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Sample records for biomedical studies phd

  1. Career Coaches as a Source of Vicarious Learning for Racial and Ethnic Minority PhD Students in the Biomedical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Simon N.; Thakore, Bhoomi K.; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many recent mentoring initiatives have sought to help improve the proportion of underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities (URMs) in academic positions across the biomedical sciences. However, the intractable nature of the problem of underrepresentation suggests that many young scientists may require supplemental career development beyond what many mentors are able to offer. As an adjunct to traditional scientific mentoring, we created a novel academic career “coaching” intervention for PhD students in the biomedical sciences. Objective To determine whether and how academic career coaches can provide effective career-development-related learning experiences for URM PhD students in the biomedical sciences. We focus specifically on vicarious learning experiences, where individuals learn indirectly through the experiences of others. Method The intervention is being tested as part of a longitudinal randomized control trial (RCT). Here, we describe a nested qualitative study, using a framework approach to analyze data from a total of 48 semi-structured interviews from 24 URM PhD students (2 interviews per participant, 1 at baseline, 1 at 12-month follow-up) (16 female, 8 male; 11 Black, 12 Hispanic, 1 Native-American). We explored the role of the coach as a source of vicarious learning, in relation to the students’ goal of being future biomedical science faculty. Results Coaches were resources through which most students in the study were able to learn vicariously about how to pursue, and succeed within, an academic career. Coaches were particularly useful in instances where students’ research mentors are unable to provide such vicarious learning opportunities, for example because the mentor is too busy to have career-related discussions with a student, or because they have, or value, a different type of academic career to the type the student hopes to achieve. Implications Coaching can be an important way to address the lack of structured career

  2. Critical issues in PhD training for biomedical scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, R L; Oxford, G S

    2001-10-01

    The rapidly changing world of modern biomedical research is raising important new issues for traditional PhD training programs and is creating concern among young PhD scientists about their futures. Specifically, the United States is producing substantially more biomedical PhDs than can be accommodated in professional positions that truly require the PhD as a credential. The "surplus" PhD population is being relegated to poorly paid, unstable, and increasingly unsatisfying jobs. In addition, many current graduate and postdoctoral training programs may not be adequately preparing young scientists for the more complex, more quantitative biological science of the future. Finally, many current graduate training programs are not attracting a sufficient portion of the most talented young people in the nation. To ameliorate these problems in the training and early career paths of basic biomedical scientists, the authors make specific recommendations, such as urging (1) that graduate trainees should be supported exclusively by competitive individual fellowships, training grants, or institutional funds and not by RO1s or similar research awards; (2) that graduate and postdoctoral stipends be increased so that they provide a reasonable living wage; and (3) that research-intensive academic institutions create a career path for biomedical PhDs other than that designed for the traditional tenure-track, grant-funded principal investigator and faculty member. They conclude that it is in the interest of faculty and institutions to make these and other drastic changes because the current system is both inherently unfair and self-destructive.

  3. Biomedical PhD education - an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvany, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    tenured university positions. However, over the past 20–30 years, and particularly the past 10 years, the situation has changed dramatically. Governments in many countries have invested massively in PhD education, believing that trained researchers will contribute to the ‘knowledge society’, and thus...... increase the competitiveness of their countries in the future economies of the world. Thus, only a small fraction of PhD graduates now end up in academic research. Yet, the PhD remains a research degree, and indeed, institutions have become heavily dependent on PhD students for their research output...... during their PhD studies. The purpose of this article is to explore how this seeming paradox is being addressed in biomedicine and to show that far from being inconsistent that the two aspects are in fact complementary. The article is based on the author’s experience as Head of Aarhus Graduate School...

  4. Biomedical PhD education - an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvany, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The PhD, otherwise known as the doctor of philosophy or Dr. Phil., is an internationally recognized degree, indicating that the PhD graduate has received training in research under supervision. Traditionally, the PhD was the route to an academic career, with most successful PhD graduates receivin...

  5. Biomedical Science Ph.D. Career Interest Patterns by Race/Ethnicity and Gender.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth D Gibbs

    Full Text Available Increasing biomedical workforce diversity remains a persistent challenge. Recent reports have shown that biomedical sciences (BMS graduate students become less interested in faculty careers as training progresses; however, it is unclear whether or how the career preferences of women and underrepresented minority (URM scientists change in manners distinct from their better-represented peers. We report results from a survey of 1500 recent American BMS Ph.D. graduates (including 276 URMs that examined career preferences over the course of their graduate training experiences. On average, scientists from all social backgrounds showed significantly decreased interest in faculty careers at research universities, and significantly increased interest in non-research careers at Ph.D. completion relative to entry. However, group differences emerged in overall levels of interest (at Ph.D. entry and completion, and the magnitude of change in interest in these careers. Multiple logistic regression showed that when controlling for career pathway interest at Ph.D. entry, first-author publication rate, faculty support, research self-efficacy, and graduate training experiences, differences in career pathway interest between social identity groups persisted. All groups were less likely than men from well-represented (WR racial/ethnic backgrounds to report high interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities (URM men: OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.36-0.98, p = 0.04; WR women: OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.47-0.89, p = 0.008; URM women: OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.30-0.71, p<0.001, and URM women were more likely than all other groups to report high interest in non-research careers (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.28-2.90, p = 0.002. The persistence of disparities in the career interests of Ph.D. recipients suggests that a supply-side (or "pipeline" framing of biomedical workforce diversity challenges may limit the effectiveness of efforts to attract and retain the best and most

  6. Biomedical Ph.D. students enrolled in two elite universities in the United kingdom and the United States report adopting multiple learning relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Kemp

    Full Text Available The ability to form multiple learning relationships is a key element of the doctoral learning environment in the biomedical sciences. Of these relationships, that between student and supervisor has long been viewed as key. There are, however, limited data to describe the student perspective on what makes this relationship valuable. In the present study, we discuss the findings of semi-structured interviews with biomedical Ph.D. students from the United Kingdom and the United States to: i determine if the learning relationships identified in an Australian biomedical Ph.D. cohort are also important in a larger international student cohort; and ii improve our understanding of student perceptions of value in their supervisory relationships.32 students from two research intensive universities, one in the United Kingdom (n = 17, and one in the United States (n = 15 were recruited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Verbatim transcripts were transcribed, validated and analysed using a Miles and Huberman method for thematic analysis.Students reported that relationships with other Ph.D. students, post-doctoral scientists and supervisors were all essential to their learning. Effective supervisory relationships were perceived as the primary source of high-level project guidance, intellectual support and confidence. Relationships with fellow students were viewed as essential for the provision of empathetic emotional support. Technical learning was facilitated, almost exclusively, by relationships with postdoctoral staff.These data make two important contributions to the scholarship of doctoral education in the biomedical sciences. Firstly, they provide further evidence for the importance of multiple learning relationships in the biomedical doctorate. Secondly, they clarify the form of a 'valued' supervisory relationship from a student perspective. We conclude that biomedical doctoral programs should be designed to contain a minimum level

  7. PhD competences of food studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelo Gonzalez-Martinez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In European Higher Education, learning outcomes and competences have been used sometimes with different meanings and sometimes with the same meaning. But both terms have been more commonly used to refer to knowledge, understanding and abilities a student must demonstrate at the end of a learning experience.  Their use is a consequence of the paradigm shift of the Bologna Process to a learner centered education environment. The definition of standards of competences (or learning outcomes for the PhD degree is thus a need for the quality assurance of this degree. In this work, subject-specific and generic competences for the PhD in Food Science and Technology and their alignment with the European Qualifications Framework (EQF level descriptors for quality assurance purposes have been identified.

  8. Integrating clinical medicine into biomedical graduate education to promote translational research: strategies from two new PhD programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carolyn L; Jarrett, Marcia; Bierer, S Beth

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, a barrier has existed between research and clinical medicine, making it difficult for aspiring scientists to gain exposure to human pathophysiology and access to clinical/translational research mentors during their graduate training. In 2005, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute announced the Med Into Grad initiative to support graduate programs that integrate clinical knowledge into PhD biomedical training, with the goal of preparing a new cadre of translational researchers to work at the interface of the basic sciences and clinical medicine. Two institutions, Baylor College of Medicine and the Cleveland Clinic/Case Western Reserve University, developed new PhD programs in translational biology and/or molecular medicine. These programs teach the topics and skills that today's translational researchers must learn and expose students to clinical medicine. In this article, the authors compare and contrast the history, implementation, and evaluation of the Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine program at Baylor College of Medicine and the Molecular Medicine program at the Cleveland Clinic/Case Western Reserve University. The authors also demonstrate the feasibility of creating a multidisciplinary graduate program in molecular medicine that integrates pathophysiology and clinical medicine without extending training time. They conclude with a discussion of the similarities in training approaches that exist despite the fact that each program was independently developed and offer observations that emerged during their collaboration that may benefit others who are considering developing similar programs.

  9. Biomedical ontology improves biomedical literature clustering performance: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Illhoi; Hu, Xiaohua; Song, Il-Yeol

    2007-01-01

    Document clustering has been used for better document retrieval and text mining. In this paper, we investigate if a biomedical ontology improves biomedical literature clustering performance in terms of the effectiveness and the scalability. For this investigation, we perform a comprehensive comparison study of various document clustering approaches such as hierarchical clustering methods, Bisecting K-means, K-means and Suffix Tree Clustering (STC). According to our experiment results, a biomedical ontology significantly enhances clustering quality on biomedical documents. In addition, our results show that decent document clustering approaches, such as Bisecting K-means, K-means and STC, gains some benefit from the ontology while hierarchical algorithms showing the poorest clustering quality do not reap the benefit of the biomedical ontology.

  10. Undertaking Individual Transdisciplinary PhD Research for Sustainable Development: Case Studies from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breda, John; Musango, Josephine; Brent, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to improve the understanding of individual transdisciplinary PhD research in a developing country context, focusing on three individual PhD case studies in South Africa. Design/Methodology/Approach: Multiple-case method was used, and three completed transdisciplinary PhD research efforts undertaken at the Stellenbosch…

  11. Undertaking Individual Transdisciplinary PhD Research for Sustainable Development: Case Studies from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breda, John; Musango, Josephine; Brent, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to improve the understanding of individual transdisciplinary PhD research in a developing country context, focusing on three individual PhD case studies in South Africa. Design/Methodology/Approach: Multiple-case method was used, and three completed transdisciplinary PhD research efforts undertaken at the Stellenbosch…

  12. Design and analysis of biomedical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær

    Biomedicine is a field that has great influence on the majority of mankind. The constant development has considerably changed our way of life during the last centuries. This has been achieved through the dedication of biomedical researchers along with the tremendous ressources that over time have...... been allocated this field. It is utterly important to utilize these ressources responsibly and efficiently by constantly striving to ensure high-quality biomedical studies. This involves the use of a sound statistical methodology regarding both the design and analysis of biomedical studies. The focus...... for biomedical studies are a recurring theme in this thesis. Data collected in some biomedical studies are positively skewed; hence methods relying on the normal distribution are not directly applicable. We investigated how data from one of these studies are suitably analyzed. We extracted 23 different summary...

  13. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  14. Exploring PHD fingers and H3K4me0 interactions with molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations: AIRE-PHD1, a comparative study.

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    Dimitrios Spiliotopoulos

    Full Text Available PHD fingers represent one of the largest families of epigenetic readers capable of decoding post-translationally modified or unmodified histone H3 tails. Because of their direct involvement in human pathologies they are increasingly considered as a potential therapeutic target. Several PHD/histone-peptide structures have been determined, however relatively little information is available on their dynamics. Studies aiming to characterize the dynamic and energetic determinants driving histone peptide recognition by epigenetic readers would strongly benefit from computational studies. Herein we focus on the dynamic and energetic characterization of the PHD finger subclass specialized in the recognition of histone H3 peptides unmodified in position K4 (H3K4me0. As a case study we focused on the first PHD finger of autoimmune regulator protein (AIRE-PHD1 in complex with H3K4me0. PCA analysis of the covariance matrix of free AIRE-PHD1 highlights the presence of a "flapping" movement, which is blocked in an open conformation upon binding to H3K4me0. Moreover, binding free energy calculations obtained through Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA methodology are in good qualitative agreement with experiments and allow dissection of the energetic terms associated with native and alanine mutants of AIRE-PHD1/H3K4me0 complexes. MM/PBSA calculations have also been applied to the energetic analysis of other PHD fingers recognizing H3K4me0. In this case we observe excellent correlation between computed and experimental binding free energies. Overall calculations show that H3K4me0 recognition by PHD fingers relies on compensation of the electrostatic and polar solvation energy terms and is stabilized by non-polar interactions.

  15. Analysis of PhD study at the Medical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, in the years 1995–2010

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    Danijel Petrovič

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides teaching, research is one of the main activities of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Ljubljana. Since 1995, the PhD study at the Faculty of Medicine has been organized via the Biomedicine university programme. The authors performed the analysis of the quality of Biomedicine PhD study at the Faculty of Medicine between the years 1995 and 2010. The authors were interested in the number of PhD students that started and finished their PhD studies and how successful PhD students were during that period (how many papers they wrote on the topic of the PhD and what was the impact factor of the papers. In the 15-year period from 1995–2010, 702 students started the Biomedicine PhD programme, while 652 students completed it. Most PhD students (70.7 % have written one SCI paper related to the thesis. Finally, the medium impact factor of the SCI paper related to the PhD thesis was 2.6. We may conclude that the quality of PhD theses evaluated according to the impact factor of the SCI papers related to the theses is solid, however our strength should be aimed toward the continuous increase of quality. In this regard, PhD candidates, mentors as well as the commission for the evaluation of PhD theses must do their homework diligently.

  16. ‘AN INCREDIBLY STEEP HILL:’ HOW GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS SHAPE PERSPECTIVES ON ACADEMIC CAREERS AMONG BEGINNING BIOMEDICAL PHD STUDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christine V.; Campbell, Patricia B.; McGee, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes perspectives on academic careers among 60 beginning PhD students in the biomedical sciences. It presents seven perspectives on academic careers articulated by the students in the sample and explains the way that race/ethnicity, gender, and students’ family education backgrounds are tied to those perspectives. The findings show that traditionally underrepresented students find the academic career path less navigable than students from well-represented groups. Among underrepresented students, even those from higher family education backgrounds, experiences related to race/ethnicity and gender often inform perceptions of the academic career even before they start their graduate research training. As the composition of the graduate population changes to include more women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minority men, it is important to note that not all graduate students enter with the same perspectives and views of the academic career and that there are meaningful differences in perspectives across demographic lines. Graduate programs can play a critical role in providing information and support for graduate students as they navigate their career choices, particularly at the earliest stages of training. By becoming sensitive to students’ perspectives on career options, and understanding how differences in perspectives arise, mentors and others can align advising strategies with the experiences and views of students. PMID:28239250

  17. The Impact of Publishing during PhD Studies on Career Research Publication, Visibility, and Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo; Santos, João M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact that publishing during the period of PhD study has on researchers' future knowledge production, impact, and co-authorship. The analysis is based on a representative sample of PhDs from all fields of science working in Portugal. For each researcher in the dataset, we compiled a lifetime publication record and…

  18. Factors Influencing International PhD Students to Study Physics in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Serene H.-J.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Townson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since physics research is an activity of an active international community, international visits are a common way for physicists to share scientific knowledge and skills. International mobility of physicists is also important for PhD physics study and research training. We investigated personal and social factors that influenced the decision for…

  19. Phd study of reliability and validity: One step closer to a standardized music therapy assessment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    The paper will present a phd study concerning reliability and validity of music therapy assessment model “Assessment of Parenting Competences” (APC) in the area of families with emotionally neglected children. This study had a multiple strategy design with a philosophical base of critical realism...... and pragmatism. The fixed design for this study was a between and within groups design in testing the APCs reliability and validity. The two different groups were parents with neglected children and parents with non-neglected children. The flexible design had a multiple case study strategy specifically...... of the theoretical understanding of the clientgroup. Furthermore, a short describtion of the specific assessment protocol and analysis procedures of APC will be a part of the presentation. The phd study sought to explore how to develop measures of parenting competences in looking at autonomy relationship...

  20. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  1. Management of Stress and Anxiety Among PhD Students During Thesis Writing: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Yousefi, Alireza; Yamani, Nikoo

    2016-01-01

    Today, postgraduate students experience a variety of stresses and anxiety in different situations of academic cycle. Stress and anxiety have been defined as a syndrome shown by emotional exhaustion and reduced personal goal achievement. This article addresses the causes and different strategies of coping with this phenomena by PhD students at Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. The study was conducted by a qualitative method using conventional content analysis approach. Through purposive sampling, 16 postgraduate medical sciences PhD students were selected on the basis of theoretical sampling. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews and field observations. Six hundred fifty-four initial codes were summarized and classified into 4 main categories and 11 subcategories on the thematic coding stage dependent on conceptual similarities and differences. The obtained codes were categorized under 4 themes including "thesis as a major source of stress," "supervisor relationship," "socioeconomic problem," and "coping with stress and anxiety." It was concluded that PhD students experience stress and anxiety from a variety of sources and apply different methods of coping in effective and ineffective ways. Purposeful supervision and guidance can reduce the cause of stress and anxiety; in addition, coping strategy must be in a thoughtful approach, as recommended in this study.

  2. What Do I Want to Be with My PhD? The Roles of Personal Values and Structural Dynamics in Shaping the Career Interests of Recent Biomedical Science PhD Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Kenneth D., Jr.; Griffin, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in faculty careers decreases as graduate training progresses; however, the process underlying career-interest formation remains poorly defined. To better understand this process and whether/how it differs across social identity (i.e., race/ethnicity, gender), we conducted focus groups with 38 biomedical scientists who received PhDs…

  3. What Do I Want to Be with My PhD? The Roles of Personal Values and Structural Dynamics in Shaping the Career Interests of Recent Biomedical Science PhD Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Kenneth D., Jr.; Griffin, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in faculty careers decreases as graduate training progresses; however, the process underlying career-interest formation remains poorly defined. To better understand this process and whether/how it differs across social identity (i.e., race/ethnicity, gender), we conducted focus groups with 38 biomedical scientists who received PhDs…

  4. Biomedical Visual Computing: Case Studies and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Johnson, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computational geometric modeling, imaging, and simulation let researchers build and test models of increasing complexity, generating unprecedented amounts of data. As recent research in biomedical applications illustrates, visualization will be critical in making this vast amount of data usable; it\\'s also fundamental to understanding models of complex phenomena. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. How do scientists perceive the current publication culture? A qualitative focus group interview study among Dutch biomedical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijdink, J K; Schipper, K; Bouter, L M; Maclaine Pont, P; de Jonge, J; Smulders, Y M

    2016-02-17

    To investigate the biomedical scientist's perception of the prevailing publication culture. Qualitative focus group interview study. Four university medical centres in the Netherlands. Three randomly selected groups of biomedical scientists (PhD, postdoctoral staff members and full professors). Main themes for discussion were selected by participants. Frequently perceived detrimental effects of contemporary publication culture were the strong focus on citation measures (like the Journal Impact Factor and the H-index), gift and ghost authorships and the order of authors, the peer review process, competition, the funding system and publication bias. These themes were generally associated with detrimental and undesirable effects on publication practices and on the validity of reported results. Furthermore, senior scientists tended to display a more cynical perception of the publication culture than their junior colleagues. However, even among the PhD students and the postdoctoral fellows, the sentiment was quite negative. Positive perceptions of specific features of contemporary scientific and publication culture were rare. Our findings suggest that the current publication culture leads to negative sentiments, counterproductive stress levels and, most importantly, to questionable research practices among junior and senior biomedical scientists. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Industry careers for the biomedical engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzner, Robert F

    2004-01-01

    This year's conference theme is "linkages for innovation in biomedicine." Biomedical engineers, especially those transitioning their career from academic study into medical device industry, will play a critical role in converting the fruits of scientific research into the reality of modern medical devices. This special session is organized to help biomedical engineers to achieve their career goals more effectively. Participants will have opportunities to hear from and interact with leading industrial experts on many issues. These may include but not limited to 1) career paths for biomedical engineers (industrial, academic, or federal; technical vs. managerial track; small start-up or large established companies); 2) unique design challenges and regulatory requirements in medical device development; 3) aspects of a successful biomedical engineering job candidate (such as resume, interview, follow-up). Suggestions for other topics are welcome and should be directed to xkong@ieee.org The distinguished panelists include: Xuan Kong, Ph.D., VP of Research, NEUROMetrix Inc, Waltham, MA Robert F. Munzner, Ph.D., Medical Device Consultant, Doctor Device, Herndon, VA Glen McLaughlin, Ph.D., VP of Engineering and CTO, Zonare Medical System Inc., Mountain View, CA Grace Bartoo, Ph.D., RAC, General Manager, Decus Biomedical LLC San Carlos, CA.

  7. Navigating the Path to a Biomedical Science Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Andrea McNeely

    The number of biomedical PhD scientists being trained and graduated far exceeds the number of academic faculty positions and academic research jobs. If this trend is compelling biomedical PhD scientists to increasingly seek career paths outside of academia, then more should be known about their intentions, desires, training experiences, and career path navigation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand the process through which biomedical PhD scientists are trained and supported for navigating future career paths. In addition, the study sought to determine whether career development support efforts and opportunities should be redesigned to account for the proportion of PhD scientists following non-academic career pathways. Guided by the social cognitive career theory (SCCT) framework this study sought to answer the following central research question: How does a southeastern tier 1 research university train and support its biomedical PhD scientists for navigating their career paths? Key findings are: Many factors influence PhD scientists' career sector preference and job search process, but the most influential were relationships with faculty, particularly the mentor advisor; Planned activities are a significant aspect of the training process and provide skills for career success; and Planned activities provided skills necessary for a career, but influential factors directed the career path navigated. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  8. Factors that facilitate or inhibit interest of domestic students in the engineering PhD: A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell Smith, Michelle C.

    Given the increasing complexity of technology in our society, the United States has a growing demand for a more highly educated technical workforce. Unfortunately, the proportion of United States citizens earning a PhD in engineering has been declining and there is concern about meeting the economic, national security and quality of life needs of our country. This mixed methods sequential exploratory instrument design study identified factors that facilitate or inhibit interest in engineering PhD programs among domestic engineering undergraduate students in the United States. This study developed a testable theory for how domestic students become interested in engineering PhD programs and a measure of that process, the Exploring Engineering Interest Inventory (EEII). The study was conducted in four phases. The first phase of the study was a qualitative grounded theory exploration of interest in the engineering PhD. Qualitative data were collected from domestic engineering students, engineering faculty and industry professional who had earned a PhD in engineering. The second phase, instrument development, developed the Exploring Engineering Interest Inventory (EEII), a measurement instrument designed with good psychometric properties to test a series of preliminary hypotheses related to the theory generated in the qualitative phase. In the third phase of the study, the EEII was used to collect data from a larger sample of junior and senior engineering majors. The fourth phase integrated the findings from the qualitative and quantitative phases. Four factors were identified as being significant influences of interest in the engineering PhD: Personal characteristics, educational environment, misperceptions of the economic and personal costs, and misperceptions of engineering work. Recommendations include increasing faculty encouragement of students to pursue an engineering PhD and programming to correct the misperceptions of the costs of the engineering PhD and the

  9. What do I want to be with my PhD? The roles of personal values and structural dynamics in shaping the career interests of recent biomedical science PhD graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Kenneth D; Griffin, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    Interest in faculty careers decreases as graduate training progresses; however, the process underlying career-interest formation remains poorly defined. To better understand this process and whether/how it differs across social identity (i.e., race/ethnicity, gender), we conducted focus groups with 38 biomedical scientists who received PhDs between 2006 and 2011, including 23 women and 18 individuals from underrepresented minority (URM) backgrounds. Objective performance and quality of advisor relationships were not significantly different between scientists with high versus low interest in faculty careers. Career interests were fluid and formed in environments that generally lacked structured career development. Vicarious learning shaped similar outcome expectations about academic careers for all scientists; however, women and URMs recounted additional, distinct experiences and expectations. Scientists pursuing faculty careers described personal values, which differed by social identity, as their primary driver. For scientists with low interest in faculty careers, a combination of values, shared across social identity, and structural dynamics of the biomedical workforce (e.g., job market, grant funding, postdoc pay, etc.) played determinative roles. These findings illuminate the complexity of career choice and suggest attracting the best, most diverse academic workforce requires institutional leaders and policy makers go beyond developing individual skill, attending to individuals' values and promoting institutional and systemic reforms.

  10. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  11. Factors Influencing the Degree Progress of International PhD Students from Africa: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almoustapha Oumarou Soumana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades some countries of the Middle East have offered facilities to attract international students to pursue their higher education within their higher education institutions. The purpose of this study is to understand the difficulties faced by these students while conducting their studies abroad, and in doing so, to broaden the awareness of the challenges they face to complete their research. The participants of this qualitative study are international PhD students studying at a Middle Eastern public university. The university has reported increasing enrollment of international students, particularly from Africa in the last few years. Data were collected using a set of semi-structured interviews that drew out information on critical incidents that characterized the kind of difficulties students had faced in their studies. The data collected was further analyzed using a qualitative software package, NVivo (QSR International, 11. Six main themes came out from the content analysis of the interviews, which are the role of the adviser, student features, funding issues, family engagement, research and psychological obstacles which provide a holistic picture of student perspectives on the factors that influence degree progress. While these students might have faced difficulties mentioned in existing literature, this study argues that the participants have indicated experiencing psychological obstacles that were not described in earlier studies, such as the state of mind they were in as a result of being worried for family members due to war or violence in their home countries, and drop in currency exchange rates and difficulties in acquiring money due to international sanctions imposed against their countries. This study provides important thoughts on the factors that impact the degree progress of international PhD students from Africa, while at the same time revealing a serious gap in the advisers’ role which can contribute to the

  12. The Road to Become a Legitimate Scholar: A Case Study of International PhD Students in Science and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Bøgelund

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the doctoral education process is to create and legitimize scholarly researchers. This transformation, from student to scholar, is widely discussed in the literature. However, recent rapid changes in university culture have resulted in less time for supervision, stricter completion deadlines, and a greater focus on efficiency and productivity. This has had an impact on this transition process, and this impact has not been widely studied. The aim of this article is to understand the consequences of the current trends for PhD students and the education of PhD students in general. The article is based on interviews with 14 international students from two different research programs at the Faculty of Engineering and Science at Aalborg University in Denmark. The case of international PhD students in a western setting is singled out as a challenging case for becoming a legitimate scholar, since they face the additional challenge of becoming socialised into their new foreign setting. Overall, the study concludes that the transition process of doctoral students is affected by the way different supervisors deal with current university trends and how PhD students fit or do not fit into their knowledge production practices. The study identifies matches or mismatches in a knowledge production perspective, quality of contact, and degree of independence of the PhD student as factors that influence whether a transition process can be marked as sound, troublesome, or lacking. Finally, the study identifies an overall risk of neglecting the more interdependent types of international PhD students. Suggestions are given as how to address this risk.

  13. Customizing Process to Align with Purpose and Program: The 2003 MS PHD'S in Ocean Sciences Program Evaluative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, V. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    How did the 2003 Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Ocean Sciences Program customize evaluative methodology and instruments to align with program goals and processes? How is data captured to document cognitive and affective impact? How are words and numbers utilized to accurately illustrate programmatic outcomes? How is compliance with implicit and explicit funding regulations demonstrated? The 2003 MS PHD'S in Ocean Sciences Program case study provides insightful responses to each of these questions. MS PHD'S was developed by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increased and sustained participation in Earth system science. Key components of this initiative include development of a community of scholars sustained by face-to-face and virtual mentoring partnerships; establishment of networking activities between and among undergraduate, graduate, postgraduate students, scientists, faculty, professional organization representatives, and federal program officers; and provision of forums to address real world issues as identified by each constituent group. The evaluative case study of the 2003 MS PHD'S in Ocean Sciences Program consists of an analysis of four data sets. Each data set was aligned to document progress in the achievement of the following program goals: Goal 1: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will successfully market, recruit, select, and engage underrepresented student and non-student participants with interest/ involvement in Ocean Sciences; Goal 2: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will provide meaningful engagement for participants as determined by quantitative analysis of user-feedback; Goal 3: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will provide meaningful engagement for participants as determined by qualitative analysis of user-feedback, and; Goal 4: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will develop a constituent base adequate to demonstrate evidence of interest, value, need and sustainability in

  14. Why undertake a pilot in a qualitative PhD study? Lessons learned to promote success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Jane; Archibong, Uduak; Walton, Sean

    2017-01-23

    Background Pilot studies can play an important role in qualitative studies. Methodological and practical issues can be shaped and refined by undertaking pilots. Personal development and researchers' competence are enhanced and lessons learned can inform the development and quality of the main study. However, pilot studies are rarely published, despite their potential to improve knowledge and understanding of the research. Aim To present the main lessons learned from undertaking a pilot in a qualitative PhD study. Discussion This paper draws together lessons learned when undertaking a pilot as part of a qualitative research project. Important methodological and practical issues identified during the pilot study are discussed including access, recruitment, data collection and the personal development of the researcher. The resulting changes to the final study are also highlighted. Conclusion Sharing experiences of and lessons learned in a pilot study enhances personal development, improves researchers' confidence and competence, and contributes to the understanding of research. Implications for practice Pilots can be used effectively in qualitative studies to refine the final design, and provide the researcher with practical experience to enhance confidence and competence.

  15. Role of institutional climate in fostering diversity in biomedical research workforce: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Gary C; Hurd, Yasmin; Palermo, Ann-Gel S; Delbrune, Denise; Saran, Suman; Zony, Chati; Krulwich, Terry A

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the barriers to diversity in biomedical research and describes the evolution of efforts to address climate issues to enhance the ability to attract, retain, and develop underrepresented minorities, whose underrepresentation is found both in science and medicine, in the graduate-school biomedical research doctoral programs (PhD and MD/PhD) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. We also describe the potential beneficial impact of having a climate that supports diversity and inclusion in the biomedical research workforce. The Mount Sinai School of Medicine diversity-climate efforts are discussed as part of a comprehensive plan to increase diversity in all institutional programs: PhD, MD/PhD, and MD, and at the residency, postdoctoral fellow, and faculty levels. Lessons learned from 4 decades of targeted programs and activities at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine may be of value to other institutions interested in improving diversity in the biomedical science and academic medicine workforce. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  16. Silver metal nanoparticles study for biomedical and green house applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauwel, E.; Simón-Gracia, L.; Guha, M.; Rauwel, P.; Kuunal, S.; Wragg, D.

    2017-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNP) with diameters ranging from 2 to 100nm have received extensive attention during the past decades due to their many potential applications. This paper presents a structural and cytotoxicity study of silver metal nanoparticles targeted towards biomedical applications. Spherical Ag MNPs of diameter from 20 to 50 nm have been synthesized. The encapsulation of Ag MNPs inside pH-sensitive polymersomes has been also studied for the development of biomedical applications. A cytotoxicity study of the Ag MNPs against primary prostatic cancer cell line (PPC-1) has demonstrated a high mortality rate for concentrations ranging from 100 to 200mg/L. The paper will discuss the potential for therapeutic treatments of these Ag MNPs.

  17. The experience of international nursing students studying for a PhD in the U.K: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Educating nurses to doctoral level is an important means of developing nursing capacity globally. There is an international shortage of doctoral nursing programmes, hence many nurses seek their doctorates overseas. The UK is a key provider of doctoral education for international nursing students, however, very little is known about international doctoral nursing students' learning experiences during their doctoral study. This paper reports on a national study that sought to investigate the learning expectations and experiences of overseas doctoral nursing students in the UK. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in 2008/09 with 17 international doctoral nursing students representing 9 different countries from 6 different UK universities. Data were analysed thematically. All 17 interviewees were enrolled on 'traditional' 3 year PhD programmes and the majority (15/17) planned to work in higher education institutions back in their home country upon graduation. Results Studying for a UK PhD involved a number of significant transitions, including adjusting to a new country/culture, to new pedagogical approaches and, in some cases, to learning in a second language. Many students had expected a more structured programme of study, with a stronger emphasis on professional nursing issues as well as research - akin to the professional doctorate. Students did not always feel well integrated into their department's wider research environment, and wanted more opportunities to network with their UK peers. A good supervision relationship was perceived as the most critical element of support in a doctoral programme, but good relationships were sometimes difficult to attain due to differences in student/supervisor expectations and in approaches to supervision. The PhD was perceived as a difficult and stressful journey, but those nearing the end reflected positively on it as a life changing experience in which they had developed key professional and

  18. Application of MRI and biomedical engineering in speech production study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, S R; Freitas, D R; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2009-12-01

    Speech production has always been a subject of interest both at the morphological and acoustic levels. This knowledge is useful for a better understanding of all the involved mechanisms and for the construction of articulatory models. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique that allows the study of the whole vocal tract, with good soft tissue contrast and resolution, and permits the calculation of area functions towards a better understanding of this mechanism. Thus, our aim is to demonstrate the value and application of MRI in speech production study and its relationship with engineering, namely with biomedical engineering. After vocal tract contours extraction, data were processed for 3D reconstruction culminating in model construction of some of the sounds of European Portuguese. MRI provides useful morphological data about the position and shape of the different speech articulators, and the biomedical engineering computational tools for its analysis.

  19. Percentile growth charts for biomedical studies using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, A M; Laws, J; Laws, A; Litten, J C; Lean, I J; Clarke, L

    2008-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity and heart disease are compromising quality of life for a growing number of people. There is much research linking adult disease with the growth and development both in utero and during the first year of life. The pig is an ideal model for studying the origins of developmental programming. The objective of this paper was to construct percentile growth curves for the pig for use in biomedical studies. The body weight (BW) of pigs was recorded from birth to 150 days of age and their crown-to-rump length was measured over the neonatal period to enable the ponderal index (PI; kg/m3) to be calculated. Data were normalised and percentile curves were constructed using Cole's lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method for BW and PI. The construction of these percentile charts for use in biomedical research will allow a more detailed and precise tracking of growth and development of individual pigs under experimental conditions.

