this approach makes possible for the first time a description of resonance region data and the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality directly from QCD.

  6. Increased Functionality Porous Optical Fiber Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wooddell, Michael Gary

    2007-01-01

    A novel fiber optic structure, termed stochastic ordered hole fibers, has been developed that contains an ordered array of six hollow tubes surrounding a hollow core, combined with a nanoporous glass creating a unique fully three dimensional pore/fiber configuration. The objective of this study is to increase the functionality of these stochastic ordered hole fibers, as well as porous clad fibers, by integrating electronic device components such as conductors, and semiconductor...

  7. Structural and functional neuroimaging in intractable epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Chinchure Swati; Kesavadas Chandrasekharan; Thomas Bejoy

    2010-01-01

    Medical management remains unsatisfactory in about a third of patients with epilepsy and some of them are candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. Structural and functional neuroimaging plays an important role in the identification of the precise cortical region responsible for seizures and is very crucial for a good surgical outcome. Furthermore, identification of eloquent cortical areas near the region to be resected is essential to avoid postoperative neurologic deficit. The magnetic res...

  8. Structure, function, and plasticity of GABA transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Annalisa eScimemi

    2014-01-01

    GABA transporters belong to a large family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. They are widely expressed throughout the brain, with different levels of expression in different brain regions. GABA transporters are present in neurons and in astrocytes and their activity is crucial to regulate the extracellular concentration of GABA under basal conditions and during ongoing synaptic events. Numerous efforts have been devoted to determine the structural and functional properties of GABA transp...

  9. Functional-structural modelling in Gramineae

    OpenAIRE

    C. Fournier; Andrieu, B.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Evers, J.B.; Drouet, D.; Escobar-Gutierriez, A.J.; VOS, J

    2007-01-01

    The Gramineae have been a pioneer group among non-woody plants to be modelled with the approach of functional-structural plant modelling (FSPM). During the past decade, models have focussed on morphological aspects of plant development. They now provide crop scientists with general guidelines for building new cereal models. We present some of them here, considering the different aspects of cereal architectural modelling: plant development, pattern formation and plant geometry. We also review ...

  10. Structural and functional neuroimaging in intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinchure Swati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical management remains unsatisfactory in about a third of patients with epilepsy and some of them are candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. Structural and functional neuroimaging plays an important role in the identification of the precise cortical region responsible for seizures and is very crucial for a good surgical outcome. Furthermore, identification of eloquent cortical areas near the region to be resected is essential to avoid postoperative neurologic deficit. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI protocol for epilepsy can be individually tailored depending on the seizure semiology and possibly electroencephalography. New MRI techniques demonstrate the structure of the brain in fine detail, help in understanding the underlying pathology, and demonstrate functional activity of the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Metabolic imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission tomography (SPECT visualize metabolic alterations of the brain in the ictal and interictal states. In MR-negative epilepsy patients, these techniques may have localizing value. The proper use and interpretation of the findings provided by these new technologies is crucial. In this review article, we discuss various conventional and advanced MRI techniques, interpretation of various findings, and the role of functional imaging modalities, such as functional MRI, PET, and SPECT in the localization of epileptogenic substrate as well as for understanding the pathophysiology, propagation, and neurochemical correlates of epilepsy.

  11. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jähne, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.jaehne1@stud.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Neurosciences, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rizzoli, Silvio O. [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); Helm, Martin S., E-mail: martin.helm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Molecular Biology, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  12. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures

  13. Phenylalanine hydroxylase: function, structure, and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flydal, Marte I; Martinez, Aurora

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the phenylalanine catabolism, consuming about 75% of the phenylalanine input from the diet and protein catabolism under physiological conditions. In humans, mutations in the PAH gene lead to phenylketonuria (PKU), and most mutations are mainly associated with PAH misfolding and instability. The established treatment for PKU is a phenylalanine-restricted diet and, recently, supplementation with preparations of the natural tetrahydrobiopterin cofactor also shows effectiveness for some patients. Since 1997 there has been a significant increase in the understanding of the structure, catalytic mechanism, and regulation of PAH by its substrate and cofactor, in addition to improved correlations between genotype and phenotype in PKU. Importantly, there has also been an increased number of studies on the structure and function of PAH from bacteria and lower eukaryote organisms, revealing an additional anabolic role of the enzyme in the synthesis of melanin-like pigments. In this review, we discuss these recent studies, which contribute to define the evolutionary adaptation of the PAH structure and function leading to sophisticated regulation for effective catabolic processing of phenylalanine in mammalian organisms.

  14. STRUCTURE AND GRAMMATICAL FUNCTION OF LEO LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Yudha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lio language is a language spoken in Central Flores. Having limited morphological process in general and affixation process involving verbs (head marking and nouns (dependent marking in particular, it is classified into an isolating language. The studies exploring the languages spoken in the eastern part of Indonesia using Lexical Functional Grammar and the theory of typology are highly limited. In addition, Lio language is merely an isolating one and does not have cross referencing. It is this which inspired the writer to conduct research in syntax. This study aims at investigating the canonic structure, the types of verbs used as predicates, the grammatical function, the alternate of clausal structure, the mapping and the pivotance in Lio language. The results of analysis show that the clauses in Lio language can be divided into basic clauses with verbal and nonverbal predicates. The  predicates of the verbal clauses are classified into simple, serial, and causative.  The serial verbal constructions are distinguished based on the semantic features of the verbal components forming the serial verbal constructions. These types can be observed from the nature of the relationships among the components forming the serial verbal constructions. A serial verbal construction is made up of more than one verbs and behaves as a simple predicate. There is no dependence marker among the components forming the serial verb.  The causative structure also forms monoclause and biclause. The functional mapping uses the features [+/-r] and [+/-o], the argument uses the features [-r] and [-o] which are mapped to  SUBJ, [-r] and [+o] are mapped to OBJ, [+r] and [+o] are mapped to OBJ2 or OBJ? and [+r] and [-o] are mapped to OBL (Oblique. Lio language has GF SUBJ and OBJ as the nuclear GF (nuclear grammatical function, and OBL, COMP, and ADJ as the nonnuclear grammatical functions. The SUBJ appears before the verb (preverbal position and the OBJ appears after the

  15. Nanoscale field effect transistor for biomolecular signal amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu; Hong, Mi K; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Rosenberg, Carol; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2008-01-01

    We report amplification of biomolecular recognition signal in lithographically defined silicon nanochannel devices. The devices are configured as field effect transistors (FET) in the reversed source-drain bias region. The measurement of the differential conductance of the nanowire channels in the FET allows sensitive detection of changes in the surface potential due to biomolecular binding. Narrower silicon channels demonstrate higher sensitivity to binding due to increased surface-to-volume ratio. The operation of the device in the negative source-drain region demonstrates signal amplification. The equivalence between protein binding and change in the surface potential is described.

  16. Soft matter nanotechnology from structure to function

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Using the well-honed tools of nanotechnology, this book presents breakthrough results in soft matter research, benefitting from the synergies between the chemistry, physics, biology, materials science, and engineering communities. The team of international authors delves beyond mere structure-making and places the emphasis firmly on imparting functionality to soft nanomaterials with a focus on devices and applications. Alongside reviewing the current level of knowledge, they also put forward novel ideas to foster research and development in such expanding fields as nanobiotechnology and nanom

  17. Nucleon structure functions from constituent quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorramian, Ali N.; Arash, Firooz

    1999-10-01

    We have used a constituent quarks model to describe the nucleon structure function, F2( χ, Q2), for a wide range of χ=[10 -6,1] and Q2 = [0.5, 5000] GeV2. We have found that although F2 rises as χ decreases, but there exists some χ0 ≤ 10 -4 - 10 -5, below which the rise of F2 subsides drastically and hence, exhibits an almost flat behavior, compatible with the latest results from HERA, at least for low Q2.

  18. Proton structure function at small Q^2

    OpenAIRE

    Donnachie, A; Landshoff, P V

    1993-01-01

    A fit is made to the data for the proton structure function up to Q^2=10 GeV^2, including the real gamma p total cross-section. It is economical and simple, and its form is motivated by physical principles. It is extrapolated down to very small values of x. Data for the ratio (nu W_2^n/nu W_2^p) are also fitted. A FORTRAN program for the fit to (nu W_2^p) is available by email on request Figure 5 from the original version has been deleted.

  19. Biomolecular detection using a metal semiconductor field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Elias; Saab, Marie-Belle; Buzatu, Petre; Aulombard, Roger; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.; Gergely, Csilla; Cloitre, Thierry

    2010-04-01

    In this work, our attention was drawn towards developing affinity-based electrical biosensors, using a MESFET (Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor). Semiconductor (SC) surfaces must be prepared before the incubations with biomolecules. The peptides route was adapted to exceed and bypass the limits revealed by other types of surface modification due to the unwanted unspecific interactions. As these peptides reveal specific recognition of materials, then controlled functionalization can be achieved. Peptides were produced by phage display technology using a library of M13 bacteriophage. After several rounds of bio-panning, the phages presenting affinities for GaAs SC were isolated; the DNA of these specific phages were sequenced, and the peptide with the highest affinity was synthesized and biotinylated. To explore the possibility of electrical detection, the MESFET fabricated with the GaAs SC were used to detect the streptavidin via the biotinylated peptide in the presence of the bovine Serum Albumin. After each surface modification step, the IDS (current between the drain and the source) of the transistor was measured and a decrease in the intensity was detected. Furthermore, fluorescent microscopy was used in order to prove the specificity of this peptide and the specific localisation of biomolecules. In conclusion, the feasibility of producing an electrical biosensor using a MESFET has been demonstrated. Controlled placement, specific localization and detection of biomolecules on a MESFET transistor were achieved without covering the drain and the source. This method of functionalization and detection can be of great utility for biosensing application opening a new way for developing bioFETs (Biomolecular Field-Effect Transistor).

  20. Surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from periodic quantum dot arrays through distance control using biomolecular linkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a protein-enabled strategy to fabricate quantum dot (QD) nanoarrays where up to a 15-fold increase in surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence has been achieved. This approach permits a comprehensive control both laterally (via lithographically defined gold nanoarrays) and vertically (via the QD-metal distance) of the collectively behaving assemblies of QDs and gold nanoarrays by way of biomolecular recognition. Specifically, we demonstrated the spectral tuning of plasmon resonant metal nanoarrays and self-assembly of protein-functionalized QDs in a stepwise fashion with a concomitant incremental increase in separation from the metal surface through biotin-streptavidin spacer units.

  1. Models of protocellular structures, functions and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael H.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The central step in the origin of life was the emergence of organized structures from organic molecules available on the early earth. These predecessors to modern cells, called 'proto-cells,' were simple, membrane bounded structures able to maintain themselves, grow, divide, and evolve. Since there is no fossil record of these earliest of life forms, it is a scientific challenge to discover plausible mechanisms for how these entities formed and functioned. To meet this challenge, it is essential to create laboratory models of protocells that capture the main attributes associated with living systems, while remaining consistent with known, or inferred, protobiological conditions. This report provides an overview of a project which has focused on protocellular metabolism and the coupling of metabolism to energy transduction. We have assumed that the emergence of systems endowed with genomes and capable of Darwinian evolution was preceded by a pre-genomic phase, in which protocells functioned and evolved using mostly proteins, without self-replicating nucleic acids such as RNA.

  2. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and

  3. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER), the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts NER. PMID:27303435

  4. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Marissa Wolf Horrell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair, the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts nucleotide excision repair.

  5. Complex Analyses of Plankton Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl E. Havens

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically evaluates some complex methods that have been used to characterize the structure and function of freshwater plankton communities. The focus is on methods related to plankton size structure and carbon transfer. The specific methods reviewed are 1 size spectrum analysis, 2 size-fractionated phytoplankton productivity, 3 size-fractionated zooplankton grazing, 4 plankton ecological transfer efficiency, and 5 grazer effects on phytoplankton community structure. Taken together, these methods can provide information on community ecological properties that are directly related to practical issues including water quality and fisheries productivity. However, caution is warranted since application without a complete understanding of assumptions and context of the manipulations could lead to erroneous conclusions. As an example, experimental studies involving the addition or removal of zooplankton, especially when coupled with nutrient addition treatments, could provide information on the degree of consumer vs. resource control of phytoplankton. Resource managers subsequently could use this information in developing effective measures for controlling nuisance algal biomass. However, the experiments must be done critically and with sufficient safeguards and other measurements to ensure that treatments (e.g., zooplankton exclosure by screening of water actually are successful and do not introduce other changes in the community (e.g., removal of large algae. In all of the methods described here, the investigator must take care when generalizing results and, in particular, carry out a sufficient number of replications to encompass both the major seasonal and spatial variation that occurs in the ecosystem.

  6. Engineering biomolecular microenvironments for cell instructive biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custódio, Catarina A; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2014-06-01

    Engineered cell instructive microenvironments with the ability to stimulate specific cellular responses are a topic of high interest in the fabrication and development of biomaterials for application in tissue engineering. Cells are inherently sensitive to the in vivo microenvironment that is often designed as the cell "niche." The cell "niche" comprising the extracellular matrix and adjacent cells, influences not only cell architecture and mechanics, but also cell polarity and function. Extensive research has been performed to establish new tools to fabricate biomimetic advanced materials for tissue engineering that incorporate structural, mechanical, and biochemical signals that interact with cells in a controlled manner and to recapitulate the in vivo dynamic microenvironment. Bioactive tunable microenvironments using micro and nanofabrication have been successfully developed and proven to be extremely powerful to control intracellular signaling and cell function. This Review is focused in the assortment of biochemical signals that have been explored to fabricate bioactive cell microenvironments and the main technologies and chemical strategies to encode them in engineered biomaterials with biological information.

  7. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S.; Comment, Arnaud;

    2015-01-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi‐author interdisciplinary Review presents a state‐of‐the‐art description...

  8. Coevolutionary modeling of protein sequences: Predicting structure, function, and mutational landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Martin

    Over the last years, biological research has been revolutionized by experimental high-throughput techniques, in particular by next-generation sequencing technology. Unprecedented amounts of data are accumulating, and there is a growing request for computational methods unveiling the information hidden in raw data, thereby increasing our understanding of complex biological systems. Statistical-physics models based on the maximum-entropy principle have, in the last few years, played an important role in this context. To give a specific example, proteins and many non-coding RNA show a remarkable degree of structural and functional conservation in the course of evolution, despite a large variability in amino acid sequences. We have developed a statistical-mechanics inspired inference approach - called Direct-Coupling Analysis - to link this sequence variability (easy to observe in sequence alignments, which are available in public sequence databases) to bio-molecular structure and function. In my presentation I will show, how this methodology can be used (i) to infer contacts between residues and thus to guide tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction and RNA structure prediction, (ii) to discriminate interacting from non-interacting protein families, and thus to infer conserved protein-protein interaction networks, and (iii) to reconstruct mutational landscapes and thus to predict the phenotypic effect of mutations. References [1] M. Figliuzzi, H. Jacquier, A. Schug, O. Tenaillon and M. Weigt ''Coevolutionary landscape inference and the context-dependence of mutations in beta-lactamase TEM-1'', Mol. Biol. Evol. (2015), doi: 10.1093/molbev/msv211 [2] E. De Leonardis, B. Lutz, S. Ratz, S. Cocco, R. Monasson, A. Schug, M. Weigt ''Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction'', Nucleic Acids Research (2015), doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv932 [3] F. Morcos, A. Pagnani, B. Lunt, A. Bertolino, D. Marks, C

  9. Bridging Nano- and Microtribology in Mechanical and Biomolecular Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomala, Agnieszka; Göçerler, Hakan; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    The physical and chemical composition of surfaces determine various important properties of solids such as corrosion rates, adhesive properties, frictional properties, catalytic activity, wettability, contact potential and - finally and most importantly - failure mechanisms. Very thin, weak layers (of man-made and biological origin) on much harder substrates that reduce friction are the focus of the micro- and nanotribological investigations presented in this chapter.Biomolecular layers fulfil various functions in organs of the human body. Examples comprise the skin that provides a protective physical barrier between the body and the environment, preventing unwanted inward and outward passage of water and electrolytes, reducing penetration by destructive chemicals, arresting the penetration of microorganisms and external antigens and absorbing radiation from the sun, or the epithelium of the cornea that blocks the passage of foreign material, such as dust, water and bacteria, into the eye and that contributes to the lubrication layer that ensures smooth movement of the eyelids over the eyeballs.Monomolecular thin films, additive-derived reaction layers and hard coatings are widely used to tailor tribological properties of surfaces. Nanotribological investigations on these substrates can reveal novel properties regarding the orientation of chemisorbed additive layers, development of rubbing films with time and the relation of frictional properties to surface characteristics in diamond coatings.Depending on the questions to be answered with the tribological research, various micro- and nanotribological measurement methods are applied, including scanning probe microscopy (AFM, FFM), scanning electron microscopy, microtribometer investigations, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and optical microscopy. Thoughts on the feasibility of a unified approach to energy-dissipating systems and how it might be reached (touching upon new ways of scientific publishing

  10. Structural and functional diversity of desmosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Robert M; Green, Kathleen J

    2013-12-01

    Desmosomes anchor intermediate filaments at sites of cell contact established by the interaction of cadherins extending from opposing cells. The incorporation of cadherins, catenin adaptors, and cytoskeletal elements resembles the closely related adherens junction. However, the recruitment of intermediate filaments distinguishes desmosomes and imparts a unique function. By linking the load-bearing intermediate filaments of neighboring cells, desmosomes create mechanically contiguous cell sheets and, in so doing, confer structural integrity to the tissues they populate. This trait and a well-established role in human disease have long captured the attention of cell biologists, as evidenced by a publication record dating back to the mid-1860s. Likewise, emerging data implicating the desmosome in signaling events pertinent to organismal development, carcinogenesis, and genetic disorders will secure a prominent role for desmosomes in future biological and biomedical investigations.

  11. Structural and Functional Views of Mechatronic Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kjeld; Petersen, Thomas Ditlev; Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn

    2011-01-01

    in the costumer view as well in the production view. In this paper, the relationships in mechatronic products between the functional and structural levels are explored in relation to modularity. A list of commonly used module drivers is presented and a qualitative survey is used to explore significance......The development and subsequent production of industrial products are often complicated tasks. The complication increases with combined product as mechatronic products and is further complicated when large variety is required. Modularity is often used to achieve optimum in these complications both...... of influence on these module drivers when applying mechatronic product technology and view levels. The result is summarized in a list of which drivers should be addressed in a mechatronic product approach to modularity. Keywords:...

  12. Macrodomains: Structure, Function, Evolution, and Catalytic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Perina, Dragutin; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments indicate that macrodomains, an ancient and diverse protein domain family, are key players in the recognition, interpretation, and turnover of ADP-ribose (ADPr) signaling. Crucial to this is the ability of macrodomains to recognize ADPr either directly, in the form of a metabolic derivative, or as a modification covalently bound to proteins. Thus, macrodomains regulate a wide variety of cellular and organismal processes, including DNA damage repair, signal transduction, and immune response. Their importance is further indicated by the fact that dysregulation or mutation of a macrodomain is associated with several diseases, including cancer, developmental defects, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the current insights into macrodomain evolution and how this evolution influenced their structural and functional diversification. We highlight some aspects of macrodomain roles in pathobiology as well as their emerging potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26844395

  13. The HADDOCK2.2 Web Server: User-Friendly Integrative Modeling of Biomolecular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zundert, G C P; Rodrigues, J P G L M; Trellet, M; Schmitz, C; Kastritis, P L; Karaca, E; Melquiond, A S J; van Dijk, M; de Vries, S J; Bonvin, A M J J

    2016-02-22

    The prediction of the quaternary structure of biomolecular macromolecules is of paramount importance for fundamental understanding of cellular processes and drug design. In the era of integrative structural biology, one way of increasing the accuracy of modeling methods used to predict the structure of biomolecular complexes is to include as much experimental or predictive information as possible in the process. This has been at the core of our information-driven docking approach HADDOCK. We present here the updated version 2.2 of the HADDOCK portal, which offers new features such as support for mixed molecule types, additional experimental restraints and improved protocols, all of this in a user-friendly interface. With well over 6000 registered users and 108,000 jobs served, an increasing fraction of which on grid resources, we hope that this timely upgrade will help the community to solve important biological questions and further advance the field. The HADDOCK2.2 Web server is freely accessible to non-profit users at http://haddock.science.uu.nl/services/HADDOCK2.2.

  14. A self-regulating biomolecular comparator for processing oscillatory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Franco, Elisa; Schulman, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    While many cellular processes are driven by biomolecular oscillators, precise control of a downstream on/off process by a biochemical oscillator signal can be difficult: over an oscillator's period, its output signal varies continuously between its amplitude limits and spends a significant fraction of the time at intermediate values between these limits. Further, the oscillator's output is often noisy, with particularly large variations in the amplitude. In electronic systems, an oscillating signal is generally processed by a downstream device such as a comparator that converts a potentially noisy oscillatory input into a square wave output that is predominantly in one of two well-defined on and off states. The comparator's output then controls downstream processes. We describe a method for constructing a synthetic biochemical device that likewise produces a square-wave-type biomolecular output for a variety of oscillatory inputs. The method relies on a separation of time scales between the slow rate of production of an oscillatory signal molecule and the fast rates of intermolecular binding and conformational changes. We show how to control the characteristics of the output by varying the concentrations of the species and the reaction rates. We then use this control to show how our approach could be applied to process different in vitro and in vivo biomolecular oscillators, including the p53-Mdm2 transcriptional oscillator and two types of in vitro transcriptional oscillators. These results demonstrate how modular biomolecular circuits could, in principle, be combined to build complex dynamical systems. The simplicity of our approach also suggests that natural molecular circuits may process some biomolecular oscillator outputs before they are applied downstream. PMID:26378119

  15. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiming

    2010-02-04

    The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

  16. Structure and function of carbonic anhydrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-07-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyse the interconversion between CO2 and bicarbonate as well as other hydrolytic reactions. Among the six genetic families known to date, the α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ζ- and η-CAs, detailed kinetic and X-ray crystallographic studies have allowed a deep understanding of the structure-function relationship in this superfamily of proteins. A metal hydroxide nucleophilic species of the enzyme, and a unique active site architecture, with half of it hydrophilic and the opposing part hydrophobic, allow these enzymes to act as some of the most effective catalysts known in Nature. The CA activation and inhibition mechanisms are also known in detail, with a large number of new inhibitor classes being described in the last years. Apart from the zinc binders, some classes of inhibitors anchor to the metal ion coordinated nucleophile, others occlude the entrance of the active site cavity and more recently, compounds binding outside the active site were described. CA inhibition has therapeutic applications for drugs acting as diuretics, antiepileptics, antiglaucoma, antiobesity and antitumour agents. Targeting such enzymes from pathogens may lead to novel anti-infectives. Successful structure-based drug design campaigns allowed the discovery of highly isoform selective CA inhibitors (CAIs), which may lead to a new generation of drugs targeting these widespread enzymes. The use of CAs in CO2 capture processes for mitigating the global temperature rise has also been investigated more recently. PMID:27407171

  17. Structure and biological functions of fungal cerebrosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto-Bergter Eliana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide monohexosides (CMHs, cerebrosides are glycosphingolipids composed of a hydrophobic ceramide linked to one sugar unit. In fungal cells, CMHs are very conserved molecules consisting of a ceramide moiety containing 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine in amidic linkage to 2-hydroxyoctadecanoic or 2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids, and a carbohydrate portion consisting of one residue of glucose or galactose. 9-Methyl 4,8-sphingadienine-containing ceramides are usually glycosylated to form fungal cerebrosides, but the recent description of a ceramide dihexoside (CDH presenting phytosphingosine in Magnaporthe grisea suggests the existence of alternative pathways of ceramide glycosylation in fungal cells. Along with their unique structural characteristics, fungal CMHs have a peculiar subcellular distribution and striking biological properties. In Pseudallescheria boydii, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, A. fumigatus, and Schizophyllum commune, CMHs are apparently involved in morphological transitions and fungal growth. The elucidation of structural and functional aspects of fungal cerebrosides may therefore contribute to the design of new antifungal agents inhibiting growth and differentiation of pathogenic species.

  18. Wavelets and Geometric Structure for Function Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Xiang YANG

    2004-01-01

    With Littlewood-Paley analysis, Peetre and Triebel classified, systematically, almost all the usual function spaces into two classes of spaces: Besov spaces (B)s,q p(s ∈ R,0 < p,q ≤∞) and Triebel-Lizorkin spaces (F)s,q p(s∈R,0<p<∞,0<q≤∞); but the structure of dual spaces (D)s,q p of (F)s,q p(s∈R, 0<p≤1≤q≤∞) is very different from that of Besov spaces or that of Triebel-Lizorkin spaces, and their structure cannot be analysed easily in the Littlewood-Paley analysis. Our main goal is to characterize (D)s,q p (s ∈ R, 0<p= 1≤q≤∞) in tent spaces with wavelets. By the way, some applications are given: (i) Triebel-Lizorkin spaces for p = ∞ defined by Littlewood-Paley analysis cannot serve as the dual spaces of Triebel-Lizorkin spaces for p = 1; (ii) Some inclusion relations among these above spaces and some relations among(B)o,q1,(F)o,q1 and L1 are studied.

  19. Biomolecular crystals for material applications and a mechanistic study of an iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Joshua Charles

    The three projects within this work address the difficulties of controlling biomolecular crystal formats (i.e. size and shape), producing 3-D ordered composite materials from biomolecular crystal templates, and understanding the mechanism of a practical iron oxide synthesis. The unifying thread consistent throughout these three topics is the development of methods to manipulate nanomaterials using a bottom-up approach. Biomolecular crystals are nanometer to millimeter sized crystals that have well ordered mesoporous solvent channels. The overall physical dimensions of these crystals are highly dependent on crystallization conditions. The controlled growth of micro- and nanoprotein crystals was studied to provide new pathways for creating smaller crystalline protein materials. This method produced tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals (250--100,000 nm) with near monodisperse size distributions (membranes or templates. In this work, the porous structure of larger cowpea mosaic virus crystals was used to template metal nanoparticle growth within the body centered cubic crystalline network. The final composite material was found to have long range ordering of palladium and platinum nonocrystal aggregates (10nm) with symmetry consistent to the virus template. Nanoparticle synthesis itself is an immense field of study with an array of diverse applications. The final piece of this work investigates the mechanism behind a previously developed iron oxide synthesis to gain more understanding and direction to future synthesis strategies. The particle growth mechanism was found to proceed by the formation of a solvated iron(III)oleate complex followed by a reduction of iron (III) to iron (II). This unstable iron(II) nucleates to form a wustite (FeO) core which serves as an epitaxial surface for the magnetite (Fe3O4) shell growth. This method produces spherical particles (6-60nm) with relative size distributions of less than 15%.

  20. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo

  1. Biomolecular mechanisms in varicose veins development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segiet, Oliwia Anna; Brzozowa-Zasada, Marlena; Piecuch, Adam; Dudek, Damian; Reichman-Warmusz, Edyta; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2015-02-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) can be described as tortuous and dilated palpable veins, which are more than 3 mm in diameter. They are one of the clinical presentations of chronic venous disorders, which are a significant cause of morbidity. The prevalence of VVs has been estimated at 25-33% in women and 10-20% in men and is still increasing at an alarming rate. Family history, older age, female, pregnancy, obesity, standing occupations, and a history of deep venous thrombosis are the predominant risk factors. A great amount of factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of VVs, including changes in hydrostatic pressure, valvular incompetence, deep venous obstruction, ineffective function of calf muscle pump, biochemical and structural alterations of the vessel wall, extracellular matrix abnormalities, impaired balance between growth factors or cytokines, genetic alterations, and several other mechanisms. Nevertheless, the issue of pathogenesis in VVs is still not completely known, even if a great progress has been made in understanding their molecular basis. This kind of studies appears promising and should be encouraged, and perhaps the new insight in this matter may result in targeted therapy or possibly prevention.

  2. Report on result 1998. Research and development on fusion area. Part 3 (biomolecular mechanism and design); 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Yugo ryoiki kenkyu kaihatsu daisan bunsatsu (bimolecular mechanism and design)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    An organism is a molecular mechanical system consisting of nucleic acid, peptide and protein having a self-forming and a self-repairing function. For the purpose of creating cells, tissues and molecular mechanism alternating these biological functions, their basic technology was developed. Concretely, studies were made on three-dimensional cellular structural module engineering and biomolecular mechanism and design. Studies on biological soft tissue resulted in success by giving atmospheric glow discharge treatment to the inner surface of a tubular PVC. An artificial vitreous body was created using PVA hydrogels. In addition, liver cells were successfully cultured for the first time in the world. Studies on biological hard tissue revealed that osteopontin plays a role of a trigger for the initial differentiation of the osteoblast cell. Further, a basic experiment was carried out on the initial response of the cartilage cell. In the research on the molecular mechanism, examination was made on the mechanism of a double-head molecular motor. Examination was also made on the adjustment of the hydrogenase LB film as an electricity/hydrogen energy conversion element and on the biomolecular mechanism and design. (NEDO)

  3. The interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic bounded noises in biomolecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Caravagna

    Full Text Available After being considered as a nuisance to be filtered out, it became recently clear that biochemical noise plays a complex role, often fully functional, for a biomolecular network. The influence of intrinsic and extrinsic noises on biomolecular networks has intensively been investigated in last ten years, though contributions on the co-presence of both are sparse. Extrinsic noise is usually modeled as an unbounded white or colored gaussian stochastic process, even though realistic stochastic perturbations are clearly bounded. In this paper we consider Gillespie-like stochastic models of nonlinear networks, i.e. the intrinsic noise, where the model jump rates are affected by colored bounded extrinsic noises synthesized by a suitable biochemical state-dependent Langevin system. These systems are described by a master equation, and a simulation algorithm to analyze them is derived. This new modeling paradigm should enlarge the class of systems amenable at modeling. We investigated the influence of both amplitude and autocorrelation time of a extrinsic Sine-Wiener noise on: (i the Michaelis-Menten approximation of noisy enzymatic reactions, which we show to be applicable also in co-presence of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise, (ii a model of enzymatic futile cycle and (iii a genetic toggle switch. In (ii and (iii we show that the presence of a bounded extrinsic noise induces qualitative modifications in the probability densities of the involved chemicals, where new modes emerge, thus suggesting the possible functional role of bounded noises.

  4. Submicrometer Hall sensors for detection of magnetic nanoparticles in biomolecular sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlovic, Goran; Xiong, P.; von Molnar, S.; Ohtani, K.; Ohno, H.; Field, M.; Sullivan, G. J.

    2006-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the recent years in synthesis and biomolecular functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetic bio-nanolabels can be utilized as protein or gene markers in biomolecular sensing assays, in contrast to the much larger micron sized magnetic beads that are usually limited to cell labeling. However, the low magnetic moments of individual nanoparticles (10^4-10^5 μB) render their sensitive detection still a challenging task. In order to address this issue we are developing miniaturized Hall sensors from InAs/AlSb quantum well semiconductor heterostructures with active Hall cross areas down to 300 nm x 300 nm. Our preliminary characterization measurements performed at room temperature show functional devices with magnetic field resolution < 100 μT/√Hz at frequencies above 100 Hz, yielding a moment sensitivity ˜ 10^5 μB. In addition to the progress in improving the moment sensitivity of the submicrometer Hall detectors, we will also present efforts in device integration with on-chip microcoils for the generation of local magnetic excitation fields. Results on nanoparticle detection will also be presented.

