WorldWideScience

Sample records for biomimetic energy transduction

  1. The progress of olfactory transduction and biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU ChunSheng; WANG LiJiang; ZHOU Jun; ZHAO LuHang; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    Olfaction is a very important sensation for all animals. Recently great progress has been made in the research of olfactory transduction. Especially the novel finding of the gene superfamily encoding olfactory receptors has led to rapid advances in olfactory transduction. These advances also promoted the research of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors and some obvious achievements have been obtained due to their potential commercial prospects and promising industrial applications. This paper briefly introduces the biological basis of olfaction, summarizes the progress of olfactory signal transduction in the olfactory neuron, the olfactory bulb and the olfactory cortex, outlines the latest developments and applications of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors. Finally, the olfactory biosensor based on light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) is addressed in detail based on our recent work and the research trends of olfactory biosensors in future are discussed.

  2. Green Tribology Biomimetics, Energy Conservation and Sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    Tribology is the study of friction, wear and lubrication. Recently, the concept of “green tribology” as “the science and technology of the tribological aspects of ecological balance and of environmental and biological impacts” was introduced. The field of green tribology includes tribological technology that mimics living nature (biomimetic surfaces) and thus is expected to be environmentally friendly, the control of friction and wear that is of importance for energy conservation and conversion, environmental aspects of lubrication and surface modification techniques, and tribological aspects of green applications such as wind-power turbines or solar panels. This book is the first comprehensive volume on green tribology. The chapters are prepared by leading experts in their fields and cover such topics as biomimetics, environmentally friendly lubrication, tribology of wind turbines and renewable sources of energy, and ecological impact of new technologies of surface treatment.

  3. Energy Harvesting By Optimized Piezo Transduction Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Boban, Bijo; Satheesh, U; Devaprakasam, D

    2014-01-01

    We report generation of electrical energy from nonlinear mechanical noises available in the ambient environment using optimized piezo transduction mechanisms. Obtaining energy from an ambient vibration has been attractive for remotely installed standalone microsystems and devices. The mechanical noises in the ambient environment can be converted to electrical energy by a piezo strip based on the principle of piezoelectric effect. In this work, we have designed and developed a standalone energy harvesting module based on piezo transduction mechanisms. Using this designed module we harvested noise energy and stored electrical energy in a capacitor. Using NI-PXI workstation with a LabVIEW programming, the output voltage of the piezo strip and voltage of the capacitor were measured and monitored. In this paper we discuss about the design, development, implementation, performance and characteristics of the energy harvesting module.

  4. Energy Harvesting By Optimized Piezo Transduction Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Boban, Bijo; Babu, S. K. Suresh; Satheesh, U.; Devaprakasam, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report generation of electrical energy from nonlinear mechanical noises available in the ambient environment using optimized piezo transduction mechanisms. Obtaining energy from an ambient vibration has been attractive for remotely installed standalone microsystems and devices. The mechanical noises in the ambient environment can be converted to electrical energy by a piezo strip based on the principle of piezoelectric effect. In this work, we have designed and developed a standalone energ...

  5. Biomimetic utilization of solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most interesting recent publications dealing with so-called artificial photosynthesis, i.e., the development of photocatalytic converters of solar energy to the chemical bond energy using the fundamental principles of natural oxygenic photosynthesis, are discussed. The key stages of photosynthesis that should be reproduced in the artificial converters include light harvesting and transport of the light quantum to reaction centres where photoinduced charge separation occurs to give elementary reducing agents and oxidants (electrons and holes). The dark catalytic reactions involving the elementary reducing agents and oxidants give stable end products, namely, dioxygen and carbohydrates in the natural photosynthesis or dioxygen and hydrogen in the artificial photosynthesis. The bibliography includes 99 references.

  6. Biomimetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Ramachandra Rao

    2003-06-01

    The well-organised multifunctional structures, systems and biogenic materials found in nature have attracted the interest of scientists working in many disciplines. The efforts have resulted in the development of a new and rapidly growing field of scientific effort called biomimetics. In this article we present a few natural materials and systems and explore how ideas from nature are being interpreted and modified to suit efforts aimed at designing better machines and synthesising newer materials.

  7. Energy transduction by respiratory complex I

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Ana P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this dissertation was to provide a contribution to the understanding of the energy transducing mechanism of respiratory complex I. This enzyme is present in most bacteria and in all mitochondrial systems and it is characterized by its large number of subunits, its prosthetic groups (flavin and iron-sulfur centers), and its NADH:quinone oxidoreductase activity sensitive to specific inhibitors and coupled with charge translocation across the membrane.(...)

  8. Myoglobin-biomimetic electroactive materials made by surface molecular imprinting on silica beads and their use as ionophores in polymeric membranes for potentiometric transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Felismina T C; Dutra, Rosa A F; Noronha, Joao P C; Sales, M Goreti F

    2011-08-15

    Myoglobin (Mb) is among the cardiac biomarkers playing a major role in urgent diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Its monitoring in point-of-care is therefore fundamental. Pursuing this goal, a novel biomimetic ionophore for the potentiometric transduction of Mb is presented. It was synthesized by surface molecular imprinting (SMI) with the purpose of developing highly efficient sensor layers for near-stereochemical recognition of Mb. The template (Mb) was imprinted on a silane surface that was covalently attached to silica beads by means of self-assembled monolayers. First the silica was modified with an external layer of aldehyde groups. Then, Mb was attached by reaction with its amine groups (on the external surface) and subsequent formation of imine bonds. The vacant places surrounding Mb were filled by polymerization of the silane monomers 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) and propyltrimethoxysilane (PTMS). Finally, the template was removed by imine cleavage after treatment with oxalic acid. The results materials were finely dispersed in plasticized PVC selective membranes and used as ionophores in potentiometric transduction. The best analytical features were found in HEPES buffer of pH 4. Under this condition, the limits of detection were of 1.3 × 10(-6)mol/L for a linear response after 8.0 × 10(-7) mol/L with an anionic slope of -65.9 mV/decade. The imprinting effect was tested by preparing non-imprinted (NI) particles and employing these materials as ionophores. The resulting membranes showed no ability to detect Mb. Good selectivity was observed towards creatinine, sacarose, fructose, galactose, sodium glutamate, and alanine. The analytical application was conducted successfully and showed accurate and precise results. PMID:21683568

  9. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  10. Mechanism of active transport: Free energy dissipation and free energy transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Tanford, C

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathway for "chemiosmotic" free energy transduction in active transport is discussed with an ATP-driven Ca2+ pump as an illustrative example. Two innovations are made in the analysis. (i) Free energy dissipated as heat is rigorously excluded from overall free energy bookkeeping by focusing on the dynamic equilibrium state of the chemiosmotic process. (ii) Separate chemical potential terms for free energy donor and transported ions are used to keep track of the thermodynamic ...

  11. A structural model reveals energy transduction in dynein

    OpenAIRE

    Serohijos, Adrian W. R.; Chen, Yiwen; Ding, Feng; Elston, Timothy C.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular active transport is driven by ATP-hydrolyzing motor proteins that move along cytoskeletal filaments. In particular, the microtubule-associated dynein motor is involved in the transport of organelles and vesicles, the maintenance of the Golgi, and mitosis. However, unlike kinesin and myosin, the mechanism by which dynein converts chemical energy into mechanical force remains largely a mystery, due primarily to the lack of a high-resolution molecular structure. Using homology mode...

  12. Free Energy Transduction in a Chemical Motor Model

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, J E

    2003-01-01

    Motor enzymes catalyze chemical reactions, like the hydrolysis of ATP, and in the process they also perform work. Recent studies indicate that motor enzymes perform work with specific intermediate steps in their catalyzed reactions, challenging the classic view (in Brownian motor models) that work can only be performed within biochemical states. An alternative class of models (chemical motor models) has emerged in which motors perform work with biochemical transitions, but many of these models lack a solid physicochemical foundation. In this paper, I develop a self consistent framework for chemical motor models. This novel framework accommodates multiple pathways for free energy transfer, predicts rich behaviors from the simplest multi motor systems, and provides important new insights into muscle and motor function.

  13. Exploring signal transduction in heteromultimeric protein based on energy dissipation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng-Wei; Xiu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic intersubunit interactions are key elements in the regulation of many biological systems. A better understanding of how subunits interact with each other and how their interactions are related to dynamic protein structure is a fundamental task in biology. In this paper, a heteromultimeric allosteric protein, Corynebacterium glutamicum aspartokinase, is used as a model system to explore the signal transduction involved in intersubunit interactions and allosteric communication with an emphasis on the intersubunit signaling process. For this purpose, energy dissipation simulation and network construction are conducted for each subunit and the whole protein. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the mutation sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. Additionally, analysis revealed that the function of the effector threonine is to facilitate the binding of the two subunits without contributing to the allosteric communication. During the allosteric regulation upon the binding of the effector lysine, signals can be transferred from the β-subunit to the catalytic site of the α-subunit through both a direct way of intersubunit signal transduction, and an indirect way: first, to the regulatory region of the α-subunit by intersubunit signal transduction and then to the catalytic region by intramolecular signal transduction. Therefore, the new approach is able to illustrate the diversity of the underlying mechanisms when the strength of feedback inhibition by the effector(s) is modulated, providing useful information that has potential applications in engineering heteromultimeric allosteric regulation. PMID:24279729

  14. Biomimetics design tool used to develop new components for lower-energy buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Salmaan

    2008-01-01

    The contributions to knowledge documented in this doctoral thesis are two-fold. The first contribution is in the application of a new biomimetic design tool called BioTRIZ. Its creators claim it can be used to facilitate the transfer of biological principles to solve engineering problems. The core case-study of this thesis documents how this tool was used to frame and systematically explore low-energy solutions to a key technical problem in the underdeveloped field of radiative cooling. Radia...

  15. Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eloy; Hendricks, Eric; Menze, Michael A; Torres, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between O2 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of ATP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit. PMID:26297983

  16. Size-Independent Energy Transfer in Biomimetic Nanoring Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Patrick; Kamonsutthipaijit, Nuntaporn; Anderson, Harry L; Herz, Laura M

    2016-06-28

    Supramolecular antenna-ring complexes are of great interest due to their presence in natural light-harvesting complexes. While such systems are known to provide benefits through robust and efficient energy funneling, the relationship between molecular structure, strain (governed by nuclear coordinates and motion), and energy dynamics (arising from electronic behavior) is highly complex. We present a synthetic antenna-nanoring system based on a series of conjugated porphyrin chromophores ideally suited to explore such effects. By systematically varying the size of the acceptor nanoring, we reveal the interplay between antenna-nanoring binding, local strain, and energy dynamics on the picosecond time scale. Binding of the antenna unit creates a local strain in the nanoring, and this strain was measured as a function of the size of the nanoring, by UV-vis-NIR titration, providing information on the conformational flexibility of the system. Strikingly, the energy-transfer rate is independent of nanoring size, indicating the existence of strain-localized acceptor states, spread over about six porphyrin units, arising from the noncovalent antenna-nanoring association. PMID:27176553

  17. Biomimetic thin film synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Gordon, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for forming thin film coatings and to demonstrate that the biomimetic thin film technology developed at PNL is useful for industrial applications. In the biomimetic process, mineral deposition from aqueous solution is controlled by organic functional groups attached to the underlying substrate surface. The coatings process is simple, benign, inexpensive, energy efficient, and particularly suited for temperature sensitive substrate materials (such as polymers). In addition, biomimetic thin films can be deposited uniformly on complex shaped and porous substrates providing a unique capability over more traditional line-of-sight methods.

  18. Energy transduction inside vesicles, photocatalysis by titanium dioxide and formation of NADH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David; Noveron, Juan; Rodoni, David; Basa, Ranor

    A number of theories on the origin and early evolution of life have focused on the role of lipid bilayer membrane structures (vesicles). These vesicles are similar to modern cellular membranes , and have been postulated to have been abiotically formed and spontaneously assemble on the prebiotic Earth to provide compartments for early cellular life. They can contain water-soluble species, concentrate species, and have the potential to catalyze reactions. The origin of the use of photochemical energy to drive metabolism (ie. energy transduction) is also one of the central issues in our attempts to understand the origin and evolution of life. When did energy transduction and photosynthesis begin? What was the original system for capturing photochemical energy? How simple can such a system be? It has been postulated that vesicle structures developed the ability to capture and transduce light, providing energy for reactions. It has been shown that pH gradients can be photo-chemically created, but it has been found difficult to couple these to drive chemical reactions. Minerals can introduce a number of properties to a vesicle system. The incorporation of clay particles into vesicles can provide catalytic activity that mediates both vesicle assembly and RNA oligomerization. It is known that colloidal semiconducting mineral particles can act as photocatalysts and drive redox chemistry. We show that encapsulation of these particles has the potential to provide a source of energy transduction inside vesicles, and thereby drive protocellular chemistry and represent a model system for early photosynthesis. TiO2 particles can be incorporated into vesicles and retain their photoactivity through the dehydration/rehydration cycles that have been shown to be able concentrate species inside a vesicle. It is shown that these can be used to produce biochemical species such as enzymatically active NADH in such structures. This system demonstrates a simple energy source inside vesicles

  19. Tensile property of a hot work tool steel prepared by biomimetic coupled laser remelting process with different laser input energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanwei; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Zhihui; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Tan, Fuxing

    2012-09-01

    Coupled with the biomimetic principle, a hot work tool steel (4Cr5MoSiV1) was manufactured using a laser with different input energies. Results of tensile tests confirmed that the biomimetic coupled laser remelting (BCLR) process had an advance effect on improving the strength and ductility of 4Cr5MoSiV1 steel simultaneously. Microstructure examinations demonstrated that a fine microstructure along with nano scale carbide was acquired in the BCLR units, which produced an accumulative contribution of grain refinement, precipitation strengthening and a mixed microstructure. Based on the well distribution of the BCLR units, the beneficial effect of stress transfer from the matrix to the units on tensile property was also analyzed.

  20. Magnetic levitation-based electromagnetic energy harvesting: a semi-analytical non-linear model for energy transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.; Simões, José A. O.; Pascoal, Ricardo; Torrão, João; Xue, Xiaozheng; Furlani, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic levitation has been used to implement low-cost and maintenance-free electromagnetic energy harvesting. The ability of levitation-based harvesting systems to operate autonomously for long periods of time makes them well-suited for self-powering a broad range of technologies. In this paper, a combined theoretical and experimental study is presented of a harvester configuration that utilizes the motion of a levitated hard-magnetic element to generate electrical power. A semi-analytical, non-linear model is introduced that enables accurate and efficient analysis of energy transduction. The model predicts the transient and steady-state response of the harvester a function of its motion (amplitude and frequency) and load impedance. Very good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment with energy errors lower than 14.15% (mean absolute percentage error of 6.02%) and cross-correlations higher than 86%. The model provides unique insight into fundamental mechanisms of energy transduction and enables the geometric optimization of harvesters prior to fabrication and the rational design of intelligent energy harvesters.

  1. Magnetic levitation-based electromagnetic energy harvesting: a semi-analytical non-linear model for energy transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P; Ferreira, Jorge A F; Simões, José A O; Pascoal, Ricardo; Torrão, João; Xue, Xiaozheng; Furlani, Edward P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic levitation has been used to implement low-cost and maintenance-free electromagnetic energy harvesting. The ability of levitation-based harvesting systems to operate autonomously for long periods of time makes them well-suited for self-powering a broad range of technologies. In this paper, a combined theoretical and experimental study is presented of a harvester configuration that utilizes the motion of a levitated hard-magnetic element to generate electrical power. A semi-analytical, non-linear model is introduced that enables accurate and efficient analysis of energy transduction. The model predicts the transient and steady-state response of the harvester a function of its motion (amplitude and frequency) and load impedance. Very good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment with energy errors lower than 14.15% (mean absolute percentage error of 6.02%) and cross-correlations higher than 86%. The model provides unique insight into fundamental mechanisms of energy transduction and enables the geometric optimization of harvesters prior to fabrication and the rational design of intelligent energy harvesters. PMID:26725842

  2. Energy Status Determines Hindbrain Signal Transduction Pathway Transcriptional Reactivity to AMPK in the Estradiol-Treated Ovariectomized Female Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Baher A.; Alenazi, Fahaad S.H.; Briski, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Dorsal vagal complex (DVC) AMPK regulation of food intake in the estradiol-treated ovariectomized (OVX) female rat is energy state-dependent. Here, RT-PCR array technology was used to identify estradiol-sensitive AMPK-regulated DVC signal transduction pathways that exhibit differential reactivity to sensor activation during energy balance versus imbalance. The AMP mimetic AICAR correspondingly reduced or stimulated cDVC phosphoAMPK (pAMPK) and estrogen receptor-beta (ERβ) proteins in full-fed...

  3. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    The basic reaction for hydrogen generation is formation of molecular hydrogen from two electrons and two protons. Although there are many possible sources for the protons and electrons, and a variety of mechanisms for providing the requisite energy for hydrogen synthesis, the most abundant and readily available source of protons and electrons is water, and the most attractive source of energy for powering the process is sunlight. Not surprisingly, living systems have evolved to take advantage of these sources for materials and energy. Thus, biology provides paradigms for carrying out the reactions necessary for hydrogen production. Photosynthesis in green plants uses sunlight as the source of energy for the oxidation of water to give molecular oxygen, protons, and reduction potential. Some photosynthetic organisms are capable of using this reduction potential, in the form of the reduced redox protein ferredoxin, to reduce protons and produce molecular hydrogen via the action of an hydrogenase enzyme. A variety of other organisms metabolize the reduced carbon compounds that are ultimately the major products of photosynthesis to produce molecular hydrogen. These facts suggest that it might be possible to use light energy to make molecular hydrogen via biomimetic constructs that employ principles similar to those used by natural organisms, or perhaps with hybrid "bionic" systems that combine biomimetic materials with natural enzymes. It is now possible to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that mimic some of the major steps in the natural process.(1) Artificial antennas based on porphyrins, carotenoids and other chromophores absorb light at various wavelengths in the solar spectrum and transfer the harvested excitation energy to artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.(2) In these centers, photoinduced electron transfer uses the energy from light to move an electron from a donor to an acceptor moiety, generating a high-energy charge-separated state

  4. Signal transduction protein PII from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 senses low adenylate energy charge in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Herrmann, Christina; Forchhammer, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Abstract PII proteins belong to a family of highly conserved signal transduction proteins widely spread in bacteria, archaea and plants. They respond to the central metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) and control enzymes, transcription factors and transport proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism. Here we studied the effect of ADP on in vitro PII signalling properties from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, a model for oxygenic phototrophic organisms. Different...

  5. Enhancement of the performance of a hybrid nonlinear vibration energy harvester based on piezoelectric and electromagnetic transductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiphysics model of a hybrid piezoelectric–electromagnetic vibration energy harvester (VEH), including the main sources of nonlinearities, is developed. The continuum problem is derived on the basis of the extended Hamilton principle, and the modal Galerkin decomposition method is used in order to obtain a reduced-order model consisting of a nonlinear Duffing equation of motion coupled with two transduction equations. The resulting system is solved analytically using the method of multiple time scales and numerically by means of the harmonic balance method coupled with the asymptotic numerical continuation technique. Closed-form expressions for the moving magnet critical amplitude and the critical load resistance are provided in order to allow evaluation of the linear dynamic range of the proposed device. Several numerical simulations have been performed to highlight the performance of the hybrid VEH. In particular, the power density and the frequency bandwidth can be boosted, by up to 60% and 29% respectively, compared to those for a VEH with pure magnetic levitation thanks to the nonlinear elastic guidance. Moreover, the hybrid transduction permits enhancement of the power density by up to 84%. (papers)

  6. External Mechanical Work and Pendular Energy Transduction of Overground and Treadmill Walking in Adolescents with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Marie; Degache, Francis; Currat, Gabriel; Pochon, Ludmila; Peyrot, Nicolas; Newman, Christopher J.; Malatesta, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Motor impairments affect functional abilities and gait in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Improving their walking is an essential objective of treatment, and the use of a treadmill for gait analysis and training could offer several advantages in adolescents with CP. However, there is a controversy regarding the similarity between treadmill and overground walking both for gait analysis and training in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of these two types of gait modalities at standard and preferred walking speeds in adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) and typically developing (TD) adolescents matched on age, height and body mass. Methods: Spatiotemporal parameters, external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of walking were computed using two inertial sensors equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and gyroscope and compared in 10 UCP (14.2 ± 1.7 year) and 10 TD (14.1 ± 1.9 year) adolescents during treadmill and overground walking at standard and preferred speeds. Results: The treadmill induced almost identical mechanical changes to overground walking in TD adolescents and those with UCP, with the exception of potential and kinetic vertical and lateral mechanical works, which are both significantly increased in the overground-treadmill transition only in UCP (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Adolescents with UCP have a reduced adaptive capacity in absorbing and decelerating the speed created by a treadmill (i.e., dynamic stability) compared to TD adolescents. This may have an important implication in rehabilitation programs that assess and train gait by using a treadmill in adolescents with UCP. PMID:27148062

  7. Magainins and the disruption of membrane-linked free-energy transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Westerhoff, H V; Juretić, D; Hendler, R W; Zasloff, M.

    1989-01-01

    Magainins, a family of positively charged peptides, are partly if not wholly responsible for antimicrobial activity in skin extracts of Xenopus laevis. We report here that members of the magainin family--i.e., the 21-amino acid peptide PGLa and the 23-amino acid peptide magainin 2 amide (PGSa)--dissipate the electric potential across various energy-transducing membranes and thus uncouple respiration from other free-energy-requiring processes. We propose that this is a likely mechanism for the...

  8. Rotaxanes and Photovoltaic Materials Based on Pi-Conjugated Donors and Acceptors: Toward Energy Transduction on the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Carson J.

    The flow of energy between its various forms is central to our understanding of virtually all natural phenomena, from the origins and fate of the universe to the mechanisms that underpin Life. Therefore, a deeper fundamental understanding of how to manage energy processes at the molecular scale will open new doors in science and technology. This dissertation describes organic molecules and materials that are capable of transducing various forms of energy on the nanoscale, namely, a class of mechanically interlocked molecules known as rotaxanes for electrochemical-to-mechanical energy transduction (Part I), and a class of thin films known as organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for solar-to-electric energy transduction (Part II). These materials are all based on conjugated molecules with a capacity to donate or accept pi-electrons. A contemporary challenge in molecular nanotechnology is the development of artificial molecular machines (AMMs) that mimic the ability of motor proteins (e.g. myosin, kinesin) to perform mechanical work by leveraging a combination of energy sources and rich structural chemistry. Part I describes the synthesis, characterization, molecular dynamics, and switching properties of a series of `daisy chain' and oligorotaxane AMM prototypes. All compounds are templated by charge transfer and hydrogen bonding interactions between pi-associated 1,5-dioxynaphthlene donors appended with polyether groups and pi-acceptors of either neutral (naphthalenediimide) or charged (4,4´-bipyridinium) varieties, and are synthesized using efficient one-pot copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition `click chemistry' protocols. The interlocked architectures of these rotaxanes enable them to express sophisticated secondary structures (i.e. foldamers) and mechanical motions in solution, which have been elucidated using dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations, cyclic voltammetry, and spectroelectrochemistry experiments have demonstrated

  9. Signal-transduction protein P(II) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 senses low adenylate energy charge in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Herrmann, Christina; Forchhammer, Karl

    2011-11-15

    P(II) proteins belong to a family of highly conserved signal-transduction proteins that occurs widely in bacteria, archaea and plants. They respond to the central metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-OG (2-oxoglutarate), and control enzymes, transcription factors and transport proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism. In the present study, we examined the effect of ADP on in vitro P(II)-signalling properties for the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, a model for oxygenic phototrophic organisms. Different ADP/ATP ratios strongly affected the properties of P(II) signalling. Increasing ADP antagonized the binding of 2-OG and directly affected the interactions of P(II) with its target proteins. The resulting P(II)-signalling properties indicate that, in mixtures of ADP and ATP, P(II) trimers are occupied by mixtures of adenylate nucleotides. Binding and kinetic activation of NAGK (N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase), the controlling enzyme of arginine biosynthesis, by P(II) was weakened by ADP, but relief from arginine inhibition remained unaffected. On the other hand, ADP enhanced the binding of P(II) to PipX, a co-activator of the transcription factor NtcA and, furthermore, antagonized the inhibitory effect of 2-OG on P(II)-PipX interaction. These results indicate that S. elongatus P(II) directly senses the adenylate energy charge, resulting in target-dependent differential modification of the P(II)-signalling properties. PMID:21774788

  10. An investigation into membrane bound redox carriers involved in energy transduction mechanism in Brevibacterium linens DSM 20158 with unsequenced genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbiri, Khadija; Botting, Catherine H; Adnan, Ahmad; Fuszard, Matthew; Naseem, Shahid; Ahmed, Safeer; Shujaat, Shahida; Syed, Quratulain; Ahmad, Waqar

    2014-04-01

    Brevibacterium linens (B. linens) DSM 20158 with an unsequenced genome can be used as a non-pathogenic model to study features it has in common with other unsequenced pathogens of the same genus on the basis of comparative proteome analysis. The most efficient way to kill a pathogen is to target its energy transduction mechanism. In the present study, we have identified the redox protein complexes involved in the electron transport chain of B. linens DSM 20158 from their clear homology with the shot-gun genome sequenced strain BL2 of B. linens by using the SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with nano LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. B. linens is found to have a branched electron transport chain (Respiratory chain), in which electrons can enter the respiratory chain either at NADH (Complex I) or at Complex II level or at the cytochrome level. Moreover, we are able to isolate, purify, and characterize the membrane bound Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase), Complex III (menaquinone cytochrome c reductase cytochrome c subunit, Complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and Complex V (ATP synthase) of B. linens strain DSM 20158. PMID:24573306

  11. Alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotection and visual signal transduction in the retina of Parkinsonian, MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Campello

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is mainly characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, including the retina. Different interrelated molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease-associated neuronal death have been put forward in the brain, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Systemic injection of the proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP to monkeys elicits the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome, including morphological and functional impairments in the retina. However, the intracellular events leading to derangement of dopaminergic and other retinal neurons in MPTP-treated animal models have not been so far investigated. Here we have used a comparative proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in the retina of MPTP-treated monkeys. Proteins were solubilized from the neural retinas of control and MPTP-treated animals, labelled separately with two different cyanine fluorophores and run pairwise on 2D DIGE gels. Out of >700 protein spots resolved and quantified, 36 were found to exhibit statistically significant differences in their expression levels, of at least ± 1.4-fold, in the parkinsonian monkey retina compared with controls. Most of these spots were excised from preparative 2D gels, trypsinized and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. Data obtained were used for protein sequence database interrogation, and 15 different proteins were successfully identified, of which 13 were underexpressed and 2 overexpressed. These proteins were involved in key cellular functional pathways such as glycolysis and mitochondrial electron transport, neuronal protection against stress and survival, and phototransduction processes. These functional categories underscore that alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotective mechanisms and signal transduction are involved in MPTP-induced neuronal degeneration in the retina, in similarity to

  12. Functional interfaces for biomimetic energy harvesting: CNTs-DNA matrix for enzyme assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Rachel M E; Garcia, Kristen E; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Matanovic, Ivana; Banta, Scott; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-05-01

    The development of 3D structures exploring the properties of nano-materials and biological molecules has been shown through the years as an effective path forward for the design of advanced bio-nano architectures for enzymatic fuel cells, photo-bio energy harvesting devices, nano-biosensors and bio-actuators and other bio-nano-interfacial architectures. In this study we demonstrate a scaffold design utilizing carbon nanotubes, deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and a specific DNA binding transcription factor that allows for directed immobilization of a single enzyme. Functionalized carbon nanotubes were covalently bonded to a diazonium salt modified gold surface through carbodiimide chemistry creating a brush-type nanotube alignment. The aligned nanotubes created a highly ordered structure with high surface area that allowed for the attachment of a protein assembly through a designed DNA scaffold. The enzyme immobilization was controlled by a zinc finger (ZNF) protein domain that binds to a specific dsDNA sequence. ZNF 268 was genetically fused to the small laccase (SLAC) from Streptomyces coelicolor, an enzyme belonging to the family of multi-copper oxidases, and used to demonstrate the applicability of the developed approach. Analytical techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and enzymatic activity analysis, allowed characterization at each stage of development of the bio-nano architecture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics - the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26751397

  13. Biomimetic nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ana Maria Carmona-RibeiroBiocolloids Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Mimicking nature is a powerful approach for developing novel lipid-based devices for drug and vaccine delivery. In this review, biomimetic assemblies based on natural or synthetic lipids by themselves or associated to silica, latex or drug particles will be discussed. In water, self-assembly of lipid molecules into supramolecular structures is fairly well understood. However, their self-assembly on a solid surface or at an interface remains poorly understood. In certain cases, hydrophobic drug granules can be dispersed in aqueous solution via lipid adsorption surrounding the drug particles as nanocapsules. In other instances, hydrophobic drug molecules attach as monomers to borders of lipid bilayer fragments providing drug formulations that are effective in vivo at low drug-to-lipid-molar ratio. Cationic biomimetic particles offer suitable interfacial environment for adsorption, presentation and targeting of biomolecules in vivo. Thereby antigens can effectively be presented by tailored biomimetic particles for development of vaccines over a range of defined and controllable particle sizes. Biomolecular recognition between receptor and ligand can be reconstituted by means of receptor immobilization into supported lipidic bilayers allowing isolation and characterization of signal transduction steps.Keywords: cationic lipid, phospholipids, bilayer fragments, vesicles, silica, polymeric particles, antigens, novel cationic immunoadjuvants, drugs

  14. Embedded SMA wire actuated biomimetic fin: a module for biomimetic underwater propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenlong; Hang, Guanrong; Wang, Yangwei; Li, Jian; Du, Wei

    2008-04-01

    An embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuated biomimetic fin is presented, and based on this module for biomimetic underwater propulsion, a micro robot fish (146 mm in length, 30 g in weight) and a robot squid (242 mm in length, 360 g in weight) were developed. Fish swim by undulating their body and/or fins. Squid and cuttlefish can also swim by undulating their fins. To simplify engineering modeling, the undulating swimming movement is assumed to be the integration of the movements of many flexible bending segments connected in parallel or in series. According to this idea, a biomimetic fin which can bend flexibly was developed. The musculature of a cuttlefish fin was investigated to aid the design of the biomimetic fin. SMA wires act as 'muscle fibers' to drive the biomimetic fin just like the transverse muscles of the cuttlefish fin. During the bending phase, elastic energy is stored in the elastic substrate and skin, and during the return phase, elastic energy is released to power the return movement. Theorem analysis of the bending angle was performed to estimate the bending performance of the biomimetic fin. Experiments were carried out on single-face fins with latex rubber skin and silicone skin (SF-L and SF-S) to compare the bending angle, return time, elastic energy storage and reliability. Silicone was found to be the better skin. A dual-face fin with silicone skin (DF-S) was tested in water to evaluate the actuating performance and to validate the reliability. Thermal analysis of the SMA temperature was performed to aid the control strategy. The micro robot fish and robot squid employ one and ten DF-S, respectively. Swimming experiments with different actuation frequencies were carried out. The speed and steering radius of the micro robot fish reached 112 mm s-1 and 136 mm, respectively, and the speed and rotary speed of the robot squid reached 40 mm s-1 and 22° s-1, respectively.

  15. Embedded SMA wire actuated biomimetic fin: a module for biomimetic underwater propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuated biomimetic fin is presented, and based on this module for biomimetic underwater propulsion, a micro robot fish (146 mm in length, 30 g in weight) and a robot squid (242 mm in length, 360 g in weight) were developed. Fish swim by undulating their body and/or fins. Squid and cuttlefish can also swim by undulating their fins. To simplify engineering modeling, the undulating swimming movement is assumed to be the integration of the movements of many flexible bending segments connected in parallel or in series. According to this idea, a biomimetic fin which can bend flexibly was developed. The musculature of a cuttlefish fin was investigated to aid the design of the biomimetic fin. SMA wires act as 'muscle fibers' to drive the biomimetic fin just like the transverse muscles of the cuttlefish fin. During the bending phase, elastic energy is stored in the elastic substrate and skin, and during the return phase, elastic energy is released to power the return movement. Theorem analysis of the bending angle was performed to estimate the bending performance of the biomimetic fin. Experiments were carried out on single-face fins with latex rubber skin and silicone skin (SF-L and SF-S) to compare the bending angle, return time, elastic energy storage and reliability. Silicone was found to be the better skin. A dual-face fin with silicone skin (DF-S) was tested in water to evaluate the actuating performance and to validate the reliability. Thermal analysis of the SMA temperature was performed to aid the control strategy. The micro robot fish and robot squid employ one and ten DF-S, respectively. Swimming experiments with different actuation frequencies were carried out. The speed and steering radius of the micro robot fish reached 112 mm s−1 and 136 mm, respectively, and the speed and rotary speed of the robot squid reached 40 mm s−1 and 22° s−1, respectively

  16. Structure–function relationship of the foam-like pomelo peel (Citrus maxima)—an inspiration for the development of biomimetic damping materials with high energy dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical properties of artificial foams are mainly determined by the choice of bulk materials and relative density. In natural foams, in contrast, variation to optimize properties is achieved by structural optimization rather than by conscious substitution of bulk materials. Pomelos (Citrus maxima) have a thick foam-like peel which is capable of dissipating considerable amounts of kinetic energy and thus this fruit represents an ideal role model for the development of biomimetic impact damping structures. This paper focuses on the analysis of the biomechanics of the pomelo peel and on its structure–function relationship. It deals with the determination of the onset strain of densification of this foam-like tissue and on how this property is influenced by the arrangement of vascular bundles. It was found here that the vascular bundles branch in a very regular manner—every 16.5% of the radial peel thickness—and that the surrounding peel tissue (pericarp) attains its exceptional thickness mainly by the expansion of existing interconnected cells causing an increasing volume of the intercellular space, rather than by cell division. These findings lead to the discussion of the pomelo peel as an inspiration for fibre-reinforced cast metallic foams with the capacity for excellent energy dissipation. (paper)

  17. Biomimetics materials, structures and processes : examples, ideas and case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckner, Dietmar; Hellmich, Christian; Schmiedmayer, Heinz-Bodo; Stachelberger, Herbert; Gebeshuber, Ille

    2011-01-01

    The book presents an outline of current activities in the field of biomimetics and integrates a variety of applications comprising biophysics, surface sciences, architecture and medicine. Biomimetics as innovation method is characterised by interdisciplinary information transfer from the life sciences to technical application fields aiming at increased performance, functionality and energy efficiency. The contributions of the book relate to the research areas: - Materials and structures in nanotechnology and biomaterials - Biomimetic approaches to develop new forms, construction principles and design methods in architecture - Information and dynamics in automation, neuroinformatics and biomechanics Readers will be informed about the latest research approaches and results in biomimetics with examples ranging from bionic nano-membranes to function-targeted design of tribological surfaces and the translation of natural auditory coding strategies.

  18. Biomimetic sensor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hun; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Desai, Malav S.; Ren, Shuo; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-01

    Detection of desired target chemicals in a sensitive and selective manner is critically important to protect human health, environment and national security. Nature has been a great source of inspiration for the design of sensitive and selective sensors. In this mini-review, we overview the recent developments in bio-inspired sensor development. There are four major components of sensor design: design of receptors for specific targets; coating materials to integrate receptors to transducing machinery; sensitive transducing of signals; and decision making based on the sensing results. We discuss the biomimetic methods to discover specific receptors followed by a discussion about bio-inspired nanocoating material design. We then review the recent developments in phage-based bioinspired transducing systems followed by a discussion of biomimetic pattern recognition-based decision making systems. Our review will be helpful to understand recent approaches to reverse-engineer natural systems to design specific and sensitive sensors.

  19. Amelogenin and Enamel Biomimetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Qichao; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Mature tooth enamel is acellular and does not regenerate itself. Developing technologies that rebuild tooth enamel and preserve tooth structure is therefore of great interest. Considering the importance of amelogenin protein in dental enamel formation, its ability to control apatite mineralization in vitro, and its potential to be applied in fabrication of future bio-inspired dental material this review focuses on two major subjects: amelogenin and enamel biomimetics. We review the most recen...

  20. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Klem, Michael T.; Mark Young; Trevor Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches...

  1. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mukkamala, Ravindranath; Chen, Qing; Hu, Hopin; Baude, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  2. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz L. Dickert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE, but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors.

  3. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Klem

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches to materials chemistry have provided a new avenue for the synthesis and assembly of magnetic nanomaterials that has great potential for overcoming these obstacles.

  4. Biomimetics in Tribology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebeshuber, I. C.; Majlis, B. Y.; Stachelberger, H.

    Science currently goes through a major change. Biology is evolving as new Leitwissenschaft, with more and more causation and natural laws being uncovered. The term `technoscience' denotes the field where science and technology are inseparably interconnected, the trend goes from papers to patents, and the scientific `search for truth' is increasingly replaced by search for applications with a potential economic value. Biomimetics, i.e. knowledge transfer from biology to technology, is a field that has the potential to drive major technical advances. The biomimetic approach might change the research landscape and the engineering culture dramatically, by the blending of disciplines. It might substantially support successful mastering of current tribological challenges: friction, adhesion, lubrication and wear in devices and systems from the meter to the nanometer scale. A highly successful method in biomimectics, the biomimicry innovation method, is applied in this chapter to identify nature's best practices regarding two key issues in tribology: maintenance of the physical integrity of a system, and permanent as well as temporary attachment. The best practices identified comprise highly diverse organisms and processes and are presented in a number of tables with detailed references.

  5. Light energy transduction by the purple membrane of halophilic bacteria; Proceedings of the Symposium, San Francisco, Calif., June 6, 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Several aspects of bacteriorhodopsin, the retinal protein component of the purple membranes of Halobacterium halobium, are discussed. Structural studies are presented. Photochemical properties of the protein complex and of its chromophore are described. Proton translocation of bacteriorhodopsin is compared to that of a protein from a thermophilic bacterium. Ionophore activity of bacteriorhodopsin is considered with attention to conformational changes, light dependency, and electrical potential. Amino acid transport is also examined and the light-energy budget is investigated. Bacteriorhodopsin is of interest because of its similarity to rhodopsin, which plays a major role in mammalian vision, and also because its attainability and distinctive characteristics will facilitate studies of certain bacterial physiological functions, such as ion transport and membrane organization.

  6. Biomimetic Cilia Based on MEMS Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Zhou; Zhi-wen Liu

    2008-01-01

    A review on the research of Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology based biomimetic cilia is presented. Biomimetic cilia, enabled by the advancement of MEMS technology, have been under dynamic development for the past decade. After a brief description of the background of cilia and MEMS technology, different biomimetic cilia applications are reviewed. Biomimetic cilia micro-actuators, including micromachined polyimide bimorph biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, electro-statically actuated polymer biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, and magnetically actuated nanorod array biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, are presented. Subsequently micromachined underwater flow biomimetic cilia micro-sensor is studied, followed by acoustic flow micro-sensor. The fabrication of these MEMS-based biomimetic cilia devices, characterization of their physical properties, and the results of their application experiments are discussed.

  7. A Biomimetic Haptic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mitchinson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The design and implementation of the periphery of an artificial whisker sensory system is presented. It has been developed by adopting a biomimetic approach to model the structure and function of rodent facial vibrissae. The artificial vibrissae have been formed using composite materials and have the ability to be actively moved or whisked. The sensory structures at the root of real vibrissae has been modelled and implemented using micro strain gauges and Digital Signal Processors. The primary afferents and vibrissal trigeminal ganglion have been modelled using empirical data taken from electrophysiological measurements, and implemented in real-time using a Field Programmable Gate Array. Pipelining techniques were employed to maximise the utility of the FPGA hardware. The system is to be integrated into a more complete whisker sensory model, including neural structures within the central nervous system, which can be used to orient a mobile robot.

  8. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  9. Biomimetic Nanotechnology: A Powerful Means to address Global Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Gebeshuber, Ille C

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic nanotechnology is a prominent research area at the meeting place of life sciences with engineering and physics: it is a continuously growing field that deals with knowledge transfer from biology to nanotechnology. Biomimetic nanotechnology is a field that has the potential to substantially support successful mastering of major global challenges. The Millennium Project was commissioned by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2002 to develop a concrete action plan for the world to reverse the grinding poverty, hunger and disease affecting billions of people. It states 15 Global Challenges: sustainable development, water, population and resources, democratization, long-term perspectives, information technology, the rich-poor gap, health, capacity to decide, peace and conflict, status of women, transnational crime, energy, science and technology and global ethics. The possible contributions to master these challenges with the help of biomimetic nanotechnology will be discussed in detail.

  10. BIOMIMETIC STRATEGIES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS. TERPENES

    OpenAIRE

    V. Kulcitki

    2012-01-01

    The current paper represents an outline of the selected contributions to the biomimetic procedures and approaches for the synthesis of terpenes with complex structure and diverse functionalisation pattern. These include homologation strategies, cyclisations, rearrangements, as well as biomimetic remote functionalisations.

  11. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg;

    2009-01-01

    peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays......To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro......, and furthermore demonstrate that the design can conveniently be scaled up to support planar lipid bilayers in large square-centimeter partition arrays....

  12. [Biomimetic sensors in biomedical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Landry; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The recent research on both the synthesis of membrane proteins by cell-free systems and the reconstruction of planar lipid membranes, has led to the development of a cross-technology to produce biosensors or filters. Numerous biomimetic membranes are currently being standardized and used by the industry, such as filters containing aquaporin for water desalination, or used in routine at the laboratory scale, for example the bacteriorhodopsin as a light sensor. In the medical area, several fields of application of these biomimetic membranes are under consideration today, particularly for the screening of therapeutic molecules and for the developing of new tools in diagnosis, patient monitoring and personalized medicine. PMID:26152170

  13. Bio-mimetic Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Bio-mimetic engineering or bio-mimetics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology (from Wikipedia). The concept itself is old, but successful developments have been made recently, especially in the research field of flow control. The objective of flow control based on the bio-mimetic approach is to develop novel concepts for reducing drag, increasing lift and enhancing aerodynamic performance. For skin friction reduction, a few ideas have been suggested such as the riblet from shark, compliant surface from dolphin, microbubble injection and multiple front-body curvature from penguin, and V-shaped protrusion from sailfish. For form drag reduction, several new attempts have been also made recently. Examples include the V-shaped spanwise grooves from saguaro cactus, overall shape of box fish, longitudinal grooves on scallop shell, bill of swordfish, hooked comb on owl wing, trailing-edge protrusion on dragonfly wing, and fillet. For the enhancement of aerodynamic performance, focuses have been made on the birds, fish and insects: e.g., double layered feather of landing bird, leading-edge serration of humpback-whale flipper, pectoral fin of flying fish, long tail on swallowtail-butterfly wing, wing flapping motion of dragonfly, and alula in birds. Living animals adapt their bodies to better performance in multi purposes, but engineering requires single purpose in most cases. Therefore, bio-mimetic approaches often produce excellent results more than expected. However, they are sometimes based on people's wrong understanding of nature and produce unwanted results. Successes and failures from bio-mimetic approaches in flow control will be discussed in the presentation.

  14. Man-tailored biomimetic sensor of molecularly imprinted materials for the potentiometric measurement of oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Felismina T C; Kamel, Ayman H; Guerreiro, Joana R L; Sales, M Goreti F

    2010-10-15

    A novel biomimetic sensor for the potentiometric transduction of oxytetracycline is presented. The artificial host was imprinted in methacrylic acid and/or acrylamide based polymers. Different amounts of molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were dispersed in different plasticizing solvents and entrapped in a poly(vinyl chloride) matrix. Only molecularly imprinted based sensors allowed a potentiometric transduction, suggesting the existence of host-guest interactions. These sensors exhibited a near-Nernstian response in steady state evaluations; slopes and detection limits ranged 42-63 mV/decade and 2.5-31.3 μg/mL, respectively. Sensors were independent from the pH of test solutions within 2-5. Good selectivity was observed towards glycine, ciprofloxacin, creatinine, acid nalidixic, sulfadiazine, cysteine, hydroxylamine and lactose. In flowing media, the biomimetic sensors presented good reproducibility (RSD of ±0.7%), fast response, good sensitivity (65 mV/decade), wide linear range (5.0×10(-5) to 1.0×10(-2) mol/L), low detection limit (19.8 μg/mL), and a stable baseline for a 5×10(-3) M citrate buffer (pH 2.5) carrier. The sensors were successfully applied to the analysis of drugs and urine. This work confirms the possibility of using molecularly imprinted polymers as ionophores for organic ion recognition in potentiometric transduction. PMID:20688507

  15. Biological and Biomimetic Comb Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Some new phenomena involved in the physical properties of comb polyelectrolyte solutions are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to synthetic biomimetic materials, and the structures formed by these molecules are compared with those of naturally occurring glycoprotein and proteoglycan solutions. Developments in the determination of the structure and dynamics (viscoelasticity of comb polymers in solution are also covered. Specifically the appearance of multi-globular structures, helical instabilities, liquid crystalline phases, and the self-assembly of the materials to produce hierarchical comb morphologies is examined. Comb polyelectrolytes are surface active and a short review is made of some recent experiments in this area that relate to their morphology when suspended in solution. We hope to emphasize the wide variety of phenomena demonstrated by the vast range of naturally occurring comb polyelectrolytes and the challenges presented to synthetic chemists designing biomimetic materials.

  16. Biomimetic Dye Aggregate Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Marek, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    A biomimetic self-assembling dye, which forms aggregates that mimic the natural light-harvesting system of special photosynthetic active bacteria, has been investigated towards its applicability to solar cells. This fully synthetic dye, self-assembles to orderly structured nano- to micrometer sized rod-shaped aggregates, which might improve solar cells based on conventional organic dyes. In order to use the full potential of the dye aggregates, the self-assembly needed to be controlled and a ...

  17. SPP1-mediated plasmid transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Canosi, U; Lüder, G; Trautner, T A

    1982-01-01

    The virulent Bacillus subtilis phage SPP1 transduces plasmid DNA. Plasmid-transducing phages contain only plasmid DNA. Such DNA represents a concatemer of monomeric plasmid molecules with the molecular weight of mature SPP1 DNA. Biological parameters of plasmid transduction are described.

  18. Biomimetic Architecture in Building Envelope Maintenance (A Literature)

    OpenAIRE

    Agus Salim N.A.; Mydin M.A.O; Ulang N. H. Md.

    2014-01-01

    The study of biomimetic architecture on building envelope is the main structure of this research. The concept is believed more sustainable and efficient for energy saving, operating cost consumption, waste recycle and design renewal in the future. The inspiration from the nature developed the intention on this study to explore on what and how this concept to overcome the problems through design. Biomimicry does catch the attention of human to study more on the system and function of its natur...