  20. Simulation Programs for Ph.D. Study of Analysis, Modeling and Optimum Design of Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Lin

    1999-01-01

    The design of solar domestic hot water system is a complex process, due to characteristics inherent in solar heating technology. Recently, computer simulation has become a widely used technique to improve the understanding of the thermal processes in such systems. This report presents the detailed...... programs or units that were developed in the Ph.D study of " Analysis, Modeling and Optimum Design of Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems"....

  1. The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

  2. Studies on biochemical and biomedical properties of Conus betulinus venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giji Sadhasivam

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the biochemical and biomedical properties of predatory gastropod Conus betulinus venom. Methods: Molecular weight of the crude venom extract was determined by using SDS-PAGE. Toxicity studies were carried out using haemolytic and brine shrimp lethality assays. Fibrin plate assay and substrate SDS-PAGE were used to determine the effect of sample on fibrin(ogen olytic and proteolytic activity. The FTIR characterisation and chemical fingerprinting of amino acid were done with HPTLC. Enzymatic activities like phospholipase and hyaluronidase were measured spectrophotometrically and calculated in units. Anticancer screening was carried out by MTT assay. Results: Studies on this deadly venom revealed six different molecular weight proteins of medical significance ranging between 20.0 kDa and 97.4 kDa. The protein content was estimated as 0.9 mg/ mL. Haemolytic activity in erythrocytes was recorded and LC50 (Artemia at 31.5 µg/mL. Further the venom showed considerable enzymatic properties like gelatinolytic, caesinolytic, fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities. The hyaluronidase and phospholipase activities were recorded at meagre range. The venom exhibited significant activity against HeLa cell lines. Moreover the evolution of venom is the crucial nature of Conus peptides in their challenging ecosystem. Periodical study on these peptides will unveil more peptides of biomedical use. Conclusions: Although quite a lot of works have dealt with paralytic effects of Conus venom, it still remains as an unexplored cocktail with promising molecules for drug development.

  3. A cross-language study on citation practice in PhD theses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Soler Monreal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Citation practice provides justification for arguments and allows a writer to indicate a rhetorical gap for her/his research and adopt a tone of authority. Claims must be supported with evidence, and writers must demonstrate an understanding of approaches and knowledge in their fields of specialisation, in order to persuade the examiners that the thesis is worthy of the award of a doctorate (Thompson, 2005b. Candidates need to keep the adequate interpersonal relationship with the immediate audience (the examiners. They have to evaluate the previous research in an area of study and to be respectful with previous claims from authorities in the disciplines. They also need to position themselves in relation to other disciplinary members and highlight their individual claims. This paper investigates contrastively how interactional resources of citation and, in particular reporting verbs, are deployed in the literature review chapters of PhD theses written in English and in Spanish.El uso de citas y referencias proporciona una justificación para la argumentaci��n y permite al académico identificar un hueco o espacio retórico donde situar su investigación y adoptar cierto tono de autoridad. Las hipótesis o afirmaciones científicas deben apoyarse en evidencias, y los investigadores deben demostrar un buen conocimiento de los enfoques de su campo de especialización, para así persuadir a los miembros del tribunal examinador de la tesis de que ésta es digna de merecer el doctorado (Thompson, 2005b. Los doctorandos necesitan mantener una relación interpersonal apropiada con su audiencia (el tribunal examinador. Asimismo, necesitan evaluar la literatura de su área de estudio y ser respetuosos con las afirmaciones sobre investigaciones previas de autoridades de la disciplina. Necesitan adoptar una postura ante los miembros de la comunidad científica a la vez que enfatizan sus propias afirmaciones. En este trabajo se lleva a cabo un estudio

  4. Simulation programs for ph.D. study of analysis, modeling and optimum design of solar domestic hot water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Qin

    1998-12-31

    The design of solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems is a complex process, due to characteristics inherent in the solar heating technology. Recently, computer simulation has become a widely used technique to improve the understanding of the thermal processes in such systems. One of the main objects of the Ph.D. study of `Analysis, Modelling and optimum Design of Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems` is to develop and verify programs for carrying out the simulation and evaluation of the dynamic performance of solar DHW systems. During this study, simulation programs for hot water distribution networks and for certain types of solar DHW systems were developed. (au)

  5. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  6. Fundraising for Accelerated Study for the PhD in Nursing: A Community Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    This article describes fundraising strategies by a School of Nursing to support a post-master's accelerated (3-year) PhD degree program. A sample proposal to solicit funds is included, as well as a contract that students sign before accepting the scholarship and agreeing to teach for 3 years or repay the money. The first campaign raised $2.3 million for ten students, and the second campaign raised $1.3 million for six students. One useful marketing strategy is to show the impact of an investment in educating ten doctoral students who will become faculty and teach 100 additional students per year, who will then become professionals caring for thousands of patients during their careers. Over a 10 year period, the impact of an accelerated program is enormous, with 660 students taught who in their lifetime will care for 2.4 million patients. The article also discusses motivation and mind sets for giving to promote success in fundraising.

  7. Biomedical scientist training officers' evaluation of integrated (co-terminus) Applied Biomedical Science BSc programmes: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, S J; Cunningham, J M

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) portfolio for pre-registration training in 2003 allowed universities to develop integrated (co-terminus) biomedical science BSc programmes. Students undertake structured placements within clinical pathology laboratories as part of their degree. The clinical training and professional development of students is undertaken by training officers (TOs), who are experienced Health Professions Council (HPC)-registered biomedical scientists and usually also members of the IBMS. This study aims to evaluate TOs' perceptions of these integrated degrees as a means of delivering pre-registration training for biomedical scientists. A questionnaire to collect quantitative data and be completed anonymously was sent to TOs, via staff at participating universities. Items considered TOs' perceptions in four categories: how well students fitted into the laboratory team, their professional and scientific development, the impact of delivering integrated degrees on service delivery, and the commitment to training students. Surveys took place in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and involved TOs taking students from 10, 14 and 17 universities each year, respectively. The response rates to the survey were 60% in 2007, 34% in 2008 and 12% in 2009. Participants were representative in terms of age, gender and pathology discipline and had a broad range of experience with students. The overall mean score for TOs perceptions was 3.38 in 2007 which increased significantly to 3.99 in 2009 (Kruskall Wallis test chi2 = 21.13, P<0.01). Mean scores in three of the four categories were positive in 2007, although the impact on service delivery was perceived negatively. In all areas, means were significantly greater in 2009. The results indicate that TOs view the integrated degrees favourably and are happy with the scientific and professional development of students. Although designing training sessions suitable for undergraduates took extra work initially

  8. Biomedical Engineering and Cognitive Science Secondary Science Curriculum Development: A Three Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stacy S.; Sherwood, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on a multi-year effort to create and evaluate cognitive-based curricular materials for secondary school science classrooms. A team of secondary teachers, educational researchers, and academic biomedical engineers developed a series of curriculum units that are based in biomedical engineering for secondary level students in…

  9. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  10. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roozen, K.

    1995-02-15

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

  11. Liquid Cooling Garment Technology Transfer: A Biomedical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Lomax, W. Curtis; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    Liquid cooling garments (LCGs) are routinely used to remove the body heat generated in a space-suit during extravehicular activity (EVA). Garments based upon LCG design have been used in various biomedical situations. The objectives of this investigation is to describe one recent LCG application to provide relief of the pain associated with peripheral neuritis and to report the physiologic changes responsible for this relief.

  12. A study to assess the knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    bio-medical waste management among the health care providers working in primary health .... booklet. Therefore, the current status of health ... The present study was conducted in the ..... Tsakona M, Anagnostopoulou E, Gidarakas E. Hospital ...

  13. Using Google blogs and discussions to recommend biomedical resources: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robyn B; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Iwema, Carrie L

    2013-01-01

    This case study investigated whether data gathered from discussions within the social media provide a reliable basis for a biomedical resources recommendation system. Using a search query to mine text from Google Blogs and Discussions, a ranking of biomedical resources was determined based on those most frequently mentioned. To establish quality, these results were compared with rankings by subject experts. An overall agreement between the frequency of social media discussions and subject expert recommendations was observed when identifying key bioinformatics and consumer health resources. Testing the method in more than one biomedical area implies this procedure could be employed across different subjects.

  14. In vitro studies of biomedical magnesium alloys in a simulated physiological environment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Y; Hu, T; Chu, P K

    2011-04-01

    In spite of the immense potential of biodegradable magnesium alloys, the fast degradation rates of Mg-based biomedical implants in the physiological environment impose severe limitations in many clinical applications. Consequently, extensive in vitro studies have been carried out to investigate the materials' performance and fathom the associated mechanisms. Here, an up-to-date review of the in vitro studies on biomedical magnesium alloys in a simulated physiological environment is provided. This review focuses on four topics: (1) materials selection and in vitro biocompatibility of biomedical magnesium alloys; (2) in vitro degradation of biomedical magnesium alloys in simulated physiological environments, specifically discussing corrosion types, degradation rates, corrosion products and impact of the constituents in body fluids on materials degradation; (3) selection of suitable test media for in vitro assessment; and (4) future research trends.

  15. Latino beliefs about biomedical research participation: a qualitative study on the U.S.-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Rachel M; Knerr, Sarah; Scott, Mary Alice; Hohl, Sarah D; Malen, Rachel C; Vilchis, Hugo; Thompson, Beti

    2014-10-01

    Latinos are under-represented in biomedical research conducted in the United States, impeding disease prevention and treatment efforts for this growing demographic group. We gathered perceptions of biomedical research and gauged willingness to participate through elicitation interviews and focus groups with Latinos living on the U.S.-Mexico border. Themes that emerged included a strong willingness to participate in biomedical studies and suggested that Latinos may be under-represented due to limited formal education and access to health information, not distrust. The conflation of research and clinical care was common and motivated participation. Outreach efforts and educational interventions to inform Latinos of participation opportunities and clarify harms and benefits associated with biomedical research participation will be essential to maintain trust within Latino communities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Outcomes assessment of science & engineering doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) programs: An exploratory study of prospective influencers in distinguished graduate placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Louise M.

    This exploratory study was an investigation of the mission and emphases of twenty-two science & engineering doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) programs in ten fields of study at nine public research universities in the United States and the corresponding influence those factors impose on placement of Ph.D. graduates of those programs into academic program settings. Ph.D. program chairs participated via protocol to provide descriptive, statistical, and experiential details of their Ph.D. programs and offered insight on current conditions for academic placement opportunities. The quantitative analysis served as the basis of examination of influencers in graduate placement for those Ph.D. programs that are informed about placement activity of their graduates. Among the nine tested hypotheses there were no statistically significant findings. The qualitative expressions of this study---those found in the confounding variables, the limitations of the study, those questions that elicited opinions and further discussion and follow-up queries with program chairs---added most meaningfully, however, to the study in that they served as a gauge of the implications of neglect for those Ph.D. programs that remain uninformed about their graduate placement activity. Central to the findings of this study was that one compelling fact remains the same. Denecke, Director of Best Practice at the Council of Graduate Schools, pointed out years ago that just as "we know very little about why those who finish and why those who leave do so, we also know surprisingly little about where students go after their degrees...we therefore have little information about how effective doctoral programs are in preparing doctorates for short- and long-term career success." The fact remains that the effectiveness of doctoral programs in the context of career success is just as uncertain today. A serious admonition is that one-half of those programs that participated in this study remain uninformed about the

  17. Project Alexander the Great: a study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O

    2008-01-01

    Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering is considered amongst the most reputable fields within the global arena, and will likely be the primer for any future breakthroughs in Medicine and Biology. Bioengineering/biomedical engineering education has evolved since late 1950s and is undergoing advancement in leading academic institutions worldwide. This paper delineates an original study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and bears the name 'Project Alexander the Great'. The initial step of the project was to survey all 10448 universities, recognized by the International Association of Universities, spread among the 193 member states of the United Nations within the six continents. The project aims at identifying, disseminating, and networking, through the world-wide-web, those institutions of higher learning that provide bioengineering/biomedical engineering education. The significance of this project is multifold: i) the inception of a web-based 'world-map' in bioengineering/biomedical engineering education for the potential international student desiring to pursue a career in this field; ii) the global networking of bioengineering/biomedical engineering academic/research programs; iii) the promotion of first-class bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and the catalysis of global proliferation of this field; iv) the erection of bridges among educational institutions, industry, and professional societies or organizations involved in Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering; and v) the catalysis in the establishment of framework agreements for cooperation among the identified institutions offering curricula in this field. This paper presents the results obtained from Africa and North America. The whole project is due to be completed by 2009.

  18. Are we studying what matters? Health priorities and NIH-funded biomedical engineering research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jessica B; Paltiel, A David; Saltzman, W Mark

    2010-07-01

    With the founding of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in 1999, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) made explicit its dedication to expanding research in biomedical engineering. Ten years later, we sought to examine how closely federal funding for biomedical engineering aligns with U.S. health priorities. Using a publicly accessible database of research projects funded by the NIH in 2008, we identified 641 grants focused on biomedical engineering, 48% of which targeted specific diseases. Overall, we found that these disease-specific NIH-funded biomedical engineering research projects align with national health priorities, as quantified by three commonly utilized measures of disease burden: cause of death, disability-adjusted survival losses, and expenditures. However, we also found some illnesses (e.g., cancer and heart disease) for which the number of research projects funded deviated from our expectations, given their disease burden. Our findings suggest several possibilities for future studies that would serve to further inform the allocation of limited research dollars within the field of biomedical engineering.

  19. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  20. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  1. A Study on Changes of Supervision Model in Universities and Fostering Creative PhD Students in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Lingling; Zhou, Chunfang; Zhang, Song

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the changes of supervision model in higher education in relation to fostering creative Ph.D. students in China. The changes are being made from the traditional Apprentice Master Model (AMM) to the modern Collaborative Cohort Model (CCM). According to the results of the ...

  2. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Reporto of PhD Dissertations.   Mario Dalle Carbonare Società, potere e clientele nell’Irlanda altomedievale (secoli V-IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale europea, Università "Ca' Foscari" di Venezia, 2003 Vieri Mazzoni La legislazione antighibellina e la politica oligarchica della Parte Guelfa di Firenze nel secondo Trecento (1347-1378, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale (ciclo XII, Università degli Studi di Firenze   Alma Poloni Pisa dalle origini del movimento popolare alla discesa di Ludovico il Bavaro. I gruppi dirigenti cittadini tra continuità e trasformazione, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dell'Europa nel medioevo, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2003   Andrea Puglia Potere marchionale, amministrazione del territorio, società locali dalla morte di Ugo di Tuscia a Guelfo VI di Baviera (1001-1160, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Milano, 2003

  3. Clustering analysis of questionnaire for Ph.D. studies in Electrical and Information Engineering in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadourakis, George M.; Christinaki, Eirini; Hatzi, Panagiota

    2013-01-01

    interactions of Higher Education Institutions and Lifelong Learning. The European consortium of ELLEIEC was a good opportunity to conduct a survey on that point in the various countries involved in the program. Two surveys one for the “bachelor and master” levels and one for the doctoral studies were carried...

  4. Fault and Error Latency Under Real Workload: an Experimental Study. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillarege, Ram

    1986-01-01

    A practical methodology for the study of fault and error latency is demonstrated under a real workload. This is the first study that measures and quantifies the latency under real workload and fills a major gap in the current understanding of workload-failure relationships. The methodology is based on low level data gathered on a VAX 11/780 during the normal workload conditions of the installation. Fault occurrence is simulated on the data, and the error generation and discovery process is reconstructed to determine latency. The analysis proceeds to combine the low level activity data with high level machine performance data to yield a better understanding of the phenomena. A strong relationship exists between latency and workload and that relationship is quantified. The sampling and reconstruction techniques used are also validated. Error latency in the memory where the operating system resides was studied using data on the physical memory access. Fault latency in the paged section of memory was determined using data from physical memory scans. Error latency in the microcontrol store was studied using data on the microcode access and usage.

  5. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Guido Antonioli Conservator pacis et iustitie. La signoria di Taddeo Pepoli a Bologna (1337-1347, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Filologia romanza e cultura medievale (XIII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001   Elisabetta Filippini «In vassallatico episcopi permanere debent». Rapporti vassallatici e concessioni beneficiali dei vescovi di Cremona fra X e XIII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di Ricerca in Storia Medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2003   Marco Meschini, Innocenzo III e il "negotium pacis et fidei" in Linguadoca tra il 1198 e il 1215, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 2003   Fabrizio Ricciardelli The Politics of Exclusion in Florence (1215-1434, thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History, University of Warwick, Department of History, April 2003 Renata Salvarani Baptizare pueros et decimas dare. Cura delle anime, strutturazione ecclesiastica e organizzazione delle campagne in area gardesana fra VIII e XIII secolo (diocesi di Brescia, Verona, Mantova e Trento, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2002-2003   Vito Sibilio Le parole della prima crociata, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel medioevo euromediterraneo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  6. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations.   Miguel Calleja Puerta El conde Suero Vermúdez, su parentela y su entorno social. La aristocracia leonesa en los siglos XI y XII, Tesis de doctorado en Historia, Universidad de Oviedo (España, 2000   Adele Cilento Potere e monachesimo nella Calabria bizantina: relazioni e interferenze (secc. IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (X ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2000   Amedeo De Vincentiis Firenze e i signori. Sperimentazioni istituzionali e modelli di regime nelle signorie fiorentine degli Angioini (fine XIII - metà XIV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale (XI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Milano, 1999   Marco Folin Il sistema politico di un antico Stato italiano: i ducati estensi nella prima Età moderna (1452-1598, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Scuola Normale superiore di Pisa, 2000   Barbara Frale Guardiani del Santuario. Le radici orientali del processo contro l’ordine del Tempio (1128 - 1314, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale d’Europa (XI ciclo, Università "Ca’ Foscari" di Venezia, 2000

  7. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  8. Studies of an x ray selected sample of cataclysmic variables. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Andrew D.

    1986-01-01

    Just prior to the thesis research, an all-sky survey in hard x rays with the HEAO-1 satellite and further observations in the optical resulted in a catalog of about 700 x-ray sources with known optical counterparts. This sample includes 43 cataclysmic variables, which are binaries consisting of a detached white-dwarf and a Roche lobe filling companion star. This thesis consists of studies of the x-ray selected sample of catalcysmic variables.

  9. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pulsating Turbulent Flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the effects of small amplitude sinusoidal pulsations on fully developed turbulent flow in a tube from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Theoretical models for the macroscopic behavior of pulsating turbulent tube flow were developed for the two cases of very low and very high pulsation frequencies. The models are based on assumptions of quasi-steady and frozen eddy viscosity flow behavior, respectively. The models successfully predict unsteady velocity profiles, thereby supporting the currently proposed definitions of frequency regimes in pulsating turbulent flow. Experimental measurements were made of the time-dependent pressure drop and velocity profiles over the range of frequency-to-Reynolds number ratios from 0.0095 to 0.24. The two macroscopic models developed in this study predict unsteady velocity profiles which are in moderately good agreement with the experiments in their respective frequency regimes, and a previously developed quasi-steady model is found to predict experimental velocity profiles well in both the quasisteady and the frozen eddy viscosity frequency regimes. The effect of flow pulsations on the dissipation of turbulence energy in the vicinity of the wall was measured in the lower transition frequency regime. The long-time averaged dissipation was observed to be unchanged from the steady flow dissipation, within the accuracy of the experiment. A theoretical model of the periodic viscous sublayer was also developed and applied to pulsating flow in a tube, in order to investigate the effects of flow pulsations on the rate of production of turbulence in the region of the wall. The periodic viscous sublayer model predicts sublayer growth periods in steady flow which agree with the published experimental data. When the model is applied to pulsating flow, the response of the sublayer growth period falls into three frequency regimes, the parameters of which are in approximate agreement

  10. A Study of Strong Stability of Distributed Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataltepe, Tayfun

    1989-01-01

    The strong stability of distributed systems is studied and the problem of characterizing strongly stable semigroups of operators associated with distributed systems is addressed. Main emphasis is on contractive systems. Three different approaches to characterization of strongly stable contractive semigroups are developed. The first one is an operator theoretical approach. Using the theory of dilations, it is shown that every strongly stable contractive semigroup is related to the left shift semigroup on an L(exp 2) space. Then, a decomposition for the state space which identifies strongly stable and unstable states is introduced. Based on this decomposition, conditions for a contractive semigroup to be strongly stable are obtained. Finally, extensions of Lyapunov's equation for distributed parameter systems are investigated. Sufficient conditions for weak and strong stabilities of uniformly bounded semigroups are obtained by relaxing the equivalent norm condition on the right hand side of the Lyanupov equation. These characterizations are then applied to the problem of feedback stabilization. First, it is shown via the state space decomposition that under certain conditions a contractive system (A,B) can be strongly stabilized by the feedback -B(*). Then, application of the extensions of the Lyapunov equation results in sufficient conditions for weak, strong, and exponential stabilizations of contractive systems by the feedback -B(*). Finally, it is shown that for a contractive system, the first derivative of x with respect to time = Ax + Bu (where B is any linear bounded operator), there is a related linear quadratic regulator problem and a corresponding steady state Riccati equation which always has a bounded nonnegative solution.

  11. A numerical study of fundamental shock noise mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis - Cornell Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1995-01-01

    The results of this thesis demonstrate that direct numerical simulation can predict sound generation in unsteady aerodynamic flows containing shock waves. Shock waves can be significant sources of sound in high speed jet flows, on helicopter blades, and in supersonic combustion inlets. Direct computation of sound permits the prediction of noise levels in the preliminary design stage and can be used as a tool to focus experimental studies, thereby reducing cost and increasing the probability of a successfully quiet product in less time. This thesis reveals and investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation by shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled by the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. During the interaction, the shock wave begins to move and the sound pressure is amplified as the wave passes through the shock. The numerical approach presented in this thesis is validated by the comparison of results obtained in a quasi-one dimensional simulation with linear theory. Analysis of the perturbation energy demonstrated for the first time that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction. Shock deformation is investigated by the numerical simulation of a ring vortex interacting with a shock. This interaction models the passage of turbulent structures through the shock wave. The simulation demonstrates that both acoustic waves and contact surfaces are generated downstream during the interaction. Analysis demonstrates that the acoustic wave spreads cylindrically, that the sound intensity is highly directional, and that the sound pressure level increases significantly with increasing shock strength. The effect of shock strength on sound pressure level is consistent with experimental observations of shock noise, indicating that the interaction of a ring vortex with a shock wave correctly models a dominant mechanism of shock noise generation.

  12. Arab nations lagging behind other Middle Eastern countries in biomedical research: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakoush Omran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of biomedical research and publications in a country or group of countries is used to monitor research progress and trends. This study aims to assess the performance of biomedical research in the Arab world during 2001–2005 and to compare it with other Middle Eastern non-Arab countries. Methods PubMed and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-expanded were searched systematically for the original biomedical research publications and their citation frequencies of 16 Arab nations and three non-Arab Middle Eastern countries (Iran, Israel and Turkey, all of which are classified as middle or high income countries. Results The 16 Arab countries together have 5775 and 14,374 original research articles listed by PubMed and SCI-expanded, respectively, significantly less (p Conclusion The Arab world is producing fewer biomedical publications of lower quality than other Middle Eastern countries. Studies are needed to clarify the causes and to propose strategies to improve the biomedical research status in Arab countries.

  13. A Case Study: Data Management in Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R. Gaudette

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a biomedical engineering lab at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, co-author Dr. Glenn R. Gaudette and his research team are investigating the effects of stem cell therapy on the regeneration of function in damaged cardiac tissue in laboratory rats. Each instance of stem cell experimentation on a rat yields hundreds of data sets that must be carefully captured, documented and securely stored so that the data will be easily accessed and retrieved for papers, reports, further research, and validation of findings, while meeting NIH guidelines for data sharing. After a brief introduction to the bioengineering field and stem cell research, this paper focuses on the experimental workflow and the data generated in one instance of stem cell experimentation; the lab’s data management practices; and how Dr. Gaudette teaches data management to the lab’s incoming graduate students each semester. The co-authors discuss the haphazard manner by which engineering and science students typically learn data management practices, and advocate for the integration of formal data management instruction in higher education STEM curricula. The paper concludes with a discussion of the Frameworks for a Data Management Curriculum developed collaboratively by the co-authors’ institutions -- the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute -- to teach data management best practices to students in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering.

  14. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. [ed.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  15. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. (ed.); Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  16. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. (ed.); Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  17. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. [ed.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  18. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Federica Cengarle Le investiture feudali di Filippo Maria Visconti (1412-1447, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Silvia Coazzin Liberi domini totius castri. L'aristocrazia rurale "minore" nel Senese e nella Toscana meridionale. Forme di egemonia, assetto sociale e patrimoniale di lignaggi, famiglie e gruppi consortili di castello (secc. XI-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Maria Elena Cortese Signori e castelli. Famiglie aristocratiche, dominati signorili e trasformazioni insediative nel comitatus fiorentino (fine X-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Patrizia Meli Gabriele Malaspina marchese di Fosdinovo: il condottiero ed il politico, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Federica Pessotto La Morea franca. Economia e istituzioni tra Oriente e Occidente nei secoli XIII e XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società e Religioni dal Tardoantico alla fine del Medioevo, Università degli studi di Torino, 2003 Lorenzo Pubblici Dal Caucaso al Mar d’Azov. L’impatto dell’invasione mongola nella Caucasia fra nomadismo e civiltà sedentaria (1204-1395, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 [01/05] Riccardo Rao "Comunia". Risorse collettive e patrimoniali dei maggiori comuni subalpini (secoli XII - inizio XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Alessandro Soddu Feudalesimo e potere signorile in Sardegna nei secoli XI-XIV.  La signoria territoriale dei Malaspina, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Università "Pompeu Fabra" di Barcellona, 2004

  19. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertation. Laura Baietto Una politica per le città. Rapporti fra papato, vescovi e comuni nell'Italia centro-settentrionale da Innocenzo III a Gregorio IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Giuseppe Banfo Compresenze e sovrapposizioni di poteri territoriali di qualità diversa tra X e XIII: il caso del basso Monferrato, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Francesca Dell'Acqua La vetrata tra l'età tardo imperiale e l'altomedioevo: le fonti, l'archeologia, Tesi di Perfezionamento in Storia dell'Arte Medievale, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 2001   Primo Giovanni Embriaco I vescovi di Albenga e gli sviluppi signorili nella Liguria occidentale (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2001   Antonella Ghignoli Documenti e proprietà altomedievali. Fondamenti e problemi dell'esegesi storica delle fonti documentarie nello specchio della tradizione delle carte pisane dei secoli VIII-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Vito Loré Espansione monastica e mutamenti politici. La Trinità di Cava nei suoi rapporti con i sovrani longobardi e normanni e con l'aristocrazia territoriale. Secoli XI-XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Rosaria Stracuzzi Messina nel '400, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 2001   Stefania Tamburini Le "portate" ecclesiastiche nel piviere di San Giovanni in Firenze nel 1427. Spunti per una riflessione sul patrimonio ecclesiastico della diocesi fiorentina,Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e informatica, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001

  20. A case study: biomedical waste management practices at city hospital in Himachal Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Akansha; Pathak, Aishwarya; Bajaj, Prasad; Singh, Harvinder; Kumar, Sudhir

    2011-06-01

    Proper management of biomedical waste is a crucial issue for maintaining human health and the environment. The waste generated in the hospitals has the potential for spreading infections and causing diseases. The study was conducted by visiting a near by hospital in order to get acquainted with the generation of the biomedical waste and their disposal strategies. The study includes an assortment of details about the quantity of different types of waste generated, their handling, treatment, final disposal and various management strategies adopted by the hospital. The survey was conducted by asking various questions regarding the issue by the waste management team and the workers involved in managing the waste.

  1. Does working with industry come at a price? A study of doctoral candidates’ performance in collaborative vs. non-collaborative Ph.D. projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, Negin; Bekkers, Rudi; Frenken, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative Ph.D. projects between university and industry constitute an important aspect of university–industry collaboration, yet has remained under-researched thus far. The specific question this paper asks is how collaborative Ph.D. projects perform compared to non-collaborative Ph.D. projects

  2. PASSIM – an open source software system for managing information in biomedical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neogi Sudeshna

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the crucial aspects of day-to-day laboratory information management is collection, storage and retrieval of information about research subjects and biomedical samples. An efficient link between sample data and experiment results is absolutely imperative for a successful outcome of a biomedical study. Currently available software solutions are largely limited to large-scale, expensive commercial Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS. Acquiring such LIMS indeed can bring laboratory information management to a higher level, but often implies sufficient investment of time, effort and funds, which are not always available. There is a clear need for lightweight open source systems for patient and sample information management. Results We present a web-based tool for submission, management and retrieval of sample and research subject data. The system secures confidentiality by separating anonymized sample information from individuals' records. It is simple and generic, and can be customised for various biomedical studies. Information can be both entered and accessed using the same web interface. User groups and their privileges can be defined. The system is open-source and is supplied with an on-line tutorial and necessary documentation. It has proven to be successful in a large international collaborative project. Conclusion The presented system closes the gap between the need and the availability of lightweight software solutions for managing information in biomedical studies involving human research subjects.

  3. All That Glitters Isn't Gold: A Survey on Acknowledgment of Limitations in Biomedical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Riet, Gerben; Chesley, Paula; Gross, Alan G.; Siebeling, Lara; Muggensturm, Patrick; Heller, Nadine; Umbehr, Martin; Vollenweider, Daniela; Yu, Tsung; Akl, Elie A.; Brewster, Lizzy; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Richter, Bernd; Singh, Sonal; Goodman, Steven; Puhan, Milo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acknowledgment of all serious limitations to research evidence is important for patient care and scientific progress. Formal research on how biomedical authors acknowledge limitations is scarce. Objectives To assess the extent to which limitations are acknowledged in biomedical publications explicitly, and implicitly by investigating the use of phrases that express uncertainty, so-called hedges; to assess the association between industry support and the extent of hedging. Design We analyzed reporting of limitations and use of hedges in 300 biomedical publications published in 30 high and medium -ranked journals in 2007. Hedges were assessed using linguistic software that assigned weights between 1 and 5 to each expression of uncertainty. Results Twenty-seven percent of publications (81/300) did not mention any limitations, while 73% acknowledged a median of 3 (range 1–8) limitations. Five percent mentioned a limitation in the abstract. After controlling for confounders, publications on industry-supported studies used significantly fewer hedges than publications not so supported (p = 0.028). Limitations Detection and classification of limitations was – to some extent – subjective. The weighting scheme used by the hedging detection software has subjective elements. Conclusions Reporting of limitations in biomedical publications is probably very incomplete. Transparent reporting of limitations may protect clinicians and guideline committees against overly confident beliefs and decisions and support scientific progress through better design, conduct or analysis of new studies. PMID:24324540

  4. All that glitters isn't gold: a survey on acknowledgment of limitations in biomedical studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben Ter Riet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acknowledgment of all serious limitations to research evidence is important for patient care and scientific progress. Formal research on how biomedical authors acknowledge limitations is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent to which limitations are acknowledged in biomedical publications explicitly, and implicitly by investigating the use of phrases that express uncertainty, so-called hedges; to assess the association between industry support and the extent of hedging. DESIGN: We analyzed reporting of limitations and use of hedges in 300 biomedical publications published in 30 high and medium -ranked journals in 2007. Hedges were assessed using linguistic software that assigned weights between 1 and 5 to each expression of uncertainty. RESULTS: Twenty-seven percent of publications (81/300 did not mention any limitations, while 73% acknowledged a median of 3 (range 1-8 limitations. Five percent mentioned a limitation in the abstract. After controlling for confounders, publications on industry-supported studies used significantly fewer hedges than publications not so supported (p = 0.028. LIMITATIONS: Detection and classification of limitations was--to some extent--subjective. The weighting scheme used by the hedging detection software has subjective elements. CONCLUSIONS: Reporting of limitations in biomedical publications is probably very incomplete. Transparent reporting of limitations may protect clinicians and guideline committees against overly confident beliefs and decisions and support scientific progress through better design, conduct or analysis of new studies.

  5. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Massimo Della Misericordia Divenire comunità. Comuni rurali, poteri signorili, identità sociali in Valtellina e nella montagna lombarda nel tardo medioevo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2003   Mariano Dell’Omo Il monastero di S. Liberatore alla Maiella centro dell’irradiazione di Montecassino nell’Abruzzo medievale e moderno. Contributo alla storia dell’organizzazione patrimoniale e della civiltà monastica cassinese nell’Italia centrale attraverso i documenti di S. Liberatore conservati nell’Archivio di Montecassino. Introduzione storica, paleografica e archivistica. Edizione dei documenti più antichi (†798-1000 e regesti di quelli posteriori (1005-1735, Tesi di dottorato in Storia Ecclesiastica, Facoltà di Storia Ecclesiastica, Pontificia Università Gregoriana di Roma,  2004   Giulia Lorenzoni Conquistare e governare la città. Forme di potere e istituzioni nel primo anno della signoria viscontea a Bologna (ottobre 1350-novembre 1351, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Federica Monteleone Il viaggio di Carlo Magno in Terra Santa. Un’esperienza di pellegrinaggio nella tradizione europea occidentale, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo   Francesca Pucci Donati Fra teorie mediche e pratica quotidiana: i calendari dietetici dell’Occidente latino altomedievale (secoli IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2004 Alberto Ricciardi L’Epistolario di Lupo di Ferrières come fonte per la storia degli intellettuali nell’età di Carlo il Calvo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Francesco Paolo Terlizzi I trattati dell'Anonimo Normanno: ricerche di ecclesiologia, Tesi

  6. A Multilayer Secure Biomedical Data Management System for Remotely Managing a Very Large Number of Diverse Personal Healthcare Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, KeeHyun; Lim, SeungHyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a multilayer secure biomedical data management system for managing a very large number of diverse personal health devices is proposed. The system has the following characteristics: the system supports international standard communication protocols to achieve interoperability. The system is integrated in the sense that both a PHD communication system and a remote PHD management system work together as a single system. Finally, the system proposed in this paper provides user/message authentication processes to securely transmit biomedical data measured by PHDs based on the concept of a biomedical signature. Some experiments, including the stress test, have been conducted to show that the system proposed/constructed in this study performs very well even when a very large number of PHDs are used. For a stress test, up to 1,200 threads are made to represent the same number of PHD agents. The loss ratio of the ISO/IEEE 11073 messages in the normal system is as high as 14% when 1,200 PHD agents are connected. On the other hand, no message loss occurs in the multilayered system proposed in this study, which demonstrates the superiority of the multilayered system to the normal system with regard to heavy traffic.