  5. The detection of specific biomolecular interactions with micro-Hall magnetic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Pradeep; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Aledealat, Khaled; Mihajlović, Goran; Yun, C. Steven; Field, Mark; Sullivan, Gerard J.; Strouse, Geoffrey F.; Bryant Chase, P.; von Molnár, Stephan; Xiong, Peng

    2009-09-01

    The detection of reagent-free specific biomolecular interactions through sensing of nanoscopic magnetic labels provides one of the most promising routes to biosensing with solid-state devices. In particular, Hall sensors based on semiconductor heterostructures have shown exceptional magnetic moment sensitivity over a large dynamic field range suitable for magnetic biosensing using superparamagnetic labels. Here we demonstrate the capability of such micro-Hall sensors to detect specific molecular binding using biotin-streptavidin as a model system. We apply dip-pen nanolithography to selectively biotinylate the active areas of InAs micro-Hall devices with nanoscale precision. Specific binding of complementarily functionalized streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads to the Hall crosses occurs via molecular recognition, and magnetic detection of the assembled beads is achieved at room temperature using phase sensitive micro-Hall magnetometry. The experiment constitutes the first unambiguous demonstration of magnetic detection of specific biomolecular interactions with semiconductor micro-Hall sensors, and the selective molecular functionalization and resulting localized bead assembly demonstrate the possibility of multiplexed sensing of multiple target molecules using a single device with an array of micro-Hall sensors.

  6. DockScreen: A Database of In Silico Biomolecular Interactions to Support Computational Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael-Rock Goldsmith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed DockScreen, a database of in silico biomolecular interactions designed to enable rational molecular toxicological insight within a computational toxicology framework. This database is composed of chemical/target (receptor and enzyme binding scores calculated by molecular docking of more than 1000 chemicals into 150 protein targets and contains nearly 135 thousand unique ligand/target binding scores. Obtaining this dataset was achieved using eHiTS (Simbiosys Inc., a fragment-based molecular docking approach with an exhaustive search algorithm, on a heterogeneous distributed high-performance computing framework. The chemical landscape covered in DockScreen comprises selected environmental and therapeutic chemicals. The target landscape covered in DockScreen was selected based on the availability of high-quality crystal structures that covered the assay space of phase I ToxCast in vitro assays. This in silico data provides continuous information that establishes a means for quantitatively comparing, on a structural biophysical basis, a chemical’s profile of biomolecular interactions. The combined minimum-score chemical/target matrix is provided.

  7. Plant sex chromosomes: molecular structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilena, M; Mariotti, B; Manzano, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent molecular and genomic studies carried out in a number of model dioecious plant species, including Asparagus officinalis, Carica papaya, Silene latifolia, Rumex acetosa and Marchantia polymorpha, have shed light on the molecular structure of both homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and also on the gene functions they have maintained since their evolution from a pair of autosomes. The molecular structure of sex chromosomes in species from different plant families represents the evolutionary pathway followed by sex chromosomes during their evolution. The degree of Y chromosome degeneration that accompanies the suppression of recombination between the Xs and Ys differs among species. The primitive Ys of A. officinalis and C. papaya have only diverged from their homomorphic Xs in a short male-specific and non-recombining region (MSY), while the heteromorphic Ys of S. latifolia, R. acetosa and M. polymorpha have diverged from their respective Xs. As in the Y chromosomes of mammals and Drosophila, the accumulation of repetitive DNA, including both transposable elements and satellite DNA, has played an important role in the divergence and size enlargement of plant Ys, and consequently in reducing gene density. Nevertheless, the degeneration process in plants does not appear to have reached the Y-linked genes. Although a low gene density has been found in the sequenced Y chromosome of M. polymorpha, most of its genes are essential and are expressed in the vegetative and reproductive organs in both male and females. Similarly, most of the Y-linked genes that have been isolated and characterized up to now in S. latifolia are housekeeping genes that have X-linked homologues, and are therefore expressed in both males and females. Only one of them seems to be degenerate with respect to its homologous region in the X. Sequence analysis of larger regions in the homomorphic X and Y chromosomes of papaya and asparagus, and also in the heteromorphic sex chromosomes

  8. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  9. Polarized and Unpolarized Structure Functions in the Valon Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz

    2006-02-01

    Hadrons are considered as the bound states of their structureful constituents, the Valons. The valon structure is calculated perturbatively in QCD; which is universal and independent of the hosting hadron. This structure is used to calculate Proton and pion structure functions. For the case of polarized structure function, the valon representation, not only gives all the available data on gp,n,d1, but also requires a sizable orbital angular momentum associated with the partonic structure of the valon.

  10. Models of Protocellular Structure, Function and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Szostak, Jack W.; Keefe, Tony; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of any record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard Medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids in which a small number of functional molecules are selected from a large, random population of candidates. The selected molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Structure and function of DNA polymerase μ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA polymerases are enzymes playing the central role in DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination. DNA polymerase μ (pol μ DNA polymerase λ (pol λ) and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) in X family DNA polymerases function in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the predonmiant repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEJ involves enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA strand, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and repair the DSB. Pol μ and pol λ fill in the gaps at the junction to maintain the genomic integrity. TdT synthesizes N region at the junction during V(D)J recombination and promotes diversity of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene. Among these three polymerases, the regulatory mechanisms of pol μ remain rather unclear. We have approached the mechanism of pol μ from both sides of structure and cellular dynamics. Here, we propose some new insights into pol μ and the probable NHEJ model including our findings. (author)

  12. [Glutamate Metabotropic Receptors: Structure, Localisation, Functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2016-01-01

    The data on the structure, location and functions of the metabotropic glutamate receptor is shown. The family consists of 8 mGluRs subtypes and is divided into three groups: I group--mGluRs1/mGluRs5, II group--mGluRs2/mGluRs3, III group--mGluRs4/mGluRs6/mGluRs7/mGluRs8. They are associated with G-protein; signaling in the cells is carried out by IP3 or adenylate cyclase signaling pathways, in the result of which, mGluRs modify glial and neuronal excitability. Receptors are localized in the CNS and periphery in non-neuronal tissues: bone, heart, kidney, pancreas pod and platelets, the gastrointestinal tract, immune system. Their participation in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, mental and cognitive disorders, autoimmune processes, etc. is displayed. Agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators of mGluRs are considered as potential medicines for treatment of mental diseases, including depression, fragile X syndrome, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, Parkinson's disease, etc. PMID:27530046

  13. Yeast peroxisomes: structure, functions and biotechnological opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibirny, Andriy A

    2016-06-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. In yeasts, peroxisomes play important roles in cell metabolism, especially in different catabolic processes including fatty acid β-oxidation, the glyoxylic shunt and methanol metabolism, as well as some biosynthetic processes. In addition, peroxisomes are the compartment in which oxidases and catalase are localized. New peroxisomes mainly arise by fission of pre-existing ones, although they can also be formed from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Peroxisomes consist of matrix-soluble proteins and membrane proteins known as peroxins. A total of 34 PEX peroxin genes and proteins have been identified to date. and their functions have been elucidated. Protein import into peroxisomes depends on peroxins and requires specific signals in the structure of transported proteins: PTS1, PTS2 and mPTS. The mechanisms of metabolite penetration into peroxisomes are still poorly understood. Peroxisome number and the volume occupied by these organelles are tightly regulated. Methanol, fatty acids and methylamine act as efficient peroxisome proliferators, whereas glucose and ethanol induce peroxisome autophagic degradation (pexophagy). To date, 42 Atg proteins involved in pexophagy are known. Catabolism and alcoholic fermentation of the major pentose sugar, xylose, depend on peroxisomal enzymes. Overexpression of peroxisomal transketolase and transaldolase activates xylose fermentation. Peroxisomes could be useful as target organelles for overexpression of foreign toxic proteins. PMID:27189367

  14. [Blood-nerve barrier: structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is a dynamic interface between the endoneurial microenvironment and surrounding extracellular space or blood contents, and is localized the innermost layer of multilayered ensheathing perineurium and endoneurial microvessels. Since the BNB is a key structure controlling the internal milieu of the peripheral nerve parenchyma, adequate understanding of the BNB is crucial for developing treatment strategies for human peripheral nervous system disorders, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and diabetic and various metabolic/toxic neuropathies. However, fewer studies have been conducted on the BNB, if we compare against the number of studies on the blood-brain barrier. This is because of the lack of adequate human cell lines originating from the BNB. In our laboratory, human immortal cell lines from the BNB, namely, the endothelial cell line and pericyte cell line, have recently been established and vigorous investigations of their biological and physiological properties are now underway. Pericytes constituting the BNB were found to possess robust ability of controlling BNB integrity via secretion of various cytokines and growth factors including bFGF, VEGF, GDNF, BDNF, and angiopoietin-1. Unknown soluble factors secreted by pericytes also contribute to the upregulation of claudin-5 in endothelial cells in the BNB and thus, strengthen the barrier function of the BNB. In diabetic neuropathy, pericytes were shown to regulate the vascular basement membrane, while AGEs were shown to induce basement membrane hypertrophy and disrupt the BNB by increasing the autocrine secretion of VEGF and TGF-beta from pericytes. In this review article, we discuss the macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the human BNB as well as the molecular mechanisms of mononuclear cell infiltration across the BNB. PMID:21613659

  15. Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities Survey: Service Laboratory Funding

    OpenAIRE

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel; Nicolet, Charles M.; Niece, Ronald L.; Young, Mary; Simpson, John T.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, The Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Survey Committee surveyed the ABRF membership and scientists at-large concerning the current state of funding in service-oriented laboratories. Questions pertained to services offered, cost recovery, capital equipment funding, and future outlook. The web-based survey, available for 3 weeks, achieved participation from 209 respondents in 13 countries, 77% of which represented academic laboratories. Most respondents (75%) direc...

  16. Biomolecular Detection employing the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos A Lopez; George G Daaboul; Ahn, Sunmin; Reddington, Alexander P.; Monroe, Margo R.; Zhang, Xirui; Irani, Rostem J.; Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline A.; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Connor, John H.; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2011-01-01

    The sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions has use in many fields and industries such as basic biology and microbiology, environmental/agricultural/biodefense monitoring, nanobiotechnology, and more. For diagnostic applications, monitoring (detecting) the presence, absence, or abnormal expression of targeted proteomic or genomic biomarkers found in patient samples can be used to determine treatment approaches or therapy efficacy. In the research arena, information on molecular aff...

  17. Dynamic Presentation of Immobilized Ligands Regulated through Biomolecular Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yang; Riesberg, Jeremiah J.; Shen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    To mimic the dynamic regulation of signaling ligands immobilized on extracellular matrices or on the surfaces of neighboring cells for guidance of cell behavior and fate selection, we have harnessed biomolecular recognition in combination with polymer engineering to create dynamic surfaces on which the accessibility of immobilized ligands to cell surface receptors can be reversibly interconverted under physiological conditions. The cell-adhesive RGD peptide is chosen as a model ligand. RGD is...

  18. Pion Structure Function $F_{2}^{\\pi}$ in the Valon Model

    OpenAIRE

    Arash, Firooz

    2003-01-01

    Partonic structure of constituent quark (or{\\it{valon}}) in the Next-to-Leading Order is used to calculate pion structure function. This is a further demonstration of the finding that the constituent quark structure is universal, and once it is calculated, the Structure of any hadron can be predicted thereafter, using a convolution method, without introducing any new free parameter. The results are compared with the pion structure function from ZEUS Coll. Leading Neutron Production in $e^{+}p...

  19. Single-Molecule Pull-down FRET (SiMPull-FRET) to dissect the mechanisms of biomolecular machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlscheuer, Matthew L.; Widom, Julia; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosomes are multi-megadalton RNA-protein complexes responsible for the faithful removal of non-coding segments (introns) from pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs), a process critical for the maturation of eukaryotic mRNAs for subsequent translation by the ribosome. Both the spliceosome and ribosome, as well as many other RNA and DNA processing machineries, contain central RNA components that endow biomolecular complexes with precise, sequence-specific nucleic acid recognition and versatile structural dynamics. Single molecule fluorescence (or Förster) resonance energy transfer (smFRET) microscopy is a powerful tool for the study of local and global conformational changes of both simple and complex biomolecular systems involving RNA. The integration of biochemical tools such as immunoprecipitation with advanced methods in smFRET microscopy and data analysis has opened up entirely new avenues towards studying the mechanisms of biomolecular machines isolated directly from complex biological specimens such as cell extracts. Here we detail the general steps for using prism-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy in exemplary single molecule pull-down FRET (SiMPull-FRET) studies of the yeast spliceosome and discuss the broad application potential of this technique. PMID:26068753

  20. Molecular Models of Genetic and Organismic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    In recent studies we showed that the earlier relational theories of organismic sets (Rashevsky,1967), Metabolic-Replication (M,R)-systems (Rosen,1958)and molecular sets (Bartholomay,1968) share a joint foundation that can be studied within a unified categorical framework of functional organismic structures (Baianu,1980. This is possible because all relational theories have a biomolecular basis, that is, complex structures such as genomes, cells,organs and biological organisms are mathematically represented in terms of biomolecular properties and entities,(that are often implicit in their representation axioms. The definition of organismic sets, for example, requires that certain essential quantities be determined from experiment: these are specified by special sets of values of general observables that are derived from physicochemical measurements(Baianu,1970; Baianu,1980; Baianu et al, 2004a.)Such observables are context-dependent and lead directly to natural transformations in categories and Topoi, that are...

  1. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Rafiei, Ali; Mirjalili, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    In the context of noncommutative space-time, we investigate the nucleon structure functions which plays an important role to identify the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of noncommutative tensor \\theta_{\\mu\

  2. Inorganic pyrophosphatases: structural diversity serving the function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samygina, V. R.

    2016-05-01

    The review is devoted to ubiquitous enzymes, inorganic pyrophosphatases, which are essential in all living organisms. Despite the long history of investigations, these enzymes continue to attract interest. The review focuses on the three-dimensional structures of various representatives of this class of proteins. The structural diversity, the relationship between the structure and some properties of pyrophosphatases and various mechanisms of enzyme action related to the structural diversity of these enzymes are discussed. Interactions of pyrophosphatase with other proteins and possible practical applications are considered. The bibliography includes 56 references.

  3. Biomolecular papain thin films grown by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Sauthier, G.; Figueras, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biomolecular papain thin films were grown both by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques with the aid of an UV KrF∗ (λ =248 nm, τFWHM≅20 ns) excimer laser source. For the MAPLE experiments the targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on frozen composites obtained by dissolving the biomaterial powder in distilled water at 10 wt % concentration. Conventional pressed biomaterial powder targets were used in the PLD experiments. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force microscopy and their structure and composition were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The possible physical mechanisms implied in the ablation processes of the two techniques, under comparable experimental conditions were identified. The results showed that the growth mode, surface morphology as well as structure of the deposited biomaterial thin films are determined both by the incident laser fluence value as well as target preparation procedure.

  4. Advances in biomolecular surface meshing and its applications to mathematical modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN MinXin; LU BenZhuo

    2013-01-01

    In the field of molecular modeling and simulation,molecular surface meshes are necessary for many problems,such as molecular structure visualization and analysis,docking problem and implicit solvent modeling and simulation.Recently,with the developments of advanced mathematical modeling in the field of implicit solvent modeling and simulation,providing surface meshes with good qualities efficiently for large real biomolecular systems becomes an urgent issue beyond its traditional purposes for visualization and geometry analyses for molecular structure.In this review,we summarize recent works on this issue.First,various definitions of molecular surfaces and corresponding meshing methods are introduced.Second,our recent meshing tool,TMSmesh,and its performances are presented.Finally,we show the applications of the molecular surface mesh in implicit solvent modeling and simulations using boundary element method (BEM) and finite element method (FEM).

  5. Nuclear enhanced power corrections to DIS structure functions

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jianwei; Zhu, Wei

    2001-01-01

    We calculate nuclear enhanced power corrections to structure functions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We find that the nuclear medium enhanced power corrections at order of $O(\\alpha_s/Q^2)$ enhance the longitudinal structure function $F_L$, and suppress the transverse structure function $F_1$. We demonstrate that strong nuclear effects in $\\sigma_A/\\sigma_D$ and $R_A/R_D$, recently observed by HERMES Collaboration, can be explained in ...

  6. Biomolecular and metagenomic analyses of biofouling communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the decades of research that have focused on understanding the formation of biofouling communities, relatively little is known about the soft fouling consortia that are responsible for their formation and function. In this study, we used PhyloChip microbial profiling, metagenomic DNA sequenc...

  7. Calculation of the Gluon Distribution Function Using Alternative Method for the Proton Structure Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.Ghahramany; G.R.Boroun

    2003-01-01

    A calculation of the proton structure function F2(x,Q2) is reported with an approximation method that relates the reduced cross section derivative and the F2(x, Q2) scaling violation at low x by using quadratic form for the structure function. This quadratic form approximation method can be used to determine the structure function F2 (x, Q2) from the HERA reduced cross section data taken at low x. This new approach can determine the structure functions F2(x,Q2) with reasonable precision even for low x values which have not been investigated. We observe that the Q2 dependence is quadratic over the full kinematic covered range. To test the validity of our new determined structure functions, we find the gluon distribution function in the leading order approximation with our new calculation for the structure functions and compare them with the QCD parton distribution functions.

  8. Calculation of the Gluon Distribution Function Using Alternative Method for the Proton Structure Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Ghahramany; G.R. Boroun

    2003-01-01

    A calculation of the proton structure function F2(x,Q2) is reported with an approximation method that relates the reduced cross section derivative and the F2(x, Q2) scaling violation at low x by using quadratic form for the structure function. This quadratic form approximation method can be used to determine the structure function F2 (x, Q2)from the HERA reduced cross section data taken at low x. This new approach can determine the structure functions F2(x,Q2) with reasonable precision even for low x values which have not been investigated. We observe that the Q2 dependence is quadratic over the full kinematic covered range. To test the validity of our new determined structure functions, wefind the gluon distribution function in the leading order approximation with our new calculation for the structure functions and compare them with the QCD parton distribution functions.

  9. Measurement of the Electron Structure Function at LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, U; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W-D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Asman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K-H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Berat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besancon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Bruckman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, Ph; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D; Cuevas, J; D'Hondt, J; da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; De Boer, W; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; de Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelof, T; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Foeth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; Garcia, C; Gavillet, Ph; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S-O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouznetsov, O; Krumstein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; Lopez, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Marechal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J-C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martinez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; Mc Nulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W; Mjoernmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Moenig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Mueller, U; Muenich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nemecek, S; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Olshevski, A; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, Th D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdniakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Richard, F; Ridky, J; Rivero, M; Rodriguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovsky, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Slominski, W; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassov, T; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Szwed, J; Tabarelli, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tome, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2010-01-01

    The hadronic part of the Electron Structure Function (ESF) has been measured for the first time, using e+e- data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies sqrt(s) = 91.2-209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The ESF data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the quasi-real photon virtuality contribution is significant. The presented data can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function analyses and help in refining existing parametrizations.

  10. Structure and function of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Introduction 2. Isoenzymes of YADH 3. Substrate specificity 4. Kinetic mechanism 5. Primary structure 6. The active site 7. Mutations in the yeast enzyme 8. Chemical mechanism 9. Binding of coenzymes 10. Hydride transfer

  11. Structure and function of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC; SVETLANA TRIVIC

    2000-01-01

    1. Introduction 2. Isoenzymes of YADH 3. Substrate specificity 4. Kinetic mechanism 5. Primary structure 6. The active site 7. Mutations in the yeast enzyme 8. Chemical mechanism 9. Binding of coenzymes 10. Hydride transfer

  12. Verified Analysis of Functional Data Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Nipkow, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In recent work the author has analyzed a number of classical functional search tree and priority queue implementations with the help of the theorem prover Isabelle/HOL. The functional correctness proofs of AVL trees, red-black trees, 2-3 trees, 2-3-4 trees, 1-2 brother trees, AA trees and splay trees could be automated. The amortized logarithmic complexity of skew heaps, splay trees, splay heaps and pairing heaps had to be proved manually.

  13. Purification, structure and function of bioactive peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Eriste, Elo

    2004-01-01

    Peptides are vitally important molecules and many evoke cellular responses. The completion of several genome sequencing projects has revealed a number of new genes. However, as functional peptides often contain posttranslational modifications and/or occur at various lengths, it is of great importance to detect, purify and characterize novel bioactive peptides. To achieve these goals, new methods for peptide detection, isolation and functional characterization have to be d...

  14. Nucleon structure functions from relativistic constituent quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Melnitchouk, W

    1994-01-01

    We investigate deep inelastic lepton scattering from the nucleon within a constituent quark picture, in which the internal structure of constituent quarks is modeled by meson and diquark dressing. In a covariant framework this structure leads to a breakdown of the factorization necessary for a convolution formulation. We perform our analysis in time-ordered perturbation theory in the infinite momentum frame where factorization of subprocesses is automatic. Numerical results are compared with recent data on valence quark distributions in the proton.

  15. Utilizing plasma physics to create biomolecular movies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau-Riege, S [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    In spring of 2000, the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee selected the top scientific experiments for LCLS. One of the proposed flagship experiments is atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure determination of isolated biolgical macromolecules and particles, with the ultimate goal of obtaining molecular (snapshot) movies. The key enabling insight was that radiation damage may be overcome by using x-ray pulses that are shorter than the time it takes for damage to manifest itself.

  16. Neural network parametrization of deep-inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We construct a parametrization of deep-inelastic structure functions which retains information on experimental errors and correlations, and which does not introduce any theoretical bias while interpolating between existing data points. We generate a Monte Carlo sample of pseudo-data configurations and we train an ensemble of neural networks on them. This effectively provides us with a probability measure in the space of structure functions, within the whole kinematic region where data are available. This measure can then be used to determine the value of the structure function, its error, point-to-point correlations and generally the value and uncertainty of any function of the structure function itself. We apply this technique to the determination of the structure function F2 of the proton and deuteron, and a precision determination of the isotriplet combination F2[p-d]. We discuss in detail these results, check their stability and accuracy, and make them available in various formats for applications. (author)

  17. Raman microspectroscopic study of biomolecular structure inside living adhesive cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Guang; (李光); YANG; Hongying(杨红英); XU; Yiming; (许以明); ZHANG; Zhiyi(张志义)

    2002-01-01

    Cells adhesion is very important for many physiological processes. Using advanced Raman microspectroscopic technique, we selected T Leukemia cells (Jurkat) as the materials and obtained simultaneously conformation information of various biomolecules inside the whole living cells. By comparing the Raman microspectroscopic spectra of single and adhesive cancer cells, we found for the first time that when cells adhered, the conformation of the biomolecules (DNA, protein, carbohydrates and lipids) inside the cells had different changes: (i) the backbone of double-stranded DNA maintained orderly B-form or modified B-form conformation, whereas the groups of its deoxyribose and bases were modified; (ii) the conformational changes of the main chain and the side chain in the protein were obviously variant. The lines intensity belonging to α-helix andβ-sheet decreased, while that ofβ-turn increased. Tyrosine and tryptophane residues of the protein changed from "buried state" to "exposed state"; the lines intensity of its sulfhydryl group also increased; the conformation of its disulfide bond changed from two kinds to three kinds. These facts suggest that the cells adhesion causes changes in H-bonds organization of the main chain and environment of the side chain in the protein; (iii) the groups of the carbohydrates were also modified simultaneously; (iv) the conformation of the lipids bilayers of the membranes changed obviously; the order parameter for lateral interaction between chains decreased gradually with the increase of number of the adhesive cells. So cells adhesion resulted in an increase in fluidity of the membrane and ion permeability on the membrane.

  18. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppl, Timm B.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fox, Peter T.; Laird, Angela R.; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Despite its 0.5–1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multi-modal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia. PMID:25733379

  19. Visualizing and Clustering Protein Similarity Networks: Sequences, Structures, and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Te-Lun; Hu, Geng-Ming; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Research in the recent decade has demonstrated the usefulness of protein network knowledge in furthering the study of molecular evolution of proteins, understanding the robustness of cells to perturbation, and annotating new protein functions. In this study, we aimed to provide a general clustering approach to visualize the sequence-structure-function relationship of protein networks, and investigate possible causes for inconsistency in the protein classifications based on sequences, structures, and functions. Such visualization of protein networks could facilitate our understanding of the overall relationship among proteins and help researchers comprehend various protein databases. As a demonstration, we clustered 1437 enzymes by their sequences and structures using the minimum span clustering (MSC) method. The general structure of this protein network was delineated at two clustering resolutions, and the second level MSC clustering was found to be highly similar to existing enzyme classifications. The clustering of these enzymes based on sequence, structure, and function information is consistent with each other. For proteases, the Jaccard's similarity coefficient is 0.86 between sequence and function classifications, 0.82 between sequence and structure classifications, and 0.78 between structure and function classifications. From our clustering results, we discussed possible examples of divergent evolution and convergent evolution of enzymes. Our clustering approach provides a panoramic view of the sequence-structure-function network of proteins, helps visualize the relation between related proteins intuitively, and is useful in predicting the structure and function of newly determined protein sequences. PMID:27267620

  20. Structural plasticity upon learning: regulation and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroni, Pico; Donato, Flavio; Muller, Dominique

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies have provided long-sought evidence that behavioural learning involves specific synapse gain and elimination processes, which lead to memory traces that influence behaviour. The connectivity rearrangements are preceded by enhanced synapse turnover, which can be modulated through changes in inhibitory connectivity. Behaviourally related synapse rearrangement events tend to co-occur spatially within short stretches of dendrites, and involve signalling pathways partially overlapping with those controlling the functional plasticity of synapses. The new findings suggest that a mechanistic understanding of learning and memory processes will require monitoring ensembles of synapses in situ and the development of synaptic network models that combine changes in synaptic function and connectivity.

  1. Enhanced semiempirical QM methods for biomolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusret Duygu Yilmazer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent successes and failures of the application of ‘enhanced’ semiempirical QM (SQM methods are reviewed in the light of the benefits and backdraws of adding dispersion (D and hydrogen-bond (H correction terms. We find that the accuracy of SQM-DH methods for non-covalent interactions is very often reported to be comparable to dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, while computation times are about three orders of magnitude lower. SQM-DH methods thus open up a possibility to simulate realistically large model systems for problems both in life and materials science with comparably high accuracy.

  2. Enhanced semiempirical QM methods for biomolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Nusret Duygu; Korth, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Recent successes and failures of the application of 'enhanced' semiempirical QM (SQM) methods are reviewed in the light of the benefits and backdraws of adding dispersion (D) and hydrogen-bond (H) correction terms. We find that the accuracy of SQM-DH methods for non-covalent interactions is very often reported to be comparable to dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D), while computation times are about three orders of magnitude lower. SQM-DH methods thus open up a possibility to simulate realistically large model systems for problems both in life and materials science with comparably high accuracy. PMID:25848495

  3. Structural and functional imaging: Particularities in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, INSERM, Serv Neuropediat, U663, F-75015 Paris (France); Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [UnivParis 05, F-75005 Paris (France); Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [CEA, I2BM, Neurospin, SHFJ, F-91191 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Surgery of partial epilepsies in childhood has largely benefited from the recent advances of imaging techniques, which carry a triple goal: (1) to contribute to the localization of the epilepsy onset zone, (2) to detect and delineate an underlying lesion, and (3) to study the spatial relationship between the epileptogenic zone and the neighboring functional cortex, in order to select patients and plan the resection. This noninvasive pre-surgical imaging workup must be compared to clinical and electrical data to estimate the postoperative prognosis, while invasive techniques such as SEEG, cortical stimulations, and IAT often remain indispensable in difficult cases, i.e., in cryptogenic epilepsies. As in adults, advances in MRI allow us to detect more and more subtle underlying lesions, but this requires repeating MR studies during early childhood and using adapted sequence parameters to account for ongoing myelination. Ictal SPECT and PET imaging prove especially useful in planning depth electrode placement when video-EEG is not contributive, when MRI looks normal or shows multiple abnormalities, or in cases of discrepant findings. Multimodal imaging greatly enhances the sensitivity of all of these techniques. Finally, functional MRI of motor and language functions provide noninvasive cortical mapping of essential functions, using age-adapted paradigms, in cooperating children from age five to six and from IQs around 60. (authors)

  4. The structure and function of endophilin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Ole; Brodin, Lennart; Jung, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Members of the BAR domain protein superfamily are essential elements of cellular traffic. Endophilins are among the best studied BAR domain proteins. They have a prominent function in synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE), receptor trafficking and apoptosis, and in other processes that require...

  5. Types and Functions of Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; A. Hughes, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Coastal structures are used in coastal defence schemes with the objective of preventing shoreline erosion and flooding of the hinterland. Other objectives include sheltering of harbour basins and harbour entrances against waves, stabilization of navigation channels at inlets, and protection of wa...

  6. Protein hydrogels with engineered biomolecular recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Lixin

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are the hydrated macromolecular gels in which cells migrate and proliferate and organize into tissues in vivo . The development of artificial ECM with the required mechanical, physico-chemical, and biological properties has long been a challenge in the biomaterial research field. In this dissertation, a novel set of bioactive protein hydrogels has been synthesized and characterized at both molecular and materials levels. The self-recognized and self-assembled protein copolymers have the ability to provide engineered biofunctionality through the controlled arrangement of bioactive domains on the nanoscale. Genetic engineering methods have been employed to synthesize these protein copolymers. Plasmid DNA carrying genes to express both di- and tri-block proteins have been constructed using molecular cloning techniques. These genes were expressed in bacterial E. coli to ensure homogeneous protein length and anticipated structure. Three diblock protein sequences having a leucine zipper construct on one end and polyelectrolyte (AGAGAGPEG)10 on the other, have been studied by circular dichroism, size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, and static light scattering to characterize their secondary structure, structural stability, and oligomeric state. The results show that ABC diblock mixtures form very stable heterotrimer aggregates via self-recognition and self-assembly of the coiled coil end domains. Tri-block proteins with two leucine zipper motif ends flanking the polyelectrolyte random coil in the middle have been investigated by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the hydrogels formed by self-assembly of these tri-blocks have been studied using transmission electronic microscopy and diffusing wave spectroscopy. The reversible gelation behavior is the result of heterotrimeric aggregation of helices to form the physical crosslinks in the gel, with the polyelectrolyte region center block retaining

  7. Portable, On-Demand Biomolecular Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Keith; Slomovic, Shimyn; Nguyen, Peter Q; Lee, Jeong Wook; Donghia, Nina; Burrill, Devin; Ferrante, Tom; McSorley, Fern R; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Vernet, Andyna; Lewandowski, Michael; Boddy, Christopher N; Joshi, Neel S; Collins, James J

    2016-09-22

    Synthetic biology uses living cells as molecular foundries for the biosynthesis of drugs, therapeutic proteins, and other commodities. However, the need for specialized equipment and refrigeration for production and distribution poses a challenge for the delivery of these technologies to the field and to low-resource areas. Here, we present a portable platform that provides the means for on-site, on-demand manufacturing of therapeutics and biomolecules. This flexible system is based on reaction pellets composed of freeze-dried, cell-free transcription and translation machinery, which can be easily hydrated and utilized for biosynthesis through the addition of DNA encoding the desired output. We demonstrate this approach with the manufacture and functional validation of antimicrobial peptides and vaccines and present combinatorial methods for the production of antibody conjugates and small molecules. This synthetic biology platform resolves important practical limitations in the production and distribution of therapeutics and molecular tools, both to the developed and developing world. PMID:27662092

  8. Soil-borne microbial functional structure across different land uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramae, Eiko E; Zhou, Jizhong Z; Kowalchuk, George A; van Veen, Johannes A

    2014-01-01

    Land use change alters the structure and composition of microbial communities. However, the links between environmental factors and microbial functions are not well understood. Here we interrogated the functional structure of soil microbial communities across different land uses. In a multivariate r

  9. Scanning probe and optical tweezer investigations of biomolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby-Singleton, Shellie

    2002-07-01

    A complex array of intermolecular forces controls the interactions between and within biological molecules. The desire to empirically explore the fundamental forces has led to the development of several biophysical techniques. Of these, the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the optical tweezers have been employed throughout this thesis to monitor the intermolecular forces involved in biomolecular interactions. The AFM is a well-established force sensing technique capable of measuring biomolecular interactions at a single molecule level. However, its versatility has not been extrapolated to the investigation of a drug-enzyme complex. The energy landscape for the force induced dissociation of the DHFR-methotrexate complex was studied. Revealing an energy barrier to dissociation located {approx}0.3 nm from the bound state. Unfortunately, the AFM has a limited range of accessible loading rates and in order to profile the complete energy landscape alternative force sensing instrumentation should be considered, for example the BFP and optical tweezers. Thus, this thesis outlines the development and construction an optical trap capable of measuring intermolecular forces between biomolecules at the single molecule level. To demonstrate the force sensing abilities of the optical set up, proof of principle measurements were performed which investigate the interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces subjected to varying degrees of argon plasma treatment. Complementary data was gained from measurements performed independently by the AFM. Changes in polymer resistance to proteins as a response to changes in polymer surface chemistry were detected utilising both AFM and optical tweezers measurements. Finally, the AFM and optical tweezers were employed as ultrasensitive biosensors. Single molecule investigations of the antibody-antigen interaction between the cardiac troponin I marker and its complementary antibody, reveals the impact therapeutic concentrations of heparin

  10. Galactosaminoglycan Function and Oligosaccharide Structure Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela G. Seidler

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will discuss the importance of sequencing long chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate chains specifically derived from decorin. Decorin is a member of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans and ubiquitously expressed primarily in the skin. Sequence information and diverse function of glycosaminoglycans is further influenced by variable expression through the core protein indicating the importance to analyse glycosaminoglycans from specific proteoglycans.