  19. Physical aspects of sensory transduction on seeing, hearing and smelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Tohru; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    What is the general principle of sensory transduction? Sensory transduction is defined as energy transformation from the external world to the internal world. The energy of the external world, such as thermal energy (heat), electro-magnetic energy (light), mechanical energy (sound) and the energy from molecules (chemicals), is converted into electrochemical events in the animal nervous system. The following five classes of special sense receptors are utilized for energy conversion: vision (photo); audition (sound); taste and smell (chemo); and tactile (mechano). There are also other special sense receptors, including thermo and noxious receptors. The focus of this study is on photoreceptors, sound-receptors and odorant-receptors because the transduction mechanisms of these receptors are explained biochemically and understood by a common physical principle; these biochemical models are well known in neuroscience. The following notable problems are inherent in these biochemical models: the cGMP ionophore model of the vertebrate photoreceptor cannot explain the fast photo-response (∼msec); the tip links connection model of stereocilia in the basilar membrane for opening the K+ channel on the tip of a hair has difficulty explaining the high frequency vibration of hair cells without a damping of the oscillation, and the odorant shape-specific receptor model for olfactory transduction has difficulty in discriminating the minute differences among similar fragrant smells of essential oils with different molecular shapes. These difficulties might arise from a lack of the physical sense when the transduction models were proposed. This article will reconsider these problems and propose rational models for visual, olfactory and auditory transduction. PMID:27493557

  20. BIOMIMETIC STRATEGIES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS. TERPENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kulcitki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The current paper represents an outline of the selected contributions to the biomimetic procedures and approaches for the synthesis of terpenes with complex structure and diverse functionalisation pattern. These include homologation strategies, cyclisations, rearrangements, as well as biomimetic remote functionalisations.

  1. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2010-01-01

    The paper illustrates how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis of the...... of biomimetic studies of sense organs in animals....

  2. Gibberellin Signal Transduction in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Min Fan; Xiaoyan Feng; Yu Wang; Xing Wang Deng

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, significant knowledge has accumulated regarding gibberellin (GA) signal transduction in rice as a result of studies using multiple approaches, particularly molecular genetics. The present review highlights the recent developments in the identification of GA signaling pathway components, the discovery of GA-induced destruction of GA signaling represser (DELLA protein), and the possible mechanism underlying the regulation of GA-responsive gene expression in rice.

  3. Biomimetic fabrication of a three-level hierarchical calcium phosphate/collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-level hierarchical calcium phosphate/collagen/hydroxyapatite (CaP/Col/HAp) scaffold for bone tissue engineering was developed using biomimetic synthesis. Porous CaP ceramics were first prepared as substrate materials to mimic the porous bone structure. A second-level Col network was then composited into porous CaP ceramics by vacuum infusion. Finally, a third-level HAp layer was achieved by biomimetic mineralization. The three-level hierarchical biomimetic scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectra, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the mechanical properties of the scaffold were evaluated using dynamic mechanical analysis. The results show that this scaffold exhibits a similar structure and composition to natural bone tissues. Furthermore, this three-level hierarchical biomimetic scaffold showed enhanced mechanical strength compared with pure porous CaP scaffolds. The biocompatibility and osteoinductivity of the biomimetic scaffolds were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo tests. Cell culture results indicated the good biocompatibility of this biomimetic scaffold. Faster and increased bone formation was observed in these scaffolds following a six-month implantation in the dorsal muscles of rabbits, indicating that this biomimetic scaffold exhibits better osteoinductivity than common CaP scaffolds. (papers)

  4. Researches and developments of biomimetics in tribology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhendong; TONG Jin; REN Luquan

    2006-01-01

    Animals and plants have developed optimal geometric structures, smart topological materials and multi-functional surface textures with excellent tribological characteristics through the evolution of thousand millions of years and become models for tribological design. This paper puts forward the definition and fundament of biomimetic tribology, investigates the status of self-cleaning of liquid-solid interface, adhesion between animals' feet and solid surface, wear characteristics of biological surfaces and biomimetic design, as well as the friction and bionic design on liquid-solid interface. The further developments of the tribological biomimetics are discussed.

  5. Biomimetic, Catalytic Oxidation in Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-lchi Murahashi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Oxidation is one of the most fundamental reactions in organic synthesis. Owing to the current need to develop forward-looking technology that is environmentally acceptable with respect many aspects. The most attractive approaches are biomimetic oxidation reactions that are closely related to the metabolism of living things. The metabolisms are governed by a variety of enzymes such as cytochrome P-450 and flavoenzyme.Simulation of the function of these enzymes with simple transition metal complex catalyst or organic catalysts led to the discovery of biomimetic, catalytic oxidations with peroxides[1]. We extended such biomimetic methods to the oxidation with molecular oxygen under mild conditions.

  6. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine; Braekevelt, Sylvie; Lauritzen, Karsten; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins-aquaporins-has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market-in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes. PMID:26556379

  7. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Perry

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market—in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes.

  8. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  9. Biomimetic catalysis: Taking on the turnover challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooley, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    Emulating the efficiency with which enzymes catalyse reactions has often been used as inspiration to develop self-assembled cages. Now two studies present approaches to achieving catalyst turnover -- one of the biggest challenges in achieving truly biomimetic catalysis.

  10. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the possibilities and challenges in mimicking biological membranes and creating membrane-based sensor and separation devices. It covers recent advances in developing biomimetic membranes for technological applications with a focus on the use of integral membrane protein mediated transport. It describes the fundamentals of biosensing as well as separation and shows how the two processes work together in biological systems. The book provides an overview of the current state of the art, points to areas that need further investigation and anticipates future directions in the field. Biomimetics is a truly cross-disciplinary approach and this is exemplified by the challenges in mimicking osmotic processes as they occur in nature using aquaporin protein water channels as central building blocks. In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channel and carrier proteins are important and examples of how these may be reconstituted and controlled in biomimetic membranes are ...

  11. Biomimetic Membrane Arrays on Cast Hydrogel Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roerdink-Lander, Monique; Ibragimova, Sania; Rein Hansen, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bilayers are intrinsically fragile and require mechanical support in technical applications based on biomimetic membranes. Tethering the lipid bilayer membranes to solid substrates, either directly through covalent or ionic substrate−lipid links or indirectly on substrate-supported cushions......, provides mechanical support but at the cost of small molecule transport through the membrane−support sandwich. To stabilize biomimetic membranes while allowing transport through a membrane−support sandwich, we have investigated the feasibility of using an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE...

  12. Biomimetic Active Touch with Fingertips and Whiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepora, Nathan F

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a synthetic viewpoint that compares, contrasts, and draws commonalities for biomimetic perception over a range of tactile sensors and tactile stimuli. Biomimetic active perception is formulated from three principles: (i) evidence accumulation based on leading models of perceptual decision making; (ii) action selection with an evidence-based policy, here based on overt focal attention; and (iii) sensory encoding of evidence based on neural coding. Two experiments with each of three biomimetic tactile sensors are considered: the iCub (capacitive) fingertip, the TacTip (optical) tactile sensor, and BIOTACT whiskers. For each sensor, one experiment considers a similar task (perception of shape and location) and the other a different tactile perception task. In all experiments, active perception with a biomimetic action selection policy based on focal attention outperforms passive perception with static or random action selection. The active perception also consistently reaches superresolved accuracy (hyperacuity) finer than the spacing between tactile elements. Biomimetic active touch thus offers a common approach for biomimetic tactile sensors to accurately and robustly characterize and explore non-trivial, uncertain environments analogous to how animals perceive the natural world. PMID:27168603

  13. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate

  14. Biomimetic use of genetic algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Dessalles, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are considered as an original way to solve problems, probably because of their generality and of their "blind" nature. But GAs are also unusual since the features of many implementations (among all that could be thought of) are principally led by the biological metaphor, while efficiency measurements intervene only afterwards. We propose here to examine the relevance of these biomimetic aspects, by pointing out some fundamental similarities and divergences between GAs and the genome of living beings shaped by natural selection. One of the main differences comes from the fact that GAs rely principally on the so-called implicit parallelism, while giving to the mutation/selection mechanism the second role. Such differences could suggest new ways of employing GAs on complex problems, using complex codings and starting from nearly homogeneous populations.

  15. Biomimetic mechanism for micro aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Darryll J. (Inventor); Bohorquez, Felipe A. (Inventor); Sirohi, Jayant (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic pitching and flapping mechanism including a support member, at least two blade joints for holding blades and operatively connected to the support member. An outer shaft member is concentric with the support member, and an inner shaft member is concentric with the outer shaft member. The mechanism allows the blades of a small-scale rotor to be actuated in the flap and pitch degrees of freedom. The pitching and the flapping are completely independent from and uncoupled to each other. As such, the rotor can independently flap, or independently pitch, or flap and pitch simultaneously with different amplitudes and/or frequencies. The mechanism can also be used in a non-rotary wing configuration, such as an ornithopter, in which case the rotational degree of freedom would be suppressed.

  16. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær;

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One...... barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...... organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these...

  17. Biomimetic electrochemistry from conducting polymers. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Composition and properties of conducting polymers change during reactions. ► These properties are being exploited to develop biomimetic reactive and soft devices. ► The state of the art for artificial muscles sensing working conditions was reviewed. ► Smart membranes, drug delivery devices and nervous interfaces were also reviewed. - Abstract: Films of conducting polymers in the presence of electrolytes can be oxidized or reduced by the flow of anodic or cathodic currents. Ions and solvent are exchanged during a reaction for charge and osmotic pressure balance. A reactive conducting polymer contains ions and solvent. Such variation of composition during a reaction is reminiscent of the biological processes in cells. Along changes to the composition of the material during a reaction, there are also changes to other properties, including: volume (electrochemomechanical), colour (electrochromic), stored charge (electrical storage), porosity or permselectivity (electroporosity), stored chemicals, wettability and so on. Most of those properties mimic similar property changes in organs during their functioning. These properties are being exploited to develop biomimetic reactive and soft devices: artificial muscles and polymeric actuators; supercapacitors and all organic batteries; smart membranes; electron-ion transducers; nervous interfaces and artificial synapses, or drug delivery devices. In this review we focus on the state of the art for artificial muscles, smart membranes and electron-ion transducers. The reactive nature of those devices provide them with a unique advantage related to the present days technologies: any changes in the surrounding physical or chemical variable acting on the electrochemical reaction rate will be sensed by the device while working. Working under constant current (driving signal), the evolution of the device potential or the evolution of the consumed electrical energy (sensing signals) senses and quantifies the

  18. Biomimetic mineral coatings in dental and orthopaedic implantology

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y.; Groot; Hunziker, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetic techniques are used to deposit coatings of calcium phosphate upon medical devices. The procedure is conducted under near-physiological, or "biomimetic", conditions of temperature and pH primarily to improve their biocompatibility and biodegradability of the materials. The inorganic layers generated by biomimetic methods resemble bone mineral, and can be degraded within a biological milieu. The biomimetic coating technique involves the nucleation and growth of bone-like crystals upo...

  19. Mineralization of Zein Films by Biomimetic Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xiaoning; ZHANG Yanxiang; MA Ying; ZENG Sheng; WANG Shaozhen; MA Yalu

    2015-01-01

    The transparent or opaque zein film was prepared by a phase separation method with a zein ethanol aqueous solution. The circular zein film was self-assembled on the air-water interface. According to the images by scanning elec-tron microscopy, the upper surface of film is flat and smooth and the downward surface presents a complex reticulation structure of corn protein fiber. Zein film as a biomimetic mineralization template is used to synthesize calcium phosphate crystals by a bioinspired mineralization process. Randomly oriented apatite crystals appear on the both surfaces of zein film after immersion in 10´simulated body fluid, and the phase composition and morphology of the deposited calcium apatite are also distinguished from deposited location and immersion time. The phase transformation process from dical-cium phosphate dihydrate into hydroxyapatite (HAp) phase was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Based on the results by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the Ca/P ratio of the deposited apatite increases with the transformation from DCPD to HAp. The HAp/Zein films possess the excellent biodegradable structural features, and the coating of HAp crystallites has some potential applications for bone repair and regeneration.

  20. Biomimetics applied to centering in micro-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, L.H.; Lenau, Torben Anker; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a biomimetic search method to develop ideas for centering objects in micro-assembly. Biomimetics involves the imitation of biological phenomena to solve problems. An obstacle to the use of biomimetics in engineering is knowledge of biological phenomena that...

  1. Biomimetics, color, and the arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Franziska

    2015-03-01

    Color as dramatic, dynamic and dazzling as the iridescent hues on the wings of certain butterflies has never been encountered in the art world. Unlike and unmatched by the chemical pigments of the artists' palette, this changeable color is created by transparent, colorless nanostructures that, as with prisms, diffract and reflect light to render spectral color visible. Until now, iridescent colors, by their very nature, have defied artists' best efforts to fully capture these rainbow hues. Now, for the first time, the artist and researcher Franziska Schenk employs latest nature-inspired color-shift technology to actually simulate the iridescence of butterflies and beetles on canvas. Crucially, studying the ingenious ways in which a range of such displays are created by insects has provided the artist with vital clues on how to adapt and adopt these challenging optical nano-materials for painting. And indeed, after years of meticulous and painstaking research both in the lab and studio, the desired effect is achieved. The resulting paintings, like an iridescent insect, do in fact fluctuate in perceived color - depending on the light and viewing angle. In tracing the artist's respective biomimetic approach, the paper not only provides an insight into the new color technology's evolution and innovative artistic possibilities, but also suggests what artists can learn from nature.

  2. Laser technology in biomimetics basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Belegratis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Lasers are progressively more used as versatile tools for fabrication purposes. The wide range of available powers, wavelengths, operation modes, repetition rates etc. facilitate the processing of a large spectrum of materials at exceptional precision and quality. Hence, manifold methods were established in the past and novel methods are continuously under development. Biomimetics, the translation from nature-inspired principles to technical applications, is strongly multidisciplinary. This field offers intrinsically a wide scope of applications for laser based methods regarding structuring and modification of materials. This book is dedicated to laser fabrication methods in biomimetics. It introduces both, a laser technology as well as an application focused approach.  The book covers the most important laser lithographic methods and various biomimetics application scenarios ranging from coatings and biotechnology to construction, medical applications and photonics.

  3. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    preventing the passage of others, a property critical for the overall conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Both ion and water channels are highly efficient membrane pore proteins capable of transporting solutes at very high rates, up to 109 molecules per second. Carrier proteins...... membrane-based sensor and/or separation devices? In the development of biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channels (ion and water channels) and carriers (transporters) are important. Generally, each class of transport proteins conducts specific molecular species in and out of the cell while...... generally have a lower turnover but are capable of transport against gradients. For both classes of proteins, their unique flux-properties make them interesting as candidates in biomimetic sensor/separation devices. An ideal sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually...

  4. Robust High Performance Aquaporin based Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus; Zhao, Yichun; Qiu, C.;

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins are water channel proteins with high water permeability and solute rejection, which makes them promising for preparing high-performance biomimetic membranes. Despite the growing interest in aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes (ABMs), it is challenging to produce robust and defect...... on top of a support membrane. Control membranes, either without aquaporins or with the inactive AqpZ R189A mutant aquaporin served as controls. The separation performance of the membranes was evaluated by cross-flow forward osmosis (FO) and reverse osmosis (RO) tests. In RO the ABM achieved a water......% rejection for urea and a water permeability around 10 L/(m2h) with 2M NaCl as draw solution. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using aquaporin proteins in biomimetic membranes for technological applications....

  5. Touch stimulated pulse generation in biomimetic single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Chun, Hyunsuk; Choi, Eunseok; Choi, Jungbong; Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Dongpyo; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-02-01

    Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac point in the graphene energy band, which generates a sharp peak in the measured resistance. We found that by changing the gate potential it was possible to modulate the threshold pressure and using a series of graphene channels, a train of pulses were generated during a transient pressurizing stimulus demonstrating biomimetic behaviour.Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac

  6. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic

  7. Helicoidal microstructure of Scarabaei cuticle and biomimetic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)]. E-mail: bchen@cqu.edu.cn; Peng, X. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Cai, C. [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Niu, H. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wu, X. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2006-05-15

    Insect cuticles as a natural biocomposite include many favorable microstructures which have been refined over centuries and endow the cuticles excellent mechanical and physical properties, such as light weight, high strength and toughness, etc. The various microstructures of a Scarabaei cuticle are investigated with a scanning electronic microscope and reported in this paper. It is found that the cuticle is a kind of fiber-reinforced biocomposite composed of chitin-fiber layers and sclerous protein matrixes. Different chitin-fiber layers have different orientations, composed of crossed and helicoidal structures at different location. In the helicoidal structure, each fiber layer rotates with an almost fixed angle against its neighboring layer. The maximum pullout energy of the helicoidal structure is analyzed based on the representative model of the structure. The result shows that the pullout energy of the helicoidal structure is markedly larger than that of the conventional 0{sup o}-structure. A biomimetic composite with the observed helicoidal structure is designed and fabricated. A comparative test shows that the fracture toughness of the biomimetic composite is markedly larger than that of the 0{sup o}-layer composite.

  8. Major intrinsic proteins in biomimetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting-the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Also known as water channels or aquaporins they are highly efficient membrane pore proteins some of which are capable of transporting water at very high rates up to 10(9) molecules per second. Some MIPs transport other small, uncharged solutes, such as glycerol and other permeants such as carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide and the metalloids antimonite, arsenite, silicic and boric acid depending on the effective restriction mechanism of the protein. The flux properties of MIPs thus lead to the question ifMIPs can be used in separation devices or as sensor devices based on, e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport

  9. Development of autonomous eating mechanism for biomimetic robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kil-Woong; Cho, Ik-Jin; Lee, Yun-Jung

    2005-12-01

    Most of the recently developed robots are human friendly robots which imitate animals or humans such as entertainment robot, bio-mimetic robot and humanoid robot. Interest for these robots are being increased because the social trend is focused on health, welfare, and graying. Autonomous eating functionality is most unique and inherent behavior of pets and animals. Most of entertainment robots and pet robots make use of internal-type battery. Entertainment robots and pet robots with internal-type battery are not able to operate during charging the battery. Therefore, if a robot has an autonomous function for eating battery as its feeds, the robot is not only able to operate during recharging energy but also become more human friendly like pets. Here, a new autonomous eating mechanism was introduced for a biomimetic robot, called ELIRO-II(Eating LIzard RObot version 2). The ELIRO-II is able to find a food (a small battery), eat and evacuate by itself. This work describe sub-parts of the developed mechanism such as head-part, mouth-part, and stomach-part. In addition, control system of autonomous eating mechanism is described.

  10. Touch stimulated pulse generation in biomimetic single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Chun, Hyunsuk; Choi, Eunseok; Choi, Jungbong; Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Dongpyo; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-02-14

    Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac point in the graphene energy band, which generates a sharp peak in the measured resistance. We found that by changing the gate potential it was possible to modulate the threshold pressure and using a series of graphene channels, a train of pulses were generated during a transient pressurizing stimulus demonstrating biomimetic behaviour. PMID:26790981

  11. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  12. Biomimetic Membranes for Water Purification and Wastewater Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Chuyang Y.; Wang, Zhining; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    in energy consumption calls for novel membranes with significantly enhanced water permeability compared to the current state of the art thin-film composite polyamides. An attractive option is to learn from nature's high efficiently water filtration systems that involve a group of specialised water transport......Reverse osmosis (RO)-based desalination and wastewater reclamation are gaining increasing popularity driven by water shortages and population growth. Advances in membrane technology in the past few decades have resulted in great savings in energy consumption of RO processes. Further reduction...... proteins - aquaporins. This chapter presents the recent development of aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes, a topic that received a great interest in the membrane community in recent years....

  13. Bioinformatics analyses for signal transduction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; LI Dong; ZHU YunPing; HE FuChu

    2008-01-01

    Research in signaling networks contributes to a deeper understanding of organism living activities. With the development of experimental methods in the signal transduction field, more and more mechanisms of signaling pathways have been discovered. This paper introduces such popular bioin-formatics analysis methods for signaling networks as the common mechanism of signaling pathways and database resource on the Internet, summerizes the methods of analyzing the structural properties of networks, including structural Motif finding and automated pathways generation, and discusses the modeling and simulation of signaling networks in detail, as well as the research situation and tendency in this area. Now the investigation of signal transduction is developing from small-scale experiments to large-scale network analysis, and dynamic simulation of networks is closer to the real system. With the investigation going deeper than ever, the bioinformatics analysis of signal transduction would have immense space for development and application.

  14. Biomimetics on seed dispersal: survey and insights for space exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds provide the vital genetic link and dispersal agent between successive generations of plants. Without seed dispersal as a means of reproduction, many plants would quickly die out. Because plants lack any sort of mobility and remain in the same spot for their entire lives, they rely on seed dispersal to transport their offspring throughout the environment. This can be accomplished either collectively or individually; in any case as seeds ultimately abdicate their movement, they are at the mercy of environmental factors. Thus, seed dispersal strategies are characterized by robustness, adaptability, intelligence (both behavioral and morphological), and mass and energy efficiency (including the ability to utilize environmental sources of energy available): all qualities that advanced engineering systems aim at in general, and in particular those that need to enable complex endeavors such as space exploration. Plants evolved and adapted their strategy according to their environment, and taken together, they enclose many desirable characteristics that a space mission needs to have. Understanding in detail how plants control the development of seeds, fabricate structural components for their dispersal, build molecular machineries to keep seeds dormant up to the right moment and monitor the environment to release them at the right time could provide several solutions impacting current space mission design practices. It can lead to miniaturization, higher integration and packing efficiency, energy efficiency and higher autonomy and robustness. Consequently, there would appear to be good reasons for considering biomimetic solutions from plant kingdom when designing space missions, especially to other celestial bodies, where solid and liquid surfaces, atmosphere, etc constitute and are obviously parallel with the terrestrial environment where plants evolved. In this paper, we review the current state of biomimetics on seed dispersal to improve space mission design

  15. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    internal pH and salt concentration. Also known as water channels or aquaporins they are highly efficient membrane pore proteins some of which are capable of transporting water at very high rates up to 109 molecules per second. Some MIPs transport other small, uncharged solutes, such as glycerol and other....../separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells...... or as sensor devices based on e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix...

  16. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnstock Geoffrey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  17. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long......-term cultures. Support protocols describe methods for maintenance of vector-producing fibroblasts (VPF) and supernatant collection from these cells, screening medium components for the ability to support hematopoietic cell growth, and establishing colonies from long-term cultures. Other protocols provide PCR...

  18. Action of Chicory Fructooligosaccharides on Biomimetic Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, A. F.; Henrique, R. S.; A. S. Lucho; V. Paffaro; J.M. Schneedorf

    2014-01-01

    Fructooligosaccharides from chicory (FOSC) are functional prebiotic foods recognized to exert several well-being effects in human health and animal production, as decreasing blood lipids, modulating the gut immune system, enhancing mineral bioavailability, and inhibiting microbial growth, among others. Mechanisms of actions directly on cell metabolism and structure are however little known. In this sense this work was targeted to investigate the interaction of FOSC with biomimetic membranes (...

  19. Design of graded biomimetic osteochondral composite scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica; Landi, Elena; Pressato, Daniele; Francioli, Silvia; Quarto, Rodolfo; Martin, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    With the ultimate goal to generate suitable materials for the repair of osteochondral defects, in this work we aimed at developing composite osteochondral scaffolds organized in different integrated layers, with features which are biomimetic for articular cartilage and subchondral bone and can differentially support formation of such tissues. A biologically inspired mineralization process was first developed to nucleate Mg-doped hydroxyapatite crystals on type I collagen fibers during their s...

  20. Biomimetic Composite Structural T-joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vimal Kumar Thummalapalli; Steven L.Donaldson

    2012-01-01

    Biological structural fixed joints exhibit unique attributes,including highly optimized fiber paths which minimize stress concentrations.In addition,since the joints consist of continuous,uncut fiber architectures,the joints enable the organism to transport information and chemicals from one part of the body to the other.To the contrary,sections of man-made composite material structures are often joined using bolted or bonded joints,which involve low strength and high stress concentrations.These methods are also expensive to achieve.Additional functions such as fluid transport,electrical signal delivery,and thermal conductivity across the joints typically require parasitic tubes,wires,and attachment clips.By using the biomimetic methods,we seek to overcome the limitations which are present in the conventional methods. In the present work,biomimetic co-cured composite sandwich T-joints were constructed using unidirectional glass fiber,epoxy resin,and structural foam.The joints were fabricated using the wet lay-up vacuum bag resin infusion method.Foam sandwich T-joints with multiple continuous fiber architectures and sandwich foam thickness were prepared.The designs were tested in quasi-static bending using a mechanical load frame.The significantweight savings using the biomimetic approaches is discussed,as well as a comparison of failure modes versus architecture is described.

  1. Forward osmosis biomimetic membranes in industrial and environmental applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Bajraktari, Niada;

    consumption and lead to much more stable operations, but is currently limited by the availability of suitable membranes. However, by introducing aquaporin protein channels into a polymeric membrane to make a biomimetic membrane, the vision of both high flux and separation efficiency may be achieved. In this......Membrane processes have in recent years found increasing uses in several sectors where separation of one or more components from a solvent, typically water, is required. The most widespread types of membranes are polymeric and pressure driven, but the high pressures that are required results in...... increasing costs and fouling/scaling problems. In an attempt to overcome these problems, attention has recently turned to the use of forward osmosis, where a solution with a high osmotic pressure is used to draw water from the solution that is to be filtered. This technology promises to reduce the energy...

  2. Biomimetic shark skin: design, fabrication and hydrodynamic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Weaver, James C; Lauder, George V

    2014-05-15

    Although the functional properties of shark skin have been of considerable interest to both biologists and engineers because of the complex hydrodynamic effects of surface roughness, no study to date has successfully fabricated a flexible biomimetic shark skin that allows detailed study of hydrodynamic function. We present the first study of the design, fabrication and hydrodynamic testing of a synthetic, flexible, shark skin membrane. A three-dimensional (3D) model of shark skin denticles was constructed using micro-CT imaging of the skin of the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus). Using 3D printing, thousands of rigid synthetic shark denticles were placed on flexible membranes in a controlled, linear-arrayed pattern. This flexible 3D printed shark skin model was then tested in water using a robotic flapping device that allowed us to either hold the models in a stationary position or move them dynamically at their self-propelled swimming speed. Compared with a smooth control model without denticles, the 3D printed shark skin showed increased swimming speed with reduced energy consumption under certain motion programs. For example, at a heave frequency of 1.5 Hz and an amplitude of ± 1 cm, swimming speed increased by 6.6% and the energy cost-of-transport was reduced by 5.9%. In addition, a leading-edge vortex with greater vorticity than the smooth control was generated by the 3D printed shark skin, which may explain the increased swimming speeds. The ability to fabricate synthetic biomimetic shark skin opens up a wide array of possible manipulations of surface roughness parameters, and the ability to examine the hydrodynamic consequences of diverse skin denticle shapes present in different shark species. PMID:24829323

  3. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  4. Signal transduction of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is characterized by immunodeficiency, progressive cerebellar ataxia, gonadal abnormalities, radiosensitivity, and cancer predisposition. The signal transduction of AT are reviewed, including ATM (AT mutated) gene and clinical symptoms, some transcription factors in the signaling pathway induced by ionizing radiation, cell cycle checkpoint defects, durative oxidative stress and cell apoptosis

  5. Towards the LIVING envelope: Biomimetics for building envelope adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badarnah Kadri, L.

    2012-01-01

    Several biomimetic design strategies are available for various applications, though the research on biomimetics as a design tool in architecture is still challenging. This is due to a lack of systematic design tools required for identifying relevant organisms, or natural systems, and abstracting the

  6. Surface Modifications of Support Partitions for Stabilizing Biomimetic Membrane Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius;

    2011-01-01

    Black lipid membrane (BLM) formation across apertures in an ethylene tetra-fluoroethylene (ETFE) partition separating two aqueous compartments is an established technique for the creation of biomimetic membranes. Recently multi-aperture BLM arrays have attracted interest and in order to increase...... biomimetic membrane arrays....

  7. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. The paper reviews a number of biomimetic studies of...... sense organs in animals and illustrates how a formal search method developed at University of Toronto can be applied to sensor design. Design/methodology/approach – Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis of the biological solutions, identification of design principles...... ideas or the search gives too many results. This is handled by a more advanced search strategy where the search is either widened or it is focused further mainly using biological synonyms. Findings – A major problem in biomimetic design is finding the relevant analogies to actual design tasks in nature...

  8. Biomimetic Ca-P coating on pre-calcified Ti plates by electrodeposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new electrodeposition method was presented for Ca-P coating on pre-calcified titanium (PTi) plates at room temperature. The biomimetic coating morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the functional TiOx layer with groups of -Ca and -OH was formed on PTi surface after pre-calcified chemical treatment. The TiOx layer showed a lower water contact angle and lower surface energy than those of pure titanium surfaces, and the PTi surface natures are benefited by coupling biomimetic Ca-P layer with bioactivity in the electrodeposition process. Moreover, the crystallization of Ca-P precipitate and the bond strength of coating to PTi substrates were improved significantly by post-treatments. Our results suggest this new coating process and its subsequent application to biomedical implant devices.

  9. Signal transduction immunohistochemistry - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander E. Kalyuzhny statement that immunohistochemical detection of labile, low abundance and short-lived signal transduction molecules appears to be a very challenging task actually captures the same reader’s feeling. Each of us daily using immunohistochemical protocols to reveal targets either useful for research or diagnostic aims will surely wonder by which tricky techniques it is possible to overcome the preservation and unmasking of those labile antigens involved in signal transduction. Well, by seventheen chapters grouped in five parts Prof. Alexander E. Kalyuzhny is presenting an invaluable technical and methodological source of hints to satisfy our needs: to overcome troubleshottings if we are already in the field or to orientate those entering the field....

  10. Biomimetic synthesis for precursor of muscone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Muscone is a precious fragrant compound scarce in nature. Many attempts have been made to synthesize this unique natural product. In this work, the one- carbon unit transfer reaction of tetrahydrofolate coenzyme was initiated. Benzimidazolium salt was used as the tetrahydrofolate coenzyme model at formic acid oxidation level and di-Grignard reagent as the nucleophile to which one-carbon unit was transferred; the biomimetic synthesis of 2,15- hexade-canedione, a precursor of muscone, was successfully accomplished by using the addition-hydrolysis reaction of benzimidazolium salt with Grignard reagent. And an impor-tant useful method for the synthesis of muscone is provided.

  11. Challenges in biomimetic design and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Barfoed, Michael; Shu, Li

    is a key issue in design and innovation work where problem identification and systematic search for suitable solution principle are major activities. One way to deal with this challenge is to use a biology search method. The use of such a method is illustrated with a case story describing the design...... including the terminology and knowledge organisation. It is often easy to recognise the splendour of a biological solution, but it can be much more difficult to understand the underlying mechanisms. Another challenge in biomimetic design is the search and identification of relevant solutions in nature. This...

  12. Tailored antireflective biomimetic nanostructures for UV applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhard, Christoph; Pacholski, Claudia; Spatz, Joachim P [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lehr, Dennis; Brunner, Robert; Helgert, Michael [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Sundermann, Michael, E-mail: Pacholski@mf.mpg.de [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 56, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Antireflective surfaces composed of biomimetic sub-wavelength structures that employ the 'moth eye principle' for reflectance reduction are highly desirable in many optical applications such as solar cells, photodetectors and laser optics. We report an efficient approach for the fabrication of antireflective surfaces based on a two-step process consisting of gold nanoparticle mask generation by micellar block copolymer nanolithography and a multi-step reactive ion etching process. Depending on the RIE process parameters nanostructured surfaces with tailored antireflective properties can easily be fabricated that show optimum performance for specific applications.

  13. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H. Florenzano

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic, monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied, which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities

  14. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenzano, F H; Politi, M J

    1997-02-01

    The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers) was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic), monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied), which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities. PMID:9239302

  15. Biomimetic magnetic nanocomposite for smart skins

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We report a biomimetic tactile sensor consisting of magnetic nanocomposite artificial cilia and magnetic sensors. The nanocomposite is fashioned from polydimethylsiloxane and iron nanowires and exhibits a permanent magnetic behavior. This enables remote operation without an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires, which simplifies device integration. Moreover, the highly elastic and easy patternable nanocomposite is corrosion resistant and thermally stable. The highly sensitive and power efficient tactile sensors can detect vertical and shear forces from interactions with objects. The sensors can operate in dry and wet environment with the ability to measure different properties such as the texture and the movement or stability of objects, with easily adjustable performance.

  16. Biotechnologies and biomimetics for civil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Labrincha, J; Diamanti, M; Yu, C-P; Lee, H

    2015-01-01

    Putting forward an innovative approach to solving current technological problems faced by human society, this book encompasses a holistic way of perceiving the potential of natural systems. Nature has developed several materials and processes which both maintain an optimal performance and are also totally biodegradable, properties which can be used in civil engineering. Delivering the latest research findings to building industry professionals and other practitioners, as well as containing information useful to the public, ‘Biotechnologies and Biomimetics for Civil Engineering’ serves as an important tool to tackle the challenges of a more sustainable construction industry and the future of buildings.

  17. Efficient Transductive Online Learning via Randomized Rounding

    OpenAIRE

    Cesa-Bianchi, Nicolò; Shamir, Ohad

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional online learning algorithms are based on variants of mirror descent or follow-the-leader. In this paper, we present an online algorithm based on a completely different approach, tailored for transductive settings, which combines "random playout" and randomized rounding of loss subgradients. As an application of our approach, we present the first computationally efficient online algorithm for collaborative filtering with trace-norm constrained matrices. As a second application,...

  18. Chi activity during transduction-associated recombination.

    OpenAIRE

    Dower, N. A.; Stahl, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Chi is a genetic element that stimulates phage lambda recombination by the Escherichia coli recBC pathway during lytic infection [Stahl, F. W. (1979) Annu. Rev. Genet. 13, 7--24]. Herein we show that chi in lambda prophage influences exchange distribution in P1 phage-mediated transduction and in conjugation. This demonstration encourages the view that chi may influence genetic exchange in E. coli in the total absence of lambda.

  19. Signal transduction by the Fat cytoplasmic domain

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Guohui; Feng, Yongqiang; Ambegaonkar, Abhijit A.; Sun, Gongping; Huff, Matthew; Rauskolb, Cordelia; Irvine, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The large atypical cadherin Fat is a receptor for both Hippo and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways. Here we investigate the molecular basis for signal transduction downstream of Fat by creating targeted alterations within a genomic construct that contains the entire fat locus, and by monitoring and manipulating the membrane localization of the Fat pathway component Dachs. We establish that the human Fat homolog FAT4 lacks the ability to transduce Hippo signaling in Drosophila, but can trans...

  20. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being ...

  1. Optical racetrack resonator transduction of nanomechanical cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optomechanical transduction has demonstrated its supremacy in probing nanomechanical displacements. In order to apply nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) as force and mass sensors, knowledge about the transduction responsivity (i.e. the change in measured optical transmission with nanomechanical displacement) and its tradeoffs with system design is paramount. We compare the measured responsivities of NOMS devices with varying length, optomechanical coupling strength gom, and optical cavity properties. Cantilever beams 1.5 to 5 μm long are fabricated 70 to 160 nm from a racetrack resonator optical cavity and their thermomechanical (TM) noise signals are measured. We derive a generic expression for the transduction responsivity of the NOMS in terms of optical and mechanical system parameters such as finesse, optomechanical coupling constant, and interaction length. The form of the expression holds direct insight as to how these parameters affect the responsivity. With this expression, we obtain the optomechanical coupling constants using only measurements of the TM noise power spectra and optical cavity transmission slopes. All optical pump/probe operation is also demonstrated in our side-coupled cantilever–racetrack NOMS. Finally, to assess potential operation in a gas sensing environment, the TM noise signal of a device is measured at atmospheric pressure. (paper)

  2. Designing Biomimetic, Dissipative Material Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, Anna C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Whitesides, George M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Brinker, C. Jeffrey [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. Center for Micro-Engineered Materials; Aranson, Igor S. [UChicago, LLC., Argonne, IL (United States); Chaikin, Paul [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dogic, Zvonimir [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Glotzer, Sharon [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Macromolecular Science and Engineering Physics; Hammer, Daniel [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Irvine, Darrell [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering; Little, Steven R. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Parikh, Atul N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering. Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Stupp, Samuel [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Medicine. Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Szostak, Jack [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2016-01-21

    Throughout human history, new materials have been the foundation of transformative technologies: from bronze, paper, and ceramics to steel, silicon, and polymers, each material has enabled far-reaching advances. Today, another new class of materials is emerging—one with both the potential to provide radically new functions and to challenge our notion of what constitutes a “material”. These materials would harvest, transduce, or dissipate energy to perform autonomous, dynamic functions that mimic the behaviors of living organisms. Herein, we discuss the challenges and benefits of creating “dissipative” materials that can potentially blur the boundaries between living and non-living matter.

  3. Biomimetics as a design methodology – possibilities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetics – or bionik as it is called in parts of Europe – offer a number of promising opportunities and challenges for the designer. The paper investigates how biomimetics as a design methodology is used in engineering design by looking at examples of biological searches and highlight the...... possibilities and challenges. Biomimetics for engineering design is explored through an experiment involving 12 design engineering students. For 7 selected problem areas they searched biology literature available at a university library and identified a number of biological solutions. Central solution...

  4. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) Modified Biomimetic Polymeric Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xufeng NIU; Yuanliang WANG; Yanfeng LUO; Juan XIN; Yonggang LI

    2005-01-01

    The new generation of biomaterials focuses on the design of biomimetic polymeric materials that are capable of eliciting specific cellular responses and directing new tissue formation. Since Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequences have been found to promote cell adhesion in 1984, numerous polymers have been functionalized with RGD peptides for tissue engineering applications. This review gave the advance in RGD modified biomimetic polymeric materials,focusing on the mechanism of RGD, the surface and bulk modification of polymer with RGD peptides and the evaluation in vitro and in vivo of the modified biomimetic materials.

  5. Biomimetic multifunctional surfaces inspired from animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Mu, Zhengzhi; Yin, Wei; Li, Wen; Niu, Shichao; Zhang, Junqiu; Ren, Luquan

    2016-08-01

    Over millions of years, animals have evolved to a higher intelligent level for their environment. A large number of diverse surface structures on their bodies have been formed to adapt to the extremely harsh environment. Just like the structural diversity existed in plants, the same also applies true in animals. Firstly, this article provides an overview and discussion of the most common functional surface structures inspired from animals, such as drag reduction, noise reduction, anti-adhesion, anti-wear, anti-erosion, anti-fog, water capture, and optical surfaces. Then, some typical characteristics of morphologies, structures, and materials of the animal multifunctional surfaces were discussed. The adaptation of these surfaces to environmental conditions was also analyzed. It mainly focuses on the relationship between their surface functions and their surface structural characteristics. Afterwards, the multifunctional mechanisms or principles of these surfaces were discussed. Models of these structures were provided for the development of structure materials and machinery surfaces. At last, fabrication techniques and existing or potential technical applications inspired from biomimetic multifunctional surfaces in animals were also discussed. The application prospects of the biomimetic functional surfaces are very broad, such as civil field of self-cleaning textile fabrics and non-stick pots, ocean field of oil-water separation, sports field of swimming suits, space development field of lens arrays. PMID:27085632

  6. A review of selected pumping systems in nature and engineering--potential biomimetic concepts for improving displacement pumps and pulsation damping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, D; Schmich, F; Masselter, T; Speck, T

    2015-10-01

    The active transport of fluids by pumps plays an essential role in engineering and biology. Due to increasing energy costs and environmental issues, topics like noise reduction, increase of efficiency and enhanced robustness are of high importance in the development of pumps in engineering. The study compares pumps in biology and engineering and assesses biomimetic potentials for improving man-made pumping systems. To this aim, examples of common challenges, applications and current biomimetic research for state-of-the art pumps are presented. The biomimetic research is helped by the similar configuration of many positive displacement pumping systems in biology and engineering. In contrast, the configuration and underlying pumping principles for fluid dynamic pumps (FDPs) differ to a greater extent in biology and engineering. However, progress has been made for positive displacement as well as for FDPs by developing biomimetic devices with artificial muscles and cilia that improve energetic efficiency and fail-safe operation or reduce noise. The circulatory system of vertebrates holds a high biomimetic potential for the damping of pressure pulsations, a common challenge in engineering. Damping of blood pressure pulsation results from a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of the artery walls which represent a complex composite material. The transfer of the underlying functional principle could lead to an improvement of existing technical solutions and be used to develop novel biomimetic damping solutions. To enhance efficiency or thrust of man-made fluid transportation systems, research on jet propulsion in biology has shown that a pulsed jet can be tuned to either maximize thrust or efficiency. The underlying principle has already been transferred into biomimetic applications in open channel water systems. Overall there is a high potential to learn from nature in order to improve pumping systems for challenges like the reduction of pressure pulsations, increase of jet

  7. Biomimetics as a design methodology – possibilities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    Biomimetics – or bionik as it is called in parts of Europe – offer a number of promising opportunities and challenges for the designer. The paper investigates how biomimetics as a design methodology is used in engineering design by looking at examples of biological searches and highlight the...... possibilities and challenges. Biomimetics for engineering design is explored through an experiment involving 12 design engineering students. For 7 selected problem areas they searched biology literature available at a university library and identified a number of biological solutions. Central solution...... principles were formulated and used for designing technical items that could be used to solve the initial problems. Experiences are that biomimetic design can be made successfully using commonly available biological literature and internet resources and that designers without detailed biological knowledge...

  8. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Dong; Wang, Xiumei; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Kyung Min; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    We introduce our active experts' communications and reviews (Part II) of 2015 Korea-China Joint Symposium on Biomimetic Medical Materials in Republic of Korea, which reflect their perspectives on current research trends of biomimetic medical materials for tissue regeneration in both Korea and China. The communications covered three topics of biomimetics, i.e., 1) hydrogel for therapeutics and extracellular matrix environments, 2) design of electrical polymers for communications between electrical sources and biological systems and 3) design of biomaterials for nerve tissue engineering. The reviews in the Part II will cover biomimetics of 3D bioprinting materials, surface modifications, nano/micro-technology as well as clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage. PMID:27026826

  9. Brassinosteroid signal transduction: An emerging picture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiaomei; MA Ligeng

    2003-01-01

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in animal growth and development. Steroid signaling in animal system is focused on the direct gene regulation response mediated by its nuclear receptors. Recently, steroid hormones are also found in plants. Identification of BRI1 - a critical component of the plasma-membrane steroid receptor complex, and the related signal transduction pathway mediated by the membrane receptor have revealed an elementary picture of BR signaling from the cell surface perception to the activation of BR-responsive nuclear genes.

  10. A review paper on biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, X.; De Groot,, P.A.J.; Wang, D.; Hu, Q; Wismeijer, D.; Liu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings have been developed for bone regeneration and repair because of their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and easy preparation. They can be rendered osteoinductive by incorporating an osteogenic agent, such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), into the crystalline lattice work in physiological situations. The biomimetic calcium phosphate coating enables a controlled, slow and local release of BMP-2 when it undergoes cell mediated coating degradation ...

  11. Biomimetic Nanotechnology: A Powerful Means to address Global Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ille C. Gebeshuber; Majlis, Burhanuddin Y.

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic nanotechnology is a prominent research area at the meeting place of life sciences with engineering and physics: it is a continuously growing field that deals with knowledge transfer from biology to nanotechnology. Biomimetic nanotechnology is a field that has the potential to substantially support successful mastering of major global challenges. The Millennium Project was commissioned by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2002 to develop a concrete action plan for the world to...

  12. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly cons...

  13. Aloe vera Induced Biomimetic Assemblage of Nucleobase into Nanosized Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Sherwani, Asif; Owais, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Biomimetic nano-assembly formation offers a convenient and bio friendly approach to fabricate complex structures from simple components with sub-nanometer precision. Recently, biomimetic (employing microorganism/plants) synthesis of metal and inorganic materials nano-particles has emerged as a simple and viable strategy. In the present study, we have extended biological synthesis of nano-particles to organic molecules, namely the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), using Aloe vera lea...

  14. Structural Design and Sealing Performance Analysis of Biomimetic Sealing Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Chuanjun Han; Han Zhang; Jie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the failure probability of rubber sealing rings in reciprocating dynamic seal, a new structure of sealing ring based on bionics was designed. The biomimetic ring has three concave ridges and convex bulges on each side which are very similar to earthworms. Bulges were circularly designed and sealing performances of the biomimetic ring in both static seal and dynamic seal were simulated by FEM. In addition, effects of precompression, medium pressure, speed, friction coefficie...

  15. Biomimetic mineral coatings in dental and orthopaedic implantology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-lian LIU; Klaas de GROOT; Ernst B.HUNZIKER

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetic techniques are used to deposit coatings of calcium phosphate upon medical devices. The procedure is conducted under near-physiological, or "biomimetic", conditions of temperature and pH primarily to improve their biocompatibility and biodegradability of the materials. The inorganic layers genelated by biomi-metic methods resemble bone mineral, and can be degraded within a biological milieu.The biomimetic coating technique involves the nuclea-tion and growth of bone-like crystals upon a pretreated substrate by immersing this in a supersaturated solution of calcium phosphate under physiological conditions of temperature (37~C) and pH (7.4). The method, originally developed by Kokubo in 1990, has since undergone improvement and refinement by several groups of investigators.Biomimetic coatings are valuable in that they can serve as a vehicle for the slow and sustained release of osteogenic agents at the site of implantation. This attribute is rendered possible by the near-physiological conditions under which these coatings are prepared, which permits an incorporation of binactive agents into the inorganic crystal latticework rather than their nlere superficial adsorption onto preformed layers. In addition, the biomimetic coating technique can be applied to implants of an organic as well as of an inorganic nature and to those with irregular surface geometries, which is not possible using conventional methodologies.

  16. Development of a Biomimetic Quadruped Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thanhtam Ho; Sunghac Choi; Sangyoon Lee

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the design and prototype of a small quadruped robot whose walking motion is realized by two piezocomposite actuators. In the design, biomimetic ideas are employed to obtain the agility of motions and sustainability of a heavy load. The design of the robot legs is inspired by the leg configuration of insects, two joints (hip and knee) of the leg enable two basic motions, lifting and stepping. The robot frame is designed to have a slope relative to the horizontal plane, which makes the robot move forward. In addition, the bounding locomotion of quadruped animals is implemented in the robot. Experiments show that the robot can carry an additional load of about 100 g and run with a fairly high velocity. The quadruped prototype can be an important step towards the goal of building an autonomous mobile robot actuated by piezocomposite actuators.