  7. A Multilayer Secure Biomedical Data Management System for Remotely Managing a Very Large Number of Diverse Personal Healthcare Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KeeHyun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multilayer secure biomedical data management system for managing a very large number of diverse personal health devices is proposed. The system has the following characteristics: the system supports international standard communication protocols to achieve interoperability. The system is integrated in the sense that both a PHD communication system and a remote PHD management system work together as a single system. Finally, the system proposed in this paper provides user/message authentication processes to securely transmit biomedical data measured by PHDs based on the concept of a biomedical signature. Some experiments, including the stress test, have been conducted to show that the system proposed/constructed in this study performs very well even when a very large number of PHDs are used. For a stress test, up to 1,200 threads are made to represent the same number of PHD agents. The loss ratio of the ISO/IEEE 11073 messages in the normal system is as high as 14% when 1,200 PHD agents are connected. On the other hand, no message loss occurs in the multilayered system proposed in this study, which demonstrates the superiority of the multilayered system to the normal system with regard to heavy traffic.

  8. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhan Milo A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of

  9. A Study to Identify the Optimum Method of Providing Biomedical Engineering/Maintenance Support of Radiologic Equipment at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This study was done to determine the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance support of diagnostic radiologic equipment at...General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital (GLWACH). The study concluded that the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance

  10. Linking biomedical engineering ethics case study approach and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrell, William; Dobie, Elizabeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we link bioengineering case study methods to the development of policy. The case study approach to ethics is an excellent way to show the complex nature of practical/moral reasoning. This approach can, however, lead to a kind of overwhelming complexity. The individual nature of each case makes it difficult to identify the most important information and difficult to see what moral considerations are most relevant. In order to make the overwhelming complexity less debilitating, we present a framework for moral decision making derived from suggestions made by W.D. Ross and Virginia Held. Ross articulates the multiple sources of morality and Held deepens the discussion by reminding us of the foundational importance of care and sympathy to our moral natures. We show how to use the notion of prima facie duty and discuss moral conflict. In doing this, we show how the framework, applied to cases, can be of assistance in helping us develop policies and codes of ethics with sufficient plasticity to be useful in the complex world of the bioengineer.

  11. [The marmoset in biomedical research. Value of this primate model for cardiovascular studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, J B; Mahouy, G

    1990-03-01

    Because of its small size, low cost of maintenance, breeding capabilities in captivity, the marmoset, a New World monkey, appears well suited for clinical and fundamental investigations. The contribution of this laboratory animal in the main areas of biomedical research is succinctly described: viral oncology, infections diseases, immunology, reproduction, toxicology and teratology, odontology, behaviour and neuro-psychopathology. Emphasis is put upon the exceptional interest of the use of marmoset as a biological model in cardiovascular studies.

  12. Consumer nueroscience: a new area of study for biomedical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    In scientific literature, the most accepted definition of consumer neuroscience or neuromarketing is that it is a field of study concerning the application of neuroscience methods to analyze and understand human behavior related to markets and marketing exchanges. First, it might seem strange that marketers would be interested in using neuroscience to understand consumer's preferences. Yet in practice, the basic goal of marketers is to guide the design and presentation of products in such a way that they are highly compatible with consumer preferences. To understand consumers preferences, several standard research tools are commonly used by marketers, such as personal interviews with the consumers, scoring questionnaries gathered from consumers, and focus groups. The reason marketing researchers are interested in using brain imaging tools instead of simply asking people for their preferences in front of marketing stimuli, arises from the assumption that people cannot (or do not want to) fully explain their preference when explicitly asked. Researchers in the field hypothesize that neuroimaging tools can access information within the consumer's brain during the generation of a preference or the observation of a commercial advertisement. The question of will this information be useful in further promoting the product is still up for debate in marketing literature. From the marketing researchers point of view, there is a hope that this body of brain imaging techniques will provide an efficient tradeoff between costs and benefits of the research. Currently, neuroscience methodology includes powerful brain imaging tools based on the gathering of hemodynamic or electromagnetic signals related to the human brain activity during the performance of a relevant task for marketing objectives. These tools are briefly reviewed in this article.

  13. Microstructural studies of thermal spray coatings for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Limin

    2002-01-01

    This project aims to address two major concerns with the use of hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, i.e., HA] coatings; i.e., (i) the resorption of the coating, and (ii) the resorption of bone. The objective is to optimize coating design through microstructural studies of two coating systems: a HA coating and a HA/polymer composite coating. For the HA coating, the HA powders were atmospherically plasma sprayed (APS) using various process parameters. The phase, structure and microstructure of the coatings were investigated and the mechanical property and dissolution behavior measured. Both crystallinity and hydroxyl contents decreased with increasing spray power and stand-off distance (SOD), and increased from the coating interface to surface. Impurity phase contents increased with increasing spray power. Crystallinity alone cannot reflect coating quality due to the existence of various HA, i.e., unmelted, recrystallized and dehydroxylated, and the gradient structure. Coating microstructure varied from a porous structure to a smooth glassy structure or a typical lamellar structure, and some newly formed nanocrystalline regions were revealed. These effects were associated with the temperature-time experiences of particles, their cooling rates and the heat and hydroxyl accumulation during coating buildup. Different coating properties and performance resulted from the characteristic differences. The coating with highest recrystallization displayed the highest microhardness. Dissolution of all coatings reached a saturation value much lower compared to their pulverized counterparts in a fresh solution despite a higher and similar dissolution in the initial immersion stage. The coating with higher recrystallization exhibited higher saturation value. Microstructural analysis indicated the complete and preferential dissolution of amorphous and impurity phases and some precipitation of apatite observable for coatings with higher recrystallization. For the composite coating, HA

  14. Molecular Cloning of phd1 and Comparative Analysis of phd1, 2, and 3 Expression in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive gene targeting studies in mice have revealed that prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs play important roles in murine embryonic development; however, the expression patterns and function of these genes during embryogenesis of other vertebrates remain largely unknown. Here we report the molecular cloning of phd1 and systematic analysis of phd1, phd2, and phd3 expression in embryos as well as adult tissues of Xenopus laevis. All three phds are maternally provided during Xenopus early development. The spatial expression patterns of phds genes in Xenopus embryos appear to define a distinct synexpression group. Frog phd2 and phd3 showed complementary expression in adult tissues with phd2 transcription levels being high in the eye, brain, and intestine, but low in the liver, pancreas, and kidney. On the contrary, expression levels of phd3 are high in the liver, pancreas, and kidney, but low in the eye, brain, and intestine. All three phds are highly expressed in testes, ovary, gall bladder, and spleen. Among three phds, phd3 showed strongest expression in heart.

  15. The role of biomedical knowledge in echocardiographic interpretation expertise development: a correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Gøtzsche, Ole; Eika, Berit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about factors of relevance for achieving knowledge of echocardiography (TTE); one of the essential skills defined by the European Society of Cardiology Core Curriculum. Recent research in other fields suggests that biomedical knowledge plays a more prominent role...... in professional practice than previously assumed. This study investigates the role of biomedical knowledge represented by physiology knowledge in the development of echocardiographic expertise. Methods: Forty-five physicians (15 novices, 15 intermediates and 15 experts) were evaluated on echocardiography...... interpretation skills. An anatomical focused checklist was developed based on Danish Cardiology Society guidelines for a standard echocardiography of adults. A TTE case of a common and complex clinical presentation was recorded and presented to participants on a portable computer using EchoPac software...

  16. Biomedical solid waste management in an Indian hospital: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Gayathri V; Pokhrel, Kamala

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (i) to assess the waste handling and treatment system of hospital bio-medical solid waste and its mandatory compliance with Regulatory Notifications for Bio-medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 1998, under the Environment (Protection Act 1986), Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Govt. of India, at the chosen KLE Society's J. N. Hospital and Medical Research Center, Belgaum, India and (ii) to quantitatively estimate the amount of non-infectious and infectious waste generated in different wards/sections. During the study, it was observed that: (i) the personnel working under the occupier (who has control over the institution to take all steps to ensure biomedical waste is handled without any adverse effects to human health and the environment) were trained to take adequate precautionary measures in handling these bio-hazardous waste materials, (ii) the process of segregation, collection, transport, storage and final disposal of infectious waste was done in compliance with the Standard Procedures, (iii) the final disposal was by incineration in accordance to EPA Rules 1998, (iv) the non-infectious waste was collected separately in different containers and treated as general waste, and (v) on an average about 520 kg of non-infectious and 101 kg of infectious waste is generated per day (about 2.31 kg per day per bed, gross weight comprising both infectious and non-infectious waste). This hospital also extends its facility to the neighboring clinics and hospitals by treating their produced waste for incineration.

  17. Biomedical waste management: Study on the awareness and practice among healthcare workers in a tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-medical waste has a higher potential of infection and injury to the healthcare worker, patient and the surrounding community. Awareness programmes on their proper handling and management to healthcare workers can prevent the spread of infectious diseases and epidemics. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to assess the impact of training, audits and education/implementations from 2009 to 2012 on awareness and practice of biomedical waste segregation. Our study reveals focused training, strict supervision, daily surveillance, audits inspections, involvement of hospital administrators and regular appraisals are essential to optimise the segregation of biomedical waste.

  18. Research Collaboration and Commercialization: The PhD Candidate Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Lawrence; Kenny, Breda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores PhD students' perceptions of their entrepreneurial and commercial capabilities, their attitude towards university supports and the extent to which they engage in external collaboration. The study concentrated on current PhD researchers at one university in Ireland as a unit of analysis and provides encouraging evidence from the…

  19. Tracking the PhD Students' Daily Computer Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwong Nui; van der Meer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated PhD students' computer activities in their daily research practice. Software that tracks computer usage (Manic Time) was installed on the computers of nine PhD students, who were at their early, mid and final stage in doing their doctoral research in four different discipline areas (Commerce, Humanities, Health Sciences and…

  20. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of cell biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D., conducted November 29, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Don Francis Petersen by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Petersen was selected for this interview because of his long research career at Los Alamos and his knowledge of the Atomic Energy Commission`s biomedical program. Dr. Petersen did not personally conduct research on human subjects. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Petersen discusses his remembrances of the early use of radionuclides as biological tracers, aspects of nuclear weapons testing in the 1940`s and 1950`s including fallout studies, the means by which research projects were approved, use of humans in the whole-body counter, and the Health Division Biomedical responsibilities.

  1. 78 FR 107 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Person: John K. Hayes, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  2. A functional study of EGFR and Notch signaling in brain cancer stem-like cells from glioblastoma multiforme (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina

    2013-01-01

    on their resemblance to normal neural stem cells (NSC) and their tumorigenic potential. Like for NSC, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Notch receptor signaling pathways are believed to be important for the maintenance of bCSC. These pathways as such present promising targets in a future anti-bCSC GBM...... treatment. The overall aim of the present PhD project has been to study the functional role of EGFR and Notch activity in bCSCs stem cell-like features and tumorigenic potential with the purpose of deepen our knowledge about the significance of these pathways in the bCSC population in GBM. By establishing...... and culturing human derived GBM xenograft cells under NSC conditions we obtained neurosphere cultures that contained cells with stem cell-like and tumorigenic properties. We moreover characterized the different cultures based on their expression level of the EGFR and Notch receptor as well as the expression...

  3. Applied PhD Research in a Work-Based Environment: An Activity Theory-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, S. N.; Dochy, F.

    2016-01-01

    Activity theory is used to compare PhD undertaken at university, that is, academic PhD, with PhD performed in collaboration with industry, that is, semi-industrial PhD. The research is divided into a literature review and a case study. Semi-industrial and academic PhD are modelled as activity systems, and differences are highlighted in terms of…

  4. A Study of Hybrid Composite Hydroxyapatite (HA-Geopolymers as a Material for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to study the physical properties and microstructure characters of hybrid composites HA-geopolymers as a material for biomedical application. Hybrid composite HA–geopolymers were produced through alkaline activation method of metakaolin as a matrix and HA as the filler. HA was synthesized from eggshell particles by using a precipitation method. The addition of HA in metakaolin paste was varied from 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% relative the weight of metakaolin. FTIR was used to examine the absorption bands the composites. X-ray diffraction (XRD was used to study the crystal structure of the starting and the resulting materials. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS was used to investigate the surface morphology of the composites. The thermal properties of the samples was examined by means of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. Capacitance measurement was conducted to investigate the bioactive properties of HA. The study results suggest that hybrid composite HA-geopolymers has a potential to be applied as a biomedical such as biosensor material.

  5. Applications of computational intelligence in biomedical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Majernik, Jaroslav; Pancerz, Krzysztof; Zaitseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This book presents latest results and selected applications of Computational Intelligence in Biomedical Technologies. Most of contributions deal with problems of Biomedical and Medical Informatics, ranging from theoretical considerations to practical applications. Various aspects of development methods and algorithms in Biomedical and Medical Informatics as well as Algorithms for medical image processing, modeling methods are discussed. Individual contributions also cover medical decision making support, estimation of risks of treatments, reliability of medical systems, problems of practical clinical applications and many other topics  This book is intended for scientists interested in problems of Biomedical Technologies, for researchers and academic staff, for all dealing with Biomedical and Medical Informatics, as well as PhD students. Useful information is offered also to IT companies, developers of equipment and/or software for medicine and medical professionals.  .

  6. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  7. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  8. Placebo studies and ritual theory: a comparative analysis of Navajo, acupuncture and biomedical healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2011-06-27

    Using a comparative analysis of Navajo healing ceremonials, acupuncture and biomedical treatment, this essay examines placebo studies and ritual theory as mutually interpenetrating disciplines. Healing rituals create a receptive person susceptible to the influences of authoritative culturally sanctioned 'powers'. The healer provides the sufferer with imaginative, emotional, sensory, moral and aesthetic input derived from the palpable symbols and procedures of the ritual process-in the process fusing the sufferer's idiosyncratic narrative unto a universal cultural mythos. Healing rituals involve a drama of evocation, enactment, embodiment and evaluation in a charged atmosphere of hope and uncertainty. Experimental research into placebo effects demonstrates that routine biomedical pharmacological and procedural interventions contain significant ritual dimensions. This research also suggests that ritual healing not only represents changes in affect, self-awareness and self-appraisal of behavioural capacities, but involves modulations of symptoms through neurobiological mechanisms. Recent scientific investigations into placebo acupuncture suggest several ways that observations from ritual studies can be verified experimentally. Placebo effects are often described as 'non-specific'; the analysis presented here suggests that placebo effects are the 'specific' effects of healing rituals.

  9. In vitro cytotoxicity study for electron beam cured adhesive tape for bio-medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Singh, Gurdeep; Mehra, Dayal Singh; Niyogi, Utpal Kumar

    2015-07-01

    A device made for biomedical applications must be biocompatible and biologically safe for use. The used ingredients may leach off a device into adjacent tissue and can harm the body after or during application. In the present study qualitative and quantitative methods were used to assess the cytotoxicity of electron beam (e-beam) cured polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive (PU-PSA) tape materials made for different biomedical applications. In the qualitative morphological results, it was found that there was no cell lysis or morphological changes in triplicate culture wells of the extract of e-beam cured PU-PSAtape. In the quantitative method of cytotoxicity studies, MTT cell viability (%) for PSA tape samples were >90, i.e., relative value of toxicity was nil. In case of agar overlay test for test samples, the relative value of toxicity was nil, while in filter diffusion score for the test samples was between 0-0.2, hence the relative degree of toxicity was nil.

  10. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abler, Daniel; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN’s competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR an...

  11. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-07-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments.

  12. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high “motivation score” (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49–9.59; P = 0.005) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01–6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: “attending physician” (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86–11.37; P = 0.001); “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51–11.23; P = 0.006); “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91–6.46; P = 0.0001); and “male gender” (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02–3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33–15.19; P = 0.0002) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university

  13. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies: A Strobe-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high "motivation score" (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49-9.59; P = 0.005) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01-6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: "attending physician" (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86-11.37; P = 0.001); "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51-11.23; P = 0.006); "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91-6.46; P = 0.0001); and "male gender" (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02-3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33-15.19; P = 0.0002) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.46-4.77; P = 0.001). This is the

  14. Meet EPA Scientist Michael Nye, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Nye, Ph.D., is a social scientist who studies natural risk, socio-demographic change and sustainable behavior. Prior to joining EPA, he worked for the UK Environment Agency in flood risk management and emergency preparedness

  15. Meet EPA Chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA research chemist Quincy Teng, Ph.D., focuses on the application of metabolomics—a relatively new, specialized field of biochemistry focused on studying small molecules known as metabolites—on environmental and life sciences.

  16. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  17. Career Development among American Biomedical Postdocs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Kenneth D; McGready, John; Griffin, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Recent biomedical workforce policy efforts have centered on enhancing career preparation for trainees, and increasing diversity in the research workforce. Postdoctoral scientists, or postdocs, are among those most directly impacted by such initiatives, yet their career development remains understudied. This study reports results from a 2012 national survey of 1002 American biomedical postdocs. On average, postdocs reported increased knowledge about career options but lower clarity about their career goals relative to PhD entry. The majority of postdocs were offered structured career development at their postdoctoral institutions, but less than one-third received this from their graduate departments. Postdocs from all social backgrounds reported significant declines in interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities and increased interest in nonresearch careers; however, there were differences in the magnitude and period of training during which these changes occurred across gender and race/ethnicity. Group differences in interest in faculty careers were explained by career interest differences formed during graduate school but not by differences in research productivity, research self-efficacy, or advisor relationships. These findings point to the need for enhanced career development earlier in the training process, and interventions sensitive to distinctive patterns of interest development across social identity groups.

  18. Study on microscope hyperspectral medical imaging method for biomedical quantitative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI QingLi; XUE YongQi; XIAO GongHai; ZHANG JingFa

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system was developed based on the microscopic technology and spectral imaging technology according to the principle of spectral imager in remote sensing. The basic principle and key technologies of this system were presented and the system per-formance was also analyzed. Some methods and algorithms were proposed to preprocess and nor-malize the microscopic hyperspectral data and retrieve the transmittance spectrum of samples. As a case study, the microscopic hyperspectral imaging system was used to image the retina sections of different rats and get some significant results. Experiment results show that the system can be used for the quantitative assessment and evaluating the effect of medication in biomedical research.

  19. Applications of high-resolution magic angle spinning MRS in biomedical studies II-Human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Christopher; Ehret, Felix; Palmas, Francesco; Vandergrift, Lindsey A; Jiang, Yanni; Schmitt, Vanessa; Dufner, Vera; Habbel, Piet; Nowak, Johannes; Cheng, Leo L

    2017-09-15

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) MRS is a powerful method for gaining insight into the physiological and pathological processes of cellular metabolism. Given its ability to obtain high-resolution spectra of non-liquid biological samples, while preserving tissue architecture for subsequent histopathological analysis, the technique has become invaluable for biochemical and biomedical studies. Using HRMAS MRS, alterations in measured metabolites, metabolic ratios, and metabolomic profiles present the possibility to improve identification and prognostication of various diseases and decipher the metabolomic impact of drug therapies. In this review, we evaluate HRMAS MRS results on human tissue specimens from malignancies and non-localized diseases reported in the literature since the inception of the technique in 1996. We present the diverse applications of the technique in understanding pathological processes of different anatomical origins, correlations with in vivo imaging, effectiveness of therapies, and progress in the HRMAS methodology. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Concept for linking de-identified biomedical research data using a study participant management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmann, Alexander; Bauer, Christian R K D; Schwanke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research projects show an increasing demand of large numbers of participants from different recruiting centers to achieve statistically significant results. The collected types of data are stored in distributed databases and are linked to the participant by different non-resolvable identifiers (layered pseudonyms) for de-identification. To ensure the quality of the gathered data, regular quality assurance analyses are required at each local center. Because of the distributed databases and layered pseudonyms the analyses can only be achieved manually. Therefore, the process is error-prone and laborious. The objective of this paper is to propose a solution concept to automate the manual process by using a local study participant management system. It orchestrates the process and enables the quality assurance analyses within a clinical data warehouse.

  1. Predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test: an evaluation and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Ferguson, Eamonn; Wakeford, Richard; Powis, David; James, David

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increase in the use of pre-admission selection tests for medicine. Such tests need to show good psychometric properties. Here, we use a paper by Emery and Bell [2009. The predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test for pre-clinical examination performance. Med Educ 43:557-564] as a case study to evaluate and comment on the reporting of psychometric data in the field of medical student selection (and the comments apply to many papers in the field). We highlight pitfalls when reliability data are not presented, how simple zero-order associations can lead to inaccurate conclusions about the predictive validity of a test, and how biases need to be explored and reported. We show with BMAT that it is the knowledge part of the test which does all the predictive work. We show that without evidence of incremental validity it is difficult to assess the value of any selection tests for medicine.

  2. Multimorbidity - not just an older person's issue. Results from an Australian biomedical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilkington Rhiannon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multimorbidity, the simultaneous occurrence of two or more chronic conditions, is usually associated with older persons. This research assessed multimorbidity across a range of ages so that planners are informed and appropriate prevention programs, management strategies and health service/health care planning can be implemented. Methods Multimorbidity was assessed across three age groups from data collected in a major biomedical cohort study (North West Adelaide Health Study. Using randomly selected adults, diabetes, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were determined clinically and cardio-vascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis and mental health by self-report (ever been told by a doctor. A range of demographic, social, risk and protective factors including high blood pressure and high cholesterol (assessed bio-medically, health service use, quality of life and medication use (linked to government records were included in the multivariate modelling. Results Overall 4.4% of the 20-39 year age group, 15.0% of the 40-59 age group and 39.2% of those aged 60 years of age or older had multimorbidity (17.1% of the total. Of those with multimorbidity, 42.1% were aged less than 60 years of age. A variety of variables were included in the final logistic regression models for the three age groups including family structure, marital status, education attainment, country of birth, smoking status, obesity measurements, medication use, health service utilisation and overall health status. Conclusions Multimorbidity is not just associated with older persons and flexible care management support systems, appropriate guidelines and care-coordination programs are required across a broader age range. Issues such as health literacy and polypharamacy are also important considerations. Future research is required into assessing multimorbidity across the life course, prevention of complications and assessment of appropriate self

  3. A comparison study on algorithms of detecting long forms for short forms in biomedical text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Cathy H

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation With more and more research dedicated to literature mining in the biomedical domain, more and more systems are available for people to choose from when building literature mining applications. In this study, we focus on one specific kind of literature mining task, i.e., detecting definitions of acronyms, abbreviations, and symbols in biomedical text. We denote acronyms, abbreviations, and symbols as short forms (SFs and their corresponding definitions as long forms (LFs. The study was designed to answer the following questions; i how well a system performs in detecting LFs from novel text, ii what the coverage is for various terminological knowledge bases in including SFs as synonyms of their LFs, and iii how to combine results from various SF knowledge bases. Method We evaluated the following three publicly available detection systems in detecting LFs for SFs: i a handcrafted pattern/rule based system by Ao and Takagi, ALICE, ii a machine learning system by Chang et al., and iii a simple alignment-based program by Schwartz and Hearst. In addition, we investigated the conceptual coverage of two terminological knowledge bases: i the UMLS (the Unified Medical Language System, and ii the BioThesaurus (a thesaurus of names for all UniProt protein records. We also implemented a web interface that provides a virtual integration of various SF knowledge bases. Results We found that detection systems agree with each other on most cases, and the existing terminological knowledge bases have a good coverage of synonymous relationship for frequently defined LFs. The web interface allows people to detect SF definitions from text and to search several SF knowledge bases. Availability The web site is http://gauss.dbb.georgetown.edu/liblab/SFThesaurus.

  4. Motivational factors for participation in biomedical research: evidence from a qualitative study of biomedical research participation in Blantyre District, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfutso-Bengo, Joseph; Manda-Taylor, Lucinda; Masiye, Francis

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining effective informed consent from research participants is a prerequisite to the conduct of an ethically sound research. Yet it is believed that obtaining quality informed consent is generally difficult in settings with low socioeconomic status. This is so because of the alleged undue inducements and therapeutic misconception among participants. However, there is a dearth of data on factors that motivate research participants to take part in research. Hence, this study was aimed at filling this gap in the Malawian context. We conducted 18 focus group discussions with community members in urban and rural communities of Blantyre in Malawi. Most participants reported that they accepted the invitation to participate in research because of better quality treatment during study also known as ancillary care, monetary and material incentives given to participants, and thorough medical diagnosis.

  5. Unreliable item or inconsistent person? A study of variation in health beliefs and belief-anchors to biomedical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Edward H; Saldana, Santiago; Chen, Shyh-Huei; Kirk, Julienne K; Bell, Ronny A; Nguyen, Ha; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Arcury, Thomas A; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-08-01

    The reliability of an item designed to measure health belief is often confounded with response consistency at the person level. The study applied contemporary measurement methods to an inventory of common sense beliefs about diabetes and used a sample of N = 563 adults with diabetes to test the hypothesis that individuals whose beliefs are congruent with a biomedical model are more consistent in their responses. Item-level analysis revealed that the domains of Causes and Medical Management were the least reliable. Person-level analysis showed that respondents who held views congruent with the biomedical model were more consistent than people who did not.

  6. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  7. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events.

  8. A Follow-Up Study of Medical Students' Biomedical Understanding and Clinical Reasoning Concerning the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahopelto, Ilona; Mikkila-Erdmann, Mirjamaija; Olkinuora, Erkki; Kaapa, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Novice medical students usually hold initial conceptions concerning medical domains, such as the cardiovascular system, which may contradict scientific explanations and thus hinder learning. The purpose of this study was to investigate which kinds of biomedical representations medical students constructed of the central cardiovascular system in…

  9. Student engagement in biomedical courses : studies in technology-enhanced seminar learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, R.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical and biomedical curricula are designed to educate future academics contributing to new developments in science, clinical practice and society. During undergraduate programs student training is typically focused on acquisition of knowledge and understanding of these interdisciplinary

  10. Student engagement in biomedical courses : studies in technology-enhanced seminar learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical and biomedical curricula are designed to educate future academics contributing to new developments in science, clinical practice and society. During undergraduate programs student training is typically focused on acquisition of knowledge and understanding of these interdisciplinary

  11. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of biophysicist Cornelius A. Tobias, Ph.D., January 16, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Dr. Cornelius A. Tobias was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). He was chosen for this interview because of his extensive biophysics and medical physics research activities while he was employed by the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco and at the Donner Laboratory. He discusses his involvement in wartime studies of effects of high altitude on aviators, carbon monoxide with radioactive tracers, blood studies with radioactive iron, human use committees, heavy-ion research with the Bevatron, boron isotope research, classified research involving human subjects, heavy-particle radiography, heavy- particle beams and medical research, and pituitary irradiation studies,.

  12. Statistics in biomedical research

    OpenAIRE

    González-Manteiga, Wenceslao; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The discipline of biostatistics is nowadays a fundamental scientific component of biomedical, public health and health services research. Traditional and emerging areas of application include clinical trials research, observational studies, physiology, imaging, and genomics. The present article reviews the current situation of biostatistics, considering the statistical methods traditionally used in biomedical research, as well as the ongoing development of new methods in response to the new p...

  13. Choosing to Study for a PhD: A Framework for Examining Decisions to Become a Research Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Alistair; Guerin, Cally; Jayatilaka, Asangi; Calder, Paul; Ranasinghe, Damith

    2017-01-01

    Given its importance to institutions, policy-makers and intending students, there is a surprising lack of research exploring the reasons students choose to undertake a research degree. What studies there are tend to be largely descriptive and the topic lacks a theoretically-informed framework through which student decisions can be examined and…

  14. Study of Online Electronic Information search skills among Ph.D. Students at Faculty of Geography, University of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Eslami

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing 60 questionnaires collected, it was determined that the preliminary web and search tool skills of students studied were lesser than average (37.5%. Most of the members of the population studied, generally considered themselves as being “veterans”, i.e. a person that is successful in finding the needed information but who most of the time needs assistance. Students were most familiar with Google and Yahoo search engines, and with Elsevier specialized database. Search Engines and Database usage were also investigated. The average employment of the Boolean operators was 34.7%, with “+” operator having the highest and “-“ operator having the least usage.  Google advanced search and Elsevier database were most frequently used.

  15. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  16. Empirical studies of magnetosheath and tail field and current structure, and model comparisons. Ph.D. Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaymaz, Z.

    1993-12-31

    In this dissertation, the authors present the observational results obtained with IMP-8 in the magnetosheath and magnetotail, and compare them with the results from the gas dynamic (GD) and global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. Although the magnetotail has been investigated by many others, the magnetosheath is one of the least studied regions of space despite its importance in solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. In this study, by utilizing a large magnetometer data set obtained simultaneously from IMP-8 and ISEE-3, the authors construct average magnetic field vector maps of the magnetosheath and tail in the cross-sectional plane. They determine how this average structure is influenced by the IMF, the Earth`s dipole tilt angle, and geomagnetic activity. For equatorial IMF`s, the magnetosheath field drapes asymmetrically around the magnetosphere causing a rotation of the field draping pattern, the tail current sheet twists, and plasma sheet field lines cease to show north-south symmetry. The magnetic field structure for north/south IMF`s is also shown to exhibit different properties including irregularities in the sheath (for southward) and placement of the dipolar and flaring regions in the tail. An IMF related perturbation field is observed in the tail which is strongest on the plasma sheet dawn and dusk sides for equatorial IMF, and on the flanks for north-south IMF. The Earth`s dipole tilt with respect to the geomagnetic equator affects the magnetotail current structure by causing its displacement from the geomagnetic equator. The authors examine the structure of the current sheet shape and location extensively using 16-years of IMP-8 magnetic field data. They show how geomagnetic activity affects this displacement. Many other field and current properties of the tail structure are also investigated such as the spatial distribution of the current density vectors and the (J x B) forces.

  17. Biomedical nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Sarah J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the roles of nanomaterials in biomedical applications, focusing on those highlighted in this volume. A brief history of nanoscience and technology and a general introduction to the field are presented. Then, the chemical and physical properties of nanostructures that make them ideal for use in biomedical applications are highlighted. Examples of common applications, including sensing, imaging, and therapeutics, are given. Finally, the challenges associated with translating this field from the research laboratory to the clinic setting, in terms of the larger societal implications, are discussed.

  18. Studies of Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flow in Microgravity. Ph.D. Thesis, Dec. 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousman, William Scott

    1995-01-01

    Two-phase gas-liquid flows are expected to occur in many future space operations. Due to a lack of buoyancy in the microgravity environment, two-phase flows are known to behave differently than those in earth gravity. Despite these concerns, little research has been conducted on microgravity two-phase flow and the current understanding is poor. This dissertation describes an experimental and modeling study of the characteristics of two-phase flows in microgravity. An experiment was operated onboard NASA aircraft capable of producing short periods of microgravity. In addition to high speed photographs of the flows, electronic measurements of void fraction, liquid film thickness, bubble and wave velocity, pressure drop and wall shear stress were made for a wide range of liquid and gas flow rates. The effects of liquid viscosity, surface tension and tube diameter on the behavior of these flows were also assessed. From the data collected, maps showing the occurrence of various flow patterns as a function of gas and liquid flow rates were constructed. Earth gravity two-phase flow models were compared to the results of the microgravity experiments and in some cases modified. Models were developed to predict the transitions on the flow pattern maps. Three flow patterns, bubble, slug and annular flow, were observed in microgravity. These patterns were found to occur in distinct regions of the gas-liquid flow rate parameter space. The effect of liquid viscosity, surface tension and tube diameter on the location of the boundaries of these regions was small. Void fraction and Weber number transition criteria both produced reasonable transition models. Void fraction and bubble velocity for bubble and slug flows were found to be well described by the Drift-Flux model used to describe such flows in earth gravity. Pressure drop modeling by the homogeneous flow model was inconclusive for bubble and slug flows. Annular flows were found to be complex systems of ring-like waves and a

  19. The Cancer Cell Oxygen Sensor PHD2 Promotes Metastasis via Activation of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kuchnio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Several questions about the role of the oxygen sensor prolyl-hydroxylase 2 (PHD2 in cancer have not been addressed. First, the role of PHD2 in metastasis has not been studied in a spontaneous tumor model. Here, we show that global PHD2 haplodeficiency reduced metastasis without affecting tumor growth. Second, it is unknown whether PHD2 regulates cancer by affecting cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. We show that PHD2 haplodeficiency reduced metastasis via two mechanisms: (1 by decreasing CAF activation, matrix production, and contraction by CAFs, an effect that surprisingly relied on PHD2 deletion in cancer cells, but not in CAFs; and (2 by improving tumor vessel normalization. Third, the effect of concomitant PHD2 inhibition in malignant and stromal cells (mimicking PHD2 inhibitor treatment is unknown. We show that global PHD2 haplodeficiency, induced not only before but also after tumor onset, impaired metastasis. These findings warrant investigation of PHD2’s therapeutic potential.