  11. Quantifying the evolutionary divergence of protein structures: the role of function change and function conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-García, Alberto; Abia, David; Méndez, Raúl; Nido, Gonzalo S; Bastolla, Ugo

    2010-01-01

    The molecular clock hypothesis, stating that protein sequences diverge in evolution by accumulating amino acid substitutions at an almost constant rate, played a major role in the development of molecular evolution and boosted quantitative theories of evolutionary change. These studies were extended to protein structures by the seminal paper by Chothia and Lesk, which established the approximate proportionality between structure and sequence divergence. Here we analyse how function influences the relationship between sequence and structure divergence, studying four large superfamilies of evolutionarily related proteins: globins, aldolases, P-loop and NADP-binding. We introduce the contact divergence, which is more consistent with sequence divergence than previously used structure divergence measures. Our main findings are: (1) Small structure and sequence divergences are proportional, consistent with the molecular clock. Approximate validity of the clock is also supported by the analysis of the clustering coefficient of structure similarity networks. (2) Functional constraints strongly limit the structure divergence of proteins performing the same function and may allow to identify incomplete or wrong functional annotations. (3) The rate of structure versus sequence divergence is larger for proteins performing different functions than for proteins performing the same function. We conjecture that this acceleration is due to positive selection for new functions. Accelerations in structure divergence are also suggested by the analysis of the clustering coefficient. (4) For low sequence identity, structural diversity explodes. We conjecture that this explosion is related to functional diversification. (5) Large indels are almost always associated with function changes.

  12. Overcoming the solubility limit with solubility-enhancement tags: successful applications in biomolecular NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the rapid progress of NMR technology has significantly expanded the range of NMR-trackable systems, preparation of NMR-suitable samples that are highly soluble and stable remains a bottleneck for studies of many biological systems. The application of solubility-enhancement tags (SETs) has been highly effective in overcoming solubility and sample stability issues and has enabled structural studies of important biological systems previously deemed unapproachable by solution NMR techniques. In this review, we provide a brief survey of the development and successful applications of the SET strategy in biomolecular NMR. We also comment on the criteria for choosing optimal SETs, such as for differently charged target proteins, and recent new developments on NMR-invisible SETs.

  13. Event Detection and Sub-state Discovery from Bio-molecular Simulations Using Higher-Order Statistics: Application To Enzyme Adenylate Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations at milli-second and longer timescales can provide vital insights into functional mechanisms. Since post-simulation analyses of such large trajectory data-sets can be a limiting factor in obtaining biological insights, there is an emerging need to identify key dynamical events and relating these events to the biological function online, that is, as simulations are progressing. Recently, we have introduced a novel computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA)...

  14. Nuclear modification of structure functions in lepton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Kumano, S.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss nuclear structure functions in lepton scattering including neutrino reactions. First, the determination of nuclear parton distribution functions is explained by using the data of electron and muon deep inelastic scattering and those of Drell-Yan processes. Second, NuTeV sin^2 theta_W anomaly is discussed by focusing on nuclear corrections in the iron target. Third, we show that the HERMES effect, which indicates nuclear modification of the longitudinal-transverse structure function...

  15. Fitting EMC structure functions with intrinsic charm

    CERN Document Server

    Rottoli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study of the impact of the data collected by the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) on the parton distribution function (PDF) of the charm quark is presented. The analysis is performed in the NNPDF framework, and the charm PDF is freely parametrized on equal footing as light quark and gluon distributions. We find that variations in the treatment of EMC data do not modify the charm PDF and do not affect our previous conclusion on the presence of an intrinsic component in the charm PDF.

  16. Turner syndrome: neuroimaging findings: structural and functional.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including the parietal lobe; cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus; and basal ganglia; and perhaps differences in "connectivity" between frontal and parieto-occipital regions. Finally, there is preliminary evidence that genomic imprinting, sex hormones and growth hormone have significant modulatory effects on brain maturation in TS.

  17. Meson structure functions in the valon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parton distributions in a valon in the next-to-leading order are used to determine the parton distributions in a pion and kaon. The validity of the valon model is tested and it is shown that the partonic content of the valon is universal and independent of the valon type. We evaluate the valon distribution in the pion and kaon, and in particular it is shown that the results are in good agreement with the experimental data on the pion structure in a wide range of x=[10-4,1

  18. Meson structure functions in the valon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz

    2004-03-01

    Parton distributions in a valon in the next-to-leading order are used to determine the parton distributions in a pion and kaon. The validity of the valon model is tested and it is shown that the partonic content of the valon is universal and independent of the valon type. We evaluate the valon distribution in the pion and kaon, and in particular it is shown that the results are in good agreement with the experimental data on the pion structure in a wide range of x=[10-4,1].

  19. Three Kinds of Velocity Structure Function in Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; JIANG Nan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the local multi-scale eddy structures in turbulent flows, we elucidate the essential difference between the real turbulent field with a finite Reynolds number and the Kolmogorov fully developed random field. The motion of fluid particles in the real turbulent field is not fully random. There exist multi-scale structures due to the effect of viscosity. Actually the movements of fluid particles in the turbulent field are restricted by such eddy structures. Furthermore, concept of the locally averaged velocity structure function is put forward to describe the relative strain distortion of two adjacent turbulent eddy structures at a certain scale. The time sequence of the longitudinal velocity component at different vertical locations in turbulent boundary layer has been elaborately measured by the constant temperature anemometry of model IFA-300 in a wind tunnel. The experiment proves that the locally averaged velocity structure function is in agreement with the wavelet-coefficient structure function.

  20. Cognitive Adequacy in Structural-Functional Theories of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the role played by cognition in three linguistic theories which may be labelled as "structural-functional": Functional (Discourse) Grammar, Role and Reference Grammar and Systemic Functional Grammar. It argues that if we are to achieve true cognitive adequacy, we must go well beyond the grammar itself to include the processes…

  1. Piezo channels: from structure to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkers, Linda; Mechioukhi, Yasmine; Coste, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is the conversion of mechanical stimuli into biological signals. It is involved in the modulation of diverse cellular functions such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis as well as in the detection of sensory stimuli such as air vibration and mechanical contact. Therefore, mechanotransduction is crucial for organ development and homeostasis and plays a direct role in hearing, touch, proprioception, and pain. Multiple molecular players involved in mechanotransduction have been identified in the past, among them ion channels directly activated by cell membrane deformation. Most of these channels have well-established roles in lower organisms but are not conserved in mammals or fail to encode mechanically activated channels in mammals due to non-conservation of mechanotransduction property. A family of mechanically activated channels that counts only two members in human, piezo1 and 2, has emerged recently. Given the lack of valid mechanically activated channel candidates in mammals in the past decades, particular attention is given to piezo channels and their potential roles in various biological functions. This review summarizes our current knowledge on these ion channels.

  2. Structural and functional analysis of rice genome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh K. Tyagi; Jitendra P. Khurana; Paramjit Khurana; Saurabh Raghuvanshi; Anupama Gaur; Anita Kapur; Vikrant Gupta; Dibyendu Kumar; V. Ravi; Shubha Vij; Parul Khurana; Sulabha Sharma

    2004-04-01

    Rice is an excellent system for plant genomics as it represents a modest size genome of 430 Mb. It feeds more than half the population of the world. Draft sequences of the rice genome, derived by whole-genome shotgun approach at relatively low coverage (4–6 X), were published and the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) declared high quality (>10 X), genetically anchored, phase 2 level sequence in 2002. In addition, phase 3 level finished sequence of chromosomes 1, 4 and 10 (out of 12 chromosomes of rice) has already been reported by scientists from IRGSP consortium. Various estimates of genes in rice place the number at > 50,000. Already, over 28,000 full-length cDNAs have been sequenced, most of which map to genetically anchored genome sequence. Such information is very useful in revealing novel features of macro- and micro-level synteny of rice genome with other cereals. Microarray analysis is unraveling the identity of rice genes expressing in temporal and spatial manner and should help target candidate genes useful for improving traits of agronomic importance. Simultaneously, functional analysis of rice genome has been initiated by marker-based characterization of useful genes and employing functional knock-outs created by mutation or gene tagging. Integration of this enormous information is expected to catalyze tremendous activity on basic and applied aspects of rice genomics.

  3. Thermal coupling at aqueous and biomolecular interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenogina, Natalia B.

    structural characterization tools. We followed up with studies of models of heterogeneous interfaces where we addressed the issue of independent vs. correlated contributions of hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfacial regions to thermal transfer. Finally we simulated heat flow across lipid bilayers which involve hydrophilic interfaces, but are characterized by relatively high surface roughness and non-saturated hydrocarbon chains. We found that roughness of the interface can significantly enhance thermal transport across the lipid membranes.

  4. Determining structure and function in nanomaterial biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, David M.

    Polymeric biomaterials represent the leading technologies available today for the repair of tissue damage and for targeted drug delivery. Perhaps the most valuable aspect of polymer-based systems is the extent to which their physical properties (e.g. elasticity, porosity, etc.) can be controlled and tuned by regulating experimental parameters during their synthesis. Biomaterial performance can be improved further still by including supplementary components resulting in a composite material. Synergetic interactions between the constituents of composite materials often results in bulk physical properties that are substantially more than the sum of individual parts. Through understanding and exploiting these sympathetic relationships, novel biocomposites can be developed which exhibit improved efficacy and biocompatibility. Here we report on the synthesis strategies and characterization of novel biocomposites from our laboratory. We look specifically at hydrogel composites containing a physically-associated network of PluronicRTM block copolymer along with a calcium-phosphate mineral component. Rheological results show that composites containing an in situ deposited mineral exhibit a significantly higher elastic modulus than composites of similar composition formed by conventional means. Moreover, analysis of the calcium-phosphate phase of in situ composites revealed that system parameters such as acidity play an integral role in determining the size and stability of the resultant mineral and subsequently the materials' expected in vivo performance. Changes to the structure in PluronicRTM/calcium-phosphate composite hydrogels during dehydration was investigated to provide a look into the mechanisms involved in composite formation. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis of these systems shows that hydrogen bonding interactions between phosphate ions and the polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymer block significantly impact the nanoscale structure and long-range order contained

  5. Fiber: composition, structures, and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Ian M; Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    Kiwifruit dietary fiber consists of cell-wall polysaccharides that are typical of the cell walls of many dicotyledonous fruits, being composed of pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and cellulose. The kiwifruit pectic polysaccharides consist of homo- and rhamnogalacturonans with various neutral, (arabino)-galactan side chains, while the hemicelluloses are mostly xyloglucan and xylan. The proportions of pectic polysaccharide, hemicellulose, and cellulose in both green 'Hayward' and 'Zespri® Gold' are similar and are little affected by in vitro exposure to gastric and small intestinal digestion. The hydration properties of the kiwifruit-swelling and water retention capacity-are also unaffected by foregut digestion, indicating that the functional properties of kiwifruit fiber survive in the foregut. However, in the hindgut, kiwifruit fiber is fermented, but whole kiwifruit consumed in association with slowly fermented fiber leads to distal displacement of fermentation, indicating that hindgut benefits of kiwifruit may result from its interaction with other dietary sources of fiber. PMID:23394983

  6. The structures and functions of oligosaccharins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.

    1991-08-01

    This document contains a summary of proposed research studying the role of oligosaccharins in developmental biology and in plant-microbe interactions. Research is described in the following areas of developmental biology: Use of the tobacco thin-cell-layer explant bioassay to screen for oligosaccharins that are able to regulate growth and morphogenesis; oligosaccharin receptors - searching for the receptor for biologically active alpha-1,4-oligogalacturnoides; molecular biology studies of endopolygalacturonase in tobacco tissues; investigation of membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides; the effect of structurally defined oligosaccharins on plant gene expression. In the area of plant-microbe interactions research is focused on: do oligosaccharins elicit the hypersensitive resistance response, and the polygalacturonase-inhibitor protein (PGIP).

  7. History, structure, and function of the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowniak, J

    1998-04-01

    The Internet stands at the forefront of telecommunications in medicine. This worldwide system of computers had its beginnings in networking projects in the United States and western Europe in the 1960s and 1970s. The precursor of the Internet was ARPANET, a long-distance telecommunication network funded by the Department of Defense that linked together computers throughout the United States. In the 1980s, ARPANET was superseded by NSFNET, a series of networks created by the National Science Foundation, which established the present-day structure of the Internet. The physical structure of the Internet resembles and is integrated with the telephone system. Long-distance data transport services are provided by large telecommunication companies, called network service providers (NSPs), through high-capacity, high-speed national and international fiber optic cables. These transport services are accessed through Internet service providers, ISPs. ISPs, the equivalent of regional Bell operating companies, provide the physical link to the NSPs for individuals and organizations. Telecommunications on the Internet are standardized by a set of communications protocols, the TCP/IP protocol suite, that describe routing of messages over the Internet, computer naming conventions, and commonly used Internet services such as e-mail. At present, the Internet consists of over 20 million computer worldwide and is continuing to grow at a rapid rate. Along with the growth of the Internet, higher speed access methods are offering a range of new services such as real-time video and voice communications. Medical education, teaching, and research, as well as clinical practice, will be affected in numerous different ways by these advances. PMID:9579415

  8. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  9. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  10. History, structure, and function of the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowniak, J

    1998-04-01

    The Internet stands at the forefront of telecommunications in medicine. This worldwide system of computers had its beginnings in networking projects in the United States and western Europe in the 1960s and 1970s. The precursor of the Internet was ARPANET, a long-distance telecommunication network funded by the Department of Defense that linked together computers throughout the United States. In the 1980s, ARPANET was superseded by NSFNET, a series of networks created by the National Science Foundation, which established the present-day structure of the Internet. The physical structure of the Internet resembles and is integrated with the telephone system. Long-distance data transport services are provided by large telecommunication companies, called network service providers (NSPs), through high-capacity, high-speed national and international fiber optic cables. These transport services are accessed through Internet service providers, ISPs. ISPs, the equivalent of regional Bell operating companies, provide the physical link to the NSPs for individuals and organizations. Telecommunications on the Internet are standardized by a set of communications protocols, the TCP/IP protocol suite, that describe routing of messages over the Internet, computer naming conventions, and commonly used Internet services such as e-mail. At present, the Internet consists of over 20 million computer worldwide and is continuing to grow at a rapid rate. Along with the growth of the Internet, higher speed access methods are offering a range of new services such as real-time video and voice communications. Medical education, teaching, and research, as well as clinical practice, will be affected in numerous different ways by these advances.

  11. Tolerance and lymphoid organ structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryna Elizabeth Burrell

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Frontiers in Immunologic Tolerance explores barriers to tolerance from a variety of views of cells, molecules, and processes of the immune system. Our laboratory has spent over a decade focused on the migration of the cells of the immune system, and dissecting the signals that determine how and where effector and suppressive regulatory T cells traffic from one site to another in order to reject or protect allografts. These studies have led us to a greater appreciation of the anatomic structure of the immune system, and the realization that the path taken by lymphocytes during the course of the immune response to implanted organs determines the final outcome. In particular, the structures, microanatomic domains, and the cells and molecules that lymphocytes encounter during their transit through blood, tissues, lymphatics, and secondary lymphoid organs are powerful determinants for whether tolerance is achieved. Thus, the understanding of complex cellular and molecular processes of tolerance will not come from 96-well plate immunology, but from an integrated understanding of the temporal and spatial changes that occur during the response to the allograft. The study of the precise positioning and movement of cells in lymphoid organs has been difficult since it is hard to visualize cells within their 3-dimensional setting; instead techniques have tended to be dominated by 2-dimensional renderings, although advanced confocal and 2-photon systems are changing this view. It is difficult to precisely modify key molecules and events in lymphoid organs, so that existing knockouts, transgenics, inhibitors, and activators have global and pleiotropic effects, rather than precise anatomically restricted influences. Lastly, there are no well-defined postal codes or tracking systems for leukocytes, so that while we can usually track cells from point A to point B, it is exponentially more difficult or even impossible to track them to point C and

  12. Biochemical functional predictions for protein structures of unknown or uncertain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn L. Mills

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exponential growth in the determination of protein sequences and structures via genome sequencing and structural genomics efforts, there is a growing need for reliable computational methods to determine the biochemical function of these proteins. This paper reviews the efforts to address the challenge of annotating the function at the molecular level of uncharacterized proteins. While sequence- and three-dimensional-structure-based methods for protein function prediction have been reviewed previously, the recent trends in local structure-based methods have received less attention. These local structure-based methods are the primary focus of this review. Computational methods have been developed to predict the residues important for catalysis and the local spatial arrangements of these residues can be used to identify protein function. In addition, the combination of different types of methods can help obtain more information and better predictions of function for proteins of unknown function. Global initiatives, including the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI, COMputational BRidges to EXperiments (COMBREX, and the Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA, are evaluating and testing the different approaches to predicting the function of proteins of unknown function. These initiatives and global collaborations will increase the capability and reliability of methods to predict biochemical function computationally and will add substantial value to the current volume of structural genomics data by reducing the number of absent or inaccurate functional annotations.

  13. On a useful functional representation of control system structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchow, Harvey L.

    1988-01-01

    An alternative structure for control systems is proposed. The structure is represented by a three-element block diagram and three functional definitions. It is argued that the three functional elements form a canonical set. The set includes the functions description, estimation and control. General overlay of the structure on parallel state and nested-state control systems is discussed. Breakdown of two real nested-state control systems into the proposed functional format is displayed. Application of the process to the mapping of complex control systems R and D efforts is explained with the Mars Rover Sample and Return mission as an example. A previous application of this basic functional structure to Space Station performance requirements organization is discussed.

  14. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten;

    Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging have become the most important noninvasive windows to the human brain. A major challenge in the analysis of brain networks is to establish the similarities and dissimilarities between functional and structural connectivity. We formulate a non......-parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...... significant structures that are consistently shared across subjects and data splits. This provides an unsupervised approach for modeling of structure-function relations in the brain and provides a general framework for multimodal integration....

  15. Network-Level Structure-Function Relationships in Human Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišić, Bratislav; Betzel, Richard F; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Berman, Marc G; McIntosh, Anthony R; Sporns, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity are shaped by underlying patterns of anatomical connectivity. While numerous studies have demonstrated edge-wise correspondence between structural and functional connections, much less is known about how large-scale coherent functional network patterns emerge from the topology of structural networks. In the present study, we deploy a multivariate statistical technique, partial least squares, to investigate the association between spatially extended structural networks and functional networks. We find multiple statistically robust patterns, reflecting reliable combinations of structural and functional subnetworks that are optimally associated with one another. Importantly, these patterns generally do not show a one-to-one correspondence between structural and functional edges, but are instead distributed and heterogeneous, with many functional relationships arising from nonoverlapping sets of anatomical connections. We also find that structural connections between high-degree hubs are disproportionately represented, suggesting that these connections are particularly important in establishing coherent functional networks. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the network organization of the cerebral cortex supports the emergence of diverse functional network configurations that often diverge from the underlying anatomical substrate. PMID:27102654

  16. Structural properties of prokaryotic promoter regions correlate with functional features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Meysman

    Full Text Available The structural properties of the DNA molecule are known to play a critical role in transcription. In this paper, the structural profiles of promoter regions were studied within the context of their diversity and their function for eleven prokaryotic species; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas auroginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Synechocystis sp., Synechoccocus elongates, Bacillus anthracis, and the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. The main anchor point for these promoter regions were transcription start sites identified through high-throughput experiments or collected within large curated databases. Prokaryotic promoter regions were found to be less stable and less flexible than the genomic mean across all studied species. However, direct comparison between species revealed differences in their structural profiles that can not solely be explained by the difference in genomic GC content. In addition, comparison with functional data revealed that there are patterns in the promoter structural profiles that can be linked to specific functional loci, such as sigma factor regulation or transcription factor binding. Interestingly, a novel structural element clearly visible near the transcription start site was found in genes associated with essential cellular functions and growth in several species. Our analyses reveals the great diversity in promoter structural profiles both between and within prokaryotic species. We observed relationships between structural diversity and functional features that are interesting prospects for further research to yet uncharacterized functional loci defined by DNA structural properties.

  17. Perspective: Coarse-grained models for biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noid, W. G.

    2013-09-01

    By focusing on essential features, while averaging over less important details, coarse-grained (CG) models provide significant computational and conceptual advantages with respect to more detailed models. Consequently, despite dramatic advances in computational methodologies and resources, CG models enjoy surging popularity and are becoming increasingly equal partners to atomically detailed models. This perspective surveys the rapidly developing landscape of CG models for biomolecular systems. In particular, this review seeks to provide a balanced, coherent, and unified presentation of several distinct approaches for developing CG models, including top-down, network-based, native-centric, knowledge-based, and bottom-up modeling strategies. The review summarizes their basic philosophies, theoretical foundations, typical applications, and recent developments. Additionally, the review identifies fundamental inter-relationships among the diverse approaches and discusses outstanding challenges in the field. When carefully applied and assessed, current CG models provide highly efficient means for investigating the biological consequences of basic physicochemical principles. Moreover, rigorous bottom-up approaches hold great promise for further improving the accuracy and scope of CG models for biomolecular systems.

  18. Knowledge based cluster ensemble for cancer discovery from biomolecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Wongb, Hau-San; You, Jane; Yang, Qinmin; Liao, Hongying

    2011-06-01

    The adoption of microarray techniques in biological and medical research provides a new way for cancer diagnosis and treatment. In order to perform successful diagnosis and treatment of cancer, discovering and classifying cancer types correctly is essential. Class discovery is one of the most important tasks in cancer classification using biomolecular data. Most of the existing works adopt single clustering algorithms to perform class discovery from biomolecular data. However, single clustering algorithms have limitations, which include a lack of robustness, stability, and accuracy. In this paper, we propose a new cluster ensemble approach called knowledge based cluster ensemble (KCE) which incorporates the prior knowledge of the data sets into the cluster ensemble framework. Specifically, KCE represents the prior knowledge of a data set in the form of pairwise constraints. Then, the spectral clustering algorithm (SC) is adopted to generate a set of clustering solutions. Next, KCE transforms pairwise constraints into confidence factors for these clustering solutions. After that, a consensus matrix is constructed by considering all the clustering solutions and their corresponding confidence factors. The final clustering result is obtained by partitioning the consensus matrix. Comparison with single clustering algorithms and conventional cluster ensemble approaches, knowledge based cluster ensemble approaches are more robust, stable and accurate. The experiments on cancer data sets show that: 1) KCE works well on these data sets; 2) KCE not only outperforms most of the state-of-the-art single clustering algorithms, but also outperforms most of the state-of-the-art cluster ensemble approaches.

  19. Role of biomolecular logic systems in biosensors and bioactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Shay; Katz, Evgeny

    2014-09-01

    An overview of recent advances in biosensors and bioactuators based on biocomputing systems is presented. Biosensors digitally process multiple biochemical signals through Boolean logic networks of coupled biomolecular reactions and produce an output in the form of a YES/NO response. Compared to traditional single-analyte sensing devices, the biocomputing approach enables high-fidelity multianalyte biosensing, which is particularly beneficial for biomedical applications. Multisignal digital biosensors thus promise advances in rapid diagnosis and treatment of diseases by processing complex patterns of physiological biomarkers. Specifically, they can provide timely detection and alert medical personnel of medical emergencies together with immediate therapeutic intervention. Application of the biocomputing concept has been successfully demonstrated for systems performing logic analysis of biomarkers corresponding to different injuries, particularly as exemplified for liver injury. Wide-ranging applications of multianalyte digital biosensors in medicine, environmental monitoring, and homeland security are anticipated. "Smart" bioactuators, for signal-triggered drug release, for example, were designed by interfacing switchable electrodes with biocomputing systems. Integration of biosensing and bioactuating systems with biomolecular information processing systems advances the potential for further scientific innovations and various practical applications.

  20. Biomolecular logic systems: applications to biosensors and bioactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an overview of recent advances in biosensors and bioactuators based on the biocomputing concept. Novel biosensors digitally process multiple biochemical signals through Boolean logic networks of coupled biomolecular reactions and produce output in the form of YES/NO response. Compared to traditional single-analyte sensing devices, biocomputing approach enables a high-fidelity multi-analyte biosensing, particularly beneficial for biomedical applications. Multi-signal digital biosensors thus promise advances in rapid diagnosis and treatment of diseases by processing complex patterns of physiological biomarkers. Specifically, they can provide timely detection and alert to medical emergencies, along with an immediate therapeutic intervention. Application of the biocomputing concept has been successfully demonstrated for systems performing logic analysis of biomarkers corresponding to different injuries, particularly exemplified for liver injury. Wide-ranging applications of multi-analyte digital biosensors in medicine, environmental monitoring and homeland security are anticipated. "Smart" bioactuators, for example for signal-triggered drug release, were designed by interfacing switchable electrodes and biocomputing systems. Integration of novel biosensing and bioactuating systems with the biomolecular information processing systems keeps promise for further scientific advances and numerous practical applications.

  1. A graph theoretical approach for assessing bio-macromolecular complex structural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carpio, Carlos Adriel; Iulian Florea, Mihai; Suzuki, Ai; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Miyamoto, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Fast and proper assessment of bio macro-molecular complex structural rigidity as a measure of structural stability can be useful in systematic studies to predict molecular function, and can also enable the design of rapid scoring functions to rank automatically generated bio-molecular complexes. Based on the graph theoretical approach of Jacobs et al. [Jacobs DJ, Rader AJ, Kuhn LA, Thorpe MF (2001) Protein flexibility predictions using graph theory. Proteins: Struct Funct Genet 44:150-165] for expressing molecular flexibility, we propose a new scheme to analyze the structural stability of bio-molecular complexes. This analysis is performed in terms of the identification in interacting subunits of clusters of flappy amino acids (those constituting regions of potential internal motion) that undergo an increase in rigidity at complex formation. Gains in structural rigidity of the interacting subunits upon bio-molecular complex formation can be evaluated by expansion of the network of intra-molecular inter-atomic interactions to include inter-molecular inter-atomic interaction terms. We propose two indices for quantifying this change: one local, which can express localized (at the amino acid level) structural rigidity, the other global to express overall structural stability for the complex. The new system is validated with a series of protein complex structures reported in the protein data bank. Finally, the indices are used as scoring coefficients to rank automatically generated protein complex decoys.

  2. Engineering structure and function using thermoresponsive biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszka, Martha K; MacKay, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly enables exquisite control at the smallest scale and generates order among macromolecular-building blocks that remain too small to be manipulated individually. Environmental cues, such as heating, can trigger the organization of these materials from individual molecules to multipartixcle assemblies with a variety of compositions and functions. Synthetic as well as biological polymers have been engineered for these purposes; however, biological strategies can offer unparalleled control over the composition of these macromolecular-building blocks. Biologic polymers are macromolecules composed of monomeric units that can be precisely tailored at the genetic level; furthermore, they can often utilize endogenous biodegradation pathways, which may enhance their potential clinical applications. DNA (nucleotides), polysaccharides (carbohydrates), and proteins (amino acids) have all been engineered to self-assemble into nanostructures in response to a change in temperature. This focus article reviews the growing body of literature exploring temperature-dependent nano-assembly of these biological macromolecules, summarizes some of their physical properties, and discusses future directions.

  3. Structure/function relationships in cellulolytic enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marc Claeyssens

    2004-01-01

    @@ Cellulose and hemicellulose (mostly xylan), together with lignin, are the major polymeric constituents of plant cell walls and from the largest reservoir of fixed carbon in nature. The enzymatic hydrolysis of polymeric substances by extracellular enzymes, such as cellulases, hemicellulases and laccases, is preferred to chemical depolymerisation to avoid the production of toxic by-products and waste that are expensive to treat. The monosaccharides released through enzymatic hydrolysis can subsequently be microbially converted to commercial commodities, such as bio-ethanol (fuel extender) or microbial protein as feed supplements. The individual depolymerisering enzymes used, such as cellulases,xylanases and laccases, also have industrial application in (i) biobleaching in the paper and pulp industry, (ii) improvement of animal feed (poultry and ruminants) digestibility in feed industries, and (iii) dough rheology and bread volume in the baking process, and beer viscosity and filtration velocity during brewing. The cloning of the genes, coding for several xylan degrading enzymes, and their expression in Baker' s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and filamentous fungi (Aspergillus species)opened the possibility to study the pure enzymes, without contaminating activity.Trichoderma reesei produces several of these enzymes and detailed information on their specificity,synergies and structure/activity relationships is known. An overview will be presented.

  4. Novel mechanisms that regulate clot structure/function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-05-01

    The structure and function of the blood clot has been associated with altered risk of thrombosis. Dense fibrin structures with small pores increase the risk of thrombosis, and have major functional consequences by increasing the resistance to fibrinolysis and altering the visco-elastic properties of the clot. However, while the structural changes to the overall fibrin network have been extensively characterised, little is known regarding the intrafibrillar structure of fibrin, the way protofibrils are arranged inside the fibrin fibers and the functional consequences of this. This brief paper aims to review recent findings regarding novel mechanisms that regulate fibrin intrafibrillar structure, including the degree of protofibril packing, their functional consequences, and the effects of FXIII activation on clot structure and thrombosis. It is concluded that fibrin intrafibrillar structure represents a major novel mechanism that influences clot structure and stability. Future studies are required to investigate the role of fibrin intrafibrillar structure in the functional characteristics of the blood clot, and in diseases of bleeding and thrombosis.