  17. Biomimetics for architecture & design nature, analogies, technology

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Göran

    2015-01-01

    This book provides the readers with a timely guide to the application of biomimetic principles in architecture and engineering design. As a result of a combined effort by two internationally recognized authorities, the biologist Werner Nachtigall and the architect Göran Pohl, the book describes the principles which can be used to compare nature and technology, and at the same time it presents detailed explanations and examples showing how biology can be used as a source of inspiration and “translated” in building and architectural solutions (biomimicry). Even though nature cannot be directly copied, the living world can provide architects and engineers with a wealth of analogues and inspirations for their own creative designs. But how can analysis of natural entities give rise to advanced and sustainable design? By reporting on the latest bionic design methods and using extensive artwork, the book guides readers through the field of nature-inspired architecture, offering an extraordinary resource for pro...

  18. Biomimetic electrospun nanofibers for tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Susan; Li Bojun; Ma Zuwei; Wei He; Chan Casey; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative (NUSNNI), Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2006-09-15

    Nanofibers exist widely in human tissue with different patterns. Electrospinning nanotechnology has recently gained a new impetus due to the introduction of the concept of biomimetic nanofibers for tissue regeneration. The advanced electrospinning technique is a promising method to fabricate a controllable continuous nanofiber scaffold similar to the natural extracellular matrix. Thus, the biomedical field has become a significant possible application field of electrospun fibers. Although electrospinning has developed rapidly over the past few years, electrospun nanofibers are still at a premature research stage. Further comprehensive and deep studies on electrospun nanofibers are essential for promoting their biomedical applications. Current electrospun fiber materials include natural polymers, synthetic polymers and inorganic substances. This review briefly describes several typically electrospun nanofiber materials or composites that have great potential for tissue regeneration, and describes their fabrication, advantages, drawbacks and future prospects. (topical review)

  19. Biomimetic accommodating lens with implementation in MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Alexander L.; Baker, Brian; Fisher, Charles; Naylor, Stephen; Fettig, Doug; Harvey, Ian R.

    2012-03-01

    We describe an accommodating lens patterned after the crystalline lens of the eye. Our biomimetic MEMS design calls to mind the zonules of zinn which pull radially to stretch the crystalline lens of the eye to modify the optical path. We present initial characterization of the prototype macro-scale device constructed through traditional machining techniques and using a PDMS polymer lens. Testing of the macro-scale lens indicated a 22% change in focal length through the range of radial stretching, with degradation of the spherical lens shape but no hysteresis after low-cycle testing. We also demonstrate a MEMS implementation of the lens actuator constructed using the Sandia SUMMiT-V ™ surface micromachining process. The optical path of this system is approximately 300 microns in diameter, providing a platform to potential applications improving mobile camera optics and medical imaging.

  20. Biomimetic oral mucin from polymer micelle networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authimoolam, Sundar Prasanth

    Mucin networks are formed by the complexation of bottlebrush-like mucin glycoprotein with other small molecule glycoproteins. These glycoproteins create nanoscale strands that then arrange into a nanoporous mesh. These networks play an important role in ensuring surface hydration, lubricity and barrier protection. In order to understand the functional behavior in mucin networks, it is important to decouple their chemical and physical effects responsible for generating the fundamental property-function relationship. To achieve this goal, we propose to develop a synthetic biomimetic mucin using a layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition approach. In this work, a hierarchical 3-dimensional structures resembling natural mucin networks was generated using affinity-based interactions on synthetic and biological surfaces. Unlike conventional polyelectrolyte-based LBL methods, pre-assembled biotin-functionalized filamentous (worm-like) micelles was utilized as the network building block, which from complementary additions of streptavidin generated synthetic networks of desired thickness. The biomimetic nature in those synthetic networks are studied by evaluating its structural and bio-functional properties. Structurally, synthetic networks formed a nanoporous mesh. The networks demonstrated excellent surface hydration property and were able capable of microbial capture. Those functional properties are akin to that of natural mucin networks. Further, the role of synthetic mucin as a drug delivery vehicle, capable of providing localized and tunable release was demonstrated. By incorporating antibacterial curcumin drug loading within synthetic networks, bacterial growth inhibition was also demonstrated. Thus, such bioactive interfaces can serve as a model for independently characterizing mucin network properties and through its role as a drug carrier vehicle it presents exciting future opportunities for localized drug delivery, in regenerative applications and as bio

  1. Transductions Computed by One-Dimensional Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Kutrib; Andreas Malcher

    2012-01-01

    Cellular automata are investigated towards their ability to compute transductions, that is, to transform inputs into outputs. The families of transductions computed are classified with regard to the time allowed to process the input and to compute the output. Since there is a particular interest in fast transductions, we mainly focus on the time complexities real time and linear time. We first investigate the computational capabilities of cellular automaton transducers by comparing them to it...

  2. Signal transduction and information processing in mammalian taste buds

    OpenAIRE

    Roper, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular machinery for chemosensory transduction in taste buds has received considerable attention within the last decade. Consequently, we now know a great deal about sweet, bitter, and umami taste mechanisms and are gaining ground rapidly on salty and sour transduction. Sweet, bitter, and umami tastes are transduced by G-protein-coupled receptors. Salty taste may be transduced by epithelial Na channels similar to those found in renal tissues. Sour transduction appears to be initiated b...

  3. Quantifying efficient information transduction of biochemical signaling cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Cells can be considered as systems that utilize changes in thermodynamic entropy as information. Therefore, they serve as useful models for investigating the relationships between entropy production and information transmission, i.e., signal transduction. Based on the hypothesis that cells apply a chemical reaction cascade for the most efficient transduction of information, we adopted a coding design that minimizes the number of bits per concentration of molecules that are employed for information transduction. As a result, the average rate of entropy production is uniform across all cycles in a cascade reaction. Thus, the entropy production rate can be a valuable measure for the quantification of intracellular signal transduction.

  4. Development of solid supports for electrochemical study of biomimetic membrane systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mech-Dorosz, Agnieszka

    Biomimetic membranes are model membrane systems used as an experimental tool to study fundamental cellular membrane physics and functionality of reconstituted membrane proteins. By exploiting the properties of biomimetic membranes resembling the functions of biological membranes, it is possible to...

  5. Design and Dynamic Analysis of a Novel Biomimetic Robotics Hip Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Bingyan Cui; Liwen Chen; Zhijun Wang; Yuanhao Zhao; Zhanxian Li; Zhenlin Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the workspace and the carrying capacity of biomimetic robotics hip joint, a novel biomimetic robotics hip joint was developed. The biomimetic robotics hip joint is mainly composed of a moving platform, frame, and 3-RRR orthogonal spherical parallel mechanism branched chains, and has the characteristics of compact structure, large bearing capacity, high positioning accuracy, and good controllability. The functions of the biomimetic robotics hip joint are introduced, such a...

  6. Biomimetic Architecture in Building Envelope Maintenance (A Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Salim N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of biomimetic architecture on building envelope is the main structure of this research. The concept is believed more sustainable and efficient for energy saving, operating cost consumption, waste recycle and design renewal in the future. The inspiration from the nature developed the intention on this study to explore on what and how this concept to overcome the problems through design. Biomimicry does catch the attention of human to study more on the system and function of its nature course. The designers are not exception influenced by this concept when the form, shape, texture and colour inspired them in their design. The domination of building form will affect the building envelope as the skin of the structure. A clear impact on building failure is begun with building envelope appearance without a proper maintenance. The faults in building design place a heavy burden on the building for the rest of its operational life and there is no compensation for it. In such situations, the responsibility falls on the shoulders of the designer.

  7. Phosphoproteins involved in bacterial signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells adjust their behavior continuously in response to changing environmental conditions. A number of specific stimulus-response systems have been investigated in bacteria. These include the chemotaxis system (Che), the nitrogen regulatory system (Ntr), the phosphorus system (Pho), the system that controls expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) in response to changes in osmotic pressure, the sporulation system (SpoO), and the virulence system (Vir) that mediates bacterial infectivity of damaged plant tissues. Surprisingly, all of these systems show a common set of components. In each case, the signal transduction proteins include members of two homologous families, which appear to comprise a cascade: Sensory information feeds into the first component, which activates the second component that, in turn, modulates a target activity within the cell. In this paper, the authors present evidence that the communication between the two components involves a phospho-transfer mechanism that is common to all of these regulatory systems

  8. Striatal signal transduction and drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Philibin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug

  9. Striatal Signal Transduction and Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibin, Scott D.; Hernandez, Adan; Self, David W.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug addiction. PMID

  10. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jangsun Hwang,1 Yoon Jeong,1,2 Jeong Min Park,3 Kwan Hong Lee,1,2,4 Jong Wook Hong,1,2 Jonghoon Choi1,2 1Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul, 2Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan, Korea; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 4OpenView Venture Partners, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain ideas from nature, and to apply concepts that may benefit science, engineering, and medicine. Examples of biomimetic studies include fluid-drag reduction swimsuits inspired by the structure of shark’s skin, velcro fasteners modeled on burrs, shape of airplanes developed from the look of birds, and stable building structures copied from the backbone of turban shells. In this article, we focus on the current research topics in biomimetics and discuss the potential of biomimetics in science, engineering, and medicine. Our report proposes to become a blueprint for accomplishments that can stem from biomimetics in the next 5 years as well as providing insight into their unseen limitations. Keywords: biomimicry, tissue engineering, biomaterials, nature, nanotechnology, nanomedicine

  11. Effects of Biomimetic Surface Designs on Furrow Opener Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Tong; Ballel. Z. Moayad; Yun-hai Ma; Ji-yu Sun; Dong-hui Chen; Hong-lei Jia; Lu-quan Ren

    2009-01-01

    The effects of biomimetic designs of tine furrow opener surface on equivalent pressure and pressure in the direction of motion on opener surface against soil were studied by finite element method (FEM) simulation and the effects of these designs on tool force and power requirements were examined experimentally. Geometrical structures of the cuticle surfaces of dung beetle (Copris ochus Motschulsky) were examined by stereoscopy. The structures of the cuticle surfaces and Ultra High Mo-lecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) material were modeled on surface of tine furrow opener as biomimetic designs. Seven furrow openers were analyzed in ANSYS program (a FEM simulation software). The biomimetic furrow opener surfaces with UHMWPE structures were found to have lower equivalent pressure and pressure in the direction of motion as compared to the conventional surface and to the biomimetic surfaces with textured steel-35 structures. It was found that the tool force and power were increased with the cutting depth and operating speed and the biomimetic furrow opener with UHMWPE tubular section ridges showed the lowest resistance and power requirement against soil.

  12. Sustainability assessment of a lightweight biomimetic ceiling structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intensive and continuous debate centres on the question of whether biomimetics has a specific potential to contribute to sustainability. In the context of a case study, the objective of this paper is to contribute to this debate by presenting the first systematic approach to assess the sustainability of a complex biomimetic product. The object of inquiry is a lecture hall's ribbed slab. Based on criteria suggested by the Association of German Engineers (VDI), it has been verified that the slab has been correctly defined as biomimetic. Moreover, a systematic comparative product sustainability assessment has been carefully carried out. For purposes of comparison, estimated static calculations have been performed for conceivable current state-of-the-art lightweight ceiling structures. Alternative options are a hollow article slab and a pre-stressed flat slab. Besides a detailed benefit analysis and a discussion of social effects, their costs have also been compared. A particularly detailed life cycle assessment on the respective environmental impacts has also been performed. Results show that the biomimetic ribbed slab built in the 1960s is able to keep up with the current state-of-the-art lightweight solutions in terms of sustainability. These promising results encourage a systematic search for a broad range of sustainable biomimetic solutions. (paper)

  13. Sustainability assessment of a lightweight biomimetic ceiling structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Florian; Grießhammer, Rainer; Speck, Thomas; Speck, Olga

    2014-03-01

    An intensive and continuous debate centres on the question of whether biomimetics has a specific potential to contribute to sustainability. In the context of a case study, the objective of this paper is to contribute to this debate by presenting the first systematic approach to assess the sustainability of a complex biomimetic product. The object of inquiry is a lecture hall's ribbed slab. Based on criteria suggested by the Association of German Engineers (VDI), it has been verified that the slab has been correctly defined as biomimetic. Moreover, a systematic comparative product sustainability assessment has been carefully carried out. For purposes of comparison, estimated static calculations have been performed for conceivable current state-of-the-art lightweight ceiling structures. Alternative options are a hollow article slab and a pre-stressed flat slab. Besides a detailed benefit analysis and a discussion of social effects, their costs have also been compared. A particularly detailed life cycle assessment on the respective environmental impacts has also been performed. Results show that the biomimetic ribbed slab built in the 1960s is able to keep up with the current state-of-the-art lightweight solutions in terms of sustainability. These promising results encourage a systematic search for a broad range of sustainable biomimetic solutions. PMID:24503487

  14. Conventional vs Biomimetic Approaches to the Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, A.

    It is not usual to refer to convention in planetary exploration missions by virtue of the innovation required for such projects. The term conventional refers to the methodologies, tools and approaches typically adopted in engineering that are applied to such missions. Presented is a "conventional" Mars rover mission in which the author was involved - ExoMars - into which is interspersed references to examples where biomimetic approaches may yield superior capabilities. Biomimetics is a relatively recently active area of research which seeks to examine how biological systems solve the problem of survival in the natural environment. Biological organisms are autonomous entities that must survive in a hostile world adapting both adaptivity and robustness. It is not then surprising that biomimetics is particularly useful when applied to robotic elements of a Mars exploration mission. I present a number of areas in which biomimetics may yield new solutions to the problem of Mars exploration - optic flow navigation, potential field navigation, genetically-evolved neuro-controllers, legged locomotion, electric motors implementing muscular behaviour, and a biomimetic drill based on the wood wasp ovipositor. Each of these techniques offers an alternative approach to conventional ones. However, the perceptive hurdles are likely to dwarf the technical hurdles in implementing many of these methods in the near future.

  15. FCJ-124 Interactive Environments as Fields of Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoph Brunner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a critical inquiry of interactive environments as fields of transduction. It is argued that Gilbert Simondon’s concepts of individuation, transduction, in-formation, the preindividual, and the associated milieu enable a processual thinking of the analysis and design of interactive technologies as technogenetic emergence. These concepts offer a way for interaction design to understand interactive environments through the dynamics between fields of transduction and fields of experience in relational and affective terms. The article analyses the way in which two technological assemblages, Voz Alta and the Impossible Room, provide different experiential fields experimenting with the transductive power of digital and interactive media. We emphasise the potential for creating new modes of experience. Our aim is to underline the necessary convergences between practices of design and thought; to enable affectively engaging fields of transduction.

  16. Biomimetic synthesis of aragonite superstructures using hexamethylenetetramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, biomimetic synthesis of aragonite superstructures using a low molecular weight organic-hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) as an additive in the presence of CO2 supplied by an ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3) diffusion method at room temperature was studied. The products were characterized by scanning or transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffractometry, and selected area electron diffraction. The results showed the aragonite superstructures especially dumbbell-flower-like ones were obtained. The formation process of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in HMT aqueous solution was investigated, suggesting that the products transformed from calcite to vaterite primarily, and then changed into a mixture of aragonite and calcite with an increase of reaction time. The formation mechanism of CaCO3 in HMT solution was also discussed, revealing that aragonite might be controlled by HMT molecules and NH4+ ions together. - Graphical abstract: The well-defined aragonite hierarchical superstructures are formed using hexamethylenetetramine in aqueous solution. Highlights: → Aragonite superstructures are formed with hexamethylenetetramine at about 25 deg. C. → Dumbbell-flower-like aragonite produces when hexamethylenetetramine/Ca2+=10:1. → CaCO3 formation in hexamethylenetetramine solution violates the Ostwald ripening. → Hexamethylenetetramine and NH4+ might control the growth of aragonite together.

  17. Biomimetic Polymers for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a morbid disorder characterized by progressive cardiomyocyte (CM) dysfunction and death. Interest in cell-based therapies is growing, but sustainability of injected CMs remains a challenge. To mitigate this, we developed an injectable biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel (RTG) specifically engineered to support long-term CM survival. This RTG biopolymer provided a solution-based delivery vehicle of CMs, which transitioned to a gel-based matrix shortly after reaching body temperature. In this study we tested the suitability of this biopolymer to sustain CM viability. The RTG was biomolecule-functionalized with poly-l-lysine or laminin. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) were cultured in plain-RTG and biomolecule-functionalized-RTG both under 3-dimensional (3D) conditions. Traditional 2D biomolecule-coated dishes were used as controls. We found that the RTG-lysine stimulated NRVM to spread and form heart-like functional syncytia. Regarding cell contraction, in both RTG and RTG-lysine, beating cells were recorded after 21 days. Additionally, more than 50% (p value < 0.05; n = 5) viable ARVMs, characterized by a well-defined cardiac phenotype represented by sarcomeric cross-striations, were found in the RTG-laminin after 8 days. These results exhibit the tremendous potential of a minimally invasive CM transplantation through our designed RTG-cell therapy platform. PMID:27073119

  18. Biomimetic Pattern Recognition Theory and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShoujue; ZHAOXingtao

    2004-01-01

    Biomimetic pattern recogntion (BPR),which is based on “cognition” instead of “classification”,is much closer to the function of human being. The basis of BPR is the Principle of homology-continuity (PHC),which means the difference between two samples of the same class must be gradually changed. The aim of BPR is to find an optimal covering in the feature space, which emphasizes the “similarity” among homologous group members, rather than “division” in traditional pattern recognition. Some applications of BPR are surveyed, in which the results of BPR are much better than the results of Support Vector Machine. A novel neuron model, Hyper sausage neuron (HSN), is shown as a kind of covering units in BPR. The mathematical description of HSN is given and the 2-dimensional discriminant boundary of HSN is shown. In two special cases, in which samples are distributed in a line segment and a circle, both the HSN networks and RBF networks are used for covering. The results show that HSN networks act better than RBF networks in generalization, especially for small sample set, which are consonant with the results of the applications of BPR. And a brief explanation of the HSN networks' advantages in covering general distributed samples is also given.

  19. Biomimetic visual detection based on insect neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, David C.

    2001-11-01

    With a visual system that accounts for as much as 30% of the lifted mass, flying insects such as dragonflies and hoverflies invest more in vision than any other animal. Impressive visual performance is subserved by a surprisingly simple visual system. In a typical insect eye, between 2,000 and 30,000 pixels in the image are analyzed by fewer than 200,000 neurons in underlying neural circuits. The combination of sophisticated visual processing with an approachable level of complexity has made the insect visual system a leading model for biomimetic approaches to computer vision. Much neurobiological research has focused on neural circuits used for detection of moving patterns (e.g. optical flow during flight) and moving targets (e.g. prey). Research from several labs has led to great advances in our understanding of the neural mechanisms involved, and has spawned neuromorphic hardware based on key processes identified in neurobiological experiments. Despite its attractions, the highly non-linear nature of several key stages in insect visual processing presents a challenge to understanding. I will describe examples of adaptive elements of neural circuits in the fly visual system which analyze the direction and velocity of wide-field optical flow patterns and the result of experiments that suggest that these non-linearities may contribute to robust responses to natural image motion.

  20. Biomimetic Polymers for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Brisa; Martinelli, Valentina; Jeong, Mark; Bosi, Susanna; Lapasin, Romano; Taylor, Matthew R G; Long, Carlin S; Shandas, Robin; Park, Daewon; Mestroni, Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Heart failure is a morbid disorder characterized by progressive cardiomyocyte (CM) dysfunction and death. Interest in cell-based therapies is growing, but sustainability of injected CMs remains a challenge. To mitigate this, we developed an injectable biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel (RTG) specifically engineered to support long-term CM survival. This RTG biopolymer provided a solution-based delivery vehicle of CMs, which transitioned to a gel-based matrix shortly after reaching body temperature. In this study we tested the suitability of this biopolymer to sustain CM viability. The RTG was biomolecule-functionalized with poly-l-lysine or laminin. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) were cultured in plain-RTG and biomolecule-functionalized-RTG both under 3-dimensional (3D) conditions. Traditional 2D biomolecule-coated dishes were used as controls. We found that the RTG-lysine stimulated NRVM to spread and form heart-like functional syncytia. Regarding cell contraction, in both RTG and RTG-lysine, beating cells were recorded after 21 days. Additionally, more than 50% (p value < 0.05; n = 5) viable ARVMs, characterized by a well-defined cardiac phenotype represented by sarcomeric cross-striations, were found in the RTG-laminin after 8 days. These results exhibit the tremendous potential of a minimally invasive CM transplantation through our designed RTG-cell therapy platform. PMID:27073119

  1. Development of Underwater Microrobot with Biomimetic Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microrobots have powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields. They should have a compact structure, be easy to manufacture, have efficient locomotion, be driven by low voltage and have a simple control system. To meet these purposes, inspired by the leg of stick insects, we designed a novel type of microrobot with biomimetic locomotion with 1-DOF (degree of freedom legs. The locomotion includes two ionic conducting polymer film (ICPF actuators to realize the 2-DOF motion. We developed several microrobots with this locomotion. Firstly, we review a microrobot, named Walker-1, with 1-DOF motion. And then a new microrobot, named Walker-2, utilizing six ICPF actuators, with 3-DOF motion is introduced. It is 47 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height (in static state. It has 0.61 g of dried weight. We compared the two microrobot prototypes, and the result shows that Walker-2 has some advantages, such as more flexible moving motion, good balance, less water resistance, more load-carrying ability and so on. We also compared it with some insect-inspired microrobots and some microrobots with 1-DOF legs, and the result shows that a microrobot with this novel type of locomotion has some advantages. Its structure has fewer actuators and joints, a simpler control system and is compact. The ICPF actuator decides that it can be driven by low voltage (less than 5 V and move in water. A microrobot with this locomotion has powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields.

  2. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  3. Tribological and electrochemical studies on biomimetic synovial fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, tribological and electrochemical performances of the new biomimetic synovial fluids were studied according to different composition concentrations, including hyaluronic acid, albumin and alendronic acid sodium. By using Taguchi method, the composition contents of the biomimetic synovial fluids were designed. Items such as friction coefficient, mean scar diameter and viscosity were investigated via a four-ball tribo-tester, viscosity meter and optical microscope. Polarization studies were carried out to analyze the electrochemical behaviour of the fluids. Results showed that hyaluronic acid dominates the viscosity of the fluids. High albumin concentration will reduce friction, while increasing wear rate due to the electro-chemical effect. Alendronic acid sodium is found to reduce the biocorrosion of CoCrMo as well as provide better lubricating. In conclusion, biomimetic synovial fluids partially recover the functions of natural synovial fluids and provide good lubricating property.

  4. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly considered to determine the phalangeal length parameters. The usefulness of the devised biomimetic optimization method is shown through the design examples of various humanoid robot fingers. In fact, the optimization-based finger design method enables us to determine effectively the proper phalangeal size of humanoid robot fingers for human-like object handling tasks. In addition, we discuss its contribution to the structural configuration and coordinated motion of a humanoid robot finger, and address its practical availability in terms of effective finger design.

  5. PEM Fuel Cells Redesign Using Biomimetic and TRIZ Design Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Keith Kin Kei

    Two formal design methodologies, biomimetic design and the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, TRIZ, were applied to the redesign of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Proof of concept prototyping was performed on two of the concepts for water management. The liquid water collection with strategically placed wicks concept demonstrated the potential benefits for a fuel cell. Conversely, the periodic flow direction reversal concepts might cause a potential reduction water removal from a fuel cell. The causes of this water removal reduction remain unclear. In additional, three of the concepts generated with biomimetic design were further studied and demonstrated to stimulate more creative ideas in the thermal and water management of fuel cells. The biomimetic design and the TRIZ methodologies were successfully applied to fuel cells and provided different perspectives to the redesign of fuel cells. The methodologies should continue to be used to improve fuel cells.

  6. IPMC mechanoelectrical transduction: its scalability and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic polymer–metal composite (IPMC) mechanoelectrical transduction is described with a system of partial differential equations—the Poisson equation, the Nernst–Planck equation, and the Navier equations for the displacements. Modeling of this system of four equations is challenging due to the differences in the physical fields—namely, one physical field can be very smooth while others have steeper gradients. When using the conventional finite element method (FEM), the problem size in terms of number of degrees of freedom can be very large. Additionally, it is challenging to find an optimal mesh due to the fact that the physical fields are time dependent. Last but not least, due to the coupled nature of the system, it is necessary to have a way to estimate the error to ensure the desired accuracy of the solutions. In this work, we propose a novel hp-FEM modeling method for solving the system of equations. hp-FEM is a modern version of the FEM that is capable of exponential convergence. It is also demonstrated how the multi-meshing reduces the problem size while maintaining the prescribed error limit. The solution domain that describes IPMC can be scaled without a significant increase in the number of degrees of freedom and solution time. Additionally, PID controller based time step optimization is incorporated. The model is implemented in Hermes, which is a free hp-FEM solver. (paper)

  7. TMC function in hair cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jeffrey R; Pan, Bifeng; Koussa, Mounir A; Asai, Yukako

    2014-05-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins 1 and 2 are necessary for hair cell mechanotransduction but their precise function is controversial. A growing body of evidence supports a direct role for TMC1 and TMC2 as components of the transduction complex. However, a number of important questions remain and alternate hypotheses have been proposed. Here we present an historical overview of the identification and cloning of Tmc genes, a discussion of mutations in TMC1 that cause deafness in mice and humans and a brief review of other members of the Tmc gene superfamily. We also examine expression of Tmc mRNAs and localization of the protein products. The review focuses on potential functions of TMC proteins and the evidence from Beethoven mice that suggests a direct role for TMC1 in hair cell mechanotransduction. Data that support alternate interpretations are also considered. The article concludes with a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions for TMC research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:24423408

  8. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  9. Polymer Composition and Substrate Influences on the Adhesive Bonding of a Biomimetic, Cross-Linking Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Pérez, Cristina R.; White, James D.; Wilker, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical biological materials such as bone, sea shells, and marine bioadhesives are providing inspiration for the assembly of synthetic molecules into complex structures. The adhesive system of marine mussels has been the focus of much attention in recent years. Several catechol-containing polymers are being developed to mimic the cross-linking of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) used by shellfish for sticking to rocks. Many of these biomimetic polymer systems have been shown to form surface coatings or hydrogels, however bulk adhesion is demonstrated less often. Developing adhesives requires addressing design issues including finding a good balance between cohesive and adhesive bonding interactions. Despite the growing number of mussel mimicking polymers, there has been little effort to generate structure-property relations and gain insights on what chemical traits give rise to the best glues. In this report, we examined the simplest of these biomimetic polymers, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene]. Pendant catechol groups (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxystyrene) were distributed throughout a polystyrene backbone. Several polymer derivatives were prepared, each with a different 3,4-dihyroxystyrene content. Bulk adhesion testing showed where the optimal middle ground of cohesive and adhesive bonding resides. Adhesive performance was benchmarked against commercial glues as well as the genuine material produced by live mussels. In the best case, bonding was similar to cyanoacrylate “Krazy” or “Super” glue. Performance was also examined using low (e.g., plastics) and high (e.g., metals, wood) energy surfaces. Adhesive bonding of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] may be the strongest of reported mussel protein mimics. These insights should help us to design future biomimetic systems, thereby bringing us closer to development of bone cements, dental composites, and surgical glues. PMID:22582754

  10. Polymer composition and substrate influences on the adhesive bonding of a biomimetic, cross-linking polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Pérez, Cristina R; White, James D; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2012-06-01

    Hierarchical biological materials such as bone, sea shells, and marine bioadhesives are providing inspiration for the assembly of synthetic molecules into complex structures. The adhesive system of marine mussels has been the focus of much attention in recent years. Several catechol-containing polymers are being developed to mimic the cross-linking of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) used by shellfish for sticking to rocks. Many of these biomimetic polymer systems have been shown to form surface coatings or hydrogels; however, bulk adhesion is demonstrated less often. Developing adhesives requires addressing design issues including finding a good balance between cohesive and adhesive bonding interactions. Despite the growing number of mussel-mimicking polymers, there has been little effort to generate structure-property relations and gain insights on what chemical traits give rise to the best glues. In this report, we examine the simplest of these biomimetic polymers, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene]. Pendant catechol groups (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxystyrene) are distributed throughout a polystyrene backbone. Several polymer derivatives were prepared, each with a different 3,4-dihyroxystyrene content. Bulk adhesion testing showed where the optimal middle ground of cohesive and adhesive bonding resides. Adhesive performance was benchmarked against commercial glues as well as the genuine material produced by live mussels. In the best case, bonding was similar to that obtained with cyanoacrylate "Krazy Glue". Performance was also examined using low- (e.g., plastics) and high-energy (e.g., metals, wood) surfaces. The adhesive bonding of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] may be the strongest of reported mussel protein mimics. These insights should help us to design future biomimetic systems, thereby bringing us closer to development of bone cements, dental composites, and surgical glues. PMID:22582754

  11. Biomimetic actuators using electroactive polymers (EAP) as artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    Evolution has resolved many of nature's challenges leading to lasting solutions with maximal performance and effective use of resources. Nature's inventions have always inspired human achievements leading to effective materials, structures, tools, mechanisms, processes, algorithms, methods, systems and many other benefits. The field of mimicking nature is known as Biomimetics and one of its topics includes electroactive polymers that gain the moniker artificial muscles. Integrating EAP with embedded sensors, self-repair and many other capabilities that are used in composite materials can add greatly to the capability of smart biomimetic systems. Such development would enable fascinating possibilities potentially turning science fiction ideas into engineering reality.

  12. Desalination by biomimetic aquaporin membranes: Review of status and prospects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, C.Y.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, R.;

    2013-01-01

    Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review......; including an overview of our own recent developments in aquaporin-based membranes. Finally we outline future prospects of aquaporin based biomimetic membrane for desalination and water reuse....... is to provide an overview of the properties of aquaporins, their preparation and characterization. We discuss the challenges in exploiting the remarkable properties of aquaporin proteins for membrane separation processes and we present various attempts to construct aquaporin in membranes for desalination...

  13. Investigation of the Mechanoelectrical Transduction at Single Stereocilia by Afm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, M. G.; Fink, S.; Löffler, K.; Koitschev, A.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2003-02-01

    The transduction of sound into an electrical signal in the inner ear is closely related to the mechanical properties of the hair bundles cytoskeleton and cross-linkage. In this study the effect of lateral cross-links on hair bundle mechanics and the transduction current response is demonstrated on the level of individual stereocilia. For experiments stereocilia of outer hair cells of postnatal rats (P3 - P8) were scanned with a sharp AFM tip at nanometerscale. Transduction currents were simultaneously recorded in the whole-cell-recording mode with patch clamp. AFM was used as a nanotool for local mechanical stimulation and force measurement at stereocilia whereas patch clamp serves as a detector for the electrical response of the cell. In a first experiment force transmission between adjacent stereocilia of the V- and W- shaped hair bundles of outer hair cells was investigated. Results showed that a force exerted to a single stereocilium declined to 36 % at the nearest adjacent stereocilium of the same row. This result supposes AFM to be convenient for local displacement of single stereocilia. For control, the local response of transduction channels was measured at single stereocilia of the same hair bundle. Measured transduction current amplitudes ranged from 9 to 49 pA supposing an opening of one to five transduction channels. Both, weak force transmission by lateral cross-links and small transduction current amplitudes indicate a weak mechanical interaction between individual stereocilia of the tallest row of stereocilia of outer hair cells from postnatal rats.

  14. Novel structures of PII signal transduction proteins from oxygenic phototropic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Chellamuthu, Vasuki Ranjani

    2014-01-01

    PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins, whose representatives are present in archaea, bacteria and plants. They play a pivotal role to control the nitrogen, carbon and energy status of the cell in response to the central metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG). These signals from central metabolites are integrated by PII proteins and transmitted to the regulatory targets (protein modifying enzymes, metabolic enzymes, transpor...

  15. New crystal in the pineal gland : characterization and potential role in electromechano-transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Baconnier, Simon; Lang, Sidney.B.; De Seze, René

    2002-01-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine transducer secreting melatonin, responsible for the physiological circadian rhythm control. A new form of biomineralization has been studied in the human pineal gland. It consists of small crystals that are less than 20 µm in length. These crystals could be responsible for an electromechanical biological transduction mechanism in the pineal gland due to their structure and piezoelectric properties. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disper...

  16. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  17. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  18. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  19. Natural Ventilation with Heat Recovery: A Biomimetic Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In temperate countries, heat recovery is often desirable through mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR. Drawbacks of MVHR include use of electric power and complex ducting, while alternative passive heat recovery systems in the form of roof or chimney-based solutions are limited to low rise buildings. This paper describes a biomimetic concept for natural ventilation with heat recovery (NVHR. The NVHR system mimics the process of water/mineral extraction from urine in the Loop of Henle (part of human kidney. Simulations on a facade-integrated Chamber successfully imitated the geometry and behaviour of the Loop of Henle (LoH. Using a space measuring 12 m2 in area and assuming two heat densities of 18.75 W/m2 (single occupancy or 30 W/m2 (double occupancy, the maximum indoor temperatures achievable are up to 19.3 °C and 22.3 °C respectively. These come with mean relative ventilation rates of 0.92 air changes per hour (ACH or 10.7 L·s−1 and 0.92 ACH (11.55 L·s−1, respectively, for the month of January. With active heating and single occupant, the LoH Chamber consumes between 65.7% and 72.1% of the annual heating energy required by a similar naturally ventilated space without heat recovery. The LoH Chamber could operate as stand-alone indoor cabinet, benefitting refurbishment of buildings and evading constraints of complicated ducting, external aesthetic or building age.

  20. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Glaucia Mendes

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.

  1. Framing biomimetics in a strategic orientation perspective (biopreneuring)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how design originally rooted in biology can be translated into applications outside its original domain (biomimetics), and thus become strategically important for commercial organisations. This paper will also discuss how concepts from organisation and management theory can h...

  2. Case Study in Biomimetic Design: Handling and Assembly of Microparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Li; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gegeckaite, Asta;

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the biomimetic design process to the development of automated gripping devices for microparts. Handling and assembly of micromechanical parts is complicated by size effects that occur when part dimensions are scaled down. A common complication involves...

  3. Aquaporin-Based Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes: Approaches and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habel, Joachim Erich Otto; Hansen, Michael; Kynde, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, aquaporin biomimetic membranes (ABMs) for water separation have gained considerable interest. Although the first ABMs are commercially available, there are still many challenges associated with further ABM development. Here, we discuss the interplay of the main components of ABMs...

  4. Diffraction from relief gratings on a biomimetic elastomer cast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomimetic optical elements combine the optimized designs of nature with the versatility of materials engineering. We employ a beetle carapace as the template for fabricating relief gratings on an elastomer substrate. Biological surface features are successfully replicated by a direct casting procedure. Far-field diffraction effects are discussed in terms of the Fraunhofer approximation in Fourier space.

  5. Design and Implementation of a Modular Biomimetic Infochemical Communication System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rácz, Z.; Cole, M.; Gardner, J.W.; Chowdhury, M.F.; Bula, W.P.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Karout, S.; Capurro, A.; Pearce, T.C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here the design and implementation of a novel biomimetic infochemical communication system that employs airborne molecules alone to communicate over space and time. The system involves the design and fabrication of a microsystem capable of producing and releasing a precise mix of biosynt

  6. Structural Design and Sealing Performance Analysis of Biomimetic Sealing Ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chuanjun; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the failure probability of rubber sealing rings in reciprocating dynamic seal, a new structure of sealing ring based on bionics was designed. The biomimetic ring has three concave ridges and convex bulges on each side which are very similar to earthworms. Bulges were circularly designed and sealing performances of the biomimetic ring in both static seal and dynamic seal were simulated by FEM. In addition, effects of precompression, medium pressure, speed, friction coefficient, and material parameters on sealing performances were discussed. The results show that von Mises stress of the biomimetic sealing ring distributed symmetrically in no-pressure static sealing. The maximum von Mises stress appears on the second bulge of the inner side. High contact stress concentrates on left bulges. Von Mises stress distribution becomes uneven under medium pressure. Both von Mises stress and contact stress increase when precompression, medium pressure, and rubber hardness increase in static sealing. Biomimetic ring can avoid rolling and distortion in reciprocating dynamic seal, and its working life is much longer than O-ring and rectangular ring. The maximum von Mises stress and contact stress increase with the precompression, medium pressure, rubber hardness, and friction coefficient in reciprocating dynamic seal. PMID:27019582

  7. Structural Design and Sealing Performance Analysis of Biomimetic Sealing Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the failure probability of rubber sealing rings in reciprocating dynamic seal, a new structure of sealing ring based on bionics was designed. The biomimetic ring has three concave ridges and convex bulges on each side which are very similar to earthworms. Bulges were circularly designed and sealing performances of the biomimetic ring in both static seal and dynamic seal were simulated by FEM. In addition, effects of precompression, medium pressure, speed, friction coefficient, and material parameters on sealing performances were discussed. The results show that von Mises stress of the biomimetic sealing ring distributed symmetrically in no-pressure static sealing. The maximum von Mises stress appears on the second bulge of the inner side. High contact stress concentrates on left bulges. Von Mises stress distribution becomes uneven under medium pressure. Both von Mises stress and contact stress increase when precompression, medium pressure, and rubber hardness increase in static sealing. Biomimetic ring can avoid rolling and distortion in reciprocating dynamic seal, and its working life is much longer than O-ring and rectangular ring. The maximum von Mises stress and contact stress increase with the precompression, medium pressure, rubber hardness, and friction coefficient in reciprocating dynamic seal.

  8. Hierarcially biomimetic bone materials: from nanometer to millimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG W.; CUI F. Z.; LIAO S. S.

    2001-01-01

    @@ The bone composite was produced by biomimetic synthesis. It shows some features of natural bone in both composition and microstructure. And the collagen moleculars and the nano-crystal hydroxyapatite assemble into ultrastructure similar to natural bone. It possesses porous structure with porosity from 100μm to 500μm after mixed with PLA (poly lactic acid).

  9. Structural Design and Sealing Performance Analysis of Biomimetic Sealing Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chuanjun

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the failure probability of rubber sealing rings in reciprocating dynamic seal, a new structure of sealing ring based on bionics was designed. The biomimetic ring has three concave ridges and convex bulges on each side which are very similar to earthworms. Bulges were circularly designed and sealing performances of the biomimetic ring in both static seal and dynamic seal were simulated by FEM. In addition, effects of precompression, medium pressure, speed, friction coefficient, and material parameters on sealing performances were discussed. The results show that von Mises stress of the biomimetic sealing ring distributed symmetrically in no-pressure static sealing. The maximum von Mises stress appears on the second bulge of the inner side. High contact stress concentrates on left bulges. Von Mises stress distribution becomes uneven under medium pressure. Both von Mises stress and contact stress increase when precompression, medium pressure, and rubber hardness increase in static sealing. Biomimetic ring can avoid rolling and distortion in reciprocating dynamic seal, and its working life is much longer than O-ring and rectangular ring. The maximum von Mises stress and contact stress increase with the precompression, medium pressure, rubber hardness, and friction coefficient in reciprocating dynamic seal. PMID:27019582

  10. A biomimetic tactile sensing system based on polyvinylidene fluoride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Tian, Hongying; Guo, Chao; Li, Xiang; Sun, Hongshuai; Wang, Peiyuan; Qian, Chenghui; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film has been widely investigated as a sensing material due to its outstanding properties such as biocompatibility, high thermal stability, good chemical resistance, high piezo-, pyro- and ferro-electric properties. This paper reports on the design, test, and analysis of a biomimetic tactile sensor based on PVDF film. This sensor consists of a PVDF film with aluminum electrodes, a pair of insulating layers, and a "handprint" friction layer with a copper foil. It is designed for easy fabrication and high reliability in outputting signals. In bionics, the fingerprint of the glabrous skin plays an important role during object handling. Therefore, in order to enhance friction and to provide better manipulation, the ridges of the fingertips were introduced into the design of the proposed tactile sensor. And, a basic experimental study on the selection of the high sensitivity fingerprint type for the biomimetic sensor was performed. In addition, we proposed a texture distinguish experiment to verify the sensor sensitivity. The experiment's results show that the novel biomimetic sensor is effective in discriminating object surface characteristics. Furthermore, an efficient visual application program (LabVIEW) and a quantitative evaluation method were proposed for the verification of the biomimetic sensor. The proposed tactile sensor shows great potential for contact force and slip measurements.

  11. A Laboratory Exercise to Introduce Inorganic Biomimetic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Donald M.

    1985-01-01

    Biomimetic chemistry is concerned with the synthesis of small, molecular weight molecules which mimic the properties of metal-containing sites within certain biologically significant species. A series of experiments for an advanced undergraduate laboratory is described as a way to introduce this area into the chemistry curriculum. (JN)

  12. 3D Modelling of Biological Systems for Biomimetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujun Zhang; Kevin Hapeshi; Ashok K. Bhattacharya

    2004-01-01

    With the advanced development of computer-based enabling technologies, many engineering, medical, biology,chemistry, physics and food science etc have developed to the unprecedented levels, which lead to many research and development interests in various multi-discipline areas. Among them, biomimetics is one of the most promising and attractive branches of study. Biomimetics is a branch of study that uses biological systems as a model to develop synthetic systems.To learn from nature, one of the fundamental issues is to understand the natural systems such animals, insects, plants and human beings etc. The geometrical characterization and representation of natural systems is an important fundamental work for biomimetics research. 3D modeling plays a key role in the geometrical characterization and representation, especially in computer graphical visualization. This paper firstly presents the typical procedure of 3D modelling methods and then reviews the previous work of 3D geometrical modelling techniques and systems developed for industrial, medical and animation applications. Especially the paper discusses the problems associated with the existing techniques and systems when they are applied to 3D modelling of biological systems. Based upon the discussions, the paper proposes some areas of research interests in 3D modelling of biological systems and for Biomimetics.

  13. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  14. Dense and porous titanium substrates with a biomimetic calcium phosphate coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, A.A., E-mail: aantunesr@yahoo.com.br [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Balestra, R.M. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, M.N. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Peripolli, S.B. [Materials Metrology Division, National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Quality, No. 50 Nossa Senhora das Gracas Street, Building 3, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Andrade, M.C. [Polytechnic Institute of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State University, s/n, Alberto Rangel Street, 28630-050 Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, L.C. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, M.V. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A biomimetic coating method with simplified solution is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are submitted to chemical and heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are coated with biocompatible calcium phosphate phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simplified solution shows potential to be applied as a coating technique. - Abstract: The present work studied a biomimetic method using a simplified solution (SS) with calcium and phosphorus ions for coating titanium substrates, in order to improve their bioactivity. Commercially pure titanium dense sheet, microporous and macroporous titanium samples, both produced by powder metallurgy, were treated in NaOH solution followed by heat-treating and immersed in SS for 7, 14 or 21 days. The samples characterization was performed by quantitative metallographic analysis, confocal scanning optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and low angle X-ray diffraction. The results showed coatings with calcium phosphate precipitation in all samples, with globular or plate-like morphology, typical of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate, respectively, indicating that the solution (SS) has potential for coating titanium substrates. In addition, the different surfaces of substrates had an effect on the formed calcium phosphate phase and thickness of coatings, depending on the substrate type and imersion time in the simplified solution.

  15. Biomimetic photo-actuation: sensing, control and actuation in sun-tracking plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the actuation mechanisms that drive plant movement have been investigated from a biomimetic perspective, few studies have looked at the wider sensing and control systems that regulate this motion. This paper examines photo-actuation—actuation induced by, and controlled with light—through a review of the sun-tracking functions of the Cornish Mallow. The sun-tracking movement of the Cornish Mallow leaf results from an extraordinarily complex—yet extremely elegant—process of signal perception, generation, filtering and control. Inspired by this process, a concept for a simplified biomimetic analogue of this leaf is proposed: a multifunctional structure employing chemical sensing, signal transmission, and control of composite hydrogel actuators. We present this multifunctional structure, and show that the success of the concept will require improved selection of materials and structural design. This device has application in the solar-tracking of photovoltaic panels for increased energy yield. More broadly it is envisaged that the concept of chemical sensing and control can be expanded beyond photo-actuation to many other stimuli, resulting in new classes of robust solid-state devices. (paper)

  16. Colloidal ionic assembly between anionic native cellulose nanofibrils and cationic block copolymer micelles into biomimetic nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Olszewska, Anna; Walther, Andreas; Malho, Jani-Markus; Schacher, Felix H; Ruokolainen, Janne; Ankerfors, Mikael; Laine, Janne; Berglund, Lars A; Osterberg, Monika; Ikkala, Olli

    2011-06-13

    We present a facile ionic assembly between fibrillar and spherical colloidal objects toward biomimetic nanocomposites with majority hard and minority soft domains based on anionic reinforcing native cellulose nanofibrils and cationic amphiphilic block copolymer micelles with rubbery core. The concept is based on ionic complexation of carboxymethylated nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC, or also denoted as microfibrillated cellulose, MFC) and micelles formed by aqueous self-assembly of quaternized poly(1,2-butadiene)-block-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) with high fraction of the NFC reinforcement. The adsorption of block copolymer micelles onto nanocellulose is shown by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, atomic force microscopy imaging, and fluorescent optical microscopy. The physical properties are elucidated using electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and mechanical testing. The cationic part of the block copolymer serves as a binder to NFC, whereas the hydrophobic rubbery micellar cores are designed to facilitate energy dissipation and nanoscale lubrication between the NFC domains under deformation. We show that the mechanical properties do not follow the rule of mixtures, and synergistic effects are observed with promoted work of fracture in one composition. As the concept allows wide possibilities for tuning, the work suggests pathways for nanocellulose-based biomimetic nanocomposites combining high toughness with stiffness and strength. PMID:21517114

  17. Calcium phosphate coating on magnesium alloy by biomimetic method :Investigation of morphology ,composition and formation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Magnesium alloy has similar mechanical properties with natural bone and can degrade via corrosion in the electrolytic environment of the human body.Calcium phosphate has been proven to possess bioactivity and bone inductivity.In order to integrate both advantages,calcium phosphate coating was fabricated on magnesium alloy by a biomimetic method.Supersaturated calcification solutions (SCSs) with different Ca/P ratio and C1- concentration were used as mimetic solutions.The morphology,composition and formation process of the coating were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS),Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The results show that a uniform calcium phosphate coating was observed on magnesium alloy,the properties of which could be adjusted by the SCSs with different Ca/P ratio.The formation process of the coating was explored by immersing magnesium alloy in SCSs with different Cl- concentration which could adjust the hydrogen production.According to SEM results,the hydrogen bubbles were associated with the formation of grass-like and flower-like coating morphologies.In conclusion,the biomimetic method was effective to form calcium phosphate coating on magnesium alloy and the morphology and composition of the coating could be accommodated by the Ca/P ratio and Cl- concentration in SCSs.