  20. Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Sang C; Tanik, Murat M

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical Engineering: Health Care Systems, Technology and Techniques is an edited volume with contributions from world experts. It provides readers with unique contributions related to current research and future healthcare systems. Practitioners and researchers focused on computer science, bioinformatics, engineering and medicine will find this book a valuable reference.

  1. Biomedical Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizer, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    Biomedical libraries are discussed as a distinct and specialized group of special libraries and their unique services and user interactions are described. The move toward professional standards, as evidenced by the Medical Library Association's new certification program, and the current state of development for a new section of IFLA established…

  2. Neutron scattering and ab initio molecular dynamics study of cross-linking in biomedical phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, A J; Ahmed, I; Rudd, C D [Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cuello, G J; Pellegrini, E; Richard, D; Johnson, M R, E-mail: andrew.parsons@nottingham.ac.uk [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2010-12-08

    Details of the microscopic structure of phosphate glasses destined for biomedical applications, which include sodium, magnesium and calcium cations, have been obtained from the static structure factor measured by means of neutron scattering. A complementary, molecular dynamics study has been performed on a range of phosphate glasses using density functional theory methods, which allow structural fluctuations, including bond breaking, in the liquid phase before quenching to the glass phase. Good agreement between experiment and simulation allows the molecular dynamics trajectories to be analysed in detail. In particular, attention is focused on the cross-linking of divalent cations in contrast with the structural aspects associated with monovalent cations. Magnesium cations are found equidistant and bridging between the phosphorus atoms of different phosphate chains, leading to a shorter phosphorus-phosphorus second neighbour distance (that is, a more compact packing of neighbouring phosphate chains) compared to the effect of sodium cations. Calcium cations show behaviour intermediate between those of magnesium and sodium. Molecular dynamics simulations give access to the cation mobility, which is lowest for magnesium, reflecting its structural, cross-linking role.

  3. Exo+ proofreading polymerases mediate genetic analysis and its application in biomedical studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan-fang LIAO; Lin-ling CHEN; Cui-ying PENG; Jia ZHANG; Kai LI

    2005-01-01

    Polymerases with a proofreading function in their internal 3' to 5' exonuclease possess high fidelity for DNA replication both in vivo and in vitro. The obstacle facing Exo+ polymerases for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection could be bypassed by using primer-3'-termini modification. This hypothesis has been well tested using three types of modified allele specific primers with: 3' labeling, 3'to 5'exonuclease resistance, and 3'dehydroxylation. Accordingly, three new SNP assaying methods have been developed to carry out genome-wide genotyping,taking advantage of the enzymatic properties of Exo+ polymerases. These new mutation detection assays are widely adaptable to a variety of platforms, including multi-well plate and microarray technologies. Application of Exo+ polymerases to genetic analysis, including genotyping that is mostly relevant to pharmacogenetics, high-fidelity gene expression profiling, rare mutation detection and mutation load assay, will help to accelerate the pace of personalized medicine. In this review paper, we will first introduce three new assays that we have recently developed, and then describe a number of their applications in pharmacogenetics and in other biomedical studies.

  4. Titanium-35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Dennia Perez; de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Carvalho, Isabel Chaves Silva; Forte, Lilibeth Ferraz de Brito Penna; de Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia; Prado, Renata Falchete do; Santos, Dalcy Roberto Dos; Cairo, Carlos Alberto Alves; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium-niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti-35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti-35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti-35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti-35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Scientific Reproducibility in Biomedical Research: Provenance Metadata Ontology for Semantic Annotation of Study Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Valdez, Joshua; Rueschman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reproducibility is key to scientific progress as it allows the research community to build on validated results, protect patients from potentially harmful trial drugs derived from incorrect results, and reduce wastage of valuable resources. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a systematic guideline titled "Rigor and Reproducibility " for supporting reproducible research studies, which has also been accepted by several scientific journals. These journals will require published articles to conform to these new guidelines. Provenance metadata describes the history or origin of data and it has been long used in computer science to capture metadata information for ensuring data quality and supporting scientific reproducibility. In this paper, we describe the development of Provenance for Clinical and healthcare Research (ProvCaRe) framework together with a provenance ontology to support scientific reproducibility by formally modeling a core set of data elements representing details of research study. We extend the PROV Ontology (PROV-O), which has been recommended as the provenance representation model by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), to represent both: (a) data provenance, and (b) process provenance. We use 124 study variables from 6 clinical research studies from the National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) to evaluate the coverage of the provenance ontology. NSRR is the largest repository of NIH-funded sleep datasets with 50,000 studies from 36,000 participants. The provenance ontology reuses ontology concepts from existing biomedical ontologies, for example the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), to model the provenance information of research studies. The ProvCaRe framework is being developed as part of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) data provenance project.

  6. Simulation study of a high power density rectenna array for biomedical implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Yoon, Hargsoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    2016-04-01

    The integration of wireless power transmission devices using microwaves into the biomedical field is close to a practical reality. Implanted biomedical devices need a long lasting power source or continuous power supply. Recent development of high efficiency rectenna technology enables continuous power supply to these implanted devices. Due to the size limit of most of medical devices, it is imperative to minimize the rectenna as well. The research reported in this paper reviews the effects of close packing the rectenna elements which show the potential of directly empowering the implanted devices, especially within a confined area. The rectenna array is tested in the X band frequency range.

  7. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-12-01

    Tra Riforma, vescovo e clientes. Camaldoli e le società locali (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 [09/05] Giuseppe Gardoni "Episcopus et potestas". Vescovi e società a Mantova nella prima metà del Duecento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia del Cristianesimo e delle Chiese (antichità, medioevo, età moderna, Università degli Studi di Padova, 2005 Nicola Mancassola La gestione delle campagne tra Langobardia e Romània in età carolingia e post carolingia. La struttura delle aziende fondiarie in Emilia e Romagna, Tesi di dottorato in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2005 Gloria Papaccio Storia e archeologia degli opifici idraulici in Val di Pesa. La Badia di Passignano e i suoi mulini (XI-XIV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Adelaide Ricci La città e il suo ospedale: assetti urbani, dinamiche sociali e organizzazione del sistema caritativo-assistenziale a Cremona nel XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli studi di Torino, 2005 Luca Sant'Ambrogio Il borgo di Treviglio nel secondo Quattrocento: istituzioni e società, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Elisabetta Scarton Giovanni Lanfredini. Uomo d'affari e diplomatico nell'Italia del Quattrocento, Tesi di dottorato in Storia della società europea, Università degli Studi di Napoli "Federico II", 2005

  8. Feasibility study of the production of biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy by powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzoni, L; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2015-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are characterized by an exceptional combination of properties like high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility which makes them suitable materials for biomedical prosthesis and devices. The wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloy is generally favored in comparison to other metallic biomaterials due to its relatively low elastic modulus and it has been long used to obtain products for biomedical applications. In this work an alternative route to fabricate biomedical implants made out of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. Specifically, the feasibility of the conventional powder metallurgy route of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering is addressed by considering two types of powders (i.e. blended elemental and prealloyed). The characterization of physical properties, chemical analysis, mechanical behavior and microstructural analysis is carried out in-depth and the properties are correlated among them. On the base of the results found, the produced alloys are promising materials for biomedical applications as well as cheaper surgical devices and tools.

  9. Qualitative study of physicians' varied uses of biomedical research in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Lauren A; Moorhead, Laura L; Willinsky, John M

    2016-11-21

    To investigate the nature of physicians' use of research evidence in experimental conditions of open access to inform training and policy. This qualitative study was a component of a larger mixed-methods initiative that provided 336 physicians with relatively complete access to research literature via PubMed and UpToDate, for 1 year via an online portal, with their usage recorded in web logs. Using a semistructured interview protocol, a subset of 38 physician participants were interviewed about their use of research articles in general and were probed about their reasons for accessing specific articles as identified through their web logs. Transcripts were analysed using a general inductive approach. Physician participants were recruited from and registered in the USA. 38 physicians from 16 US states, engaged in 22 medical specialties, possessing more than 1 year of experience postresidency training participated. 26 participants attested to the value of consulting research literature within the context of the study by making reference to their roles as clinicians, educators, researchers, learners, administrators and advocates. The physicians reported previously encountering what they experienced as a prohibitive paywall barrier to the research literature and other frustrations with the nature of information systems, such as the need for passwords. The findings, against the backdrop of growing open access to biomedical research, indicate that a minority of physicians, at least initially, is likely to seek out and use research and do so in a variety of common roles. Physicians' use of research in these roles has not traditionally been part of their training or part of the considerations for open access policies. The findings have implications for educational and policy initiatives directed towards increasing the effectiveness of this access to and use of research in improving the quality of healthcare. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  10. Biomedical Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jiang; ZHOU Yanling

    2011-01-01

    @@ Biomedical materials, biomaterials for short, is regarded as "any substance or combination of substances, synthetic or natural in origin, which can be used for any period of time, as a whole or as part of a system which treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ or function of the body" (Vonrecum & Laberge, 1995).Biomaterials can save lives, relieve suffering and enhance the quality of life for human being.

  11. A descriptive study on evaluation of bio-medical waste management in a tertiary care public hospital of North India

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajiv; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper management of Biomedical waste (BMW) generated in a healthcare facility is one of the most important functions of a healthcare worker (HCW) as its improper management not only poses risk to human beings and environment, but may also invite legal action against HCW as well as hospital administration. This study was carried out to evaluate quality of BMW management in 1100-bedded hospital attached to a tertiary care public institute in North India. Methods A checklist, includi...

  12. Using typed dependencies to study and recognise conceptualisation zones in biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Tudor

    2013-01-01

    In the biomedical domain, authors publish their experiments and findings using a quasi-standard coarse-grained discourse structure, which starts with an introduction that sets up the motivation, continues with a description of the materials and methods, and concludes with results and discussions. Over the course of the years, there has been a fair amount of research done in the area of scientific discourse analysis, with a focus on performing automatic recognition of scientific artefacts/conceptualisation zones from the raw content of scientific publications. Most of the existing approaches use Machine Learning techniques to perform classification based on features that rely on the shallow structure of the sentence tokens, or sentences as a whole, in addition to corpus-driven statistics. In this article, we investigate the role carried by the deep (dependency) structure of the sentences in describing their rhetorical nature. Using association rule mining techniques, we study the presence of dependency structure patterns in the context of a given rhetorical type, the use of these patterns in exploring differences in structure between the rhetorical types, and their ability to discriminate between the different rhetorical types. Our final goal is to provide a series of insights that can be used to complement existing classification approaches. Experimental results show that, in particular in the context of a fine-grained multi-class classification context, the association rules emerged from the dependency structure are not able to produce uniform classification results. However, they can be used to derive discriminative pair-wise classification mechanisms, in particular for some of the most ambiguous types.

  13. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Falchete do Prado, Renata, E-mail: renatafalchete@hotmail.com [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto [Division of Materials, Air and Space Institute, CTA, Praça Mal. do Ar Eduardo Gomes, 14, São José dos Campos 12904-000, SP (Brazil); Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys.

  14. Are Graduate Students Rational? Evidence from the Market for Biomedical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Kohout, Margaret E.; Clack, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget expansion from 1998 through 2003 increased demand for biomedical research, raising relative wages and total employment in the market for biomedical scientists. However, because research doctorates in biomedical sciences can often take six years or more to complete, the full labor supply response to such changes in market conditions is not immediate, but rather is observed over a period of several years. Economic rational expectations models assume that prospective students anticipate these future changes, and also that students take into account the opportunity costs of their pursuing graduate training. Prior empirical research on student enrollment and degree completions in science and engineering (S&E) fields indicates that “cobweb” expectations prevail: that is, at least in theory, prospective graduate students respond to contemporaneous changes in market wages and employment, but do not forecast further changes that will arise by the time they complete their degrees and enter the labor market. In this article, we analyze time-series data on wages and employment of biomedical scientists versus alternative careers, on completions of S&E bachelor's degrees and biomedical sciences PhDs, and on research expenditures funded both by NIH and by biopharmaceutical firms, to examine the responsiveness of the biomedical sciences labor supply to changes in market conditions. Consistent with previous studies, we find that enrollments and completions in biomedical sciences PhD programs are responsive to market conditions at the time of students' enrollment. More striking, however, is the close correspondence between graduate student enrollments and completions, and changes in availability of NIH-funded traineeships, fellowships, and research assistantships. PMID:24376573

  15. Are graduate students rational? Evidence from the market for biomedical scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Kohout, Margaret E; Clack, John W

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget expansion from 1998 through 2003 increased demand for biomedical research, raising relative wages and total employment in the market for biomedical scientists. However, because research doctorates in biomedical sciences can often take six years or more to complete, the full labor supply response to such changes in market conditions is not immediate, but rather is observed over a period of several years. Economic rational expectations models assume that prospective students anticipate these future changes, and also that students take into account the opportunity costs of their pursuing graduate training. Prior empirical research on student enrollment and degree completions in science and engineering (S&E) fields indicates that "cobweb" expectations prevail: that is, at least in theory, prospective graduate students respond to contemporaneous changes in market wages and employment, but do not forecast further changes that will arise by the time they complete their degrees and enter the labor market. In this article, we analyze time-series data on wages and employment of biomedical scientists versus alternative careers, on completions of S&E bachelor's degrees and biomedical sciences PhDs, and on research expenditures funded both by NIH and by biopharmaceutical firms, to examine the responsiveness of the biomedical sciences labor supply to changes in market conditions. Consistent with previous studies, we find that enrollments and completions in biomedical sciences PhD programs are responsive to market conditions at the time of students' enrollment. More striking, however, is the close correspondence between graduate student enrollments and completions, and changes in availability of NIH-funded traineeships, fellowships, and research assistantships.

  16. Maximising value from a United Kingdom Biomedical Research Centre: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Ovseiko, Pavel V; Fahy, Nick; Shaw, Sara; Kerr, Polly; Rushforth, Alexander D; Channon, Keith M; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki

    2017-08-14

    Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country's international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients, and to improve efficiency and reduce waste in healthcare. As NIHR Oxford BRC (Oxford BRC) enters its third 5-year funding period, we seek to (1) apply the evidence base on how best to support the various partnerships in this large, multi-stakeholder research system and (2) research how these partnerships play out in a new, ambitious programme of translational research. Organisational case study, informed by the principles of action research. A cross-cutting theme, 'Partnerships for Health, Wealth and Innovation' has been established with multiple sub-themes (drug development, device development, business support and commercialisation, research methodology and statistics, health economics, bioethics, patient and public involvement and engagement, knowledge translation, and education and training) to support individual BRC research themes and generate cross-theme learning. The 'Partnerships' theme will support the BRC's goals by facilitating six types of partnership (with patients and citizens, clinical services, industry, across the NIHR infrastructure, across academic disciplines, and with policymakers and payers) through a range of engagement platforms and activities. We will develop a longitudinal progress narrative centred around exemplar case studies, and apply theoretical models from innovation studies (Triple Helix), sociology of science (Mode 2 knowledge production) and business studies (Value Co-creation). Data sources will be the empirical research studies within individual BRC research themes (who will apply separately for NHS ethics approval), plus documentary analysis and interviews and ethnography with research

  17. Epidemiology and Reporting Characteristics of Systematic Reviews of Biomedical Research: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Page

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews (SRs can help decision makers interpret the deluge of published biomedical literature. However, a SR may be of limited use if the methods used to conduct the SR are flawed, and reporting of the SR is incomplete. To our knowledge, since 2004 there has been no cross-sectional study of the prevalence, focus, and completeness of reporting of SRs across different specialties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a more recent cross-section of SRs.We searched MEDLINE to identify potentially eligible SRs indexed during the month of February 2014. Citations were screened using prespecified eligibility criteria. Epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a random sample of 300 SRs were extracted by one reviewer, with a 10% sample extracted in duplicate. We compared characteristics of Cochrane versus non-Cochrane reviews, and the 2014 sample of SRs versus a 2004 sample of SRs. We identified 682 SRs, suggesting that more than 8,000 SRs are being indexed in MEDLINE annually, corresponding to a 3-fold increase over the last decade. The majority of SRs addressed a therapeutic question and were conducted by authors based in China, the UK, or the US; they included a median of 15 studies involving 2,072 participants. Meta-analysis was performed in 63% of SRs, mostly using standard pairwise methods. Study risk of bias/quality assessment was performed in 70% of SRs but was rarely incorporated into the analysis (16%. Few SRs (7% searched sources of unpublished data, and the risk of publication bias was considered in less than half of SRs. Reporting quality was highly variable; at least a third of SRs did not report use of a SR protocol, eligibility criteria relating to publication status, years of coverage of the search, a full Boolean search logic for at least one database, methods for data extraction, methods for study risk of bias assessment, a primary outcome, an

  18. Italia-Netherland PhD Program: the I.O. PhD Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissima, Valentina; Borghesi, Alessandro; Bozzetti, Valentina; Dessì, Angelica; Fabiano, Adele; Risso, Francesco M; Salvo, Vincenzo; Satriano, Angela; Silvagni, Davide; Varrica, Alessandro; van Bel, Frank; Visser, Gerard H A; Vles, Hans Js; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Gavilanes, Antonio D W; Gazzolo, Diego

    2011-10-01

    In the framework of long-term scientific collaboration among the founder members coming from Holland and Italy there was a growing consensus to activate a philosophical doctorate (PhD) program, involving young Italian researchers in the field of perinatal medicine, neonatology and pediatrics. The aims were to promote excellence in research, offering to young Italian physicians the opportunity to maturate an International research experience leading to PhD degree, and to promote human and technological improvement energies in perinatal, neonatal and pediatrics research. Thus, an official collaboration among the Dutch Universities from Maastricht and Utrecht and the Italian Children's Hospital from Alessandria, has been activated on March 1st 2010, finalized to the PhD program. The experimental phase included the selection of projects and relative candidates after an interview-selection focusing on their scientific attitudes and the availability on their research projects. Candidates' selection started on May 2010 and on September 29th ten projects and candidates have been approved by the scientific commission. Research topics included: perinatal asphyxia, aging and the origin of adulthood neurodegenerative disease, neuroprotective strategies, biochemical pulmonology, intrauterine growth retardation and perinatal teratology. To date, all projects have been approved by local Ethics Committee from the University/Hospital of origin of the candidates. Five manuscripts have been published and/or submitted to international Journals regarding pneumology, perinatal asphyxia and teratology, whilst about 60-70% of data regarding clinical studies have already been collected.

  19. Ethics in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Ahmed; Flexman, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This session focuses on a number of aspects of the subject of Ethics in Biomedical Engineering. The session starts by providing a case study of a company that manufactures artificial heart valves where the valves were failing at an unexpected rate. The case study focuses on Biomedical Engineers working at the company and how their education and training did not prepare them to deal properly with such situation. The second part of the session highlights the need to learn about various ethics rules and policies regulating research involving human or animal subjects.

  20. Enhancing the skills of PhD supervisors facing internationalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgelund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    This research started out due to some institutional changes at a department at Aalborg University as regards supervision of PhD students. For various reasons the department suddenly got a large intake of PhD students in 2008, many of which came with an international background. After a period...... of time staff members of the department began to look very frustrated. Not only did they feel burdened with the large intake, they also struggled with the task of facilitating the transition of international students to become independent scholars. The situation led to the creation of a more general...... interview study within the faculty, and an inquiry into the field of cross-cultural supervision with the purpose of enhancing the skills of PhD supervisors. As is often the case with cross-cultural exchange and inquiry, the study ended up by being just as informative on the supervision cultures and settings...

  1. Iron oxide nanoparticles - In vivo/in vitro biomedical applications and in silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkova, Miroslava; Donkova, Borjana; Romanova, Julia; Tzvetkov, George; Madurga, Sergio; Simeonov, Vasil

    2017-05-03

    The review presents a broad overview of the biomedical applications of surface functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents for sensitive and precise diagnosis tool and synergistic combination with other imaging modalities. Then, the recent progress in therapeutic applications, such as hyperthermia is discussed and the available toxicity data of magnetic nanoparticles concerning in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications are addressed. This review also presents the available computer models using molecular dynamics (MD), Monte Carlo (MC) and density functional theory (DFT), as a basis for a complete understanding of the behaviour and morphology of functionalized IONPs, for improving NPs surface design and expanding the potential applications in nanomedicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge attitude and practice study on biomedical waste management among health care professionals and paramedical students in a Tertiary Care Government Hospital in South India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vetrivel Sengodan; K Amruth

    2013-01-01

      Aims: The aim of our study was to analyze the knowledge attitude and practice (KAP) of biomedical waste management among medical, paramedical students and health care professionals in Coimbatore Medical College Hospital in South India...

  3. Mid-Career PhD Physicists: Academia & Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan

    2017-01-01

    What jobs do mid-career PhD physicists hold? In a first-ever study, we collected data in 2011 from over 1,500 physics PhD recipients from the classes of 1996, 1997, 2000, and 2001. About 45% of the physics PhD recipients in these classes immediately took jobs that were not temporary, and over 40% accepted postdocs. How does taking a postdoc affect mid-career employment? What is the relationship between first job (after any postdocs) and mid-career employment? How do physicists' actual jobs compare with what they thought they would be doing when they graduated? Using our initial employment and mid-career data, I will answer these questions and more.

  4. Fundamental and applied studies in nanoparticle biomedical imaging, stabilization, and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansare, Vikram J.

    Nanoparticle carrier systems are gaining importance in the rapidly expanding field of biomedical whole animal imaging where they provide long circulating, real time imaging capability. This thesis presents a new paradigm in imaging whereby long wavelength fluorescent or photoacoustically active contrast agents are embedded in the hydrophobic core of nanocarriers formed by Flash NanoPrecipitation. The long wavelength allows for improved optical penetration depth. Compared to traditional contrast agents where fluorophores are placed on the surface, this allows for improved signal, increased stability, and molecular targeting capabilities. Several types of long wavelength hydrophobic dyes based on acene, cyanine, and bacteriochlorin scaffolds are utilized and animal results obtained for nanocarrier systems used in both fluorescent and photoacoustic imaging modes. Photoacoustic imaging is particularly promising due to its high resolution, excellent penetration depth, and ability to provide real-time functional information. Fundamental studies in nanoparticle stabilization are also presented for two systems: model alumina nanoparticles and charge stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles. Motivated by the need for stable suspensions of alumina-based nanocrystals for security printing applications, results are presented for the adsorption of various small molecule charged hydrophobes onto the surface of alumina nanoparticles. Results are also presented for the production of charge stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles via Flash NanoPrecipitation, allowing for the independent control of polymer molecular weight and nanoparticle size, which is not possible by traditional emulsion polymerization routes. Lastly, methods for processing nanoparticle systems are explored. The increasing use of nanoparticle therapeutics in the pharmaceutical industry has necessitated the development of scalable, industrially relevant processing methods. Ultrafiltration is particularly well suited for

  5. Enhancing the Industrial PhD Programme as a Policy Tool for University-Industry Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roolaht, Tõnu

    2015-01-01

    The changing role of universities in society includes the increasing expectation that academic institutions should engage in collaboration with companies. Industrial PhD programmes are educational tools for building bridges between the academic sector and industry. In these programmes, the PhD student studies and carries out research while being…

  6. Enhancing the Industrial PhD Programme as a Policy Tool for University-Industry Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roolaht, Tõnu

    2015-01-01

    The changing role of universities in society includes the increasing expectation that academic institutions should engage in collaboration with companies. Industrial PhD programmes are educational tools for building bridges between the academic sector and industry. In these programmes, the PhD student studies and carries out research while being…

  7. Creating Entrepreneurial Networks: Academic Entrepreneurship, Mobility and Collaboration during PhD Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowska, Dzamila; Klofsten, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Network-building activities of PhD students are an important area of study in furthering our understanding of academic entrepreneurship. This paper focuses on PhD students' participation in network-building activities defined as mobility and collaboration, as well as own interest in and perceived grade of support for commercialisation from various…

  8. What is biomedical informatics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstam, Elmer V; Smith, Jack W; Johnson, Todd R

    2010-02-01

    Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically-grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine.

  9. Urbanism PhD Research 2008 - 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Hoeven, F.D.; Brand, N.; Van der Burg, L.; Çalışkan, O.; Tan, E.R.; Wang, C.-Y.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the Ph.D. research the Department introduced a special procedure for periodic evaluation: after a period of nine months the potential Ph.D. candidates are asked to present their research design, theoretical framework and methodological approach to the members of the Departme

  10. Using Animal Instincts to Design Efficient Biomedical Studies via Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jiaheng; Chen, Ray-Bing; Wang, Weichung; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-10-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is an increasingly popular metaheuristic algorithm for solving complex optimization problems. Its popularity is due to its repeated successes in finding an optimum or a near optimal solution for problems in many applied disciplines. The algorithm makes no assumption of the function to be optimized and for biomedical experiments like those presented here, PSO typically finds the optimal solutions in a few seconds of CPU time on a garden-variety laptop. We apply PSO to find various types of optimal designs for several problems in the biological sciences and compare PSO performance relative to the differential evolution algorithm, another popular metaheuristic algorithm in the engineering literature.

  11. Computational intelligence in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art computational intelligence research and technologies in biomedical images with emphasis on biomedical decision making. Biomedical imaging offers useful information on patients’ medical conditions and clues to causes of their symptoms and diseases. Biomedical images, however, provide a large number of images which physicians must interpret. Therefore, computer aids are demanded and become indispensable in physicians’ decision making. This book discusses major technical advancements and research findings in the field of computational intelligence in biomedical imaging, for example, computational intelligence in computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and brain disease, in lung function analysis, and in radiation therapy. The book examines technologies and studies that have reached the practical level, and those technologies that are becoming available in clinical practices in hospitals rapidly such as computational inte...

  12. A PHD in histone language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones are important for various DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. We recently reported that the ALFIN LIKE 6 (AL6) gene, identified in a forward genetic screen, is critical for phosphate deficiency-induced root hair formation and several other processes associated with the regulation of cellular phosphate homeostasis. AL6 contains a Plant Homeo Domain (PHD) finger that can bind to trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3). Homozygous mutants defective in AL6 expression form very short root hairs under phosphate-deficient conditions, presumably caused by altered expression of putative primary and secondary down-stream targets of AL6. In this Addendum, we speculate about possible roles of AL6, H3K4 trimethylation and other chromatin modifications in the adaptation of plants to low phosphate availability. PMID:23531693

  13. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application – the frutalin case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eOliveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly-glycosylated alpha-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that batch-to-batch variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine.

  14. A framework for unifying ontology-based semantic similarity measures: a study in the biomedical domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harispe, Sébastien; Sánchez, David; Ranwez, Sylvie; Janaqi, Stefan; Montmain, Jacky

    2014-04-01

    Ontologies are widely adopted in the biomedical domain to characterize various resources (e.g. diseases, drugs, scientific publications) with non-ambiguous meanings. By exploiting the structured knowledge that ontologies provide, a plethora of ad hoc and domain-specific semantic similarity measures have been defined over the last years. Nevertheless, some critical questions remain: which measure should be defined/chosen for a concrete application? Are some of the, a priori different, measures indeed equivalent? In order to bring some light to these questions, we perform an in-depth analysis of existing ontology-based measures to identify the core elements of semantic similarity assessment. As a result, this paper presents a unifying framework that aims to improve the understanding of semantic measures, to highlight their equivalences and to propose bridges between their theoretical bases. By demonstrating that groups of measures are just particular instantiations of parameterized functions, we unify a large number of state-of-the-art semantic similarity measures through common expressions. The application of the proposed framework and its practical usefulness is underlined by an empirical analysis of hundreds of semantic measures in a biomedical context. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. How Broad Liberal Arts Training Produces Phd Economists: Carleton's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Jenny; Grawe, Nathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies point to strong performance in economics PhD programs of graduates from liberal arts colleges. While every undergraduate program is unique and the likelihood of selection bias combines with small sample sizes to caution against drawing strong conclusions, the authors reflect on their experience at Carleton College to…

  16. Ph.d. report nº1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, Lorenzo Banos

    The following report serves as an introduction to the Ph.d subject "Control system Modeling of the Wave Star Energy's Power Take-O". The device studied belongs to the Wave Energy field, which forms part of the renewable hydro Power generation sector. In Denmark, following the succesful course...

  17. The Vulnerability of Study Participants in the Context of Transnational Biomedical Research: From Conceptual Considerations to Practical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Helen Grete; Schicktanz, Silke

    2017-08-01

    Outsourcing clinical trials sponsored by pharmaceutical companies from industrialized countries to low- (middle)-income countries - summarized as transnational biomedical research (TBR) - has lead to many concerns about ethical standards. Whether study participants are particularly vulnerable is one of those concerns. However, the concept of vulnerability is still vague and varies in its definition. Despite the fact that important international ethical guidelines such as the Declaration of Helsinki by the World Medical Association or the Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects by the Council of International Organizations of Medical Sciences refer to vulnerability as ethical principle, each of their approaches are different. To overcome these shortcomings, we analyze and unite different approaches of vulnerability and develop practical criteria in order to operationalize the concept especially for the context of TBR. These criteria refer to the context of a study as well as the characteristics and the current living situation of study participants. Based on a case study of an HIV-vaccine-trial conducted in India we demonstrate how those criteria can be applied in a retrospective way to identify potential ethical conflicts. The criteria can also indicate a prospective function for ethical pre-assessment. For this, we provide an outlook for three major topics: 1. Vulnerability as a normative concept: Different ways of protection; 2. The relevance of transparency and 3. Vulnerability as an instrument to increase decision participation of human subjects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase 3 (PHD3 expression is downregulated during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trenton L Place

    Full Text Available Prolyl-4-hydroxylation by the intracellular prolyl-4-hydroxylase enzymes (PHD1-3 serves as a master regulator of environmental oxygen sensing. The activity of these enzymes is tightly tied to tumorigenesis, as they regulate cell metabolism and angiogenesis through their control of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF stability. PHD3 specifically, is gaining attention for its broad function and rapidly accumulating array of non-HIF target proteins. Data from several recent studies suggest a role for PHD3 in the regulation of cell morphology and cell migration. In this study, we aimed to investigate this role by closely examining the relationship between PHD3 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT; a transcriptional program that plays a major role in controlling cell morphology and migratory capacity. Using human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA cell lines and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells, we examined the correlation between several markers of EMT and PHD3 expression. We demonstrated that loss of PHD3 expression in PDA cell lines is highly correlated with a mesenchymal-like morphology and an increase in cell migratory capacity. We also found that induction of EMT in MDCK cells resulted in the specific downregulation of PHD3, whereas the expression of the other HIF-PHD enzymes was not affected. The results of this study clearly support a model by which the basal expression and hypoxic induction of PHD3 is suppressed by the EMT transcriptional program. This may be a novel mechanism by which migratory or metastasizing cells alter signaling through specific pathways that are sensitive to regulation by O2. The identification of downstream pathways that are affected by the suppression of PHD3 expression during EMT may provide important insight into the crosstalk between O2 and the migratory and metastatic potential of tumor cells.

  19. ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In this #CERNandSociety video, the 3 PhD students, awarded the ATLAS PhD Grant in 2015, talk about their research work within the ATLAS Collaboration and how this experience has shaped their future. Find out more about the ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme: cern.ch/ATLASPhDGrant This programme is just one of the many #CERNandSociety projects at CERN. Find out more and how you can be involved: http://cern.ch/go/pBt7

  20. From Doctoral Student To Faculty Member: PhD. Project Alumni’s Evaluation Of Their Preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill N. Schwartz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In response to the important issues regarding diversity in business schools and corporate America, the KPMG Foundation established the PhD Project. The PhD Project helps business professionals and recent college graduates earn doctoral degrees in business disciplines and join business school faculty. While the PhD Project has helped increase the number of minority faculty members in business schools, it may be helpful to gather insights from the recent PhD alumni who have received support from the PhD Project. Our study examines attitudes about preparedness of PhD Project alums for their first faculty position after completing their PhD program. Results show that PhD Project alumni and majority PhD alumni (alumni not associated with the PhD Project felt they were prepared for their first faculty position, but they were not significantly different in their evaluation in most respects. However, to our surprise, majority PhD alumni felt they were better prepared for research than PhD Project alumni. This difference was significant and further analyses showed that younger faculty and those in the ethnic majority were better prepared for research. Both groups considered themselves well prepared for research and teaching. Neither group was as optimistic about being prepared for service responsibilities and the academic climate or politics of an academic career. Our findings show that the PhD Project is necessary to help ensure that minority faculty members are adequately prepared for research and their academic careers.

  1. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  2. A beam optics study of the biomedical beam line at a proton therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Chong Cheoul [National Center for Inter-University Research Facilities, Seoul National University, Sillim-dong, Gwanak, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Won [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Ilsan-gu, Koyang, Kyonggi 410 769 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jwkim@ncc.re.kr

    2007-10-15

    A biomedical beam line has been designed for the experimental area of a proton therapy facility to deliver mm to sub-mm size beams in the energy range of 20-50 MeV using the TRANSPORT/TURTLE beam optics codes and a newly-written program. The proton therapy facility is equipped with a 230 MeV fixed-energy cyclotron and an energy selection system based on a degrader and slits, so that beam currents available for therapy decrease at lower energies in the therapeutic beam energy range of 70-230 MeV. The new beam line system is composed of an energy-degrader, two slits, and three quadrupole magnets. The minimum beam sizes achievable at the focal point are estimated for the two energies of 50 and 20 MeV. The focused FWHM beam size is approximately 0.3 mm with an expected beam current of 20 pA when the beam energy is reduced to 50 MeV from 100 MeV, and roughly 0.8 mm with a current of 10 pA for a 20 MeV beam.