  5. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure

    KAUST Repository

    Staicu, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L (2)-norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a multilevel structure of the form groups-clusters or subjects-units, where the unit-level profiles are spatially correlated within the cluster, and the cluster-level data are independent. Orthogonal series expansions are used to approximate the group mean functions and the test statistic is estimated using the basis coefficients. The asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic is developed, under mild regularity conditions. To our knowledge this is the first work that studies hypothesis testing, when data have such complex multilevel functional and spatial structure. Two small-sample alternatives, including a novel block bootstrap for functional data, are proposed, and their performance is examined in simulation studies. The paper concludes with an illustration of a motivating experiment.

  6. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶大年; 马哲生; 赫伟; 李哲; 施倪承; D.Pushcharovsky

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-0 and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures. Therefore, those silicates may be named titano-and zircono-silicates. Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra, the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet, respectively. As a new concept, the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  7. A structural biology perspective on NMDA receptor pharmacology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Michael C; Romero-Hernandez, Annabel; Furukawa, Hiro

    2015-08-01

    N-methyld-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) belong to the large family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which are critically involved in basic brain functions as well as multiple neurological diseases and disorders. The NMDARs are large heterotetrameric membrane protein complexes. The extensive extracellular domains recognize neurotransmitter ligands and allosteric compounds and translate the binding information to regulate activity of the transmembrane ion channel. Here, we review recent advances in the structural biology of NMDARs with a focus on pharmacology and function. Structural analysis of the isolated extracellular domains in combination with the intact heterotetrameric NMDAR structure provides important insights into how this sophisticated ligand-gated ion channel may function.

  8. Deep inelastic structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Didactica de las Ciencias Experimentales); Vento, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular)

    1989-10-02

    We calculate the structure functions for deep inelastic scattering on baryons in the cavity approximation to the chiral bag model. The behavior of these structure functions is analyzed in the Bjorken limit. We conclude that scaling is satisfied, but not Regge behavior. A trivial extension as a parton model can be achieved by introducing the structure function for the pion in a convolution picture. In this extended version of the model not only scaling but also Regge behavior is satisfied. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of our results with experimental data. (orig.).

  9. Cellular regulation of the structure and function of aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail El-Hamamsy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic valve was long considered a passive structure that opens and closes in response to changes in transvalvular pressure. Recent evidence suggests that the aortic valve performs highly sophisticated functions as a result of its unique microscopic structure. These functions allow it to adapt to its hemodynamic and mechanical environment. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in normal valve physiology is essential to elucidate the mechanisms behind valve disease. We here review the structure and developmental biology of aortic valves; we examine the role of its cellular parts in regulating its function and describe potential pathophysiological and clinical implications.

  10. Structure and function of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, R; Mackenzie, P I

    1997-12-01

    1. The uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are a family of enzymes that catalyse the covalent addition of glucuronic acid to a wide range of lipophilic chemicals. They play a major role in the detoxification of many exogenous and endogenous compounds by generating products that are more polar and, thus, more readily excreted in bile or urine. 2. Inherited deficiencies in UGT forms are deleterious, as exemplified by the debilitating effects of hyperbilirubinaemia and neurotoxicity in subjects with mutations in the enzyme that converts bilirubin to its more polar glucuronide. 3. The UGT protein can be conceptually divided into two domains with the amino-terminal half of the protein demonstrating greater sequence divergence between isoforms. This region apparently determines aglycone specificity. The aglycone binding site is presumed to be a 'loose' fit, as many structurally diverse substrates can be bound by the same UGT isoform. The carboxyl-terminal half, which is more conserved in sequence between different isoforms, is believed to contain a binding site for the cosubstrate UDP glucuronic acid (UDPGA). 4. Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and spans the membrane with a type I topology. The putative transmembrane domain is located near the carboxyl terminus of the protein such that only a small portion of the protein resides in the cytosol. This cytosolic tail is believed to contain an ER-targeting signal. The major portion of the protein is located in the ER lumen, including the proposed substrate-binding domains and the catalytic site. 5. The microsomal membrane impedes the access of UDPGA to the active site, resulting in latency of UGT activity in intact ER-derived microsomes. Active transport of UDPGA is believed to occur in hepatocytes, but the transport system has not been fully characterized. Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase activity is also highly lipid dependent and the

  11. Functional and planning structures of education institutions areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Віталіївна Соколова

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the main aspects of functional and planning organization of the education institutions. The features of the schools stationing in the city structure and its future extension are also defined. The major functional subdivisions are considered and the role of each of it in the education institution structure is investigated. The ratio of the functional zones depending on the specialization of educational institution is determined. The advantages of the functional zone cooperation of the multidisciplinary institutions are also considered. 

  12. Factor structure of functional state of primary school age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidenko O.V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The examination of primary school children to determine the ranking of significant factors that determine the structure of their functional state depending on the level of physical health. It is shown that the main factor in the structure of the functional state of younger schoolchildren in low-and lower-middle level of physical fitness is selected morpho-functional status, which characterizes the functions of the body at rest. For children with average or above average level of physical fitness is a leading factor in physical fitness of schoolchildren.

  13. Extinction order and altered community structure rapidly disrupt ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Trond H; Williams, Neal M; Kremen, Claire

    2005-05-01

    By causing extinctions and altering community structure, anthropogenic disturbances can disrupt processes that maintain ecosystem integrity. However, the relationship between community structure and ecosystem functioning in natural systems is poorly understood. Here we show that habitat loss appeared to disrupt ecosystem functioning by affecting extinction order, species richness and abundance. We studied pollination by bees in a mosaic of agricultural and natural habitats in California and dung burial by dung beetles on recently created islands in Venezuela. We found that large-bodied bee and beetle species tended to be both most extinction-prone and most functionally efficient, contributing to rapid functional loss. Simulations confirmed that extinction order led to greater disruption of function than predicted by random species loss. Total abundance declined with richness and also appeared to contribute to loss of function. We demonstrate conceptually and empirically how the non-random response of communities to disturbance can have unexpectedly large functional consequences.

  14. The b1 structure function and nuclear pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The b1 structure function is measurable in deep inelastic scattering from polarized nuclei with unpolarized beams. The contributions of nuclear pions are evaluated and found to be small, about 2%. 8 refs

  15. Conflict between object structural and functional affordances in peripersonal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalénine, Solène; Wamain, Yannick; Decroix, Jérémy; Coello, Yann

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that competition between conflicting action representations slows down planning of object-directed actions. The present study aims to assess whether similar conflict effects exist during manipulable object perception. Twenty-six young adults performed reach-to-grasp and semantic judgements on conflictual objects (with competing structural and functional gestures) and non-conflictual objects (with similar structural and functional gestures) presented at difference distances in a 3D virtual environment. Results highlight a space-dependent conflict between structural and functional affordances. Perceptual judgments on conflictual objects were slower that perceptual judgments on non-conflictual objects, but only when objects were presented within reach. Findings demonstrate that competition between structural and functional affordances during object perception induces a processing cost, and further show that object position in space can bias affordance competition. PMID:27327864

  16. Nonlinear correction to the longitudinal structure function at small x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroun, G.R. [Razi University, Physics Department, Kermanshah (Iran)

    2010-03-15

    We computed the longitudinal proton structure function F{sub L}, using the nonlinear Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (NLDGLAP) evolution equation approach at small x. For the gluon distribution, the nonlinear effects are related to the longitudinal structure function. As the very small-x behavior of the gluon distribution is obtained by solving the Gribov, Levin, Ryskin, Mueller and Qiu (GLR-MQ) evolution equation with the nonlinear shadowing term incorporated, we show that the strong rise that corresponds to the linear QCD evolution equations can be tamed by screening effects. Consequently, the obtained longitudinal structure function shows a tamed growth at small x. We computed the predictions for all details of the nonlinear longitudinal structure function in the kinematic range where it has been measured by the H1 Collaboration and made comparisons with the computation by Moch, Vermaseren and Vogt at the second order with input data from the MRST QCD fit. (orig.)

  17. Functional oxide structures on a surface of metals and alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The investigations of the plasma electrolytic processes in our laboratory are aimed to the development of conditions of formation of oxide layers with determined composition, structure and functional properties on the surface of valve metals (Al, Ti) and their alloys.

  18. A notion of functional completeness for first-order structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne R. Alomo Temgoua

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Using ☆-congruences and implications, Weaver (1993 introduced the concepts of prevariety and quasivariety of first-order structures as generalizations of the corresponding concepts for algebras. The notion of functional completeness on algebras has been defined and characterized by Burris and Sankappanavar (1981, Kaarli and Pixley (2001, Pixley (1996, and Quackenbush (1981. We study the notion of functional completeness with respect to ☆-congruences. We extend some results on functionally complete algebras to first-order structures A=(A;FA;RA and find conditions for these structures to have a compatible Pixley function which is interpolated by term functions on suitable subsets of the base set A.

  19. A model for nucleon, pion and kaon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis that, in the leading twist approximation and to all orders of perturbative QCD, there exists a momentum scale Q20 at which hadrons are pure valence quark (or antiquark) bound states leads to definite predictions on their structure functions. Predictions are made here using a non-relativistic approximation for the bound states. Good agreement with experiment is found for nucleon, pion and kaon structure functions

  20. New insights into structure and function of type I collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Collagen is one of the most abundant proteins in mammalians and strongly conserved throughout evolution. It constitutes one third of the human proteome and comprises three-quarters of the dry weight of human skin. It is widely accepted as a major structural component in animal body such as in bones, cartilage and skins. More and more studies have shown that, in addition to the structural function, collagens can induce or regulate many cellular functions and processes such as cell differentiat...

  1. Automatic structures and growth functions for finitely generated abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the formal power series whose n-th coefficient is the number of copies of a given finite graph in the ball of radius n centred at the identity element in the Cayley graph of a finitely generated group and call it the growth function. Epstein, Iano-Fletcher and Uri Zwick proved that the growth function is a rational function if the group has a geodesic automatic structure. We compute the growth function in the case where the group is abelian and see that the denominator of the rational function is determined from the rank of the group.

  2. Toward a structural understanding of IRES RNA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-06-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can start by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With more direct structural information available for the viral IRESs, data suggest an inverse correlation between the degree to which an IRES RNA can form a stable structure on its own and the number of factors that it requires to function. Lessons learned from the viral IRESs may help understand the cellular IRESs, although more structural data are needed before any strong links can be made. PMID:19362464

  3. Myoglobin Structure and Function: A Multiweek Biochemistry Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.; Kirk, Sarah R.; Meyer, Scott C.; Holman, Karen L. McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure,…

  4. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  5. Structure-Function Studies on the Prolactin Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg

    information on the intracellular domains (ICDs) of these receptors. The overall aim of this study was to obtain an improved understanding of cytokine receptor signaling through structure-function studies on the prolactin receptor (PRLR). The primary focus of this thesis was to structurally characterize...

  6. Towards a calculus of biomolecular complexes at equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2007-07-01

    An overview is presented of the construction and use of algebraic partition functions to represent the equilibrium statistical mechanics of multimolecular complexes and their action within a larger regulatory network. Unlike many applications of equilibrium statistical mechanics, multimolecular complexes may operate with various subsets of their components present and connected to the others, the rest remaining in solution. Thus they are variable-structure systems. This aspect of their behavior may be accounted for by the use of 'fugacity' variables as a representation within the partition functions. Four principles are proposed by which the combinatorics of molecular complex construction can be reflected in the construction of their partition functions. The corresponding algebraic operations on partition functions are multiplication, addition, function composition and a less commonly used operation called contraction. Each has a natural interpretation in terms of probability distributions on multimolecular structures. Possible generalizations to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics are briefly discussed.

  7. Computing the partition function for kinetically trapped RNA secondary structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Lorenz

    Full Text Available An RNA secondary structure is locally optimal if there is no lower energy structure that can be obtained by the addition or removal of a single base pair, where energy is defined according to the widely accepted Turner nearest neighbor model. Locally optimal structures form kinetic traps, since any evolution away from a locally optimal structure must involve energetically unfavorable folding steps. Here, we present a novel, efficient algorithm to compute the partition function over all locally optimal secondary structures of a given RNA sequence. Our software, RNAlocopt runs in O(n3 time and O(n2 space. Additionally, RNAlocopt samples a user-specified number of structures from the Boltzmann subensemble of all locally optimal structures. We apply RNAlocopt to show that (1 the number of locally optimal structures is far fewer than the total number of structures--indeed, the number of locally optimal structures approximately equal to the square root of the number of all structures, (2 the structural diversity of this subensemble may be either similar to or quite different from the structural diversity of the entire Boltzmann ensemble, a situation that depends on the type of input RNA, (3 the (modified maximum expected accuracy structure, computed by taking into account base pairing frequencies of locally optimal structures, is a more accurate prediction of the native structure than other current thermodynamics-based methods. The software RNAlocopt constitutes a technical breakthrough in our study of the folding landscape for RNA secondary structures. For the first time, locally optimal structures (kinetic traps in the Turner energy model can be rapidly generated for long RNA sequences, previously impossible with methods that involved exhaustive enumeration. Use of locally optimal structure leads to state-of-the-art secondary structure prediction, as benchmarked against methods involving the computation of minimum free energy and of maximum expected

  8. Towards a structural understanding of IRES RNA function

    OpenAIRE

    Filbin, Megan E.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can initiate by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With...

  9. Functional-structural plant modelling in crop production

    OpenAIRE

    VOS, J; Marcelis, L.F.M.; de Visser; Struik, P.C.; Evers, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    Functional-structural plant models (FSPMs) describe in quantitative terms the development over time of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of plants as governed by physiological processes and affected by environmental factors. FSPMs are particularly suited to analyse problems in which the spatial structure of the plant or its canopy is an essential factor to explain, e.g., plant competition (intra-plant, inter-plant, inter-species) and the effects of plant configuration and plant manipulatio...

  10. [Function of surface membrane structures in Thiobacillus thiooxidans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, T A; Karavaĭko, G I

    1975-01-01

    The function of the surface membrane structures was studied with cytochemical techniques on ultrathin sections of Thiobacillus thiooxidans. The transport of elementary sulphur inside the cell involves the surface membrane structures, while oxidation of the sulphur to sulphuric acid takes place on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. The surface membrane structures are supposed also to participate in the primary dissolution of elementary sulphur at the site of contact of the cells with the mineral.

  11. SARA: a server for function annotation of RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Emidio; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2009-07-01

    Recent interest in non-coding RNA transcripts has resulted in a rapid increase of deposited RNA structures in the Protein Data Bank. However, a characterization and functional classification of the RNA structure and function space have only been partially addressed. Here, we introduce the SARA program for pair-wise alignment of RNA structures as a web server for structure-based RNA function assignment. The SARA server relies on the SARA program, which aligns two RNA structures based on a unit-vector root-mean-square approach. The likely accuracy of the SARA alignments is assessed by three different P-values estimating the statistical significance of the sequence, secondary structure and tertiary structure identity scores, respectively. Our benchmarks, which relied on a set of 419 RNA structures with known SCOR structural class, indicate that at a negative logarithm of mean P-value higher or equal than 2.5, SARA can assign the correct or a similar SCOR class to 81.4% and 95.3% of the benchmark set, respectively. The SARA server is freely accessible via the World Wide Web at http://sgu.bioinfo.cipf.es/services/SARA/.

  12. Proceedings Fourth Workshop on Mathematically Structured Functional Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, James; 10.4204/EPTCS.76

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Mathematically Structured Functional Programming (MSFP 2012), taking place on 25 March, 2012 in Tallinn, Estonia, as a satellite event of the European Joint Conferences on Theory and Practice of Software, ETAPS 2012. MSFP is devoted to the derivation of functionality from structure. It highlights concepts from algebra, semantics and type theory as they are increasingly reflected in programming practice, especially functional programming. The workshop consists of two invited presentations and eight contributed papers on a range of topics at that interface.

  13. Simulation of Parallel Logical Operations with Biomolecular Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Kadkhoda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular computing is the computational method that uses the potential of DNA as a parallel computing device. DNA computing can be used to solve NP-complete problems. An appropriate application of DNA computation is large-scale evaluation of parallel computation models such as Boolean Circuits. In this study, we present a molecular-based algorithm for evaluation of Nand-based Boolean Circuits. The contribution of this paper is that the proposed algorithm has been implemented using only three molecular operations and the number of passes in each level is decreased to less than half of previously addressed in the literature. Thus, the proposed algorithm is much easier to implement in the laboratory.

  14. Perspective: Markov Models for Long-Timescale Biomolecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schwantes, Christian R; Pande, Vijay S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to provide atomic-level detail and insight to important questions in chemical physics that cannot be observed in typical experiments. However, simply generating a long trajectory is insufficient, as researchers must be able to transform the data in a simulation trajectory into specific scientific insights. Although this analysis step has often been taken for granted, it deserves further attention as large-scale simulations become increasingly routine. In this perspective, we discuss the application of Markov models to the analysis of large-scale biomolecular simulations. We draw attention to recent improvements in the construction of these models as well as several important open issues. In addition, we highlight recent theoretical advances that pave the way for a new generation of models of molecular kinetics.

  15. Solving crystal structures with the symmetry minimum function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unravelling the Patterson function (the auto-correlation function of the crystal structure) (A.L. Patterson, Phys. Rev. 46 (1934) 372) can be the only way of solving crystal structures from neutron and incomplete diffraction data (e.g. powder data) when direct methods for phase determination fail. The negative scattering lengths of certain isotopes and the systematic loss of information caused by incomplete diffraction data invalidate the underlying statistical assumptions made in direct methods. In contrast, the Patterson function depends solely on the quality of the available diffraction data. Simpson et al. (P.G. Simpson et al., Acta Crystallogr. 18 (1965) 169) showed that solving a crystal structure with a particular superposition of origin-shifted Patterson functions, the symmetry minimum function, is advantageous over using the Patterson function alone, for single-crystal X-ray data.This paper describes the extension of the Patterson superposition approach to neutron data and powder data by (a) actively using the negative regions in the Patterson map caused by negative scattering lengths and (b) using maximum entropy Patterson maps (W.I.F. David, Nature 346 (1990) 731). Furthermore, prior chemical knowledge such as bond lengths and angles from known fragments have been included. Two successful structure solutions of a known and a previously unknown structure (M. Hofmann, J. Solid State Chem., in press) illustrate the potential of this new development. ((orig.))

  16. Functional clustering in hippocampal cultures: relating network structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we investigate the relationship between gross anatomic structural network properties, neuronal dynamics and the resultant functional structure in dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Specifically, we studied cultures as they developed under two conditions: the first supporting glial cell growth (high glial group), and the second one inhibiting it (low glial group). We then compared structural network properties and the spatio-temporal activity patterns of the neurons. Differences in dynamics between the two groups could be linked to the impact of the glial network on the neuronal network as the cultures developed. We also implemented a recently developed algorithm called the functional clustering algorithm (FCA) to obtain the resulting functional network structure. We show that this new algorithm is useful for capturing changes in functional network structure as the networks evolve over time. The FCA detects changes in functional structure that are consistent with expected dynamical differences due to the impact of the glial network. Cultures in the high glial group show an increase in global synchronization as the cultures age, while those in the low glial group remain locally synchronized. We additionally use the FCA to quantify the amount of synchronization present in the cultures and show that the total level of synchronization in the high glial group is stronger than in the low glial group. These results indicate an interdependence between the glial and neuronal networks present in dissociated cultures

  17. On the analytic proton structure function with heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytic proton structure function including quark mass is derived in the framework of color glass condensate. To get the massive proton structure function we keep the quark mass in photon wave function in the derivation process although the calculation is much more complicated than the massless case. It shows that the quark mass plays a key role in the description of the experimental data of proton structure function, and the cross-section of γ*p scattering will be divergent without quark mass regulation. To have the right threshold behavior and a smooth transition in the limit Q2 → 0, the quark mass has to include in the cross-section. (orig.)

  18. On the analytic proton structure function with heavy quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y.; Zeng, J.; Li, Q.; Zhou, F. [Guizhou Normal University, College of Physics and Electronics Science, Guiyang (China); Zhou, D. [Huazhong Normal University, Institute of Particle physics, Wuhan (China); Xiang, W. [Guizhou Normal University, College of Physics and Electronics Science, Guiyang (China); South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Department of Physics, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The analytic proton structure function including quark mass is derived in the framework of color glass condensate. To get the massive proton structure function we keep the quark mass in photon wave function in the derivation process although the calculation is much more complicated than the massless case. It shows that the quark mass plays a key role in the description of the experimental data of proton structure function, and the cross-section of γ{sup *}p scattering will be divergent without quark mass regulation. To have the right threshold behavior and a smooth transition in the limit Q{sup 2} → 0, the quark mass has to include in the cross-section. (orig.)

  19. Optical investigation of functional structures in isolated perfused pig heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Robert; Boehnert, Markus; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-11-01

    Light scattering in tissue of mammals and humans is affected by subcellular structures. Since these structures correlate well with the status of cells and tissue, light scattering seems to be ideal for monitoring of functional tissue state. By use of EMPHO SSK Oxyscan we investigated functional parameters in a novel kind of isolated perfused pig heart model. In this perfusion model we use organs obtained by the local slaughterhouse that are reanimated at our institute by application of a heart-lung machine. By creating 3D-images of tissue scattering we found an interesting relation between anatomical structures of myocardium and the 3D-images. Additionally, we detected coherence between backscattered light intensity and functional tissue status. Furthermore, we got a sight into the redox state of cytochrome aa3, b and c by creating difference spectra. We believe that this new kind of tissue imaging method will give us the opportunity to get new insights into myocardial function.

  20. Structural features for functional selectivity at serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Chong; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D; Jiang, Yi; Chu, Meihua; Siu, Fai Yiu; Liu, Wei; Xu, H Eric; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L; Stevens, Raymond C

    2013-05-01

    Drugs active at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can differentially modulate either canonical or noncanonical signaling pathways via a phenomenon known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. We report biochemical studies showing that the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide, its precursor ergotamine (ERG), and related ergolines display strong functional selectivity for β-arrestin signaling at the 5-HT2B 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor, whereas they are relatively unbiased at the 5-HT1B receptor. To investigate the structural basis for biased signaling, we determined the crystal structure of the human 5-HT2B receptor bound to ERG and compared it with the 5-HT1B/ERG structure. Given the relatively poor understanding of GPCR structure and function to date, insight into different GPCR signaling pathways is important to better understand both adverse and favorable therapeutic activities. PMID:23519215

  1. Rational Design of a Structural and Functional Nitric Oxide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, N.; Lin, Y; Gao, Y; Zhao, X; Russell, B; Lei, L; Miner, L; Robinson, H; Lu, Y

    2009-01-01

    Protein design provides a rigorous test of our knowledge about proteins and allows the creation of novel enzymes for biotechnological applications. Whereas progress has been made in designing proteins that mimic native proteins structurally, it is more difficult to design functional proteins. In comparison to recent successes in designing non-metalloproteins, it is even more challenging to rationally design metalloproteins that reproduce both the structure and function of native metalloenzymes. This is because protein metal-binding sites are much more varied than non-metal-containing sites, in terms of different metal ion oxidation states, preferred geometry and metal ion ligand donor sets. Because of their variability, it has been difficult to predict metal-binding site properties in silico, as many of the parameters, such as force fields, are ill-defined. Therefore, the successful design of a structural and functional metalloprotein would greatly advance the field of protein design and our understanding of enzymes. Here we report a successful, rational design of a structural and functional model of a metalloprotein, nitric oxide reductase (NOR), by introducing three histidines and one glutamate, predicted as ligands in the active site of NOR, into the distal pocket of myoglobin. A crystal structure of the designed protein confirms that the minimized computer model contains a haem/non-haem FeB centre that is remarkably similar to that in the crystal structure. This designed protein also exhibits NO reduction activity, and so models both the structure and function of NOR, offering insight that the active site glutamate is required for both iron binding and activity. These results show that structural and functional metalloproteins can be rationally designed in silico.

  2. PDB-UF: database of predicted enzymatic functions for unannotated protein structures from structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rychlewski Leszek

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of protein structures from structural genomics centers dramatically increases in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Many of these structures are functionally unannotated because they have no sequence similarity to proteins of known function. However, it is possible to successfully infer function using only structural similarity. Results Here we present the PDB-UF database, a web-accessible collection of predictions of enzymatic properties using structure-function relationship. The assignments were conducted for three-dimensional protein structures of unknown function that come from structural genomics initiatives. We show that 4 hypothetical proteins (with PDB accession codes: 1VH0, 1NS5, 1O6D, and 1TO0, for which standard BLAST tools such as PSI-BLAST or RPS-BLAST failed to assign any function, are probably methyltransferase enzymes. Conclusion We suggest that the structure-based prediction of an EC number should be conducted having the different similarity score cutoff for different protein folds. Moreover, performing the annotation using two different algorithms can reduce the rate of false positive assignments. We believe, that the presented web-based repository will help to decrease the number of protein structures that have functions marked as "unknown" in the PDB file. Availability http://paradox.harvard.edu/PDB-UF and http://bioinfo.pl/PDB-UF

  3. Pion structure function F2π in the valon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz

    2003-03-01

    Partonic structure of constituent quark (or valon) in the next-to-leading order is used to calculate pion structure function. This is a further demonstration of the finding that the constituent quark structure is universal, and once it is calculated, the structure of any hadron can be predicted thereafter, using a convolution method, without introducing any new free parameter. The results are compared with the pion structure function from ZEUS Collaboration leading neutron production in e+p collisions at HERA. We found good agreement with the experiment. A resolution for the issue of normalization of the experimental data is suggested. In addition, the proportionality of F2π and F2p, which have caused confusion in the normalization of ZEUS data is discussed and resolved.

  4. Pion structure function F2π in the valon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partonic structure of constituent quark (or valon) in the next-to-leading order is used to calculate pion structure function. This is a further demonstration of the finding that the constituent quark structure is universal, and once it is calculated, the structure of any hadron can be predicted thereafter, using a convolution method, without introducing any new free parameter. The results are compared with the pion structure function from ZEUS Collaboration leading neutron production in e+p collisions at HERA. We found good agreement with the experiment. A resolution for the issue of normalization of the experimental data is suggested. In addition, the proportionality of F2π and F2p, which have caused confusion in the normalization of ZEUS data is discussed and resolved

  5. Electron crystallography for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are important research targets for basic biological sciences and drug design, but studies of their structure and function are considered difficult to perform. Studies of membrane structures have been greatly facilitated by technological and instrumental advancements in electron microscopy together with methodological advancements in biology. Electron crystallography is especially useful in studying the structure and function of membrane proteins. Electron crystallography is now an established method of analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which resembles their natural biological environment. To better understand the neural system function from a structural point of view, we developed the cryo-electron microscope with a helium-cooled specimen stage, which allows for analysis of the structures of membrane proteins at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review introduces recent instrumental advances in cryo-electron microscopy and presents some examples of structure analyses of membrane proteins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, water channels and gap junction channels. This review has two objectives: first, to provide a personal historical background to describe how we came to develop the cryo-electron microscope and second, to discuss some of the technology required for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy.

  6. Tensor-polarized structure functions: Tensor structure of deuteron in 2020's

    OpenAIRE

    Kumano, S

    2014-01-01

    We explain spin structure for a spin-one hadron, in which there are new structure functions, in addition to the ones ($F_1$, $F_2$, $g_1$, $g_2$) which exist for the spin-1/2 nucleon, associated with its tensor structure. The new structure functions are $b_1$, $b_2$, $b_3$, and $b_4$ in deep inelastic scattering of a charged-lepton from a spin-one hadron such as the deuteron. Among them, twist-two functions are related by the Callan-Gross type relation $b_2 = 2 x b_1$ in the Bjorken scaling l...

  7. Ontogenetic functional diversity: size structure of a keystone predator drives functioning of a complex ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Rasmussen, Nick L

    2013-05-01

    A central challenge in community ecology is to understand the connection between biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. While traditional approaches have largely focused on species-level diversity, increasing evidence indicates that there exists substantial ecological diversity among individuals within species. By far, the largest source of this intraspecific diversity stems from variation among individuals in ontogenetic stage and size. Although such ontogenetic shifts are ubiquitous in natural communities, whether and how they scale up to influence the structure and functioning of complex ecosystems is largely unknown. Here we take an experimental approach to examine the consequences of ontogenetic niche shifts for the structure of communities and ecosystem processes. In particular we experimentally manipulated the stage structure in a keystone predator, larvae of the dragonfly Anax junius, in complex experimental pond communities to test whether changes in the population stage or size structure of a keystone species scale up to alter community structure and ecosystem processes, and how functional differences scale with relative differences in size among stages. We found that the functional role of A. junius was stage-specific. Altering what stages were present in a pond led to concurrent changes in community structure, primary producer biomass (periphyton and phytoplankton), and ultimately altered ecosystem processes (respiration and net primary productivity), indicating a strong, but stage-specific, trophic cascade. Interestingly, the stage-specific effects did not simply scale with size or biomass of the predator, but instead indicated clear ontogenetic niche shifts in ecological interactions. Thus, functional differences among stages within a keystone species scaled up to alter the functioning of entire ecosystems. Therefore, our results indicate that the classical approach of assuming an average functional role of a species can be misleading because

  8. The Evolution of Protein Structures and Structural Ensembles Under Functional Constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Liberles, David A; Grahnen, Johan A.; Jessica Siltberg-Liberles

    2011-01-01

    Protein sequence, structure, and function are inherently linked through evolution and population genetics. Our knowledge of protein structure comes from solved structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), our knowledge of sequence through sequences found in the NCBI sequence databases (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/), and our knowledge of function through a limited set of in-vitro biochemical studies. How these intersect through evolution is described in the first part of the review. In the secon...

  9. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  10. Generating function approach to reliability analysis of structural systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The generating function approach is an important tool for performance assessment in multi-state systems. Aiming at strength reliability analysis of structural systems, generating function approach is introduced and developed. Static reliability models of statically determinate, indeterminate systems and fatigue reliability models are built by constructing special generating functions, which are used to describe probability distributions of strength (resistance), stress (load) and fatigue life, by defining composite operators of generating functions and performance structure functions thereof. When composition operators are executed, computational costs can be reduced by a big margin by means of collecting like terms. The results of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the generating function approach can be widely used for probability modeling of large complex systems with hierarchical structures due to the unified form, compact expression, computer program realizability and high universality. Because the new method considers twin loads giving rise to component failure dependency, it can provide a theoretical reference and act as a powerful tool for static, dynamic reliability analysis in civil engineering structures and mechanical equipment systems with multi-mode damage coupling.

  11. MULTI-SCALE COHERENT STRUCTURES IN TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER DETECTED BY LOCALLY AVERAGED VELOCITY STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-hua; JIANG Nan; WANG Zhen-dong; SHU Wei

    2005-01-01

    The time sequence of longitudinal velocity component at different vertical locations in turbulent boundary layer was finely measured in a wind tunnel. The concept of coarse-grained velocity structure functions, which describes the relative motions of straining and compressing for multi-scale eddy structures in turbulent flows, was put forward based on the theory of locally multi-scale average. Based on the consistency between coarse-grained velocity structure function and Harr wavelet transformation, detecting method was presented,by which the coherent structures and their intermittency was identified by multi-scale flatness factor calculated by locally average structure function. Phase-averaged evolution course for multi-scale coherent eddy structures in wall turbulence were extracted by this conditional sampling to educe scheme. The dynamics course of multi-scale coherent eddy structures and their effects on statistics of turbulent flows were studied.