  18. Design and Dynamic Analysis of a Novel Biomimetic Robotics Hip Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyan Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the workspace and the carrying capacity of biomimetic robotics hip joint, a novel biomimetic robotics hip joint was developed. The biomimetic robotics hip joint is mainly composed of a moving platform, frame, and 3-RRR orthogonal spherical parallel mechanism branched chains, and has the characteristics of compact structure, large bearing capacity, high positioning accuracy, and good controllability. The functions of the biomimetic robotics hip joint are introduced, such as the technical parameters, the structure and the driving mode. The biomimetic robotics hip joint model of the robot is established, the kinematics equation is described, and then the dynamics are analyzed and simulated with ADAMS software. The proposed analysis methodology can be provided a theoretical base for biomimetic robotics hip joint of the servo motor selection and structural design. The designed hip joint can be applied in serial and parallel robots or any other mechanisms.

  19. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Pu; Guangji Li; Hanlu Huang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark s...

  20. Design of biomimetic camouflage materials based on angiosperm leaf organs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The micro structures and reflectance spectra of angiosperm leaves were compared with those of angiosperm petals. The study indicated that angiosperm leaf organs had identical micro structures and reflectance characteristics in the wave band of near infrared. Micro structures and compositions of leaf organs were the crucial factors influencing their reflectance spectra. The model of biomimetic materials based on angiosperm leaf organs was introduced and verified. From 300 to 2600 nm, the similarity coefficients of reflectance spectra of the foam containing water and Platanus Orientalis Linn. leaves were all above 0.969. The biomimetic camou- flage material exhibited almost the same reflectance spectra with those of green leaves in ultraviolet, visible and near infrared wave bands. And its "concolor and conspectrum" effect might take on reconnaissance of hyperspectral and ultra hy- perspectral imaging.

  1. Biomimetic Adhesive Materials Containing Cyanoacryl Group for Medical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueng Hwan Jo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For underwater adhesives with biocompatible and more flexible bonds using biomimetic adhesive groups, DOPA-like adhesive molecules were modified with cyanoacrylates to obtain different repeating units and chain length copolymers. The goal of this work is to copy the mechanisms of underwater bonding to create synthetic water-borne underwater medical adhesives through blending of the modified DOPA and a triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO for practical application to repair wet living tissues and bones, and in turn, to use the synthetic adhesives to test mechanistic hypotheses about the natural adhesive. The highest values in stress and modulus of the biomimetic adhesives prepared in wet state were 165 kPa and 33 MPa, respectively.

  2. Biomimetic strengthening polylactide scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guofu; MOU Shenzhou; ZHOU Lingping; LIAO Susan; YIN Zhimin; CUI Fuzhai

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,a new polylactide(PLA)-based scaffold composite by biomimetic synthesis was designed.The novel composite mainly consists ofnano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA),which is the main inorganic content in natural bone tissue for the PLA.The crystal degree of the n-HA in the composite is low and the crystal size is very small,which is similar to that of natural bone.The compressive strength of the composite is higher than that of the PLA scaffold.Using the osteoblast culture technique,we detected cell behaviors on the biomaterial in vitro by SEM,and the cell affinity of the composite was found to be higher than that of the PLA scaffold.The biomimetic three-dimensional porous composite can serve as a kind of excellent scaffold material for bone tissue engineering because of its microstructure and properties.

  3. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lihong; Lim, C. W.; Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing

    2016-06-01

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media.

  4. Gene Expression Pattern of Signal Transduction in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huiyu; JIE Shenghua; GUO Tiannan; HUANG Shi'ang

    2006-01-01

    To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of signaling pathway in Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a series of cDNA microarray chips were tested. The results showed that differentially expressed genes related to singal transduction in CML were screened out and the genes involved in Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and other signaling pathway genes simultaneously. The results also showed that most of these genes were up-expression genes , which suggested that signal transduction be overactivated in CML. Further analysis of these differentially expressed signal transduction genes will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of CML and find new targets of treatment.

  5. The development of taste transduction and taste chip technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qingjun; XU Ying; CAI Hua; QIN Lifeng; WANG Lijiang; WANG Ping

    2005-01-01

    The intrinsic perception process of taste is obviously far less known than those of vision, audition, touch and olfaction. Despite that taste cells utilize a variety of sensory mechanisms to translate plenty of gustatory sensations such as sour, sweet, bitter, salty and umami into cellular signals, gustatory perception mechanisms are still under exploration due to the lack of effective methods on cellular and molecular level. Recently the development of molecular biological and electrophysiological studies has promoted exploration of olfactory and gustatory transduction and coding mechanisms dramatically. Based on the studies of artificial olfaction, artificial taste and cell-based biosensor in our laboratory, this paper reviews the current research on taste transduction mechanism. We introduce the recent advances in cell chip that combined biology with microelectronics, discuss taste cell chip as well as its potential of prospective application in taste transduction mechanism in detail and propose the research trends of taste chip in future.

  6. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  7. Methods for biomimetic remineralization of human dentine: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Ying Cao; May Lei Mei; Quan-Li Li; Edward Chin Man Lo; Chun Hung Chu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the laboratory methods on biomimetic remineralization of demineralized human dentine. A systematic search of the publications in the PubMed, TRIP, and Web of Science databases was performed. Titles and abstracts of initially identified publications were screened. Clinical trials, reviews, non-English articles, resin-dentine interface studies, hybrid layer studies, hybrid scaffolds studies, and irrelevant studies were excluded. The remaining papers were retrieved wi...

  8. Biomimetics in Modern Organizations – Laws or Metaphors?

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Schatten; Miroslav Zugaj

    2011-01-01

    Biomimetics, the art and science of imitating nature and life for technological solutions is discussed from a modern organization theory perspective. The main hypothesis of this article is that there are common laws in nature that are applicable to living, social and likewise organizational systems. To take advantage of these laws, the study of nature's principles for their application to organizations is proposed - a process which is in product and technology design known as bionic creativit...

  9. Neural Networks Integrated Circuit for Biomimetics MEMS Microrobot

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Saito; Kazuaki Maezumi; Yuka Naito; Tomohiro Hidaka; Kei Iwata; Yuki Okane; Hirozumi Oku; Minami Takato; Fumio Uchikoba

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we will propose the neural networks integrated circuit (NNIC) which is the driving waveform generator of the 4.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm, width, length, height in size biomimetics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microrobot. The microrobot was made from silicon wafer fabricated by micro fabrication technology. The mechanical system of the robot was equipped with small size rotary type actuators, link mechanisms and six legs to realize the ant-like switching behavior. The NNIC generat...

  10. Applied Biomimetics: A New Fresh Look of Textiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela Teodorescu

    2014-01-01

    Biomimetics is a new research field that deals with extraction and imitation of functional principles of nature and applying them in engineering. Due to the perfection of structures and mechanisms found in the natural world, scientists came to the conclusion that these may constitute reliable sources of inspiration and viable solutions for technological problems they face today. Industrial applications have rapidly developed. Trying to synthesize all information about this extremely large fie...

  11. Biomimetic supramolecular metallohosts for binding and activation of dioxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Sprakel, Vera Stefanie Irene

    2004-01-01

    Host-guest chemistry involves the binding of a specific substrate in a receptor via molecular recognition based on supramolecular interactions. Metal-containing derivatives of receptors for the selective supramolecular binding of dihydroxybenzene substrates, which receptors model oxygen binding enzymes both in structure and in function are described in this thesis with the ultimate goal to realize biomimetic catalysis. A PY2-appended receptor 1 and a TPA-appended receptor 2 and the bis-copper...

  12. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez Yagüe, Marc; Lázaro Calvo, Pedro; Herrero Climent, Mariano; Ríos Santos, José Vicente; Bullón, Pedro; Gil Mur, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite’s high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amor...

  13. Flight mechanism and design of biomimetic micro air vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper summaries the investigations on natural flyers and development of bio-mimetic micro air vehicles(MAVs)at NUAA,China,where the authors have led a group to conduct research for a decade. The investigations include the studies of low Reynolds number aerodynamics,unsteady computational fluid dynamics and flight control for the fixed-wing MAVs,the bird-like MAVs,the dragonfly-like MAVs and the bee-like MAVs.

  14. Flisht mechanism and design of biomimetic micro air vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ANG HaiSong; XIAO TianHang; DUAN WenBo

    2009-01-01

    This paper summaries the investigations on natural flyers and development of bio-mimetic micro air vehicles(MAVs)at NUAA,China,where the authors have led a group to conduct research for a decade.The investigations include the studies of low Reynolds number aerodynamics,unsteady computational fluid dynamics and flight control for the fixed-wing MAVs,the bird-like MAVs,the dragonfly-like MAVs and the bee-like MAVs.

  15. Membrane Assembly Driven by a Biomimetic Coupling Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Itay; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major goals of synthetic biology is the development of non-natural cellular systems. In this work we describe a catalytic biomimetic coupling reaction capable of driving the de novo self-assembly of phospholipid membranes. Our system features a copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition that results in the formation of a triazole containing phospholipid analog. Concomitant assembly of membranes occurs spontaneously, not requiring preexisting membranes to house catalysts or precurs...

  16. Bone Regeneration Mediated by Biomimetic Mineralization of a Nanofiber Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Mata, Alvaro; Geng, Yanbiao; Henrikson, Karl; Aparicio, Conrado; Stock, Stuart; Satcher, Robert L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid bone regeneration within a three-dimensional defect without the use of bone grafts, exogenous growth factors, or cells remains a major challenge. We report here on the use of self-assembling peptide nanostructured gels to promote bone regeneration that have the capacity to mineralize in biomimetic fashion. The main molecular design was the use of phosphoserine residues in the sequence of a peptide amphiphile known to nucleate hydroxyapatite crystals on the surfaces of nanofibers. We tes...

  17. Biomimetic Fabrication of Hydroxyapatite Microcapsules by Using Apatite Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Takeshi; Yabutsuka, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    When the pH or the temperature of SBF is raised, fine particles of calcium phosphate are precipitated in the fluid. It was found that these particles are very active for forming hydroxyapatite from SBF and these particles were named Apatite Nuclei. By the discovery of Apatite Nuclei, it became possible to develop various multifunctional biomaterials possesing high bioaffinity in micron or nano scale by using biomimetic method. The authors have successfully encapsulated Ag, PLA and silicagel m...

  18. Development of biomimetic microengineered hydrogel fibers for tendon regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Almeida, R.; Gasperini, Luca; Rodrigues, Márcia T.; Babo, P. M.; Mano, J.F; Reis, R.L.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Tendon injuries are responsible for substantial morbidity, pain and disability. Tissue engineering strategies aim at translating tendon structure into biomimetic materials. The main goal of the present study is to develop microengineered hydrogel fibers through the combination of microfabrication and chemical interactions between oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. For this, methacrylated hyaluronic acid (MeHA) a...

  19. Fabrication of Biomimetic Water Strider Legs Covered with Setae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Zhou; Zhi-wen Liu

    2009-01-01

    Water striders have remarkable water-repellent legs that enable them to stand effortlessly and move quickly on water. Fluid physics indicates this feature is due to a surface-tension effect caused by the special hierarchical structure of the legs, which are covered with a large number of inclined setae with fine nanogrooves inducing water resistance. This inspires us to fabricate special water-repellent structure on functional surfaces through the cooperation between the surface treatment and the surface micro- and nanostructures, which may bring great advantages in a wide variety of applications. In this paper we present a procedure for fabricating biomimetic water strider legs covered with setae using Polycarbonate Track-Etched (PCTE) membranes as templates. By choosing appropriate membrane lengths, diameters, pitches and densities of the setae, the biomimetic legs can be fabricated conveniently and at a low cost. Furthermore we investigated the relationship between stiffness of the molding materials, high aspect ratio and density, which affect the fidelity of fabrication and self adhesion, to optimize the stability of setae. The knowledge we gained from this study will offer important insights into the biomimetic design and fabrication of water strider setae.

  20. Biomimetic coating of calcium phosphate on biometallic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Er-lin; YANG Ke

    2005-01-01

    The biomimetic coating process in comparison with other processes is reviewed. This processing shows advantages in the surface bio-modification, such as low cost and flexible processing, wide range of apatite composition and thickness, non-line-of-sight characteristic and possibility to coat polymers and porous implants. The bio-mimetic apatite coating is made up of larger number of globules with size of 1-5μm. Each globule is a group of numerous flakes with a size range of 100-200nm to 30μm in length and 0.1-1μm in thickness. In-vitro and in-vivo studies show that the biomimetic apatite coating can promote an early and strong bonding to bone or promote the bone in-growth into the porous structure, which will be beneficial to the cementless stable fixation of orthopaedic implants. Recently developed co-precipitation of a kind of protein molecules into the HA coating shows much promising.

  1. Methods for biomimetic remineralization of human dentine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chris Ying; Mei, May Lei; Li, Quan-Li; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Chu, Chun Hung

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the laboratory methods on biomimetic remineralization of demineralized human dentine. A systematic search of the publications in the PubMed, TRIP, and Web of Science databases was performed. Titles and abstracts of initially identified publications were screened. Clinical trials, reviews, non-English articles, resin-dentine interface studies, hybrid layer studies, hybrid scaffolds studies, and irrelevant studies were excluded. The remaining papers were retrieved with full texts. Manual screening was conducted on the bibliographies of remaining papers to identify relevant articles. A total of 716 studies were found, and 690 were excluded after initial screening. Two articles were identified from the bibliographies of the remaining papers. After retrieving the full text, 23 were included in this systematic review. Sixteen studies used analogues to mimic the functions of non-collagenous proteins in biomineralization of dentine, and four studies used bioactive materials to induce apatite formation on demineralized dentine surface. One study used zinc as a bioactive element, one study used polydopamine, and another study constructed an agarose hydrogel system for biomimetic mineralization of dentine. Many studies reported success in biomimetic mineralization of dentine, including the use of non-collagenous protein analogues, bioactive materials, or elements and agarose hydrogel system. PMID:25739078

  2. Biological activity of lactoferrin-functionalized biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nocerino N

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nunzia Nocerino,1 Andrea Fulgione,1 Marco Iannaccone,1 Laura Tomasetta,1 Flora Ianniello,1 Francesca Martora,1 Marco Lelli,2 Norberto Roveri,2 Federico Capuano,3 Rosanna Capparelli1 1Department of Agriculture Special Biotechnology Center Federico II, CeBIOTEC Biotechnology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, 2Department of Chemistry, G Ciamician, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna, 3Department of Food Inspection IZS ME, Naples, Italy Abstract: The emergence of bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics is a general public health problem. Progress in developing new molecules with antimicrobial properties has been made. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of a hybrid nanocomposite composed of synthetic biomimetic hydroxyapatite surface-functionalized by lactoferrin (LF-HA. We evaluated the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of LF-HA and found that the composite was active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and that it modulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and enhanced antioxidant properties as compared with LF alone. These results indicate the possibility of using LF-HA as an antimicrobial system and biomimetic hydroxyapatite as a candidate for innovative biomedical applications. Keywords: lactoferrin, hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, biomimetism, biological activity, drug delivery

  3. Bottom-Up Synthesis and Sensor Applications of Biomimetic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanotechnology, biology, and bioengineering greatly improved the developments of nanomaterials with unique functions and properties. Biomolecules as the nanoscale building blocks play very important roles for the final formation of functional nanostructures. Many kinds of novel nanostructures have been created by using the bioinspired self-assembly and subsequent binding with various nanoparticles. In this review, we summarized the studies on the fabrications and sensor applications of biomimetic nanostructures. The strategies for creating different bottom-up nanostructures by using biomolecules like DNA, protein, peptide, and virus, as well as microorganisms like bacteria and plant leaf are introduced. In addition, the potential applications of the synthesized biomimetic nanostructures for colorimetry, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrical resistance, electrochemistry, and quartz crystal microbalance sensors are presented. This review will promote the understanding of relationships between biomolecules/microorganisms and functional nanomaterials in one way, and in another way it will guide the design and synthesis of biomimetic nanomaterials with unique properties in the future.

  4. Fouling Characterization of Forward Osmosis Biomimetic Aquaporin Membranes Used for Water Recovery from Municipal Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarebska, Agata; Petrinic, Irena; Hey, Tobias;

    Generally more than 99.93% of municipal wastewater is composed of water, therefore water recovery can alleviate global water stress which currently exists. Traditional ways to extract water from wastewater by the use of membrane bioreactors combined with reverse osmosis (RO), or micro....../ultrafiltration coupled with RO and sand filtration, or advanced oxidation process require high energy. Contrary to pressure driven membrane processes, forward osmosis (FO) offers advantages such as no need of high hydraulic pressure, reduced fouling and simple cleaning. Even though fouling of FO membranes is less severe......, organic, and biological fouling, membrane characterization is not a trivial task. The aim of this work is to characterize fouling of FO biomimetic aquaporin membranes during water recovery from municipal wastewater. Membrane fouling was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Dispersive...

  5. Chiral discrimination in biomimetic systems: Phenylalanine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Thirumoorthy; K Soni; T Arun; N Nandi

    2007-09-01

    Chiral discrimination and recognition is important in peptide biosynthesis, amino acid synthesis and drug designing. Detailed structural information is available about the peptide synthesis in ribosome. However, no detailed study is available about the discrimination in peptide synthesis. We study the conformational energy variation of neutral methoxy phenyl alanine molecule as a function of its different dihedral angle to locate the minimum energy conformation using quantum chemical theory. We compared the intermolecular energy surfaces of phenyl alanine molecule in its neutral and zwitterionic state using quantum chemical theory as a function of distance and mutual orientation. The energy surfaces are studied with rigid geometry by varying the distance and orientation. The potential energy surfaces of - and - pairs are found to be dissimilar and reflect the underlying chirality of the homochiral pair and racemic nature of the heterochiral pair. The intermolecular energy surface of homochiral pair is more favourable than the corresponding energy surface of heterochiral pair.

  6. Plants and Animals as Concept Generators for the Development of Biomimetic Cable Entry Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tom Masseiter; Uwe Scharf; Thomas Speck

    2008-01-01

    Many animals and plants have high potential to serve as concept generators for developing biomimetic materials and structures. We present some ideas based on structural and functional properties of plants and animals that led to the development of two types of biomimetic cable entry systems. Those systems have been realized on the level of functional demonstrators.

  7. A future of living machines?: International trends and prospects in biomimetic and biohybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Tony J.; Lepora, Nathan; Vershure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Research in the fields of biomimetic and biohybrid systems is developing at an accelerating rate. Biomimetics can be understood as the development of new technologies using principles abstracted from the study of biological systems, however, biomimetics can also be viewed from an alternate perspective as an important methodology for improving our understanding of the world we live in and of ourselves as biological organisms. A biohybrid entity comprises at least one artificial (engineered) component combined with a biological one. With technologies such as microscale mobile computing, prosthetics and implants, humankind is moving towards a more biohybrid future in which biomimetics helps us to engineer biocompatible technologies. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of biomimetic and biohybrid systems focusing particularly on technologies that emulate living organisms—living machines. Based on our recent bibliographic analysis [1] we examine how biomimetics is already creating life-like robots and identify some key unresolved challenges that constitute bottlenecks for the field. Drawing on our recent research in biomimetic mammalian robots, including humanoids, we review the future prospects for such machines and consider some of their likely impacts on society, including the existential risk of creating artifacts with significant autonomy that could come to match or exceed humankind in intelligence. We conclude that living machines are more likely to be a benefit than a threat but that we should also ensure that progress in biomimetics and biohybrid systems is made with broad societal consent.

  8. Biomimetically inspired short access to the 2-aminoimidazole-fused tetracyclic core of (+/-)-dibromoagelaspongin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon, Sylvain; Tran, Huu Dau Elise; Martin, Marie-Thérèse; Retailleau, Pascal; Zaparucha, Anne; Al-Mourabit, Ali

    2009-06-18

    A six-step synthesis of the tetracyclic core of the natural compound (+/-)-dibromoagelaspongin, isolated from Agelas sp. Sponge, was achieved from the commercially available 5-aminopentan-1-ol, 2-trichloroacetylpyrrole, and 2-aminopyrimidine. Following a biomimetic inspired approach, successive oxidative reactions including the final DMDO biomimetic oxidation gave the interesting triaminomethane-fused core. PMID:19445491

  9. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens; Ødum, Niels; Skov, Per Stahl

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...

  10. Synthetic modular systems--reverse engineering of signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2005-01-01

    to a deeper and more abstract understanding of signal transduction systems. Designing and successfully introducing synthetic proteins into cellular pathways would provide us with a powerful research tool with many applications, such as development of biosensors, protein drugs and rewiring of...

  11. Beyond microarrays: Finding key transcription factors controlling signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kel, Alexdander; Voss, Nico; Jauregui, Ruy; Kel-Margoulis, Olga; Wingender, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Background Massive gene expression changes in different cellular states measured by microarrays, in fact, reflect just an "echo" of real molecular processes in the cells. Transcription factors constitute a class of the regulatory molecules that typically require posttranscriptional modifications or ligand binding in order to exert their function. Therefore, such important functional changes of transcription factors are not directly visible in the microarray experiments. Results We developed a novel approach to find key transcription factors that may explain concerted expression changes of specific components of the signal transduction network. The approach aims at revealing evidence of positive feedback loops in the signal transduction circuits through activation of pathway-specific transcription factors. We demonstrate that promoters of genes encoding components of many known signal transduction pathways are enriched by binding sites of those transcription factors that are endpoints of the considered pathways. Application of the approach to the microarray gene expression data on TNF-alpha stimulated primary human endothelial cells helped to reveal novel key transcription factors potentially involved in the regulation of the signal transduction pathways of the cells. Conclusion We developed a novel computational approach for revealing key transcription factors by knowledge-based analysis of gene expression data with the help of databases on gene regulatory networks (TRANSFAC® and TRANSPATH®). The corresponding software and databases are available at . PMID:17118134

  12. Expression of SMAD signal transduction molecules in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Michael; Hougaard, D.; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis;

    2001-01-01

    Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which eve...

  13. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Tian You

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  14. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy; Andersen, Jens S

    2007-01-01

    mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds of...

  15. Biomimetics in materials science self-healing, self-lubricating, and self-cleaning materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nosonovsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetics in Materials Science provides a comprehensive theoretical and practical review of biomimetic materials with self-healing, self-lubricating and self-cleaning properties. These three topics are closely related and constitute rapidly developing areas of study. The field of self-healing materials requires a new conceptual understanding of this biomimetic technology, which is in contrast to traditional  engineering processes such as wear and fatigue.  Biomimetics in Materials Science is the first monograph to be devoted to these materials. A new theoretical framework for these processes is presented based on the concept of multi-scale structure of entropy and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, together with a detailed review of the available technology. The latter includes experimental, modeling, and simulation results obtained on self-healing/lubricating/cleaning materials since their emergence in the past decade. Describes smart, biomimetic materials in the context of nanotechnology, biotechnology, an...

  16. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Khaled; El-Feki, Hafed; Marsan, Olivier; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ATP is a well-known energy supplier in cells. The idea to associate ATP to pharmaceutical formulations/biotechnological devices to promote cells activity by potentially modulating their microenvironment thus appears as an appealing novel approach. Since biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites have shown great promise for biomedical applications (bone regeneration, cells diagnostics/therapeutics, …), thanks to a high surface reactivity and an intrinsically high biocompatibility, the present contribution was aimed at exploring ATP/apatite interactions. ATP adsorption on a synthetic carbonated nanocrystalline apatite preliminarily characterized (by XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-DTA and SEM-EDX) was investigated in detail, pointing out a good agreement with Sips isothermal features. Adsorption characteristics were compared to those previously obtained on monophosphate nucleotides (AMP, CMP), unveiling some specificities. ATP was found to adsorb effectively onto biomimetic apatite: despite smaller values of the affinity constant KS and the exponential factor m, larger adsorbed amounts were reached for ATP as compared to AMP for any given concentration in solution. m ATP/apatite adsorption process is mostly guided by direct surface bonding rather than through stabilizing intermolecular interactions. Although standard ΔGads ° was estimated to only -4 kJ/mol, the large value of Nmax led to significantly negative effective ΔGads values down to -33 kJ/mol, reflecting the spontaneous character of adsorption process. Vibrational spectroscopy data (FTIR and Raman) pointed out spectral modifications upon adsorption, confirming chemical-like interactions where both the triphosphate group of ATP and its nucleic base were involved. The present study is intended to serve as a basis for future research works involving ATP and apatite nanocrystals/nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications (e.g. bone tissue engineering, intracellular drug delivery, …).

  17. Facile construction of multicompartment multienzyme system through layer-by-layer self-assembly and biomimetic mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiafu; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2011-03-01

    In nature, some organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts possess multicompartment structure, which render powerful and versatile performance in cascade conversion, selective separation, and energy transfer. In this study, mitochondria-inspired hybrid double membrane microcapsules (HDMMCs) were prepared through synergy between biomimetic mineralization and layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly using double templating strategy. The organic inner membrane was acquired via LbL self-assembly of oxidized alginate (o-alginate) and protamine on the CaCO(3) template, the silica template layer was then formed onto the inner membrane through biomimetic silicification using protamine as inducer and silicate as precursor, the organic-inorganic hybrid outer membrane was acquired via biomimetic mineralization of titanium precursor. After the CaCO(3) template and the silica template are removed subsequently, multicompartment microcapsules with microscale lumen and nanoscale intermembrane space were obtained. The double membrane structure of the HDMMCs was verified by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), and the superior mechanical stability of HDMMCs was demonstrated by osmotic pressure experiment and fluorescence microscopy. A multienzyme system was constructed by following this protocol: the first enzyme was encapsulated in the lumen of the HDMMCs, whereas the second enzyme was encapsulated in the intermembrane space. Compared to encapsulated multienzyme in single-compartment microcapsules (SCMCs) or in free form in aqueous solution, enzymatic activity, selectivity, and recycling stability of HDMMCs-enabled multienzyme system were significantly improved. Because of the inherent gentle and generic feature, the present study can be utilized to create a variety of compartment structures for the potential applications in chemical/biological catalysis and separation, drug/gene delivery systems, and biosensors. PMID:21348442

  18. Anti-wear properties on 20CrMnTi steel surfaces with biomimetic non-smooth units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain a sufficient wear resistance for applications, the biomimetic non-smooth units in concave were fabricated on the surfaces of 20CrMnTi steel using a biomimetic laser remelting technology. The diameter and distribution of the concaves were optimized using orthogonal experiment. The microstructures of the biomimetic non-smooth units were examined. The anti-wear behaviors were investigated by the rolling wear test with lubricant. The results of wear tests indicated that the biomimetic surfaces exhibit a higher anti-wear ability than the smooth surfaces. The biomimetic surface with concaves of 250 μm in diameter and transverse distance of 270 μm and longitudinal distance of 400 μm exhibits the best anti-wear property. The enhancement of wear resistance can be mainly attributed to the action of biomimetic non-smooth units and the super fined microstructure and hardness in the biomimetic unit zones.

  19. Modulation and interactions of charged biomimetic membranes with bivalent ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe

    biomolecules in a dynamic environment and the lack of appropriate physical and biochemical tools. In contrast, biomimetic membrane models that rely on the amphiphilic properties of phospholipids are powerful tools that enable the study of these molecules in vitro. By having control over the different experimental parameters such as temperature and pH, reliable and repeatable experimental conditions can be created. One of the key questions I investigated in this thesis is related to the clustering mechanism of PtdIns(4, 5)P2 into pools or aggregates that enable independent cellular control of this species by geometric separation. The lateral aggregation of PtdIns(4, 5)P2 and its underlying physical causes is still a matter of debate. In the first part of this thesis I introduce the general information on lipid membranes with a special focus on the PtdIns family and their associated signaling events. In addition, I explain the Langmuir-Blodgett film balance (LB) system as tool to study lipid membranes and lipid interactions. In the second chapter, I describe my work on the lateral compressibility of PtdIns(4, 5)P2, PtdIns and DOPG monolayers and its modulation by bivalent ions using Langmuir monolayers. In addition, a theoretical framework of compressibility that depends on a surface potential induced by a planar layer of charged molecules and ions in the bulk was provided. In the third part, I present my work on the excess Gibbs free energy of the lipid systems PtdIns(4, 5)P2 --POPC, PtdIns(4, 5)P2, and POPC as they are modulated by bivalent ions. In the fourth part, I report on my foray in engineering a light-based system that relies on different dye properties to simulate calcium induced calcium release (CICR) that occurs in many cell types. In the final chapter, I provide a general conclusion and present directions for future research that would build on my findings.

  20. Developing a synthetic signal transduction system in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Kevin J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Albrecht, Kirk D; Bowen, Tessa A; Troupe, Jared F; Havens, Keira L; Medford, June I

    2011-01-01

    One area of focus in the emerging field of plant synthetic biology is the manipulation of systems involved in sensing and response to environmental signals. Sensing and responding to signals, including ligands, typically involves biological signal transduction. Plants use a wide variety of signaling systems to sense and respond to their environment. One of these systems, a histidine kinase (HK) based signaling system, lends itself to manipulation using the tools of synthetic biology. Both plants and bacteria use HKs to relay signals, which in bacteria can involve as few as two proteins (two-component systems or TCS). HK proteins are evolutionarily conserved between plants and bacteria and plant HK components have been shown to be functional in bacteria. We found that this conservation also applies to bacterial HK components which can function in plants. This conservation of function led us to hypothesize that synthetic HK signaling components can be designed and rapidly tested in bacteria. These novel HK signaling components form the foundation for a synthetic signaling system in plants, but typically require modifications such as codon optimization and proper targeting to allow optimal function. We describe the process and methodology of producing a synthetic signal transduction system in plants. We discovered that the bacterial response regulator (RR) PhoB shows HK-dependent nuclear translocation in planta. Using this discovery, we engineered a partial synthetic pathway in which a synthetic promoter (PlantPho) is activated using a plant-adapted PhoB (PhoB-VP64) and the endogenous HK-based cytokinin signaling pathway. Building on this work, we adapted an input or sensing system based on bacterial chemotactic binding proteins and HKs, resulting in a complete eukaryotic signal transduction system. Input to our eukaryotic signal transduction system is provided by a periplasmic binding protein (PBP), ribose-binding protein (RBP). RBP interacts with the membrane

  1. A novel soft biomimetic microrobot with two motion attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liwei; Guo, Shuxiang; Li, Maoxun; Mao, Shilian; Xiao, Nan; Gao, Baofeng; Song, Zhibin; Asaka, Kinji

    2012-01-01

     A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7.14 mm/s. Obstacle

  2. A Novel Soft Biomimetic Microrobot with Two Motion Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Shi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7

  3. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  4. Multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced biomimetic bundled gel fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Haruko; Sasaki, Naruo; Matsunaga, Yukiko T

    2016-08-19

    This work describes the fabrication and characterization of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based biomimetic bundled gel fibres. The bundled gel fibres were reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A phase-separated aqueous solution with MWCNT and HPC was transformed into a bundled fibrous structure after being injected into a co-flow microfluidic device and applying the sheath flow. The resulting MWCNT-bundled gel fibres consist of multiple parallel microfibres. The mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT-bundled gel fibres were improved and their potential for tissue engineering applications as a cell scaffold was demonstrated. PMID:27200527

  5. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang J; Jeong Y.; Park JM; Lee KH; Hong JW; Choi J.

    2015-01-01

    Jangsun Hwang,1 Yoon Jeong,1,2 Jeong Min Park,3 Kwan Hong Lee,1,2,4 Jong Wook Hong,1,2 Jonghoon Choi1,2 1Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul, 2Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan, Korea; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 4OpenView Venture Partners, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain id...

  6. Forward osmosis biomimetic membranes in industrial and environmental applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajraktari, Niada; Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Nielsen, K. H.;

    consumption and lead to much more stable operations, but is currently limited by the availability of suitable membranes. However, by introducing aquaporin protein channels into a polymeric membrane to make a biomimetic membrane, the vision of both high flux and separation efficiency may be achieved. In this...... simple unit operation based on osmotic extraction of water from dilute peptide samples with no – or very little loss of sample material. A big challenge in modern water treatment is the handling of micropollutants. One example of these is the pollution of ground-/drinking water with pesticides, which in...

  7. Biomimetic optical directional microphone with structurally coupled diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. J.; Yu, M.; Zhang, X. M.

    2008-12-01

    A biomimetic directional microphone based on structurally coupled diaphragms and a fiber-optic detection system is presented. The microphone design aims to mimic the fly Ormia Ochracea's ear structure and capture its performance. Experiments show that the designed microphone amplifies the interaural time difference (ITD) by 4.4 times and has a directional sensitivity of 6.5 μs/deg. An important finding is that one needs to utilize both the rocking and translational vibration modes to obtain the appropriate ITD amplification without sacrifice of directional sensitivity. This work can serve as a foundation for realizing fly-ear inspired miniature directional microphones.

  8. UV photofunctionalization promotes nano-biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saita M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Makiko Saita,1 Takayuki Ikeda,1,2 Masahiro Yamada,1,3 Katsuhiko Kimoto,4 Masaichi Chang-Il Lee,5 Takahiro Ogawa1 1Division of Advanced Prosthodontics, Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Complete Denture Prosthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Yokosuka, Japan; 3Division of Molecular and Regenerative Prosthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan; 4Department of Prosthodontics and Oral Rehabilitation, 5Yokosuka-Shonan Disaster Health Emergency Research Center and ESR Laboratories, Kanagawa Dental University Graduate School of Dentistry, Yokosuka, Japan Background: Although biomimetic apatite coating is a promising way to provide titanium with osteoconductivity, the efficiency and quality of deposition is often poor. Most titanium implants have microscale surface morphology, and an addition of nanoscale features while preserving the micromorphology may provide further biological benefit. Here, we examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, on the efficacy of biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium and its biological capability.Methods and results: Micro-roughed titanium disks were prepared by acid-etching with sulfuric acid. Micro-roughened disks with or without photofunctionalization (20-minute exposure to UV light were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF for 1 or 5 days. Photofunctionalized titanium disks were superhydrophilic and did not form surface air bubbles when immersed in SBF, whereas non-photofunctionalized disks were hydrophobic and largely covered with air bubbles during immersion. An apatite-related signal was observed by X-ray diffraction on photofunctionalized titanium after 1 day of SBF immersion, which was equivalent to the one observed after 5 days of immersion of control titanium. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nodular apatite deposition

  9. Polycyclic Polyprenylated Xanthones from Symphonia globulifera: Isolation and Biomimetic Electrosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Kevin; Neudörffer, Anne; Kritsanida, Marina; Michel, Sylvie; Lallemand, Marie-Christine; Largeron, Martine

    2015-08-28

    Two regioisomeric polycyclic xanthones, 3,16-oxyguttiferone A (2) and 1,16-oxyguttiferone A (3), which are polyprenylated acylphloroglucinol-derived analogues, were isolated from the seeds of Symphonia globulifera, together with their presumed o-dihydroxybenzoyl precursor, guttiferone A (1). Anodic oxidation of 1 into the corresponding o-quinone species proved to be an efficient biomimetic method to generate xanthones 2 and 3 in high overall yield and to confirm their structures. Both compounds displayed cytotoxicity against the HCT 116 colon carcinoma cell line with IC₅₀ values of 8 and 3 μM, respectively. PMID:26221771

  10. Biomimetic engineering: towards a self-assembled nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Nanoscience and Systems program was set up within CSIRO Telecommunications and Industrial Physics three years ago with an emphasis on biomimetic engineering, with the aim of developing new cross-disciplinary research in traditional physics areas. By combining expertise in experimental and theoretical physics with biology and chemistry, new approaches towards understanding and using nanoscale systems and devices are being explored. Research in the program ranges from using self-assembled lipid membranes for surface passivation of GaAs transistors to the electrical properties of nanoparticle films and devices. An overview of the research will be given, highlighting the diversity of nanotechnology applications

  11. 3-D Locomotion control for a biomimetic robot fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang ZHANG; Shuo WANG; Min TAN

    2004-01-01

    This paper concerns with 3-D locomotion control methods for a biomimetic robot fish. The system architecture of the fish is firstly presented based on a physical model of carangiform fish. The robot fish has a flexible body, a rigid caudal fin and a pair of pectoral fins, driven by several servomotors. The motion control of the robot fish are then divided into speed control, orientation control, submerge control and transient motion control, corresponding algorithms are detailed respectively.Finally, experiments and analyses on a 4-1ink, radio-controlled robot fish prototype with 3-D locomotion show its good performance.

  12. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18304834 LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Cytokine. ...2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...way. PubmedID 18304834 Title LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Authors Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Publica

  13. DMPD: Toll-like receptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17934330 Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Krishnan J, Selvarajoo K, Tsuchiya... M, Lee G, Choi S. Exp Mol Med. 2007 Aug 31;39(4):421-38. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor signal tran...sduction. PubmedID 17934330 Title Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Authors Krishnan J,

  14. The new sideway of CNTF signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The action of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on intercellular free Ca2+ concentrations [Ca2+]I induced by glutamate (Glu) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons were detected with Fura2/AM,a Ca2+-sensitive fluorophore,and the morphological influence of G-protein on it was ob- jected. Glu could induce rapid increase of [Ca2+]I in hippo- campal neurons. CNTF had no significant action on [Ca2+]I in resting hippocampal neurons. However,after incubation of CNTF for 5 min,the increase of [Ca2+]I in hippocampal neurons rapidly induced by Glu was inhibited. Pretussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G protein could block the action. These results indicate that a new non-genomic rapid sideway might exist in the upper stream of CNTF signal transduction pathway,which was related to Ca2+ signal transduction.

  15. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  16. Pantropic retroviruses as a transduction tool for sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core, Amanda B; Reyna, Arlene E; Conaway, Evan A; Bradham, Cynthia A

    2012-04-01

    Sea urchins are an important model for experiments at the intersection of development and systems biology, and technical innovations that enhance the utility of this model are of great value. This study explores pantropic retroviruses as a transduction tool for sea urchin embryos, and demonstrates that pantropic retroviruses infect sea urchin embryos with high efficiency and genomically integrate at a copy number of one per cell. We successfully used a self-inactivation strategy to both insert a sea urchin-specific enhancer and disrupt the endogenous viral enhancer. The resulting self-inactivating viruses drive global and persistent gene expression, consistent with genomic integration during the first cell cycle. Together, these data provide substantial proof of principle for transduction technology in sea urchin embryos. PMID:22431628

  17. Sympathetic vascular transduction is augmented in young normotensive blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine sympathetic vascular transduction in young normotensive black and white adults. We hypothesized that blacks would demonstrate augmented transduction of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) into vascular resistance. To test this hypothesis, MSNA, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). At rest, no differences existed in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). Likewise, LBNP elicited comparable responses of these variables for blacks and whites. Baseline MSNA did not differ between blacks and whites, but whites demonstrated greater increases during LBNP (28 +/- 7 vs. 55 +/- 18%, 81 +/- 21 vs. 137 +/- 42%, 174 +/- 81 vs. 556 +/- 98% for -5, -15, and -40 mmHg LBNP, respectively; P forearm vasoconstriction than whites. This finding may contribute to augmented blood pressure reactivity in blacks.

  18. Sympathetic vascular transduction is augmented in young normotensive blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine sympathetic vascular transduction in young normotensive black and white adults. We hypothesized that blacks would demonstrate augmented transduction of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) into vascular resistance. To test this hypothesis, MSNA, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). At rest, no differences existed in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). Likewise, LBNP elicited comparable responses of these variables for blacks and whites. Baseline MSNA did not differ between blacks and whites, but whites demonstrated greater increases during LBNP (28 +/- 7 vs. 55 +/- 18%, 81 +/- 21 vs. 137 +/- 42%, 174 +/- 81 vs. 556 +/- 98% for -5, -15, and -40 mmHg LBNP, respectively; P vasoconstriction than whites. This finding may contribute to augmented blood pressure reactivity in blacks.

  19. Efficient, Broadband and Wide-Angle Hot-Electron Transduction using Metal-Semiconductor Hyperbolic Metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Sakhdari, Maryam

    2016-05-20

    Hot-electron devices are emerging as promising candidates for the transduction of optical radiation into electrical current, as they enable photodetection and solar/infrared energy harvesting at sub-bandgap wavelengths. Nevertheless, poor photoconversion quantum yields and low bandwidth pose fundamental challenge to fascinating applications of hot-electron optoelectronics. Based on a novel hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) structure, we theoretically propose a vertically-integrated hot-electron device that can efficiently couple plasmonic excitations into electron flows, with an external quantum efficiency approaching the physical limit. Further, this metamaterial-based device can have a broadband and omnidirectional response at infrared and visible wavelengths. We believe that these findings may shed some light on designing practical devices for energy-efficient photodetection and energy harvesting beyond the bandgap spectral limit.

  20. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Pu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface.

  1. Biomimetics - Architectural Considerations for Functional Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    This thesis will focus on synthetic nanomaterials that combine hard nanocellulose reinforcement with soft molecularly engineered synthetic polymeric components. The architectural designs have all been inspired by natural nanocomposites, such as silk, animal bone and plant fibres. Typically, the design of natural structures are built around hard reinforcing nanodomains bound together by energy dissipating sacrificial networks. These natural materials consist of proteins, carbohydrates or britt...

  2. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST) were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries...

  3. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Borrisé, X. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra Spain (Spain); San Paulo, A. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (IMM-CSIC), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  4. Electromechanical Transduction in Ionic Liquid-Swollen Nafion Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Matthew Damon

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, water has been used as the diluent for ionomeric polymer transducers. The water mobilizes the counterions within the polymer and allows electromechanical transduction to occur. However, these water-swollen devices have limited stability when operated in a non-aqueous environment. In this work, ionic liquids are demonstrated as viable diluents for ionomeric polymer transducers based on Nafion membranes. Ionic liquids are molten salts that are highly thermally stable and have...

  5. The Physiology of Mechanoelectrical Transduction Channels in Hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Fettiplace, Robert; Kim, Kyunghee X.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about the mechanotransducer (MT) channels mediating transduction in hair cells of the vertrbrate inner ear. With the use of isolated preparations, it is experimentally feasible to deliver precise mechanical stimuli to individual cells and record the ensuing transducer currents. This approach has shown that small (1–100 nm) deflections of the hair-cell stereociliary bundle are transmitted via interciliary tip links to open MT channels at the tops of the stereocilia. These channel...

  6. Host Signal Transduction and Protein Kinases Implicated in Legionella Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hempstead, Andrew D.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of the phosphorylation status of proteins by both kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in cellular signal transduction. Challenge of host cells by Legionella pneumophila manipulates the phosphorylation state of multiple host factors. These changes play roles in bacterial uptake, vacuole modification, cellular survival, and the immune response. In addition to modification by host cell kinases in response to the bacterium, L. pneumophila translocates bacterial kinases int...

  7. Transductive neural decoding for unsorted neuronal spikes of rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhe; Kloosterman, Fabian; Layton, Stuart; Wilson, Matthew A

    2012-01-01

    Neural decoding is an important approach for extracting information from population codes. We previously proposed a novel transductive neural decoding paradigm and applied it to reconstruct the rat’s position during navigation based on unsorted rat hippocampal ensemble spiking activity. Here, we investigate several important technical issues of this new paradigm using one data set of one animal. Several extensions of our decoding method are discussed.

  8. Semi-Supervised Transductive Hot Spot Predictor Working on Multiple Assumptions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingyan

    2014-05-23

    Protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few residues (“hot spots”) at the interfaces. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the binding free energy and if mutated they can disrupt the interaction. As mutagenesis studies require significant experimental efforts, there exists a need for accurate and reliable computational hot spot prediction methods. Compared to the supervised hot spot prediction algorithms, the semi-supervised prediction methods can take into consideration both the labeled and unlabeled residues in the dataset during the prediction procedure. The transductive support vector machine has been utilized for this task and demonstrated a better prediction performance. To the best of our knowledge, however, none of the transductive semi-supervised algorithms takes all the three semisupervised assumptions, i.e., smoothness, cluster and manifold assumptions, together into account during learning. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised method for hot spot residue prediction, by considering all the three semisupervised assumptions using nonlinear models. Our algorithm, IterPropMCS, works in an iterative manner. In each iteration, the algorithm first propagates the labels of the labeled residues to the unlabeled ones, along the shortest path between them on a graph, assuming that they lie on a nonlinear manifold. Then it selects the most confident residues as the labeled ones for the next iteration, according to the cluster and smoothness criteria, which is implemented by a nonlinear density estimator. Experiments on a benchmark dataset, using protein structure-based features, demonstrate that our approach is effective in predicting hot spots and compares favorably to other available methods. The results also show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art transductive learning methods.

  9. Expression and functional analyses of the Arabidopsis QUA1 gene in light signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaojin, Chen; Chuanyu, Ding; Yuan, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Plants not only use light as an energy source for photosynthesis, but also have to monitor the light quality and quantity input to execute appropriate physiological and developmental responses, such as cell differentiation, structural and functional changes, as well as the formation of tissues and organs. The process is referred to as photomorphogenesis. Arabidopsis QUA1 (QUASIMODO1), which functions in pectin synthesis, is identified as a member of glycosyltransferases. Previously, the hypocotyl elongation of the qua1-1 mutant was shown to be inhibited under dark conditions. In this study, we used the qua1-1/cry1 and qua1-1/phyB double mutants as the materials to study the function of the QUA1 gene in light signal transduction. The results showed that QUA1 not only participated in hypocotyl elongation under dark conditions, but also in blue light, red light and far red light conditions. In qua1-1 mutant seedlings, both the cell length of hypocotyl and the light-regulated gene expression were affected. Compared with cry1 and phyB mutants, qua1-1/cry1 and qua1-1/phyB double mutants had the shorter hypocotyl. Light-regulated gene expression was also affected in the double mutants. These data indicated that QUA1 might participate in the light signal transduction regulated by CRY1 and PHYB. Hence, the QUA1 gene may play multiple roles in light signal transduction by regulating the cell elongation and light-regulated gene expression. PMID:27232492

  10. Wetting, superhydrophobicity, and icephobicity in biomimetic composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Vahid

    Recent developments in nano- and bio-technology require new materials. Among these new classes of materials which have emerged in the recent years are biomimetic materials, which mimic structure and properties of materials found in living nature. There are a large number of biological objects including bacteria, animals and plants with properties of interest for engineers. Among these properties is the ability of the lotus leaf and other natural materials to repel water, which has inspired researchers to prepare similar surfaces. The Lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. The range of actual and potential applications of superhydrophobic surfaces is diverse including optical, building and architecture, textiles, solar panels, lab-on-a-chip, microfluidic devices, and applications requiring antifouling from biological and organic contaminants. In this thesis, in chapter one, we introduce the general concepts and definitions regarding the wetting properties of the surfaces. In chapter two, we develop novel models and conduct experiments on wetting of composite materials. To design sustainable superhydrophobic metal matrix composite (MMC) surfaces, we suggest using hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. We experimentally study the wetting properties of graphite-reinforced Al- and Cu-based composites and conclude that the Cu-based MMCs have the potential to be used in the future for the applications where the wear-resistant superhydrophobicity is required. In chapter three, we introduce hydrophobic coating at the surface of concrete materials making them waterproof to prevent material failure, because concretes and ceramics cannot stop water from seeping through them and forming cracks. We create water-repellant concretes with CA close to 160o using superhydrophobic coating. In chapter four, experimental

  11. Transductions Computed by One-Dimensional Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kutrib

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellular automata are investigated towards their ability to compute transductions, that is, to transform inputs into outputs. The families of transductions computed are classified with regard to the time allowed to process the input and to compute the output. Since there is a particular interest in fast transductions, we mainly focus on the time complexities real time and linear time. We first investigate the computational capabilities of cellular automaton transducers by comparing them to iterative array transducers, that is, we compare parallel input/output mode to sequential input/output mode of massively parallel machines. By direct simulations, it turns out that the parallel mode is not weaker than the sequential one. Moreover, with regard to certain time complexities cellular automaton transducers are even more powerful than iterative arrays. In the second part of the paper, the model in question is compared with the sequential devices single-valued finite state transducers and deterministic pushdown transducers. It turns out that both models can be simulated by cellular automaton transducers faster than by iterative array transducers.