  3. An intercultural study of first-person plural references in biomedical writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Maria Carciu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper carries out a contrastive analysis of biomedical research articles published in international English-medium journals and written by scholars from two cultural contexts (Anglo-American and Spanish. It first describes both similarities and differences in terms of the rhetorical effects that first-person plural references (“we”, “our” and “us” create across the different sections of the IMRaD pattern (Swales, 1990. Then, the functions of these pronouns are explored following Tang and John’s (1999 taxonomy of the discourse roles of personal pronouns. Quantitative results show that, overall, Spanish writers tend to use “we” pronouns more than their native counterparts, thus making themselves more visible in their texts particularly in Introduction and Discussion sections. On the other hand, results also indicate striking similarities regarding the discourse role of “we” as “guide”, “architect”, “opinion-holder” and “originator” –roles which seem to indicate writers’ awareness of the specific communicative purposes of “we” references in each RA section. This crosscultural variation is finally discussed in relation to the dominance of English as the international lingua franca of academic communication and research (Benfield & Howard, 2000; Tardy, 2004; Giannoni, 2008a.

  4. What PhD students really want

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Minnie

    2010-01-01

    The road to becoming an astronomer is exciting, but often fraught with danger and conflicting messages. A PhD student is inundated with catch-phrases such as "publish or perish" and "it's not about the quantity, but the quality of work". How do we know which advice to follow? How can we publish copious amounts of quality work in only three years so as to maximize our success in the future? How do we even know what "good quality" really is? With only a short time to prepare ourselves for the big wide world of Astronomy, what is the best way for a PhD student to maximize their research and ultimately maximize their success as a real astronomer? The PhD students of today are the astronomers of tomorrow, but their journey depends on a positive work environment in which they can thrive and improve. Here I present the results of a survey of current PhD students on how they believe they can maximize their success in science. I find that PhD students in Australia expect to write more papers during their PhD than is e...

  5. Sharing big biomedical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Arthur W; Dinov, Ivo D

    The promise of Big Biomedical Data may be offset by the enormous challenges in handling, analyzing, and sharing it. In this paper, we provide a framework for developing practical and reasonable data sharing policies that incorporate the sociological, financial, technical and scientific requirements of a sustainable Big Data dependent scientific community. Many biomedical and healthcare studies may be significantly impacted by using large, heterogeneous and incongruent datasets; however there are significant technical, social, regulatory, and institutional barriers that need to be overcome to ensure the power of Big Data overcomes these detrimental factors. Pragmatic policies that demand extensive sharing of data, promotion of data fusion, provenance, interoperability and balance security and protection of personal information are critical for the long term impact of translational Big Data analytics.

  6. Optical Polarizationin Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tuchin, Valery V; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A

    2006-01-01

    Optical Polarization in Biomedical Applications introduces key developments in optical polarization methods for quantitative studies of tissues, while presenting the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium as a basis for the quantitative description of polarized light interaction with tissues. This theory uses the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters and predicts the polarization structure of multiple scattered optical fields. The backscattering polarization matrices (Jones matrix and Mueller matrix) important for noninvasive medical diagnostic are introduced. The text also describes a number of diagnostic techniques such as CW polarization imaging and spectroscopy, polarization microscopy and cytometry. As a new tool for medical diagnosis, optical coherent polarization tomography is analyzed. The monograph also covers a range of biomedical applications, among them cataract and glaucoma diagnostics, glucose sensing, and the detection of bacteria.

  7. Increased EPO Levels Are Associated With Bone Loss in Mice Lacking PHD2 in EPO-Producing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, Martina; Franke, Kristin; Murray, Marta; Singh, Rashim Pal; Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Platzbecker, Uwe; Gassmann, Max; Socolovsky, Merav; Neumann, Drorit; Gabet, Yankel; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Wielockx, Ben

    2016-10-01

    The main oxygen sensor hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) is a critical regulator of tissue homeostasis during erythropoiesis, hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, and wound healing. Recent studies point toward a role for the PHD2-erythropoietin (EPO) axis in the modulation of bone remodeling, even though the studies produced conflicting results. Here, we used a number of mouse strains deficient of PHD2 in different cell types to address the role of PHD2 and its downstream targets HIF-1α and HIF-2α in bone remodeling. Mice deficient for PHD2 in several cell lineages, including EPO-producing cells, osteoblasts, and hematopoietic cells (CD68:cre-PHD2(f/f) ) displayed a severe reduction of bone density at the distal femur as well as the vertebral body due to impaired bone formation but not bone resorption. Importantly, using osteoblast-specific (Osx:cre-PHD2(f/f) ) and osteoclast-specific PHD2 knock-out mice (Vav:cre- PHD2(f/f) ), we show that this effect is independent of the loss of PHD2 in osteoblast and osteoclasts. Using different in vivo and in vitro approaches, we show here that this bone phenotype, including the suppression of bone formation, is directly linked to the stabilization of the α-subunit of HIF-2, and possibly to the subsequent moderate induction of serum EPO, which directly influenced the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblast progenitors resulting in lower bone density. Taken together, our data identify the PHD2:HIF-2α:EPO axis as a so far unknown regulator of osteohematology by controlling bone homeostasis. Further, these data suggest that patients treated with PHD inhibitors or EPO should be monitored with respect to their bone status. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. What Google Maps can do for biomedical data dissemination: examples and a design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianu, Radu; Laidlaw, David H

    2013-05-04

    Biologists often need to assess whether unfamiliar datasets warrant the time investment required for more detailed exploration. Basing such assessments on brief descriptions provided by data publishers is unwieldy for large datasets that contain insights dependent on specific scientific questions. Alternatively, using complex software systems for a preliminary analysis may be deemed as too time consuming in itself, especially for unfamiliar data types and formats. This may lead to wasted analysis time and discarding of potentially useful data. We present an exploration of design opportunities that the Google Maps interface offers to biomedical data visualization. In particular, we focus on synergies between visualization techniques and Google Maps that facilitate the development of biological visualizations which have both low-overhead and sufficient expressivity to support the exploration of data at multiple scales. The methods we explore rely on displaying pre-rendered visualizations of biological data in browsers, with sparse yet powerful interactions, by using the Google Maps API. We structure our discussion around five visualizations: a gene co-regulation visualization, a heatmap viewer, a genome browser, a protein interaction network, and a planar visualization of white matter in the brain. Feedback from collaborative work with domain experts suggests that our Google Maps visualizations offer multiple, scale-dependent perspectives and can be particularly helpful for unfamiliar datasets due to their accessibility. We also find that users, particularly those less experienced with computer use, are attracted by the familiarity of the Google Maps API. Our five implementations introduce design elements that can benefit visualization developers. We describe a low-overhead approach that lets biologists access readily analyzed views of unfamiliar scientific datasets. We rely on pre-computed visualizations prepared by data experts, accompanied by sparse and intuitive

  9. In vivo electrochemical corrosion study of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy in human synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igual Munoz, A; Schwiesau, J; Jolles, B M; Mischler, S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was initiated with the aim to assess the in vivo electrochemical corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo biomedical alloys in human synovial fluids in an attempt to identify possible patient or pathology specific effects. For this, electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential OCP, polarization resistance Rp, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS) were carried out on fluids extracted from patients with different articular pathologies and prosthesis revisions. Those electrochemical measurements could be carried out with outstanding precision and signal stability. The results show that the corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo alloy in synovial fluids not only depends on material reactivity but also on the specific reactions of synovial fluid components, most likely involving reactive oxygen species. In some patients the latter were found to determine the whole cathodic and anodic electrochemical response. Depending on patients, corrosion rates varied significantly between 50 and 750 mg dm(-2)year(-1).

  10. A Study of the Information Literacy of Biomedical Graduate Students: Based on the Thesis Topic Discovery Process in Molecular Biology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhao-Yen Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The biomedical information environment is in a state of constant and rapid change due to the increase in research data and rapid technological advances. In Taiwan, few research has investigated the information literacy of biomedical graduate students. This exploratory study examined the information literacy abilities and training of biomedical graduate students in Taiwan. Semi-structured interviews based on the Association of College and Research Libraries Information Literacy Competency Standards for Science and Engineering/Technology were conducted with 20 molecular biological graduate students. The interview inquired about their information-seeking channels and information literacy education. The findings show that the biomedical graduate students developed a workable thesis topic with their advisors. Through various information-seeking channels and retrieval strategies, they obtained and critically evaluated information to address different information needs for their thesis research. Through seminars, annual conferences and papers, the interviewees were informed of current developments in their field. Subsequently, through written or oral communications, they were able to integrate and exchange the information. Most interviewees cared about the social, economic, legal, and ethical issues surrounding the use of information. College courses and labs were the main information literacy education environment for them to learn about research skills and knowledge. The study concludes four areas to address for the information literacy of biomedical graduate students, i.e., using professional information, using the current information, efficiency in assessing the domain information, and utilization of diverse information channels. Currently, the interviewees showed rather low usage of library resources, which is a concern for biomedical educators and libraries. [Article content in Chinese

  11. Implementation of an Education-Focused PhD Program in Anatomy and Cell Biology at Indiana University: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, James J.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the School of Education, admitted its first student to a newly approved PhD program in Anatomy and Cell Biology focusing on educational research rather than biomedical research. The goal of the program is twofold: (1) to provide students with extensive training in all of the…

  12. Implementation of an Education-Focused PhD Program in Anatomy and Cell Biology at Indiana University: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, James J.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the School of Education, admitted its first student to a newly approved PhD program in Anatomy and Cell Biology focusing on educational research rather than biomedical research. The goal of the program is twofold: (1) to provide students with extensive training in all of the…

  13. Actualization of the PhD Students' Intercultural Research Competencies in Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Dailidiene

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available globalization is changing the qualitative characteristics of society, affecting both the life and mentality of people. In relevance to globalization, higher education is gaining new dimensions as well. Bologna and Lisbon documents guide and obligate each country to create integrated and harmonious international space of higher education in Europe. phd studies are considered as integral in the higher education structure; therefore, internationalization is a significant imperative for phd studies development. In the process of internationalization, the need for students’ intercultural competencies is widely recognized. Firstly, we suppose that the impact of globalization on internationalization still remains underestimated. Globalization makes internationalization not only more intense, but also qualitatively different. Secondly, there is a lack of systemic analysis on the development of intercultural research competencies in phd studies. We relate the need for intercultural research competencies to the following critical and rhetorical question: ‘Are today’s phd students ready to solve tomorrow’s global problems?’

  14. Biomedical engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Engineering Fundamentals, the first volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in physiological systems, biomechanics, biomaterials, bioelectric phenomena, and neuroengineering. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including cardia

  15. Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Students in Multidisciplinary Research Area of Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Engineering makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop Biomedical Engineering. Communication is not easy in a multidisciplinary research area, because each area has its own background of thinking. Because each nation has its own background of culture, on the other hand, international communication is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student program has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area. Students from a variety of backgrounds of research area and culture have joined in the program: mechanical engineering, material science, environmental engineering, science of nursing, dentist, pharmacy, electronics, and so on. The program works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area of biomedical engineering. Foreign language and digital data give students chance to study several things: how to make communication precisely, how to quote previous data. The experience in the program helps students not only understand new idea in the laboratory visit, but also make a presentation in the international research conference. The program relates to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  16. I-determinants for a successful PhD or postdoctoral outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen HT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Toft Sørensen1–3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark; 2Department of Health Research and Policy, 3Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Many resources are invested in research training, but very little literature exists on predictors for a successful PhD and postdoctoral training outcome. A PhD program has two overall objectives: to extend knowledge about a hopefully important health topic and to provide extensive training to improve the PhD student’s skills through learning research methods and collaboration. A substantial number of PhD students may run into some kind of problem in the course of their PhD program. In this article, some determinants all starting with an “I” and indicative of a good PhD outcome are reported. The successful PhD student can be described as having an Interest in the PhD program, an Incentive for the program, and an Idea of what he or she wants to investigate, showing Initiative, and having high personal Integrity and good Interpersonal relationships. When these so-called I-determinants are present, the likelihood of success in a PhD program is high. More evidence is available for selection of candidates for postdoctoral appointments since it is known that the postdoctoral candidate has completed a PhD program, published papers in peer-reviewed journals, and received awarded grants. However, other characteristics determine a successful transition of the postdoctoral candidate into a research leader. These determinants are Identity, Independence and Image, Implementation ability in terms of being able to implement decisions and projects, working with Innovative and Important topics, having In-depth knowledge of the research topic, being Interactive and Integrated with the scientific community, and Internationally oriented. In conclusion, regardless of the framework of research, the

  17. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  18. ATLAS PhD Grants 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS PHd Grants - We are excited to announce the creation of a dedicated grant scheme (thanks to a donation from Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni following their award from the Fundamental Physics Prize foundation) to encourage young and high-caliber doctoral students in particle physics research (including computing for physics) and permit them to obtain world class exposure, supervision and training within the ATLAS collaboration. This special PhD Grant is aimed at graduate students preparing a doctoral thesis in particle physics (incl. computing for physics) to spend one year at CERN followed by one year support also at the home Institute.

  19. Peer Relationships and the Biomedical Doctorate: A Key Component of the Contemporary Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Matthew W.; Molloy, Timothy J.; Pajic, Marina; Chapman, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the scholarship of doctoral education in the biomedical sciences, hindering the formulation of research-informed improvements to this important area of higher education. We present an analysis of interview data from Australian PhD students and suggest that relationships between students and their…

  20. Peer Relationships and the Biomedical Doctorate: A Key Component of the Contemporary Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Matthew W.; Molloy, Timothy J.; Pajic, Marina; Chapman, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the scholarship of doctoral education in the biomedical sciences, hindering the formulation of research-informed improvements to this important area of higher education. We present an analysis of interview data from Australian PhD students and suggest that relationships between students and their…

  1. Role of PHD fingers and COOH-terminal 30 amino acids in AIRE transactivation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Alessandra; Incani, Federica; Corda, Denise; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomic autoimmune disease resulting from the defective function of a gene codifying for a transcription factor named autoimmune regulation (AIRE). The AIRE protein contains several domains among which two PHD fingers involved in the transcriptional activation. We investigated the function of the two PHD finger domains and the COOH terminal portion of AIRE by using several mutated constructs transfected in mammalian cells and a luciferase reporter assay. The results predict that the second PHD as well as the COOH terminal regions have marked transactivational properties. The COOH terminal region contains the fourth LXXLL and the PXXPXP motifs which play a critical role in mediating the transactivation capacity of the AIRE protein. Our study provides a definition of the role of the PHD fingers in transactivation and identifies a new transactivation domain of the AIRE protein localized in the COOH terminal region.

  2. PhD Crisis Discourse: A Critical Approach to the Framing of the Problem and Some Australian "Solutions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Denise; Molla, Tebeje

    2015-01-01

    A feature of HE reform discourse is the tendency to construct the rationale for reform in terms of averting calamity and risk. We refer to this risk talk as "crisis discourse." This study examines the formulation of PhD crisis discourse internationally and in Australia. We find that a key feature of PhD crisis discourse is that…

  3. Publishing and Learning Writing for Publication in English: Perspectives of NNES PhD Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ju Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Publication in international journals has become a prerequisite to PhD graduation. This study thus provides a framework for understanding the learning of writing skills and publishing practices of nonnative English-speaking PhD students by investigating their perceptions of publishing and learning to write for publication. Findings show that these…

  4. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1973-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 3, is a collection of papers that discusses circulatory system models, linguistics in computer usage, and clinical applications on patient monitoring. One paper describes the use of comparative models of overall circulatory mechanics that include models of the cardiac pump, of the vascular systems, and of the overall systems behavior. Another paper describes a model in processing medical language data that employs an explicit semantic structure, becoming the basis for the computer-based, artificial intelligence of the system. One paper cites studies b

  5. Biomedical Sensors and Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    The living body is a difficult object to measure: accurate measurements of physiological signals require sensors and instruments capable of high specificity and selectivity that do not interfere with the systems under study. As a result, detailed knowledge of sensor and instrument properties is required to be able to select the "best" sensor from one of the many designed to meet these challenges. From the underlying principles to practical applications, this updated edition of Biomedical Sensors and Instruments provides an easy-to-understand introduction to the various kinds of biome

  6. Metformin and Melatonin in Adrenocortical Carcinoma: Morphoproteomics and Biomedical Analytics Provide Proof of Concept in a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert E; Buryanek, Jamie; McGuire, Mary F

    2017-08-01

    Metformin has been proposed as a novel anti-cancer drug for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) based upon Poli's recent preclinical studies that 1. "in vitro" metformin modulates the ACC cell model H295R and 2. "in vivo" metformin inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft model as confirmed by a significant reduction of Ki67 [1]. Here we report on our prior clinical case study that provides proof of concept for Poli's studies. We were requested to perform morphoproteomic analysis to further define the biology of, and raise targeted therapeutic options, for a case of post-treatment and chemoresistant ACC metastatic to the liver and the lung. Profiling the patient's ACC from the liver resulted in the recommendation of metformin as a maintenance therapy, which was supported by biomedical data analysis. The patient remains on maintenance therapy with metformin and melatonin and is free of disease some 7 years post diagnosis, thus underscoring the recommendation for clinical trials employing these therapeutic agents. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  7. [The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H

    2001-01-01

    On September 29th, 2000, The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors was founded, sponsored by the "Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT)" (the Governmental Agency promoting and funding scientific research and technological development in Chile) and the "Sociedad Médica de Santiago" (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine). The Association adopted the goals of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and therefore it will foster "cooperation and communication among Editors of Chilean biomedical journals; to improve editorial standards, to promote professionalism in medical editing through education, self-criticism and self-regulation; and to encourage research on the principles and practice of medical editing". Twenty nine journals covering a closely similar number of different biomedical sciences, medical specialties, veterinary, dentistry and nursing, became Founding Members of the Association. A Governing Board was elected: President: Humberto Reyes, M.D. (Editor, Revista Médica de Chile); Vice-President: Mariano del Sol, M.D. (Editor, Revista Chilena de Anatomía); Secretary: Anna María Prat (CONICYT); Councilors: Manuel Krauskopff, Ph.D. (Editor, Biological Research) and Maritza Rahal, M.D. (Editor, Revista de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello). The Association will organize a Symposium on Biomedical Journal Editing and will spread information stimulating Chilean biomedical journals to become indexed in international databases and in SciELO-Chile, the main Chilean scientific website (www.scielo.cl).

  8. [The use of bibliographic databases by Spanish-speaking Latin American biomedical researchers: a cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, Edgar Guillermo; Reveiz Herault, Ludovic; Cardona, Andrés Felipe

    2005-04-01

    To describe how Spanish-speaking biomedical professionals in Latin America access and utilize bibliographic databases. Based on a MEDLINE search, 2 515 articles published between August 2002 and August 2003 were identified that dealt with and/or had authors from 16 countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The search was limited to references to basic science, clinical science, or social medicine. A survey was sent by e-mail to researchers who lived in 15 of the 16 countries (the exception being Nicaragua). The survey asked about the researcher's area of work (basic science, clinical science, or public health), the level of skill in using databases, the frequency and type of access to the databases most utilized, the impact from not having access to the full text of articles when preparing a manuscript, and how the respondent usually obtained the full-text version of articles. A total of 586 e-mail messages with the survey were sent out, and 185 responses were received (32%). The databases most utilized to obtain biomedical information were MEDLINE (34.1%), general search engines (Google, Yahoo!, and AltaVista) (15.9%), on-line journals (9.8%), BIREME-LILACS (6.0%), BioMedNet (5.4%), the databases of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States of America (5.2%), and the Cochrane Library (4.9%). Of the respondents, 64% said they had average or advanced abilities in using MEDLINE. However, 71% of the respondents did not use or were not aware of the MEDLINE Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), a controlled vocabulary established by the National Library of Medicine of the United States of America for indexing articles. The frequency of accessing the databases was similar in all the countries studied, without significant differences in terms of the type of access (authorized access to commercial databases, unauthorized access to

  9. [Master course in biomedical engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbágy, Akos; Benyó, Zoltán; Monos, Emil

    2009-11-22

    The Bologna Declaration aims at harmonizing the European higher education structure. In accordance with the Declaration, biomedical engineering will be offered as a master (MSc) course also in Hungary, from year 2009. Since 1995 biomedical engineering course has been held in cooperation of three universities: Semmelweis University, Budapest Veterinary University, and Budapest University of Technology and Economics. One of the latter's faculties, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, has been responsible for the course. Students could start their biomedical engineering studies - usually in parallel with their first degree course - after they collected at least 180 ECTS credits. Consequently, the biomedical engineering course could have been considered as a master course even before the Bologna Declaration. Students had to collect 130 ECTS credits during the six-semester course. This is equivalent to four-semester full-time studies, because during the first three semesters the curriculum required to gain only one third of the usual ECTS credits. The paper gives a survey on the new biomedical engineering master course, briefly summing up also the subjects in the curriculum.

  10. 翻译学博士研究生跨学科研究能力的培养%Cultivating the Interdisciplinary Research Competence of the PhD Candidates in Translation Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫爱屏; 满德亮; 蒋清凤

    2014-01-01

    从跨学科角度探究翻译学博士研究生科研能力的培养可从学生选拔、课程设置及学生指导三个方面着手。本文认为:扩大招生范围、取消对生源的限制是实现学生学科背景多样化的前提;确立课程设置的基本原则、构建具有跨学科性的培养方案、建立灵活的选课机制是提升学生跨学科研究能力的基本条件;拓宽导师的学科维度是培养学生跨学科研究能力的重要保证。简言之,优质的生源、合理的课程设置、多维度论文指导的动态培养模式可促进合格翻译人才的培养。%This paper argues that the cultivation of the interdisciplinary research competence of the PhD candidates in Translation Studies can be approached from three different aspects, i.e. the enrollment, the curriculum design and the supervisor’s guidance. It is suggested that in terms of enrollment, the source of the candidates be enlarged and the academic background be diversified. Regarding the curriculum design, fundamental principles should now be established, interdisciplinarity be incorporated and a flexible mechanism be set up to promote cross-disciplinary course-selection. Last but not least, the combined efforts of a more diversified team of supervisors will make for the enhanced research competence of the PhD candidates in Translation Studies. It can therefore be concluded that a dynamic model encompassing the interaction among qualified candidates, a well-designed curriculum and multi-dimensional supervision plays a crucial role in the cultivation of competent interpreters/translators.

  11. Ethics of medical care and clinical research: a qualitative study of principal investigators in biomedical HIV prevention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire, Bridget G

    2013-04-01

    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are distinct, it is a mistake for researchers to assume therapeutic responsibilities while engaging in research. Others propose that there is a duty of care, but disagree as to how this is limited and specified. In this qualitative study, principal investigators from HIV prevention trials discuss their experience of providing medical benefits to participants within the context of conducting research into HIV biomedical prevention technologies. They describe the limitations imposed at times by funders and at times by infrastructure constraints, and canvass the importance of ancillary care provision and capacity building in trial communities. The views of the principal investigators are compatible with the perspective that there is a duty of care, limited by the nature of the research, the depth of the relationship between research and participant, and the capacity of the research site. The therapeutic orientation in HIV prevention trial appears to be indivisible from competent research practise by making concrete and appropriate benefits available to trial participants and their communities that support rather than compete with local infrastructure.

  12. Applications of high-resolution magic angle spinning MRS in biomedical studies I-cell line and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaebisch, Eva; Fuss, Taylor L; Vandergrift, Lindsey A; Toews, Karin; Habbel, Piet; Cheng, Leo L

    2017-06-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) MRS allows for direct measurements of non-liquid tissue and cell specimens to present valuable insights into the cellular metabolisms of physiological and pathological processes. HRMAS produces high-resolution spectra comparable to those obtained from solutions of specimen extracts but without complex metabolite extraction processes, and preserves the tissue cellular structure in a form suitable for pathological examinations following spectroscopic analysis. The technique has been applied in a wide variety of biomedical and biochemical studies and become one of the major platforms of metabolomic studies. By quantifying single metabolites, metabolite ratios, or metabolic profiles in their entirety, HRMAS presents promising possibilities for diagnosis and prediction of clinical outcomes for various diseases, as well as deciphering of metabolic changes resulting from drug therapies or xenobiotic interactions. In this review, we evaluate HRMAS MRS results on animal models and cell lines reported in the literature, and present the diverse applications of the method for the understanding of pathological processes and the effectiveness of therapies, development of disease animal models, and new progress in HRMAS methodology. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Density functional theory (DFT) study on the hydrolysis behavior of degradable Mg/Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezafati, Marjan

    Magnesium-based (Mg and/or Mg alloys) materials possess many advantageous physicochemical/biological characteristics such as good biocompatibility and similarity of the mechanical properties to the human bone tissue, which renders this material a promising candidate for the biomedical and implant applications. One of the most attractive features of Mg-based materials is the degradability in the physiological environment. With the burst of research on the biodegradable materials for the healthcare device applications, Mg and its alloys attracted a strong attention in the bioengineering field in recent years. However, the major limitation of applying Mg-based materials to biomedical applications is the fast degradation/corrosion rate with regards to the healing process time-span. In the present thesis, an atomistic model employing the density-functional theory (DFT) has been developed to study the hydrolysis process by understanding the influences of commonly used alloying elements (zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), aluminum (Al), and yttrium (Y)) and the crystallographic orientation of the dissolution surfaces (basal (0001), prism (1010), and pyramidal (1011) planes) on the corrosion behavior. These parameters are known to strongly impact the initial hydrolysis phenomena of Mg-based materials. To develop the atomistic computational model, we have implemented the Dmol3 software package in conjunction with PBE (Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof) correlation energy functional in the GGA (generalized gradient approximation) scheme. Throughout the thesis, we performed three sets of calculations, i) surface energy, ii) dissolution potential, and iii) water adsorption computations, to examine the hydrolysis mechanism and the subsequent corrosion/degradation of Mg/Mg alloys. The total energy changes of various Mg-based systems in different conditions for these surface energies, dissolution behavior, and tendency of the system for adsorbing the water molecule were quantified. The results

  14. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  15. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomedical applications of nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J M; Gwak, J W; Kamarajan, P; Fenno, J C; Rickard, A H; Kapila, Y L

    2016-06-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin produced by a group of Gram-positive bacteria that belongs to Lactococcus and Streptococcus species. Nisin is classified as a Type A (I) lantibiotic that is synthesized from mRNA and the translated peptide contains several unusual amino acids due to post-translational modifications. Over the past few decades, nisin has been used widely as a food biopreservative. Since then, many natural and genetically modified variants of nisin have been identified and studied for their unique antimicrobial properties. Nisin is FDA approved and generally regarded as a safe peptide with recognized potential for clinical use. Over the past two decades the application of nisin has been extended to biomedical fields. Studies have reported that nisin can prevent the growth of drug-resistant bacterial strains, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococci and Clostridium difficile. Nisin has now been shown to have antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative disease-associated pathogens. Nisin has been reported to have anti-biofilm properties and can work synergistically in combination with conventional therapeutic drugs. In addition, like host-defence peptides, nisin may activate the adaptive immune response and have an immunomodulatory role. Increasing evidence indicates that nisin can influence the growth of tumours and exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. Collectively, the application of nisin has advanced beyond its role as a food biopreservative. Thus, this review will describe and compare studies on nisin and provide insight into its future biomedical applications.

  17. Retention of prolyl hydroxylase PHD2 in the cytoplasm prevents PHD2-induced anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokilehto, Terhi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Hoegel, Heidi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Heikkinen, Pekka [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Rantanen, Krista [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Elenius, Klaus [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Sundstroem, Jari [Department of Pathology, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jaakkola, Panu M. [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland)

    2010-04-15

    Cellular oxygen tension is sensed by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) that regulate the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1{alpha} and -2{alpha}). The PHD2 isoform is considered as the main downregulator of HIF in normoxia. Our previous results have shown that nuclear translocation of PHD2 associates with poorly differentiated tumor phenotype implying that nuclear PHD2 expression is advantageous for tumor growth. Here we show that a pool of PHD2 is shuttled between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In line with this, accumulation of wild type PHD2 in the nucleus was detected in human colon adenocarcinomas and in cultured carcinoma cells. The PHD2 isoforms showing high nuclear expression increased anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth. However, retention of PHD2 in the cytoplasm inhibited the anchorage-independent cell growth. A region that inhibits the nuclear localization of PHD2 was identified and the deletion of the region promoted anchorage-independent growth of carcinoma cells. Finally, the cytoplasmic PHD2, as compared with the nuclear PHD2, less efficiently downregulated HIF expression. Forced HIF-1{alpha} or -2{alpha} expression decreased and attenuation of HIF expression increased the anchorage-independent cell growth. However, hydroxylase-inactivating mutations in PHD2 had no effect on cell growth. The data imply that nuclear PHD2 localization promotes malignant cancer phenotype.

  18. Biomedical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wriggers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    During the last years computational methods lead to new approaches that can be applied within medical practice. Based on the tremendous advances in medical imaging and high-performance computing, virtual testing is able to help in medical decision processes or implant designs. Current challenges in medicine and engineering are related to the application of computational methods to clinical medicine and the study of biological systems at different scales. Additionally manufacturers will be able to use computational tools and methods to predict the performance of their medical devices in virtual patients. The physical and animal testing procedures could be reduced by virtual prototyping of medical devices. Here simulations can enhance the performance of alternate device designs for a range of virtual patients. This will lead to a refinement of designs and to safer products. This book summarizes different aspects of approaches to enhance function, production, initialization and complications of different types o...

  19. Statistics in biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Manteiga, Wenceslao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The discipline of biostatistics is nowadays a fundamental scientific component of biomedical, public health and health services research. Traditional and emerging areas of application include clinical trials research, observational studies, physiology, imaging, and genomics. The present article reviews the current situation of biostatistics, considering the statistical methods traditionally used in biomedical research, as well as the ongoing development of new methods in response to the new problems arising in medicine. Clearly, the successful application of statistics in biomedical research requires appropriate training of biostatisticians. This training should aim to give due consideration to emerging new areas of statistics, while at the same time retaining full coverage of the fundamentals of statistical theory and methodology. In addition, it is important that students of biostatistics receive formal training in relevant biomedical disciplines, such as epidemiology, clinical trials, molecular biology, genetics, and neuroscience.La Bioestadística es hoy en día una componente científica fundamental de la investigación en Biomedicina, salud pública y servicios de salud. Las áreas tradicionales y emergentes de aplicación incluyen ensayos clínicos, estudios observacionales, fisología, imágenes, y genómica. Este artículo repasa la situación actual de la Bioestadística, considerando los métodos estadísticos usados tradicionalmente en investigación biomédica, así como los recientes desarrollos de nuevos métodos, para dar respuesta a los nuevos problemas que surgen en Medicina. Obviamente, la aplicación fructífera de la estadística en investigación biomédica exige una formación adecuada de los bioestadísticos, formación que debería tener en cuenta las áreas emergentes en estadística, cubriendo al mismo tiempo los fundamentos de la teoría estadística y su metodología. Es importante, además, que los estudiantes de

  20. A Bag of Concepts Approach for Biomedical Document Classification Using Wikipedia Knowledge*. Spanish-English Cross-language Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriño-García, Marcos A; Pérez-Rodríguez, Roberto; Anido-Rifón, Luis E

    2017-08-16

    The ability to efficiently review the existing literature is essential for the rapid progress of research. This paper describes a classifier of text documents, represented as vectors in spaces of Wikipedia concepts, and analyses its suitability for classification of Spanish biomedical documents when only English documents are available for training. We propose the cross-language concept matching (CLCM) technique, which relies on Wikipedia interlanguage links to convert concept vectors from the Spanish to the English space. The performance of the classifier is compared to several baselines: a classifier based on machine translation, a classifier that represents documents after performing Explicit Semantic Analysis (ESA), and a classifier that uses a domain-specific semantic annotator (MetaMap). The corpus used for the experiments (Cross-Language UVigoMED) was purpose-built for this study, and it is composed of 12,832 English and 2,184 Spanish MEDLINE abstracts. The performance of our approach is superior to any other state-of-the art classifier in the benchmark, with performance increases up to: 124% over classical machine translation, 332% over MetaMap, and 60 times over the classifier based on ESA. The results have statistical significance, showing p-values < 0.0001. Using knowledge mined from Wikipedia to represent documents as vectors in a space of Wikipedia concepts and translating vectors between language-specific concept spaces, a cross-language classifier can be built, and it performs better than several state-of-the-art classifiers.

  1. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell-cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future.