  12. Population structure analysis using rare and common functional variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Lili

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Next-generation sequencing technologies now make it possible to genotype and measure hundreds of thousands of rare genetic variations in individuals across the genome. Characterization of high-density genetic variation facilitates control of population genetic structure on a finer scale before large-scale genotyping in disease genetics studies. Population structure is a well-known, prevalent, and important factor in common variant genetic studies, but its relevance in rare variants is unclear. We perform an extensive population structure analysis using common and rare functional variants from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 mini-exome sequence. The analysis based on common functional variants required 388 principal components to account for 90% of the variation in population structure. However, an analysis based on rare variants required 532 significant principal components to account for similar levels of variation. Using rare variants, we detected fine-scale substructure beyond the population structure identified using common functional variants. Our results show that the level of population structure embedded in rare variant data is different from the level embedded in common variant data and that correcting for population structure is only as good as the level one wishes to correct.

  13. Functional substitution of coordination polyhedron in crystal structure of silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the bases of the study of comparative crystal chemistry of silicates it has been concluded that the octahedra and square pyramids of Ti-O and Zr-O play functional role of tetrahedra of Si-O in the construction of crystal structures.Therefore,those silicates may be named titano- and zircono-silicates.Because of the functional similarity of coordination polyhedra,the structures of cristobalite and feldspar have been compared with those of perovskite and garnet,respectively.As a new concept,the functional replacement of tetrahedra by octahedra and/or pyramids is defined by the authors of this paper for favorable comparison of relative crystal structures.

  14. Emerging approaches to probing ion channel structure and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Guang Li; Tian-Le Xu

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels,as membrane proteins,are the sensors of the cell.They act as the first line of communication with the world beyond the plasma membrane and transduce changes in the external and internal environments into unique electrical signals to shape the responses of excitable cells.Because of their importance in cellular communication,ion channels have been intensively studied at the structural and functional levels.Here,we summarize the diverse approaches,including molecular and cellular,chemical,optical,biophysical,and computational,used to probe the structural and functional rearrangements that occur during channel activation (or sensitization),inactivation (or desensitization),and various forms of modulation.The emerging insights into the structure and function of ion channels by multidisciplinary approaches allow the development of new pharmacotherapies as well as new tools useful in controlling cellular activity.

  15. Lipids in the structure and functions of biological membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov V.I.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are one of the main components of cellular membranes. Lipids make up 30-55% of the cell content depending on the types of cells. Phospholipids, sphingomyelins, cholesterol, etc. are characteristic to cellular membranes. The composition of lipids of the both sides of the membranes differs. This fact determines asymmetry of the structure of bili-pid layer. The reason for many pathologies is the changes in the properties of cellular membranes with the modification of their components. The study of structure and functioning of cellular biomembranes is essential for many researchers. The condition of membranes, their quality, their quantitative composition and modification under the influence of different factors as well as their interaction with carbohydrate and protein component are of great importance for the functioning of both membranes, cells and the body in general. Analysis and structuring of lipids and their functions in biological membranes are studied.

  16. New insights into plastid nucleoid structure and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinska, Karin; Melonek, Joanna; Krause, Kirsten

    2013-03-01

    Investigations over many decades have revealed that nucleoids of higher plant plastids are highly dynamic with regard to their number, their structural organization and protein composition. Membrane attachment and environmental cues seem to determine the activity and functionality of the nucleoids and point to a highly regulated structure-function relationship. The heterogeneous composition and the many functions that are seemingly associated with the plastid nucleoids could be related to the high number of chromosomes per plastid. Recent proteomic studies have brought novel nucleoid-associated proteins into the spotlight and indicated that plastid nucleoids are an evolutionary hybrid possessing prokaryotic nucleoid features and eukaryotic (nuclear) chromatin components, several of which are dually targeted to the nucleus and chloroplasts. Future studies need to unravel if and how plastid-nucleus communication depends on nucleoid structure and plastid gene expression.

  17. Studying Membrane Protein Structure and Function Using Nanodiscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, Pie

    The structure and dynamic of membrane proteins can provide valuable information about general functions, diseases and effects of various drugs. Studying membrane proteins are a challenge as an amphiphilic environment is necessary to stabilise the protein in a functionally and structurally relevant...... form. This is most typically achieved through the use of detergent based reconstitution systems. However, time and again such systems fail to provide a suitable environment causing aggregation and inactivation. Nanodiscs are self-assembled lipoproteins containing two membrane scaffold proteins...... for understanding the key mechanisms during reconstitution of membrane proteins in these lipoproteins. In this project the self-assembly of nanodiscs has been structurally characterized with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in a time resolved fashion. This brought knowledge about the structural development...

  18. Unified approach to partition functions of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    RNA secondary structure formation is a field of considerable biological interest as well as a model system for understanding generic properties of heteropolymer folding. This system is particularly attractive because the partition function and thus all thermodynamic properties of RNA secondary structure ensembles can be calculated numerically in polynomial time for arbitrary sequences and homopolymer models admit analytical solutions. Such solutions for many different aspects of the combinatorics of RNA secondary structure formation share the property that the final solution depends on differences of statistical weights rather than on the weights alone. Here, we present a unified approach to a large class of problems in the field of RNA secondary structure formation. We prove a generic theorem for the calculation of RNA folding partition functions. Then, we show that this approach can be applied to the study of the molten-native transition, denaturation of RNA molecules, as well as to studies of the glass phase of random RNA sequences.

  19. Recent Structural Insights into Cytochrome P450 Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guengerich, F Peter; Waterman, Michael R; Egli, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes are important in the metabolism of drugs, steroids, fat-soluble vitamins, carcinogens, pesticides, and many other types of chemicals. Their catalytic activities are important issues in areas such as drug-drug interactions and endocrine function. During the past 30 years, structures of P450s have been very helpful in understanding function, particularly the mammalian P450 structures available in the past 15 years. We review recent activity in this area, focusing on the past 2 years (2014-2015). Structural work with microbial P450s includes studies related to the biosynthesis of natural products and the use of parasitic and fungal P450 structures as targets for drug discovery. Studies on mammalian P450s include the utilization of information about 'drug-metabolizing' P450s to improve drug development and also to understand the molecular bases of endocrine dysfunction. PMID:27267697

  20. Class I Cytokine Receptors: Structure and function in the Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard

    of these challenging domains. Supplemented by a review of the current collection of TMD structures from single-pass transmembrane receptors, the thesis as a whole provides important insights on the structure and function in the membrane as well as highlight the open questions to be addressed in the years to come....... with a globular domain in combination with a membrane embedded domain and an intrinsically disordered domain is exceptionally challenging, this structure, along with data collected on the adjacent domains in isolation, was utilized to present the first full-length integrative structure of a class I cytokine......Class I cytokine receptors are involved in important biological functions of both physiological and pathological nature in mammals. However, the molecular details of the cross-membrane signal transduction through these receptors remain obscure. One of the major reasons for this is the lack...

  1. Tensor-polarized structure functions: Tensor structure of deuteron in 2020's

    CERN Document Server

    Kumano, S

    2014-01-01

    We explain spin structure for a spin-one hadron, in which there are new structure functions, in addition to the ones ($F_1$, $F_2$, $g_1$, $g_2$) which exist for the spin-1/2 nucleon, associated with its tensor structure. The new structure functions are $b_1$, $b_2$, $b_3$, and $b_4$ in deep inelastic scattering of a charged-lepton from a spin-one hadron such as the deuteron. Among them, twist-two functions are related by the Callan-Gross type relation $b_2 = 2 x b_1$ in the Bjorken scaling limit. First, these new structure functions are introduced, and useful formulae are derived for projection operators of $b_{1-4}$ from a hadron tensor $W_{\\mu\

  2. The Higgs boson structure functions as signposts of new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gounaris, G J

    2015-01-01

    We show that the Higgs boson structure functions observable in the inclusive process $e^-e^+ \\to H + {\\rm "anything"}$ may reveal the presence of anomalous contributions corresponding to several types of new physics partners, Higgs boson compositeness or invisible (dark) matter. This could be done without making a difficult or even an impossible experimental analysis of the contents of the "anything". We give illustrations showing how the shapes of the various structure functions containing such typical new contributions may differ from the standard prediction and allow their identification.

  3. Functional and Structural Brain Changes Associated with Methamphetamine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R. Russell

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA is a potent psychostimulant drug whose abuse has become a global epidemic in recent years. Firstly, this review article briefly discusses the epidemiology and clinical pharmacology of methamphetamine dependence. Secondly, the article reviews relevant animal literature modeling methamphetamine dependence and discusses possible mechanisms of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Thirdly, it provides a critical review of functional and structural neuroimaging studies in human MA abusers; including positron emission tomography (PET and functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The effect of abstinence from methamphetamine, both short- and long-term within the context of these studies is also reviewed.

  4. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  5. Resonance Region Structure Functions and Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Carl E.; Rislow, Benjamin C.

    2012-01-01

    The primary motive of parity violating deep inelastic scattering experiments has been to test the standard model, particularly the axial couplings to the quarks, in the scaling region. The measurements can also test for the validity of models for the off-diagonal structure functions $F_{1,2,3}^{\\gamma Z}(x,Q^2)$ in the resonance region. The off-diagonal structure functions are important for the accurate calculation of the $\\gamma Z$-box correction to the weak charge of the proton. Currently, ...

  6. A new approach to the gluon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the gluon structure function of a color dipole in a new approach evaluating the matrix element of gluon field operators separated along a direction close to the light cone. As vacuum state in the pure glue sector, we use a variational ground state of the near-light-cone Hamiltonian. With a mean momentum fraction of the gluons fixed to the ''experimental value'' in a proton, the resulting gluon structure function for a dipole state with four links is rather close to the NLO MRST 2002 and the CTEQAB-0 parameterizations at Q2=1.5 GeV2.

  7. The Structure, Functions, and Mechanical Properties of Keratin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKittrick, J.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bodde, S. G.; Yang, W.; Novitskaya, E. E.; Meyers, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Keratin is one of the most important structural proteins in nature and is widely found in the integument in vertebrates. It is classified into two types: α-helices and β-pleated sheets. Keratinized materials can be considered as fiber-reinforced composites consisting of crystalline intermediate filaments embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. They have a wide variety of morphologies and properties depending on different functions. Here, we review selected keratin-based materials, such as skin, hair, wool, quill, horn, hoof, feather, and beak, focusing on the structure-mechanical property-function relationships and finally give some insights on bioinspired composite design based on keratinized materials.

  8. The impact of structural and functional parameters in glaucoma patients on patient-reported visual functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hirneiß

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of structural changes of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, and visual field loss, on functional impairment assessed by patient-reported visual functioning in glaucoma. METHODS: Patients with glaucomatous optic nerve damage were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Peripapillary RNFL thickness was obtained with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Function was assessed by patient-reported visual functioning using the Rasch-calibrated Glaucoma Activity Limitation 9 (GAL-9 questionnaire and standard automated perimetry. The impact of peripapillary RNFL loss on functional impairment was analyzed with correlation and linear regression analyses. RESULTS: A total of 176 eyes from 88 glaucoma patients were included. The SD-OCT assessed temporal-superior and temporal-inferior RNFL sector of the worse eye revealed significant correlation with the GAL-9 scores (r=-0.298, p=0.011 and r=-0.251, p=0.033, respectively. In mutivariate regression analysis, the best predictors for patient-reported visual functioning were visual acuity of the better eye and mean defect of the worse eye (R(2=0.334, while structural parameters could not enhance the prediction of GAL-9 scores. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported visual functioning of patients with glaucoma is better predicted by visual performance data than structural parameters. However, some structural changes of the worse eye are significantly correlated with patient-reported visual functioning.

  9. The impact of structural and functional characteristics of social relations as determinants of functional decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Lund, Rikke; Holstein, Bjørn E;

    2004-01-01

    pattern (n = 565); and third, mortality (n = 651). Social relations were measured at baseline by several items focusing on the structure and function of the social network. RESULTS: In men, no weekly telephone contact was related to functional decline and mortality. Among women, less than weekly telephone...

  10. Differential geometry-based solvation and electrolyte transport models for biomolecular modeling: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Guo Wei; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the differential geometry-based solvation and electrolyte transport for biomolecular solvation that have been developed over the past decade. A key component of these methods is the differential geometry of surfaces theory, as applied to the solvent-solute boundary. In these approaches, the solvent-solute boundary is determined by a variational principle that determines the major physical observables of interest, for example, biomolecular surface area, enclosed volume, el...

  11. Influence of chronic kidney disease on cardiac structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Coresh, Josef

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the presence of kidney dysfunction and/or damage, is a worldwide public health issue. Although CKD is independently associated with various subtypes of cardiovascular diseases, a recent international collaborative meta-analysis demonstrates that CKD is particularly strongly associated with heart failure, suggesting its critical impact on cardiac structure and function. Although numerous studies have investigated the association of CKD and cardiac structure and function, these studies substantially vary regarding source populations and methodology (e.g., measures of CKD and/or parameters of cardiac structure and function), making it difficult to reach universal conclusions. Nevertheless, in this review, we comprehensively examine relevant studies, discuss potential mechanisms linking CKD to alteration of cardiac structure and function, and demonstrate clinical implications as well as potential future research directions. We exclusively focus on studies investigating both CKD measures, kidney function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate [GFR], creatinine clearance, or levels of filtration markers), and kidney damage represented by albuminuria, since current international clinical guidelines of CKD recommend staging CKD and assessing its clinical risk based on both GFR and albuminuria. PMID:26194332

  12. [Structure and function of arbuscular mycorrhiza: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mi; Chen, Ying-long; Li, Min; Liu, Run-jin

    2013-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is one of the most widely distributed and the most important mutualistic symbionts in terrestrial ecosystems, playing a significant role in enhancing plant resistance to stresses, remediating polluted environments, and maintaining ecosystem stabilization and sustainable productivity. The structural characteristics of AM are the main indicators determining the mycorrhizal formation in root system, and have close relations to the mycorrhizal functions. This paper summarized the structural characteristics of arbuscules, vesicles, mycelia and invasion points of AM, and analyzed the relationships between the Arum (A) type arbuscules, Paris (P) type arbuscules, vesicles, and external mycelia and their functions in improving plant nutrient acquisition and growth, enhancing plant resistance to drought, waterlogging, salinity, high temperature, diseases, heavy metals toxicity, and promoting toxic organic substances decomposition and polluted and degraded soil remediation. The factors affecting the AM structure and functions as well as the action mechanisms of mycorrhizal functions were also discussed. This review would provide a basis for the systemic study of AM structural characteristics and functional mechanisms and for evaluating and screening efficient AM fungal species.

  13. How well do we know the neutron structure function?

    OpenAIRE

    Arrington, J.; Rubin, J. G.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the uncertainty in the neutron F2n structure function extracted from inclusive deuteron and proton deep-inelastic scattering data. The analysis includes experimental uncertainties as well as uncertainties associated with the deuteron wave function, nuclear smearing, and nucleon off-shell corrections. Consistently accounting for the Q^2 dependence of the data and calculations, and restricting the nuclear corrections to microscopic models of the deuteron, we fi...

  14. A notion of functional completeness for first-order structure

    OpenAIRE

    Etienne R. Alomo Temgoua; Marcel Tonga

    2005-01-01

    Using ☆-congruences and implications, Weaver (1993) introduced the concepts of prevariety and quasivariety of first-order structures as generalizations of the corresponding concepts for algebras. The notion of functional completeness on algebras has been defined and characterized by Burris and Sankappanavar (1981), Kaarli and Pixley (2001), Pixley (1996), and Quackenbush (1981). We study the notion of functional completeness with respect to ☆-congruences. We extend some result...

  15. EM vs Weak Structure Functions in DIS processes

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Simo, I Ruiz; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We obatin the ratio $F_i^A/F_i^{D}$(i=2,3, A=Be, C, Fe, Pb; D=Deuteron) in the case of weak and electromagnetic nuclear structure functions. For this, relativistic nuclear spectral function which incorporate the effects of Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations is used. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions and shadowing and antishadowing effects.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the effective functionality that governs the enzymatic self-organized processes in cellular conditions is a crucial topic in the post-genomic era. In recent studies, Transfer Entropy has been proposed as a rigorous, robust and self-consistent method for the causal quantification of the functional information flow among nonlinear processes. Here, in order to quantify the functional connectivity for the glycolytic enzymes in dissipative conditions we have analyzed different catalytic patterns using the technique of Transfer Entropy. The data were obtained by means of a yeast glycolytic model formed by three delay differential equations where the enzymatic rate equations of the irreversible stages have been explicitly considered. These enzymatic activity functions were previously modeled and tested experimentally by other different groups. The results show the emergence of a new kind of dynamical functional structure, characterized by changing connectivity flows and a metabolic invariant that constrains the activity of the irreversible enzymes. In addition to the classical topological structure characterized by the specific location of enzymes, substrates, products and feedback-regulatory metabolites, an effective functional structure emerges in the modeled glycolytic system, which is dynamical and characterized by notable variations of the functional interactions. The dynamical structure also exhibits a metabolic invariant which constrains the functional attributes of the enzymes. Finally, in accordance with the classical biochemical studies, our numerical analysis reveals in a quantitative manner that the enzyme phosphofructokinase is the key-core of the metabolic system, behaving for all conditions as the main source of the effective causal flows in yeast glycolysis. PMID:22393350

  17. The structure and function of bacterial light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Christopher J; Roszak, Aleksander W; Southall, June; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    The harvesting of solar radiation by purple photosynthetic bacteria is achieved by circular, integral membrane pigment-protein complexes. There are two main types of light-harvesting complex, termed LH2 and LH1, that function to absorb light energy and to transfer that energy rapidly and efficiently to the photochemical reaction centres where it is trapped. This mini-review describes our present understanding of the structure and function of the purple bacterial light-harvesting complexes.

  18. A no extensive statistical model for the nucleon structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and two chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon.

  19. a Nonextensive Statistical Model for the Nucleon Structure Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis Augusto; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and two chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalizations in the nucleon.

  20. Optimizing non-decomposable loss functions in structured prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjbar, Mani

    2012-01-01

    Learning functional dependencies (mapping) between arbitrary input and output spaces is one of the main challenges in computational intelligence. There have been two main threads in the literature for solving this problem -- one focusing on designing more discriminative representation of the input and another one focusing on designing flexible mapping functions.Interestingly, for many applications, the outputs follow a structure, which can be exploited to narrow down the space of possible (mo...

  1. A Three-Stage Model of Golgi Structure and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Kasey J; Staehelin, L. Andrew; Glick, Benjamin S

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus contains multiple classes of cisternae that differ in structure, composition, and function, but there is no consensus about the number and definition of these classes. A useful way to classify Golgi cisternae is according to the trafficking pathways by which the cisternae import and export components. By this criterion, we propose that Golgi cisternae can be divided into three classes that correspond to functional stages of maturation. First, cisternae at the cisternal ass...

  2. Controlled structuration and functionalization of organic-inorganic hybrid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials obtained by sol-gel process are very interesting materials. Indeed, these materials have both the properties of the organic phase and those of the inorganic matrix. Two functionalization and structuration ways are presented here: 1)the meso-porous hybrid materials formed in presence of structuring surfactant and the lamellar hybrid materials obtained by auto-assembling. (O.M.)

  3. Silicon Photodetectors Matrix Coordinate Bipolar Functionally Integrated Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Murashev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new approach for solving the detection and coordinate the detection of radiation in the optical range of 0.3-1.1 microns, based on the use of so-called bipolar functionally integrated structures (BI-FIS in pixels photodetector arrays is discussed. Variants of new technical solutions based on photo-detectors matrix pixel BI-FIS structures are shown. Their effectiveness and scope are evaluated.

  4. Rational Design of a Structural and Functional Nitric Oxide Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, Natasha; Lin, Ying-Wu; Gao, Yi-Gui; Zhao, Xuan; Russell, Brandy S.; Lei, Lanyu; Miner, Kyle D.; Robinson, Howard; Lu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein design provides an ultimate test of our knowledge about proteins and allows the creation of novel enzymes for biotechnological applications. While progress has been made in designing proteins that mimic native proteins structurally 1–3 , it is more difficult to design functional proteins 4–8 . In comparison to recent successes in designing non-metalloproteins 4,6,7,9,10 , it is even more challenging to rationally design metalloproteins that reproduce both the structure and fun...

  5. Analytical theory of the probability distribution function of structure formation

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Johan; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-01-01

    The probability distribution function (PDF) tails of the zonal flow structure formation and the PDF tails of momentum flux by incorporating effect of a shear flow in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence are computed in the present paper. The bipolar vortex soliton (modon) is assumed to be the coherent structure responsible for bursty and intermittent events driving the PDF tails. It is found that stronger zonal flows are generated in ITG turbulence than Hasegawa-Mima (HM) turbulence as w...

  6. Soil-Borne Microbial Functional Structure across Different Land Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko E. Kuramae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Land use change alters the structure and composition of microbial communities. However, the links between environmental factors and microbial functions are not well understood. Here we interrogated the functional structure of soil microbial communities across different land uses. In a multivariate regression tree analysis of soil physicochemical properties and genes detected by functional microarrays, the main factor that explained the different microbial community functional structures was C : N ratio. C : N ratio showed a significant positive correlation with clay and soil pH. Fields with low C : N ratio had an overrepresentation of genes for carbon degradation, carbon fixation, metal reductase, and organic remediation categories, while fields with high C : N ratio had an overrepresentation of genes encoding dissimilatory sulfate reductase, methane oxidation, nitrification, and nitrogen fixation. The most abundant genes related to carbon degradation comprised bacterial and fungal cellulases; bacterial and fungal chitinases; fungal laccases; and bacterial, fungal, and oomycete polygalacturonases. The high number of genes related to organic remediation was probably driven by high phosphate content, while the high number of genes for nitrification was probably explained by high total nitrogen content. The functional gene diversity found in different soils did not group the sites accordingly to land management. Rather, the soil factors, C : N ratio, phosphate, and total N, were the main factors driving the differences in functional genes across the fields examined.

  7. A new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghawry, Huda A; Mostafa, Mostafa G M; Gharib, Tarek F

    2014-12-01

    One of the challenging problems in bioinformatics is the prediction of protein function. Protein function is the main key that can be used to classify different proteins. Protein function can be inferred experimentally with very small throughput or computationally with very high throughput. Computational methods are sequence based or structure based. Structure-based methods produce more accurate protein function prediction. In this article, we propose a new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction. The representation is based on three-dimensional patterns of protein residues. In the analysis, we used protein function based on enzyme activity through six mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies: amidohydrolase, crotonase, haloacid dehalogenase, isoprenoid synthase type I, and vicinal oxygen chelate. We applied three different classification methods, naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, and random forest, to predict the enzyme superfamily of a given protein. The prediction accuracy using the proposed representation outperforms a recently introduced representation method that is based only on the distance patterns. The results show that the proposed representation achieved prediction accuracy up to 98%, with improvement of about 10% on average. PMID:25343279

  8. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Kourtis, Nikos; Petratos, Kyriacos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2010-09-16

    The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel) protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1). MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  9. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Gessmann

    Full Text Available The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1. MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  10. Osteoblast functions in functionally graded Ti-6Al-4 V mesh structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, K C; Kumar, A; Misra, R D K; Li, S J; Hao, Y L; Yang, R

    2016-03-01

    We describe here the combined efforts of engineering and biological sciences as a systemic approach to fundamentally elucidate osteoblast functions in functionally graded Ti-6Al-4 V mesh structures in relation to uniform/monolithic mesh arrays. First, the interconnecting porous architecture of functionally graded mesh arrays was conducive to cellular functions including attachment, proliferation, and mineralization. The underlying reason is that the graded fabricated structure with cells seeded from the large pore size side provided a channel for efficient transfer of nutrients to other end of the structure (small pore size), leading to the generation of mineralized extracellular matrix by differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Second, a comparative and parametric study indicated that gradient mesh structure had a pronounced effect on cell adhesion and mineralization, and strongly influenced the proliferation phase. High intensity and near-uniform distribution of proteins (actin and vinculin) on struts of the gradient mesh structure (cells seeded from large pore side) implied signal transduction during cell adhesion and was responsible for superior cellular activity, in comparison to the uniform mesh structure and non-porous titanium alloy. Cells adhered to the mesh struts by forming a sheet, bridging the pores through numerous cytoplasmic extensions, in the case of porous mesh structures. Intercellular interaction in porous structures provided a pathway for cells to communicate and mature to a differentiated phenotype. Furthermore, the capability of cells to migrate through the interconnecting porous architecture on mesh structures led to colonization of the entire structure. Cells were embedded layer-by-layer in the extracellular matrix as the matrix mineralized. The outcomes of the study are expected to address challenges associated with the treatment of segmental bone defects and bone-remodeling through favorable modulation of cellular response. Moreover, the study

  11. Protein mechanics: a route from structure to function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard Lavery; Sophie Sacquin-Mora

    2007-08-01

    In order to better understand the mechanical properties of proteins, we have developed simulation tools which enable these properties to be analysed on a residue-by-residue basis. Although these calculations are relatively expensive with all-atom protein models, good results can be obtained much faster using coarse-grained approaches. The results show that proteins are surprisingly heterogeneous from a mechanical point of view and that functionally important residues often exhibit unusual mechanical behaviour. This finding offers a novel means for detecting functional sites and also potentially provides a route for understanding the links between structure and function in more general terms.

  12. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  13. A simple knowledge-based mining method for exploring hidden key molecules in a human biomolecular network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuji Shingo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the functional genomics analysis domain, various methodologies are available for interpreting the results produced by high-throughput biological experiments. These methods commonly use a list of genes as an analysis input, and most of them produce a more complicated list of genes or pathways as the results of the analysis. Although there are several network-based methods, which detect key nodes in the network, the results tend to include well-studied, major hub genes. Results To mine the molecules that have biological meaning but to fewer degrees than major hubs, we propose, in this study, a new network-based method for selecting these hidden key molecules based on virtual information flows circulating among the input list of genes. The human biomolecular network was constructed from the Pathway Commons database, and a calculation method based on betweenness centrality was newly developed. We validated the method with the ErbB pathway and applied it to practical cancer research data. We were able to confirm that the output genes, despite having fewer edges than major hubs, have biological meanings that were able to be invoked by the input list of genes. Conclusions The developed method, named NetHiKe (Network-based Hidden Key molecule miner, was able to detect potential key molecules by utilizing the human biomolecular network as a knowledge base. Thus, it is hoped that this method will enhance the progress of biological data analysis in the whole-genome research era.

  14. Improved protein structure selection using decoy-dependent discriminatory functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitt Michael

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key component in protein structure prediction is a scoring or discriminatory function that can distinguish near-native conformations from misfolded ones. Various types of scoring functions have been developed to accomplish this goal, but their performance is not adequate to solve the structure selection problem. In addition, there is poor correlation between the scores and the accuracy of the generated conformations. Results We present a simple and nonparametric formula to estimate the accuracy of predicted conformations (or decoys. This scoring function, called the density score function, evaluates decoy conformations by performing an all-against-all Cα RMSD (Root Mean Square Deviation calculation in a given decoy set. We tested the density score function on 83 decoy sets grouped by their generation methods (4state_reduced, fisa, fisa_casp3, lmds, lattice_ssfit, semfold and Rosetta. The density scores have correlations as high as 0.9 with the Cα RMSDs of the decoy conformations, measured relative to the experimental conformation for each decoy. We previously developed a residue-specific all-atom probability discriminatory function (RAPDF, which compiles statistics from a database of experimentally determined conformations, to aid in structure selection. Here, we present a decoy-dependent discriminatory function called self-RAPDF, where we compiled the atom-atom contact probabilities from all the conformations in a decoy set instead of using an ensemble of native conformations, with a weighting scheme based on the density scores. The self-RAPDF has a higher correlation with Cα RMSD than RAPDF for 76/83 decoy sets, and selects better near-native conformations for 62/83 decoy sets. Self-RAPDF may be useful not only for selecting near-native conformations from decoy sets, but also for fold simulations and protein structure refinement. Conclusions Both the density score and the self-RAPDF functions are decoy

  15. QCD. What else is needed for the Proton Structure Function?

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    2014-01-01

    While QCD can provide corrections to the parton distribution function, it cannot produce the distribution. Where is then the starting point for the proton structure function? The only known source is the quark-model wave function for the proton at rest. The harmonic oscillator is used for the trial wave function. When Lorentz-boosted, this wave function exhibits all the peculiarities of Feynman's parton picture. The time-separation between the quarks plays the key role in the boosting process. This variable is hidden in the present form of quantum mechanics, and the failure to measure it leads to an increase in entropy. This leads to a picture of boiling quarks which become partons in their plasma state.

  16. Structured RNAs that evade or confound exonucleases: function follows form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M; Eiler, Daniel; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2016-02-01

    Cells contain powerful RNA decay machinery to eliminate unneeded RNA from the cell, and this process is an important and regulated part of controlling gene expression. However, certain structured RNAs have been found that can robustly resist degradation and extend the lifetime of an RNA. In this review, we present three RNA structures that use a specific three-dimensional fold to provide protection from RNA degradation, and discuss how the recently-solved structures of these RNAs explain their function. Specifically, we describe the Xrn1-resistant RNAs from arthropod-borne flaviviruses, exosome-resistant long non-coding RNAs associated with lung cancer metastasis and found in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and tRNA-like sequences occurring in certain plant viruses. These three structures reveal three different mechanisms to protect RNAs from decay and suggest RNA structure-based nuclease resistance may be a widespread mechanism of regulation. PMID:26797676

  17. Neutrino structure functions in the QCD dipole picture

    CERN Document Server

    Ducati, M B G; Machado, M V T

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution we present an exploratory QCD analysis of the neutrino structure functions in charged current DIS using the color dipole formalism. The corresponding dipole cross sections are taken from recent phenomenological and theoretical studies in deep inelastic inclusive production, including nuclear shadowing corrections. The theoretical predictions are compared to the available experimental results in the small-x region.

  18. Neutrino structure functions in the QCD dipole picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay Ducati, M.B.; Machado, M.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group - GFPAE; Machado, M.V.T. [Universidade Federal do Pampa (UNIPAMPA), Bage, RS (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    In this contribution we present an exploratory QCD analysis of the neutrino structure functions in charged current DIS using the color dipole formalism. The corresponding dipole cross sections are taken from recent phenomenological and theoretical studies in deep inelastic inclusive production, including nuclear shadowing corrections. The theoretical predictions are compared to the available experimental results in the small-x region. (author)

  19. Functional oxide structures on a surface of metals and alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rudnev; V.; S.; Yarovaya; T.; P.; Boguta; D.; L.; Lukiyanchuk; I.; V.; Tyrina; L.; M.; Morozova; V.; P.; Nedozorov; P.; M.; Vasilyeva; M.; S.; Kondrikov; N.; B.