  12. State–time spectrum of signal transduction logic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the current wealth of high-throughput data, our understanding of signal transduction is still incomplete. Mathematical modeling can be a tool to gain an insight into such processes. Detailed biochemical modeling provides deep understanding, but does not scale well above relatively a few proteins. In contrast, logic modeling can be used where the biochemical knowledge of the system is sparse and, because it is parameter free (or, at most, uses relatively a few parameters), it scales well to large networks that can be derived by manual curation or retrieved from public databases. Here, we present an overview of logic modeling formalisms in the context of training logic models to data, and specifically the different approaches to modeling qualitative to quantitative data (state) and dynamics (time) of signal transduction. We use a toy model of signal transduction to illustrate how different logic formalisms (Boolean, fuzzy logic and differential equations) treat state and time. Different formalisms allow for different features of the data to be captured, at the cost of extra requirements in terms of computational power and data quality and quantity. Through this demonstration, the assumptions behind each formalism are discussed, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and possible future developments. (paper)

  13. An electrokinetic model of transduction in the semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, D P

    1970-09-01

    Transduction in the semicircular canal was studied by focusing an infrared beam on either side of exposed ampullae from the posterior canals of Rana pipiens. The direction of fluid movement resulting from a stimulus was inferred by observing the polarity of the change in afferent impulse mean rate relative to the spontaneous value. On the basis of the accepted functional polarization of this receptor, the results indicate that fluid moved toward the warmer side of the ampulla. Convection and thermal reception were shown to be unlikely explanations for these results. Morover, cupular displacements toward the warmer side would not be expected. Because thermo-osmosis can cause fluid to move toward the warmer side in a gelatin membrane, the results can be interpreted as evidence that thermo-osmosis occurred in the gelatinous cupula and influenced the transduction mechanism. Thermo-osmosis of liquids appears to be due to an electric field that is set up in a charged membrane; hence, the hair cells might have detected an electric field that occurred in the cupula during thermo-osmosis. Electroreception might be an important link in the transduction of physiological stimuli also. Rotational stimuli could result in weak electric fields in the cupula by the mechanoelectric effect. Cupular displacements could be important for large stimuli, but extrapolations to threshold stimuli suggest displacements of angstrom amplitudes. Therefore, electroreception by the hair cells could be an explanation of the great sensitivity that has been observed in the semicircular canal and other labyrinthine receptors. PMID:5496906

  14. Retinal transduction profiles by high-capacity viral vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppo, Agostina; Cesi, Giulia; Marrocco, Elena; Piccolo, Pasquale; Jacca, Sarah; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Parks, Robin J.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Colloca, Stefano; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Philip; Donofrio, Gaetano; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, the limited cargo capacity of AAV prevents their use for therapy of those inherited retinopathies (IRs) due to mutations in large (>5kb) genes. Viral vectors derived from Adenovirus (Ad), Lentivirus (LV) and Herpesvirus (HV) can package large DNA sequences but do not target efficiently retinal photoreceptors (PRs) where the majority of genes responsible for IRs are expressed. Here, we have evaluated the mouse retinal transduction profiles of vectors derived from 16 different Ad serotypes, 7 LV pseudotypes, and from a bovine HV. Most of the vectors tested transduced efficiently the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We found that LV-GP64 tends to transduce more PRs than the canonical LV-VSVG albeit this was restricted to a narrow region. We observed more extensive PR transduction with HdAd1, 2 and 5/F35++ than with LV, although none of them outperformed the canonical HdAd5 or matched the extension of PR transduction achieved with AAV2/8. PMID:24989814

  15. Hair-bundle friction from transduction channels' gating forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. We have shown recently that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle and thus provide a major source of damping [2]. We develop here a physical theory of passive hair-bundle mechanics that explains the origin of channel friction. We show that channel friction can be understood quantitatively by coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. As a result, varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. The analysis emphasizes the dual role of transduction channels' gating forces, which affect both hair-bundle stiffness and drag. Friction originating from gating of ion channels is a general concept that is relevant to all mechanosensitive channels.

  16. Transduction patterns of pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Liang-Fong; Azzouz, Mimoun; Walmsley, Lucy E; Askham, Zoe; Wilkes, Fraser J; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-primate-based lentiviral vector based on the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) for efficient gene transfer to the central and peripheral nervous systems. Previously we have demonstrated that pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the rabies virus glycoprotein confers retrograde axonal transport to these vectors. In the present study we have successfully produced high-titer EIAV vectors pseudotyped with envelope glycoproteins from Rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) serotypes (Indiana and Chandipura strains); rabies virus [various Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth ERA strains and challenge virus standard (CVS)]; Lyssavirus Mokola virus, a rabies-related virus; and Arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). These vectors were delivered to the striatum or spinal cord of adult rats or muscle of neonatal mice by direct injection. We report that the lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with envelopes from the VSV Indiana strain, wild-type ERA, and CVS strains resulted in strong transduction in the striatum, while Mokola- and LCMV-pseudotyped vectors exhibited moderate and weak transduction, respectively. Furthermore ERA- and CVS-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors demonstrated retrograde transport and expression in distal neurons after injection in brain, spinal cord, and muscle. The differences in transduction efficiencies and retrograde transport conferred by these envelope glycoproteins present novel opportunities in designing therapeutic strategies for different neurological diseases. PMID:14741783

  17. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries were queried and all bona fide and putative photoreceptor gene families were found in citrus species. We have identified 53 orthologs for several families of transcriptional regulators and cytoplasmic proteins mediating photoreceptor-induced responses although some important Arabidopsis phytochrome- and cryptochrome-signaling components are absent from citrus sequence databases. The main gene families responsible for phototropin-mediated signal transduction were present in citrus transcriptome, including general regulatory factors (14-3-3 proteins, scaffolding elements and auxin-responsive transcription factors and transporters. A working model of light perception, signal transduction and response-eliciting in citrus is proposed based on the identified key components. These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and economically important crop species to elucidate several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  18. A biomimetic projector with high subwavelength directivity based on dolphin biosonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Sai; Cao, Wenwu; Tang, Liguo; Wang, Ding; Li, Yan

    2014-09-01

    Based on computed tomography of a Yangtze finless porpoise's biosonar system, a biomimetic structure was designed to include air cavity, gradient-index material, and steel outer-structure mimicking air sacs, melon, and skull, respectively. The mainlobe pressure was about three times higher, the angular resolution was one order of magnitude higher, and the effective source size was orders of magnitude larger than those of the subwavelength source without the biomimetic structure. The superior subwavelength directivity over a broad bandwidth suggests potential applications of this biomimetic projector in underwater sonar, medical ultrasonography, and other related applications.

  19. Formation of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Coating on Titanium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgen Volodymyrovych PYLYPCHUK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has long been used as a coating material in the implant industry for orthopedic implant applications. HA is the natural inorganic constituent of bone and teeth. By coating titanium (base material of implant engineering because of its lightness and durability with hydroxyapatite, we can provide higher biocompatibility of titanium implants, according to HA ability to form a direct biochemical bond with living tissues. This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite with titanium A method of modifying the surface of titanium by organic modifiers (for creating functional groups on the surface, followed by formation "self-assembled" layer of biomimetic hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF. FTIR and XPS confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium surface. Comparative study of the formation of HA on the surface of titanium plates modified by different functional groups: Ti(≡OH, Ti/(≡Si-OH and Ti/(≡COOH is conducted. It was found that the closest to natural stoichiometric hydroxyapatite Ca/P ratio was obtained on Ti/(≡COOH samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4974

  20. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Coburn, James C.; Sorg, Brian S.; Chen, Yu; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2015-12-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements-including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth-were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light-tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance.

  1. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a "water-tight" barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis. PMID:26903872

  2. Biomimetics of fetal alveolar flow phenomena using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of life in utero, the respiratory system begins as a liquid-filled tubular organ and undergoes significant morphological changes during fetal development towards establishing a respiratory organ optimized for gas exchange. As airspace morphology evolves, respiratory alveolar flows have been hypothesized to exhibit evolving flow patterns. In the present study, we have investigated flow topologies during increasing phases of embryonic life within an anatomically inspired microfluidic device, reproducing real-scale features of fetal airways representative of three distinct phases of in utero gestation. Micro-particle image velocimetry measurements, supported by computational fluid dynamics simulations, reveal distinct respiratory alveolar flow patterns throughout different stages of fetal life. While attached, streamlined flows characterize the shallow structures of premature alveoli indicative of the onset of saccular stage, separated recirculating vortex flows become the signature of developed and extruded alveoli characteristic of the advanced stages of fetal development. To further mimic physiological aspects of the cellular environment of developing airways, our biomimetic devices integrate an alveolar epithelium using the A549 cell line, recreating a confluent monolayer that produces pulmonary surfactant. Overall, our in vitro biomimetic fetal airways model delivers a robust and reliable platform combining key features of alveolar morphology, flow patterns, and physiological aspects of fetal lungs developing in utero. PMID:25759753

  3. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility. PMID:25630300

  4. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Green

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a water-tight barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachement complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement.. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organising cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis.

  5. Biomimetic Drag Reduction Study on Herringbone Riblets of Bird Feather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Chen; Fugang Rao; Xiaopeng Shang; Deyuan Zhang; Ichiro Hagiwara

    2013-01-01

    Birds have gradually formed various excellent structures such as streamlined shape and hollow shaft of feather to improve their flying performance by millions of years of natural selection.As typical property of bird feather,herringbone riblets align along the shaft of each feather,which is caused by perfect link of barbs,especially for the primary and secondary feathers of wings.Such herringbone riblets of feather are assumed to have great impact on drag reduction.In this paper,microstructures of secondary feathers of adult pigeons are investigated by SEM,and their structural parameters are statistically obtained.Based on quantitative analysis of feather structure,novel biomimetic herringbone riblets with narrow smooth edge are proposed to reduce surface drag.In comparison with traditional microgroove riblets and other drag reduction structures,the drag reduction rate of the proposed biomimetic herringbone riblets is experimentally clarified up to 16%,much higher than others.Moreover,the drag reduction mechanism of herringbone riblets are also confirmed and exploited by CFD.

  6. Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhushan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab.

  7. Scaling Up Nature: Large Area Flexible Biomimetic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinyong; John, Jacob; Kolewe, Kristopher W; Schiffman, Jessica D; Carter, Kenneth R

    2015-10-28

    The fabrication and advanced function of large area biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) and slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) are reported. The use of roll-to-roll nanoimprinting techniques enabled the continuous fabrication of SHS and SLIPS based on hierarchically wrinkled surfaces. Perfluoropolyether hybrid molds were used as flexible molds for roll-to-roll imprinting into a newly designed thiol-ene based photopolymer resin coated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate films. The patterned surfaces exhibit feasible superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle around 160° without any further surface modification. The SHS can be easily converted into SLIPS by roll-to-roll coating of a fluorinated lubricant, and these surfaces have outstanding repellence to a variety of liquids. Furthermore, both SHS and SLIPS display antibiofouling properties when challenged with Escherichia coli K12 MG1655. The current article describes the transformation of artificial biomimetic structures from small, lab-scale coupons to low-cost, large area platforms. PMID:26423494

  8. Biomimetic aquaporin membranes coming of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Chuyang; Wang, Zhining; Petrinić, Irena;

    2015-01-01

    Membrane processes have been widely used for water purification because of their high stability, efficiency, low energy requirement and ease of operation. Traditional desalting membranes are mostly dense polymeric films with a "trade off" effect between permeability and selectivity. Biological...... membranes, on the other hand, can perform transport in some cases with exceptional flux and rejection properties. In particular the discovery of selective water channel proteins - aquaporins - has prompted interest in using these proteins as building blocks for new types of membranes. The major challenge...... in developing an aquaporin-based membrane technology stems from the fact that the aquaporin protein spans a membrane only a few nanometers thick. Such ultrathin membranes will not be able to withstand any substantial pressures, nor being industrially scalable without supporting structures. Incorporating...

  9. Explicit Learning Curves for Transduction and Application to Clustering and Compression Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Derbeko, P; Meir, R; 10.1613/jair.1417

    2011-01-01

    Inductive learning is based on inferring a general rule from a finite data set and using it to label new data. In transduction one attempts to solve the problem of using a labeled training set to label a set of unlabeled points, which are given to the learner prior to learning. Although transduction seems at the outset to be an easier task than induction, there have not been many provably useful algorithms for transduction. Moreover, the precise relation between induction and transduction has not yet been determined. The main theoretical developments related to transduction were presented by Vapnik more than twenty years ago. One of Vapnik's basic results is a rather tight error bound for transductive classification based on an exact computation of the hypergeometric tail. While tight, this bound is given implicitly via a computational routine. Our first contribution is a somewhat looser but explicit characterization of a slightly extended PAC-Bayesian version of Vapnik's transductive bound. This characteriza...

  10. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of a biomimetic nanoscale calcium phosphate coating on a polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, CHEN; LI, HONG; GUO, CHANGAN; CHEN, SHIYI

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament was coated with an organic layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled template of chitosan and hyaluronic acid, and then incubated in a calcium phosphate (CaP) solution to prepare a biomimetic CaP coating. The surface characterization of the ligament was examined using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effects of CaP coatings on the osteogenic activity of MC3T3 E1 mouse osteoblastic cells were investigated by evaluating their attachment, proliferation and the relative expression levels of alkaline phosphatase. The results revealed that the organic LBL template on the PET artificial ligament was effective for CaP apatite formation. Following incubation for 72 h, numerous nanoscale CaP apatites were deposited on the PET ligament fibers. In addition, the results of the in vitro culture of MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblastic cells demonstrated that the CaP coating had a good biocompatibility for cell proliferation and adhesion, and the CaP-coated group had a significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity compared with the uncoated control group after seven days of cell culture. Collectively, these results demonstrated that the biomimetic nanoscale CaP-coated PET artificial ligaments have potential in bone-tissue engineering. PMID:27347053

  11. Biomimetic approach to the formation of gold nanoparticle/silica core/shell structures and subsequent bioconjugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The encapsulation of individual nanoparticles has gained great attention as a method for both stabilizing nanoparticles and tailoring their surface properties. In particular, the encapsulation of nanoparticles with silica shells is advantageous for bioconjugation and applications to (nano)biotechnology. Herein we report a method for constructing gold nanoparticle (AuNP)/silica core/shell hybrid structures by biomimetic silicification of silicic acids. The procedure consists of surface-initiated, atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) from AuNPs and biomimetic polycondensation of silicic acids by using poly(DMAEMA) as a synthetic counterpart for silaffins that are found in diatoms. The resulting AuNP/silica hybrids were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the immobilization of biological ligands onto the hybrids was investigated for potential applications to biotechnology. As a model ligand, biotin was attached onto the AuNP/silica hybrids through substitution reaction and Michael addition reaction, and the attachment was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy after complexation with fluorescein-conjugated streptavidin

  12. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Analysis of Sensitivity Amplification in Biological Signal Transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, H

    2003-01-01

    Based on a thermodynamic analysis of the kinetic model for the protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, we study the ATP (or GTP) energy utilization of this ubiquitous biological signal transduction process. It was shown that the free energy from hydrolysis inside cells, Delta G (phosphorylation potential), controls the amplification and sensitivity of the switch-like cellular module; the response coefficient of the sensitivity amplification approaches the optimal 1 and the Hill coefficeint increases with increasing Delta G. Futhermore, we show the high amplification in zero-order ultrasensitivity is mechanistically related to the proofreading kinetics for protein biosynthesis. Both utilize multiple kinetic cycles in time to gain temporal cooperativity, in contrast to allosteric cooperativity that utilizes multiple subunits in a protein.

  13. A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, H. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1996-12-31

    The diminishing resources of petroleum oil has meant that there has been considerable efforts in recent years to find a suitable substitute for gasoline as a transportation fuel. Methanol has been identified as a suitable substitute since it is a readily combustible fuel which can be manufactured from a number of different sources. Methane is commonly used as a starting material for the production of synthesis gas (CO + H{sub 2}) and hence methanol. It is well known that the cleavage of the C-H bond of methane is extremely difficult (bond energy is around 104 kcal/mol) and that fairly drastic conditions are required to convert methane into methanol. Temperatures around 1200 deg C and pressures of up to 100 atmospheres over metal catalysts in a series of reactions are required to effect this process. Efforts have been made to reduce the temperature and the number of steps by using lanthanide ruthenium oxide catalyst but such reactions are still thermodynamically endothermic. An energetically more efficient reaction would be the direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen as the oxidant: CH{sub 4} + 1/2O{sub 2} -> CH{sub 3}OH {Delta}H deg = - 30.7 kcal/mol. Such a direct oxidation route is manifest in the bacterially-mediated oxidation of methane by methanotrophic bacteria. These organisms effect the direct oxidation of methane to methanol by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) as part of the reaction sequences to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide. (14 refs.)

  14. Bioinspired Design of Ultrathin 2D Bimetallic Metal-Organic-Framework Nanosheets Used as Biomimetic Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixian; Zhao, Meiting; Ping, Jianfeng; Chen, Bo; Cao, Xiehong; Huang, Ying; Tan, Chaoliang; Ma, Qinglang; Wu, Shixin; Yu, Yifu; Lu, Qipeng; Chen, Junze; Zhao, Wei; Ying, Yibin; Zhang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    With the bioinspired design of organic ligands and metallic nodes, novel ultrathin 2D bimetallic metal-organic-framework nanosheets are successfully synthesized, which can serve as advanced 2D biomimetic nanomaterials to mimic heme proteins. PMID:27008574

  15. Influence of the Chemical Design on the Coherent Photoisomerization of Biomimetic Molecular Switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivucci Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals the effect of chemical substitutions on the photoreaction kinetics of biomimetic photoswitches displaying coherent dynamics. Ground state vibrational coherences are no longer observed when the excited state lifetime exceeds 300fs.

  16. A biomimetic jellyfish robot based on ionic polymer metal composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biomimetic jellyfish robot based on ionic polymer metal composite actuators was fabricated and activated to mimic real locomotive behavior with pulse and recovery processes. To imitate the curved shape of the jellyfish, a thermal treatment was applied to obtain a permanent initial deformation of a hemispherical form. The bio-inspired input signal was generated for mimicking real locomotion of the jellyfish. The vertical floating displacement and the thrust force of the biomimetic jellyfish robot under various input signals were measured and compared. The present results show that the bio-inspired electrical input signal with pulse-recovery process generates much higher floating velocity of the biomimetic jellyfish robot in comparison with pure sinusoidal excitations. The curved shape of the IPMC actuator through thermal treatments can be successfully applied to mimic the real biomimetic robots with smooth curves

  17. Mirrors Containing Biomimetic Shape-Control Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Curved mirrors of a proposed type would comprise lightweight sheets or films containing integral, biologically inspired actuators for controlling their surface figures. These mirrors could be useful in such applications as collection of solar energy, focusing of radio beams, and (provided sufficient precision could be achieved) imaging. These mirrors were originally intended for use in outer space, but it should also be possible to develop terrestrial versions. Several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles have described a variety of approaches to the design of curved, lightweight mirrors containing integral shape-control actuators. The primary distinction between the present approach and the prior approaches lies in the actuator design concept, which involves shapes and movements reminiscent of those of a variety of small, multi-armed animals. The shape and movement of an actuator of this type can also be characterized as reminiscent of that of an umbrella. This concept can be further characterized as a derivative of that of multifinger grippers, the fingers of which are bimorph bending actuators (see Figure 1). The fingers of such actuators can be strips containing any of a variety of materials that have been investigated for use as actuators, including such electroactive polymers as ionomeric polymer/metal composites (IPMCs), ferroelectric polymers, and grafted elastomers. A mirror according to this proposal would be made from a sheet of one of the actuator composites mentioned above. The design would involve many variables, including the pre-curvature and stiffness of the mirror sheet, the required precision of figure control, the required range of variation in focal length (see Figure 2), the required precision of figure control for imaging or non-imaging use, the bending and twisting moments needed to effect the required deformations, and voltage-tomoment coefficients of the actuators, and the voltages accordingly required for actuation. A typical design would call

  18. From natural to bioassisted and biomimetic artificial water channel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboiu, Mihail; Gilles, Arnaud

    2013-12-17

    Within biological systems, natural channels and pores transport metabolites across the cell membranes. Researchers have explored artificial ion-channel architectures as potential mimics of natural ionic conduction. All these synthetic systems have produced an impressive collection of alternative artificial ion-channels. Amazingly, researchers have made far less progress in the area of synthetic water channels. The development of synthetic biomimetic water channels and pores could contribute to a better understanding of the natural function of protein channels and could offer new strategies to generate highly selective, advanced water purification systems. Despite the imaginative work by synthetic chemists to produce sophisticated architectures that confine water clusters, most synthetic water channels have used natural proteins channels as the selectivity components, embedded in the diverse arrays of bioassisted artificial systems. These systems combine natural proteins that present high water conductance states under natural conditions with artificial lipidic or polymeric matrixes. Experimental results have demonstrated that natural biomolecules can be used as bioassisted building blocks for the construction of highly selective water transport through artificial membranes. A next step to further the potential of these systems was the design and construction of simpler compounds that maintain the high conduction activity obtained with natural compounds leading to fully synthetic artificial biomimetic systems. Such studies aim to use constitutional selective artificial superstructures for water/proton transport to select functions similar to the natural structures. Moving to simpler water channel systems offers a chance to better understand mechanistic and structural behaviors and to uncover novel interactive water-channels that might parallel those in biomolecular systems. This Account discusses the incipient development of the first artificial water channels

  19. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-bio (BAMN2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Oh, Ilkwon

    2014-07-01

    The 7th International Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio was held on the magnificent and beautiful Jeju Island in Korea on 26-30 August 2013. In June 2007, the volcanic island and lava tube cave systems were designated as UNESCO World Natural Heritage Sites for their natural beauty and unique geographical values. The aim of the congress was to offer high-level lectures, extensive discussions and communications covering the state-of-the-art on biomimetics, artificial muscles, and nano-bio technologies providing an overview of their potential applications in the industrial, biomedical, scientific and robotic fields. This conference provided a necessary platform for an ongoing dialogue between researchers from different areas (chemistry, physics, biology, medicine, engineering, robotics, etc) within biomimetics, artificial muscle and nano-bio technologies. This special issue of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers that were presented at BAMN2013. Of the 400 or so papers and over 220 posters presented at this international congress, 15 papers were finally received, reviewed and accepted for this special issue, following the regular peer review procedures of the journal. The special issue covers polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites, and their applications. In particular, electromechanical performance and other characteristics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) fabricated with various commercially available ion exchange membranes are discussed. Additionally, the control of free-edge interlaminar stresses in composite laminates using piezoelectric actuators is elaborated on. Further, the electrode effects of a cellulose-based electroactive paper energy harvester are described. Next, a flexible tactile-feedback touch screen using transparent ferroelectric polymer film vibrators is discussed. A broad coverage of bio-applications of IPMC transducers is

  20. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-bio (BAMN2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Oh, Ilkwon

    2014-07-01

    The 7th International Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio was held on the magnificent and beautiful Jeju Island in Korea on 26-30 August 2013. In June 2007, the volcanic island and lava tube cave systems were designated as UNESCO World Natural Heritage Sites for their natural beauty and unique geographical values. The aim of the congress was to offer high-level lectures, extensive discussions and communications covering the state-of-the-art on biomimetics, artificial muscles, and nano-bio technologies providing an overview of their potential applications in the industrial, biomedical, scientific and robotic fields. This conference provided a necessary platform for an ongoing dialogue between researchers from different areas (chemistry, physics, biology, medicine, engineering, robotics, etc) within biomimetics, artificial muscle and nano-bio technologies. This special issue of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers that were presented at BAMN2013. Of the 400 or so papers and over 220 posters presented at this international congress, 15 papers were finally received, reviewed and accepted for this special issue, following the regular peer review procedures of the journal. The special issue covers polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites, and their applications. In particular, electromechanical performance and other characteristics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) fabricated with various commercially available ion exchange membranes are discussed. Additionally, the control of free-edge interlaminar stresses in composite laminates using piezoelectric actuators is elaborated on. Further, the electrode effects of a cellulose-based electroactive paper energy harvester are described. Next, a flexible tactile-feedback touch screen using transparent ferroelectric polymer film vibrators is discussed. A broad coverage of bio-applications of IPMC transducers is

  1. Design and demonstration of a biomimetic wing section using lightweight piezoceramic composite actuator (LIPCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sahng M.; Lee, Sangki; Park, Hoon C.; Yoon, Kwang J.; Goo, Nam Seo

    2003-08-01

    Biomimetic wing sections actuated by piezoceramics actuator LIPCA have been designed and their actuation displacements estimated by using the thermal analogy and MSC/NASTRAN based on the linear elasticity. The wing sections are fabricated as the design and tested for evaluation. Measured actuation displacements were larger than the estimated values mainly due to the material non-linearity of the PZT wafer. The biomimetic wing sections can be used for control surfaces of small scale UAVs.

  2. Biomimetic coating of apatite/collagen composite on poly L-lactic acid facilitates cell seeding

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y; Mak, AFT; Wang, M; Li, J.

    2005-01-01

    Collagen and apatite were co-precipitated as a composite coating on poly L-lactic acid (PLLA) in an accelerated biomimetic process. The coating formed on PLLA films after 24 hours incubation was characterized. Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells were used to evaluate the cell seeding on this biomimetic composite coating. It was shown that cell seeding on PLLA films with the composite coating was greatly improved. PLLA coated with submicron collagen fibrils and submicron apatite paticulates can facil...

  3. Lentiviral vector-mediated transduction of goat undifferentiated spermatogonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Hassan; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Hajian, Mahdi; Nasiri, Zahra; Bahadorani, Mehrnoosh; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies show that spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are able to colonize and form mature spermatozoa following transplantation into germ cell depleted testes of recipient males. Therefore, efficient ways for enrichment and gene transfer into SSCs provides a powerful tool for production of transgenic animals. In order to adapt the technique to goats, three issues were addressed: (i) enrichment of the undifferentiated spermatogonia including SSCs using magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), (ii) lentiviral vector-mediated transduction of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene into enriched cells, and (iii) transplantation of transduced undifferentiated spermatogonia into the germ cell depleted testes of immune-suppressed mice to assess for migration and colony formation ability. Enriched cells were transduced by lentiviral vectors and subsequently analyzed for expression of THY1, PLZF, VASA, UCHL1 and BCL6B genes. Cells were also analyzed for GFP and PLZF by flow cytometry. Enriched transduced cells were transplanted into germ cell depleted mice testis. Quantitative analysis of transcripts revealed that MACS-enrichment significantly increased the expression of SSC-characteristic genes THY1, PLZF, VASA, UCHL1 and BCL6B compared to non-enriched population (P≤0.05). EGFP transduction did not affect the expression levels of SSC-characteristic genes. Flow cytometry revealed that 72% of transduced-enriched cells were positive for EGFP. Finally, transduced-enriched goat SSCs could colonize within the cells into the seminiferous tubules of germ cell depleted recipient mice at higher frequency than non-enriched cells. The results indicated that enrichment of goat undifferentiated spermatogonia by magnetic-activated cell sorting for THY1 antibody combined with lentiviral vector-mediated transduction has the potential to be used for production of transgenic goats. PMID:26481046

  4. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique. PMID:26812153

  5. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Ruhwald, M; Claesson, M H

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... immediately after and at later intervals following MHC-I ligation. It is hypothesized that MHC-I expression, both ontogenically and in evolution, is driven by a cell-mediated selection pressure advantageous to the MHC-I-expressing cell. Accordingly, in addition to their role in T-cell selection and...

  6. Biomimetic microchannels of planar reactors for optimized photocatalytic efficiency of water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wuxia; Wang, Ning; Wang, Taisheng; Xu, Jia; Han, Xudong; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xuming; Yu, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a biomimetic design of microchannels in the planar reactors with the aim to optimize the photocatalytic efficiency of water purification. Inspired from biology, a bifurcated microchannel has been designed based on the Murray's law to connect to the reaction chamber for photocatalytic reaction. The microchannels are designed to have a constant depth of 50 μm but variable aspect ratios ranging from 0.015 to 0.125. To prove its effectiveness for photocatalytic water purification, the biomimetic planar reactors have been tested and compared with the non-biomimetic ones, showing an improvement of the degradation efficiency by 68%. By employing the finite element method, the flow process of the designed microchannel reactors has been simulated and analyzed. It is found that the biomimetic design owns a larger flow velocity fluctuation than that of the non-biomimetic one, which in turn results in a faster photocatalytic reaction speed. Such a biomimetic design paves the way for the design of more efficient planar reactors and may also find applications in other microfluidic systems that involve the use of microchannels. PMID:26958102

  7. A biomimetic nano hybrid coating based on the lotus effect and its anti-biofouling behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Wang, Guoqing; Meng, Qinghua; Ding, Chunhua; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Yongzeng

    2014-10-01

    To develop an environmentally friendly anti-biofouling coating in virtue of bionics, a block copolymer containing fluorine (Coplm_F) of low surface energy was prepared by copolymerization. The Ag-loaded mesoporous silica (Ag@SBA) acting as a controlled-release antifoulant was prepared from the mesoporous silica (SBA-15). The nano hybrid coating (Ag@SBA/Coplm_F) composing of the Coplm_F and Ag@SBA was to biomimetically simulate the lotus microstructure. The concentration of fluorine element on surface was analyzed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and found rising to 1.45% after hybridation, which could be explained by the driving effect of SBA-15 via the hydrogen bond. This nanoscale morphology of the hybrid coating was measured and found highly semblable to the microstructure of the lotus surface. The contact angle was determined as 151° which confirmed the superhydrophobicity and lotus effect. The adhesion behaviors of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Diatoms, and Chlorella on the surface of the nano hybrid coating (Ag@SBA/Coplm_F) were studied and good effects of anti-biofouling were observed.

  8. Locomotion Performance of Biomimetic Fish-like Swimming Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Brenden P.; Valdivia Y Alvarado, Pablo; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2007-11-01

    The swimming performance of a biomimetic, fish-like swimming device, designed to exploit the natural dynamics of its compliant body to achieve locomotion, is studied experimentally. A theoretical model combines beam-bending stress analysis and unsteady hydrodynamic forcing with known material properties of the robot to reveal desired geometry distributions and actuation modes. Swimming kinematics and corresponding performance of the device are also predicted and tested for a carangiform prototype device in a quiescent tank of water. Experimental swimming tests show good agreement with the simplified theoretical models. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the wake behind the device are investigated using time-resolved particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) over a range of tail beat frequencies, from 1 to 4 Hz, to asses vortical wake patterns and hydrodynamic forces. PIV data are compared to theoretical model predictions. Reynolds numbers for the swimming device are between 2500 and 8500 based on body length.

  9. CPG Network Optimization for a Biomimetic Robotic Fish via PSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junzhi; Wu, Zhengxing; Wang, Ming; Tan, Min

    2016-09-01

    In this brief, we investigate the parameter optimization issue of a central pattern generator (CPG) network governed forward and backward swimming for a fully untethered, multijoint biomimetic robotic fish. Considering that the CPG parameters are tightly linked to the propulsive performance of the robotic fish, we propose a method for determination of relatively optimized control parameters. Within the framework of evolutionary computation, we use a combination of dynamic model and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to seek the CPG characteristic parameters for an enhanced performance. The PSO-based optimization scheme is validated with extensive experiments conducted on the actual robotic fish. Noticeably, the optimized results are shown to be superior to previously reported forward and backward swimming speeds. PMID:26259223

  10. Plasmonic nanoparticles tuned thermal sensitive photonic polymer for biomimetic chameleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yang; Liu, Lin; Cai, Zihe; Xu, Jiwen; Xu, Zhou; Zhang, Di; Hu, Xiaobin

    2016-08-01

    Among many thermo-photochromic materials, the color-changing behavior caused by temperature and light is usually lack of a full color response. And the study on visible light-stimuli chromic response is rarely reported. Here, we proposed a strategy to design a thermo-photochromic chameleon biomimetic material consisting of photonic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) copolymer and plasmonic nanoparticles which has a vivid color change triggered by temperature and light like chameleons. We make use of the plasmonic nanoparticles like gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles to increase the sensitivity of the responsive behavior and control the lower critical solution temperature of the thermosensitive films by tuning the polymer chain conformation transition. Finally, it is possible that this film would have colorimetric responses to the entire VIS spectrum by the addition of different plasmonic nanoparticles to tune the plasmonic excitation wavelength. As a result, this method provides a potential use in new biosensors, military and many other aspects.

  11. Biomimetic synthesis of calcium-strontium apatite hollow nanospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this work,calcium-strontium apatite (Sr-HA) hollow nanospheres were synthesized by a facile biomimetic method.The structure and property of Sr-HA were characterized by FESEM,TEM,HRTEM,XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy.The influences of different ratios of calcium and strontium on the morphologies of the Sr-HA products were investigated.The experimental results revealed that the hollow spherical Sr-HA,with a size of 30-120 nm in diameter,could be synthesized when the molar ratio of Ca/Sr was 1:1.The possible formation mechanism of the hollow Sr-HA was proposed.The drug release experiments indicated that the hollow spherical Sr-HA had the property of sustained release.

  12. Bacteriorhodopsin-based bipolar photosensor for biomimetic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Katsuyuki; Haruyama, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Toshiki; Akiba, Makoto; Tominari, Yukihiro; Kaji, Takahiro; Terui, Toshifumi; Peper, Ferdinand; Tanaka, Shukichi; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Okada-Shudo, Yoshiko; Otomo, Akira

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a promising biomaterial for several applications. Optical excitation of bR at an electrode-electrolyte interface generates differential photocurrents while an incident light is turned on and off. This unique functional response is similar to that seen in retinal neurons. The bR-based bipolar photosensor consists of the bR dip-coated thin films patterned on two ITO plates and the electrolyte solution. This bipolar photocell will function as a biomimetic photoreceptor cell. The bipolar structure, due to the photocurrent being generated in alignment with the cathodic direction, makes the excitatory and inhibitory regions possible. This scheme shows our bipolar cell can act as a basic unit of edge detection and forms the artificial visual receptive field.

  13. Transport of Carbon Dioxide through a Biomimetic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios Matsaridis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic membranes (BMM based on polymer filters impregnated with lipids or their analogues are widely applied in numerous areas of physics, biology, and medicine. In this paper we report the design and testing of an electrochemical system, which allows the investigation of CO2 transport through natural membranes such as alveoli barrier membrane system and also can be applied for solid-state measurements. The experimental setup comprises a specially designed two-compartment cell with BMM connected with an electrochemical workstation placed in a Faraday cage, two PH meters, and a nondispersive infrared gas analyzer. We prove, experimentally, that the CO2 transport through the natural membranes under different conditions depends on pH and displays a similar behavior as natural membranes. The influence of different drugs on the CO2 transport process through such membranes is discussed.

  14. Biomimetics in Modern Organizations – Laws or Metaphors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schatten

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetics, the art and science of imitating nature and life for technological solutions is discussed from a modern organization theory perspective. The main hypothesis of this article is that there are common laws in nature that are applicable to living, social and likewise organizational systems. To take advantage of these laws, the study of nature’s principles for their application to organizations is proposed – a process which is in product and technology design known as bionic creativity engineering. In a search for most interesting concepts borrowed from nature we found amoeba organizations, the theory of autopoiesis or self-creation, neural networks, heterarchies, as well as fractals and bioteaming which are described and reviewed. Additionally other concepts like swarm intelligence, stigmergy, as well as genesis and reproduction, are introduced. In the end all these ideas are summarized and guidelines for further research are given.

  15. Artificial lateral line with biomimetic neuromasts to emulate fish sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrodynamic imaging using the lateral line plays a critical role in fish behavior. To engineer such a biologically inspired sensing system, we developed an artificial lateral line using MEMS (microelectromechanical system) technology and explored its localization capability. Arrays of biomimetic neuromasts constituted an artificial lateral line wrapped around a cylinder. A beamforming algorithm further enabled the artificial lateral line to image real-world hydrodynamic events in a 3D domain. We demonstrate that the artificial lateral line system can accurately localize an artificial dipole source and a natural tail-flicking crayfish under various conditions. The artificial lateral line provides a new sense to man-made underwater vehicles and marine robots so that they can sense like fish.

  16. Artificial lateral line with biomimetic neuromasts to emulate fish sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yingchen; Chen Nannan; Tucker, Craig; Hu Huan; Liu Chang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Nguyen, Nam; Lockwood, Michael; Jones, Douglas L [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bleckmann, Horst, E-mail: changliu@northwestern.ed, E-mail: dl-jones@uiuc.ed [Institut fuer Zoologie, Universitaet Bonn, Poppelsdorfer Schloss, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Hydrodynamic imaging using the lateral line plays a critical role in fish behavior. To engineer such a biologically inspired sensing system, we developed an artificial lateral line using MEMS (microelectromechanical system) technology and explored its localization capability. Arrays of biomimetic neuromasts constituted an artificial lateral line wrapped around a cylinder. A beamforming algorithm further enabled the artificial lateral line to image real-world hydrodynamic events in a 3D domain. We demonstrate that the artificial lateral line system can accurately localize an artificial dipole source and a natural tail-flicking crayfish under various conditions. The artificial lateral line provides a new sense to man-made underwater vehicles and marine robots so that they can sense like fish.

  17. Braking Performance of a Biomimetic Squid-Like Underwater Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md.Mahbubar Rahman; Sinpei Sugimori; Hiroshi Miki; Risa Yamamoto; Yugo Sanada; Yasuyuki Toda

    2013-01-01

    In this study,the braking performance of the undulating fin propulsion system ofa biomimetic squid-like underwater robot was investigated through free run experiment and simulation of the quasi-steady mathematical model.The quasi-steady equations of motion were solved using the measured and calculated hydrodynamic forces and compared with free-run test results.Various braking strategies were tested and discussed in terms of stopping ability and the forces acting on the stopping stage.The stopping performance of the undulating fin propulsion system tured out to be excellent considering the short stopping time and short stopping distance.This is because of the large negative thrust produced by progressive wave in opposite direction.It was confirmed that the undulating fin propulsion system can effectively perform braking even in complex underwater explorations.

  18. Aquaporin-Based Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes: Approaches and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Habel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, aquaporin biomimetic membranes (ABMs for water separation have gained considerable interest. Although the first ABMs are commercially available, there are still many challenges associated with further ABM development. Here, we discuss the interplay of the main components of ABMs: aquaporin proteins (AQPs, block copolymers for AQP reconstitution, and polymer-based supporting structures. First, we briefly cover challenges and review recent developments in understanding the interplay between AQP and block copolymers. Second, we review some experimental characterization methods for investigating AQP incorporation including freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, stopped-flow light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Third, we focus on recent efforts in embedding reconstituted AQPs in membrane designs that are based on conventional thin film interfacial polymerization techniques. Finally, we describe some new developments in interfacial polymerization using polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane cages for increasing the physical and chemical durability of thin film composite membranes.

  19. The Design and Implementation of a Biomimetic Robot Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhou

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel design of a biomimetic robot fish is presented. Based on the propulsion and maneuvering mechanisms of real fishes, a tail mechanical structure with cams and connecting rods for fitting carangiform fish body wave is designed, which provides the main propulsion. Two pectoral fins are mounted, and each pectoral fin can flap separately and rotate freely. Coordinating the movements of the tail and pectoral fins, the robot fish can simulate the movements of fishes in water. In order to obtain the necessary environmental information, several kinds of sensors (video, infrared, temperature, pressure and PH value sensors were mounted. Finally, the realization of the robot fish is presented.

  20. Crystallization at Inorganic-Organic Interfaces: Biominerals and Biomimetic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Stephen; Archibald, Douglas D.; Didymus, Jon M.; Douglas, Trevor; Heywood, Brigid R.; Meldrum, Fiona C.; Reeves, Nicholas J.

    1993-09-01

    Crystallization is an important process in a wide range of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, biology, geology, and materials science. Recent investigations of biomineralization indicate that specific molecular interactions at inorganic-organic interfaces can result in the controlled nucleation and growth of inorganic crystals. Synthetic systems have highlighted the importance of electrostatic binding or association, geometric matching (epitaxis), and stereochemical correspondence in these recognition processes. Similarly, organic molecules in solution can influence the morphology of inorganic crystals if there is molecular complementarity at the crystal-additive interface. A biomimetic approach based on these principles could lead to the development of new strategies in the controlled synthesis of inorganic nanophases, the crystal engineering of bulk solids, and the assembly of organized composite and ceramic materials.

  1. Piezoelectrically Actuated Biomimetic Self-Contained Quadruped Bounding Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thanhtam Ho; Sangyoon Lee

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a mesoscale self-contained quadruped mobile robot that employs two pieces of piezocomposite actuators for the bounding locomotion. The design of the robot leg is inspired by legged insects and animals,and the biomimetic concept is implemented in the robot in a simplified form, such that each leg of the robot has only one degree of freedom. The lack of degree of freedom is compensated by a slope of the robot frame relative to the horizontal plane. For the implementation of the self-contained mobile robot, a small power supply circuit is designed and installed on the robot. Experimental results show that the robot can locomote at about 50 mm.s-1 with the circuit on board, which can be considered as a significant step toward the goal of building an autonomous legged robot actuated by piezoelectric actuators.

  2. Biomimetic Control of Mechanical Systems Equipped with Musculotendon Actuators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier Moreno-Valenzuela; Adriana Salinas-Avila

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of modelling, control, and simulation of a mechanical system actuated by an agonist-antagonist musculotendon subsystem. Contraction dynamics is given by case I of Zajac's model. Saturated semi positive proportional-derivative-type controllers with switching as neural excitation inputs are proposed. Stability theory of switched system and SOSTOOLS, which is a sum of squares optimization toolbox of Matlab, are used to determine the stability of the obtained closed-loop system. To corroborate the obtained theoretical results numerical simulations are carried out. As additional contribution, the discussed ideas are applied to the biomimetic control of a DC motor, i.e., the position control is addressed assuming the presence of musculotendon actuators. Real-experiments corroborate the expected results.

  3. Multicompartmentalized polymeric systems: towards biomimetic cellular structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguet, Maïté; Bonduelle, Colin; Lecommandoux, Sébastien

    2013-01-21

    The cell is certainly one of the most complex and exciting systems in Nature that scientists are still trying to fully understand. Such a challenge pushes material scientists to seek to reproduce its perfection by building biomimetic materials with high-added value and previously unmatched properties. Thanks to their versatility, their robustness and the current state of polymer chemistry science, we believe polymer-based materials to constitute or represent ideal candidates when addressing the challenge of biomimicry, which defines the focus of this review. The first step consists in mimicking the structure of the cell: its inner compartments, the organelles, with a multicompartmentalized structure, and the rest, i.e. the cytoplasm minus the organelles (mainly cytoskeleton/cytosol) with gels or particular solutions (highly concentrated for example) in one compartment, and finally the combination of both. Achieving this first structural step enables us to considerably widen the gap of possibilities in drug delivery systems. Another powerful property of the cell lies in its metabolic function. The second step is therefore to achieve enzymatic reactions in a compartment, as occurs in the organelles, in a highly controlled, selective and efficient manner. We classify the most exciting polymersome nanoreactors reported in our opinion into two different subsections, depending on their very final concept or purpose of design. We also highlight in a thorough table the experimental sections crucial to such work. Finally, after achieving control over these prerequisites, scientists are able to combine them and push the frontiers of biomimicry further: from cell structure mimics towards a controlled biofunctionality. Such a biomimetic approach in material design and the future research it will stimulate, are believed to bring considerable enrichments to the fields of drug delivery, (bio)sensors, (bio)catalysis and (bio)technology. PMID:23073077

  4. Thermal gelation and tissue adhesion of biomimetic hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine and freshwater mussels are notorious foulers of natural and manmade surfaces, secreting specialized protein adhesives for rapid and durable attachment to wet substrates. Given the strong and water-resistant nature of mussel adhesive proteins, significant potential exists for mimicking their adhesive characteristics in bioinspired synthetic polymer materials. An important component of these proteins is L-3,4-dihydroxylphenylalanine (DOPA), an amino acid believed to contribute to mussel glue solidification through oxidation and crosslinking reactions. Synthetic polymers containing DOPA residues have previously been shown to crosslink into hydrogels upon the introduction of oxidizing reagents. Here we introduce a strategy for stimuli responsive gel formation of mussel adhesive protein mimetic polymers. Lipid vesicles with a bilayer melting transition of 37 0C were designed from a mixture of dipalmitoyl and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholines and exploited for the release of a sequestered oxidizing reagent upon heating from ambient to physiologic temperature. Colorimetric studies indicated that sodium-periodate-loaded liposomes released their cargo at the phase transition temperature, and when used in conjunction with a DOPA-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) polymer gave rise to rapid solidification of a crosslinked polymer hydrogel. The tissue adhesive properties of this biomimetic system were determined by in situ thermal gelation of liposome/polymer hydrogel between two porcine dermal tissue surfaces. Bond strength measurements showed that the bond formed by the adhesive hydrogel (mean = 35.1 kPa, SD = 12.5 kPa, n = 11) was several times stronger than a fibrin glue control tested under the same conditions. The results suggest a possible use of this biomimetic strategy for repair of soft tissues

  5. Gravity perception and signal transduction in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, I.; Wolke, A.; Briegleb, W.; Ivanova, K.