  2. Biomedical Engineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The Masters of Engineering program with concentration in Biomedical Engineering at Tennessee State University was established in fall 2000. Under... biomedical engineering . The lab is fully equipped with 10 Pentium5-based, 2 Pentium4-based laptops for mobile experiments at remote locations, 8 Biopac...students (prospective graduate students in biomedical engineering ) are regularly using this lab. This summer, 8 new prospective graduate students

  3. Biomedical Imaging Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salzer, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    This book presents and describes imaging technologies that can be used to study chemical processes and structural interactions in dynamic systems, principally in biomedical systems. The imaging technologies, largely biomedical imaging technologies such as MRT, Fluorescence mapping, raman mapping, nanoESCA, and CARS microscopy, have been selected according to their application range and to the chemical information content of their data. These technologies allow for the analysis and evaluation of delicate biological samples, which must not be disturbed during the profess. Ultimately, this may me

  4. Design optimization study of a shape memory alloy active needle for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konh, Bardia; Honarvar, Mohammad; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2015-05-01

    Majority of cancer interventions today are performed percutaneously using needle-based procedures, i.e. through the skin and soft tissue. The difficulty in most of these procedures is to attain a precise navigation through tissue reaching target locations. To overcome this challenge, active needles have been proposed recently where actuation forces from shape memory alloys (SMAs) are utilized to assist the maneuverability and accuracy of surgical needles. In the first part of this study, actuation capability of SMA wires was studied. The complex response of SMAs was investigated via a MATLAB implementation of the Brinson model and verified via experimental tests. The isothermal stress-strain curves of SMAs were simulated and defined as a material model in finite element analysis (FEA). The FEA was validated experimentally with developed prototypes. In the second part of this study, the active needle design was optimized using genetic algorithm aiming its maximum flexibility. Design parameters influencing the steerability include the needle's diameter, wire diameter, pre-strain and its offset from the needle. A simplified model was presented to decrease the computation time in iterative analyses. Integration of the SMA characteristics with the automated optimization schemes described in this study led to an improved design of the active needle. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain); Mariani, Valentina [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Cohen, Dror [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Madi, Lea [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Garanger, Elisabeth [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Rossi, François [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Korenstein, Rafi [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Lecommandoux, Sébastien [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Ponti, Jessica [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro, E-mail: heredia@gaiker.es [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)-block–poly(l-glutamic acid) (PTMC-b–PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-block–poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PEG-b–PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood–serum–protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC-b–PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG-b–PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  6. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe; Mariani, Valentina; Cohen, Dror; Madi, Lea; Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo; Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella; Garanger, Elisabeth; Rossi, François; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam; Korenstein, Rafi; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Ponti, Jessica; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)- block-poly( l-glutamic acid) (PTMC- b-PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)- block-poly( γ-benzyl- l-glutamate) (PEG- b-PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood-serum-protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC- b-PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG- b-PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  7. Biomedical engineering principles

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Arthur B; Valdevit, Antonio; Ascione, Alfred N

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Modeling of Physiological ProcessesCell Physiology and TransportPrinciples and Biomedical Applications of HemodynamicsA Systems Approach to PhysiologyThe Cardiovascular SystemBiomedical Signal ProcessingSignal Acquisition and ProcessingTechniques for Physiological Signal ProcessingExamples of Physiological Signal ProcessingPrinciples of BiomechanicsPractical Applications of BiomechanicsBiomaterialsPrinciples of Biomedical Capstone DesignUnmet Clinical NeedsEntrepreneurship: Reasons why Most Good Designs Never Get to MarketAn Engineering Solution in Search of a Biomedical Problem

  8. Fundamental of biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sawhney, GS

    2007-01-01

    About the Book: A well set out textbook explains the fundamentals of biomedical engineering in the areas of biomechanics, biofluid flow, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation and use of computing in biomedical engineering. All these subjects form a basic part of an engineer''s education. The text is admirably suited to meet the needs of the students of mechanical engineering, opting for the elective of Biomedical Engineering. Coverage of bioinstrumentation, biomaterials and computing for biomedical engineers can meet the needs of the students of Electronic & Communication, Electronic & Instrumenta

  9. Checklists in biomedical publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardal-Refoyo JL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: the authors, reviewers, editors and readers must have specific tools that help them in the process of drafting, review, or reading the articles. Objective: to offer a summary of the major checklists for different types of biomedical research articles. Material and method: review literature and resources of the EQUATOR Network and adaptations in Spanish published by Medicina Clínica and Evidencias en Pediatría journals. Results: are the checklists elaborated by various working groups. (CONSORT and TREND, experimental studies for observational studies (STROBE, accuracy (STARD diagnostic studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA and for studies to improve the quality (SQUIRE. Conclusions: the use of checklists help to improve the quality of articles and help to authors, reviewers, to the editor and readers in the development and understanding of the content.

  10. Revealing topics and their evolution in biomedical literature using Bio-DTM: a case study of ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Ai, Ni; Liao, Jie; Shao, Xin; Liu, Yufeng; Fan, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Valuable scientific results on biomedicine are very rich, but they are widely scattered in the literature. Topic modeling enables researchers to discover themes from an unstructured collection of documents without any prior annotations or labels. In this paper, taking ginseng as an example, biological dynamic topic model (Bio-DTM) was proposed to conduct a retrospective study and interpret the temporal evolution of the research of ginseng. The system of Bio-DTM mainly includes four components, documents pre-processing, bio-dictionary construction, dynamic topic models, topics analysis and visualization. Scientific articles pertaining to ginseng were retrieved through text mining from PubMed. The bio-dictionary integrates MedTerms medical dictionary, the second edition of side effect resource, a dictionary of biology and HGNC database of human gene names (HGNC). A dynamic topic model, a text mining technique, was used to emphasize on capturing the development trends of topics in a sequentially collected documents. Besides the contents of topics taken on, the evolution of topics was visualized over time using ThemeRiver. From the topic 9, ginseng was used in dietary supplements and complementary and integrative health practices, and became very popular since the early twentieth century. Topic 6 reminded that the planting of ginseng is a major area of research and symbiosis and allelopathy of ginseng became a research hotspot in 2007. In addition, the Bio-DTM model gave an insight into the main pharmacologic effects of ginseng, such as anti-metabolic disorder effect, cardioprotective effect, anti-cancer effect, hepatoprotective effect, anti-thrombotic effect and neuroprotective effect. The Bio-DTM model not only discovers what ginseng's research involving in but also displays how these topics evolving over time. This approach can be applied to the biomedical field to conduct a retrospective study and guide future studies.

  11. Studying the influence of nanodiamonds over the elasticity of polymer/nanodiamond composites for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikov, T.; Mitev, D.; Radeva, E.; Iglic, A.; Presker, R.; Daniel, M.; Sepitka, J.; Krasteva, N.; Keremidarska, M.; Cvetanov, I.; Pramatarova, L.

    2014-12-01

    The combined unique properties offered by organic and inorganic constituents within a single material on a nanoscale level make nanocomposites attractive for the next generation of biocompatible materials. The composite materials of the detonation nanodiamond/polymer type possess spatial organization of components with new structural features and physical properties, as well as complex functions due to the strong synergistic effects between the nanoparticles and the polymer [1]. The plasma polymerization (PP) method was chosen to obtain composites of silicon-based polymers, in which detonation generated nanodiamond (DND) particles were incorporated. The composite layers are homogeneous, chemically resistant, thermally and mechanically stable, thus allowing a large amount of biological components to be loaded onto their surface and to be used in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, implants, stents, biosensors and other medical and biological devices. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the main focus of research in regenerative medicine due to their extraordinary potential to differentiate into different kinds of cells including osteoblasts, which are needed for various bone disease treatments. However, for optimal usage of MSCs knowledge about the factors that influence their initial distribution in the human system, tissue-specific activation and afterwards differentiation into osteoblasts is required. In recent studies it was found that one of these factors is the elasticity of the substrates [2]. The choice of the proper material which specifically guides the differentiation of stem cells even in the absence of growth factors is very important when building modern strategy for bone regeneration. One of the reasons for there not being many studies in this area worldwide is the lack of suitable biomaterials which support these kinds of experiments. The goal of this study is to create substrates suitable for cell culture with a range of mechanical properties

  12. Magnetic properties study of iron-oxide nanoparticles/PVA ferrogels with potential biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Zelis, P., E-mail: pmendoza@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP-CONICET and Departamento de Fisica (Argentina); Muraca, D., E-mail: dmuraca@ifi.unicamp.br [Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Sergio Buarque de Holanda (Brazil); Gonzalez, J. S. [CoMP-INTEMA-CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Pasquevich, G. A. [IFLP-CONICET and Facultad de Ingenieria (Argentina); Alvarez, V. A. [CoMP-INTEMA-CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata (Argentina); Pirota, K. R. [Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Sergio Buarque de Holanda (Brazil); Sanchez, F. H. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP-CONICET and Departamento de Fisica (Argentina)

    2013-05-15

    A study of the magnetic behavior of maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer matrices prepared by physical cross-linking is reported. The magnetic nanocomposites (ferrogels) were obtained by the in situ co-precipitation of iron salts in the presence of PVA polymer, and subsequently subjected to freezing-thawing cycles. The magnetic behavior of these ferrogels was compared with that of similar systems synthesized using the glutaraldehyde. This type of chemical cross-linking agents presents several disadvantages due to the presence of residual toxic molecules in the gel, which are undesirable for biological applications. Characteristic particle size determined by several techniques are in the range 7.9-9.3 nm. The iron oxidation state in the NPs was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Moessbauer measurements showed that the NP magnetic moments present collective magnetic excitations and superparamagnetic relaxations. The blocking and irreversibility temperatures of the NPs in the ferrogels, and the magnetic anisotropy constant, were obtained from magnetic measurements. An empirical model including two magnetic contributions (large NPs slightly departed from thermodynamic equilibrium below 200 K, and small NPs at thermodynamic equilibrium) was used to fit the experimental magnetization curves. A deviation from the superparamagnetic regime was observed. This deviation was explained on the basis of an interacting superparamagnetic model. From this model, relevant magnetic and structural properties were obtained, such as the magnitude order of the dipolar interaction energy, the NPs magnetic moment, and the number of NPs per ferrogel mass unit. This study contributes to the understanding of the basic physics of a new class of materials that could emerge from the PVA-based magnetic ferrogels.

  13. Stream computing for biomedical signal processing: A QRS complex detection case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B M; O'Driscoll, C; Boylan, G B; Lightbody, G; Marnane, W P

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in "Big Data" have brought significant gains in the ability to process large amounts of data on commodity server hardware. Stream computing is a relatively new paradigm in this area, addressing the need to process data in real time with very low latency. While this approach has been developed for dealing with large scale data from the world of business, security and finance, there is a natural overlap with clinical needs for physiological signal processing. In this work we present a case study of streams processing applied to a typical physiological signal processing problem: QRS detection from ECG data.

  14. Biomedical studies on lipid peroxidation and erythrocyte fragility during the process of aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun; Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate oxidative stress,hemoglobin percentage and erythrocyte osmotic fragility in various aging groups.Methods:A total of 200 healthy volunteers of hoth genders between age group 20-65 years were selected by random method.Determination of hemoglobin percentage was done employing modified cyanide method of Dacie and Lewis.The erythrocyte lysis was observed in hypotonic solution of buffered saline at varying concentrations and optical density was measured at 540 nm.The extent of lipid peroxidation in form of malondialdehyde was measured by thiobarbituric acid method.Results:The study found a significant decrease in hemoglobin percentage,increase in erythrocyte osmotic fragility and increased lipid peroxidation in form of malondialdehyde with increasing age.Conclusions:Supplementation of antioxidants may prevent the oxidative injury in elderly group of subjects.

  15. Biomedical studies on lipid peroxidation and erythrocyte fragility during the process of aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate oxidative stress, hemoglobin percentage and erythrocyte osmotic fragility in various aging groups. Methods: A total of 200 healthy volunteers of both genders between age group 20-65 years were selected by random method. Determination of hemoglobin percentage was done employing modified cyanide method of Dacie and Lewis. The erythrocyte lysis was observed in hypotonic solution of buffered saline at varying concentrations and optical density was measured at 540 nm. The extent of lipid peroxidation in form of malondialdehyde was measured by thiobarbituric acid method. Results: The study found a significant decrease in hemoglobin percentage, increase in erythrocyte osmotic fragility and increased lipid peroxidation in form of malondialdehyde with increasing age. Conclusions: Supplementation of antioxidants may prevent the oxidative injury in elderly group of subjects.

  16. Multiple myeloma in Nigeria: a multi-centre epidemiological and biomedical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnonyelum, Odunukwe Nkiruka; Anazoeze, Madu Jude; Eunice, Nnodu Obigeli; Emmanuel, Okocha Onyichide; Stella, Akingbola Titilola; Marcus, Asuquo Inyama; Taiwo, Balogun Modupe; Olufela, Kalejaiye Olufunto; Chinawaeze, Aneke John; Orkuma, Joseph Aondowase; Dalhat, Gwarzo Gwarzo; Otobo, Ujah Innocent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Myelomatosis is a malignant proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, with relatively high prevalence in African populations. Variation in genetic mutations has been observed in individual patients and may be responsible for differences in disease pattern and treatment outcomes. This study described the presentations and treatment outcomes of multiple myeloma in nigerian. Methods The data was obtained retrospectively from the case notes of 135 patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma from eight tertiary health institutions across the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria from 2005 to 2014. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS 17.0. Results The predominant presentations were bone pain in 97 (74%), nephropathy in 47 (35.9%) and pathological fractures in 58 (44.3%). Sixty-seven percent (67%) of the patients were less than 60 years, and 35% had Bence Jones proteinuria. The overall survival beyond 6 months was 91.3%, mean duration of survival rate was 7.4 months. Majority (66.2%) were on Melphalan alone or on melphalan-containing combinations. A higher packed cell volume (PCV) and total serum protein levels at presentation were associated with increased survival, p=0.033 and 0.036, respectively. Conclusion This study portrayed the importance of detail investigation on the causes of bone pain and anaemia in person's aged 40 years and above. There is a high prevalence of nephropathy in this cohort of patients which needs to be further investigated. Majority of the patients, though < 65 years of age were placed on melphalan-containing combinations, which foreclosed chances of future autologous bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26966488

  17. Studying the correlation between different word sense disambiguation methods and summarization effectiveness in biomedical texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Alberto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Word sense disambiguation (WSD attempts to solve lexical ambiguities by identifying the correct meaning of a word based on its context. WSD has been demonstrated to be an important step in knowledge-based approaches to automatic summarization. However, the correlation between the accuracy of the WSD methods and the summarization performance has never been studied. Results We present three existing knowledge-based WSD approaches and a graph-based summarizer. Both the WSD approaches and the summarizer employ the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS Metathesaurus as the knowledge source. We first evaluate WSD directly, by comparing the prediction of the WSD methods to two reference sets: the NLM WSD dataset and the MSH WSD collection. We next apply the different WSD methods as part of the summarizer, to map documents onto concepts in the UMLS Metathesaurus, and evaluate the summaries that are generated. The results obtained by the different methods in both evaluations are studied and compared. Conclusions It has been found that the use of WSD techniques has a positive impact on the results of our graph-based summarizer, and that, when both the WSD and summarization tasks are assessed over large and homogeneous evaluation collections, there exists a correlation between the overall results of the WSD and summarization tasks. Furthermore, the best WSD algorithm in the first task tends to be also the best one in the second. However, we also found that the improvement achieved by the summarizer is not directly correlated with the WSD performance. The most likely reason is that the errors in disambiguation are not equally important but depend on the relative salience of the different concepts in the document to be summarized.

  18. Design, implementation, and evaluation of principles of writing biomedical research paper course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI AKBAR NEKOOEIAN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Graduate (PhD students in medical sciences, who will form future faculties and investigators in Iran’s Universities of Medical Sciences, are not trained on scientific writing during their training. The present study describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of Principles of Writing Biomedical Research Paper course. Methods: The course, prepared based on an extensive search of the literature and books on writing biomedical research papers, was offered as an elective course to PhD students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in the second semester of 2011-2012 academic year. The structure and function of various sections of a paper and publication ethics were discussed in lecture and practical sessions over a period of 12 weeks. The course was then evaluated using a self-designed questionnaire. Results: The majority of students gave the highest score (20 to the content and implementation of all sessions of the course. Moreover, most of them believed that the allotted time to the course was not enough, and suggested that it should be increased to 32 hours (equal to two credits. Also, almost all the participants believed that overall the materials lectured were comprehensive, the practical sessions were important in learning the lectured materials, and the course was useful in advancing their abilities and skills to write papers. Conclusion: The evaluation of the present course showed that it was able to increase the participants’ knowledge of the structure of scientific papers, and enhanced their abilities and skills to write papers. The evaluation was used as a basis to modify the course.

  19. Isocyanate-functional adhesives for biomedical applications. Biocompatibility and feasibility study for vascular closure applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadba, Ahmad R; Belcheva, Nadya; Jones, Fatima; Abuzaina, Ferass; Calabrese, Allison; Kapiamba, Mbiya; Skalla, Walter; Taylor, Jack L; Rodeheaver, George; Kennedy, John

    2011-10-01

    Biodegradable isocyanate-functional adhesives based on poly(ethylene glycol)-adipic acid esters were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Two types of formulations, P2TT and P2MT, were developed by functionalization with 2,4-tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) or 4,4'-methylene-bis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI), respectively, and branching with 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane (TMP). The biocompatibility of the synthesized adhesive formulations was evaluated as per ISO 10993. Cytotoxicity, systemic toxicity, pyrogenicity, genotoxicity (reverse mutation of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli), hemolysis, intracutaneous reactivity, and delayed-type hypersensitivity were evaluated. All formulations met the requirements of the conducted standard tests. The biological behavior and ability of the adhesive formulations to close an arteriotomy and withstand arterial pressure following partial approximation with a single suture were evaluated in a rat abdominal aorta model. Animals were evaluated at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after surgery. Macroscopic and histopathologic evaluation of explanted arteries suggested that the P2TT formulation had better in vivo performance than the P2MT formulation. Additionally, the P2TT formulation resulted in less tissue reaction than P2MT formulation. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the potential of this new class of isocyanate-functional degradable adhesives for vascular applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ATLAS PhD Grant Scholarship Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2014-01-01

    On 11 February, the first recipients of the ATLAS PhD Grant were presented with a certificate by the programme’s selection committee. The three scholars - Lailin Xu of China, Josefina Alconada of Argentina and Gagik Vardanyan of Armenia - were delighted at being able to continue their PhD programmes at CERN.   With certificates, from left: Lailin Xu, Josefina Alconada, and Gagik Vardanyan. The selection committee members, from left: IFAE Barcelona’s Martine Bosman, Fabiola Gianotti, Peter Jenni and from CERN HR James Purvis. (Image: ATLAS/Claudia Marcelloni). Former ATLAS spokespersons Peter Jenni and Fabiola Gianotti started the fund with the Fundamental Physics Prize award money they received last year. Both have used the entirety of their prizes for educational and humanitarian programmes. "We wanted to do something for students who are working on ATLAS, in particular those who otherwise could not come here and actually see the detector they are working on,&am...

  1. PhD students share their work

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    Last week, the second Doctoral Student Assembly gave students in the final stages of their PhD at CERN the chance to meet and present their work.   On 9 May, 24 students who are completing their PhD under the CERN Doctoral Student Programme were joined by their CERN supervisors and some of their university supervisors at an event organised by HR and the Technical Students Committee (TSC). After an address by the Director-General Rolf Heuer and short presentations by Ingrid Haug from HR and TSC Chair Stephan Russenschuck, the students presented their work in a poster session. Held in a packed Council Chamber, the event was a great opportunity for the doctoral students to get to know each other and to share their work in fields as diverse as radiation protection, computing, physics and engineering.

  2. Poor antibody validation is a challenge in biomedical research: a case study for detection of c-FLIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, Octavian; Pennarun, Bodvael; Stancu, Andreea Lucia; Nadler, Monica; Muraru, Maria Sinziana; Bertomeu, Thierry; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2013-10-01

    Successful translation of findings derived from preclinical studies into effective therapies is critical in biomedical research. Lack of robustness and reproducibility of the preclinical data, due to insufficient number of repeats, inadequate cell-based and mouse models contribute to the poor success rate. Antibodies are widely used in preclinical research, notably to determine the expression of potential therapeutic targets in tissues of interest, including tumors, but also to identify disease and/or treatment response biomarkers. We sought to determine whether the current antibody characterization standards in preclinical research are sufficient to ensure reliability of the data found in peer-reviewed publications. To address this issue, we used detection of the protein c-FLIP, a major factor of resistance to apoptosis, as a proof of concept. Accurate detection of endogenous c-FLIP levels in the preclinical settings is imperative since it is considered as a potential theranostic biomarker. Several sources of c-FLIP antibodies validated by their manufacturer and recommended for western blotting were therefore rigorously tested. We found a wide divergence in immune recognition properties. While these antibodies have been used in many publications, our results show that several of them failed to detect endogenous c-FLIP protein by Western blotting. Our results suggest that antibody validation standards are inadequate, and that systematic use of genetic knockdowns and/or knockouts to establish proof of specificity is critical, even for antibodies previously used in the scientific literature. Because antibodies are fundamental tools in both preclinical and clinical research, ensuring their specificity is crucial.

  3. Data-Driven Approaches for Computation in Intelligent Biomedical Devices: A Case Study of EEG Monitoring for Chronic Seizure Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Verma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent biomedical devices implies systems that are able to detect specific physiological processes in patients so that particular responses can be generated. This closed-loop capability can have enormous clinical value when we consider the unprecedented modalities that are beginning to emerge for sensing and stimulating patient physiology. Both delivering therapy (e.g., deep-brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, etc. and treating impairments (e.g., neural prosthesis requires computational devices that can make clinically relevant inferences, especially using minimally-intrusive patient signals. The key to such devices is algorithms that are based on data-driven signal modeling as well as hardware structures that are specialized to these. This paper discusses the primary application-domain challenges that must be overcome and analyzes the most promising methods for this that are emerging. We then look at how these methods are being incorporated in ultra-low-energy computational platforms and systems. The case study for this is a seizure-detection SoC that includes instrumentation and computation blocks in support of a system that exploits patient-specific modeling to achieve accurate performance for chronic detection. The SoC samples each EEG channel at a rate of 600 Hz and performs processing to derive signal features on every two second epoch, consuming 9 μJ/epoch/channel. Signal feature extraction reduces the data rate by a factor of over 40×, permitting wireless communication from the patient’s head while reducing the total power on the head by 14×.

  4. Albuminuria and its associated biomedical factors among indigenous adults in Far North Queensland: a 7-year follow up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; McDermott, Robyn

    2015-12-10

    To document albuminuria prevalence and its associated factors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (TSI) adults with high renal and metabolic risks from 19 rural and remote north Queensland communities. One thousand nine hundred seventy-one indigenous adults were enrolled in 1998 and 566 completed follow up in 2007 in this population-based study. Measurements included weight, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), fasting glucose, lipids, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR), smoking, alcohol intake and physical activity (PA). Albuminuria was defined as an UACR > =2.5 g/mol in males and > =3.5 g/mol in females. The association between albuminuria and biomedical factors was assessed with generalised linear modelling. Baseline albuminuria prevalence was 19.7 % (95 % CI: 18.0-21.6 %). Follow up prevalence was 42.4 % (95 % CI: 38.4-46.5 %) among the 566 adults having the 2(nd) UACR measurements. Follow-up albuminuria was associated with fasting glucose of 5.4 mmol/L (OR 2.5, 95 % CI 1.5-4.2), GGT tertiles in a dose-response manner (OR 2.0 for 2(nd) and 3.7 for 3(rd) tertile, p for trend TSI counterparts, while TSI smokers had twice the likelihood (95 % CI 1.2-3.2). At both baseline and follow up, albuminuria was more prevalent among older participants. Indigenous Australians in north Queensland are at high risk of albuminuria. Overweight and obesity, glycaemia, increased GGT, and smoking were associated with albuminuria at baseline and/or follow up.

  5. MS PHD'S Professional Development Program: A Scientific Renaissance in Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. M.; Williamson, V. A.; Griess, C. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    This study is a component of a four-year investigation of MS PHD'S Professional Development Program's virtual community through the lenses of underrepresented minority students in Earth system science and engineering fields. In this presentation, the development, assessment and projected utilization of the ongoing study will be discussed. The overall goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of virtual team building methods and understand how the development of a communal cyberinfrastructure acts as an integral part of the emergence of a Scientific Renaissance. The exemplar, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S), provides professional development experiences to facilitate the advancement of students of color achieving outstanding Earth system careers. Undergraduate and graduate students are supported through access to scientific conferences, mentorship and virtual community building. Framed by critical theory, this ethnographic exploration uses a mixed methods research design to record, observe, and analyze both the processes and products of the website, listserv and synchronous web-based dialogue. First, key findings of the formative evaluation and annual reports of the successfully implemented 2003 MS PHD'S Pilot Project are presented. These findings inform future evaluations of the use of technological resources and illustrate how this public space provides peer support and enriched research opportunities. Quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, academic and professional tracking and evaluative tools for scientific content and competency are complimented by qualitative methods that include observations, heuristic case studies and focus group interviews. The findings of this ongoing investigation will provide insight on how national organizations, higher education practitioners, community-based support systems and underrepresented minorities in the sciences promote diversity by developing

  6. Qualitative case study research : The case of a PhD research project on organising and managing new product development systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd-Nederhof, de Petra C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses methodological aspects of case study research and qualitative data collection and analysis. Discusses the choice of a research strategy and data collection and analysis methods according to theory as well as the arguments which lead to qualitative case research. Suggests steps in research

  7. Qualitative case study research. The case of a Ph.D. research project on organising and managing new product development systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses methodological aspects of case study research and qualitative data collection and analysis. Discusses the choice of a research strategy and data collection and analysis methods according to theory as well as the arguments which lead to qualitative case research. Suggests steps in research

  8. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as highlighting

  9. Can holism be practiced in a biomedical setting? A qualitative study of the integration of complementary medicine to a surgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Yael; Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad

    2012-11-01

    In recent decades, complementary medicine (CM) has been increasingly integrated to conventional healthcare organizations, in which the biomedical profession clearly maintains dominance. Our objective was to investigate empirically what integration and 'holism' mean to the diverse professional groups involved and whether treatment becomes more holistic when CM is integrated. A qualitative study was conducted in a general surgery department at a public hospital in Israel. Data were collected by means of observations of medical encounters and daily work, and 30 in-depth interviews with medical directors, surgeons, senior nurses, CM practitioners and hospitalized patients. We found that most of the interviewed nurses, surgeons and directors and some patients believed that CM treatments were of value in addressing the psychological needs of patients within this predominantly somatic-oriented department. To CM practitioners and some of the patients, integration means introducing and practicing a holistic outlook in this biomedical context, which involves elements such as Qi, energy, soul and spirit. Such practices were directed to a suitable audience, namely, patients as well as conventional medical staff who were willing to explore a holistic approach. We concluded that patient care tends to become more comprehensive when CM is integrated. Despite the overall dominance of biomedicine, holistic CM practices were introduced to the biomedical setting of the hospital. Yet, the question whether holistic CM practices and perceptions will eventually lead nurses and physicians toward paradigmatic integration, has still to be examined.

  10. The status of PhD education in economic, social, and administrative sciences between 2005 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Joel F; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Blalock, Susan J

    2010-09-10

    To describe the funding, education, enrollment, and graduation patterns from economic, social, and administrative sciences PhD programs in colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. Economic, social, and administrative sciences PhD programs were identified from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Web site. A 41-item online survey instrument was sent to the director of graduate studies of each identified program. Only programs offering a PhD degree were included in the study. Of the 26 programs surveyed, 20 (77%) provided useable responses to the survey instrument. Approximately 91% of PhD programs guarantee funding to incoming students with an average commitment of 2.9 years. On average, students were paid a stipend of $18,000 per year for commitments to research and teaching assistantships, each averaging approximately 2 years in length. Programs admitted an average of 3.5 students per year and graduated approximately 85% of entering students. The majority of students are non-US citizens and accept positions in either academic or industrial positions after graduation. Most economic, social, and administrative sciences PhD programs guarantee funding to incoming PhD candidates. Programs offering funding packages significantly below the average may be at a competitive disadvantage. It is unclear whether the number of students graduating from PhD programs is adequate to fulfill academic and industrial needs.

  11. Substrate preference of the HIF-prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) and substrate-induced conformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektas, Serap; Knapp, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) is a non-heme Fe, 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent dioxygenase that regulates the hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF) by hydroxylating two conserved prolyl residues in N-terminal oxygen degradation domain (NODD) and C-terminal oxygen degradation domain (CODD) of HIF-1α. Prior studies have suggested that the substrate preference of PHD2 arises from binding contacts with the β2β3 loop of PHD2. In this study we tested the substrate selectivity of PHD2 by kinetic competition assays, varied ionic strength, and global protein flexibility using amide H/D exchange (HDX). Our results revealed that PHD2 preferred CODD by 20-fold over NODD and that electrostatics influenced this effect. Global HDX monitored by mass spectrometry indicated that binding of Fe(II) and 2OG stabilized the overall protein structure but the saturating concentrations of either NODD or CODD caused an identical change in protein flexibility. These observations imply that both substrates stabilize the β2β3 loop to the same extent. Under unsaturated substrate conditions NODD led to a higher HDX rate than CODD due to its lower binding affinity to PHD2. Our results suggest that loop closure is the dominant contributor to substrate selectivity in PHD2.

  12. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21cm line and precise CMB polarization observations (PhD thesis, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI))

    CERN Document Server

    Oyama, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Also, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this thesis, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the neutrino mass hierarchy, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the lepton asymmetry of our Universe. We will show that by combining the precise CMB polarization observations with Square Kilometer Array (SKA) we can measure the impact of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation, and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 2 sigma level if the total neutrino mass is smaller than 0.1 eV. Additionally, we will show that by using these combinations we can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthes...

  13. A senstitivity study of the ground hydrologic model using data generated by an atmospheric general circulation model. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Ground Hydrologic Model (GHM) developed for use in an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) has been refined. A series of sensitivity studies of the new version of the GHM were conducted for the purpose of understanding the role played by various physical parameters in the GHM. The following refinements have been made: (1) the GHM is coupled directly with the planetary boundary layer (PBL); (2) a bulk vegetation layer is added with a more realistic large-scale parameterization; and (3) the infiltration rate is modified. This version GHM has been tested using input data derived from a GCM simulation run for eight North America regions for 45 days. The results are compared with those of the resident GHM in the GCM. The daily average of grid surface temperatures from both models agree reasonably well in phase and magnitude. However, large difference exists in one or two regions on some days. The daily average evapotranspiration is in general 10 to 30% less than the corresponding value given by the resident GHM.

  14. An Experimental Study of the Flowfield on a Semispan Rectangular Wing with a Simulated Glaze Ice Accretion. Ph.D. Thesis, 1993 Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah

    1994-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted in order to study the effect of a simulated glaze ice accretion on the flowfield of a semispan, reflection-plane, rectangular wing at Re = 1.5 million and M = 0.12. A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to map the flowfield on the upper surface of the model in both the clean and iced configurations at alpha = 0, 4, and 8 degrees angle of attack. At low angles of attack, the massive separation bubble aft of the leading edge ice horn was found to behave in a manner similar to laminar separation bubbles. At alpha = 0 and 4 degrees, the locations of transition and reattachment, as deduced from momentum thickness distributions, were found to be in good agreement with transition and reattachment locations in laminar separation bubbles. These values at y/b = 0.470, the centerline measurement location, matched well with data obtained on a similar but two dimensional model. The measured velocity profiles on the iced wing compared reasonably with the predicted profiles from Navier-Stokes computations. The iced-induced separation bubble was also found to have features similar to the recirculating region aft of rearward-facing steps. At alpha = 0 degrees and 4 degrees, reverse flow magnitudes and turbulence intensity levels were typical of those found in the recirculating region aft of rearward-facing steps. The calculated separation streamline aft of the ice horn at alpha = 4 degrees, y/b = 0.470 coincided with the locus of the maximum Reynolds normal stress. The maximum Reynolds normal stress peaked at two locations along the separation streamline. The location of the first peak-value coincided with the transition location, as deduced from the momentum thickness distributions. The location of the second peak was just upstream of reattachment, in good agreement with measurements of flows over similar obstacles. The intermittency factor in the vicinity of reattachment at alpha = 4 degrees, y/b = 0.470, revealed the time-dependent nature of

  15. PhD students’ expectations from their supervisors: A qualitative content analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Rimaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of research in PhD programs increases if supervisors become aware of students' expectations from them. This qualitative study aimed to explore expectations of PhD students from their supervisors was done.   Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was conducted on 22 graduated PhD students of Iran University of Medical Sciences, in 2014. The samples were purposefully selected and interviewed. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim.   Results: After analyzing and coding data, it was found that PhD students have four main expectations from their supervisors. These expectations consist of scientific support including help with selection of subject, preparation and registration of proposal, data collection and support for writing and examination of the thesis. Developing scientific skills and help with preparing manuscripts were other expectations. Emotional-social support with five categories including relationship between supervisor-student, general expectations of supervisor, supervisor personality characteristics, needed emotional skills and social activities related to thesis and finally providing adequate resources including financial support and access to facilities inside and outside the university were among the other expectations.   Conclusion: PhD students need to scientific, emotional, social and material supports from their supervisors in the process of performing thesis. These expectations should be told to supervisors.

  16. Predicting the "graduate on time (GOT)" of PhD students using binary logistics regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, S. Sarifah Radiah; Rodzi, Nur Atiqah Mohd; Rahman, Kahartini Abdul; Zahari, Siti Meriam; Deni, Sayang Mohd

    2016-10-01

    Malaysian government has recently set a new goal to produce 60,000 Malaysian PhD holders by the year 2023. As a Malaysia's largest institution of higher learning in terms of size and population which offers more than 500 academic programmes in a conducive and vibrant environment, UiTM has taken several initiatives to fill up the gap. Strategies to increase the numbers of graduates with PhD are a process that is challenging. In many occasions, many have already identified that the struggle to get into the target set is even more daunting, and that implementation is far too ideal. This has further being progressing slowly as the attrition rate increases. This study aims to apply the proposed models that incorporates several factors in predicting the number PhD students that will complete their PhD studies on time. Binary Logistic Regression model is proposed and used on the set of data to determine the number. The results show that only 6.8% of the 2014 PhD students are predicted to graduate on time and the results are compared wih the actual number for validation purpose.