    2005-01-01

    The investigations of the plasma electrolytic processes in our laboratory are aimed to the development of conditions of formation of oxide layers with determined composition, structure and functional properties on the surface of valve metals (Al, Ti) and their alloys.……

  20. Generalized parton distributions and structure functions from full lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here the latest results from the QCDSF collaboration for (moments of) structure functions and generalized form factors in full QCD with Nf=2O(a)-improved Wilson fermions based on simulations closer to the chiral and continuum limit

  1. From structure to function : Protein assemblies dissected by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates some of the possibilities mass spectrometry can provide to gain new insight into structure and function of protein complexes. While technologies in native mass spectrometry are still under development, it already allows research on complete proteins and protein complexes up

  2. The Polarized Structure Function $g_{2} A Lattice Study Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Göckeler, M; Kürzinger, W; Oelrich, H; Rakow, P; Schierholz, G

    1999-01-01

    A recent lattice calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g_2 is revisited. It has been recognized that the twist-three operator, which gives rise to d_2, mixes non-perturbatively with operators of lower dimensions under renormalization. This changes the results substantially.

  3. Structure, function and nutritional potential of milk osteopontin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Brian Søndergaard; Sørensen, Esben Skipper

    2016-01-01

    in cancer related events. In this article, we review the differences between milk-derived OPN and OPN derived from transformed cells and compare the structure of OPN from human and bovine milk. Furthermore, current knowledge about the function of OPN in milk and recent findings about the effect of orally...

  4. Structure and Function of a Nonruminant Gut: A Porcine Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tajima, Kiyoshi; Aminov, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    In many aspects, the anatomical, physiological, and microbial diversity features of the ruminant gut are different from that of the monogastric animals. Thus, the main aim of this chapter is to give a comparative overview of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract of a nonruminan...

  5. The Intestinal Tract: Structure, Function, Disorders and Related Medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Dianne M.

    This instructional guide is intended for use within inservice or continuing education programs for people who work in long-term care facilities. This module includes an overview of the normal functions of the small and large intestines and discusses the structures of the intestines, absorption in the intestines, and commonly occurring conditions…

  6. Glucoamylase: structure/function relationships, and protein engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, J; Sigurskjold, B W; Christensen, U;

    2000-01-01

    fundamental structure/function relationships in the binding and catalytic mechanisms. In parallel, issues of relevance for application have been pursued using protein engineering to improve the industrial properties. The present review focuses on recent findings on the catalytic site, mechanism of action...

  7. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  8. Mass-spectrometric exploration of proteome structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    , the structures and functions of selected proteins have been studied using biochemical and biophysical methods. However, the properties and behaviour of the proteome as an integrated system have largely remained elusive. Powerful mass-spectrometry-based technologies now provide unprecedented insights...

  9. Studies on the structure and function of pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, de R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to obtain more information of the structure and function of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes from Azotobacter vinelandii and Escherichia coli.In chapter 2 a survey is given of the recent literature on pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes.In chapter 3 results

  10. Multi-functional Anti-pollution Construction Structure for Drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Lirong; Yin Weidong; Yang Ping; Wang Rong

    1997-01-01

    @@ Treatment of drilling waste water is the focus of environmental protection for the East Sichuan Drilling Corporation. The three-functional (consists of settling pit, oil interceptor,cistern) construction structure against pollution from drilling waste water was preliminarily improved in 1989.

  11. Structural and functional models for [NiFe] hydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angamuthu, Raja

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of the research presented in this thesis is the synthesis of suitable structural and functional models for the enzyme [NiFe] hydrogenase, which can reduce protons into dihydrogen. A brief survey of the roles of all the known nickel containing enzymes in biological systems with a focus

  12. Regarding Chilcott's "Structural Functionalism as a Heuristic Device" Heuristically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Richard K.

    1998-01-01

    The heuristic value of Chilcott's essay lies less in its support for structural functionalism and more in its concern to reexamine theory in the work of earlier educational anthropologists for what earlier theories and practices can add to current research. (SLD)

  13. Two-dimensional boron nitride structures functionalization: first principles studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Pérez, R; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D hBN) structures functionalization with organic molecules. 2x2, 4x4 and 6x6 periodic 2D hBN layers have been considered to interact with acetylene. To deal with the exchange-correlation energy the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is invoked. The electron-ion interaction is treated with the pseudopotential method. The GGA with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) functionals together with van der Waals interactions are considered to deal with the composed systems. To investigate the functionalization two main configurations have been explored; in one case the molecule interacts with the boron atom and in the other with the nitrogen atom. Results of the adsorption energies indicate chemisorption in both cases. The total density of states (DOS) displays an energy gap in both cases. The projected DOS indicate that the B-p and N-p orbitals are those that make the most important contribution in the valence band and the H-s and C-p orbitals provide an important contribution in the conduction band to the DOS. Provided that the interactions of the acetylene with the 2D layer modify the structural and electronic properties of the hBN the possibility of structural functionalization using organic molecules may be concluded. PMID:27566317

  14. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  15. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules. PMID:27506964

  16. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-11-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of the fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Restrictions: Only three or six significant digits options are provided in this version. Unusual features: Most of the codes are in Fortran77 style. Memory allocation functions from Fortran90 and above are used in a few subroutines. Additional comments: The current version of the codes is designed and written for single core/processor desktop machines. Check http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html for updates and changes. Running time: The running time varies with the number of discretized elements (N) in the system and their distributions. In most cases, it scales linearly as a function of N.

  17. A coarse-grained model for the simulations of biomolecular interactions in cellular environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao, E-mail: yinghao.wu@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Systems and Computational Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    The interactions of bio-molecules constitute the key steps of cellular functions. However, in vivo binding properties differ significantly from their in vitro measurements due to the heterogeneity of cellular environments. Here we introduce a coarse-grained model based on rigid-body representation to study how factors such as cellular crowding and membrane confinement affect molecular binding. The macroscopic parameters such as the equilibrium constant and the kinetic rate constant are calibrated by adjusting the microscopic coefficients used in the numerical simulations. By changing these model parameters that are experimentally approachable, we are able to study the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of molecular binding, as well as the effects caused by specific cellular environments. We investigate the volumetric effects of crowded intracellular space on bio-molecular diffusion and diffusion-limited reactions. Furthermore, the binding constants of membrane proteins are currently difficult to measure. We provide quantitative estimations about how the binding of membrane proteins deviates from soluble proteins under different degrees of membrane confinements. The simulation results provide biological insights to the functions of membrane receptors on cell surfaces. Overall, our studies establish a connection between the details of molecular interactions and the heterogeneity of cellular environments.

  18. Magneto-optical relaxation measurements for the characterization of biomolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the magneto-optical relaxation of ferrofluids (MORFF) were applied as a novel homogeneous immunoassay for the investigation of biomolecular interactions. The technique is based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) functionalized with antibodies. The relaxation time of the optical birefringence that occurs when a pulsed magnetic field is applied to the nanoparticle suspension depends on the particle size. This enables the detection of particle aggregates formed after the addition of the antigen coupling partner. MORFF size measurements on the original ferrofluid and its fractions obtained by magnetic fractionation are comparable with results from other methods such as atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. In kinetic studies, the binding properties of five antigens and their polyclonal antibodies were investigated: human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), human immunoglobulin M (hIgM), human Eotaxin (hEotaxin), human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA), and human insulin (hInsulin). The enlargement of the relaxation time observed during the coupling experiments is expressed in terms of a size distribution function, which includes MNP monomers as well as aggregates. The kinetic process can be described by a model of stepwise polymerization. The kinetic parameters obtained are compared to results of surface plasmon resonance measurements

  19. Calculating free-energy profiles in biomolecular systems from fast nonequilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forney, Michael W.; Janosi, Lorant; Kosztin, Ioan

    2008-11-01

    Often gaining insight into the functioning of biomolecular systems requires to follow their dynamics along a microscopic reaction coordinate (RC) on a macroscopic time scale, which is beyond the reach of current all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A practical approach to this inherently multiscale problem is to model the system as a fictitious overdamped Brownian particle that diffuses along the RC in the presence of an effective potential of mean force (PMF) due to the rest of the system. By employing the recently proposed FR method [I. Kosztin , J. Chem. Phys. 124, 064106 (2006)], which requires only a small number of fast nonequilibrium MD simulations of the system in both forward and time reversed directions along the RC, we reconstruct the PMF: (1) of deca-alanine as a function of its end-to-end distance, and (2) that guides the motion of potassium ions through the gramicidin A channel. In both cases the computed PMFs are found to be in good agreement with previous results obtained by different methods. Our approach appears to be about one order of magnitude faster than the other PMF calculation methods and, in addition, it also provides the position-dependent diffusion coefficient along the RC. Thus, the obtained PMF and diffusion coefficient can be used in an overdamped Brownian model to estimate important characteristics of the studied systems, e.g., the mean folding time of the stretched deca-alanine and the mean diffusion time of the potassium ion through gramicidin A.

  20. Calculating free energy profiles in biomolecular systems from fast non-equilibrium processes

    CERN Document Server

    Forney, Michael; Kosztin, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    Often gaining insight into the functioning of biomolecular systems requires to follow their dynamics along a microscopic reaction coordinate (RC) on a macroscopic time scale, which is beyond the reach of current all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A practical approach to this inherently multiscale problem is to model the system as a fictitious overdamped Brownian particle that diffuses along the RC in the presence of an effective potential of mean force (PMF) due to the rest of the system. By employing the recently proposed FR method [I. Kosztin et al., J. of Chem. Phys. 124, 064106 (2006)], which requires only a small number of fast nonequilibrium MD simulations of the system in both forward and time reversed directions along the RC, we reconstruct the PMF: (1) of deca-alanine as a function of its end-to-end distance, and (2) that guides the motion of potassium ions through the gramicidin A channel. In both cases the computed PMFs are found to be in good agreement with previous results obtained by ...

  1. Computational Recipe for Efficient Description of Large-Scale Conformational Changes in Biomolecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing large-scale structural transitions in biomolecular systems poses major technical challenges to both experimental and computational approaches. On the computational side, efficient sampling of the configuration space along the transition pathway remains the most daunting challenge. Recognizing this issue, we introduce a knowledge-based computational approach toward describing large-scale conformational transitions using (i) nonequilibrium, driven simulations combined with work measurements and (ii) free energy calculations using empirically optimized biasing protocols. The first part is based on designing mechanistically relevant, system-specific reaction coordinates whose usefulness and applicability in inducing the transition of interest are examined using knowledge-based, qualitative assessments along with nonequilirbrium work measurements which provide an empirical framework for optimizing the biasing protocol. The second part employs the optimized biasing protocol resulting from the first part to initiate free energy calculations and characterize the transition quantitatively. Using a biasing protocol fine-tuned to a particular transition not only improves the accuracy of the resulting free energies but also speeds up the convergence. The efficiency of the sampling will be assessed by employing dimensionality reduction techniques to help detect possible flaws and provide potential improvements in the design of the biasing protocol. Structural transition of a membrane transporter will be used as an example to illustrate the workings of the proposed approach.

  2. Protein structure. Direct observation of structure-function relationship in a nucleic acid-processing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Matthew J; Whitley, Kevin D; Jia, Haifeng; Sokoloski, Joshua; Lohman, Timothy M; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R

    2015-04-17

    The relationship between protein three-dimensional structure and function is essential for mechanism determination. Unfortunately, most techniques do not provide a direct measurement of this relationship. Structural data are typically limited to static pictures, and function must be inferred. Conversely, functional assays usually provide little information on structural conformation. We developed a single-molecule technique combining optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy that allows for both measurements simultaneously. Here we present measurements of UvrD, a DNA repair helicase, that directly and unambiguously reveal the connection between its structure and function. Our data reveal that UvrD exhibits two distinct types of unwinding activity regulated by its stoichiometry. Furthermore, two UvrD conformational states, termed "closed" and "open," correlate with movement toward or away from the DNA fork. PMID:25883359

  3. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  4. Structure functions of the nucleon and nuclei in neutrino reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of parton distribution functions in nuclei is important for calculating nuclear corrections in oscillation experiments, from which detailed information should be extracted on neutrino properties. First, nuclear parton distributions are discussed for explaining high-energy nuclear reaction data. Possible nuclear modification is explained for valence-quark and antiquark distributions. It is rather difficult to determine gluon distributions in nuclei. Next, reversing the topic, we discuss structure functions which could be investigated by neutrino reactions. Determination of polarized parton distributions in the nucleon is discussed in polarized neutrino reactions. In addition, neutrino reactions should be important for finding nuclear modification of valence-quark distributions at small x if structure function ratios F3A/F3D are measured for various nuclei

  5. G-quadruplex structures: in vivo evidence and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Hans J; Rhodes, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Although many biochemical and structural studies have demonstrated that DNA sequences containing runs of adjacent guanines spontaneously fold into G-quadruplex DNA structures in vitro, only recently has evidence started to accumulate for their presence and function in vivo. Genome-wide analyses have revealed that functional genomic regions from highly divergent organisms are enriched in DNA sequences with G-quadruplex-forming potential, suggesting that G-quadruplexes could provide a nucleic-acid-based mechanism for regulating telomere maintenance, as well as transcription, replication and translation. Here, we review recent studies aimed at uncovering the in vivo presence and function of G-quadruplexes in genomes and RNA, with a particular focus on telomeric G-quadruplexes and how their formation and resolution is regulated to permit telomere synthesis. PMID:19589679

  6. A-dependence of weak nuclear structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Simo, I. Ruiz [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli studi di Trento Via Sommarive 14, Povo (Trento) I-38123 (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Effect of nuclear medium on the weak structure functions F{sub 2}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) have been studied using charged current (anti)neutrino deep inelastic scattering on various nuclear targets. Relativistic nuclear spectral function which incorporate Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations are used for the calculations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. Using these structure functions, F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup proton} and F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup deuteron}(i=2,3, A={sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, CH and H{sub 2}O) are obtained.

  7. Spectra and structure functions in nonhelical hydromagnetic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Haugen, N E L; Dobler, W; Haugen, Nils Erland L.; Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Nonhelical hydromagnetic turbulence without imposed magnetic field is considered. The magnetic field is entirely due to dynamo action. The structure function exponents scale approximately like in nonmagnetic turbulence and follow the She-Leveque scaling for predominantly one-dimensional (tube-like) dissipative structures. Throughout the inertial range the spectral magnetic energy exceeds the kinetic energy by a factor of 2 to 3, and both spectra are approximately parallel. At first glance, the total energy spectrum seems to be close to k^{-3/2}, but there is a strong bottleneck effect and it is suggested that the asymptotic spectrum is k^{-5/3}. This is supported by the value of the second order structure function exponent that is found to be \\zeta_2=0.70, suggesting a k^{-1.70} spectrum.

  8. CNS structures presumably involved in vagal control of ovarian function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerendai, I; Tóth, I E; Boldogköi, Z; Medveczky, I; Halász, B

    2000-04-12

    The contribution of the vagus nerve to viral transneuronal labeling of brain structures from the ovaries demonstrated recently by us was investigated. Unilateral vagotomy was performed prior to ipsilateral intraovarian virus injection. Virus-infected neurons were visualized by immunostaining. In vagotomized rats such neurons were detected only in certain cell groups of the brain (parapyramidal nucleus, A(1), A(5) cell group, caudal raphe nuclei, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamus). Vagotomy interfered with labeling of several structures that were labeled in controls, including area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal vagal complex, nucleus ambiguus, A(7) cell group, Barrington's nucleus, locus coeruleus, periaqueductal gray, dorsal hypothalamus. Findings provide a morphological basis to study the functional significance of brain structures presumably involved in the control of ovarian function and acting via the vagus or the sympathetic nerves.

  9. Structure and function relationships in IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, J M; Russell, M W

    2011-11-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) has a critical role in immune defense particularly at the mucosal surfaces, and is equipped to do so by the unique structural attributes of its heavy chain and by its ability to polymerize. Here, we provide an overview of human IgA structure, describing the distinguishing features of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses and mapping the sites of interaction with host receptors important for IgA's functional repertoire. Remarkably, these same interaction sites are targeted by binding proteins and proteases produced by various pathogens as a means to subvert the protective IgA response. As interest in the prospect of therapeutic IgA-based monoclonal antibodies grows, the emerging understanding of the relationship between IgA structure and function will be invaluable for maximizing the potential of these novel reagents. PMID:21937984

  10. DMPD: Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106784 Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Carof...html) (.csml) Show Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. PubmedID 12106784 Title Structural and functi...onal analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Authors

  11. Protein Function Prediction Based on Sequence and Structure Information

    KAUST Repository

    Smaili, Fatima Z.

    2016-05-25

    The number of available protein sequences in public databases is increasing exponentially. However, a significant fraction of these sequences lack functional annotation which is essential to our understanding of how biological systems and processes operate. In this master thesis project, we worked on inferring protein functions based on the primary protein sequence. In the approach we follow, 3D models are first constructed using I-TASSER. Functions are then deduced by structurally matching these predicted models, using global and local similarities, through three independent enzyme commission (EC) and gene ontology (GO) function libraries. The method was tested on 250 “hard” proteins, which lack homologous templates in both structure and function libraries. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional prediction methods based on sequence similarity or threading. Additionally, our method could be improved even further by incorporating protein-protein interaction information. Overall, the method we use provides an efficient approach for automated functional annotation of non-homologous proteins, starting from their sequence.

  12. From structure to function via complex supramolecular dendrimer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao-Jan; Zhang, Shaodong; Percec, Virgil

    2015-06-21

    This tutorial review summarizes strategies elaborated for the discovery and prediction of programmed primary structures derived from quasi-equivalent constitutional isomeric libraries of self-assembling dendrons, dendrimers and dendronized polymers. These libraries demonstrate an 82% predictability, defined as the percentage of similar primary structures resulting in at least one conserved supramolecular shape with internal order. A combination of structural and retrostructural analysis that employs methodologies transplanted from structural biology, adapted to giant supramolecular assemblies was used for this process. A periodic table database of programmed primary structures was elaborated and used to facilitate the emergence of a diversity of functions in complex dendrimer systems via first principles. Assemblies generated by supramolecular and covalent polymer backbones were critically compared. Although by definition complex functional systems cannot be designed, this tutorial hints to a methodology based on database analysis principles to facilitate design principles that may help to mediate an accelerated emergence of chemical, physical and most probably also societal, political and economic complex systems on a shorter time scale and lower cost than by the current methods. This tutorial review is limited to the simplest, synthetically most accessible self-assembling minidendrons, minidendrimers and polymers dendronized with minidendrons that are best analyzed and elucidated at molecular, supramolecular and theoretical levels, and most used in other laboratories. These structures are all interrelated, and their principles expand in a simple way to their higher generations. PMID:25325787

  13. Improved Left Ventricular Structure and Function After Successful Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Hewing

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiac changes observed in chronic kidney disease patients are of multifactorial origin including chronic uremia, hemodynamics or inflammation. Restoration of renal function by kidney transplantation (KTX may reverse cardiac changes. Novel echocardiographic methods such as speckle tracking echocardiography (STE allow early and sensitive detection of subtle changes of cardiac parameters. We evaluated changes of cardiac structure and function after KTX by advanced echocardiographic modalities. Methods: Thirty-one KTX recipients (female n=11 were evaluated by medical examination, laboratory testing and echocardiography before and after KTX (median follow-up 19 months. Left ventricular (LV and right ventricular (RV diameters and function were assessed by echocardiographic standard parameters. Longitudinal 2D strain of the LV (GLPS and left atrium (LA was determined by 2D STE. Results: After KTX, median serum creatinine level was 1.3 mg/dl (IQR, 1.2-1.5. Systolic blood pressure decreased significantly after KTX. Echocardiography showed a significant reduction in LV end-diastolic septal and posterior wall thickness and LV mass index after KTX, which was accompanied by an improvement of GLPS. There were no relevant changes in parameters of LA (reservoir, conduit or contractile function, LV diastolic or RV function after KTX. Conclusion: LV hypertrophy reversed after successful KTX and was accompanied by an improvement in longitudinal LV function as assessed by STE. Diastolic function and STE-derived LA function parameters did not change significantly after KTX.

  14. The fidelity of dynamic signaling by noisy biomolecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive G Bowsher

    Full Text Available Cells live in changing, dynamic environments. To understand cellular decision-making, we must therefore understand how fluctuating inputs are processed by noisy biomolecular networks. Here we present a general methodology for analyzing the fidelity with which different statistics of a fluctuating input are represented, or encoded, in the output of a signaling system over time. We identify two orthogonal sources of error that corrupt perfect representation of the signal: dynamical error, which occurs when the network responds on average to other features of the input trajectory as well as to the signal of interest, and mechanistic error, which occurs because biochemical reactions comprising the signaling mechanism are stochastic. Trade-offs between these two errors can determine the system's fidelity. By developing mathematical approaches to derive dynamics conditional on input trajectories we can show, for example, that increased biochemical noise (mechanistic error can improve fidelity and that both negative and positive feedback degrade fidelity, for standard models of genetic autoregulation. For a group of cells, the fidelity of the collective output exceeds that of an individual cell and negative feedback then typically becomes beneficial. We can also predict the dynamic signal for which a given system has highest fidelity and, conversely, how to modify the network design to maximize fidelity for a given dynamic signal. Our approach is general, has applications to both systems and synthetic biology, and will help underpin studies of cellular behavior in natural, dynamic environments.

  15. [Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI). Implications for pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viertler, C; Zatloukal, K

    2008-11-01

    High quality human biological samples (e.g. blood, tissue or DNA) with associated, well documented clinical and research data are key resources for advancement of life sciences, biotechnology, clinical medicine, drug development and also molecular pathology. Millions of samples of diseased tissues have been collected in the context of routine histopathological diagnosis and are stored in the archives of hospitals and institutes of pathology. A concerted effort is necessary to overcome the current fragmentation of the European biobanking community in order to tap the full research potential of existing biobanks. A pan-European research infrastructure for biobanking and biomolecular resources (BBMRI) is currently in its planning phase. The mission is to link and provide access to local biobanks of different formats, including tissue collections, harmonize standards, establish operational procedures which properly consider ethical, legal, societal aspects, and to secure sustainable funding. Pathology plays a key role in development and administration of tissue banks and is, thus, a major partner for collaboration, expertise and construction of this pan-European research infrastructure.

  16. Stochastic Simulation of Biomolecular Networks in Dynamic Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaritis Voliotis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of biomolecular networks is now indispensable for studying biological systems, from small reaction networks to large ensembles of cells. Here we present a novel approach for stochastic simulation of networks embedded in the dynamic environment of the cell and its surroundings. We thus sample trajectories of the stochastic process described by the chemical master equation with time-varying propensities. A comparative analysis shows that existing approaches can either fail dramatically, or else can impose impractical computational burdens due to numerical integration of reaction propensities, especially when cell ensembles are studied. Here we introduce the Extrande method which, given a simulated time course of dynamic network inputs, provides a conditionally exact and several orders-of-magnitude faster simulation solution. The new approach makes it feasible to demonstrate-using decision-making by a large population of quorum sensing bacteria-that robustness to fluctuations from upstream signaling places strong constraints on the design of networks determining cell fate. Our approach has the potential to significantly advance both understanding of molecular systems biology and design of synthetic circuits.

  17. Surface structure of polymer Gels and emerging functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kobiki, Y

    1999-01-01

    We report the surface structure of polymer gels on a submicrometer scale during the volume phase transition. Sponge-like domains with a mesoscopic scale were directly observed in water by using at atomic force microscope (AFM). The surface structure characterized by the domains is discussed in terms of the root-mean-square roughness and the auto-correlation function, which were calculated from the AFM images. In order to demonstrate the role of surface structure in determining the macroscopic properties of film-like poly (N-isopropylacrylamide: NIPA) gels. It was found that the temperature dependence, as well as the absolute values of the static contact angle, were strongly dependent on the bulk network inhomogeneities. The relation between the mesoscopic structure and the macroscopic properties is qualitatively discussed in terms of not only the changes in the chemical, but also in the physical, surface properties of the NIPA gels in response to a temperature change.

  18. Structural determinants of Smad function in TGF-β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Maria J; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Massagué, Joan

    2015-06-01

    Smad transcription factors are central to the signal transduction pathway that mediates the numerous effects of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily of cytokines in metazoan embryo development as well as in adult tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Although Smad proteins are conserved, recent genome-sequencing projects have revealed their sequence variation in metazoan evolution, human polymorphisms, and cancer. Structural studies of Smads bound to partner proteins and target DNA provide a framework for understanding the significance of these evolutionary and pathologic sequence variations. We synthesize the extant mutational and structural data to suggest how genetic variation in Smads may affect the structure, regulation, and function of these proteins. We also present a web application that compares Smad sequences and displays Smad protein structures and their disease-associated variants.

  19. Structure to function: Spider silk and human collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.

    Nature has the ability to assemble a variety of simple molecules into complex functional structures with diverse properties. Collagens, silks and muscles fibers are some examples of fibrous proteins with self-assembling properties. One of the great challenges facing Science is to mimic these designs in Nature to find a way to construct molecules that are capable of organizing into functional supra-structures by self-assembly. In order to do so, a construction kit consisting of molecular building blocks along with a complete understanding on how to form functional materials is required. In this current research, the focus is on spider silk and collagen as fibrous protein-based biopolymers that can shed light on how to generate nanostructures through the complex process of self-assembly. Spider silk in fiber form offers a unique combination of high elasticity, toughness, and mechanical strength, along with biological compatibility and biodegrability. Spider silk is an example of a natural block copolymer, in which hydrophobic and hydrophilic blocks are linked together generating polymers that organize into functional materials with extraordinary properties. Since silks resemble synthetic block copolymer systems, we adopted the principles of block copolymer design from the synthetic polymer literature to build block copolymers based on spider silk sequences. Moreover, we consider spider silk to be an important model with which to study the relationships between structure and properties in our system. Thus, the first part of this work was dedicated to a novel family of spider silk block copolymers, where we generated a new family of functional spider silk-like block copolymers through recombinant DNA technology. To provide fundamental insight into relationships between peptide primary sequence, block composition, and block length and observed morphological and structural features, we used these bioengineered spider silk block copolymers to study secondary structure

  20. Structural and functional loss in restored wetland ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Moreno-Mateos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are among the most productive and economically valuable ecosystems in the world. However, because of human activities, over half of the wetland ecosystems existing in North America, Europe, Australia, and China in the early 20th century have been lost. Ecological restoration to recover critical ecosystem services has been widely attempted, but the degree of actual recovery of ecosystem functioning and structure from these efforts remains uncertain. Our results from a meta-analysis of 621 wetland sites from throughout the world show that even a century after restoration efforts, biological structure (driven mostly by plant assemblages, and biogeochemical functioning (driven primarily by the storage of carbon in wetland soils, remained on average 26% and 23% lower, respectively, than in reference sites. Either recovery has been very slow, or postdisturbance systems have moved towards alternative states that differ from reference conditions. We also found significant effects of environmental settings on the rate and degree of recovery. Large wetland areas (>100 ha and wetlands restored in warm (temperate and tropical climates recovered more rapidly than smaller wetlands and wetlands restored in cold climates. Also, wetlands experiencing more (riverine and tidal hydrologic exchange recovered more rapidly than depressional wetlands. Restoration performance is limited: current restoration practice fails to recover original levels of wetland ecosystem functions, even after many decades. If restoration as currently practiced is used to justify further degradation, global loss of wetland ecosystem function and structure will spread.

  1. Relating methanogen community structure and anaerobic digester function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocher, B T W; Cherukuri, K; Maki, J S; Johnson, M; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown about the relationships between microbial community structure and anaerobic digester function. However, knowledge of links between community structure and function, such as specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and COD removal rate, are valuable to improve anaerobic bioprocesses. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) to predict SMA using methanogen community structure descriptors for 49 cultures. Community descriptors were DGGE demeaned standardized band intensities for amplicons of a methanogen functional gene (mcrA). First, predictive accuracy of MLR QSARs was assessed using cross validation with training (n = 30) and test sets (n = 19) for glucose and propionate SMA data. MLR equations correlating band intensities and SMA demonstrated good predictability for glucose (q(2) = 0.54) and propionate (q(2) = 0.53). Subsequently, data from all 49 cultures were used to develop QSARs to predict SMA values. Higher intensities of two bands were correlated with higher SMA values; high abundance of methanogens associated with these two bands should be encouraged to attain high SMA values. QSARs are helpful tools to identify key microorganisms or to study and improve many bioprocesses. Development of new, more robust QSARs is encouraged for anaerobic digestion or other bioprocesses, including nitrification, nitritation, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal. PMID:25562581

  2. Structure-function investigations of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, M M; Fufina, T Yu; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2011-12-01

    During photosynthesis light energy is converted into energy of chemical bonds through a series of electron and proton transfer reactions. Over the first ultrafast steps of photosynthesis that take place in the reaction center (RC) the quantum efficiency of the light energy transduction is nearly 100%. Compared to the plant and cyanobacterial photosystems, bacterial RCs are well studied and have relatively simple structure. Therefore they represent a useful model system both for manipulating of the electron transfer parameters to study detailed mechanisms of its separate steps as well as to investigate the common principles of the photosynthetic RC structure, function, and evolution. This review is focused on the research papers devoted to chemical and genetic modifications of the RCs of purple bacteria in order to study principles and mechanisms of their functioning. Investigations of the last two decades show that the maximal rates of the electron transfer reactions in the RC depend on a number of parameters. Chemical structure of the cofactors, distances between them, their relative orientation, and interactions to each other are of great importance for this process. By means of genetic and spectral methods, it was demonstrated that RC protein is also an essential factor affecting the efficiency of the photochemical charge separation. Finally, some of conservative water molecules found in RC not only contribute to stability of the protein structure, but are directly involved in the functioning of the complex.

  3. Structure and Function of the LmbE-like Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Viars

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The LmbE-like superfamily is comprised of a series of enzymes that use a single catalytic metal ion to catalyze the hydrolysis of various substrates. These substrates are often key metabolites for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which makes the LmbE-like enzymes important targets for drug development. Herein we review the structure and function of the LmbE-like proteins identified to date. While this is the newest superfamily of metallohydrolases, a growing number of functionally interesting proteins from this superfamily have been characterized. Available crystal structures of LmbE-like proteins reveal a Rossmann fold similar to lactate dehydrogenase, which represented a novel fold for (zinc metallohydrolases at the time the initial structure was solved. The structural diversity of the N-acetylglucosamine containing substrates affords functional diversity for the LmbE-like enzyme superfamily. The majority of enzymes identified to date are metal-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the hydrolysis of a N-acetylglucosamine moiety on substrate using a combination of amino acid side chains and a single bound metal ion, predominantly zinc. The catalytic zinc is coordinated to proteins via His2-Asp-solvent binding site. Additionally, studies indicate that protein dynamics play important roles in regulating access to the active site and facilitating catalysis for at least two members of this protein superfamily.

  4. Analysis of the proton longitudinal structure function from the gluon distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We make a critical, next-to-leading order, study of the relationship between the longitudinal structure function FL and the gluon distribution proposed in Cooper-Sarkar et al. (Z. Phys. C 39:281, 1988; Acta Phys. Pol. B 34:2911 2003), which is frequently used to extract the gluon distribution from the proton longitudinal structure function at small x. The gluon density is obtained by expanding at particular choices of the point of expansion and compared with the hard Pomeron behavior for the gluon density. Comparisons with H1 data are made and predictions for the proposed best approach are also provided. (orig.)