    Cellular signal processing in multi-, as well as in unicellular organisms, has to rely on fundamentally similar mechanisms. Free-living single cells often use the gravity vector for their spatial orientation (gravitaxis) and show distinct gravisensitivities. In this investigation the gravisensitive giant ameboid cell Physarum polycephalum (Myxomycetes, acellular slime molds) is used. Its gravitaxis and the modulation of its intrinsic rhythmic contraction activity by gravity was demonstrated in 180 °turn experiments and in simulated, as well as in actual, near-weightlessness studies (fast-rotating clinostat; Spacelab D1, IML-1). The stimulus perception was addressed in an IML-2 experiment, which provided information on the gravireceptor itself by the determination of the cell's acceleration-sensitivity threshold. Ground-based experiments designed to elucidate the subsequent steps in signal transduction leading to a motor response, suggest that an acceleration stimulus induces changes in the level of second messenger, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), indicating also that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  6. Physics of transduction in ionic liquid-swollen Nafion membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew; Leo, Donald

    2006-03-01

    Ionic polymer transducers are a class of electroactive polymers that are able to generate large strains (1-5%) in response to low voltage inputs (1-5 V). Additionally, these materials generate electrical charge in response to mechanical strain and are therefore able to operate as soft, distributed sensors. Traditionally, ionic polymer transducers have been limited in their application by their hydration dependence. This work seeks to overcome this limitation by replacing the water with an ionic liquid. Ionic liquids are molten salts that exhibit very high thermal and electrochemical stability while also possessing high ionic conductivity. Results have shown that an ionic liquid-swollen ionic polymer transducer can operate for more than 250,000 cycles in air as compared to about 2,000 cycles for a water-swollen transducer. The current work examines the mechanisms of transduction in ionic liquid-swollen transducers based on Nafion polymer membranes. Specifically, the morphology and relevant ion associations within these membranes are investigated by the use of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). These results reveal that the ionic liquid interacts with the membrane in much the same way that water does, and that the counterions of the Nafion polymer are the primary charge carriers. The results of these analyses are compared to the macroscopic transduction behavior in order to develop a model of the charge transport mechanism responsible for electromechanical coupling in these membranes.

  7. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  8. First realization of the piezoelectronic stress-based transduction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Josephine B; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Copel, Matthew; Solomon, Paul M; Liu, Xiao-Hu; Shaw, Thomas M; Schrott, Alejandro G; Gignac, Lynne M; Martyna, Glenn J; Newns, Dennis M

    2015-09-18

    We present the first realization of a monolithically integrated piezoelectronic transistor (PET), a new transduction-based computer switch which could potentially operate conventional computer logic at 1/50 the power requirements of current Si-based transistors (Chen 2014 Proc. IEEE ICICDT pp 1-4; Mamaluy et al 2014 Proc. IWCE pp 1-2). In PET operation, an input gate voltage expands a piezoelectric element (PE), transducing the input into a pressure pulse which compresses a piezoresistive element (PR). The PR resistance goes down, transducing the signal back to voltage and turning the switch 'on'. This transduction physics, in principle, allows fast, low-voltage operation. In this work, we address the processing challenges of integrating chemically incompatible PR and PE materials together within a surrounding cage against which the PR can be compressed. This proof-of-concept demonstration of a fully integrated, stand-alone PET device is a key step in the development path toward a fast, low-power very large scale integration technology. PMID:26302818

  9. Signal perception, transduction, and gene expression involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthocyanin pigments provide fruits and flowers with their bright red and blue colors and are induced in vegetative tissues by various signals. The biosynthetic pathway probably represents one of the best‐studied examples of higher plant secondary metabolism. It has attracted much attention of plant geneticists because of the dispensable nature of the compounds it produces. Not unexpectedly, several excellent reviews on anthocyanin biosynthesis have been published over the last 5 years (Dooner et al., 1991; Martin and Gerats, 1993a, 1993b; Koes et al., 1994; Holton and Cornish, 1995). These reviews emphasize the late steps of pigment biosynthesis rather than the early and intermediate events of signal perception and transduction. This review is broader and not only covers the identification of components of the anthocyanin signal perception/transduction networks but also provides a description of our current understanding of how they evoke the responses that they do. Progress has derived from a combination of biochemical, molecular and genetic studies. We discuss a range of relevant research to highlight the different experimental approaches being used and the diverse biological systems under investigation. (author)

  10. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Xiao

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):425-435.

  11. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6):425-435.

  12. Oxidative stress and signal transduction pathways in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, Tomás; Kalousová, Marta

    2005-11-01

    Ethanol is linked to several pathologies like alcohol liver injury, neurotoxicity, cardiomyopathy, fetal alcoholic syndrome or cancer. It is generally accepted that oxidative stress plays a central role in their pathogenesis. After chronic and excessive consumption, alcohol may accelerate oxidative mechanisms both directly via increased production of reactive oxygen species and indirectly by impairing protective mechanisms against them. Ethanol, its metabolites arising during its metabolic degradation as well as novel compounds formed via ethanol induced oxidative stress, especially during the action of the ethanol inducible microsomal cytochrome CYP2E1, may apart from direct damage to biological structures affect signal transduction pathways thus modulating and potentiating damage. Alteration of the redox status of cells following chronic ethanol misuse may have profound effects on cellular function and viability and lead to cell death and tissue damage. These changes linked to pathologic processes in the organism, are related to alteration of intracellular signaling pathways associated with protein kinases and transcription factor activation. Mainly mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, transcription factors-nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein 1 (AP-1) are involved in the deterioration of cells and organs. The response is cell-type specific and depends on the dose of ethanol. Oxido-reduction balance, regulatory disturbances and signal transduction cascades responsible for alcoholic damage have been partially described, nevertheless, further studies are required to allow future novel diagnostic and therapeutical strategies. We are only at the beginning ... PMID:16344594

  13. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  14. Comparison of Functional Protein Transduction Domains Using the NEMO Binding Domain Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Robbins; Khaleel Khaja

    2010-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs), both naturally occurring and synthetic, have been extensively utilized for intracellular delivery of biologically active molecules both in vitro and in vivo. However, most comparisons of transduction efficiency have been performed using fluorescent markers. To compare efficiency of functional protein transduction, a peptide derived from IkB kinase ß (IKKß) that prevents formation of an active IKK complex was used as a biologically active cargo. This peptid...

  15. Biomimetic apatite-coated porous PVA scaffolds promote the growth of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recapitulating the native environment of bone tissue is essential to develop in vitro models of breast cancer bone metastasis. The bone is a composite material consisting of organic matrix and inorganic mineral phase, primarily hydroxyapatite. In this study, we report the mineralization of porous poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds upon incubation in modified Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the deposited minerals have composition similar to hydroxyapatite. The study demonstrated that the rate of nucleation and growth of minerals was faster on surfaces of less porous scaffolds. However, upon prolonged incubation, formation of mineral layer was observed on the surface of all the scaffolds. In addition, the study also demonstrated that 3D mineralization only occurred for scaffolds with highly interconnected porous networks. The mineralization of the scaffolds promoted the adsorption of serum proteins and consequently, the adhesion and proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Porous PVA scaffolds fabricated via mechanical agitation followed by freeze-drying. • Mineralization of the scaffold was carried out by utilizing biomimetic approach. • Mineralization resulted in increased protein adsorption on the scaffold. • Increased breast cancer cell growth was observed on mineralized scaffolds

  16. Biomimetic design of a bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone healing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the design and synthesis of bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for bone healing applications using a biomimetic approach. Bacterial cellulose (BC) with various surface morphologies (pellicles and tubes) was negatively charged by the adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to initiate nucleation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp). The cdHAp was grown in vitro via dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF) treatments over a one week period. Characterization of the mineralized samples was done with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The amount of cdHAp observed varied among different samples. XPS demonstrated that the atomic presence of calcium and phosphorus ranged from 0.44 at.% to 7.71 at.% Ca and 0.27 at.% to 11.18 at.% P. The Ca/P overall ratio ranged from 1.22 to 1.92. FESEM images showed that the cdHAp crystal size increased with increasing nanocellulose fibril density. To determine the viability of the scaffolds in vitro, the morphology and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase gene expression. The presence of cdHAp crystals on BC surfaces resulted in increased cell attachment.

  17. Biomimetic apatite-coated porous PVA scaffolds promote the growth of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Mao; Mohanty, Pravansu; Ghosh, Gargi, E-mail: gargi@umich.edu

    2014-11-01

    Recapitulating the native environment of bone tissue is essential to develop in vitro models of breast cancer bone metastasis. The bone is a composite material consisting of organic matrix and inorganic mineral phase, primarily hydroxyapatite. In this study, we report the mineralization of porous poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds upon incubation in modified Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the deposited minerals have composition similar to hydroxyapatite. The study demonstrated that the rate of nucleation and growth of minerals was faster on surfaces of less porous scaffolds. However, upon prolonged incubation, formation of mineral layer was observed on the surface of all the scaffolds. In addition, the study also demonstrated that 3D mineralization only occurred for scaffolds with highly interconnected porous networks. The mineralization of the scaffolds promoted the adsorption of serum proteins and consequently, the adhesion and proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Porous PVA scaffolds fabricated via mechanical agitation followed by freeze-drying. • Mineralization of the scaffold was carried out by utilizing biomimetic approach. • Mineralization resulted in increased protein adsorption on the scaffold. • Increased breast cancer cell growth was observed on mineralized scaffolds.

  18. Synthesis of HgS nanocrystals in the Lysozyme aqueous solution through biomimetic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Guangrui; He, Guoxu; Wang, Li; Liu, Qiaoru; Zhang, Qiuxia; Qin, Dezhi

    2012-08-01

    In the present work, it is reported for Lysozyme-conjugated HgS nanocrystals with tunable sizes prepared at Lysozyme (Lyso) aqueous solutions by using biomimetic method. The obtained HgS nanoparticles with good dispersibility have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS). The Lysozyme molecules can control nucleation and growth of HgS crystals by binding on the surface of nanocrystals to stabilize protein-capped nanoparticles. Quantum confinement effect of Lyso-conjugated HgS nanocrystals has been confirmed by UV-vis spectra. The nanoparticles exhibit a well-defined emission feature at about 470 nm. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) data are used to envisage the binding of nanoparticles with functional groups of Lysozyme. The results of circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that the formation of HgS nanocrystals can lead to conformational change of Lysozyme.

  19. Hydroxyapatite Mineralization on the Calcium Chloride Blended Polyurethane Nanofiber via Biomimetic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Ki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyurethane nanofibers containing calcium chloride (CaCl2 were prepared via an electrospinning technique for the biomedical applications. Polyurethane nanofibers with different concentration of CaCl2 were electrospun, and their bioactivity evaluation was conducted by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid (SBF solution. The morphology, structure and thermal properties of the polyurethane/CaCl2 composite nanofibers were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. SEM images revealed that the CaCl2 salt incorporated homogeneously to form well-oriented nanofibers with smooth surface and uniform diameters along their lengths. The SBF incubation test confirmed the formation of apatite-like materials, exhibiting enhanced bioactive behavior of the polyurethane/CaCl2 composite nanofibers. This study demonstrated that the electrospun polyurethane containing CaCl2 composite nanofibers enhanced the in vitro bioactivity and supports the growth of apatite-like materials.

  20. Hydroxyapatite Mineralization on the Calcium Chloride Blended Polyurethane Nanofiber via Biomimetic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, R.; Nam, Ki Taek; Navamathavan, R.; Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hak Yong

    2011-12-01

    Polyurethane nanofibers containing calcium chloride (CaCl2) were prepared via an electrospinning technique for the biomedical applications. Polyurethane nanofibers with different concentration of CaCl2 were electrospun, and their bioactivity evaluation was conducted by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. The morphology, structure and thermal properties of the polyurethane/CaCl2 composite nanofibers were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. SEM images revealed that the CaCl2 salt incorporated homogeneously to form well-oriented nanofibers with smooth surface and uniform diameters along their lengths. The SBF incubation test confirmed the formation of apatite-like materials, exhibiting enhanced bioactive behavior of the polyurethane/CaCl2 composite nanofibers. This study demonstrated that the electrospun polyurethane containing CaCl2 composite nanofibers enhanced the in vitro bioactivity and supports the growth of apatite-like materials.

  1. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C. M.; Faria, Amanda N.; Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro; Ramos, Ana P.

    2016-05-01

    CaCO3 particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO3 deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO3 continuous films on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca2+, exposed to CO2 (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO3 film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γs) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γs of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO3 thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  2. Biomimetic design of a bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone healing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Kristen A., E-mail: kazimmer@vt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); LeBlanc, Jill M.; Sheets, Kevin T.; Fox, Robert W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Gatenholm, Paul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the design and synthesis of bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for bone healing applications using a biomimetic approach. Bacterial cellulose (BC) with various surface morphologies (pellicles and tubes) was negatively charged by the adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to initiate nucleation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp). The cdHAp was grown in vitro via dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF) treatments over a one week period. Characterization of the mineralized samples was done with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The amount of cdHAp observed varied among different samples. XPS demonstrated that the atomic presence of calcium and phosphorus ranged from 0.44 at.% to 7.71 at.% Ca and 0.27 at.% to 11.18 at.% P. The Ca/P overall ratio ranged from 1.22 to 1.92. FESEM images showed that the cdHAp crystal size increased with increasing nanocellulose fibril density. To determine the viability of the scaffolds in vitro, the morphology and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase gene expression. The presence of cdHAp crystals on BC surfaces resulted in increased cell attachment.

  3. Microstructure, mechanical, and biomimetic properties of fish scales from Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Tanaka, Junzo; Walsh, Dominic; Mann, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    The fish scale of Pagrus major has an orthogonal plywood structure of stratified lamellae, 1-2 microm in thickness, consisting of closely packed 70- to 80-nm-diameter collagen fibers. X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and infrared spectroscopy indicate that the mineral phase in the scale is calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite containing a small amount of sodium and magnesium ions, as well as carbonate anions in phosphate sites of the apatite lattice. The tensile strength of the scale is high (approximately 90 MPa) because of the hierarchically ordered structure of mineralized collagen fibers. Mechanical failure occurs by sliding of the lamellae and associated pulling out and fracture of the collagen fibers. In contrast, demineralized scales have significantly lower tensile strength (36 MPa), indicating that interactions between the apatite crystals and collagen fibers are of fundamental importance in determining the mechanical properties. Thermal treatment of fish scales to remove the organic components produces remarkable inorganic replicas of the native orthogonal plywood structure of the fibrillary plate. The biomimetic replica produced by heating to 873 K consists of stratified porous lamellae of c-axis-aligned apatite crystals that are long, narrow plates, 0.5-0.6 microm in length and 0.1-0.2 microm in width. The textured inorganic material remains intact when heated to 1473 K, although the size of the constituent crystals increases as a result of thermal sintering. PMID:12781659

  4. Analysis of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Adeel

    Abstract Euglena gracilis is a photosynthetic, eukaryotic flagellate. It can adapt autotrophic and heterotrophic mode of growth and respond to different stimuli, this makes it an organism of choice for different research disciplines. It swims to reach a suitable niche by employing different stimuli such as oxygen, light, gravity and different chemicals. Among these stimuli light and gravity are the most important. Phototaxis (locomotion under light stimulus) and gravitaxis (locomotion under gravity stimulus) synergistically help cells to attain an optimal niche in the environment. However, in the complete absence of light or under scarcity of detectable light, cells can totally depend on gravity to find its swimming path. Therefore gravity has certain advantages over other stimuli.Unlike phototatic signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis no clear primary gravity receptor has been identified in Euglena cells so far. However, there are some convincing evidence that TRP like channels act as a primary gravity receptor in Euglena gracilis.Use of different inhibitors gave rise to the involvement of protein kinase and calmodulin proteins in signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis. Recently, specific calmodulin (Calmodulin 2) and protein kinase (PKA) have been identified as potential candidates of gravitactic signal transduction chain. Further characterization and investigation of these candidates was required. Therefore a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques was employed to localize proteins in cells and also to find interacting partners. For localization studies, specific antibodies were raised and characterized. Specificity of antibodies was validated by knockdown mutants, Invitro-translated proteins and heterologously expressed proteins. Cell fractionation studies, involving separation of the cell body and flagella for western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence studies were performed for subcellular localization. In order to find

  5. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  6. Bio-Mimetics of Disaster Anticipation-Learning Experience and Key-Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tributsch, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Anomalies in animal behavior and meteorological phenomena before major earthquakes have been reported throughout history. Bio-mimetics or bionics aims at learning disaster anticipation from animals. Since modern science is reluctant to address this problem an effort has been made to track down the knowledge available to ancient natural philosophers. Starting with an archaeologically documented human sacrifice around 1700 B.C. during the Minoan civilization immediately before a large earthquake, which killed the participants, earthquake prediction knowledge throughout antiquity is evaluated. Major practical experience with this phenomenon has been gained from a Chinese earthquake prediction initiative nearly half a century ago. Some quakes, like that of Haicheng, were recognized in advance. However, the destructive Tangshan earthquake was not predicted, which was interpreted as an inherent failure of prediction based on animal phenomena. This is contradicted on the basis of reliable Chinese documentation provided by the responsible earthquake study commission. The Tangshan earthquake was preceded by more than 2,000 reported animal anomalies, some of which were of very dramatic nature. They are discussed here. Any physical phenomenon, which may cause animal unrest, must involve energy turnover before the main earthquake event. The final product, however, of any energy turnover is heat. Satellite based infrared measurements have indeed identified significant thermal anomalies before major earthquakes. One of these cases, occurring during the 2001 Bhuj earthquake in Gujarat, India, is analyzed together with parallel animal anomalies observed in the Gir national park. It is suggested that the time window is identical and that both phenomena have the same geophysical origin. It therefore remains to be demonstrated that energy can be released locally before major earthquake events. It is shown that by considering appropriate geophysical feedback processes, this is

  7. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. PMID:23352354

  8. Effects of microgravity environment on intracellular signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De CHANG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity environment is a stress and extracellular signal that affects cellular morphology and function through signal transduction system, thus leading to certain biological effect. At present, many signaling pathways have been reported to be involved in the regulation of cell function under microgravity environment, such as NF-κB signaling pathway, Notch signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway, HSP signaling pathway and so on, and these reports have laid a foundation for the molecular studies of cytolergy under outer space environment. The recent progress in the researches on intracellular signaling pathways affected by microgravity is herewith reviewed in present paper in the hope of providing references for understanding the cell activity in space environment, and to find the ways to alleviate the harmful effects caused by the microgravity environment.

  9. Modeling of biological doses and mechanical effects on bone transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Romain; Jennane, Rachid; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.003

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress, hormones like parathyroid and mineral elements like calcium mediate the amplitude of stimulus signal which affects the rate of bone remodeling. The current study investigates the theoretical effects of different metabolic doses in stimulus signal level on bone. The model was built considering the osteocyte as the sensing center mediated by coupled mechanical shear stress and some biological factors. The proposed enhanced model was developed based on previously published works dealing with different aspects of bone transduction. It describes the effects of physiological doses variations of Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 on the stimulus level sensed by osteocytes in response to applied shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow. We retained the metabolic factors (Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandin E2) as parameters of bone cell mechanosensitivity because stimulation/inhibition of induced pathways stimulates osteogenic response in vivo. We t...

  10. Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A novel full piezoelectric multilayer stacked hybrid actuation/transduction system. The system demonstrates significantly-enhanced electromechanical performance by utilizing the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer stacked negative and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that for this system, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The system consists of at least 2 layers which include electromechanically active components. The layers are arranged such that when electric power is applied, one layer contracts in a transverse direction while the second layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the first layer. An alternate embodiment includes a third layer. In this embodiment, the outer two layers contract in parallel transverse directions while the middle layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the outer layers.

  11. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moncharmont

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation.

  12. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Zazzo, Erika; De Rosa, Caterina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing) protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation. PMID:24832654

  13. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Druszczynska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms.

  14. Electro-optical transduction via a mechanical membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Corey; Lawall, John

    2013-03-01

    Both cavity opto-mechanics and cavity electro-mechanics have been studied as means to achieve ground state cooling of mechanical systems. Recent focus has turned to hybrid systems that attempt to convert photons between microwave and optical frequencies through mechanical transduction. This should allow quantum information stored in an electrical cavity to be transferred optically over longer distances. In this talk we describe our hybrid system, a silicon nitride membrane that is coupled to a piezoelectric element and placed within a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. This setup allows us to both sense and perturb the mechanical motion of the membrane. Results regarding the coupling between the different domains and the design strategies to optimize these couplings will be discussed.

  15. Influence of Unweighting on Insulin Signal Transduction in Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    2002-01-01

    Unweighting of the juvenile soleus muscle is characterized by an increased binding capacity for insulin relative to muscle mass due to sparing of the receptors during atrophy. Although carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation in the unweighted muscle develop increased sensitivity to insulin in vivo, protein synthesis in vivo and system A amino acid transport in vitro do not appear to develop such an enhanced response. The long-term goal is to identify the precise nature of this apparent resistance in the insulin signal transduction pathway and to consider how reduced weight-bearing may elicit this effect, by evaluating specific components of the insulin signalling pathway. Because the insulin-signalling pathway has components in common with the signal transduction pathway for insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and potentially other growth factors, the study could have important implications in the role of weight-bearing function on muscle growth and development. Since the insulin signalling pathway diverges following activation of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, the immediate specific aims will be to study the receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) and those branches, which lead to phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and of Shc protein. To achieve these broader objectives, we will test in situ, by intramuscular injection, the responses of glucose transport, system A amino acid transport and protein synthesis to insulin analogues for which the receptor has either a weaker or much stronger binding affinity compared to insulin. Studies will include: (1) estimation of the ED(sub 50) for each analogue for these three processes; (2) the effect of duration (one to four days) of unweighting on the response of each process to all analogues tested; (3) the effect of unweighting and the analogues on IRTK activity; and (4) the comparative effects of unweighting and analogue binding on the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRTK, IRS-1, and Shc protein.

  16. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Solar ultraviolet radiation as a trigger of cell signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet light radiation in sunlight is known to cause major alterations in growth and differentiation patterns of exposed human tissues. The specific effects depend on the wavelengths and doses of the light, and the nature of the exposed tissue. Both growth inhibition and proliferation are observed, as well as inflammation and immune suppression. Whereas in the clinical setting, these responses may be beneficial, for example, in the treatment of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, as an environmental toxicant, ultraviolet light can induce significant tissue damage. Thus, in the eye, ultraviolet light causes cataracts, while in the skin, it induces premature aging and the development of cancer. Although ultraviolet light can damage many tissue components including membrane phospholipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, it is now recognized that many of its cellular effects are due to alterations in growth factor- and cytokine-mediated signal transduction pathways leading to aberrant gene expression. It is generally thought that reactive oxygen intermediates are mediators of some of the damage induced by ultraviolet light. Generated when ultraviolet light is absorbed by endogenous photosensitizers in the presence of molecular oxygen, reactive oxygen intermediates and their metabolites induce damage by reacting with cellular electrophiles, some of which can directly initiate cell signaling processes. In an additional layer of complexity, ultraviolet light-damaged nucleic acids initiate signaling during the activation of repair processes. Thus, mechanisms by which solar ultraviolet radiation triggers cell signal transduction are multifactorial. The present review summarizes some of the mechanisms by which ultraviolet light alters signaling pathways as well as the genes important in the beneficial and toxic effects of ultraviolet light

  18. CD13 restricts TLR4 endocytic signal transduction in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Mallika; Subramani, Jaganathan; Rahman, M Mamunur; Shapiro, Linda H

    2015-05-01

    Dysregulation of the innate immune response underlies numerous pathological conditions. The TLR4 is the prototypical sensor of infection or injury that orchestrates the innate response via sequential activation of both cell surface and endocytic signaling pathways that trigger distinct downstream consequences. CD14 binds and delivers LPS to TLR4 and has been identified as a positive regulator of TLR4 signal transduction. It is logical that negative regulators of this process also exist to maintain the critical balance required for fighting infection, healing damaged tissue, and resolving inflammation. We showed that CD13 negatively modulates receptor-mediated Ag uptake in dendritic cells to control T cell activation in adaptive immunity. In this study, we report that myeloid CD13 governs internalization of TLR4 and subsequent innate signaling cascades, activating IRF-3 independently of CD14. CD13 is cointernalized with TLR4, CD14, and dynamin into Rab5(+) early endosomes upon LPS treatment. Importantly, in response to TLR4 ligands HMGB1 and LPS, p-IRF-3 activation and transcription of its target genes are enhanced in CD13(KO) dendritic cells, whereas TLR4 surface signaling remains unaffected, resulting in a skewed inflammatory response. This finding is physiologically relevant as ischemic injury in vivo provoked identical TLR4 responses. Finally, CD13(KO) mice showed significantly enhanced IFNβ-mediated signal transduction via JAK-STAT, escalating inducible NO synthase transcription levels and promoting accumulation of oxidative stress mediators and tissue injury. Mechanistically, inflammatory activation of macrophages upregulates CD13 expression and CD13 and TLR4 coimmunoprecipitate. Therefore, CD13 negatively regulates TLR4 signaling, thereby balancing the innate response by maintaining the inflammatory equilibrium critical to innate immune regulation. PMID:25801433

  19. Signal transduction pathway profiling of individual tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Carsten

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction pathways convey information from the outside of the cell to transcription factors, which in turn regulate gene expression. Our objective is to analyze tumor gene expression data from microarrays in the context of such pathways. Results We use pathways compiled from the TRANSPATH/TRANSFAC databases and the literature, and three publicly available cancer microarray data sets. Variation in pathway activity, across the samples, is gauged by the degree of correlation between downstream targets of a pathway. Two correlation scores are applied; one considers all pairs of downstream targets, and the other considers only pairs without common transcription factors. Several pathways are found to be differentially active in the data sets using these scores. Moreover, we devise a score for pathway activity in individual samples, based on the average expression value of the downstream targets. Statistical significance is assigned to the scores using permutation of genes as null model. Hence, for individual samples, the status of a pathway is given as a sign, + or -, and a p-value. This approach defines a projection of high-dimensional gene expression data onto low-dimensional pathway activity scores. For each dataset and many pathways we find a much larger number of significant samples than expected by chance. Finally, we find that several sample-wise pathway activities are significantly associated with clinical classifications of the samples. Conclusion This study shows that it is feasible to infer signal transduction pathway activity, in individual samples, from gene expression data. Furthermore, these pathway activities are biologically relevant in the three cancer data sets.

  20. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  1. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2 and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm-2, which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications.Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2

  2. Plants as concept generators for biomimetic light-weight structures with variable stiffness and self-repair mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Speck; Tom Masselter; Bettina Prüm; Olga Speck; Rolf Luchsinger; Siegfried Fink

    2004-01-01

    Plants possess many structural and functional properties that have a high potential to serve as concept generators for the production of biomimetic technical materials and structures. We present data on two features of plants (variable stiffness due to pressure changes in cellular structures and rapid self-repair functions) that may be used as models for biomimetic projects.

  3. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  4. Biomimetic synthesis of oriented hydroxyapatite mediated by nonionic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly oriented organization of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanorods was achieved through a simple reflux method using mixtures of triblock copolymer pluronic P123 and tween-60 as the mediated agents. Raft-like organized complexes were prepared when the nanorods were only directed by the mixed surfactants. Bundles of nanorod-like HAP crystals were obtained when urea was used as the cosurfactant. These HAP nanorods with a large amount of uniform 4 nm worm-like mesopores were arranged in parallel to each other along the c axis of HAP. The raft-like complexes might be mediated by the reverse lamellar micelles. And the added urea transformed the reverse lamellar micelles into hexagonal ones due to its association with the surfactant molecules by hydrogen bonds, resulting in the formation of bundles of nanorod-like HAP crystals. The regulation of the oriented HAP complexes in morphology extends the understanding of biomineralization and permits controllable design of biomimetic materials. In addition, the c-axis oriented raft-like HAP complex has great potential in selective bio-absorption and separation

  5. Optimal design and motion control of biomimetic robotic fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU JunZhi; WANG Long; ZHAO Wei; TAN Min

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the design, optimization, and motion control of a radio-controlled, multi-link, free-swimming biomimetic robotic fish based on an opti-mized kinematic and dynamic model of fish swimming. The performance of the robotic fish is determined by both the fish's morphological characteristics and ki-nematic parameters. By applying ichthyologic theories of propulsion, a design framework that takes into consideration both mechatronic constraints in physical realization and feasibility of control methods is presented, under which a multiple linked robotic fish that integrates both the carangiform and anguilliform swimming modes can be easily developed. Taking account of both theoretic hydrodynamic issues and practical problems in engineering realization, the optimal link-length-ratios are numerically calculated by an improved constrained cyclic variable method, which are successfully applied to a series of real robotic fishes. The rhythmic movements of swimming are driven by a central pattern generator (CPG) based on nonlinear oscillations, and up-and-down motion by regulating the rotating angle of pectoral fins. The experimental results verify that the presented scheme and method are effective in design and implementation.

  6. MIPs and Aptamers for Recognition of Proteins in Biomimetic Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Marcus; Yarman, Aysu; Erdőssy, Júlia; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Scheller, Frieder W

    2016-01-01

    Biomimetic binders and catalysts have been generated in order to substitute the biological pendants in separation techniques and bioanalysis. The two major approaches use either "evolution in the test tube" of nucleotides for the preparation of aptamers or total chemical synthesis for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The reproducible production of aptamers is a clear advantage, whilst the preparation of MIPs typically leads to a population of polymers with different binding sites. The realization of binding sites in the total bulk of the MIPs results in a higher binding capacity, however, on the expense of the accessibility and exchange rate. Furthermore, the readout of the bound analyte is easier for aptamers since the integration of signal generating labels is well established. On the other hand, the overall negative charge of the nucleotides makes aptamers prone to non-specific adsorption of positively charged constituents of the sample and the "biological" degradation of non-modified aptamers and ionic strength-dependent changes of conformation may be challenging in some application. PMID:27438862

  7. Biomimetic Culture Reactor for Whole-Lung Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raredon, Micha Sam Brickman; Rocco, Kevin A; Gheorghe, Ciprian P; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Balestrini, Jenna L; Raredon, Thomas L; Calle, Elizabeth A; Niklason, Laura E

    2016-01-01

    Decellularized organs are now established as promising scaffolds for whole-organ regeneration. For this work to reach therapeutic practice, techniques and apparatus are necessary for doing human-scale clinically applicable organ cultures. We have designed and constructed a bioreactor system capable of accommodating whole human or porcine lungs, and we describe in this study relevant technical details, means of assembly and operation, and validation. The reactor has an artificial diaphragm that mimics the conditions found in the chest cavity in vivo, driving hydraulically regulated negative pressure ventilation and custom-built pulsatile perfusion apparatus capable of driving pressure-regulated or volume-regulated vascular flow. Both forms of mechanical actuation can be tuned to match specific physiologic profiles. The organ is sealed in an elastic artificial pleura that mounts to a support architecture. This pleura reduces the fluid volume required for organ culture, maintains the organ's position during mechanical conditioning, and creates a sterile barrier allowing disassembly and maintenance outside of a biosafety cabinet. The combination of fluid suspension, negative-pressure ventilation, and physiologic perfusion allows the described system to provide a biomimetic mechanical environment not found in existing technologies and especially suited to whole-organ regeneration. In this study, we explain the design and operation of this apparatus and present data validating intended functions. PMID:27088061

  8. Biomimetic autonomous robot inspired by the Cyanea capillata (Cyro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biomimetic robot inspired by Cyanea capillata, termed as ‘Cyro’, was developed to meet the functional demands of underwater surveillance in defense and civilian applications. The vehicle was designed to mimic the morphology and swimming mechanism of the natural counterpart. The body of the vehicle consists of a rigid support structure with linear DC motors which actuate eight mechanical arms. The mechanical arms in conjunction with artificial mesoglea create the hydrodynamic force required for propulsion. The full vehicle measures 170 cm in diameter and has a total mass of 76 kg. An analytical model of the mechanical arm kinematics was developed. The analytical and experimental bell kinematics were analyzed and compared to the C. capillata. Cyro was found to reach the water surface untethered and autonomously from a depth of 182 cm in five actuation cycles. It achieved an average velocity of 8.47 cm s−1 while consuming an average power of 70 W. A two-axis thrust stand was developed to calculate the thrust directly from a single bell segment yielding an average thrust of 27.9 N for the whole vehicle. Steady state velocity during Cyro's swimming test was not reached but the measured performance during its last swim cycle resulted in a cost of transport of 10.9 J (kg ⋅ m)−1 and total efficiency of 0.03. (paper)

  9. Deep reduced PEDOT films support electrochemical applications: Biomimetic color front.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toribio Fernandez OTERO

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the literature accepts, despite many controversial results, that during oxidation/reduction films of conducting polymers move from electronic conductors to insulators. Thus, engineers and device’s designers are forced to use metallic supports to reoxidize the material for reversible device work. Electrochromic front experiments appear as main visual support of the claimed insulating nature of reduced conducting polymers. Here we present a different design of the biomimetic electrochromic front that corroborates the electronic and ionic conducting nature of deep reduced films. The direct contact PEDOT metal/electrolyte and film/electrolyte was prevented from electrolyte contact until 1cm far from the metal contact with protecting Parafilm®. The deep reduced PEDOT film supports the flow of high currents promoting reaction induced electrochromic color changes beginning 1 cm far from the metal-polymer electrical contact and advancing, through the reduced film, towards the metal contact. Reverse color changes during oxidation/reduction always are initiated at the film/electrolyte contact advancing, under the protecting film, towards the film/metal contact. Both reduced and oxidized states of the film demonstrate electronic and ionic conductivities high enough to be used for electronic applications or, as self-supported electrodes, for electrochemical devices. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation (ESCR model explains those results.

  10. Neural Networks Integrated Circuit for Biomimetics MEMS Microrobot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Saito

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will propose the neural networks integrated circuit (NNIC which is the driving waveform generator of the 4.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm, width, length, height in size biomimetics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS microrobot. The microrobot was made from silicon wafer fabricated by micro fabrication technology. The mechanical system of the robot was equipped with small size rotary type actuators, link mechanisms and six legs to realize the ant-like switching behavior. The NNIC generates the driving waveform using synchronization phenomena such as biological neural networks. The driving waveform can operate the actuators of the MEMS microrobot directly. Therefore, the NNIC bare chip realizes the robot control without using any software programs or A/D converters. The microrobot performed forward and backward locomotion, and also changes direction by inputting an external single trigger pulse. The locomotion speed of the microrobot was 26.4 mm/min when the step width was 0.88 mm. The power consumption of the system was 250 mWh when the room temperature was 298 K.

  11. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot®) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  12. Electro-active paper for a durable biomimetic actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung-Ryul; Yun, Gyu Young; Kim, Jung Hwan; Chen, Yi; Kim, Jaehwan

    2009-02-01

    Cellulose electro-active paper (EAPap), known as a smart material, has merits in terms of low voltage operation, light weight, dryness, low power consumption, biodegradability, abundance and low price. Since EAPap requires low power consumption, a remotely driven actuator has been proposed using microwave power transmission. This concept is attractive for many biomimetic systems such as crawling micro-insect robots, flying objects like dragon flies and smart wallpapers. However, the actuation performance of EAPap is sensitive to humidity and degrades with time. Thus, in this paper, a durable EAPap is studied. The fabrication of EAPap is explained and the actuation performance is shown with applied electric field, frequency, humidity level and time. The fabrication process includes dissolving cellulose fibers, eliminating solvent and Li ions with a mixture of deionized water and isopropyl alcohol, washing with water, drying and coating with gold. The morphology of the fabricated EAPap is analyzed by taking scanning electron microscope images and x-ray diffractograms. The actuation performance is tested in terms of bending displacement with frequency, time and humidity level

  13. Biomimetic Experimental Research on Hexapod Robot's Locomotion Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lin; HAN Bao-ling; LUO Qing-sheng; ZHANG Chun-lin; XU Jia

    2009-01-01

    To provide hexapod robots with strategies of locomotion planning,observation experiments were operated on a kind of ant with the use of high speed digital photography and computer assistant analysis.Through digitalization of original analog video,locomotion characters of ants were obtained,the biomimetic foundation was laid for polynomial trajectory planning of multi-legged robots,which was deduced with mathematics method.In addition,five rules were concluded,which apply to hexapod robots marching locomotion planning.The first one is the fundamental strategy of multi-legged robots' leg trajectory planning.The second one helps to enhance the static and dynamic stability of multi-legged robots.The third one can improve the validity and feasibility of legs' falling points.The last two give criterions of multi-legged robots' toe trajectory figures and practical recommendatory constraints.These five rules give a good method for marching locomotion planning of multi-legged robots,and can be expended to turning planning and any other special locomotion.

  14. Optimization of a tensegrity wing for biomimetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moored, Keith W., III; Taylor, Stuart A.; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2006-03-01

    Current attempts to build fast, efficient, and maneuverable underwater vehicles have looked to nature for inspiration. However, they have all been based on traditional propulsive techniques, i.e. rotary motors. In the current study a promising and potentially revolutionary approach is taken that overcomes the limitations of these traditional methods-morphing structure concepts with integrated actuation and sensing. Inspiration for this work comes from the manta ray (Manta birostris) and other batoid fish. These creatures are highly maneuverable but are also able to cruise at high speeds over long distances. In this paper, the structural foundation for the biomimetic morphing wing is a tensegrity structure. A preliminary procedure is presented for developing morphing tensegrity structures that include actuating elements. A shape optimization method is used that determines actuator placement and actuation amount necessary to achieve the measured biological displacement field of a ray. Lastly, an experimental manta ray wing is presented that measures the static and dynamic pressure field acting on the ray's wings during a normal flapping cycle.

  15. Biomimetic and bio-inspired uses of mollusc shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J P; Wang, Y; Backeljau, T; Chapelle, G

    2016-06-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification are likely to have a profound effect on marine molluscs, which are of great ecological and economic importance. One process particularly sensitive to climate change is the formation of biominerals in mollusc shells. Fundamental research is broadening our understanding of the biomineralization process, as well as providing more informed predictions on the effects of climate change on marine molluscs. Such studies are important in their own right, but their value also extends to applied sciences. Biominerals, organic/inorganic hybrid materials with many remarkable physical and chemical properties, have been studied for decades, and the possibilities for future improved use of such materials for society are widely recognised. This article highlights the potential use of our understanding of the shell biomineralization process in novel bio-inspired and biomimetic applications. It also highlights the potential for the valorisation of shells produced as a by-product of the aquaculture industry. Studying shells and the formation of biominerals will inspire novel functional hybrid materials. It may also provide sustainable, ecologically- and economically-viable solutions to some of the problems created by current human resource exploitation. PMID:27083864

  16. Biomimetic Culture Reactor for Whole-Lung Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raredon, Micha Sam Brickman; Rocco, Kevin A.; Gheorghe, Ciprian P.; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Balestrini, Jenna L.; Raredon, Thomas L.; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Decellularized organs are now established as promising scaffolds for whole-organ regeneration. For this work to reach therapeutic practice, techniques and apparatus are necessary for doing human-scale clinically applicable organ cultures. We have designed and constructed a bioreactor system capable of accommodating whole human or porcine lungs, and we describe in this study relevant technical details, means of assembly and operation, and validation. The reactor has an artificial diaphragm that mimics the conditions found in the chest cavity in vivo, driving hydraulically regulated negative pressure ventilation and custom-built pulsatile perfusion apparatus capable of driving pressure-regulated or volume-regulated vascular flow. Both forms of mechanical actuation can be tuned to match specific physiologic profiles. The organ is sealed in an elastic artificial pleura that mounts to a support architecture. This pleura reduces the fluid volume required for organ culture, maintains the organ's position during mechanical conditioning, and creates a sterile barrier allowing disassembly and maintenance outside of a biosafety cabinet. The combination of fluid suspension, negative-pressure ventilation, and physiologic perfusion allows the described system to provide a biomimetic mechanical environment not found in existing technologies and especially suited to whole-organ regeneration. In this study, we explain the design and operation of this apparatus and present data validating intended functions. PMID:27088061

  17. Dihydrobenzofuran Neolignanamides: Laccase-Mediated Biomimetic Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardullo, Nunzio; Pulvirenti, Luana; Spatafora, Carmela; Musso, Nicolò; Barresi, Vincenza; Condorelli, Daniele Filippo; Tringali, Corrado

    2016-08-26

    The biomimetic synthesis of a small library of dihydrobenzofuran neolignanamides (the natural trans-grossamide (4) and the related compounds 21-28) has been carried out through an eco-friendly oxidative coupling reaction mediated by Trametes versicolor laccase. These products, after complete spectroscopic characterization, were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against Caco-2 (colon carcinoma), MCF-7 (mammary adenocarcinoma), and PC-3 (prostate cancer) human cells, using an MTT bioassay. The racemic neolignamides (±)-21 and (±)-27, in being the most lipophilic in the series, were potently active, with GI50 values comparable to or even lower than that of the positive control 5-FU. The racemates were resolved through chiral HPLC, and the pure enantiomers were subjected to ECD measurements to establish their absolute configurations at C-2 and C-3. All enantiomers showed potent antiproliferative activity, with, in particular, a GI50 value of 1.1 μM obtained for (2R,3R)-21. The effect of (±)-21 on the Caco-2 cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry, and it was demonstrated that (±)-21 exerts its antiproliferative activity by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:27504537

  18. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications. PMID:27157717

  19. Biomechanics and biomimetics in insect-inspired flight systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Tanaka, Hiroto

    2016-09-26

    Insect- and bird-size drones-micro air vehicles (MAV) that can perform autonomous flight in natural and man-made environments are now an active and well-integrated research area. MAVs normally operate at a low speed in a Reynolds number regime of 10(4)-10(5) or lower, in which most flying animals of insects, birds and bats fly, and encounter unconventional challenges in generating sufficient aerodynamic forces to stay airborne and in controlling flight autonomy to achieve complex manoeuvres. Flying insects that power and control flight by flapping wings are capable of sophisticated aerodynamic force production and precise, agile manoeuvring, through an integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic force, muscles to move the wings and a control system to modulate power output from the muscles. In this article, we give a selective review on the state of the art of biomechanics in bioinspired flight systems in terms of flapping and flexible wing aerodynamics, flight dynamics and stability, passive and active mechanisms in stabilization and control, as well as flapping flight in unsteady environments. We further highlight recent advances in biomimetics of flapping-wing MAVs with a specific focus on insect-inspired wing design and fabrication, as well as sensing systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528780

  20. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm(-2) and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm(-2), which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications. PMID:27385421

  1. Silaffins in Silica Biomineralization and Biomimetic Silica Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin C. Lechner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomineralization processes leading to complex solid structures of inorganic material in biological systems are constantly gaining attention in biotechnology and biomedical research. An outstanding example for biomineral morphogenesis is the formation of highly elaborate, nano-patterned silica shells by diatoms. Among the organic macromolecules that have been closely linked to the tightly controlled precipitation of silica in diatoms, silaffins play an extraordinary role. These peptides typically occur as complex posttranslationally modified variants and are directly involved in the silica deposition process in diatoms. However, even in vitro silaffin-based peptides alone, with and without posttranslational modifications, can efficiently mediate biomimetic silica precipitation leading to silica material with different properties as well as with encapsulated cargo molecules of a large size range. In this review, the biomineralization process of silica in diatoms is summarized with a specific focus on silaffins and their in vitro silica precipitation properties. Applications in the area of bio- and nanotechnology as well as in diagnostics and therapy are discussed.

  2. Nanoparticle-based biomimetic functional materials (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiro, Kuniharu

    2015-09-01

    Self-assembly originated from molecules, is ubiquitous from nature to unnature systems. The formation of double-stranded structure of DNA, virus, molecular crystals, liposomes etc. are all instances of molecular self-assembly. In the biological system, for example, virus is an impressive feat of molecular engineering by assembly of hundreds of proteins through the weak hydrophobic effect. We propose a robust strategy for the size-controllable fabrication of gold nanoparticle vesicles(AuNVs) which are biomimetic nanostructures of virus consisted of gold nanoparticles instead of proteins by using carbohydrate terminated fluorinated surface ligand self-assembly with 5~40nm AuNPs, indicating that carbohydrate can act as stronger molecular glue than oligo(ethylene glycol). Carbohydrate was introduced to tune the hydrophilic effect of the ligand by varying the number of glucose (namely, glucose, maltose, and maltotriose). AuNVs size could be efficiently controlled by varying surface ligands, water content in dioxane, and AuNPs size. We find some similarities between VLPs and AuNVs composed of 30nm gold nanoparticles. Photonic properties of not only AuNVs but also other self-assemblies of nanoparticles were measured. Strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of molecules were detected from the AuNVs and self-assembled gold nanoparticles.

  3. Piezoelectric Templates - New Views on Biomineralization and Biomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitz, Nina; Eiben, Sabine; Atanasova, Petia; Domingo, Neus; Leineweber, Andreas; Burghard, Zaklina; Bill, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralization in general is based on electrostatic interactions and molecular recognition of organic and inorganic phases. These principles of biomineralization have also been utilized and transferred to bio-inspired synthesis of functional materials during the past decades. Proteins involved in both, biomineralization and bio-inspired processes, are often piezoelectric due to their dipolar character hinting to the impact of a template's piezoelectricity on mineralization processes. However, the piezoelectric contribution on the mineralization process and especially the interaction of organic and inorganic phases is hardly considered so far. We herein report the successful use of the intrinsic piezoelectric properties of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to synthesize piezoelectric ZnO. Such films show a two-fold increase of the piezoelectric coefficient up to 7.2 pm V(-1) compared to films synthesized on non-piezoelectric templates. By utilizing the intrinsic piezoelectricity of a biotemplate, we thus established a novel synthesis pathway towards functional materials, which sheds light on the whole field of biomimetics. The obtained results are of even broader and general interest since they are providing a new, more comprehensive insight into the mechanisms involved into biomineralization in living nature. PMID:27212583

  4. Conducting IPN actuator/sensor for biomimetic vibrissa system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festin, N.; Plesse, C.; Pirim, P.; Chevrot, C.; Vidal, F.