  17. Preparing for Graduate-Level Training in Professional Psychology: Comparisons across Clinical PhD, Counseling PhD, and Clinical PsyD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Smith, Lena

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, faculty who teach in clinical and counseling doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of psychology (PsyD) programs completed surveys regarding preferences for prospective student preparations to graduate programs. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for scientific methods, though…

  18. Preparing for Graduate-Level Training in Professional Psychology: Comparisons across Clinical PhD, Counseling PhD, and Clinical PsyD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Smith, Lena

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, faculty who teach in clinical and counseling doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of psychology (PsyD) programs completed surveys regarding preferences for prospective student preparations to graduate programs. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for scientific methods, though…

  19. Professional Socialization for the Ph.D.: An Exploration of Career and Professional Development Preparedness and Readiness for Ph.D. Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Matt; Campa, Henry, III; Moretto, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to uncover the career readiness and professional development needs of Ph.D. students at a large, Midwestern research university. Findings indicate that career goals of graduate students change over time, skill preparation for academic and non-academic careers continues to be inadequate for many students and professional…

  20. A Survey of the Job Profiles of Biomedical Informatics Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Alessandra A; Ruiz, Evandro E S; Baranauskas, José A

    2016-10-17

    In 2003, the University of São Paulo established the first Biomedical Informatics (BMI) undergraduate course in Brazil. Our mission is to provide undergraduate students with formal education on the fundamentals of BMI and its applied methods. This undergraduate course offers theoretical aspects, practical knowledge and scientifically oriented skills in the area of BMI, enab- ling students to contribute to research and methodical development in BMI. Course coordinators, professors and students frequently evaluate the BMI course and the curriculum to ensure that alumni receive quality higher education. This study investigates (i) the main job activities undertake by USP BMI graduates, (ii) subjects that are fundamental important for graduates to pursue a career in BMI, and (iii) the course quality perceived by the alumni. Use of a structured questionnaire to conduct a survey involving all the BMI graduates who received their Bachelor degree before July, 2015 (attempted n = 205). One hundred and forty-five graduates (71 %) answered the questionnaire. Nine out of ten of our former students currently work as informaticians. Seventy-six graduates (52 %) work within the biomedical informatics field. Fifty-five graduates (38 %) work outside the biomedical informatics field, but they work in other IT areas. Ten graduates (7 %) do not work with BMI or any other informatics activities, and four (3 %) are presently unemployed. Among the 145 surveyed BMI graduates, 46 (32 %) and seven (5 %) hold a Master's degree and a PhD degree, respectively. Database Systems, Software Engineering, Introduction to Computer Science, Object-Oriented Programming, and Data Structures are regarded as the most important subjects during the higher education course. The majority of the graduates (105 or 72 %) are satisfied with the BMI education and training they received during the undergraduate course. More than half of the graduates from our BMI course work in their primary

  1. Handbook of biomedical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical optics holds tremendous promise to deliver effective, safe, non- or minimally invasive diagnostics and targeted, customizable therapeutics. Handbook of Biomedical Optics provides an in-depth treatment of the field, including coverage of applications for biomedical research, diagnosis, and therapy. It introduces the theory and fundamentals of each subject, ensuring accessibility to a wide multidisciplinary readership. It also offers a view of the state of the art and discusses advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.Organized into six sections, this handbook: Contains intr

  2. Biomedical applications of polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Gebelein, C G

    1991-01-01

    The biomedical applications of polymers span an extremely wide spectrum of uses, including artificial organs, skin and soft tissue replacements, orthopaedic applications, dental applications, and controlled release of medications. No single, short review can possibly cover all these items in detail, and dozens of books andhundreds of reviews exist on biomedical polymers. Only a few relatively recent examples will be cited here;additional reviews are listed under most of the major topics in this book. We will consider each of the majorclassifications of biomedical polymers to some extent, inclu

  3. Powering biomedical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Edwar

    2013-01-01

    From exoskeletons to neural implants, biomedical devices are no less than life-changing. Compact and constant power sources are necessary to keep these devices running efficiently. Edwar Romero's Powering Biomedical Devices reviews the background, current technologies, and possible future developments of these power sources, examining not only the types of biomedical power sources available (macro, mini, MEMS, and nano), but also what they power (such as prostheses, insulin pumps, and muscular and neural stimulators), and how they work (covering batteries, biofluids, kinetic and ther

  4. Biomedical Engineering Desk Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Ratner, Buddy D; Schoen, Frederick J; Lemons, Jack E; Dyro, Joseph; Martinsen, Orjan G; Kyle, Richard; Preim, Bernhard; Bartz, Dirk; Grimnes, Sverre; Vallero, Daniel; Semmlow, John; Murray, W Bosseau; Perez, Reinaldo; Bankman, Isaac; Dunn, Stanley; Ikada, Yoshito; Moghe, Prabhas V; Constantinides, Alkis

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop Desk Reference, for Biomedical Engineers involved in the ever expanding and very fast moving area; this is a book that will not gather dust on the shelf. It brings together the essential professional reference content from leading international contributors in the biomedical engineering field. Material covers a broad range of topics including: Biomechanics and Biomaterials; Tissue Engineering; and Biosignal Processing* A hard-working desk reference providing all the essential material needed by biomedical and clinical engineers on a day-to-day basis * Fundamentals, key techniques,

  5. Pursuit of the Ph.D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available he thesis is put forward that changes in public policy which originally promoted broad access to higher education are leading to the diminished likelihood that minorities, those from low-income backgrounds and females in underrepresented disciplines will pursue, or be able to complete, the doctorate. By reviewing a wide range of research literature and statistical reports on the status of doctoral education in the U.S. & Canada, a detailed sociological portrait of those who pursue the Ph.D. is presented. Recommendations are given for further research on doctoral education, particularly in areas of attrition,retention, student indebtedness, social stratification, and post-doctoral career plans.

  6. New Synthesis Route for PHD Polyols

    OpenAIRE

    Peshkov, Vladimir; Evtimova, Rozeta; Herzog, Michael; Behrendt, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of polyurea dispersion polyols (PHD) was developed using a new route via depolymerization of polyurethane polyureas by a mixture of at least two glycols in the presence of a consumable catalyst, i. e. a secondary aliphatic amine. On this way such polyols were produced with a particle size distribution with a maximum in the 120 to 400 nanometer region with hydroxyl numbers of 180 to 300 mg KOH/g being optically clear and highly reactive. The exact adjustment of the ethylene oxide...

  7. PhD students' experiences of thesis supervision in Malaysia: managing relationships in the midst of institutional change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krauss, Steven Eric; Ismail, Ismi Arif

    2010-01-01

    Despite the plethora of studies that have been conducted on PhD supervision, little qualitative investigation has been conducted with a diverse, non-Western sample of doctoral students in an attempt...

  8. Low immediate scientific yield of the PhD among medical doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbol, Emil L.; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Rerup, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Background: We studied the scientific yield of the medical PhD program at all Danish Universities.Methods: We undertook a retrospective observational study. Three PhD schools in Denmark were included in order to evaluate the postdoctoral research production over more than 18 years through....... Scientific activity over time was assessed independently of author-rank and inactivity was measured relative to the date of graduation. Factors associated with inactivity were identified using multivariable logistic regression. 88.6 % of the PhD theses were conducted in internal medicine vs. 11.......12 (IQR 0.61-1.99) papers per year. About 2/3 of the graduates became inactive after 1 year and approximately 21 % of the graduates remained active during the whole follow-up. Female gender was associated with inactivity: adjusted odds ratio 1.59 (95 % confidence interval 1.24-2.05).Conclusions...

  9. Sensors for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, Piet

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the impact during the last decade of modern IC technology, microelectronics, thin- and thick-film technology, fibre optic technology, etc. on the development of sensors for biomedical applications.

  10. On the Crisis in Biomedical Education: Is There an Overproduction of Biomedical PhDs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domer, Judith E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The debate over whether there is an oversupply of doctorates in the biomedical sciences is examined, and a case study of doctoral graduates and postdoctoral fellows at the Tulane University (Louisiana) Medical Center is reported. It is concluded that there is no biomedical doctoral glut and that doctoral program downsizing would have serious…

  11. Biomedical signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Akay, Metin

    1994-01-01

    Sophisticated techniques for signal processing are now available to the biomedical specialist! Written in an easy-to-read, straightforward style, Biomedical Signal Processing presents techniques to eliminate background noise, enhance signal detection, and analyze computer data, making results easy to comprehend and apply. In addition to examining techniques for electrical signal analysis, filtering, and transforms, the author supplies an extensive appendix with several computer programs that demonstrate techniques presented in the text.

  12. Biomedical signal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M

    2015-01-01

    The book will help assist a reader in the development of techniques for analysis of biomedical signals and computer aided diagnoses with a pedagogical examination of basic and advanced topics accompanied by over 350 figures and illustrations. Wide range of filtering techniques presented to address various applications. 800 mathematical expressions and equations. Practical questions, problems and laboratory exercises. Includes fractals and chaos theory with biomedical applications.

  13. Isolation of a small molecule with anti-MRSA activity from a mangrove symbiont Streptomyces sp. PVRK-1 and its biomedical studies inZebrafish embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajaretinam Rajesh Kannan; Appadurai Muthamil Iniyan; Vincent Samuel Gnana Prakash

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to isolate the anti-MRSA (Methicillin ResistantStaphylococcus aureus ) molecule from the Mangrove symbiont Streptomyces and its biomedical studies in Zebrafish embryos. Methods: MRSA was isolated from the pus samples of Colachal hospitals and confirmed by amplification of mecA gene. Anti-MRSA molecule producing strain was identified by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. Anti-MRSA compound production was optimized by Solid State Fermentation (SSF) and the purification of the active molecule was carried out by TLC and RP-HPLC. The inhibitory concentration and LC50 were calculated using Statistical software SPSS. The Biomedical studies including the cardiac assay and organ toxicity assessment were carried out in Zebrafish. Results: The bioactive anti-MRSA small molecule A2 was purified by TLC with Rf value of 0.37 with 1.389 retention time at RP-HPLC. The Inhibitory Concentration of the purified molecule A2 was 30 μg/mL but, the inhibitory concentration of the MRSA in the infected embryo was 32-34 μg/mL for TLC purified molecule A2 with LC50 mean value was 61.504 μg/mL. Zebrafish toxicity was assessed in 48-60 μg/mL by observing the physiological deformities and the heart beat rates (HBR) of embryos for anti MRSA molecule showed the mean of 41.33-41.67 HBR/15 seconds for 40 μg/mL and control was 42.33-42.67 for 15 seconds which significantly showed that the anti-MRSA molecule A2 did not affected the HBR. Conclusions:Anti-MRSA molecule from Streptomyces sp PVRK-1 was isolated and biomedical studies in Zebrafish model assessed that the molecule was non toxic at the minimal inhibitory concentration of MRSA.

  14. Material, psychosocial, behavioural and biomedical factors in the explanation of relative socio-economic inequalities in mortality: evidence from the HUNT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalická, Vera; van Lenthe, Frank; Bambra, Clare; Krokstad, Steinar; Mackenbach, Johan

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have assessed the relative importance of material, psychosocial and behavioural factors in the explanation of relative socio-economic inequalities in mortality, but research into the contribution of biomedical factors has been limited. Our study examines the relative contribution of (i) material, (ii) psychosocial, (iii) behavioural and (iv) biomedical factors in the explanation of relative socio-economic (educational and income) inequalities in mortality. Cohort study--baseline data from the Norwegian total county population-based HUNT 2 study linked to mortality data (1995/97 to 2003). In this analysis, 18 247 men and 18 278 women aged 24-80 without severe chronic disease at baseline were eligible. No socio-economic inequalities in mortality among women were found. In men, educational- and income-related inequalities in mortality were found with a relative risk for the lowest educational group of 1.67 (1.29-2.15) and the lowest income quartile of 2.03 (1.57-2.70). Together, the four explanatory factors reduced the relative risk of mortality of the lowest educational group to 1.18 (0.90-1.55) and the relative risk of mortality in the lowest income quartile was attenuated to 1.17 (0.83-1.63). Known biomedical factors contributed least to both educational and income inequalities in mortality. Material factors were the most important in explaining income inequalities in mortality amongst men, whereas psychosocial and behavioural factors were the most important in explaining educational inequalities. This suggests that improving the material, psychosocial and behavioural circumstances of men might bring more substantial reductions in relative socio-economic inequalities in mortality.

  15. Optical Design for Biomedical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Rongguang

    2010-01-01

    Designing an efficient imaging system for biomedical optics requires a solid understanding of the special requirements of the optical systems for biomedical imaging and the optical components used in the systems. However, a lack of reference books on optical design (imaging and illumination) for biomedical imaging has led to some inefficient systems. This book fills the gap between biomedical optics and optical design by addressing the fundamentals of biomedical optics and optical engineering, and biomedical imaging systems. The first half provides a brief introduction to biomedical optics and

  16. Design of experiments in Biomedical Signal Processing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Li, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical Signal Processing is one of the most important major subjects in Biomedical Engineering. The contents of Biomedical Signal Processing include the theories of digital signal processing, the knowledge of different biomedical signals, physiology and the ability of computer programming. Based on our past five years teaching experiences, in order to let students master the signal processing algorithm well, we found that the design of experiments following algorithm was very important. In this paper we presented the ideas and aims in designing the experiments. The results showed that our methods facilitated the study of abstractive signal processing algorithms and made understanding of biomedical signals in a simple way.

  17. Tesi di dottorato PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Segnalazione di tesi di dottorato.

     

    Miguel Calleja Puerta

    El conde Suero Vermúdez, su parentela y su entorno social. La aristocracia leonesa en los siglos XI y XII, Tesis de doctorado en Historia, Universidad de Oviedo (España, 2000

     

    Adele Cilento

    Potere e monachesimo nella Calabria bizantina: relazioni e interferenze (secc. IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (X ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2000

     

    Amedeo De Vincentiis

    Firenze e i signori. Sperimentazioni istituzionali e modelli di regime nelle signorie fiorentine degli Angioini (fine XIII - metà XIV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale (XI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Milano, 1999

     

    Marco Folin

    Il sistema politico di un antico Stato italiano: i ducati estensi nella prima Età moderna (1452-1598, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Scuola Normale superiore di Pisa, 2000

     

    Barbara Frale

    Guardiani del Santuario. Le radici orientali del processo contro l’ordine del Tempio (1128 - 1314, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale d’Europa (XI ciclo, Università "Ca’ Foscari" di Venezia, 2000

    Report of PhD Dissertations.

     

    Miguel Calleja Puerta

    El conde Suero Vermúdez, su parentela y su entorno social. La aristocracia leonesa en los siglos XI y XII, Tesis de doctorado en Historia, Universidad de Oviedo (España, 2000

     

    Adele Cilento

    Potere e monachesimo nella Calabria bizantina: relazioni e interferenze (secc. IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (X ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2000

     

    Amedeo De Vincentiis

    Firenze e

  18. Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar citation rates: a case study of medical physics and biomedical engineering: what gets cited and what doesn't?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    There are often differences in a publication's citation count, depending on the database accessed. Here, aspects of citation counts for medical physics and biomedical engineering papers are studied using papers published in the journal Australasian physical and engineering sciences in medicine. Comparison is made between the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Papers are categorised into subject matter, and citation trends are examined. It is shown that review papers as a group tend to receive more citations on average; however the highest cited individual papers are more likely to be research papers.

  19. TO STUDY THE AWARENESS OF HEALTH CARE PERSONNEL INVOLVED IN BIO-MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN NEW GOVERNMENT GENERAL HOSPITAL AT VIJAYAWADA, ANDHRA PRADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalith

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recent developments in healthcare units are precisely made for the prevention and protection of community health. Sophisticated instruments have come into existence in various operations for disease treatment. Such improvement and advances in scientific knowledge has resulted in per capita per patient generation of wastes in health care units. Waste generated in the process of health care are composed of variety of wastes including hypodermic needles, scalpels, blades, surgical cotton, gloves, bandages, discarded medicine, body fluids, human tissues and organs, chemicals etc., other wastes generated in healthcare settings include radioactive wastes, mercury containing instruments, PVC plastics etc., so the awareness of personnel involved in the management of biomedical waste is important. AIM: To assess the waste handling and treatment system of hospital bio-medical solid waste and its mandatory compliance with regulatory notifications for bio-medical waste (BMW management rules 1998, under Environment Protection Act (EPA 1986, Ministry of Environment & Forest, Government of India at Government General Hospital (GGH, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This cross sectional study was conducted in GGH at Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 75 study subjects selected were personnel involved in management of hospital solid waste observed for one month and frequency tables, percentages, and proportions were used as statistical applications. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Analysis was done using MS – Excel software. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of gross total quantity of BMW generated in entire GGH, Vijayawada 74% of it is general waste. Knowledge levels regarding storage of BMW was more among class IV employees, were as awareness in differentiation of infectious and non-infectious waste was more among staff nurses.

  20. Terahertz biomedical science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Biomedical Studies Using Terahertz WavesJoo-Hiuk SonSection I Terahertz TechnologyTerahertz Sources and DetectorsHyunyong Choi and Joo-Hiuk SonTabletop High-Power Terahertz Pulse Generation TechniquesYun-Shik LeeTerahertz Imaging and Tomography TechniquesHyunyong Choi and Joo-Hiuk SonCompact Solid-State Electronic Terahertz Devices and CircuitsJae-Sung Rieh, Daekeun Yoon, and Jongwon Yun<

  1. National, inter-institutional, graduate modules – blended learning approaches for PhD education in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrave, Michael; Murphy, Orla

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a case study that describes the design and delivery of national PhD lectures with 40 PhD candidates in Digital Arts and Humanities in Ireland simultaneously to four remote locations, in Trinity College Dublin, in University College Cork, in NUI Maynooth and NUI Galway. Blended learning approaches were utilized to augment traditional teaching practices combining: face-to-face engagement, video-conferencing to multiple sites, social media lecture delivery support – a live blog and...

  2. Job Profiles of Biomedical Informatics Graduates. Results of a Graduate Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammenwerth, E; Hackl, W O

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical informatics programs exist in many countries. Some analyses of the skills needed and of recommendations for curricular content for such programs have been published. However, not much is known of the job profiles and job careers of their graduates. To analyse the job profiles and job careers of 175 graduates of the biomedical informatics bachelor and master program of the Tyrolean university UMIT. Survey of all biomedical informatics students who graduated from UMIT between 2001 and 2013. Information is available for 170 graduates. Eight percent of graduates are male. Of all bachelor graduates, 86% started a master program. Of all master graduates, 36% started a PhD. The job profiles are quite diverse: at the time of the survey, 35% of all master graduates worked in the health IT industry, 24% at research institutions, 9% in hospitals, 9% as medical doctors, 17% as informaticians outside the health care sector, and 6% in other areas. Overall, 68% of the graduates are working as biomedical informaticians. The results of the survey indicate a good job situation for the graduates. The job opportunities for biomedical informaticians who graduated with a bachelor or master degree from UMIT seem to be quite good. The majority of graduates are working as biomedical informaticians. A larger number of comparable surveys of graduates from other biomedical informatics programs would help to enhance our knowledge about careers in biomedical informatics.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yuhe Zhu; Susan Liao; Jiajia Li

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matr...

  4. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Mehra, Neelesh K; Jain, Keerti; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have captured the fascination and attention of scientists due to their simultaneous targeting and imaging potential in drug delivery, in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In the present study, we have exhaustively reviewed various aspects of QDs, highlighting their pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, pharmacology, interactions, and toxicological manifestations. The eventual use of QDs is to dramatically improve clinical diagnostic tests for early detection of cancer. In recent years, QDs were introduced to cell biology as an alternative fluorescent probe.

  5. ISIFC - dual Biomedical Engineering School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterlin, Nadia; Soto-Romero, Georges; Duffaud, Jacques; Blagosklonov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    The Superior Institute for Biomedical Engineering (ISIFC), created in 2001, is part of the Franche-Comté University and is accredited by the French Ministry of National Education. Its originality lies in its innovative course of studies, which trains engineers in the scientific and medical fields to get both competencies. The Institute therefore collaborates with the University Hospital Centre of Besançon (CHU), biomedical companies and National Research Centres (CNRS and INSERM). The dual expertise trainees will have acquired at the end of their 3 years course covers medical and biological skills, scientific and Technical expertises. ISIFC engineers answer to manufacturer needs for skilled scientific and technical staff in instrumentation and techniques adapted to diagnosis, therapeutics and medical control, as well as the needs of potential users for biomedical devices, whether they are doctors, hospital staff, patients, laboratories, etc... Both the skills and the knowledge acquired by an ISIFC engineer will enable him/her to fulfil functions of study, research and development in the industrial sector.

  6. PhD Dissertations Tesi di dottorato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Report of PhD dissertation.

    Laura Baietto

    Una politica per le città. Rapporti fra papato, vescovi e comuni nell'Italia centro-settentrionale da Innocenzo III a Gregorio IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002

     

    Giuseppe Banfo

    Compresenze e sovrapposizioni di poteri territoriali di qualità diversa tra X e XIII: il caso del basso Monferrato, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002

     

    Francesca Dell'Acqua

    La vetrata tra l'età tardo imperiale e l'altomedioevo: le fonti, l'archeologia, Tesi di Perfezionamento in Storia dell'Arte Medievale, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 2001

     

    Primo Giovanni Embriaco

    I vescovi di Albenga e gli sviluppi signorili nella Liguria occidentale (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2001

     

    Antonella Ghignoli

    Documenti e proprietà altomedievali. Fondamenti e problemi dell'esegesi storica delle fonti documentarie nello specchio della tradizione delle carte pisane dei secoli VIII-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002

     

    Vito Loré

    Espansione monastica e mutamenti politici. La Trinità di Cava nei suoi rapporti con i sovrani longobardi e normanni e con l'aristocrazia territoriale. Secoli XI-XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002

     

    Rosaria Stracuzzi

    Messina nel '400, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 2001

     

    Stefania Tamburini

  7. Handbook of photonics for biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Donghyun; Somekh, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Nanophotonics has emerged rapidly into technological mainstream with the advent and maturity of nanotechnology available in photonics and enabled many new exciting applications in the area of biomedical science and engineering that were unimagined even a few years ago with conventional photonic engineering techniques. Handbook of Nanophotonics in Biomedical Engineering is intended to be a reliable resource to a wealth of information on nanophotonics that can inspire readers by detailing emerging and established possibilities of nanophotonics in biomedical science and engineering applications. This comprehensive reference presents not only the basics of nanophotonics but also explores recent experimental and clinical methods used in biomedical and bioengineering research. Each peer-reviewed chapter of this book discusses fundamental aspects and materials/fabrication issues of nanophotonics, as well as applications in interfaces, cell, tissue, animal studies, and clinical engineering. The organization provides ...

  8. Applications of isotopes. [Need and cost of stable iotopes for use as tracers in biomedical and environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby-Smith, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Current and potential applications of stable isotopes as tracers in a number of biomedical and environmental areas are discussed. It is pointed out that a wide variety of problems exist in these fields whose solutions in principle are amenable to the isotopic approach. The number and diversity of these problems as well as the unique role stable isotopes can play in their solution illustrate the importance of achieving and maintaining a broad inventory of isotopic species. Experience has demonstrated unequivocally an additional overriding requirement for widespread exploration of stable isotopes by the scientific and technical community, i.e., the need for low cost availability of the materials in quantity. Some representative applications of /sup 12/C, /sup 13/C, /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 16/O, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O are discussed.

  9. CodeSlinger: a case study in domain-driven interactive tool design for biomedical coding scheme exploration and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Natalie L

    2010-01-01

    CodeSlinger is a desktop application that was developed to aid medical professionals in the intertranslation, exploration, and use of biomedical coding schemes. The application was designed to provide a highly intuitive, easy-to-use interface that simplifies a complex business problem: a set of time-consuming, laborious tasks that were regularly performed by a group of medical professionals involving manually searching coding books, searching the Internet, and checking documentation references. A workplace observation session with a target user revealed the details of the current process and a clear understanding of the business goals of the target user group. These goals drove the design of the application's interface, which centers on searches for medical conditions and displays the codes found in the application's database that represent those conditions. The interface also allows the exploration of complex conceptual relationships across multiple coding schemes.

  10. PhD Dissertations Tesi di dottorato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Report of PhD Dissertations.

    Francesco Barone

    Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Laura Berti Ceroni

    Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.

     

    Marco Bicchierai

    Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Emanuela Garimberti

    Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004

     

    Lorenzo Tanzini

    Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Stefania Tarquini

    Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

    Segnalazione di tesi di dottorato.

    Francesco Barone

    Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004

     

    Laura Berti Ceroni

  11. ['Sandwich PhD': considerations for a successful experience abroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, Marina de Goes; Bueno, Mariana; Gastaldo, Denise; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2013-03-01

    International PhD internship, named "Sandwich PhD" in Brazil is an opportunity to improve research abilities, to become known in academic area and to establish and/or increase work opportunities in an international context. In this article, we describe key factors regarding the planning and development of the "Sandwich PhD" as experienced by professors and students involved in the collaboration between the School of Nursing, University of São Paulo and Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada. We also present the participation of PhD students' network as an alternative to the "Sandwich PhD". An international experience, when well-planned and developed correctly, promotes students' personal and professional development and favors the internationalization of Brazilian graduate programs and research groups.

  12. The role of PHD2 mutations in the pathogenesis of erythrocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardie B

    2014-07-01

    of EPO transcription. The α subunits of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor are hydroxylated by three prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD enzymes, which belong to the iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase superfamily. Sequence analysis of the genes encoding the PHDs in patients with erythrocytosis has revealed heterozygous germline mutations only occurring in Egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1, also known as PHD2, the gene that encodes PHD2. To date, 24 different EGLN1 mutations comprising missense, frameshift, and nonsense mutations have been described. The phenotypes associated with the patients carrying these mutations are fairly homogeneous and typically limited to erythrocytosis with normal to elevated EPO. However, exceptions exist; for example, there is one case with development of concurrent paraganglioma (PHD2-H374R. Analysis of the erythrocytosis-associated PHD2 missense mutations has shown heterogeneous results. Structural studies reveal that mutations can affect different domains of PHD2. Some are close to the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor α/2-oxoglutarate or the iron binding sites for PHD2. In silico studies demonstrate that the mutations do not always affect fully conserved residues. In vitro and in cellulo studies showed varying effects of the mutations, ranging from mild effects to severe loss of function. The exact mechanism of a potential tumor-suppressor role for PHD2 still needs to be elucidated. A knockin mouse model expressing the first reported PHD2-P317R mutation recapitulates the phenotype observed in humans (erythrocytosis with inappropriately normal serum EPO levels and demonstrates that haploinsufficiency and partial deregulation of PHD2 is sufficient to cause erythrocytosis. Keywords: PHD2, EGLN1, HIF, hypoxia, erythropoietin, erythrocytosis

  13. PhD Dissertations Tesi di dottorato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Report of PhD Dissertations.

    Massimo Della Misericordia

    Divenire comunità. Comuni rurali, poteri signorili, identità sociali in Valtellina e nella montagna lombarda nel tardo medioevo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2003

     

    Mariano Dell’Omo

    Il monastero di S. Liberatore alla Maiella centro dell’irradiazione di Montecassino nell’Abruzzo medievale e moderno. Contributo alla storia dell’organizzazione patrimoniale e della civiltà monastica cassinese nell’Italia centrale attraverso i documenti di S. Liberatore conservati nell’Archivio di Montecassino. Introduzione storica, paleografica e archivistica. Edizione dei documenti più antichi (†798-1000 e regesti di quelli posteriori (1005-1735, Tesi di dottorato in Storia Ecclesiastica, Facoltà di Storia Ecclesiastica, Pontificia Università Gregoriana di Roma,  2004

     

    Giulia Lorenzoni

    Conquistare e governare la città. Forme di potere e istituzioni nel primo anno della signoria viscontea a Bologna (ottobre 1350-novembre 1351, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004

     

    Federica Monteleone

    Il viaggio di Carlo Magno in Terra Santa. Un’esperienza di pellegrinaggio nella tradizione europea occidentale, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo

     

    Francesca Pucci Donati

    Fra teorie mediche e pratica quotidiana: i calendari dietetici dell’Occidente latino altomedievale (secoli IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2004

    Alberto Ricciardi

    L’Epistolario di Lupo

  14. Launching a Geoscience Career: Insights Gained from MS PHD'S Beyond the PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, W. I.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Jansma, P. E.; Huggans, M. J.; Ricciardi, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Beyond the PhD (B-PhD) Professional Development Program is the newest addition to the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S®) Professional Development Program in Earth System Science. This exciting new program is designed to facilitate the development of a new community of underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral candidates and recent doctorate degree recipients in Earth system science (ESS)-related fields. Building upon MS PHD'S extensive professional development activities provided to URM undergraduate and graduate students, B-PhD's vision is to encourage and support URM doctoral students and early career PhD's in becoming part of the global workforce. (Since its inception in 2003, MSPHD'S supports 213 participants of which 42 have achieved the doctoral degree and another 71 are enrolled in doctoral programs.) By providing customized support and advocacy for participants, B-PhD facilitates smoother and informed transitions from graduate school to postdoctoral and tenure-track positions, as well as other "first" jobs in academia, government, industry, and non-profit organizations. In 2011, the first conference for 18 doctoral candidate and recent graduates was hosted at the University of Texas at Arlington's (UTA) College of Science. Using a format of guest speakers, brown bag discussions, and interactive breakout sessions, participants engaged in sessions entitled "Toolkits for Success in Academia, Business and Industry, Federal Government and Non-Profits", "Defining Short, Mid and Long Term Career Goals", "Accessing and Refining Skill Sets and Other Door Openers", "International Preparation and Opportunities", "Paying it Forward/Lifting as You Climb", and "Customized Strategies for Next Steps". This presentation will discuss outcomes from this pilot project, the use of social media to track and support ongoing B-PhD activities, and objectives for future B-PhD workshops.

  15. PhD Dissertations Tesi di dottorato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations.Anna Airò La scrittura delle regole. Politica e istituzioni a Taranto nel Quattrocento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Pasquale Arfé La Clavis Physicae II (316-529 di Honorius Augustodunensis. Studio ed edizione critica, Tesi di dottorato in Storia della filosofia medievale, Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale", 2005 Alessandro Azzimonti Scrittura agiografica e strutture di potere nell'Italia centro-settentrionale (X-XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Forme del sapere storico dal medioevo alla contemporaneità, Università degli Studi di Trieste, 2004 Domenico Cerami Il "Confine conteso". Uomini, istituzioni, culture a Monteveglio tra VIII-XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2005 Federica Chilà Ostaggi. Uno strumento di pacificazione e governo tra i secoli VIII e XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, società, religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2004 Enrico Faini Firenze nei secoli X-XIII: economia e società, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005Alessio FioreStrutture e pratiche del potere signorile in area umbro-marchigiana (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato ricerca in Storia, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2004Giampaolo FrancesconiTra Riforma, vescovo e clientes. Camaldoli e le società locali (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 [09/05] Giuseppe Gardoni "Episcopus et potestas". Vescovi e società a Mantova nella prima metà del Duecento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia del Cristianesimo e delle Chiese (antichità, medioevo, età moderna, Università degli Studi di Padova, 2005 Nicola Mancassola La gestione delle campagne tra Langobardia e Romània in età carolingia e post

  16. The Virtual Observatory Powered PhD Thesis

    CERN Document Server

    Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The Virtual Observatory has reached sufficient maturity for its routine scientific exploitation by astronomers. To prove this statement, here I present a brief description of the complete VO-powered PhD thesis entitled "Galactic and extragalactic research with modern surveys and the Virtual Observatory" comprising 4 science cases covering various aspects of astrophysical research. These comprize: (1) homogeneous search and measurement of main physical parameters of Galactic open star clusters in huge multi-band photometric surveys; (2) study of optical-to-NIR galaxy colors using a large homogeneous dataset including spectroscopy and photometry from SDSS and UKIDSS; (3) study of faint low-mass X-ray binary population in modern observational archives; (4) search for optical counterparts of unidentified X-ray objects with large positional uncertainties in the Galactic Plane. All these projects make heavy use of the VO technologies and tools and would not be achievable without them. So refereed papers published i...

  17. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 5, is a collection of papers that deals with application of the principles and practices of engineering to basic and applied biomedical research, development, and the delivery of health care. The papers also describe breakthroughs in health improvements, as well as basic research that have been accomplished through clinical applications. One paper examines engineering principles and practices that can be applied in developing therapeutic systems by a controlled delivery system in drug dosage. Another paper examines the physiological and materials vari

  18. Biomedical implantable microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, J D

    1980-10-17

    Innovative applications of microelectronics in new biomedical implantable instruments offer a singular opportunity for advances in medical research and practice because of two salient factors: (i) beyond all other types of biomedical instruments, implants exploit fully the inherent technical advantages--complex functional capability, high reliability, lower power drain, small size and weight-of microelectronics, and (ii) implants bring microelectronics into intimate association with biological systems. The combination of these two factors enables otherwise impossible new experiments to be conducted and new paostheses developed that will improve the quality of human life.

  19. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 6, is a collection of papers that discusses the role of integrated electronics in medical systems and the usage of biological mathematical models in biological systems. Other papers deal with the health care systems, the problems and methods of approach toward rehabilitation, as well as the future of biomedical engineering. One paper discusses the use of system identification as it applies to biological systems to estimate the values of a number of parameters (for example, resistance, diffusion coefficients) by indirect means. More particularly, the i

  20. Biomedical enhancements as justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeesoo

    2015-02-01

    Biomedical enhancements, the applications of medical technology to make better those who are neither ill nor deficient, have made great strides in the past few decades. Using Amartya Sen's capability approach as my framework, I argue in this article that far from being simply permissible, we have a prima facie moral obligation to use these new developments for the end goal of promoting social justice. In terms of both range and magnitude, the use of biomedical enhancements will mark a radical advance in how we compensate the most disadvantaged members of society.