  5. Structure-function analysis of human protein Ero1-Lα

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human Ero1-Lα catalyzes the formation of disulfide bond and hence plays an essential role in protein folding. Understanding the mechanism of disulfide bond formation in mammals is important because of the involvement of protein misfolding in conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, cancer, and aging. However, the crystal structure of the enzyme is not available yet, which seriously hinders the understanding of biological function of Ero1-Lα. Based on the crystal structure of yeast Ero1p, a rational three-dimensional structural model of Ero1-Lα was built and the characteristics of the enzyme were hence investigated. The characteristic similarities and differences between Ero1-Lα and Ero1p were compared on the basis of computational and experimental results, providing the first insight into the structure-function relationships of the enzymes. Both calculation and experiment got the concordant conclusion that FAD binds more tightly with Ero1-Lα than Ero1p. In addition, the probable electron transfer pathway was proposed on the basis of the structural models.

  6. Atomic structures of 13-atom clusters by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Wei, Ching-Ming

    2007-03-01

    The 13-atom cluster structures of the alkaline metals, alkaline earth metals, boron group, 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals in the periodic table, and Pb are investigated by density functional theory with three kinds of exchange correlation approximation: i) LDA (Local Density Approximation), ii) GGA (Generalized Gradient Approximation) [1], and iii) PBE (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) [2]. The results mainly focus on five 3-D structures: icosahedral, cuboctahedral, hexagonal-closed packed, body-center cubic, decahedral, and the other two layer structures: buckled biplanar (bbp) and garrison-cap biplanar (gbp) structures. Limited by accuracy of exchange correlation approximation, two interesting results are found. The ground states of Ca13, Sr13, Ba13, Sc13, Y13, La13, Ti13, Zr13, and Hf13 are icosahedral structures. The clusters of Ir13, Pt13, Cu13, Ag13, and Au13 are more favorable for layer structures (i.e. bbp and gbp) than the other five 3-D structures. [1] J. P. Perdew et al., Phys. Rev. B 46, 6671 (1992). [2] J. P. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996).

  7. Molecular structure and biological function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the core component of replication complex in eukaryote.As a processive factor of DNA polymerase delta, PCNA coordinates the replication process by interacting with various replication proteins. PCNA appears to play an essential role in many cell events, such as DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, through the coordination or organization of different partners. PCNA is an essential factor in cell proliferation, and has clinical significance in tumor research. In this article we review the functional structure of PCNA, which acts as a function switch in different cell events.

  8. Nuclear medium modification of the F2 structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function $F_{2}(x, Q^2)$ in nuclei in the deep inelastic lepton nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations for nuclear matter. The ratios $R_{F2}^A(x,Q^2)=\\frac{2F_2^A(x,Q^2)}{AF_{2}^{Deut}(x,Q^2)}$ are obtained and compared with the recent JLAB results for light nuclei that show a non trivial A dependence.

  9. Nuclear effects in F_3 structure function of nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2007-01-01

    We study nuclear effects in the $F^A_3(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino reactions on iron by using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral functions in the nucleus. The results for the ratio $R(x,Q^2)=\\frac{F^A_3(x,Q^2)}{AF^N_3(x, Q^2)}$ and the Gross-Llewellyn Smith(GLS) integral $G(x,Q^2)=\\int_x^1 dx F^A_3(x,Q^2)$ in nuclei are discussed and compared with the recent results available in literature from theoretical and phenomenological analyses of experimental data.

  10. Structure functions of nuclei in the ''instant'' form of dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convolution formulas for the inelastic structure functions of a nucleus are derived using the ''instant'' form of relativistic particle dynamics, and are contrasted with other convolution approaches. Using only physical nucleon constituents and harmonic oscillator shell model wave functions, the magnitude of the dip in the European Muon Collaboration ratio in the intermediate range of x is reproduced. The calculations of this ratio fail to come back up towards unity as x decreases below 0.4, and possible reasons for this are discussed

  11. Nucleon effective mass and the A dependence of structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Canal, C.A.; Santangelo, E.M.; Vucetich, H.

    1984-10-08

    The nucleon effective mass was successfully used, as the only free parameter, to adjust the ratio R(A) of structure functions measured in a nucleus of mass number A and in the deuteron, for each A value in the SLAC set of experimental data. The resulting A dependence of the effective mass, being linear in A/sup -1/3/, is consistent with the behavior expected from nuclear structure considerations. The extrapolated value of the effective mass for nuclear matter agrees with previous estimations.

  12. Structure-Function-Property-Design Interplay in Biopolymers: Spider Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures, and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. PMID:23962644

  13. Structural and functional topography of the human ribosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dmitri Graifer; Galina Karpova

    2012-01-01

    This review covers data on the structural organization of functional sites in the human ribosome,namely,the messenger RNA binding center,the binding site of the hepatitis C virus RNA internal ribosome entry site,and the peptidyl transferase center.The data summarized here have been obtained primarily by means of a site-directed crosslinking approach with application of the analogs of the respective ribosomal ligands bearing cross-linkers at the designed positions.These data are discussed taking into consideration available structural data on ribosomes from various kingdoms obtained with the use of cryo-electron microscopy,X-ray crystallography,and other approaches.

  14. Density Functional Study of the structural properties in Tamoxifen

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Coss-Martinez, Romeo; Tapia, Jorge A.; Quijano-Quiñones, Ramiro F.; Canto, Gabriel I.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density functional theory, we have studied the structural properties of Tamoxifen. The calculations were performed with two methodological approaches, which were implemented in SIESTA and Spartan codes. For SIESTA, we considerate a linear combination of atomic orbitals method, using pseudopotentials and the van der Waals approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Here we analyzed and compared the atomic structure between our results and other theoretical study. We found differences in the bond lengths between the results, that could be attributed to code approaches in each one. This work was supported under Grant FOMIX 2011-09 N: 170297 of Ph.D. A. Tapia.

  15. Effects of Tai Ji Exercise on Bone Structure and Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hong; David Lawson

    2005-01-01

    To evaluated the effects of the 24 movements Tai Ji exercise on bone structure and function. Broadband Ultrsonic Attenuation (BUA) and velocity of sound (VOS), bone formation marker Osteocalcin (OSTN) and bone resorption markers urinary Pyridum crosslinks (PYR and D-PYR) were studied before and after four months of Tai Ji exercise. Improved bone structure and increased bone density in menopausal women were reflected by BUA results. The increased BUA appears to be associated with increased bone formation rather than decreased bone resorption.

  16. The structure and function of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate most of our physiological responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and environmental stimulants, and so have great potential as therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. They are also fascinating molecules from the perspective of membrane......-protein structure and biology. Great progress has been made over the past three decades in understanding diverse GPCRs, from pharmacology to functional characterization in vivo. Recent high-resolution structural studies have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR activation and constitutive...

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of RIG-I Like Helicases -

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchhofer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The cytosolic helicases RIG-I and MDA5 are primary sensors for viral RNA during infection. Although their overall role as key players in the antiviral response and the induced signaling pathways have been elucidated in great detail over the past years, a structural and functional understanding of virus recognition by these sensors is missing. On the basis of an X-ray structure of RIG-I RD the 5’-triphosphate interaction site could be mapped to a previously identified positively charged groove...

  18. A van der Waals density functional mapping of attraction in DNA dimers

    OpenAIRE

    Londero, Elisa; Hyldgaard, Per; Schroder, Elsebeth

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion interaction between a pair of parallel DNA double-helix structures is investigated by means of the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) method. Each double-helix structure consists of an infinite repetition of one B-DNA coil with 10 base pairs. This parameter-free density functional theory (DFT) study illustrates the initial step in a proposed vdW-DF computational strategy for large biomolecular problems. The strategy is to first perform a survey of interaction geometries,...

  19. Nanoscale Biomolecular Detection Limit for Gold Nanoparticles Based on Near-Infrared Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario D’Acunto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been widely used during the past few years in various technical and biomedical applications. In particular, the resonance optical properties of nanometer-sized particles have been employed to design biochips and biosensors used as analytical tools. The optical properties of nonfunctionalized gold nanoparticles and core-gold nanoshells play a crucial role for the design of biosensors where gold surface is used as a sensing component. Gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent optical tunability at visible and near-infrared frequencies leading to sharp peaks in their spectral extinction. In this paper, we study how the optical properties of gold nanoparticles and core-gold nanoshells are changed as a function of different sizes, shapes, composition, and biomolecular coating with characteristic shifts towards the near-infrared region. We show that the optical tenability can be carefully tailored for particle sizes falling in the range 100–150 nm. The results should improve the design of sensors working at the detection limit.

  20. Bridge- and Solvent-Mediated Intramolecular Electronic Communications in Ubiquinone-Based Biomolecular Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yuan; Ma, Wei; Zhou, Hao; Cao, Xiao-Ming; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-05-01

    Intramolecular electronic communications of molecular wires play a crucial role for developing molecular devices. In the present work, we describe different degrees of intramolecular electronic communications in the redox processes of three ubiquinone-based biomolecular wires (Bis-CoQ0s) evaluated by electrochemistry and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods in different solvents. We found that the bridges linkers have a significant effect on the electronic communications between the two peripheral ubiquinone moieties and solvents effects are limited and mostly depend on the nature of solvents. The DFT calculations for the first time indicate the intensity of the electronic communications during the redox processes rely on the molecular orbital elements VL for electron transfer (half of the energy splitting of the LUMO and LUMO+1), which is could be affected by the bridges linkers. The DFT calculations also demonstrates the effect of solvents on the latter two-electron transfer of Bis-CoQ0s is more significant than the former two electrons transfer as the observed electrochemical behaviors of three Bis-CoQ0s. In addition, the electrochemistry and theoretical calculations reveal the intramolecular electronic communications vary in the four-electron redox processes of three Bis-CoQ0s.

  1. A new source for quantum optics with biomolecules and biomolecular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marksteiner, Markus; Haslinger, Philipp; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2008-03-01

    We present recent progress towards matter wave experiments with amino acids, polypeptides and large biomolecular clusters. All successful experiments on macromolecule interferometry so far, with fullerenes, fullerene derivates and large perfluoroalkyl-functionalized azobenzenes used effusive beam sources. The combination of Stark deflectometry with quantum interferometry also allowed us to create a new device for precisely measuring electric susceptibilities of large molecules in the gas phase. In order to apply quantum interference to molecules of biological interest, we have now implemented a pulsed laser desorption source. The combination of UV laser desorption into an intense noble gas jet and single-photon ionization by a VUV excimer laser (157nm) allows us to observe intense neutral jets of amino acids (e.g. Tryptophan), nucleotides (e.g. Guanin) and polypeptides ranging from tri-peptides to Gramicidin. Remarkably, we also found a new method for producing large neutral amino acid clusters, such as for instance Trp30, with masses exceeding 6000 amu: the addition of alkaline Earth salts in the desorption process leads to the inclusion of at least one metal atom per complex and is sufficient to catalyze the cluster formation process.

  2. A method for rapid quantitative assessment of biofilms with biomolecular staining and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Curtis; Winder, Eric; Jeters, Robert; Prowant, Matthew; Nettleship, Ian; Addleman, Raymond Shane; Bonheyo, George T

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of bacteria in surface-attached biofilms can be detrimental to human health, dental hygiene, and many industrial processes. Natural biofilms are soft and often transparent, and they have heterogeneous biological composition and structure over micro- and macroscales. As a result, it is challenging to quantify the spatial distribution and overall intensity of biofilms. In this work, a new method was developed to enhance the visibility and quantification of bacterial biofilms. First, broad-spectrum biomolecular staining was used to enhance the visibility of the cells, nucleic acids, and proteins that make up biofilms. Then, an image analysis algorithm was developed to objectively and quantitatively measure biofilm accumulation from digital photographs and results were compared to independent measurements of cell density. This new method was used to quantify the growth intensity of Pseudomonas putida biofilms as they grew over time. This method is simple and fast, and can quantify biofilm growth over a large area with approximately the same precision as the more laborious cell counting method. Stained and processed images facilitate assessment of spatial heterogeneity of a biofilm across a surface. This new approach to biofilm analysis could be applied in studies of natural, industrial, and environmental biofilms.

  3. A method for rapid quantitative assessment of biofilms with biomolecular staining and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Curtis; Winder, Eric; Jeters, Robert; Prowant, Matthew; Nettleship, Ian; Addleman, Raymond Shane; Bonheyo, George T

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of bacteria in surface-attached biofilms can be detrimental to human health, dental hygiene, and many industrial processes. Natural biofilms are soft and often transparent, and they have heterogeneous biological composition and structure over micro- and macroscales. As a result, it is challenging to quantify the spatial distribution and overall intensity of biofilms. In this work, a new method was developed to enhance the visibility and quantification of bacterial biofilms. First, broad-spectrum biomolecular staining was used to enhance the visibility of the cells, nucleic acids, and proteins that make up biofilms. Then, an image analysis algorithm was developed to objectively and quantitatively measure biofilm accumulation from digital photographs and results were compared to independent measurements of cell density. This new method was used to quantify the growth intensity of Pseudomonas putida biofilms as they grew over time. This method is simple and fast, and can quantify biofilm growth over a large area with approximately the same precision as the more laborious cell counting method. Stained and processed images facilitate assessment of spatial heterogeneity of a biofilm across a surface. This new approach to biofilm analysis could be applied in studies of natural, industrial, and environmental biofilms. PMID:26643074

  4. Biomolecular environment, quantification, and intracellular interaction of multifunctional magnetic SERS nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Tina; Drescher, Daniela; Merk, Virginia; Traub, Heike; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Jakubowski, Norbert; Schneider, Gerd; Kneipp, Janina

    2016-08-15

    Multifunctional composite nanoprobes consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles linked to silver and gold nanoparticles, Ag-Magnetite and Au-Magnetite, respectively, were introduced by endocytic uptake into cultured fibroblast cells. The cells containing the non-toxic nanoprobes were shown to be displaceable in an external magnetic field and can be manipulated in microfluidic channels. The distribution of the composite nanostructures that are contained in the endosomal system is discussed on the basis of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mapping, quantitative laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) micromapping, and cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo soft-XRT). Cryo soft-XRT of intact, vitrified cells reveals that the composite nanoprobes form intra-endosomal aggregates. The nanoprobes provide SERS signals from the biomolecular composition of their surface in the endosomal environment. The SERS data indicate the high stability of the nanoprobes and of their plasmonic properties in the harsh environment of endosomes and lysosomes. The spectra point at the molecular composition at the surface of the Ag-Magnetite and Au-Magnetite nanostructures that is very similar to that of other composite structures, but different from the composition of pure silver and gold SERS nanoprobes used for intracellular investigations. As shown by the LA-ICP-MS data, the uptake efficiency of the magnetite composites is approximately two to three times higher than that of the pure gold and silver nanoparticles. PMID:27353290

  5. Indirect readout in protein-peptide recognition: a different story from classical biomolecular recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua; Zhou, Peng; Deng, Maolin; Shang, Zhicai

    2014-07-28

    Protein-peptide interactions are prevalent and play essential roles in many living activities. Peptides recognize their protein partners by direct nonbonded interactions and indirect adjustment of conformations. Although processes of protein-peptide recognition have been comprehensively studied in both sequences and structures recently, flexibility of peptides and the configuration entropy penalty in recognition did not get enough attention. In this study, 20 protein-peptide complexes and their corresponding unbound peptides were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Energy analysis revealed that configurational entropy penalty introduced by restriction of the degrees of freedom of peptides in indirect readout process of protein-peptide recognition is significant. Configurational entropy penalty has become the main content of the indirect readout energy in protein-peptide recognition instead of deformation energy which is the main source of the indirect readout energy in classical biomolecular recognition phenomena, such as protein-DNA binding. These results provide us a better understanding of protein-peptide recognition and give us some implications in peptide ligand design.

  6. Computational design of proteins with novel structure and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yang; Lu-Hua, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of proteins is a relatively new field, where scientists search the enormous sequence space for sequences that can fold into desired structure and perform desired functions. With the computational approach, proteins can be designed, for example, as regulators of biological processes, novel enzymes, or as biotherapeutics. These approaches not only provide valuable information for understanding of sequence-structure-function relations in proteins, but also hold promise for applications to protein engineering and biomedical research. In this review, we briefly introduce the rationale for computational protein design, then summarize the recent progress in this field, including de novo protein design, enzyme design, and design of protein-protein interactions. Challenges and future prospects of this field are also discussed. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB910300), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012AA020308), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11021463).

  7. Myoglobin structure and function: A multiweek biochemistry laboratory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P; Kirk, Sarah R; Meyer, Scott C; Holman, Karen L McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure, students work with computer modeling and visualization of myoglobin and its homologues, after which they spectroscopically characterize its thermal denaturation. Students also study protein function (ligand binding equilibrium) and are instructed on topics in data analysis (calibration curves, nonlinear vs. linear regression). This upper division biochemistry laboratory project is a challenging and rewarding one that not only exposes students to a wide variety of important biochemical laboratory techniques but also ties those techniques together to work with a single readily available and easily characterized protein, myoglobin.

  8. Alu element-containing RNAs maintain nucleolar structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Seiler, Jeanette; Németh, Attila; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-11-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a key role in organizing the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By combining fluorescence microscopy and RNA deep-sequencing-based analysis, we found that RNA polymerase II transcripts originating from intronic Alu elements (aluRNAs) were enriched in the nucleolus. Antisense-oligo-mediated depletion of aluRNAs or drug-induced inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity disrupted nucleolar structure and impaired RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription of rRNA genes. In contrast, overexpression of a prototypic aluRNA sequence increased both nucleolus size and levels of pre-rRNA, suggesting a functional link between aluRNA, nucleolus integrity and pre-rRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we show that aluRNAs interact with nucleolin and target ectopic genomic loci to the nucleolus. Our study suggests an aluRNA-based mechanism that links RNA polymerase I and II activities and modulates nucleolar structure and rRNA production.

  9. Political ideology: its structure, functions, and elective affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, John T; Federico, Christopher M; Napier, Jaime L

    2009-01-01

    Ideology has re-emerged as an important topic of inquiry among social, personality, and political psychologists. In this review, we examine recent theory and research concerning the structure, contents, and functions of ideological belief systems. We begin by defining the construct and placing it in historical and philosophical context. We then examine different perspectives on how many (and what types of) dimensions individuals use to organize their political opinions. We investigate (a) how and to what extent individuals acquire the discursive contents associated with various ideologies, and (b) the social-psychological functions that these ideologies serve for those who adopt them. Our review highlights "elective affinities" between situational and dispositional needs of individuals and groups and the structure and contents of specific ideologies. Finally, we consider the consequences of ideology, especially with respect to attitudes, evaluations, and processes of system justification. PMID:19035826

  10. Liver transplant structure and function: Evaluation by HIDA scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-one patients who had received liver transplants at UCLA underwent a total of 146 HIDA imaging studies over an 18-month period. Sixty-seven scans were normal; and 79 were abnormal and accurately indicated 118 abnormalities of hepatic structure or function. Structural abnormalities, confirmed on US, included infarcts (five patients), extravasation of bile (two), ischemia (two), biliary obstruction (two), and perihepatic abscess (one). Liver function was graded based on relative uptake and excretion of HIDA. In four patients with hepatocellular dysfunction, In-111 white blood cell scanning was helpful in identifying cytomegalovirus as the etiology. In the UCLA liver transplant program, HIDA has played a key role in demarcating the various causes of hepatic dysfunction in liver transplant recipients. It is currently the first diagnostic study of choice for evaluating these patients at the center

  11. Evolutionary perspectives of telomerase RNA structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase is the eukaryotic solution to the 'end-replication problem' of linear chromosomes by synthesising the highly repetitive DNA constituent of telomeres, the nucleoprotein cap that protects chromosome termini. Functioning as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme, telomerase is minimally composed of the highly conserved catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and essential telomerase RNA (TR) component. Beyond merely providing the template for telomeric DNA synthesis, TR is an innate telomerase component and directly facilitates enzymatic function. TR accomplishes this by having evolved structural elements for stable assembly with the TERT protein and the regulation of the telomerase catalytic cycle. Despite its prominence and prevalence, TR has profoundly diverged in length, sequence, and biogenesis pathway among distinct evolutionary lineages. This diversity has generated numerous structural and mechanistic solutions for ensuring proper RNP formation and high fidelity telomeric DNA synthesis. Telomerase provides unique insights into RNA and protein coevolution within RNP enzymes. PMID:27359343

  12. Heart Valve Structure and Function in Development and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The mature heart valves are made up of highly organized extracellular matrix (ECM) and valve interstitial cells (VIC) surrounded by an endothelial cell layer. The ECM of the valves is stratified into elastin-, proteoglycan- and collagen-rich layers that confer distinct biomechanical properties to the leaflets and supporting structures. Signaling pathways have critical functions in primary valvulogenesis as well as maintenance of valve structure and function over time. Animal models provide powerful tools to study valve development and disease processes. Valve disease is a significant public health problem and increasing evidence implicates aberrant developmental mechanisms underlying pathogenesis. Further studies are necessary to determine regulatory pathway interactions underlying pathogenesis in order to generate new avenues for novel therapeutics. PMID:20809794

  13. The adventitia: essential regulator of vascular wall structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Kurt R; Yeager, Michael E; El Kasmi, Karim C; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V; Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette R; Frid, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    The vascular adventitia acts as a biological processing center for the retrieval, integration, storage, and release of key regulators of vessel wall function. It is the most complex compartment of the vessel wall and is composed of a variety of cells, including fibroblasts, immunomodulatory cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), progenitor cells, vasa vasorum endothelial cells and pericytes, and adrenergic nerves. In response to vascular stress or injury, resident adventitial cells are often the first to be activated and reprogrammed to influence the tone and structure of the vessel wall; to initiate and perpetuate chronic vascular inflammation; and to stimulate expansion of the vasa vasorum, which can act as a conduit for continued inflammatory and progenitor cell delivery to the vessel wall. This review presents the current evidence demonstrating that the adventitia acts as a key regulator of vascular wall function and structure from the outside in. PMID:23216413

  14. Structural and functional characterization of barium zirconium titanate / epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric behavior of composite materials (barium zirconium titanate / epoxy system was analyzed as a function of ceramic concentration. Structure and morphologic behavior of the composites was investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses. Composites were prepared by mixing the components and pouring them into suitable moulds. It was demonstrated that the amount of inorganic phase affects the morphology of the presented composites. XRD revealed the presence of a single phase while Raman scattering confirmed structural transitions as a function of ceramic concentration. Changes in the ceramic concentration affected Raman modes and the distribution of particles along into in epoxy matrix. Dielectric permittivity and dielectric losses were influenced by filler concentration.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Multimodality imaging of structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, D. W.

    2008-02-01

    Historically, medical devices to image either anatomical structure or functional processes have developed along somewhat independent paths. The recognition that combining images from different modalities can nevertheless offer significant diagnostic advantages gave rise to sophisticated software techniques to coregister structure and function. Recently, alternatives to retrospective software-based fusion have become available through instrumentation that combines two imaging modalities within a single device, an approach that has since been termed hardware fusion. As a result, following their recent introduction into the clinic, combined PET/CT and SPECT/CT devices are now playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of human disease. Recently, although limited to the brain, the first clinical MR scanner with a PET insert, a technically-challenging design, has been undergoing evaluation. This review will follow the development of multimodality instrumentation for clinical use from conception to present-day technology and assess the status and future potential for such devices.

  16. Structural and Function Prediction of Musa acuminata subsp. Malaccensis Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Munir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypothetical proteins (HPs are the proteins whose presence has been anticipated, yet in vivo function has not been built up. Illustrating the structural and functional privileged insights of these HPs might likewise prompt a superior comprehension of the protein-protein associations or networks in diverse types of life. Bananas (Musa acuminata spp., including sweet and cooking types, are giant perennial monocotyledonous herbs of the order Zingiberales, a sister grouped to the all-around considered Poales, which incorporate oats. Bananas are crucial for nourishment security in numerous tropical and subtropical nations and the most prominent organic product in industrialized nations. In the present study, the hypothetical protein of M. acuminata (Banana was chosen for analysis and modeling by distinctive bioinformatics apparatuses and databases. As indicated by primary and secondary structure analysis, XP_009393594.1 is a stable hydrophobic protein containing a noteworthy extent of α-helices; Homology modeling was done utilizing SWISS-MODEL server where the templates identity with XP_009393594.1 protein was less which demonstrated novelty of our protein. Ab initio strategy was conducted to produce its 3D structure. A few evaluations of quality assessment and validation parameters determined the generated protein model as stable with genuinely great quality. Functional analysis was completed by ProtFun 2.2, and KEGG (KAAS, recommended that the hypothetical protein is a transcription factor with cytoplasmic domain as zinc finger. The protein was observed to be vital for translation process, involved in metabolism, signaling and cellular processes, genetic information processing and Zinc ion binding. It is suggested that further test approval would help to anticipate the structures and functions of other uncharacterized proteins of different plants and living being.

  17. In Medium Nucleon Structure Functions, SRC, and the EMC effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hen, O; Gilad, S; Wood, S A

    2014-01-01

    A proposal approved by the Jefferson Lab PAC to study semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) off the deuteron, tagged with high momentum recoiling protons or neutrons emitted at large angle relative to the momentum transfer. This experiment aims at studying the virtuality dependence of the bound nucleon structure function as a possible cause to the EMC effect and the EMC-SRC correlations. The experiment was approved in 2011 for a total run time of 40 days.

  18. Proton Spin Structure Functions and Quark-Hadron Duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Quark-hadron duality of three proton spin structure functions g1, g2 and gT are discussed simultaneously. It is found that the onsets of the quark-hadron dualities of g1p, g2p and g3p are similar and they are expected to be at about Q2 ~ 2 GeV2. In addition, our results show that the elastic peak remarkably breaks local quark-hadron duality.

  19. Fibroblast Growth Factor–23 and Cardiac Structure and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Isha; Ide, Noriko; Ix, Joachim H.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Lanske, Beate; Schiller, Nelson B.; Mary A Whooley; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fibroblast growth factor–23 (FGF‐23) is a phosphaturic factor previously associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction among individuals with chronic kidney disease. Whether FGF‐23 acts directly to induce left ventricular hypertrophy, potentially independent of its klotho coreceptor, remains uncertain. We investigated associations of FGF‐23 with cardiac structural abnormalities among individuals with a broad range of kidney function and explored potential b...

  20. Dissecting the two models of TCR structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Melvin

    2016-08-01

    There are only two comprehensive models attempting to account for the TCR structure-function relationships, referred to as the Standard or Centric model (Model I) and the Tritope model (Model II). This essay is written to analyze comparatively the two formulations of restrictive reactivity, stressing in particular the logic of each. Model I is essentially built on an analogy between the TCR and the BCR. Given a TCR with only one combining site (paratope), restrictive recognition requires that its ligand be viewed as a composite structure between the peptide and restricting element. It is this relationship that entrains a set of correlates that makes Model I untenable. Model II is predicated on the postulate that the recognition of the allele-specific determinants expressed by MHC-encoded restricting elements (R) is germline encoded and selected, whereas the recognition of peptide (P) is somatically encoded and selected. These selective pressures must operate on definable structures and this, in turn, necessitates a multiply recognitive T cell antigen receptor (TCR) with independent anti-R and anti-P paratopes that function coherently to signal restrictive reactivity. The consequences of this "two repertoire" postulate give us a concept of TCR structure quite distinct from that at present generally accepted, as well as a surprising relationship between numbers of functional TCR V gene segments and allele-specific determinants in the species. In the end, both models must deal with the relationship between the epitope-paratope interaction(s) and the signals to the T cell necessary for its differentiation and function. PMID:27114367

  1. The structure and function of interdisciplinary health teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, H L

    1980-01-01

    A useful definition of the function of the interdisciplinary health team includes issues of goal identification, efficiency, effectiveness, practicality, and relevance. Criteria for determining the structure of the team involve the specific objectives to be met, administrative systems that are available, creating an atmosphere of mutual respect and professional esteem, and maintaining a proper arena for intellectual growth. Teamwork has certain disadvantages, however, and is probably not for everyone. PMID:7448366

  2. Structural, Functional and Evolutionary Studies on Prolyl-Hydroxylases

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, John Salvatore; Christopher J. Schofield

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the prolyl-hydroxylase family of 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenases from structural, functional and evolutionary perspectives. The role of prolyl-hydroxylation was first identified in collagen, wherein hydroxyproline was found to stabilise the collagen triple helix. In the 1960s, the presence of hydroxyproline in collagen was found to be a result of enzyme catalysed protein modification. An enzyme, now known as collagen prolyl-4-hydroxylase (CP4H), was found to be com...

  3. Advances on statistical/thermodynamical models for unpolarized structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the eights and nineties many statistical/thermodynamical models were proposed to describe the nucleons’ structure functions and distribution of the quarks in the hadrons. Most of these models describe the compound quarks and gluons inside the nucleon as a Fermi / Bose gas respectively, confined in a MIT bag with continuous energy levels. Another models considers discrete spectrum. Some interesting features of the nucleons are obtained by these models, like the sea asymmetries -d/-u and -d–-u.

  4. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S Hubbard

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC, whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease

  5. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  6. Brain Functional and Structural Predictors of Language Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeide, Michael A; Brauer, Jens; Friederici, Angela D

    2016-05-01

    The relation between brain function and behavior on the one hand and the relation between structural changes and behavior on the other as well as the link between the 2 aspects are core issues in cognitive neuroscience. It is an open question, however, whether brain function or brain structure is the better predictor for age-specific cognitive performance. Here, in a comprehensive set of analyses, we investigated the direct relation between hemodynamic activity in 2 pairs of frontal and temporal cortical areas, 2 long-distance white matter fiber tracts connecting each pair and sentence comprehension performance of 4 age groups, including 3 groups of children between 3 and 10 years as well as young adults. We show that the increasing accuracy of processing complex sentences throughout development is correlated with the blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation of 2 core language processing regions in Broca's area and the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus. Moreover, both accuracy and speed of processing are correlated with the maturational status of the arcuate fasciculus, that is, the dorsal white matter fiber bundle connecting these 2 regions. The present data provide compelling evidence for the view that brain function and white matter structure together best predict developing cognitive performance. PMID:25770126

  7. Detailed Measurements of Structure Functions from Nucleons and Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment will study deep inelastic muon nucleon scattering in a wide range of Q|2~(1-200 (GeV/c)|2) and x~(0.005-0.75). The main aims of the experiment are: \\item a)~~~~Detailed measurements of the nuclear dependence of the structure function F^2|A, of R~=~@s^L/@s^T and of the cross-section for J/@y production. They will provide a basis for the understanding of the EMC effect: the modification of quark and gluon distributions due to the nuclear environment. \\item b)~~~~A simultaneous high luminosity measurement of the structure function F^2 on hydrogen and deuterium. This will provide substantially improved accuracy in the knowledge of the neutron structure function F^2|n, of F^2|p-F^2|n and F^2|n/F^2|p and their Q|2 dependence. Furthermore, the data will allow a determination of the strong coupling constant @a^s(Q|2) with reduced experimental and theoretical uncertainties as well as of the ratio of the down to up quark distributions in the valence region. Due to the large x range covered by the experim...

  8. Time Variability of Quasars: the Structure Function Variance

    CERN Document Server

    MacLeod, C; De Vries, W; Sesar, B; Becker, A

    2008-01-01

    Significant progress in the description of quasar variability has been recently made by employing SDSS and POSS data. Common to most studies is a fundamental assumption that photometric observations at two epochs for a large number of quasars will reveal the same statistical properties as well-sampled light curves for individual objects. We critically test this assumption using light curves for a sample of $\\sim$2,600 spectroscopically confirmed quasars observed about 50 times on average over 8 years by the SDSS stripe 82 survey. We find that the dependence of the mean structure function computed for individual quasars on luminosity, rest-frame wavelength and time is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the behavior of the structure function derived from two-epoch observations of a much larger sample. We also reproduce the result that the variability properties of radio and X-ray selected subsamples are different. However, the scatter of the variability structure function for fixed values of luminosity...