    2014-03-01

    Electroactive polymers, or EAPs, are polymers that exhibit a change in size or shape when stimulated by an electric field. The most common applications of this type of material are in actuators and sensors. One promising technology is the elaboration of electronic conducting polymers based actuators with Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (IPNs) architecture. Their many advantageous properties as low working voltage, light weight and high lifetime make them very attractive for various applications including robotics. Conducting IPNs were fabricated by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene within a flexible Solid Polymer Electrolytes (SPE) combining poly(ethylene oxide) and Nitrile Butadiene Rubber. SPE mechanical properties and ionic conductivities in the presence of 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMITFSI) have been characterized. The presence of the elastomer within the SPE greatly improves the actuator performances. The free strain as well as the blocking force was characterized as a function of the actuator length. The sensing properties of those conducting IPNs allow their integration into a biomimetic perception prototype: a system mimicking the tactile perception of rat vibrissae.

  5. Lactoferrin Adsorbed onto Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals Controlling - In Vivo - the Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgione, Andrea; Nocerino, Nunzia; Iannaccone, Marco; Roperto, Sante; Capuano, Federico; Roveri, Norberto; Lelli, Marco; Crasto, Antonio; Calogero, Armando; Pilloni, Argenia Paola; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Background The resistance of Helicobacter pylori to the antibiotic therapy poses the problem to discover new therapeutic approaches. Recently it has been stated that antibacterial, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant properties of lactoferrin are increased when this protein is surface-linked to biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. Objective Based on these knowledge, the aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an alternative therapy against Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Antibacterial and antinflammatory properties, humoral antibody induction, histopathological analysis and absence of side effects were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Results The tests carried out have been demonstrated better performance of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles combined with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei compared to both lactoferrin and probiotic alone or pooled. Conclusion These findings indicate the effectiveness and safety of our proposed therapy as alternative treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:27384186

  6. Microfluidic devices for investigation of biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna

    The term biomimetic membrane denotes membrane that mimics biological cell membrane. Artificially made membranes are powerful tools for the fundamental biophysical studies of membrane proteins. Moreover, they may be used in biomedicine, serving as biosensors in high-throughput screening of potential...... mentioned difficulties. First, a device that facilitates atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of biomimetic membranes is presented. The microfluidic device was specifically designed and fabricated to accommodate the AFM probes that were used to study micrometer-sized fluid polymeric membranes. Second...... to microfluidic designs involving protein delivery to biomimetic membranes developed for sensor and separation applications. Finally, an OMP functionality modulation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was shown and revealed the protein potential application as a sensor. Moreover, the β-CD blocker may be used...

  7. Stress-strain properties of natural and biomimetically formed collagen constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Clara; Chirita, Mihai

    2008-01-01

    The biomimetic formed solution of collagen reconstituted films into native fibers proved to be of high interest because of its regenerative medical applications. A variety of tests to characterize the mechanical properties of biomimetic engineered films are illustrated in this paper. Based on our previous results, the modulus of elasticity and the ultimate strain of reconstituted collagen films were compared to the reported stress-strain data in the literature on various tissues (animal material), correlating the achieved properties with possible use for artificial tissue implants. The results presented in this study, with great potential to provide reference data for future work, show that the mechanical properties of the biomimetically formed collagen films is close to that of several native collagen fibers, a fact which suggests their use in medical applications. PMID:19212039

  8. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

    1993-09-01

    In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

  9. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  10. Fingerprint attendance system based on hypersphere covering of biomimetic pattern recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Yin, Ye; Cui, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Hypersphere covering of biomimetic pattern recognition method has the features of fast identification,low rate of false recognition,easy implementation,and so on.It is particularly suitable for a number of strong practical applications.In this paper,we study a biomimetic pattern recognition method based on the hypersphere string covering and apply it in a fingerprint attendance system.On the basis of analyzing actual teaching needs,we design a complete hardware and software system for the fin...

  11. Free-standing biomimetic polymer membrane imaged with atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Christian; Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius;

    2011-01-01

    Fluid polymeric biomimetic membranes are probed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using probes with both normal tetrahedrally shaped tips and nanoneedle-shaped Ag2Ga rods. When using nanoneedle probes, the collected force volume data show three distinct membrane regions which match the expected...... membrane structure when spanning an aperture in a hydrophobic scaffold. The method used provides a general method for mapping attractive fluid surfaces. In particular, the nanoneedle probing allows for characterization of free-standing biomimetic membranes with thickness on the nanometer scale suspended...

  12. Preparation of microcellular composites with biomimetic structure via supercritical fluid technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new microcellular composite material with a biomimetic structure has been prepared via the supercritical fluid (SCF) technology. The resultant material has a clear biomimetic structure like bamboo and wood. The skin region is enriched with oriented high-strength thermotropic liquid crystal polymer fibrils, while the core region with polystyrene (PS) micro-cells. The diameter and density of micro- cells can be controlled by the processing parameters such as temperature and pressure. And the skin thickness can be controlled conveniently by varying the composition of polystyrene and liquid crystal polymer.

  13. Experimental research on biomimetic drag-reducing surface application in natural gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yuehao; Zhang, Deyuan [Beihang Univ., Beijing (China). School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation

    2012-12-15

    In the context of natural gas pipelines the application of biomimetic drag-reducing technology has been proposed for the purpose of reducing wall resistance and increasing the transportation capacity by virtue of smooth internal coating. In this article, in order to validate the drag reduction effect, the precured micro-rolling technology (PCMRT) was adopted to fabricate the biomimetic drag-reducing pipes, and the field testing experiment with natural gas was performed for the first time, achieving a maximum drag reduction of 8.68%, which proves the feasibility of the application of this new technology in natural gas pipelines. (orig.)

  14. Characterization of antiseptic apatite powders prepared at biomimetics temperature and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumia Belouafa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Antiseptic apatite-based calcium phosphates were prepared as the single-phase powders. Phosphocalcic oxygenated apatites were synthesized from calcium salts and orthophosphate dissolved in oxygenated water solution at 30%, under the biomimetic conditions of 37 °C and pH 7.4. The characterization and chemical analysis of the synthesized biomimetic apatite powders were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, powder X ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and chemical analysis. The obtained materials are a calcium deficient apatites with different morphologies.

  15. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  16. Genetic Basis of Ethylene Perception and Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziqiang Zhu; Hongwei Guo

    2008-01-01

    Ethylene is a simple gaseous hormone in plants. It plays important roles in plant development and stress tolerance. In the presence of ethylene treatment, all ethylene receptors are in an activated form, which can physically interact with CTR1 and consequently recruit CTR1 protein to endoplasmic reticulum membrane to activate it. Activated CTR1 suppresses the downstream signal transduction by an unknown mechanism. Upon binding to its receptors, ethylene will inactivate the receptor/CTR1 module and in turn alleviate their inhibitory effect on two positive regulators acting downstream of CTRI: EIN2 and EIN3. Genetic study reveals that EIN2 is an essential component in the ethylene signaling pathway but its biochemical function remains a mystery. EIN3 is a plant-specific transcription factor and its protein abundance in the nucleus is rapidly induced upon ethylene treatment. In the absence of ethylene signal, EIN3 protein is degraded by an SCF complex containing one of the two F-box proteins EBF1/EBF2 in a 26S proteasome-dependent manner. EIN3 can bind to the promoter sequences of a number of downstream components, such as ERFs, which in turn bind to a GCC box,a cis-element found in many ethylene-regulated defense genes. Ethylene has been shown to also regulate many other hormones' signaling pathways including auxin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, implying the existence of complicated signaling networks in the growth, development and defense responses of various plants.

  17. Signal transduction by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mitogenic effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are mediated by the PDGF receptor. The mouse PDGF receptor was recently purified on the basis of its ability to become tyrosine phosphorylated in response to the A-B human platelet form of PDGF, and the receptor amino acid sequence was determined from a full-length cDNA clone. Both the human and mouse receptor cDNA sequences have been expressed in Chinese hamster ovary fibroblast (CHO) cells that normally lack PDGF receptors. This paper summarizes recent results using this system to study signal transduction by the PDGF receptor. Some of the findings show that the KI domain of the PDGF receptor plays an important role in the stimulation of DNA synthesis by PDGF. Surprisingly, the kinase insert region is not essential for PDGF stimulation of PtdIns turnover, pH change, increase in cellular calcium, and receptor autophosphorylation. In addition, PDGF stimulates a conformational change in the receptor

  18. Defect in radiation signal transduction in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation causes a delay in progression through the cycle at several checkpoints. Cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) ignore these checkpoint controls postirradiation. The tumour suppressor gene product p53 plays a key role at the G1/S checkpoint preventing the progression of cells into S phase. The induction of p53 by radiation is reduced and/or delayed in A-T cells, which appears to account for the failure of delay at the G1/S checkpoint. We have investigated further this defect in radiation signal transduction in A-T. While the p53 response was defective after radiation, agents that interfered with cell cycle progression such as mimosine, aphidicolin and deprivation of serum led to a normal p53 response in A-T cells. None of these agents caused breaks in DNA, as determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis, in order to elicit the response. Since this pathway is mediated by protein kinases, we investigated the activity of several of these enzymes in control and A-T cells. Ca+2-dependent and -independent protein kinase C activities were increased by radiation to the same extent in the two cell types, a variety of serine/threonine protein kinase activities were approximately the same and anti-tyrosine antibodies failed to reveal any differences in protein phosphorylation between A-T and control cells. (author)

  19. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Masahito [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States); Weinstein, I. Bernard [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States)]. E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-12-11

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities.

  20. Phosphoproteomics-based systems analysis of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eKozuka-Hata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems coordinate complex cellular information to regulate biological events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the accumulating evidence on widespread association of signaling molecules has revealed essential contribution of phosphorylation-dependent interaction networks to cellular regulation, their dynamic behavior is mostly yet to be analyzed. Recent technological advances regarding mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics have enabled us to describe the comprehensive status of phosphorylated molecules in a time-resolved manner. Computational analyses based on the phosphoproteome dynamics accelerate generation of novel methodologies for mathematical analysis of cellular signaling. Phosphoproteomics-based numerical modeling can be used to evaluate regulatory network elements from a statistical point of view. Integration with transcriptome dynamics also uncovers regulatory hubs at the transcriptional level. These omics-based computational methodologies, which have firstly been applied to representative signaling systems such as the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, have now opened up a gate for systems analysis of signaling networks involved in immune response and cancer.

  1. NO, nitrotyrosine, and cyclic GMP in signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, K. A.; Krumenacker, J. S.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in biology has evolved from being recognized as an environmental pollutant to an endogenously produced substance involved in cell communication and signal transduction. NO is produced by a family of enzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which can be stimulated by a variety of factors that mediate responses to various stimuli. NO can initiate its biological effects through activation of the heterodimeric enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or through several other chemical reactions. Activation of sGC results in the production of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an intracellular second messenger signaling molecule, which can subsequently mediate such diverse physiological events such as vasodilatation and immunomodulation. Chemically reactive NO can affect physiological changes through modifications to cellular proteins, one of which is tyrosine nitration. The demonstration that NO is involved in so many biological pathways indicates the importance of this endogenously produced substance, and suggests that there is much more to be discovered about its role in biology in years to come.

  2. Equivalent body-force model for magnetostrictive transduction in EMATs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter B.; Ribichini, Remo

    2015-03-01

    Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) are an attractive alternative to standard piezoelectric probes in those applications where couplant fluid cannot be used, i.e. high speed or high temperature testing, or when specific wave-modes have to be excited. When used on ferromagnetic samples, EMATs generate elastic waves through three different transduction mechanisms: the Lorentz force, the magnetization force and magnetostriction. The modeling of such phenomena has drawn the attention of several researchers, leading to different physical formalizations, especially for magnetostriction, being the most complex mechanism. This work presents a physics-based model for tangential bias field magnetostrictive EMATs employing surface tractions equivalent to the inertia body forces caused by magnetostrictive strains. This type of modeling had been previously used to validate a Finite Element model for normal bias field EMATs and here is extended to the tangential bias field configuration. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed model is equivalent to a recently developed method using the spatial convolution integral of body forces with Green's tensor to model elastic wave generation in a solid half-space.

  3. Transduction of Entangled Images by Localized Surface Plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowran, Mohammadjavad; Holtfrerich, Matthew; Lawrie, Benjamin; Davidson, Roderick; Pooser, Raphael; Marino, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Quantum plasmonics has attracted broad interest in recent years, motivated by nano-imaging and sub-wavelength photonic circuits. The potential for nanoscale quantum information processing and quantum plasmonic sensing has led to the study of the interface between quantum optics and plasmonics. We study the interface between continuous variable entangled images and localized surface plasmons (LSPs). We generate entangled images with four-wave mixing in hot Rb atoms. The entangled images are sent through two spatially separated plasmonic structures, which consist of an array of triangular nanoholes in a silver metal film designed to excite LSPs. After transduction through the plasmonic structure, mediated by extraordinary optical transmission (EOT), the entanglement properties of the light are characterized. We show that both the entanglement and spatial properties of the light are preserved by the LSPs. This results show that the transfer of entanglement and quantum information from multi-spatial mode photons to LSPs and back to photons is a coherent process that preserves the spatial quantum information of the incident light. By addressing two spatially separated plasmonic structures, the entanglement is effectively transferred to the plasmons for a short period of time. Work supported by the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Mannotriose regulates learning and memory signal transduction in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Zhang; Weiwei Dai; Xueli Zhang; Zhangbin Gong; Guoqin Jin

    2013-01-01

    Rehmannia is a commonly used Chinese herb, which improves learning and memory. However, the crucial components of the signal transduction pathway associated with this effect remain elusive. Pri-mary hippocampal neurons were cultured in vitro, insulted with high-concentration (1 × 10-4 mol/L) cor-ticosterone, and treated with 1 × 10-4 mol/L mannotriose. Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay and western blot analysis showed that hippocampal neuron survival rates and protein levels of glucocorti-coid receptor, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were al dramatical y decreased after high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. This effect was reversed by mannotriose, to a similar level as RU38486 and donepezil. Our findings indicate that mannotriose could protect hippocampal neurons from high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. The mechanism by which this occurred was associated with levels of glucocorticoid receptor protein, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  5. BowTieBuilder: modeling signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Adrian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory proteins react to changing environmental conditions by transducing signals into the cell. These signals are integrated into core proteins that activate downstream target proteins such as transcription factors (TFs. This structure is referred to as a bow tie, and allows cells to respond appropriately to complex environmental conditions. Understanding this cellular processing of information, from sensory proteins (e.g., cell-surface proteins to target proteins (e.g., TFs is important, yet for many processes the signaling pathways remain unknown. Results Here, we present BowTieBuilder for inferring signal transduction pathways from multiple source and target proteins. Given protein-protein interaction (PPI data signaling pathways are assembled without knowledge of the intermediate signaling proteins while maximizing the overall probability of the pathway. To assess the inference quality, BowTieBuilder and three alternative heuristics are applied to several pathways, and the resulting pathways are compared to reference pathways taken from KEGG. In addition, BowTieBuilder is used to infer a signaling pathway of the innate immune response in humans and a signaling pathway that potentially regulates an underlying gene regulatory network. Conclusion We show that BowTieBuilder, given multiple source and/or target proteins, infers pathways with satisfactory recall and precision rates and detects the core proteins of each pathway.

  6. Decoding the phosphorylation code in Hedgehog signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongbin Chen; Jin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis,and its deregulation leads to numerous human disorders including cancer.Binding of Hh to Patched (Ptc),a twelve-transmembrane protein,alleviates its inhibition of Smoothened (Smo),a seven-transmembrane protein related to G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs),leading to Smo phosphorylation and activation.Smo acts through intracellular signaling complexes to convert the latent transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Gli from a truncated repressor to a fulllength activator,leading to derepression/activation of Hh target genes.Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation participates in almost every step in the signal relay from Smo to Ci/Gli,and that differential phosphorylation of several key pathway components may be crucial for translating the Hh morphogen gradient into graded pathway activities.In this review,we focus on the multifaceted roles that phosphorylation plays in Hh signal transduction,and discuss the conservation and difference between Drosophila and mammalian Hh signaling mechanisms.

  7. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities

  8. An Investigation into the Effects of Interface Stress and Interfacial Arrangement on Temperature Dependent Thermal Properties of a Biological and a Biomimetic Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Vikas

    2015-01-13

    A significant effort in the biomimetic materials research is on developing materials that can mimic and function in the same way as biological tissues, on bio-inspired electronic circuits, on bio-inspired flight structures, on bio-mimetic materials processing, and on structural biomimetic materials, etc. Most structural biological and biomimetic material properties are affected by two primary factors: (1) interfacial interactions between an organic and an inorganic phase usually in the form of interactions between an inorganic mineral phase and organic protein network; and (2) structural arrangement of the constituents. Examples are exoskeleton structures such as spicule, nacre, and crustacean exoskeletons. A significant effort is being directed towards making synthetic biomimetic materials based on a manipulation of the above two primary factors. The proposed research is based on a hypothesis that in synthetic materials with biomimetic morphology thermal conductivity, k, (how fast heat is carried away) and thermal diffusivity, D, (how fast a material’s temperature rises: proportional to the ratio of k and heat capacity) can be engineered to be either significantly low or significantly high based on a combination of chosen interface orientation and interfacial arrangement in comparison to conventional material microstructures with the same phases and phase volume fractions. METHOD DEVELOPMENT 1. We have established a combined Raman spectroscopy and nanomechanical loading based experimental framework to perform environment (liquid vs. air vs. vacuum) dependent and temperature dependent (~1000 degree-C) in-situ thermal diffusivity measurements in biomaterials at nanoscale to micron scale along with the corresponding analytical theoretic calculations. (Zhang and Tomar, 2013) 2. We have also established a new classical molecular simulation based framework to measure thermal diffusivity in biomolecular interfaces. We are writing a publication currently (Qu and Tomar

  9. Disruption of Microtubules Post-Virus Entry Enhances Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Mitchell, Angela M; Huang, Lu; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R Jude

    2016-04-01

    Perinuclear retention of viral particles is a poorly understood phenomenon observed during many virus infections. In this study, we investigated whether perinuclear accumulation acts as a barrier to limit recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) transduction. After nocodazole treatment to disrupt microtubules at microtubule-organization center (MT-MTOC) after virus entry, we observed higher rAAV transduction. To elucidate the role of MT-MTOC in rAAV infection and study its underlying mechanisms, we demonstrated that rAAV's perinuclear localization was retained by MT-MTOC with fluorescent analysis, and enhanced rAAV transduction from MT-MTOC disruption was dependent on the rAAV capsid's nuclear import signals. Interestingly, after knocking down RhoA or inhibiting its downstream effectors (ROCK and Actin), MT-MTOC disruption failed to increase rAAV transduction or nuclear entry. These data suggest that enhancement of rAAV transduction is the result of increased trafficking to the nucleus via the RhoA-ROCK-Actin pathway. Ten-fold higher rAAV transduction was also observed by disrupting MT-MTOC in brain, liver, and tumor in vivo. In summary, this study indicates that virus perinuclear accumulation at MT-MTOC is a barrier-limiting parameter for effective rAAV transduction and defines a novel defense mechanism by which host cells restrain viral invasion. PMID:26942476

  10. Synthesis and characterization of biomimetic citrate-based biodegradable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Richard T; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Minjun; Tang, Wanjin; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Zhongmin; Jin, Dadi; Banik, Brittany; Brown, Justin L; Xie, Zhiwei; Bai, Xiaochun; Yang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Natural bone apatite crystals, which mediate the development and regulate the load-bearing function of bone, have recently been associated with strongly bound citrate molecules. However, such understanding has not been translated into bone biomaterial design and osteoblast cell culture. In this work, we have developed a new class of biodegradable, mechanically strong, and biocompatible citrate-based polymer blends (CBPBs), which offer enhanced hydroxyapatite binding to produce more biomimetic composites (CBPBHAs) for orthopedic applications. CBPBHAs consist of the newly developed osteoconductive citrate-presenting biodegradable polymers, crosslinked urethane-doped polyester and poly (octanediol citrate), which can be composited with up to 65 wt % hydroxyapatite. CBPBHA networks produced materials with a compressive strength of 116.23 ± 5.37 MPa comparable to human cortical bone (100-230 MPa), and increased C2C12 osterix gene and alkaline phosphatase gene expression in vitro. The promising results above prompted an investigation on the role of citrate supplementation in culture medium for osteoblast culture, which showed that exogenous citrate supplemented into media accelerated the in vitro phenotype progression of MG-63 osteoblasts. After 6 weeks of implantation in a rabbit lateral femoral condyle defect model, CBPBHA composites elicited minimal fibrous tissue encapsulation and were well integrated with the surrounding bone tissues. The development of citrate-presenting CBPBHA biomaterials and preliminary studies revealing the effects of free exogenous citrate on osteoblast culture shows the potential of citrate biomaterials to bridge the gap in orthopedic biomaterial design and osteoblast cell culture in that the role of citrate molecules has previously been overlooked. PMID:23996976

  11. The hydrodynamic function of shark skin and two biomimetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeffner, Johannes; Lauder, George V

    2012-03-01

    It has long been suspected that the denticles on shark skin reduce hydrodynamic drag during locomotion, and a number of man-made materials have been produced that purport to use shark-skin-like surface roughness to reduce drag during swimming. But no studies to date have tested these claims of drag reduction under dynamic and controlled conditions in which the swimming speed and hydrodynamics of shark skin and skin-like materials can be quantitatively compared with those of controls lacking surface ornamentation or with surfaces in different orientations. We use a flapping foil robotic device that allows accurate determination of the self-propelled swimming (SPS) speed of both rigid and flexible membrane-like foils made of shark skin and two biomimetic models of shark skin to measure locomotor performance. We studied the SPS speed of real shark skin, a silicone riblet material with evenly spaced ridges and a Speedo® 'shark skin-like' swimsuit fabric attached to rigid flat-plate foils and when made into flexible membrane-like foils. We found no consistent increase in swimming speed with Speedo® fabric, a 7.2% increase with riblet material, whereas shark skin membranes (but not rigid shark skin plates) showed a mean 12.3% increase in swimming speed compared with the same skin foils after removing the denticles. Deformation of the shark skin membrane is thus crucial to the drag-reducing effect of surface denticles. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) of the flow field surrounding moving shark skin foils shows that skin denticles promote enhanced leading-edge suction, which might have contributed to the observed increase in swimming speed. Shark skin denticles might thus enhance thrust, as well as reduce drag. PMID:22323201

  12. Applying Biomimetic Algorithms for Extra-Terrestrial Habitat Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to simulate and optimize distributed cooperation among a network of robots tasked with cooperative excavation on an extra-terrestrial surface. Additionally to examine the concept of directed Emergence among a group of limited artificially intelligent agents. Emergence is the concept of achieving complex results from very simple rules or interactions. For example, in a termite mound each individual termite does not carry a blueprint of how to make their home in a global sense, but their interactions based strictly on local desires create a complex superstructure. Leveraging this Emergence concept applied to a simulation of cooperative agents (robots) will allow an examination of the success of non-directed group strategy achieving specific results. Specifically the simulation will be a testbed to evaluate population based robotic exploration and cooperative strategies while leveraging the evolutionary teamwork approach in the face of uncertainty about the environment and partial loss of sensors. Checking against a cost function and 'social' constraints will optimize cooperation when excavating a simulated tunnel. Agents will act locally with non-local results. The rules by which the simulated robots interact will be optimized to the simplest possible for the desired result, leveraging Emergence. Sensor malfunction and line of sight issues will be incorporated into the simulation. This approach falls under Swarm Robotics, a subset of robot control concerned with finding ways to control large groups of robots. Swarm Robotics often contains biologically inspired approaches, research comes from social insect observation but also data from among groups of herding, schooling, and flocking animals. Biomimetic algorithms applied to manned space exploration is the method under consideration for further study.

  13. Biomimetic control over size, shape and aggregation in magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerdijk, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a widespread magnetic iron oxide encountered in both geological and biomineralizing systems, which also has many technological applications, e.g. in ferrofluids, inks, magnetic data storage materials and as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. As its magnetic properties depend largely on the size and shape of the crystals, control over crystal morphology is an important aspect in the application of magnetite nanoparticles, both in biology and synthetic systems. Indeed, in nature organisms such as magnetotactic bacteria demonstrate a precise control over the magnetite crystal morphology, resulting in uniform and monodisperse nanoparticles. The magnetite formation in these bacteria is believed to occur through the co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, which is also the most widely applied synthetic route in industry. Synthetic strategies to magnetite with controlled size and shape exist, but involve high temperatures and rather harsh chemical conditions. However, synthesis via co-precipitation generally yields poor control over the morphology and therefore over the magnetic properties of the obtained crystals. Here we demonstrate that by tuning the reaction kinetics we can achieve biomimetic control over the size and shape of magnetite crystals but also over their organization in solution as well as their magnetic properties. We employ amino acids-based polymers to direct the formation of magnetite in aqueous media at room temperature via both the co-precipitation and the partial oxidation method. By using 2D and 3D (cryo)TEM it is shown that acidic amino acid monomers are most effective in affecting the magnetite particle morphology. By changing the composition of the polymers we can tune the morphology, the dispersibility as well as the magnetic properties of these nanoparticles.

  14. Controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Maki K

    2007-08-30

    Humanitarian demining requires to accurately detect, locate and deactivate every single landmine and other buried mine-like objects as safely and as quickly as possible, and in the most non-invasive manner. The quality of landmine detection affects directly the efficiency and safety of this process. Most of the available methods to detect explosives and landmines are limited by their sensitivity and/or operational complexities. All landmines leak with time small amounts of their explosives that can be found on surrounding ground and plant life. Hence, explosive signatures represent the robust primary indicator of landmines. Accordingly, developing innovative technologies and efficient techniques to identify in real-time explosives residue in mined areas represents an attractive and promising approach. Biological and biologically inspired detection technology has the potential to compete with or be used in conjunction with other artificial technology to complement performance strengths. Biological systems are sensitive to many different scents concurrently, a property that has proven difficult to replicate artificially. Understanding biological systems presents unique opportunities for developing new capabilities through direct use of trained bio-systems, integration of living and non-living components, or inspiring new design by mimicking biological capabilities. It is expected that controlled bio-systems, biotechnology and microbial techniques will contribute to the advancement of mine detection and other application domains. This paper provides directions, evaluation and analysis on the progress of controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection. It introduces and discusses different approaches developed, underlining their relative advantages and limitations, and highlighting trends, safety and ecology concern, and possible future directions. PMID:17662594

  15. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  16. Plasmid transduction by Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage SPP1: effects of DNA homology between plasmid and bacteriophage.

    OpenAIRE

    Deichelbohrer, I; Alonso, J.C.; Lüder, G; Trautner, T A

    1985-01-01

    Any SPP1 DNA restriction fragment cloned into Bacillus subtilis plasmid pC194 or pUB110 increased the transduction frequency of the plasmid by SPP1 100- to 1,000-fold over the transduction level of the plasmid alone. This increment was observed irrespective of whether a fragment contained the SPP1 packaging origin (pac). Furthermore, an SPP1 derivative into whose genome pC194 DNA had been integrated transduced pC194 DNA with a greatly enhanced frequency. Transduction enhancement mediated by D...

  17. Biomimetically-mineralized composite coatings on titanium functionalized with gelatin methacrylate hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guoxin; Zhou, Lei; Ning, Chengyun; Tan, Ying; Ni, Guoxin; Liao, Jingwen; Yu, Peng; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2013-08-01

    Immobilizing organic-inorganic hybrid composites onto the implant surface is a promising strategy to improve host acceptance of the implant. The objective of this present study was to obtain a unique macroporous titanium-surface with the organic-mineral composite coatings consisting of gelatin methacrylate hydrogel (GelMA) and hydroxyapatite (HA). A 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA) layer was first coated onto the titanium surface, and surface was then covalently functionalized with GelMA using a photochemical method. Mineralization of the GelMA coating on the titanium surface was subsequently carried out by a biomimetic method. After 3-day mineralization, a large number of mineral phases comprising spherical amorphous nanoparticles were found randomly deposited inside GelMA matrix. The resulting mineralized hydrogel composites exhibited a unique rough surface of macroporous structure. The structure of the prepared GelMA/HA composite coating was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS), attenuated total refraction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Water contact angle measurement revealed the hydrophilicity properties of composite coatings. GelMA/HA on titanium after the TMSPMA treatment is very stable when tested in vitro with a PBS solution at 37 °C, due to the role of TMSPMA as a molecular bridge. It was expected that the macroporous GelMA/HA composite coatings might potentially promote and accelerate titanium (Ti)-based implants osseointegration for bone repair and regeneration.

  18. Biomimetically-mineralized composite coatings on titanium functionalized with gelatin methacrylate hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilizing organic–inorganic hybrid composites onto the implant surface is a promising strategy to improve host acceptance of the implant. The objective of this present study was to obtain a unique macroporous titanium-surface with the organic–mineral composite coatings consisting of gelatin methacrylate hydrogel (GelMA) and hydroxyapatite (HA). A 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA) layer was first coated onto the titanium surface, and surface was then covalently functionalized with GelMA using a photochemical method. Mineralization of the GelMA coating on the titanium surface was subsequently carried out by a biomimetic method. After 3-day mineralization, a large number of mineral phases comprising spherical amorphous nanoparticles were found randomly deposited inside GelMA matrix. The resulting mineralized hydrogel composites exhibited a unique rough surface of macroporous structure. The structure of the prepared GelMA/HA composite coating was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS), attenuated total refraction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Water contact angle measurement revealed the hydrophilicity properties of composite coatings. GelMA/HA on titanium after the TMSPMA treatment is very stable when tested in vitro with a PBS solution at 37 °C, due to the role of TMSPMA as a molecular bridge. It was expected that the macroporous GelMA/HA composite coatings might potentially promote and accelerate titanium (Ti)-based implants osseointegration for bone repair and regeneration.

  19. Biomimetically-mineralized composite coatings on titanium functionalized with gelatin methacrylate hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Guoxin, E-mail: tanguoxin@126.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Zhou, Lei [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Ning, Chengyun, E-mail: imcyning@scut.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Technology, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510641 (China); Tan, Ying [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Ni, Guoxin [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515 (China); Liao, Jingwen; Yu, Peng; Chen, Xiaofeng [College of Materials Science and Technology, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510641 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Immobilizing organic–inorganic hybrid composites onto the implant surface is a promising strategy to improve host acceptance of the implant. The objective of this present study was to obtain a unique macroporous titanium-surface with the organic–mineral composite coatings consisting of gelatin methacrylate hydrogel (GelMA) and hydroxyapatite (HA). A 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA) layer was first coated onto the titanium surface, and surface was then covalently functionalized with GelMA using a photochemical method. Mineralization of the GelMA coating on the titanium surface was subsequently carried out by a biomimetic method. After 3-day mineralization, a large number of mineral phases comprising spherical amorphous nanoparticles were found randomly deposited inside GelMA matrix. The resulting mineralized hydrogel composites exhibited a unique rough surface of macroporous structure. The structure of the prepared GelMA/HA composite coating was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS), attenuated total refraction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Water contact angle measurement revealed the hydrophilicity properties of composite coatings. GelMA/HA on titanium after the TMSPMA treatment is very stable when tested in vitro with a PBS solution at 37 °C, due to the role of TMSPMA as a molecular bridge. It was expected that the macroporous GelMA/HA composite coatings might potentially promote and accelerate titanium (Ti)-based implants osseointegration for bone repair and regeneration.

  20. Matricellular signal transduction involving calmodulin in the social amoebozoan dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Huber, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes a developmental sequence wherein an extracellular matrix (ECM) sheath surrounds a group of differentiating cells. This sheath is comprised of proteins and carbohydrates, like the ECM of mammalian tissues. One of the characterized ECM proteins is the cysteine-rich, EGF-like (EGFL) repeat-containing, calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) CyrA. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA increases the rate of random cell motility and cyclic AMP-mediated chemotaxis. Processing of full-length CyrA (~63 kDa) releases two major EGFL repeat-containing fragments (~45 kDa and ~40 kDa) in an event that is developmentally regulated. Evidence for an EGFL repeat receptor also exists and downstream intracellular signaling pathways involving CaM, Ras, protein kinase A and vinculin B phosphorylation have been characterized. In total, these results identify CyrA as a true matricellular protein comparable in function to tenascin C and other matricellular proteins from mammalian cells. Insight into the regulation and processing of CyrA has also been revealed. CyrA is the first identified extracellular CaMBP in this eukaryotic microbe. In keeping with this, extracellular CaM (extCaM) has been shown to be present in the ECM sheath where it binds to CyrA and inhibits its cleavage to release the 45 kDa and 40 kDa EGFL repeat-containing fragments. The presence of extCaM and its role in regulating a matricellular protein during morphogenesis extends our understanding of CaM-mediated signal transduction in eukaryotes. PMID:24705101

  1. Matricellular Signal Transduction Involving Calmodulin in the Social Amoebozoan Dictyostelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danton H. O'Day

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes a developmental sequence wherein an extracellular matrix (ECM sheath surrounds a group of differentiating cells. This sheath is comprised of proteins and carbohydrates, like the ECM of mammalian tissues. One of the characterized ECM proteins is the cysteine-rich, EGF-like (EGFL repeat-containing, calmodulin (CaM-binding protein (CaMBP CyrA. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA increases the rate of random cell motility and cyclic AMP-mediated chemotaxis. Processing of full-length CyrA (~63 kDa releases two major EGFL repeat-containing fragments (~45 kDa and ~40 kDa in an event that is developmentally regulated. Evidence for an EGFL repeat receptor also exists and downstream intracellular signaling pathways involving CaM, Ras, protein kinase A and vinculin B phosphorylation have been characterized. In total, these results identify CyrA as a true matricellular protein comparable in function to tenascin C and other matricellular proteins from mammalian cells. Insight into the regulation and processing of CyrA has also been revealed. CyrA is the first identified extracellular CaMBP in this eukaryotic microbe. In keeping with this, extracellular CaM (extCaM has been shown to be present in the ECM sheath where it binds to CyrA and inhibits its cleavage to release the 45 kDa and 40 kDa EGFL repeat-containing fragments. The presence of extCaM and its role in regulating a matricellular protein during morphogenesis extends our understanding of CaM-mediated signal transduction in eukaryotes.

  2. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  3. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  4. Biomechanical Origins of Muscle Stem Cell Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, James B; Cheng, Richard Y; Davoudi, Sadegh; Gilbert, Penney M

    2016-04-10

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant and widespread tissue in the human body, contracts upon receiving electrochemical signals from the nervous system to support essential functions such as thermoregulation, limb movement, blinking, swallowing and breathing. Reconstruction of adult muscle tissue relies on a pool of mononucleate, resident muscle stem cells, known as "satellite cells", expressing the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 necessary for their specification during embryonic development and long-term maintenance during adult life. Satellite cells are located around the myofibres in a niche at the interface of the basal lamina and the host fibre plasma membrane (i.e., sarcolemma), at a very low frequency. Upon damage to the myofibres, quiescent satellite cells are activated and give rise to a population of transient amplifying myogenic progenitor cells, which eventually exit the cell cycle permanently and fuse to form new myofibres and regenerate the tissue. A subpopulation of satellite cells self-renew and repopulate the niche, poised to respond to future demands. Harnessing the potential of satellite cells relies on a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms guiding their regulation in vivo. Over the past several decades, studies revealed many signal transduction pathways responsible for satellite cell fate decisions, but the niche cues driving the activation and silencing of these pathways are less clear. Here we explore the scintillating possibility that considering the dynamic changes in the biophysical properties of the skeletal muscle, namely stiffness, and the stretch and shear forces to which a myofibre can be subjected to may provide missing information necessary to gain a full understanding of satellite cell niche regulation. PMID:26004541

  5. Fish and robots swimming together: attraction towards the robot demands biomimetic locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Stefano; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    The integration of biomimetic robots in a fish school may enable a better understanding of collective behaviour, offering a new experimental method to test group feedback in response to behavioural modulations of its 'engineered' member. Here, we analyse a robotic fish and individual golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) swimming together in a water tunnel at different flow velocities. We determine the positional preference of fish with respect to the robot, and we study the flow structure using a digital particle image velocimetry system. We find that biomimetic locomotion is a determinant of fish preference as fish are more attracted towards the robot when its tail is beating rather than when it is statically immersed in the water as a 'dummy'. At specific conditions, the fish hold station behind the robot, which may be due to the hydrodynamic advantage obtained by swimming in the robot's wake. This work makes a compelling case for the need of biomimetic locomotion in promoting robot-animal interactions and it strengthens the hypothesis that biomimetic robots can be used to study and modulate collective animal behaviour. PMID:22356819

  6. Osteointegration of biomimetic apatite coating applied onto dense and porous metal implants in femurs of goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrere, F.; Valk, van der C.M.; Meijer, G.; Dalmeijer, R.A.J.; Groot, de K.; Layrolle, P.

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetic calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings were applied onto dense titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and porous tantalum (Ta) cylinders by immersion into simulated body fluid at 37 °C and then at 50 °C for 24 h. As a result, a homogeneous bone-like carbonated apatitic (BCA) coating, 30 m thick was deposite

  7. A Novel General Chemistry Laboratory: Creation of Biomimetic Superhydrophobic Surfaces through Replica Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanic, Samuel; Brady, Owen; Sanda, Ahmed; Gustafson, Carolina; Donhauser, Zachary J.

    2014-01-01

    Biomimetic replicas of superhydrophobic lotus and taro leaf surfaces can be made using polydimethylsiloxane. These replicas faithfully reproduce the microstructures of the leaves' surface and can be analyzed using contact angle goniometry, self-cleaning experiments, and optical microscopy. These simple and adaptable experiments were used to…

  8. Biomimetic synthesis and antiproliferative properties of racemic natural(-) and unnnatural(+) glyceollin I

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 14-step biomimetic synthetic route to glyceollin I in ca. 1.5% overall yield has been developed. In addition to being useful for the elaboration of analogs that can contribute to SAR, this route provides practical access to analytical standards that may be used for quality control purposes when gl...

  9. Directed Fluid Flow Produced by Arrays of Magnetically Actuated Core-Shell Biomimetic Cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiser, B. L.; Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Superfine, R.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a novel core-shell microstructure that we use to fabricate arrays of flexible, magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia. Our biomimetic cilia mimic the size and beat shape of biological cilia in order to replicate the transport of fluid driven by cilia in many biological systems including the determination of left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate embryonic nodal plate and mucociliary clearance in the lung. Our core-shell structures consist of a flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) core surrounded by a shell of nickel approximately forty nanometers thick; by using a core-shell structure, we can tune the mechanical and magnetic properties independently. We present the fabrication process and the long-range transport that occurs above the beating biomimetic cilia tips and will report on progress toward biomimetic cilia induced flow in viscoelastic fluids similar to mucus in the human airway. These flows may have applications in photonics and microfluidics, and our structures may be further useful as sensors or actuators in microelectromechanical systems.

  10. Preparation and properties of polyurethane/silicone materials for biomimetic gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Dai, Zhendong; Yang, Shengrong

    2014-03-01

    In the biomimetic design of gecko setae, it is necessary to select materials with appropriate adhesive properties and to understand the effects of materials on normal and tangential adhesive forces. To meet the adhesion performance requirements of the biomimetic gecko robot foot, in this study, performance-improved polyurethane/silicone polymer materials were designed and synthesized, and the normal adhesion and tangential adhesion were measured using an adhesive friction comprehensive tester. The results show that normal adhesion increased with an increase in load when the normal load is small; when the normal load exceeds a critical value, the increase in normal adhesion slows and adhesion saturates. Under the condition of an adhesive state, the tangential adhesive force was larger for a smaller negative normal force, and a relatively large tangential adhesive force could be generated with a very small negative normal force. The elastic modulus of the synthetic polyurethane/silicone material varied with varying ratios of components, and it increased with increasing urethane content. Polyurethane/silicone material with about 30% polyurethane provided greater adhesion than other materials with different contents of polyurethane. The results provide a basis for the choice of biomimetic materials of the biomimetic gecko robot foot.

  11. A New Absorbable Synthetic Substitute With Biomimetic Design for Dural Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhidong; Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Deng, Kunxue; Liu, Man; Ke, Yiquan; Luo, Chengyi; Yuan, Tun; Ayyad, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Dural repair products are evolving from animal tissue-derived materials to synthetic materials as well as from inert to absorbable features; most of them lack functional and structural characteristics compared with the natural dura mater. In the present study, we evaluated the properties and tissue repair performance of a new dural repair product with biomimetic design. The biomimetic patch exhibits unique three-dimensional nonwoven microfiber structure with good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. The animal study showed that the biomimetic patch and commercially synthetic material group presented new subdural regeneration at 90 days, with low level inflammatory response and minimal to no adhesion formation detected at each stage. In the biological material group, no new subdural regeneration was observed and severe adhesion between the implant and the cortex occurred at each stage. In clinical case study, there was no cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and all the postoperation observations were normal. The biomimetic structure and proper rate of degradation of the new absorbable dura substitute can guide the meaningful reconstruction of the dura mater, which may provide a novel approach for dural defect repair. PMID:26526152

  12. Biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating on pore walls improves osteointegration of poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplaine, H; Lebourg, M; Ripalda, P; Vidaurre, A; Sanz-Ramos, P; Mora, G; Prósper, F; Ochoa, I; Doblaré, M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Izal-Azcárate, I; Gallego Ferrer, G

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-ceramic composites obtained as the result of a mineralization process hold great promise for the future of tissue engineering. Simulated body fluids (SBFs) are widely used for the mineralization of polymer scaffolds. In this work an exhaustive study with the aim of optimizing the mineralization process on a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) macroporous scaffold has been performed. We observed that when an air plasma treatment is applied to the PLLA scaffold its hydroxyapatite nucleation ability is considerably improved. However, plasma treatment only allows apatite deposition on the surface of the scaffold but not in its interior. When a 5 wt % of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles is mixed with PLLA a more abundant biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer grows inside the scaffold in SBF. The morphology, amount, and composition of the generated biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer on the pores' surface have been analyzed. Large mineralization times are harmful to pure PLLA as it rapidly degrades and its elastic compression modulus significantly decreases. Degradation is retarded in the composite scaffolds because of the faster and extensive biomimetic apatite deposition and the role of HAp to control the pH. Mineralized scaffolds, covered by an apatite layer in SBF, were implanted in osteochondral lesions performed in the medial femoral condyle of healthy sheep. We observed that the presence of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on the pore's surface of the composite scaffold produces a better integration in the subchondral bone, in comparison to bare PLLA scaffolds. PMID:23152082

  13. Biomimetic Mussel Adhesive Inspired Clickable Anchors Applied to the Functionalization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldmann, Anja S.; Schoedel, Christine; Walther, Andreas; Yuan, Jiayin; Loos, Katja; Mueller, Axel H. E.; Müller, Axel H.E.

    2010-01-01

    The functionalization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with dopamine-derived clickable biomimetic anchors is reported. Herein, an alkyne-modified catechol-derivative is employed as the anchor, as i) the catechol-functional anchor groups possess irreversible covalent binding affinity to Fe3O4 nanop

  14. A Biomimetic Strategy to Access the Silybins: Total Synthesis of (−)-Isosilybin A

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Benjamin R.; Nibbs, Antoinette E.; Scheidt, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first asymmetric, total synthesis of (−)-isosilybin A. A late-stage catalytic biomimetic cyclization of a highly functionalized chalcone is employed to form the characteristic benzopyranone ring. A robust and flexible approach to this chalcone provides an entry to the preparation of the entire isomeric family of silybin natural products.

  15. Biomimetic 'Green' Synthesis of Nanomaterials Using Antioxidants-Vitamins, Glutathione and Polyphenols from Tea and Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation summarizes our recent activity in chemical synthesis of nanomaterials via benign biomimetic ‘greener’ alternatives,1 such as the use antioxidants present in a variety of natural products, and ubiquitous glutathione in aqueous media.2 Vitamins B1, B2, C, and tea ...

  16. Biomimetic triblock copolymer membrane arrays: a stable template for functional membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, A.; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius; Vissing, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that biomimetic stable triblock copolymer membrane arrays can be prepared using a scaffold containing 64 apertures of 300 μm diameter each. The membranes were made from a stock solution of block copolymers with decane as a solvent using a new deposition method. By using decane...

  17. Can Stabilization and Inhibition of Aquaporins Contribute to Future Development of Biomimetic Membranes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Janet; Torres, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the use of biomimetic membranes that incorporate membrane proteins, i.e., biomimetic-hybrid membranes, has increased almost exponentially. Key membrane proteins in these systems have been aquaporins, which selectively permeabilize cellular membranes to water. Aquaporins may be incorporated into synthetic lipid bilayers or to more stable structures made of block copolymers or solid-state nanopores. However, translocation of aquaporins to these alien environments has adverse consequences in terms of performance and stability. Aquaporins incorporated in biomimetic membranes for use in water purification and desalination should also withstand the harsh environment that may prevail in these conditions, such as high pressure, and presence of salt or other chemicals. In this respect, modified aquaporins that can be adapted to these new environments should be developed. Another challenge is that biomimetic membranes that incorporate high densities of aquaporin should be defect-free, and this can only be efficiently ascertained with the availability of completely inactive mutants that behave otherwise like the wild type aquaporin, or with effective non-toxic water channel inhibitors that are so far inexistent. In this review, we describe approaches that can potentially be used to overcome these challenges. PMID:26266425

  18. Can Stabilization and Inhibition of Aquaporins Contribute to Future Development of Biomimetic Membranes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet To

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of biomimetic membranes that incorporate membrane proteins, i.e., biomimetic-hybrid membranes, has increased almost exponentially. Key membrane proteins in these systems have been aquaporins, which selectively permeabilize cellular membranes to water. Aquaporins may be incorporated into synthetic lipid bilayers or to more stable structures made of block copolymers or solid-state nanopores. However, translocation of aquaporins to these alien environments has adverse consequences in terms of performance and stability. Aquaporins incorporated in biomimetic membranes for use in water purification and desalination should also withstand the harsh environment that may prevail in these conditions, such as high pressure, and presence of salt or other chemicals. In this respect, modified aquaporins that can be adapted to these new environments should be developed. Another challenge is that biomimetic membranes that incorporate high densities of aquaporin should be defect-free, and this can only be efficiently ascertained with the availability of completely inactive mutants that behave otherwise like the wild type aquaporin, or with effective non-toxic water channel inhibitors that are so far inexistent. In this review, we describe approaches that can potentially be used to overcome these challenges.

  19. Biomimetic Receptors for Bioanalyte Detection by Quartz Crystal Microbalances — From Molecules to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Latif

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A universal label-free detection of bioanalytes can be performed with biomimetic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM coatings prepared by imprinting strategies. Bulk imprinting was used to detect the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs known as estradiols. The estrogen 17β-estradiol is one of the most potent EDCs, even at very low concentrations. A highly sensitive, selective and robust QCM sensor was fabricated for real time monitoring of 17β-estradiol in water samples by using molecular imprinted polyurethane. Optimization of porogen (pyrene and cross-linker (phloroglucinol levels leads to improved sensitivity, selectivity and response time of the estradiol sensor. Surface imprinting of polyurethane as sensor coating also allowed us to generate interaction sites for the selective recognition of bacteria, even in a very complex mixture of interfering compounds, while they were growing from their spores in nutrient solution. A double molecular imprinting approach was followed to transfer the geometrical features of natural bacteria onto the synthetic polymer to generate biomimetic bacteria. The use of biomimetic bacteria as template makes it possible to prepare multiple sensor coatings with similar sensitivity and selectivity. Thus, cell typing, e.g., differentiation of bacteria strains, bacteria growth profile and extent of their nutrition, can be monitored by biomimetic mass sensors. Obviously, this leads to controlled cell growth in bioreactors.

  20. Preparation of biomimetic hydrophobic coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The hydrophobic coating has been a promising technology for improving surface performance. The surface performance of magnesium alloy has been limited in application. Furthermore, the hydrophobic of magnesium alloy is rarely investigated because magnesium alloy is an active metal alloy. In this paper, inspired by microstructure character of typical plant leaf surface such as lotus, the biomimetic hydrophobic coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface were prepared by means of wet-chemical combining electroless. The samples were immersed into AgNO3 solution in wet-chemical method firstly. Then, biomimetic hydrophobic coatings were prepared by electroless after wet-method pretreatment. The microstructure was observed by SEM and the contact angles were measured by contact angle tester. The results indicated that the biomimetic hydrophobic coatings with uniform crystalline and dense structure could be obtained on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface. The results of contact angle revealed that the biomimetic nano-composite coatings were hydrophobic. The wet-chemical method treatment on the AZ91D magnesium alloy substrate provided a rough microstructure, thus improving adhesion of the coating and the substrate.

  1. Bio-Mimetics of Disaster Anticipation—Learning Experience and Key-Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Tributsch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anomalies in animal behavior and meteorological phenomena before major earthquakes have been reported throughout history. Bio-mimetics or bionics aims at learning disaster anticipation from animals. Since modern science is reluctant to address this problem an effort has been made to track down the knowledge available to ancient natural philosophers. Starting with an archaeologically documented human sacrifice around 1700 B.C. during the Minoan civilization immediately before a large earthquake, which killed the participants, earthquake prediction knowledge throughout antiquity is evaluated. Major practical experience with this phenomenon has been gained from a Chinese earthquake prediction initiative nearly half a century ago. Some quakes, like that of Haicheng, were recognized in advance. However, the destructive Tangshan earthquake was not predicted, which was interpreted as an inherent failure of prediction based on animal phenomena. This is contradicted on the basis of reliable Chinese documentation provided by the responsible earthquake study commission. The Tangshan earthquake was preceded by more than 2,000 reported animal anomalies, some of which were of very dramatic nature. They are discussed here. Any physical phenomenon, which may cause animal unrest, must involve energy turnover before the main earthquake event. The final product, however, of any energy turnover is heat. Satellite based infrared measurements have indeed identified significant thermal anomalies before major earthquakes. One of these cases, occurring during the 2001 Bhuj earthquake in Gujarat, India, is analyzed together with parallel animal anomalies observed in the Gir national park. It is suggested that the time window is identical and that both phenomena have the same geophysical origin. It therefore remains to be demonstrated that energy can be released locally before major earthquake events. It is shown that by considering appropriate geophysical feedback

  2. SELF-ADAPTIVE CONTROLS OF A COMPLEX CELLULAR SIGNALING TRANSDUCTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; ZHOU Zhiyuan; DAI Rongyang; LUO Bo; ZHENG Xiaoli; YANG Wenli; HE Tao; WU Minglu

    2004-01-01

    In cells, the interactions of distinct signaling transduction pathways originating from cross-talkings between signaling molecules give rise to the formation of signaling transduction networks, which contributes to the changes (emergency) of kinetic behaviors of signaling system compared with single molecule or pathway. Depending on the known experimental data, we have constructed a model for complex cellular signaling transduction system, which is derived from signaling transduction of epidermal growth factor receptor in neuron. By the computational simulating methods, the self-adaptive controls of this system have been investigated. We find that this model exhibits a relatively stable selfadaptive system, especially to over-stimulation of agonist, and the amplitude and duration of signaling intermediates in it could be controlled by multiple self-adaptive effects, such as "signal scattering", "positive feedback", "negative feedback" and "B-Raf shunt". Our results provide an approach to understanding the dynamic behaviors of complex biological systems.

  3. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  4. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC......Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped for the...... gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage of...

  5. Layer-by-layer assembly of aquaporin Z-incorporated biomimetic membranes for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaoqi; Wang, Zhining; Wang, Xida; Wang, Shuzheng; Ding, Wande; Gao, Congjie

    2015-03-17

    We fabricated a biomimetic nanofiltration (NF) membrane by immobilizing an Aquaporin Z (AqpZ)-incorporated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on a layer-by-layer (LbL) complex polyelectrolyte membrane to achieve excellent permeability and salt rejection with a high stability. The polyelectrolyte membranes were prepared by LbL assembly of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with positive charges and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) with negative charges alternately on a porous hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile (H-PAN) substrate. AqpZ-incorporated 1,2-dioleloyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammo-nium-propane (chloride salt) (DOTAP) vesicles with positive charges were deposited on the H-PAN/PEI/PSS polyelectrolytes membrane surface. The resulting biomimetic membrane exhibited a high flux of 22 L·m(-2)·h(-1) (LMH), excellent MgCl2 rejection of ∼97% and NaCl rejection of ∼75% under an operation pressure of 0.4 MPa. Due to the attractive electrostatic interaction between SLB and the polyelectrolyte membrane, the biomimetic membrane showed satisfactory stability and durability as well as stable NF flux and rejection for at least 36 h. In addition, the AqpZ-containing biomimetic membrane was immersed in a 0.24 mM (critical micellar concentration, CMC) Triton X-100 solution for 5 min. The flux and rejection were slightly influenced by the Triton X-100 treatment. The current investigation demonstrated that the AqpZ-incorporated biomimetic membranes fabricated by the LbL method led to excellent separation performances and robust structures that withstand a high operation pressure for a relatively long time. PMID:25730158

  6. Organic Magnetoelectroluminescence for Room Temperature Transduction between Magnetic and Optical Information

    OpenAIRE

    Macià, Ferran; Wang, Fujian; Harmon, Nicholas J.; Kent, Andrew D.; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Flatté, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic and spin-based technologies for data storage and processing pose unique challenges for information transduction to light because of magnetic metals' optical loss, and the inefficiency and resistivity of semiconductor spin-based emitters at room temperature. Transduction between magnetic and optical information in typical organic semiconductors poses additional challenges as the Faraday and Kerr magnetooptical effects rely on the electronic spin-orbit interaction, and the spin-orbit i...

  7. Vectofusin-1, a New Viral Entry Enhancer, Strongly Promotes Lentiviral Transduction of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fenard, David; Ingrao, Dina; Seye, Ababacar,; Buisset, Julien; Genries, Sandrine; Martin, Samia; Kichler, Antoine; Galy, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Gene transfer into hCD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Yet, efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist such as fibronectin fragments and cationic compounds, but all present limitations. In ...

  8. Cell death and signal transduction pathways in Alzheimer's disease : The role of presenilin 1

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Bogdan O

    2004-01-01

    Mutated presenilins (PSs) may cause familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) by altering neuronal signal transduction pathways, by increasing AP production or by triggering a number of proapoptotic mechanisms. The present thesis explores mechanisms by which PSs regulate signal transduction and cell death with relevance to AD. Paper I explored the complex proteolytic processing of wild-type (WT) and FAD presenilin 1 (PS1) exon 9 deleted mutant (deltaE9 PS1) during apoptosis. PS...

  9. Bacteriophage P22 transduction of integrated plasmids: single-step cloning of Salmonella typhimurium gene fusions.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahan, M. J.; Slauch, J M; Mekalanos, J.J. (John J.)

    1993-01-01

    Transcriptional fusions to Salmonella typhimurium chromosomal genes were constructed by integration of a suicide fusion vector into the chromosome by homologous recombination with random cloned chromosomal fragments. We describe here a transductional method using the generalized transducing phage of S. typhimurium, P22, to clone these fusions directly from the bacterial chromosome, in a single step, without the use of restriction enzymes. In this transduction, the phage packages the chromosom...

  10. TRP2: A candidate transduction channel for mammalian pheromone sensory signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liman, Emily R.; David P Corey; Dulac, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) of terrestrial vertebrates plays a key role in the detection of pheromones, chemicals released by animals that elicit stereotyped sexual and aggressive behaviors among conspecifics. Sensory transduction in the VNO appears unrelated to that in the vertebrate olfactory and visual systems: the putative pheromone receptors of the VNO are evolutionarily independent from the odorant receptors and, in contrast to vertebrate visual and olfactory transduction, vomeronasal t...

  11. Tn5-mediated transposition of plasmid DNA after transduction to Myxococcus xanthus.

    OpenAIRE

    Downard, J S

    1988-01-01

    After coliphage P1-mediated transfer of Tn5-containing plasmid DNA from Escherichia coli to Myxococcus xanthus, transductants were identified which contained plasmid sequences integrated at many sites on the bacterial chromosome. The unaltered plasmid DNA sequences in these transductants were apparently flanked by intact Tn5 or IS50 sequences. These results suggest that Tn5-mediated transposition has occurred and provide a method for integrating plasmid DNA into the M. xanthus chromosome with...

  12. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle : special consideration for insulin resistance and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xiao Mei

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation work is focused on the insulin-signal-transduction pathways to glucose transport in skeletal muscle from animal models of NIDDM. The overall objective is to determine the effectiveness of different pharmacological treatments to improve insulin action in skeletal muscle. Muscle-fiber-type-specific differences in insulin signal transduction was first considered. We noted increased insulin action on insulin signaling events including; IR, IRS- 1, IRS-2, PI...

  13. Biomimetic oligosaccharide and peptide surfactant polymers designed for cardiovascular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Mark Andrew

    A common problem associated with cardiovascular devices is surface induced thrombosis initiated by the rapid, non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Control of the initial protein adsorption is crucial to achieve the desired longevity of the implanted biomaterial. The cell membrane glycocalyx acts as a non-thrombogenic interface through passive (dense oligosaccharide structures) and active (ligand/receptor interactions) mechanisms. This thesis is designed to investigate biomimicry of the cell glycocalyx to minimize non-specific protein adsorption and promote specific ligand/receptor interactions. Biomimetic macromolecules were designed through the molecular-scale engineering of polymer surfactants, utilizing a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone to which hydrophilic (dextran, maltose, peptide) and hydrophobic alkyl (hexanoyl or hexanal) chains are simultaneously attached. The structure was controlled through the molar feed ratio of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic groups, which also provided control of the solution and surface-active properties. To mimic passive properties, a series of oligomaltose surfactants were synthesized with increasing saccharide length (n = 2, 7, 15 where n is number of glucose units) to investigate the effect of coating height on protein adsorption. The surfactants were characterized by infra red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies for structural properties and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry for surface activity. Protein adsorption under dynamic flow (5 dyn/cm2) was reduced by 85%--95% over the bare hydrophobic substrate; platelet adhesion dropped by ˜80% compared to glass. Peptide ligands were incorporated into the oligosaccharide surfactant to promote functional activity of the passive coating. The surfactants were synthesized to contain 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% peptide ligand density and were stable on hydrophobic surfaces. The peptide surface density was

  14. Development of automated high throughput single molecular microfluidic detection platform for signal transduction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung; Baghbani Kordmahale, Sina; Chou, Chao-Kai; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Signal transductions including multiple protein post-translational modifications (PTM), protein-protein interactions (PPI), and protein-nucleic acid interaction (PNI) play critical roles for cell proliferation and differentiation that are directly related to the cancer biology. Traditional methods, like mass spectrometry, immunoprecipitation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy require a large amount of sample and long processing time. "microchannel for multiple-parameter analysis of proteins in single-complex (mMAPS)"we proposed can reduce the process time and sample volume because this system is composed by microfluidic channels, fluorescence microscopy, and computerized data analysis. In this paper, we will present an automated mMAPS including integrated microfluidic device, automated stage and electrical relay for high-throughput clinical screening. Based on this result, we estimated that this automated detection system will be able to screen approximately 150 patient samples in a 24-hour period, providing a practical application to analyze tissue samples in a clinical setting.

  15. The role of calcium in hypoxia-induced signal transduction and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Karen A; Yuan, Yong; Spicer, Zachary; Lu, Gang; Bedard, James; Ferguson, Tsuneo K; Pathrose, Peterson; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Kaufhold, Alexa; Millhorn, David E

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells require a constant supply of oxygen in order to maintain adequate energy production, which is essential for maintaining normal function and for ensuring cell survival. Sustained hypoxia can result in cell death. Sophisticated mechanisms have therefore evolved which allow cells to respond and adapt to hypoxia. Specialized oxygen-sensing cells have the ability to detect changes in oxygen tension and transduce this signal into organ system functions that enhance the delivery of oxygen to tissue in a wide variety of different organisms. An increase in intracellular calcium levels is a primary response of many cell types to hypoxia/ischemia. The response to hypoxia is complex and involves the regulation of multiple signaling pathways and coordinated expression of perhaps hundreds of genes. This review discusses the role of calcium in hypoxia-induced regulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression. An understanding of the molecular events initiated by changes in intracellular calcium will lead to the development of therapeutic approaches toward the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic diseases and tumors. PMID:15261489

  16. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles of β1 andβ2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR). Methods Basophils (purity of 10%-50%) were preincubated with anti-CD29 or anti-CD18 blocking antibodies before used for adhesion study. Basophils were preincubated with the pharmacological inhibitors wortmannin, PP1, PD98059 before used for adhesion and HR study. Cell adherence to bovine serum albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) was monitored using cell associated histamine as a basophil marker and the histamine was measured by the glass fiber assay.Results Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn was inhibited by anti-CD29. Interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced adhesion to BSA was inhibited by anti-CD18. Wortmannin at 1 μmol/L and PP1 at 20 μmol/L strongly interfered with, whereas PD98059 at 50 μmol/L weakly inhibited basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn. One μmol/L wortmannin strongly inhibited IL-3, IL-5, GM-CSF and anti-IgE induced adhesion to BSA. PP1 at 20 μmol/L partly inhibited anti-IgE induced adhesion. Fifty μmol/L PD98059 marginally inhibited IL-5, weakly inhibited anti-IgE, partly inhibited GM-CSF induced adhesion. Wortmannin, PP1 and PD98059 inhibited anti-IgE (1:100 or 1:1000) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner. They inhibited calcium ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/L, 5 μmol/L) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner, but to different extend with PP1 being the most efficient.Conclusions Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn is mediated by β1-integrins whereas cytokine induced adhesion

  17. Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The Stacked HYBATS (Hybrid Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative strain components and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive strain and negative strain components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented hybrid actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative strain component will contract, and the positive strain component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative strain component, the area of the cross-section for the negative strain component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive strain components. The transverse strain is negative and longitudinal strain positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative strain or positive strain at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric

  18. Development of supported biomimetic membranes for insertion of aquaporin protein water channels for novel water filtration applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard

    Aquaporins represent a class of membrane protein channels found in all living organisms that selectively transport water molecules across biological membranes. The work presented in this thesis was motivated by the conceptual idea of incorporating aquaporin water channels into biomimetic membranes...... to develop novel water separation technologies. To accomplish this, it is necessary to construct an efficient platform to handle biomimetic membranes. Moreover, general methods are required to reliable and controllable reconstitute membrane proteins into artificially made model membranes. These are...... the topics of this thesis, and are divided into three main chapters. Chapter 2 reviews recent advances in the design and construction of biomimetic membrane arrays. Moreover, current and novel strategies for the reconstitution of membrane proteins into biomimetic membranes are reviewed. Chapter 3...

  19. Beyond labels: A review of the application of quantum dots as integrated components of assays, bioprobes, and biosensors utilizing optical transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algar, W. Russ; Tavares, Anthony J. [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: ulrich.krull@utoronto.ca [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6 (Canada)

    2010-07-12

    A comprehensive review of the development of assays, bioprobes, and biosensors using quantum dots (QDs) as integrated components is presented. In contrast to a QD that is selectively introduced as a label, an integrated QD is one that is present in a system throughout a bioanalysis, and simultaneously has a role in transduction and as a scaffold for biorecognition. Through a diverse array of coatings and bioconjugation strategies, it is possible to use QDs as a scaffold for biorecognition events. The modulation of QD luminescence provides the opportunity for the transduction of these events via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), charge transfer quenching, and electrochemiluminescence (ECL). An overview of the basic concepts and principles underlying the use of QDs with each of these transduction methods is provided, along with many examples of their application in biological sensing. The latter include: the detection of small molecules using enzyme-linked methods, or using aptamers as affinity probes; the detection of proteins via immunoassays or aptamers; nucleic acid hybridization assays; and assays for protease or nuclease activity. Strategies for multiplexed detection are highlighted among these examples. Although the majority of developments to date have been in vitro, QD-based methods for ex vivo biological sensing are emerging. Some special attention is given to the development of solid-phase assays, which offer certain advantages over their solution-phase counterparts.

  20. Signal transduction, receptors, mediators and genes: younger than ever - the 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society focused on aging and immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz Lars-Oliver

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society was held in Weimar, from October 28 to 30, 2009. Special focus of the 2009 conference was "Aging and Senescence", which was co-organized by the SFB 728 "Environmentally-Induced Aging Processes" of the University of Düsseldorf and the study group 'Signal Transduction' of the German Society for Cell Biology (DGZ. In addition, several other areas of signal transduction research were covered and supported by different consortia associated with the Signal Transduction Society including the long-term associated study groups of the German Society for Immunology and the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and for instance the SFB/Transregio 52 "Transcriptional Programming of Individual T Cell Subsets" located in Würzburg, Mainz and Berlin. The different research areas that were introduced by outstanding keynote speakers attracted more than 250 scientists, showing the timeliness and relevance of the interdisciplinary concept and exchange of knowledge during the three days of the scientific program. This report gives an overview of the presentations of the conference.

  1. Phosphoric acid esters cannot replace polyvinylphosphonic acid as phosphoprotein analogs in biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Sui; Kim, Young Kyung; Toledano, Manuel; Breschi, Lorenzo; Ling, Jun Qi; PASHLEY David H.; Franklin R Tay

    2009-01-01

    Polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic analog of phosphoproteins, is crucial for recruiting polyacrylic acid (PAA)-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors during biomimetic remineralization of dentin collagen matrices. This study tested the null hypothesis that phosphoric acid esters of methacrylates in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during bimimetic remineralization of resin-dentin interfaces. Human dentin specimens were bonded with: I) XP Bond, an etch-and-rinse a...

  2. Development of a biomimetic collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering using a SBF immersion technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Munajjed, Amir A; Plunkett, Niamh A; Gleeson, John P.; Weber, Tim; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Levingstone, Tanya; Hammer, Joachim; O'Brien, Fergal J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a biomimetic, highly porous collagen-hydroxyapatite (HA) composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering (TE), combining the biological performance and the high porosity of a collagen scaffold with the high mechanical stiffness of a HA scaffold. Pure collagen scaffolds were produced using a lyophilization process and immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) to provide a biomimetic coating. Pure collagen scaffolds served as a control. The mechanical, mat...

  3. Ratiometric fluorescence transduction by hybridization after isothermal amplification for determination of zeptomole quantities of oligonucleotide biomarkers with a paper-based platform and camera-based detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor, M. Omair; Hrovat, David [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Moazami-Goudarzi, Maryam [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Espie, George S. [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: ulrich.krull@utoronto.ca [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada)

    2015-07-23

    Highlights: • Solid-phase QD-FRET transduction of isothermal tHDA amplicons on paper substrates. • Ratiometric QD-FRET transduction improves assay precision and lowers the detection limit. • Zeptomole detection limit by an iPad camera after isothermal amplification. • Tunable assay sensitivity by immobilizing different amounts of QD–probe bioconjugates. - Abstract: Paper is a promising platform for the development of decentralized diagnostic assays owing to the low cost and ease of use of paper-based analytical devices (PADs). It can be challenging to detect on PADs very low concentrations of nucleic acid biomarkers of lengths as used in clinical assays. Herein we report the use of thermophilic helicase-dependent amplification (tHDA) in combination with a paper-based platform for fluorescence detection of probe-target hybridization. Paper substrates were patterned using wax printing. The cellulosic fibers were chemically derivatized with imidazole groups for the assembly of the transduction interface that consisted of immobilized quantum dot (QD)–probe oligonucleotide conjugates. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) served as donors with Cy3 as the acceptor dye in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based transduction method. After probe-target hybridization, a further hybridization event with a reporter sequence brought the Cy3 acceptor dye in close proximity to the surface of immobilized gQDs, triggering a FRET sensitized emission that served as an analytical signal. Ratiometric detection was evaluated using both an epifluorescence microscope and a low-cost iPad camera as detectors. Addition of the tHDA method for target amplification to produce sequences of ∼100 base length allowed for the detection of zmol quantities of nucleic acid targets using the two detection platforms. The ratiometric QD-FRET transduction method not only offered improved assay precision, but also lowered the limit of detection of the assay when compared with the non

  4. Pathway to the PiezoElectronic Transduction Logic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, P. M.; Bryce, B. A.; Kuroda, M. A.; Keech, R.; Shett, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Copel, M; Hung, L. -W.; Schrott, A. G.; Armstrong, C; Gordon, M. S.; Reuter, K. B.; Theis, T. N.; Haensch, W; Rossnagel, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    The information age challenges computer technology to process an exponentially increasing computational load on a limited energy budget - a requirement that demands an exponential reduction in energy per operation. In digital logic circuits, the switching energy of present FET devices is intimately connected with the switching voltage, and can no longer be lowered sufficiently, limiting the ability of current technology to address the challenge. Quantum computing offers a leap forward in capa...

  5. Analysis of 4070A envelope levels in retroviral preparations and effect on target cell transduction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingsby, J H; Baban, D; Sutton, J; Esapa, M; Price, T; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Slade, A

    2000-07-01

    A number of stable producer cell lines for high-titer Mo-MuLV vectors have been constructed. Development has previously centered on increasing end-point titers by producing maximal levels of Mo-MuLV Gag/Pol, envelope glycoproteins, and retroviral RNA genomes. We describe the production yields and transduction efficiency characteristics of two Mo-MuLV packaging cell lines, FLYA13 and TEFLYA. Although they both produce 4070A-pseudotyped retroviral vectors reproducibly at >1 x 10(6) LFU ml(-1), the transduction efficiency of unconcentrated and concentrated virus from FLYA13 lines is poor compared with vector preparations from TEFLYA lines. A powerful inhibitor of retroviral transduction is secreted by FLYA13 packaging cells. We show that the inhibitory factor does not affect transduction of target cells by RD114-pseudotyped vectors. This suggests that the inhibitory factor functions at the level of envelope-receptor interactions. Phosphate starvation of target cells shows a two-fold increase in Pit2 receptor mRNA and causes some improvement in FLYA13 virus transduction efficiency. Western blots show that FLYA13 viral samples contain an eight-fold higher ratio of 4070A envelope to p30gag than that of virus produced by TEFLYA producer cell lines. This study correlates overexpression of 4070A envelope glycoprotein in retroviral preparations with a reduction of transduction efficiency at high multiplicities of infection. We suggest that TEFLYA packaging cells express preferable levels of 4070A compared with FLYA13, which not only enables high-titer stocks to be generated, but also facilitates a high efficiency of transduction of target cells. PMID:10910141

  6. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  7. Suppression of tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of melanoma cells by transduction of interferon gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykhova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate an inhibitory effect of baculovirus-mediated transduction of the murine interferon-beta gene on mouse melanoma in vitro and in vivo. Methods. Studies were performed on B16 mouse melanoma (MM-4 cell line. Transduction, immunocytochemical and tumor cell biology approaches have been used in this study. Results. Transduction of MM-4 cells by the recombinant baculovirus with IFN-beta gene is accompanied by morphological changes of tumor cells, suppression of cell proliferation, significant inhibition of platting efficiency of cells and their colonies formation in semisolid agar. Moreover, transduction of melanoma MM-4 cells by the baculovirus IFN-transgene leads to inhibition of tumorigenicity and metastatic ability of the cells in vivo. The intravenous administration of recombinant baculovirus vector with IFN gene inhibits growth of metastases induced in the lungs of mice by intravenously injected tumor cells. Conclusions. Transduction of mouse melanoma cells by the recombinant baculovirus with murine IFN-beta gene inhibits their proliferative potential, tumorigenicity and metastatic activity.

  8. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  9. Biomimetic mineralization of nano-sized, needle-like hydroxyapatite with ultrahigh capacity for lysozyme adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Juan; Guo, Shanshan; Shi, Jie; Du, Wenying; Wang, Zheng; Ye, Ling; Gu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Because of its superior biocompatibility, hydroxyapatite (HA) has been widely exploited as a promising vehicle to deliver a broad range of therapeutics in a variety of biological systems. Herein, we report a biomimetic process to prepare nano-sized, colloidal stable HA with needle-like morphology by using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the template. It was revealed that the needle-like HA was transformed from the spherical amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) nanoparticles after a 14-day period of aging under ambient conditions. The needle-like HA/CMC exhibited an ultra-high lysozyme adsorption capacity up to 930-940mg/g. Moreover, a sustained and pH-sensitive release of adsorbed lysozyme from HA/CMC was evidenced. Therefore, our biomimetic needle-like HA/CMC nanoparticles hold great potential in serving as an efficient carrier for the delivery and controlled release of lysozyme. PMID:27524053

  10. Synthesis of Biomimetic Superhydrophobic Surface through Electrochemical Deposition on Porous Alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiadao Wang; Ang Li; Haosheng Chen; Darong Chen

    2011-01-01

    The superhydrophobicity of plant leaves is a benefit of the hierarchical structures of their surfaces. These structures have been imitated in the creation of synthetic surfaces. In this paper, a novel process for fabrication of biomimetic hierarchical structures by electrochemical deposition of a metal on porous alumina is described. An aluminum specimen was anodically oxidized to obtain a porous alumina template, which was used as an electrode to fabricate a surface with micro structures through electrochemical deposition of a metal such as nickel and copper after the enlargement of pores. Astonishingly, a hierarchical structure with nanometer pillars and micrometer clusters was synthesized in the pores of the template. The nanometer pillars were determined by the nanometer pores. The formation of micrometer clusters was related to the thin walls of the pores and the crystallization of the metal on a flat surface. From the as-prepared biomimetic surfaces, lotus-leaf-like superhydrophobic surfaces with nickel and copper deposition were achieved.

  11. Nanoengineering of stimuli-responsive protein-based biomimetic protocells as versatile drug delivery tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fenfang; Shen, Guizhi; Chen, Chengjun; Xing, Ruirui; Zou, Qianli; Ma, Guanghui; Yan, Xuehai

    2014-06-01

    We present a general strategy to nanoengineer protein-based colloidal spheres (biomimetic protocells) as versatile delivery carriers with stimuli responsiveness by the electrostatic assembly of binary components (proteins and polypeptides) in association with intermolecular disulfide cross-linking. The size of the colloidal spheres, ranging from nanoscale to microscale, is readily tuned through parameters like protein and polypeptide concentration, the ratio between both, pH, and so on. Moreover, such colloidal spheres show versatile encapsulation of various guest molecules including small organic molecules and biomacromolecules. The pH and redox dual-responsiveness facilitates the rapid release of the payload in an acidic and reductant-enriched ambient such as in lysosomes. Thus, nanoengineering of protein-based biomimetic protocells opens a new alternative avenue for developing delivery vehicles with multifunctional properties towards a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:24828788

  12. Characterization of a biomimetic coating on dense and porous titanium substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioactive materials have been studied as coatings on bioinert subtracts. Thus, it is possible to combine the bioactivity of materials such as calcium phosphate with the excellent mechanical properties of metals. Titanium (Ti) implants can be bioactivated by a biomimetic precipitation method. This study introduces a biomimetic method under a simplified solution (SS) with calcium and phosphorus ions. As substrates, commercially pure Ti sheet and micro-porous Ti samples produced by powder metallurgy were used. The substrates were submitted to chemical and heat treating and then immersed in the SS for 7, 14, 21 days. Surface roughness was evaluated by confocal scanning optical microscopy. Coating characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed calcium phosphate crystal morphologies observed in all samples, which was confirmed by XRD phase identifications. These results reveal the solution potential for coating Ti substrates. (author)

  13. Limits of Nature and Advances of Technology: What Does Biomimetics Have to Offer to Aquatic Robots?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. Fish

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the biomimetic approach has been utilized as a mechanism for technological advancement in the field of robotics. However, there has not been a full appreciation of the success and limitations of biomimetics. Similarities between natural and engineered systems are exhibited by convergences, which define environmental factors, which impinge upon design, and direct copying that produces innovation through integration of natural and artificial technologies. Limitations of this integration depend on the structural and mechanical differences of the two technologies and on the process by which each technology arises. The diversity of organisms that arose through evolutionary descent does not necessarily provide all possible solutions of optimal functions. However, in instances where organisms exhibit superior performance to engineered systems, features of the organism can be targeted for technology transfer. In this regard, cooperation between biologists and engineers is paramount.

  14. Industrial-scale spray layer-by-layer assembly for production of biomimetic photonic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layer-by-layer assembly is a powerful and flexible thin film process that has successfully reproduced biomimetic photonic systems such as structural colour. While most of the seminal work has been carried out using slow and ultimately unscalable immersion assembly, recent developments using spray layer-by-layer assembly provide a platform for addressing challenges to scale-up and manufacturability. A series of manufacturing systems has been developed to increase production throughput by orders of magnitude, making commercialized structural colour possible. Inspired by biomimetic photonic structures we developed and demonstrated a heat management system that relies on constructive reflection of near infrared radiation to bring about dramatic reductions in heat content. (paper)

  15. Development of a biomimetic swimmer and the flow pattern surrounding the filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ngoc-San; Goo, Nam-Seo

    2010-04-01

    We have studied a biomimetic swimmer inspired by the motility mechanisms of bacteria such as E. coli theoretically and experimentally. Even though E. coli uses one or several rotating helical filaments to swim, a single rotating helical filament swimmer is considered in this work. The performance of this swimmer was estimated by modeling the dynamics of a swimmer in viscous fluid. The model has an ellipsoidal cell body propelled by a helical filament. We applied the resistive force theory on this model to calculate the linear swimming speed and the efficiency of the model. A parametric study on the swimming velocity was performed. To validate the theoretical results, a biomimetic swimmer was fabricated and an experiment setup was prepared to measure the swimming speed in silicone oil. In addition, we have studied the flow patterns surrounding the filament with a finite element simulation to understand the mechanism of propulsion.

  16. Biomimetic composite scaffolds based on mineralization of hydroxyapatite on electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/nanocellulose fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Junhui; Cui, Zhixiang; Wang, Qianting; Liu, Qiong; Liu, Chuntai

    2016-06-01

    A biomimetic nanocomposite scaffold with HA formation on the electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)/nanocellulose (NC) fibrous matrix was developed in this study. The electrospun PCL/NC fiber mat was built and then biomineralized by treatment in simulated body fluid (SBF). Using such a rapid and effective procedure, a continuous biomimetic crystalline HA layer could be successfully formed without the need of any additional chemical modification of the substrate surface. The results showed that the introduction of NC into composite fibers is an effective approach to induce the deposition of HA nucleus as well as to improve their distribution and growth of a crystalline HA layer on the fibrous scaffolds. The water contact angle (WCA) of the PCL/NC/HA scaffolds decreases with increasing NC content and mineralization time, resulting in the enhancement of their hydrophilicity. These results indicated that HA-mineralized on PCL/NC fiber can be prepared directly by simply using SBF immersion. PMID:27083369

  17. A small biomimetic quadruped robot driven by multistacked dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Canh Toan; Phung, Hoa; Dat Nguyen, Tien; Lee, Choonghan; Kim, Uikyum; Lee, Donghyouk; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Jachoon; Nam, Jae-do; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk

    2014-06-01

    A kind of dielectric elastomer (DE) material, called ‘synthetic elastomer’, has been developed based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) to be used as a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). By stacking single layers of synthetic elastomer, a linear actuator, called a multistacked actuator, is produced, and used by mechatronic and robotic systems to generate linear motion. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of the multistacked dielectric elastomer actuator in a biomimetic legged robot. A miniature robot driven by a biomimetic actuation system with four 2-DOF (two-degree-of-freedom) legged mechanisms is realized. Based on the experimental results, we evaluate the performance of the proposed robot and validate the feasibility of the multistacked actuator in a locomotion system as a replacement for conventional actuators.

  18. Biomimetics Bioinspired Hierarchical-Structured Surfaces for Green Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the general field of biomimetics - lessons from nature. It presents various examples of biomimetics, including roughness-induced superomniphobic surfaces which provide functionality of commercial interest. The major focus in the book is on lotus effect, rose petal effect, shark skin effect, and gecko adhesion.  For each example, the book first presents characterization of an object to understand how a natural object provides functionality, followed by modeling and then fabrication of structures in the lab using nature’s route to verify one’s understanding of nature and provide guidance for development of optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, examples of fabrication of optimum structures using smart materials and fabrication techniques, are presented. Examples of nature inspired objects are also presented throughout.

  19. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  20. Probing Peptide and Protein Insertion in a Biomimetic S-Layer Supported Lipid Membrane Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Damiati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important aspect of synthetic lipid membrane architectures is their ability to study functional membrane-active peptides and membrane proteins in an environment close to nature. Here, we report on the generation and performance of a biomimetic platform, the S-layer supported lipid membrane (SsLM, to investigate the structural and electrical characteristics of the membrane-active peptide gramicidin and the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin in real-time using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A shift in membrane resistance is caused by the interaction of α-hemolysin and gramicidin with SsLMs, even if only an attachment onto, or functional channels through the lipid membrane, respectively, are formed. Moreover, the obtained results did not indicate the formation of functional α-hemolysin pores, but evidence for functional incorporation of gramicidin into this biomimetic architecture is provided.

  1. Biomimetic cardiovascular stents for in vivo re-endothelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chunyong; Hu, Yuecheng; Wang, Hongshui; Xia, Dan; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Jiao; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Baoe; Li, Haipeng; Han, Dong; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-10-01

    The use of cardiovascular stents for rapid in vivo re-endothelialization is a promising strategy for reducing cardiovascular implantation or preventing local thrombus formation and restenosis. Surface-patterned intravascular endoprosthetic stents have been developed to prevent life-threatening complications. In this study, vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-biomimetic surface patterns were fabricated on 316L cardiovascular stents using a femtosecond laser and then implanted into the iliac artery of rabbit. The in vitro data revealed that the bionic surface patterns matched the morphology of the VSMCs well, which promotes the adhesion, proliferation, and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In addition, the patterned surfaces can significantly enhance re-endothelialization. Consequently, the surface biomimetic stent with the VSMC surface pattern is likely an effective approach to ensure rapid re-endothelialization and possibly reduce the incidence of in-stent restenosis. PMID:27380443

  2. Biomimetic Spider Leg Joints: A Review from Biomechanical Research to Compliant Robotic Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Landkammer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to their inherent compliance, soft actuated joints are becoming increasingly important for robotic applications, especially when human-robot-interactions are expected. Several of these flexible actuators are inspired by biological models. One perfect showpiece for biomimetic robots is the spider leg, because it combines lightweight design and graceful movements with powerful and dynamic actuation. Building on this motivation, the review article focuses on compliant robotic joints inspired by the function principle of the spider leg. The mechanism is introduced by an overview of existing biological and biomechanical research. Thereupon a classification of robots that are bio-inspired by spider joints is presented. Based on this, the biomimetic robot applications referring to the spider principle are identified and discussed.

  3. A small biomimetic quadruped robot driven by multistacked dielectric elastomer actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kind of dielectric elastomer (DE) material, called ‘synthetic elastomer’, has been developed based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) to be used as a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). By stacking single layers of synthetic elastomer, a linear actuator, called a multistacked actuator, is produced, and used by mechatronic and robotic systems to generate linear motion. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of the multistacked dielectric elastomer actuator in a biomimetic legged robot. A miniature robot driven by a biomimetic actuation system with four 2-DOF (two-degree-of-freedom) legged mechanisms is realized. Based on the experimental results, we evaluate the performance of the proposed robot and validate the feasibility of the multistacked actuator in a locomotion system as a replacement for conventional actuators. (paper)

  4. Chitin nanofibrils biomimetic products: nanoparticles and nanocomposite chitosan films in health care

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morganti, P.; Tishchenko, Galina; Palombo, M.; Kelnar, Ivan; Brožová, Libuše; Špírková, Milena; Pavlova, Ewa; Kobera, Libor; Carezzi, F.

    Boca Raton : CRC Press Taylor & Francis Group, 2013 - (Kim, S.), s. 681-716 ISBN 978-1-4665-0564-3 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1407 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : chitin nanofibrils * nanocomposite chitosan films * biomimetic products Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology http://www.crcnetbase.com/doi/abs/10.1201/b14723-39

  5. Facile one-pot synthesis of porphyrin based porous polymer networks (PPNs) as biomimetic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, LF; Feng, DW; Liu, TF; Chen, YP; Fordham, S; Yuan, S; Tian, J; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-01

    Stable porphyrin based porous polymer networks, PPN-23 and PPN-24, have been synthesized through a facile one-pot approach by the aromatic substitution reactions of pyrrole and aldehydes. PPN-24(Fe) shows high catalytic efficiency as a biomimetic catalyst in the oxidation reaction of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) in the presence of H2O2.

  6. A Biomimetic Copper Corrole ? Preparation, Characterization, and Reconstitution with Horse Heart Apomyoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Bröring, Martin; Brégier, Frédérique; Olaf, Burghaus; Kleeberg, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A copper corrole with biomimetic propionate side chains was prepared as a novel heme analog by metalation of the respective ligand as the dimethylester with copper(II) acetate hydrate and subsequent saponification with LiOH. The metalated dimethylester was characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic means and shown by comparison to contain a divalent copper ion, antiferromagnetically coupled to the radical-dianionic organic ligand. The molecular structure of this c...

  7. Biomimetic chromatographic analysis of selenium species: Application for the estimation of their pharmacokinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsopelas, Fotios [National Technical University of Athens, Laboratory of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering, Athens (Greece); University of Athens, Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Athens (Greece); Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna [University of Athens, Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Athens (Greece); Ochsenkuehn-Petropoulou, Maria [National Technical University of Athens, Laboratory of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering, Athens (Greece)

    2010-07-15

    The retention behavior of selenites, selenates, seleno-dl-methionine, selenocystine, selenocystamine, selenourea, dimethyl selenide, and dimethyl diselenide was investigated by means of biomimetic liquid chromatography. For this purpose, two immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) columns, namely, IAM.PC.DD2 and IAM.PC.MG, and two immobilized plasma protein columns, human serum albumin (HSA) and {alpha}{sub 1}-acid glycoprotein (AGP) columns, were employed using different mobile phase conditions in respect to pH and buffer composition. In general, satisfactory interrelations between retention factors obtained with the two IAM stationary phases and HSA/AGP columns were obtained. Large differences were observed between biomimetic retention factors and octanol-water logD values, since the latter fail to describe electrostatic interactions. In contrast, despite the column diversity, the net retention outcome on all four biomimetic columns was quite similar, especially in the presence of phosphate-buffered saline, which by its effective shielding alleviates the differences between the stationary phases. Of the two IAM columns, IAM.PC.DD2 showed better performance when compared with HSA and AGP columns as well as to octanol-water partitioning. Biomimetic chromatographic indices were further used to estimate the percentage of human oral absorption and plasma protein binding of the eight selenium species investigated, according to equations previously reported in the literature. The estimated values of human oral absorption imply moderate absorption only for dimethyl diselenide, which also may exhibit considerable plasma protein binding. Moderate affinity for plasma proteins should also be expected for dimethyl selenide and selenocystamine. (orig.)

  8. Electrochemical and electromechanical properties of fully hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for applications in biomimetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the development of fully hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PAAM) hydrogel for applications in biomimetics. We present an analysis of the motion of actuators based on PAAM hydrogel in order to obtain the elementary background needed for the design of actuating devices based on this material, which has a high compatibility with living tissues. The gel properties are investigated, the electroactivity of the hydrogel is shown and a qualitative–quantitative study demonstrating the basics of motion of such actuators is presented

  9. Synthesis of the Biomimetic Polymer: Aliphatic Diamine and RGDS Modified Poly(d,l-lactic acid)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Feng NIU; Yuan Liang WANG; Yan Feng LUO; Jun PAN; Juan Fang SHANG; Li Xia GUO

    2005-01-01

    A novel poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PDLLA) based biomimetic polymer was synthesized by grafting maleic anhydride, butanediamine and arg-gly-asp-ser (RGDS) peptides onto the backbone of PDLLA, aiming to overcome the acidity and auto-accelerating degradation of PDLLA during degradation and to improve its biospecificity and biocompatibility. The synthetic copolymer was characterized by FTIR, 13C NMR and amino acid analyzer (AAA).

  10. A Biomimetic Approach to Active Self-Microencapsulation of Proteins in PLGA

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ronak B.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    A biomimetic approach to organic solvent-free microencapsulation of proteins based on the self-healing capacity of poly (DL)-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres containing glycosaminoglycan-like biopolymers (BPs), was examined. To screen BPs, aqueous solutions of BP [high molecular weight dextran sulfate (HDS), low molecular weight dextran sulfate (LDS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin (HP), hyaluronic acid (HA), chitosan (CH)] and model protein lysozyme (LYZ) were combined in diffe...

  11. Triangular prism-shaped β-peptoid helices as unique biomimetic scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jonas Striegler; Harris, Pernille; Fristrup, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    β-Peptoids are peptidomimetics based on N-alkylated β-aminopropionic acid residues (or N-alkyl-β-alanines). This type of peptide mimic has previously been incorporated in biologically active ligands and has been hypothesized to be able to exhibit foldamer properties. Here we show, for the first t...... novel biomimetics that display functional groups with high accuracy in three dimensions, which has potential for development of new functional materials....

  12. Integrating Biologically Inspired Nanomaterials and Table-top Stereolithography for 3D Printed Biomimetic Osteochondral Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Nathan J.; O’Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. I...

  13. Chitosan-based biomimetic scaffolds and methods for preparing the same

    OpenAIRE

    Filée, Patrick; Freichels, Astrid; Jérôme, Christine; Aqil, Abdelhafid; Colige, Alain; Tchemtchoua Tateu, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The invention concerns chitosan-based biomimetic scaffolds and methods for modulating their intrinsic properties such as rigidity, elasticity, resistance to mechanical stress, porosity, biodegradation and absorbance of exudates. Therefore, the present invention relates to a layered chitosan-based scaffold wherein said layered scaffold comprises at least two fused layers, wherein at least one layer consists of a chitosan nanofiber scaffold membrane and at least one of the other layers of a por...

  14. Hydroxyapatite Mineralization on the Calcium Chloride Blended Polyurethane Nanofiber via Biomimetic Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nam Ki; Park Soo-Jin; Kim Hak; Navamathavan R; Nirmala R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Polyurethane nanofibers containing calcium chloride (CaCl2) were prepared via an electrospinning technique for the biomedical applications. Polyurethane nanofibers with different concentration of CaCl2 were electrospun, and their bioactivity evaluation was conducted by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. The morphology, structure and thermal properties of the polyurethane/CaCl2 composite nanofibers were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy ...

  15. Photopolymerization of diacetylene lipid bilayers and its application to the construction of micropatterned biomimetic membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Morigaki, K.; Baumgart, T.; Jonas, U.; Offenhäusser, A.

    2002-01-01

    Photopolymerization of diacetylene-containing amphiphiles in substrate-supported bilayers has been studied in connection with the development of a new fabrication strategy of micropatterned biomimetic membrane systems. Two types of amphiphilic diacetylene molecules were compared, one being a monoalkyl phosphate, phosphoric acid monohexacosa-10,12-diynyl ester (1), and the other being a phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (2). The bilayers of monomeric diace...

  16. Design specifications of the Human Robotic interface for the biomimetic underwater robot "yellow submarine project"

    OpenAIRE

    Bheemaiah, Anil

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a web based multi agent design for a collision avoidance auto navigation biomimetic submarine for submarine hydroelectricity. The paper describes the nature of the map - topology interface for river bodies and the design of interactive agents for the control of the robotic submarine. The agents are migratory on the web and are designed in XML/html interface with both interactive capabilities and visibility on a map. The paper describes mathematically the use...

  17. Surface modification tailors the characteristics of biomimetic coatings nucleated on starch-based polymers

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, A. L.; Elvira, C.; Vásquez, Blanca; J. San Román; Reis, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    This work describes the influence of surface pretreatments over the nucleation and growth of an apatite layer, formed by a biomimetic process, on which a bioactive glass is used as a precursor of the calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) formation on the materials surface. SEVA-C, a corn starch-based biodegradable blend, was used as substrate. The surfaces were pretreated during various periods by: (i) physical methods, namely ultraviolet radiation (u.v.), and over exposure to ethylene oxide sterilization...

  18. “Click & seed” approach to the biomimetic modification of material surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proks, Vladimír; Jaroš, J.; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Kučka, Jan; Popelka, Štěpán; Dvořák, P.; Hampl, A.; Rypáček, František

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 9 (2012), s. 1232-1242. ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400500904; GA ČR GAP108/11/1857; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biomimetic modifications * click chemistry * peptide radiolabeling Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.742, year: 2012

  19. Biomimetic synthesis of hybrid nanocomposite scaffolds by freeze-thawing and freeze-drying

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Nayar; A K Pramanick; A Guha; B K Mahato; M Gunjan; A Sinha

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study is to biomimetically synthesize hydroxyapatite–hydrophilic polymer scaffolds for biomedical applications. This organic–inorganic hybrid has been structurally characterized and reveals a good microstructural control as seen by the SEM analysis and the nanosize of the particulates is confirmed by AFM microscopy. The characterization of such nano-structured composites would allow researchers to design new systems, tailoring properties for different applications.

  20. Surface controlled biomimetic coating of polycaprolactone nanofiber meshes to be used as bone extracellular matrix analogues

    OpenAIRE

    J.V. Araújo; Martins, Albino; Leonor, I. B.; Pinho, Elisabete D.; Reis, R.L.; Neves, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop novel electrospun nanofiber meshes coated with a biomimetic calcium phosphate (BCP) layer that mimics the extracellular microenvironment found in the human bone structure. Poly(!-caprolactone) (PCL) was selected because of its well-known medical applications, its biodegradability, biocompatibility and its susceptibility to partial hydrolysis by a straightforward alkaline treatment. The deposition of a calcium phosphate layer, similar to the i...