  9. Time Variability of Quasars: the Structure Function Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, C.; Ivezić, Ž.; de Vries, W.; Sesar, B.; Becker, A.

    2008-12-01

    Significant progress in the description of quasar variability has been recently made by employing SDSS and POSS data. Common to most studies is a fundamental assumption that photometric observations at two epochs for a large number of quasars will reveal the same statistical properties as well-sampled light curves for individual objects. We critically test this assumption using light curves for a sample of ~2,600 spectroscopically confirmed quasars observed about 50 times on average over 8 years by the SDSS stripe 82 survey. We find that the dependence of the mean structure function computed for individual quasars on luminosity, rest-frame wavelength and time is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the behavior of the structure function derived from two-epoch observations of a much larger sample. We also reproduce the result that the variability properties of radio and X-ray selected subsamples are different. However, the scatter of the variability structure function for fixed values of luminosity, rest-frame wavelength and time is similar to the scatter induced by the variance of these quantities in the analyzed sample. Hence, our results suggest that, although the statistical properties of quasar variability inferred using two-epoch data capture some underlying physics, there is significant additional information that can be extracted from well-sampled light curves for individual objects.

  10. High-x structure function of the virtually free neutron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyn, Wim; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2016-05-01

    The pole extrapolation method is applied to the semi-inclusive inelastic electron scattering off the deuteron with tagged spectator protons to extract the high-x structure function of the neutron. This approach is based on the extrapolation of the measured cross sections at different momenta of the spectator proton to the nonphysical pole of the bound neutron in the deuteron. The advantage of the method is in the possibility of suppression of the nuclear effects in a maximally model-independent way. The neutron structure functions obtained in this way demonstrate a surprising x dependence at x ≥0.6 and 1.6 ≤Q2≤3.38 GeV2 , indicating a possible rise of the neutron-to-proton structure functions ratio. If the observed rise is valid in the true deep inelastic region then it may indicate new dynamics in the generation of high-x quarks in the nucleon. One such mechanism we discuss is the possible dominance of short-range isosinglet quark-quark correlations that can enhance the d -quark distribution in the proton.

  11. Computer Modeling of the Earliest Cellular Structures and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-03-01

    In the absence of extinct or extant record of protocells (the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells), the most direct way to test ourunderstanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models of protocells. Such efforts are currently underway in the NASA Astrobiology Program. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures and developing designs for molecules that perform protocellular functions. Many of these functions, such as import of nutrients, capture and storage of energy, and response to changes in the environment are carried out by proteins bound to membranes. We will discuss a series of large-scale, molecular-level computer simulations which demonstrate (a) how small proteins (peptides)organize themselves into ordered structures at water-membrane interfaces and insert into membranes, (b) how these peptides aggregate to form membrane-spanning structures (e.g. channels), and (c) by what mechanisms such aggregates perform essential protocellular functions, such as proton transport of protons across cell walls, a key step in cellular bioenergetics. The simulations were performed using the molecular dynamics method, in which Newton's equations of motion for each atom in the system are solved iteratively. The problems of interest required simulations on multi-nanosecond time scales, which corresponded to 10^6-10^8 time steps.

  12. In silico predicted structural and functional robustness of piscine steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, D; Huggett, D B

    2014-03-21

    Assessments of metabolic robustness or susceptibility are inherently dependent on quantitative descriptions of network structure and associated function. In this paper a stoichiometric model of piscine steroidogenesis was constructed and constrained with productions of selected steroid hormones. Structural and flux metrics of this in silico model were quantified by calculating extreme pathways and optimal flux distributions (using linear programming). Extreme pathway analysis showed progestin and corticosteroid synthesis reactions to be highly participant in extreme pathways. Furthermore, reaction participation in extreme pathways also fitted a power law distribution (degree exponent γ=2.3), which suggested that progestin and corticosteroid reactions act as 'hubs' capable of generating other functionally relevant pathways required to maintain steady-state functionality of the network. Analysis of cofactor usage (O2 and NADPH) showed progestin synthesis reactions to exhibit high robustness, whereas estrogen productions showed highest energetic demands with low associated robustness to maintain such demands. Linear programming calculated optimal flux distributions showed high heterogeneity of flux values with a near-random power law distribution (degree exponent γ≥2.7). Subsequently, network robustness was tested by assessing maintenance of metabolite flux-sum subject to targeted deletions of rank-ordered (low to high metric) extreme pathway participant and optimal flux reactions. Network robustness was susceptible to deletions of extreme pathway participant reactions, whereas minimal impact of high flux reaction deletion was observed. This analysis shows that the steroid network is susceptible to perturbation of structurally relevant (extreme pathway) reactions rather than those carrying high flux.

  13. Reactive biomolecular divergence in genetically altered yeast cells and isolated mitochondria as measured by biocavity laser spectroscopy : a rapid diagnostic method for studying cellular responses to stress and disease.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, Michael P. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Gourley, Paul Lee; Copeland, Robert Guild; McDonald, Anthony Eugene; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K. (Univesity of California, San Diego, CA)

    2006-12-01

    We report an analysis of four strains of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The four strains are grouped in two pairs (wild type and altered), in which one strain differs genetically at a single locus, affecting mitochondrial function. In one pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho0 strain differ by complete removal of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In the second pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho- strain differ by knock-out of the nuclear gene encoding Cox4, an essential subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. The biocavity laser is used to measure the biophysical optic parameter Deltalambda, a laser wavelength shift relating to the optical density of cell or mitochondria that uniquely reflects its size and biomolecular composition. As such, Deltalambda is a powerful parameter that rapidly interrogates the biomolecular state of single cells and mitochondria. Wild-type cells and mitochondria produce Gaussian-like distributions with a single peak. In contrast, mutant cells and mitochondria produce leptokurtotic distributions that are asymmetric and highly skewed to the right. These distribution changes could be self-consistently modeled with a single, log-normal distribution undergoing a thousand-fold increase in variance of biomolecular composition. These features reflect a new state of stressed or diseased cells that we call a reactive biomolecular divergence (RBD) that reflects the vital interdependence of mitochondria and the nucleus.

  14. Alternative Conformations of Cytochrome c: Structure, Function, and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana; Tomasina, Florencia; Capdevila, Daiana A; Demicheli, Verónica; Tórtora, Verónica; Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Jemmerson, Ronald; Murgida, Daniel H; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-26

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) is a cationic hemoprotein of ∼100 amino acid residues that exhibits exceptional functional versatility. While its primary function is electron transfer in the respiratory chain, cyt c is also recognized as a key component of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, the mitochondrial oxidative protein folding machinery, and presumably as a redox sensor in the cytosol, along with other reported functions. Transition to alternative conformations and gain-of-peroxidase activity are thought to further enable the multiple functions of cyt c and its translocation across cellular compartments. In vitro, direct interactions of cyt c with cardiolipin, post-translational modifications such as tyrosine nitration, phosphorylation, methionine sulfoxidation, mutations, and even fine changes in electrical fields lead to a variety of conformational states that may be of biological relevance. The identification of these alternative conformations and the elucidation of their functions in vivo continue to be a major challenge. Here, we unify the knowledge of the structural flexibility of cyt c that supports functional moonlighting and review biochemical and immunochemical evidence confirming that cyt c undergoes conformational changes during normal and altered cellular homeostasis.

  15. Intragenic tandem repeats in Daphnia magna: structure, function and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Pasquier Louis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expressed sequence tag (EST databases provide a valuable source of genetic data in organisms whose genome sequence information is not yet compiled. We used a published EST database for the waterflea Daphnia magna (Crustacea:Cladocera to isolate variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR markers for linkage mapping, Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL, and functional studies. Findings Seventy-four polymorphic markers were isolated and characterised. Analyses of repeat structure, putative gene function and polymorphism indicated that intragenic tandem repeats are not distributed randomly in the mRNA sequences; instead, dinucleotides are more frequent in non-coding regions, whereas trinucleotides (and longer motifs involving multiple-of-three nucleotide repeats are preferentially situated in coding regions. We also observed differential distribution of repeat motifs across putative genetic functions. This indicates differential selective constraints and possible functional significance of VNTR polymorphism in at least some genes. Conclusion Databases of VNTR markers situated in genes whose putative function can be inferred from homology searches will be a valuable resource for the genetic study of functional variation and selection.

  16. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2013-04-01

    The effect of molecular adsorption on the transport properties of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is investigated using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function methods. The calculated I-V characteristics predict noticeable changes in the conductivity of semiconducting BNNTs due to physisorption of nucleic acid base molecules. Specifically, guanine which binds to the side wall of BNNT significantly enhances its conductivity by introducing conduction channels near the Fermi energy of the bioconjugated system. For metallic CNTs, a large background current masks relatively small changes in current due to the biomolecular adsorption. The results therefore suggest the suitability of BNNTs for biosensing applications.

  17. Dissection of Transporter Function: From Genetics to Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallinas, G

    2016-09-01

    Transporters are transmembrane proteins mediating the selective uptake or efflux of solutes, metabolites, drugs, or ions across cellular membranes. Despite their immense biological importance in cell nutrition, communication, signaling, and homeostasis, their study remains technically difficult mostly due to their lipid-embedded nature. The study of eukaryotic transporters presents additional complexity due to multiple subcellular control mechanisms that operate to ensure proper membrane traffic, membrane localization, and turnover. Model fungi present unique genetic tools to study eukaryotic transporter function. This review highlights how fungal transporter genetics combined with new methodologies for assaying their cellular expression and function as well as recent structural approaches have led to the functional dissection of selected transporter paradigms in Aspergillus nidulans. PMID:27430403

  18. Structure and function of vanadium compounds in living organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, D

    1992-01-01

    Vanadium has been recognized as a metal of biological importance only recently. In this mini-review, its main functions uncovered during the past few years are addressed. These encompass (i) the regulation of phosphate metabolizing enzymes (which is exemplified for the inhibition of ribonucleases by vanadate), (ii) the halogenation of organic compounds by vanadate-dependent non-heme peroxidases from seaweeds, (iii) the reductive protonation of nitrogen (nitrogen fixation) by alternative, i.e. vanadium-containing, nitrogenases from N2-fixing bacteria, (iv) vanadium sequestering by sea squirts (ascidians), and (v) amavadine, a low molecular weight complex of V(IV) accumulated in the fly agaric and related toadstools. The function of vanadium, while still illusive in ascidians and toadstools, begins to be understood in vanadium-enzyme interaction. Investigations into the structure and function of model compounds play an increasingly important role in elucidating the biological significance of vanadium. PMID:1392470

  19. Scaling in many-body systems and proton structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, O

    2003-01-01

    The observation of scaling in processes in which a weakly interacting probe delivers large momentum ${\\bf q}$ to a many-body system simply reflects the dominance of incoherent scattering off target constituents. While a suitably defined scaling function may provide rich information on the internal dynamics of the target, in general its extraction from the measured cross section requires careful consideration of the nature of the interaction driving the scattering process. The analysis of deep inelastic electron-proton scattering in the target rest frame within standard many-body theory naturally leads to the emergence of a scaling function that, unlike the commonly used structure functions $F_1$ and $F_2$, can be directly identified with the intrinsic proton response.

  20. Analytical Operations Relate Structural and Functional Connectivity in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggio, Maria Luisa; Ritter, Petra; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state large-scale brain models vary in the amount of biological elements they incorporate and in the way they are being tested. One might expect that the more realistic the model is, the closer it should reproduce real functional data. It has been shown, instead, that when linear correlation across long BOLD fMRI time-series is used as a measure for functional connectivity (FC) to compare simulated and real data, a simple model performs just as well, or even better, than more sophisticated ones. The model in question is a simple linear model, which considers the physiological noise that is pervasively present in our brain while it diffuses across the white-matter connections, that is structural connectivity (SC). We deeply investigate this linear model, providing an analytical solution to straightforwardly compute FC from SC without the need of computationally costly simulations of time-series. We provide a few examples how this analytical solution could be used to perform a fast and detailed parameter exploration or to investigate resting-state non-stationarities. Most importantly, by inverting the analytical solution, we propose a method to retrieve information on the anatomical structure directly from functional data. This simple method can be used to complement or guide DTI/DSI and tractography results, especially for a better assessment of inter-hemispheric connections, or to provide an estimate of SC when only functional data are available. PMID:27536987

  1. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  2. Radiation induced structural and functional modification of haemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomlinov, B F; Savich, A V; Starikovich, L S; Dudok, E P

    1985-06-01

    An abnormality in the primary structure of dog haemoglobin was observed 1-20 days after their whole body irradiation with 190 keV X-rays (4.0 Gy). It consisted in a substitution of tryptophane residue in position 15 of the beta-chain for serine. The percentage of abnormal beta-chains in different time intervals after irradiation was determined. The structural changes have functional impact: an increasing haemoglobin affinity to oxygen. This could be explained on the basis of changes in the tertiary structure of haemoglobin, which may result from the substitution Trp 15----Ser15 in the beta-chain which may influence the haeme ability to bind oxygen. PMID:3896922

  3. Plant lessons: exploring ABCB functionality through structural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien eBailly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to mammalian ABCB1 proteins, narrow substrate specificity has been extensively documented for plant orthologs shown to catalyze the transport of the plant hormone, auxin. Using the crystal structures of the multidrug exporters Sav1866 and MmABCB1 as templates, we have developed structural models of plant ABCB proteins with a common architecture. Comparisons of these structures identified kingdom-specific candidate substrate-binding regions within the translocation chamber formed by the transmembrane domains of ABCBs from the model plant Arabidopsis. These results suggest an early evolutionary divergence of plant and mammalian ABCBs. Validation of these models becomes a priority for efforts to elucidate ABCB function and manipulate this class of transporters to enhance plant productivity and quality.

  4. Structural and Functional Plasticity in the Maternal Brain Circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mariana

    2016-09-01

    Parenting recruits a distributed network of brain structures (and neuromodulators) that coordinates caregiving responses attuned to the young's affect, needs, and developmental stage. Many of these structures and connections undergo significant structural and functional plasticity, mediated by the interplay between maternal hormones and social experience while the reciprocal relationship between the mother and her infant forms and develops. These alterations account for the remarkable behavioral plasticity of mothers. This review will examine the molecular and neurobiological modulation and plasticity through which parenting develops and adjusts in new mothers, primarily discussing recent findings in nonhuman animals. A better understanding of how parenting impacts the brain at the molecular, cellular, systems/network, and behavioral levels is likely to significantly contribute to novel strategies for treating postpartum neuropsychiatric disorders in new mothers, and critical for both the mother's physiological and mental health and the development and well-being of her young. PMID:27589496

  5. Functional Insights from Glutamate Receptor Ion Channel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Janesh; Mayer, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures for the soluble amino terminal and ligand binding domains of glutamate receptor ion channels, combined with a 3.6 Å resolution structure of the full length AMPA receptor GluA2 homotetramer, provide unique insights into the mechanisms of iGluR assembly and function. Increasingly sophisticated biochemical, computational and electrophysiological experiments are beginning to reveal the mechanism of action of partial agonists, and yield new models for the mechanism of action of allosteric modulators. Newly identified NMDA receptor ligands acting at novel sites offer hope for development of subtype selective modulators. Many issues remain unsolved, including the role of the ATD in AMPA receptor signaling, and the mechanisms by which auxiliary proteins regulate receptor activity. The structural basis for ion permeation and ion channel block also remain areas of uncertainty, and despite substantial progress, molecular dynamics simulations have yet to reveal how binding of glutamate opens the ion channel pore. PMID:22974439

  6. Interpenetration in coordination polymers: structural diversities toward porous functional materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Haldar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpenetration is a natural phenomenon frequently encountered in porous coordination polymers (PCPs or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs. Traditionally interpenetration has been considered as a threat to permanent porosity and several strategies have been adopted to control the framework interpenetration. Recent literature reports have unveiled that interpenetration has paramount importance in several material properties particularly in storage and separation of small gas molecules. Such frameworks also show interesting structural flexibility based on shearing or movement of the nets and also reveals guest induced dynamic structural transformation for modulated specific functions. In this review, we will emphasize several interpenetration phenomena observed in coordination polymers, their intriguing structural aspects and fascinating material properties.

  7. Electrostatic adhesion for added functionality of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic adhesion can be used as a means of reversible attachment. The incorporation of electrostatic adhesion into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite structures could provide significant value added functionality. Imparting large potential differences (∼2 kV) across electrodes generates an attractive force, thus providing a means of attachment. This could be used as a reversible latching mechanism or as a means of controllable internal connectivity. Varying the connectivity for discrete elements of a substructure of a given design allows for control of internal load paths and moment of area of the cross section. This could facilitate variable stiffness (both in bending and torsion). Using a combination of existing fabrication techniques, functional electrodes have been integrated within a FRP. Copper polyimide thin film laminate material has been both co-cured with carbon fibre reinforced epoxy and bonded to PVC closed cell foam core material to provide a range of structural configurations with integrated electrodes. The ability of such integrated devices to confer variations in global bending stiffness of basic beam structures is investigated. Through the application of 4 kV across integrated electrostatic adhesive devices, a 112% increase in flexural stiffness has been demonstrated for a composite sandwich structure.

  8. Detrended Structure-Function in Fully Developed Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Y X

    2014-01-01

    The classical structure-function (SF) method in fully developed turbulence or for scaling processes in general is influenced by large-scale energetic structures, known as infrared effect. Therefore, the extracted scaling exponents $\\zeta(n)$ might be biased due to this effect. In this paper, a detrended structure-function (DSF) method is proposed to extract scaling exponents by constraining the influence of large-scale structures. This is accomplished by removing a $1$st-order polynomial fitting within a window size $\\ell$ before calculating the velocity increment. By doing so, the scales larger than $\\ell$, i.e., $r\\ge \\ell$, are expected to be removed or constrained. The detrending process is equivalent to be a high-pass filter in physical domain. Meanwhile the intermittency nature is retained. We first validate the DSF method by using a synthesized fractional Brownian motion for mono-fractal processes and a lognormal process for multifractal random walk processes. The numerical results show comparable scal...

  9. A rule-based functional-structural model of rice considering source and sink functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, L.; Henke, M.; Kurth, W.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Zhu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    As a first step towards a generic genotype-phenotype model of rice, we present here a model of the growth and morphology of rice in combination with ecophysiological processes using the technique of functional-structural plant modelling (FSPM) and the interactive modelling platform GroIMP along with

  10. An Analysis of Biomolecular Force Fields for Simulations of Polyglutamine in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluitt, Aaron M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) peptides are a useful model system for biophysical studies of protein folding and aggregation, both for their intriguing aggregation properties and their own relevance to human disease. The genetic expansion of a polyQ tract triggers the formation of amyloid aggregates associated with nine neurodegenerative diseases. Several clearly identifiable and separable factors, notably the length of the polyQ tract, influence the mechanism of aggregation, its associated kinetics, and the ensemble of structures formed. Atomistic simulations are well positioned to answer open questions regarding the thermodynamics and kinetics of polyQ folding and aggregation. The additional, explicit representation of water permits deeper investigation of the role of solvent dynamics, and it permits a direct comparison of simulation results with infrared spectroscopy experiments. The generation of meaningful simulation results hinges on satisfying two essential criteria: achieving sufficient conformational sampling to draw statistically valid conclusions, and accurately reproducing the intermolecular forces that govern system structure and dynamics. In this work, we examine the ability of 12 biomolecular force fields to reproduce the properties of a simple, 30-residue polyQ peptide (Q30) in explicit water. In addition to secondary and tertiary structure, we consider generic structural properties of polymers that provide additional dimensions for analysis of the highly degenerate disordered states of the molecule. We find that the 12 force fields produce a wide range of predictions. We identify AMBER ff99SB, AMBER ff99SB*, and OPLS-AA/L to be most suitable for studies of polyQ folding and aggregation.

  11. Phenomenological study of the nucleon structure functions; Etude phenomenologique des fonctions de structure du nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, M.

    1995-05-12

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the deep inelastic scattering. Its purpose is the development of phenomenological models describing experimental results on unpolarized (F{sub 2}) and polarized (g{sub 1}) nucleon structure functions in the wide range of the kinematical domain. Special attention is paid to the small-x behaviour of F{sub 2} and to the link between deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction process. The investigation of the Pomeron in deep inelastic scattering shows that one single Pomeron compatible with the Froissard-Martin limit can account for all the present HERA data. A phenomenological model of the proton structure function is developed, based on a two-component structure including various features expected from both perturbative quantum chromodynamics and non perturbative Regge theory. A link with the photoproduction process is provided. A detailed analysis of the perturbative components, based on the Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations is presented. Taking into account the different parton distribution, this approach allows to describe data on proton and neutron structure functions, on deep inelastic neutrino scattering, and to reproduce the gluons distribution extracted by the ZEUS collaboration. The model is applied to the polarized deep inelastic scattering and the axial anomaly effect appearing both in the description of results on the spin dependent structure functions g{sup p,n,d} and in the interpretation of the nucleon spin structure is discussed. (J.S.). 260 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs., 6 appends.

  12. Structure and function relationships of the respiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauleda, J; Gea, J; Orozco-Levi, M; Corominas, J; Minguella, J; Aguar, C; Broquetas, J; Agustí, A G

    1998-04-01

    Potential relationships between the structure of the diaphragm and external intercostals and several indices of respiratory muscle function, lung function and nutrition in 27 patients (61+/-10 yrs of age) subjected to thoracotomy as a result of a lung neoplasm have been investigated. Prior to surgery the nutritional status of the patients was assessed and lung function (spirometry, lung volumes, transfer factor of the lungs for carbon monoxide, arterial blood gases) and respiratory muscle function (maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and diaphragmatic function were measured). Biopsies of the diaphragm (and external intercostals) were obtained during surgery. On average, patients showed mild airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), 70+/-14% of predicted value, FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC), 70+/-9%) with some air trapping (residual volume (RV), 139+/-50% pred) and normal gas exchange (arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2), 11.3+/-1.33 kPa (85+/-10 mmHg)) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) 5.4+/-0.5 kPa (40.6+/-4 mmHg). MIP was 77+/-25% pred; maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure was 90+/-27 cmH2O. Most morphometric measurements of the diaphragm and external intercostals were within the range of values reported previously in other skeletal muscles. The size of the fibres of these two respiratory muscles was positively related (p<0.05) to MIP (% pred). There were no significant relationships between the structure of both muscles and nutritional status or any index of lung function. In conclusion, in the population studied, the fibre size of the diaphragm and external intercostals appears to relate to their ability to generate force. PMID:9623696

  13. Structure-function correlation of the human central retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Charbel Issa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of retinal pathology detected by high-resolution imaging on vision remains largely unexplored. Therefore, the aim of the study was to achieve high-resolution structure-function correlation of the human macula in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain high-resolution tomographic and topographic images of the macula spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO, respectively, were used. Functional mapping of the macula was obtained by using fundus-controlled microperimetry. Custom software allowed for co-registration of the fundus mapped microperimetry coordinates with both SD-OCT and cSLO datasets. The method was applied in a cross-sectional observational study of retinal diseases and in a clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of intravitreal ranibizumab in macular telangietasia type 2. There was a significant relationship between outer retinal thickness and retinal sensitivity (p<0.001 and neurodegeneration leaving less than about 50 µm of parafoveal outer retinal thickness completely abolished light sensitivity. In contrast, functional preservation was found if neurodegeneration spared the photoreceptors, but caused quite extensive disruption of the inner retina. Longitudinal data revealed that small lesions affecting the photoreceptor layer typically precede functional detection but later cause severe loss of light sensitivity. Ranibizumab was shown to be ineffective to prevent such functional loss in macular telangietasia type 2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since there is a general need for efficient monitoring of the effectiveness of therapy in neurodegenerative diseases of the retina and since SD-OCT imaging is becoming more widely available, surrogate endpoints derived from such structure-function correlation may become highly relevant in future clinical trials.

  14. NbIT--a new information theory-based analysis of allosteric mechanisms reveals residues that underlie function in the leucine transporter LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-05-01

    Complex networks of interacting residues and microdomains in the structures of biomolecular systems underlie the reliable propagation of information from an input signal, such as the concentration of a ligand, to sites that generate the appropriate output signal, such as enzymatic activity. This information transduction often carries the signal across relatively large distances at the molecular scale in a form of allostery that is essential for the physiological functions performed by biomolecules. While allosteric behaviors have been documented from experiments and computation, the mechanism of this form of allostery proved difficult to identify at the molecular level. Here, we introduce a novel analysis framework, called N-body Information Theory (NbIT) analysis, which is based on information theory and uses measures of configurational entropy in a biomolecular system to identify microdomains and individual residues that act as (i)-channels for long-distance information sharing between functional sites, and (ii)-coordinators that organize dynamics within functional sites. Application of the new method to molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of the occluded state of the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT identifies a channel of allosteric coupling between the functionally important intracellular gate and the substrate binding sites known to modulate it. NbIT analysis is shown also to differentiate residues involved primarily in stabilizing the functional sites, from those that contribute to allosteric couplings between sites. NbIT analysis of MD data thus reveals rigorous mechanistic elements of allostery underlying the dynamics of biomolecular systems.

  15. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  16. Brain structural and functional correlates of resilience to Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia eFrangou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resilient adaptation can be construed in different ways, but as used here it refers to the adaptive brain changes associated with avoidance of psychopathology despite familiar risk for Bipolar Disorder (BD. Although family history of BD is associated with elevated risk of affective morbidity a significant proportion of first-degree relatives of BD patients remains free of psychopathology. Examination of brain structure and function in these individuals may inform on adaptive changes that may pre-empt disease expression. Methods: Data presented here are derived from the Vulnerability to Bipolar Disorders (VIBES study which includes patients with BD, asymptomatic relatives and healthy controls. Participants underwent extensive investigations including brain structural (sMRI and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The data presented here focus on sMRI voxel-based-morphometry and on conventional and connectivity analyses of fMRI data obtained during the Stroop Colour Word Test (SCWT, a task of cognitive control during conflict resolution. All analyses were implemented in SPM (www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm. Resilience in relatives was operationalized as the absence of clinical-range symptoms.Results: Resilient relatives of BD patients expressed structural, functional and connectivity changes reflecting the effect of genetic risk on the brain. These included increased insular volume, decreased activation within the posterior and inferior parietal regions involved in selective attention during the SCWT, and reduced fronto-insular and fronto-cingulate connectivity.Resilience was associated with increased cerebellar vermal volume and enhanced functional coupling between the dorsal and the ventral prefrontal cortex. Conclusions: Our findings suggests the presence of biological mechanisms associated with resilient adaptation of brain networks and pave the way for the identification of outcome-specific trajectories given a particular

  17. Study of structure function correlation of chemokine receptor CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hong; Stephen C PEIPER; ZHU Xi-hua

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between structure domains and functions of chemokine receptor CXCR4. Methods: After the establishment of wild type chemokine receptor CXCR4 and CXCR2 expressing cell lines, 5 CXCR4/CXCR2 chimeras, 2 CXCR4 mutants were stably expressed on CHO cell line.Binding activities of all variants with the ligand, recombinant human SDF-1β, signal transduction ability after stimulation and their function as coreceptor for HIV-1 were studied with ligand-binding assay, Cytosensor/microphysiometry and cell-cell reporter gene fusion assay. Results: Among all 7 changed CXCR4 receptors, 3 chimeras (2444a, 4442, 4122), and 1 mutant (CXCR4-Tr) bond with SDF-1β in varying degrees, of which only 2444a totally and CXCR4-Tr partially maintain signaling. All changed receptors except for 4222 could act as coreceptors for HIV-1(LAI) in varying degrees. Conclusion: Several structure domains of CXCR4 are involved in the binding with SDF-1β, among which, N-terminal extracellular domain has high affinity of binding with SDF-1β, and the 3rd extracellular loop contributes to the binding, too. Although the C-terminal intracellular domain has no association with the maintenance of the overall structure of the receptor and ligand binding capability, the signaling is decreased when this domain is truncated. For CXCR4 signaling, not only is the conserved motif DRY box needed, but also the characterized conformation of the whole molecule must be formed when activation is required. There are some overlaps between SDF-1β binding domains and coreceptor function domains in molecular structure of CXCR4.

  18. High precision prediction of functional sites in protein structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubomir Buturovic

    Full Text Available We address the problem of assigning biological function to solved protein structures. Computational tools play a critical role in identifying potential active sites and informing screening decisions for further lab analysis. A critical parameter in the practical application of computational methods is the precision, or positive predictive value. Precision measures the level of confidence the user should have in a particular computed functional assignment. Low precision annotations lead to futile laboratory investigations and waste scarce research resources. In this paper we describe an advanced version of the protein function annotation system FEATURE, which achieved 99% precision and average recall of 95% across 20 representative functional sites. The system uses a Support Vector Machine classifier operating on the microenvironment of physicochemical features around an amino acid. We also compared performance of our method with state-of-the-art sequence-level annotator Pfam in terms of precision, recall and localization. To our knowledge, no other functional site annotator has been rigorously evaluated against these key criteria. The software and predictive models are incorporated into the WebFEATURE service at http://feature.stanford.edu/wf4.0-beta.

  19. Tensor-polarized structure functions: Tensor structure of deuteron in 2020's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, S.

    2014-10-01

    We explain spin structure for a spin-one hadron, in which there are new structure functions, in addition to the ones (F1, F2, g1, g2) which exist for the spin-1/2 nucleon, associated with its tensor structure. The new structure functions are b1, b2, b3, and b4 in deep inelastic scattering of a charged-lepton from a spin-one hadron such as the deuteron. Among them, twist- two functions are related by the Callan-Gross type relation b2 = 2xb1 in the Bjorken scaling limit. First, these new structure functions are introduced, and useful formulae are derived for projection operators of b1-4 from a hadron tensor Wμν. Second, a sum rule is explained for b1, and possible tensor-polarized distributions are discussed by using HERMES data in order to propose future experimental measurements and to compare them with theoretical models. A proposal was approved to measure b1 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), so that much progress is expected for b1 in the near future. Third, formalisms of polarized proton-deuteron Drell-Yan processes are explained for probing especially tensor- polarized antiquark distributions, which were suggested by the HERMES data. The studies of the tensor-polarized structure functions will open a new era in 2020's for tensor-structure studies in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom, which are very different from ordinary descriptions in terms of nucleons and mesons.

  20. Next-to-leading-order constituent quark structure and hadronic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We utilize the existing next-to-leading-order (NLO) formalism to calculate the partonic structure of a constituent quark. The structure of any hadron can be obtained thereafter using a convolution method. Such a procedure is used to generate the structure functions of protons and pions in NLO, neglecting certain corrections to ΛQCD. It is shown that while the constituent quark structure is generated purely perturbatively and accounts for the most part of the hadronic structure, there is a few percent contribution coming from the nonperturbative sector in the hadronic structure. This contribution plays the key role in explaining the SU(2) symmetry breaking of the nucleon sea and the observed violation of the Gottfried sum rule. These effects are calculated. We obtained an excellent agreement with the experimental data in a wide range of x=[10-6,1] and Q2=[0.5,5000] GeV2 for the proton structure function. We have also calculated pion structure and compared it with the existing data. Again, the model calculations agree rather well with the data from experiment