  1. International Students' Motivation to Pursue and Complete a Ph.D. in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what motivates 19 international students to pursue a Ph.D. at a public research university in the U.S. and, more importantly, what motivates them to persist despite unsatisfying socialization. Based on value-expectancy achievement motivation theory, four motivations emerged: intrinsic interest in research, intrinsic interest in…

  2. Constructing an Institutional Identity in University Tea Rooms: The International PhD Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotovatian, Sepideh; Miller, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    This case study profiles eight international PhD students and describes the process of the construction and negotiation of their social and institutional identities in an Australian university. Audio-recorded informal conversations of the students highlight the role of social membership, staffroom interactions and language in the construction of…

  3. Winning the PhD Game: Evocative Playing of Snakes and Ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a qualitative approach to developing an understanding of the lived experiences of PhD students. Rather than relying on textbook reports and theories about studying a higher degree by research, by allowing the students' voices to be heard, explicit and conscious research can be used to generate appropriate…

  4. Career-Self Management and Entrepreneurship: An Experience with PhD Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joana Carneiro; do Ceu Taveira, Maria; Sa, Elisabete

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study presents an experience developed with PhD students aimed to analyze the extent to which career self-management should be approached along with entrepreneurship issues to promote students' career development. Method: An intervention group who attended a Career Self-Management Seminar (EG1), a comparison group who attended…

  5. From Student to Scholar: The Academic Library and Social Sciences PhD Students' Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming-May, Rachel; Yuro, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Although research concerning the information-seeking behavior of academic library users is abundant, few studies have focused specifically on PhD students. This oversight has had an impact on librarians' ability to effectively market services such as information literacy instruction and research assistance to doctoral students. In order to…

  6. Temporary contracts : Effect on job satisfaction and personal lives of recent PhD graduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijer, C.J.F.; Belder, R.; Sonneveld, H.; Van, Bochove C.A.; Van, der Weijden I.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we assess the effects of temporary employment on job satisfaction and the personal lives of recent PhD graduates. Temporary employment is becoming increasingly prevalent in many sectors, but has been relatively common in academia, especially for early career scientists. Labor market

  7. A model perception on the independence of PhD students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amy Stambach

    It is familiar that PhD students from University of Rwanda (UR) are used to ... from the beginning of doctoral studies until the successful completion by .... completion of a research degree and one shall have taken an approved and certified course on ... In addition to the supervisors, an adviser or advisers may be proposed to ...

  8. International Students' Motivation to Pursue and Complete a Ph.D. in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what motivates 19 international students to pursue a Ph.D. at a public research university in the U.S. and, more importantly, what motivates them to persist despite unsatisfying socialization. Based on value-expectancy achievement motivation theory, four motivations emerged: intrinsic interest in research, intrinsic interest in…

  9. Learning Opportunities in PhD Supervisory Talks: A Social Constructionist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenwen; Singhasiri, Wareesiri

    2016-01-01

    Although PhD supervision has been recognised as an educative process and a complex pedagogy for decades, there is little research into on-site pedagogic processes. Informed by social constructionism and a Foucauldian approach, this qualitative case study explores how learning opportunities were created by analysing both a supervisor's verbal…

  10. Interdisciplinary Area of Research Offers Tool of Cross-Cultural Understanding: Cross-Cultural Student Seminar for Communication Training on Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Misunderstanding often occurs in a multidisciplinary field of study, because each field has its own background of thinking. Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop the multidisciplinary field of study. Because each nation has its own cultural background, communication in an international seminar is not easy, either. A cross-cultural student seminar has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study. Students from a variety of back grounds have joined in the seminar. Both equations and figures are effective tools for communication in the field of science. The seminar works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study of biomedical engineering. An interdisciplinary area of research offers the tool of cross-cultural understanding. The present study refers to author's several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.

  11. RPCs in biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); De Vecchi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Giroletti, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Guida, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Musitelli, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Nardo, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Necchi, M.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Pagano, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Ratti, S.P. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Sani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Vicini, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Vitulo, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Viviani, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica and Sezione INFN, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2006-08-15

    We are studying possible applications of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in the biomedical domain such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The use of RPCs in PET can provide several improvements on the usual scintillation-based detectors. The most striking features are the extremely good spatial and time resolutions. They can be as low as 50 {mu}m and 25 ps respectively, to be compared to the much higher intrinsic limits in bulk detectors. Much efforts have been made to investigate suitable materials to make RPCs sensitive to 511 keV photons. For this reason, we are studying different types of coating employing high Z materials with proper electrical resistivity. Later investigations explored the possibility of coating glass electrodes by mean of serigraphy techniques, employing oxide based mixtures with a high density of high Z materials; the efficiency is strongly dependent on its thickness and it reaches a maximum for a characteristic value that is a function of the compound (usually a few hundred microns). The most promising mixtures seem to be PbO, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Tl{sub 2}O. Preliminary gamma efficiency measurements for a Multigap RPC prototype (MRPC) are presented as well as simulations using GEANT4-based framework. The MRPC has 5 gas gaps; their spacings are kept by 0.3 mm diameter nylon fishing line, electrodes are made of thin glasses (1 mm for the outer electrodes, 0.15-0.4 mm for the inner ones). The detector is enclosed in a metallic gas-tight box, filled with a C{sub 2}H{sub 2}F{sub 4} 92.5%, SF{sub 6} 2.5%, C{sub 4}H{sub 10} 5% mixture. Different gas mixtures are being studied increasing the SF6 percentage and results of efficiency as a function of the new mixtures will be presented.

  12. RPCs in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, G.; De Vecchi, C.; Giroletti, E.; Guida, R.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Necchi, M. M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Sani, G.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.

    2006-08-01

    We are studying possible applications of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in the biomedical domain such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The use of RPCs in PET can provide several improvements on the usual scintillation-based detectors. The most striking features are the extremely good spatial and time resolutions. They can be as low as 50 μm and 25 ps respectively, to be compared to the much higher intrinsic limits in bulk detectors. Much efforts have been made to investigate suitable materials to make RPCs sensitive to 511 keV photons. For this reason, we are studying different types of coating employing high Z materials with proper electrical resistivity. Later investigations explored the possibility of coating glass electrodes by mean of serigraphy techniques, employing oxide based mixtures with a high density of high Z materials; the efficiency is strongly dependent on its thickness and it reaches a maximum for a characteristic value that is a function of the compound (usually a few hundred microns). The most promising mixtures seem to be PbO, Bi 2O 3 and Tl 2O. Preliminary gamma efficiency measurements for a Multigap RPC prototype (MRPC) are presented as well as simulations using GEANT4-based framework. The MRPC has 5 gas gaps; their spacings are kept by 0.3 mm diameter nylon fishing line, electrodes are made of thin glasses (1 mm for the outer electrodes, 0.15-0.4 mm for the inner ones). The detector is enclosed in a metallic gas-tight box, filled with a C 2H 2F 4 92.5%, SF 6 2.5%, C 4H 10 5% mixture. Different gas mixtures are being studied increasing the SF6 percentage and results of efficiency as a function of the new mixtures will be presented.

  13. Exploring subdomain variation in biomedical language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séaghdha Diarmuid Ó

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Applications of Natural Language Processing (NLP technology to biomedical texts have generated significant interest in recent years. In this paper we identify and investigate the phenomenon of linguistic subdomain variation within the biomedical domain, i.e., the extent to which different subject areas of biomedicine are characterised by different linguistic behaviour. While variation at a coarser domain level such as between newswire and biomedical text is well-studied and known to affect the portability of NLP systems, we are the first to conduct an extensive investigation into more fine-grained levels of variation. Results Using the large OpenPMC text corpus, which spans the many subdomains of biomedicine, we investigate variation across a number of lexical, syntactic, semantic and discourse-related dimensions. These dimensions are chosen for their relevance to the performance of NLP systems. We use clustering techniques to analyse commonalities and distinctions among the subdomains. Conclusions We find that while patterns of inter-subdomain variation differ somewhat from one feature set to another, robust clusters can be identified that correspond to intuitive distinctions such as that between clinical and laboratory subjects. In particular, subdomains relating to genetics and molecular biology, which are the most common sources of material for training and evaluating biomedical NLP tools, are not representative of all biomedical subdomains. We conclude that an awareness of subdomain variation is important when considering the practical use of language processing applications by biomedical researchers.

  14. Biomedical Engineering in Modern Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attinger, E. O.

    1971-01-01

    Considers definition of biomedical engineering (BME) and how biomedical engineers should be trained. State of the art descriptions of BME and BME education are followed by a brief look at the future of BME. (TS)

  15. Holography In Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bally, G.

    1988-01-01

    Today not only physicists and engineers but also biological and medical scientists are exploring the potentials of holographic methods in their special field of work. Most of the underlying physical principles such as coherence, interference, diffraction and polarization as well as general features of holography e.g. storage and retrieval of amplitude and phase of a wavefront, 3-d-imaging, large field of depth, redundant storage of information, spatial filtering, high-resolving, non-contactive, 3-d form and motion analysis are explained in detail in other contributions to this book. Therefore, this article is confined to the applications of holography in biomedical sciences. Because of the great number of contributions and the variety of applications [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] in this review the investigations can only be mentioned briefly and the survey has to be confined to some examples. As in all fields of optics and laser metrology, a review of biomedical applications of holography would be incomplete if military developments and their utilization are not mentioned. As will be demonstrated by selected examples the increasing interlacing of science with the military does not stop at domains that traditionally are regarded as exclusively oriented to human welfare like biomedical research [9]. This fact is actually characterized and stressed by the expression "Star Wars Medicine", which becomes increasingly common as popular description for laser applications (including holography) in medicine [10]. Thus, the consequence - even in such highly specialized fields like biomedical applications of holography - have to be discussed.

  16. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  17. Career Aspirations and Career Outcomes for Solar and Space Physics Ph.D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Results from a recent graduate student survey found unsurprisingly that Solar and Space Physics (S&SP) Ph.D. graduate students almost all aspire to have research careers in Solar and Space Physics. This study reports on the research career outcomes over the last decade for S&SP Ph.Ds. We used publication of peer-reviewed articles as the indicator for persistence in a research career. We found that nearly two-thirds (64%) of Ph.D.s who graduated between 2001 to 2009 published refereed-papers four or more years after their Ph.D., while 17% of Ph.D.s never published another paper beyond the year they received their Ph.D. The remaining 19% of Ph.Ds, stopped publishing within three-years of receiving their Ph.D. We found that though there is statistically no difference on persistence of publishing research between graduates of the largest programs compared to all other programs, there are significant differences between programs. We also found there was no gender differences in any of the persistence data (i.e., men and women stop or continue publishing at the same rates). Graduate programs, faculty advisors and potential graduate students can use these data for career planning. This study suggests that a significant majority of S&SP Ph.D.s (77%) find post-doctoral research positions and a majority (56%) find research careers beyond their post-doc.

  18. Between biomedical and psychological experiments: The unexpected connections between the Pasteur Institutes and the study of animal mind in the second quarter of twentieth-century France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marion

    2016-02-01

    This article explores the unexpected connections between the Pasteur Institute in French Guinea and the study of animal mind in early twentieth century France. At a time when the study of animal intelligence was thriving in France and elsewhere, apes were appealing research subjects both in psychological and biomedical studies. Drawing on two case studies (Guillaume/Meyerson and Urbain), and then, on someone responding negatively to those connections, Thétard, this article shows how the long reach of biomedicine (linked to the prestige of Bernard and Pasteur) impinged on French biology and played a role in the tortuous, if not unsuccessful fate of animal psychology in France in the second quarter of the twentieth century. It shows how attempts to use apes (and other zoo animals) to yield new insights on animal psychology faced heavy restrictions or experienced false starts, and examines the reasons why animal psychology could not properly thrive at that time in France. Beyond the supremacy of biomedical interests over psychological ones, this article additionally explains that some individuals used animal behaviour studies as steppingstones in careers in which they proceeded on to other topics. Finally, it illustrates the tension between non-academic and academic people at a time when animal psychology was trying to acquire scientific legitimacy, and also highlights the difficulties attached to the scientific study of animals in a multipurpose and hybrid environment such as the early twentieth century Parisian zoo and also the Pasteur Institute of French Guinea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on thermo-optic property of chitosan–alizarin yellow GG complex: a direction for devices for biomedical applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nidhi Nigam; Santosh Kumar; Pradip Kumar Dutta; Tamal Ghosh

    2015-10-01

    The optical parameters including the refractive index () and thermo-optic coefficient, TOC (d/d), the dielectric constant () and its variation with temperature, and the thermal volume expansion coefficient () and its variation with temperature of chitosan–alizarin yellow GG (CS–AY GG) complex were examined. The dn/dT and - values for the polymer derivative were in the range −2.5 × 10−4 to 1.2 × 10−4° C−1 and 2.2 to 2.3, respectively. The dn/dT values were larger than that of inorganic glasses such as zinc silicate glass (5.5 × 10−6° C−1) and borosilicate glass (4.1 × 10−6° C−1) and were larger than that of organic polymers such as polystyrene (−1.23 × 10−4 ° C−1) and PMMA (−1.20 × 10−4 ° C−1). The -values are lower than optically estimated -values of conventional polymer (3.00), aliphatic polyimide (2.5) and semi-aromatic polyamide (2.83). The obtained results of chitosan derivative are expected to be useful for optical switching and optical waveguide areas for devices of biomedical applications.

  20. New imaging technique using degree of polarization for the study of polarimetric properties for non-invasive biomedical diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Isabella C.; Guyot, Steve; Lemoine, Jacques

    2012-06-01

    This research proposes a new imaging technique for near real time multispectral acquisition using CCD RGB cameras of the so called "Degree Of Polarization" (DOP) in polarimetry for future clinical investigation. The aim of exploiting the DOP as the contrast element is to demonstrate that the elliptical DOP provides more information characterizing complex medium than the more traditional linear and circular ones. The system considers an incoherent input white light beam and opportunely calibrated nematic crystals (LCVR), so no mechanical tools are necessary. The particular features of the system indicate it to be the perfect candidate for a new imaging system considering in-vivo (as well as ex-vivo) non invasive superficial diagnostic for medical application as dermatologic diagnostics, since no type of sample preparation is necessary, i.e. tissue biopsy, radiation or contrast agent injection. Thus the biomedical application of this method suggests a simple, direct, fast and also easily exploitable future employment, as a desirable mean for clinical investigation but also for digital recognition in biometrics. Further new elements to improve the model of light scattering and matter-light interaction will be acquired, in particular considering a very complete characterization of the system response using latex microspheres suspension to simulate turbid media with different concentration.

  1. [Study of blood compatibility on TiO2 coated biomedical Ni-Ti shape memory alloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuchun; Zhai, Yuchun; Hu, Jinling

    2011-10-01

    We coated a thin TiO2 film on the surface of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy by activated sputter method in the present work. The blood platelet adherence and antithrombogenicity of the TiO2-coated Ni-Ti alloy were evaluated. The results showed that the platelets on the TiO2-coated Ni-Ti alloy were fewer than those on 316L stainless steel, and no agglomeration or distortion for the platelets on the coated alloy was found, which means less probability of blood coagulation for the alloy. The coagulation time on the coated Ni-Ti shape memory alloy was longer than that on the 316L. Compared with that on the 316L stainless steel, the TiO2 coated Ni-Ti shape memory alloy showed better blood compatibility, indicating that the Ni-Ti alloy with TiO2 coating is a kind of ideal biomedical materials with high clinical value.

  2. PEGylated gold nanorods as optical trackers for biomedical applications: an in vivo and in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrasoul, Gaser N; Magrassi, Raffaella; Dante, Silvia; d'Amora, Marta; d'Abbusco, Marco Scotto; Pellegrino, Teresa; Diaspro, Alberto

    2016-06-24

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) are eligible for a variety of biological applications including cell imaging, sensing, and photothermal therapy thanks to their optical properties. The aim of this work is to show how AuNRs could be employed as non-photobleachable optical contrast agents for biomedical applications. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of their use as optical trackers, we employed two-photon emission confocal microscopy on cells incubated with PEGylated AuNRs. Remarkably, AuNRs were localized mostly in the perinuclear zone and microscopy characterization showed the presence of a considerable number of rods inside cell nuclei. Furthermore, we estimated the toxicity and the efficiency of cellular uptake of the PEGylated AuNRs as a function of administered dose on HeLa/3T3 cell lines and on zebrafish during development, employed as an in vivo model. Eventually, we observed good agreement between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The employed AuNRs were prepared through a photochemical protocol here improved by tuning the amount of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide for the achievement of AuNRs at two different aspect ratios. Furthermore we also investigated if the AuNR aspect ratio influenced the toxicity and the efficiency of cellular uptake of the PEGylated AuNRs in HeLa/3T3 cell lines and in zebrafish embryos.

  3. In vitro bioactivity studies of larnite and larnite/chitin composites prepared from biowaste for biomedical applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJAN CHOUDHARY; SENTHIL KUMAR VENKATRAMAN; ANJALI RANA; SASIKUMAR SWAMIAPPAN

    2016-09-01

    Larnite (Ca$_2$SiO$_4$) was synthesized by the sol–gel combustion process by using raw eggshell powder as a calcium source and urea as a fuel. The main focus of this work is to convert biowaste into a biomedical material ata low-processing temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirms the phase purity of the larnite and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra confirms the presence of characteristic functional groups of larnite. Scanningelectron microscopy (SEM) image shows agglomerated particles with cauliflower-like morphology and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) confirms the presence of the stoichiometric ratio of required elements. Atomicforcemicroscope (AFM) images reveal the presence of pores on the surface of spherical particles. Larnite/chitin composites were fabricated into scaffold with different ratios of bioceramic to biopolymer (70:30, 80:20) to investigatethe influence of the polymer content on the apatite formation ability in simulated body fluid (SBF) medium. XRDpattern and FTIR spectra of the scaffold immersed in SBF shows apatite deposition within 5 days. The deposition ofhydroxyapatite (HAP) on the scaffold surface increases with the increase in polymer content of the composite.

  4. Competitive binding of a benzimidazole to the histone-binding pocket of the Pygo PHD finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas C R; Rutherford, Trevor J; Birchall, Kristian; Chugh, Jasveen; Fiedler, Marc; Bienz, Mariann

    2014-12-19

    The Pygo-BCL9 complex is a chromatin reader, facilitating β-catenin-mediated oncogenesis, and is thus emerging as a potential therapeutic target for cancer. Its function relies on two ligand-binding surfaces of Pygo's PHD finger that anchor the histone H3 tail methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me) with assistance from the BCL9 HD1 domain. Here, we report the first use of fragment-based screening by NMR to identify small molecules that block protein-protein interactions by a PHD finger. This led to the discovery of a set of benzothiazoles that bind to a cleft emanating from the PHD-HD1 interface, as defined by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, we discovered a benzimidazole that docks into the H3K4me specificity pocket and displaces the native H3K4me peptide from the PHD finger. Our study demonstrates the ligandability of the Pygo-BCL9 complex and uncovers a privileged scaffold as a template for future development of lead inhibitors of oncogenesis.

  5. Three new students selected for the ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Initiated in 2013, the ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme aims to enable young, talented and motivated students to work on part of their PhD thesis at CERN. The collaboration has just selected the three students who will start their theses in 2016.   The three students who received the ATLAS grant, which will cover part of their PhD studies. From left to right: Ruth Jacobs (Germany), Artem Basalaev (Russia), Nedaa B I Asbah (Palestine). The ATLAS PhD Grant Scheme was made possible thanks to a large donation by former ATLAS spokespersons Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni, who started the fund with money from the Fundamental Physics Prize they received in 2013. Applications are handled by CERN HR, via this link. The aim of the initiative is to offer a unique educational opportunity to students within the ATLAS collaboration and to give them the possibility to continue their career in particle physics. Selected candidates receive a stipend allowing them to spend one year at CERN, followed by one year at their h...

  6. Thermoresponsive Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoni K. Georgiou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive polymers are a class of “smart” materials that have the ability to respond to a change in temperature; a property that makes them useful materials in a wide range of applications and consequently attracts much scientific interest. This review focuses mainly on the studies published over the last 10 years on the synthesis and use of thermoresponsive polymers for biomedical applications including drug delivery, tissue engineering and gene delivery. A summary of the main applications is given following the different studies on thermoresponsive polymers which are categorized based on their 3-dimensional structure; hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, micelles, crosslinked micelles, polymersomes, films and particles.

  7. A study on knowledge and practice regarding biomedical waste management among staff nurses and nursing students of Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Haider

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are the centre of cure and also the important centres of infectious waste generation. Effective management of Biomedical Waste (BMW is not only a legal necessity but also a social responsibility. Aims and Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practice in managing the biomedical wastes among nursing staff and student nurses in RIMS, Ranchi. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at RIMS, Ranchi from Oct 2013 to March 2014 (6 months. It was a descriptive, hospital based, cross-sectional study. A total of 240 nurses participated in the present study, randomly chosen from various departments A pre-designed, pre-tested, structured proforma was used for data collection after getting their informed consent. Self-made scoring system was used to categorize the participants as having good, average and poor scores. Data was tabulated and analyzed using percentages and chi-square test. Results: The knowledge regarding general information about BMW management was assessed(with scores 0-8,it was found  that level of knowledge was better in student nurses than staff nurses as student nurses scored good(6-8correct answers in more than half of the questions (65%.Whereas staff nurses scored good in only 33.33% questions. When the practical information regarding the BMW management is assessed (with scores 0-8, it was found that staff nurses had relatively better practice regarding BMW management than students as they scored good(6-8correct answers in 40% and 30% respectively. Conclusion: Though overall knowledge of study participants was good but still they need good quality training to improve their current knowledge about BMW. 

  8. Analysis and modeling of noise in biomedical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Jalaleddini, Kian; Lopez, Diego Guarin; Kearney, Robert E; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2013-01-01

    Noise characteristics play an important role in evaluating tools developed to study biomedical systems. Despite usual assumptions, noise in biomedical systems is often nonwhite or non-Gaussian. In this paper, we present a method to analyze the noise component of a biomedical system. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in the analysis of noise in voluntary ankle torque measured by a torque transducer and eye movements measured by electro-oculography (EOG).

  9. [Research misconduct: Knowledge, actions and attitudes of PhD candidates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Holm, Søren

    2016-09-01

    BACKGROUND Increasing attention is being paid to research misconduct in academic journals and in the media, but we know relatively little about its extent or attitudes to research misconduct, or how these are changing. This study therefore aims to investigate PhD candidates' knowledge, own actions and attitudes to specific forms of research misconduct.MATERIAL AND METHOD In autumn 2015, an anonymous questionnaire survey was distributed to all participants in the introductory course for PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Oslo.RESULTS Altogether 77 PhD candidates (79 %) responded to the questionnaire. A total of 62 % conducted clinical research and 25 % conducted basic research. Around one in four had heard about serious forms of research misconduct in the previous year, and around 4 % were aware of various forms of serious research misconduct in their own department in the previous year. Compared to earlier studies, an increasing number (16 %) responded that they had been subjected to unethical pressure with regard to inclusion or order of authors. Approximately two-thirds were uncertain of whether their department had written policies for academic conduct. One-third of PhD candidates did not disassociate themselves from actions that are generally viewed as scientific misconduct. One-tenth thought it acceptable to falsify or fabricate data in order to expedite publication, one-fifth did not object to taking the credit for others' ideas, and almost half did not believe it was wrong to attempt a number of methods of analysis until one arrived at a significant answer.INTERPRETATION PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine were aware of research misconduct, both generally and from their own department. They themselves reported some type of scientific misconduct, and a large majority were uncertain of their department's guidelines. Some of the candidates also accepted several forms of research misconduct.

  10. Biomedical signals, imaging, and informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Signals, Imaging, and Informatics, the third volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in biosignal processing, medical imaging, infrared imaging, and medical informatics.More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including biomedical s

  11. A Student Team in a University of Michigan Biomedical Engineering Design Course Constructs a Microfluidic Bioreactor for Studies of Zebrafish Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-chi; Li, David; Al-Shoaibi, Ali; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahid; Flak, Betsy; Perrin, Catherine; Winslow, Max; Shah, Harsh; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Schmedlen, Rachael H.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish is a valuable model for teaching developmental, molecular, and cell biology; aquatic sciences; comparative anatomy; physiology; and genetics. Here we demonstrate that zebrafish provide an excellent model system to teach engineering principles. A seven-member undergraduate team in a biomedical engineering class designed, built, and tested a zebrafish microfluidic bioreactor applying microfluidics, an emerging engineering technology, to study zebrafish development. During the semester, students learned engineering and biology experimental design, chip microfabrication, mathematical modeling, zebrafish husbandry, principles of developmental biology, fluid dynamics, microscopy, and basic molecular biology theory and techniques. The team worked to maximize each person's contribution and presented weekly written and oral reports. Two postdoctoral fellows, a graduate student, and three faculty instructors coordinated and directed the team in an optimal blending of engineering, molecular, and developmental biology skill sets. The students presented two posters, including one at the Zebrafish meetings in Madison, Wisconsin (June 2008). PMID:19292670

  12. A case study: semantic integration of gene-disease associations for type 2 diabetes mellitus from literature and biomedical data resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Grabmüller, Christoph; Kavaliauskas, Silvestras; Croset, Samuel; Woollard, Peter; Backofen, Rolf; Filsell, Wendy; Clark, Dominic

    2014-07-01

    In the Semantic Enrichment of the Scientific Literature (SESL) project, researchers from academia and from life science and publishing companies collaborated in a pre-competitive way to integrate and share information for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults. This case study exposes benefits from semantic interoperability after integrating the scientific literature with biomedical data resources, such as UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) and the Gene Expression Atlas (GXA). We annotated scientific documents in a standardized way, by applying public terminological resources for diseases and proteins, and other text-mining approaches. Eventually, we compared the genetic causes of T2DM across the data resources to demonstrate the benefits from the SESL triple store. Our solution enables publishers to distribute their content with little overhead into remote data infrastructures, such as into any Virtual Knowledge Broker.

  13. 2. mednarodna konferenca My PhD = 2nd My phd International Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armand Faganel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the organization of the second My phd InternationalConference organized in June in Bratislava. The organizer Friedrich Ebert Foundation is a German non-profit organization. During the conference young researchers from various fields dealt with the issue of ‘New Europe’ and the challenges of sustainable development. The conference was also an opportunity for young researchers to meet new colleagues and exchange their views. The interest was very big since only 40 percent of the applicants were accepted. Another interesting thing was the competitive approach towards the conference, which means that only the best articles will be published in the conference proceedings.

  14. An introduction to biomedical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Dewhurst, D J

    1976-01-01

    An Introduction to Biomedical Instrumentation presents a course of study and applications covering the basic principles of medical and biological instrumentation, as well as the typical features of its design and construction. The book aims to aid not only the cognitive domain of the readers, but also their psychomotor domain as well. Aside from the seminar topics provided, which are divided into 27 chapters, the book complements these topics with practical applications of the discussions. Figures and mathematical formulas are also given. Major topics discussed include the construction, handli

  15. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  16. ebibliographical compilation of phd theses produced at the faculty of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... This paper attempts to provide a systematic list of Ph.D theses produced by the. Faculty of Science ... field of library and information science the concept of bibliography .... Information System (GIS) in Kano State,. Nigeria.

  17. Meet EPA Engineer Shawn Ryan, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawn Ryan, Ph.D. is a chemical engineer at EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center. He has worked at EPA for 12 years, nine of which have been devoted to leading research to support decontamination and consequence management.

  18. Meet EPA Scientist Tim Shafer, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim Shafer earned his bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry from Hope College in Holland, MI, in 1986 and his Ph.D. in pharmacology and environmental toxicology from Michigan State University in 1991.

  19. Meet EPA Scientist Susan Yee, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Yee, Ph.D., is an ecologist at EPA's Gulf Ecology Division. She is working on the Puerto Rico Sustainable Communities program, developing decision support tools to evaluate how alternative decisions impact coastal ecosystem goods and services

  20. Zapping biomedical waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strack, T.

    1997-08-01

    Advances made in the use of microwave radiation techniques in the disinfection and disposal of biomedical wastes were discussed. Commercial-scale microwave disinfection methods have been developed in Germany and brought to North America in 1990. Since then some 30 hospitals in the U.S. and one in Canada have adopted the system. Details of the technology and its several operational benefits such as reduced costs, higher productivity, enhanced quality, and environmentally superior attributes, were described. The only Canadian installation is currently being operated by MEDispose Inc., as an independent, commercial biomedical treatment facility. It serves all of the southern Ontario region. Other Canadian provinces are expected to embrace the technology following extensive information dissemination about the Toronto project by the Canadian Electricity Association.

  1. Exploring challenges of the reproductive health PhD curriculum: A qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Kohan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enhancing the quality and dynamicity of higher education programs requires continuous evaluation of curriculums. Reproductive health PhD program was established in 2006 in Iran while recommending that its curriculum be evaluated by assessing graduates’ performance in workplace and surveying students, faculty members and managers. This study aimed to explore challenges of the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program. Methods: Employing a qualitative content analysis approach and using purposive and sometimes opportunistic sampling, experiences and viewpoints of 33 graduates and students of reproductive health PhD program, educational managers and reproductive health board members about the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program were collected through individual interviews and notes in 2014-15. Data were transcribed and important expressions were coded. Classification of similar codes led to preliminary categories. Five main categories were extracted by further classifications. Results: The five main categories included inadequacy of course topics and contents, challenges of student education, failure in realizing curriculum goals, long research period, and ambiguity in graduates’ professional status were appeared; each of these included various subcategories. Conclusion: Results showed that the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program required revisions to meet the program’s mission and designing courses such as sexual health and reinforcing the clinical nature of the program were necessary. Moreover, the results emphasized that the establishment of an independent educational department of reproductive health for managing higher education affairs and greater supervision of the reproductive health board on educational affairs was necessary. Furthermore, reproductive health specialists should be employed in different positions to meet society’s reproductive health needs.

  2. Adaptive Biomedical Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, P K; Hirsch, G

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive Biomedical Innovation (ABI) is a multistakeholder approach to product and process innovation aimed at accelerating the delivery of clinical value to patients and society. ABI offers the opportunity to transcend the fragmentation and linearity of decision-making in our current model and create a common collaborative framework that optimizes the benefit and access of new medicines for patients as well as creating a more sustainable innovation ecosystem.

  3. Multilingual biomedical dictionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumke, Philipp; Markó, Kornél; Poprat, Michael; Schulz, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    We present a unique technique to create a multilingual biomedical dictionary, based on a methodology called Morpho-Semantic indexing. Our approach closes a gap caused by the absence of free available multilingual medical dictionaries and the lack of accuracy of non-medical electronic translation tools. We first explain the underlying technology followed by a description of the dictionary interface, which makes use of a multilingual subword thesaurus and of statistical information from a domain-specific, multilingual corpus.

  4. [Biomedical activity of biosurfactants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowska, Anna

    2010-07-23

    Biosurfactants, amphiphilic compounds, synthesized by microorganisms have surface, antimicrobial and antitumor properties. Biosurfactants prevent adhesion and biofilms formation by bacteria and fungi on various surfaces. For many years microbial surfactants are used as antibiotics with board spectrum of activity against microorganisms. Biosurfactants act as antiviral compounds and their antitumor activities are mediated through induction of apoptosis. This work presents the current state of knowledge related to biomedical activity of biosurfactants.

  5. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  6. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  7. Engineering β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiling; Liu, Menghua; Ye, Ling; Ren, Jiaoyan; Liao, Wenzhen; Liu, Shuwen

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogels have been widely studied in various biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, cell culture, immunotherapy and vaccines, and drug delivery. Peptide-based nanofibers represent a promising new strategy for current drug delivery approaches and cell carriers for tissue engineering. This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of self-assembling engineered β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications. The applications of peptide nanofibers in biomedical fields, such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, immunotherapy, and vaccines, are highlighted. The current challenges and future perspectives for self-assembling peptide nanofibers in biomedical applications are discussed.

  8. Microfabrication materials for biomedical microdevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Derek James

    Major hurdles to the implementation of microfabricated devices for therapeutic applications include materials processing and biocompatibility issues. This dissertation reports research on improving the materials selection and fabrication for biomedical microdevices, using a microfabricated immunoisolation biocapsule as an example. Two material classes in the microfabrication protocol were examined based on the requirements determined for biomedical microdevices: the adhesive layer for bonding devices to encapsulate delicate biological substances and the thin film structural materials for surface structures, such as the biocapsule membrane. The major requirements for the adhesive layer material included non-cytotoxicity during bonding, adhesive strength, and durability under physiological conditions. Low glassy-phase transition temperature (Tg) methacrylates were found to be suitable candidates for adhesives of biomedical microdevices. A comparison study of poly propy1methacrylate (PPMA), poly (butyl, ethyl) methacrylate (PBEMA), and the higher Tg PMMA showed that all of the methacrylates had similar biocompatibility, adhesive strength, and durability. The adhesive strengths were found to be suitable for the adhesion of biomedical microdevices, as shown by measurement using a pressurized plate test and the current use of PMMA as bone cement. None of the methacrylates showed evidence of cytotoxicity, as measured by both optical and cytometric cell culture cytotoxicity tests. A protocol for the selective placement of smooth, thin films of PPMA using a Gel-PakTM transfer substrate was developed and demonstrated. The major requirements determined for the thin film structural materials were based on processing, mechanical, and biological parameters. Several candidates were identified as for structural materials based on these requirements: polycrystalline silicon. silicon nitride, fluoropolymers, PMMA, and silicone. A new fabrication protocol was developed to allow the

  9. Enhancing Graduate and Postdoctoral Education To Create a Sustainable Biomedical Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Cynthia N

    2016-11-01

    PhD-trained biomedical scientists are moving into an increasingly diverse variety of careers within the sciences. However, graduate and postdoctoral training programs have historically focused on academic career preparation, and have not sufficiently prepared trainees for transitioning into other scientific careers. Advocates for science have raised the concern that the collective disregard of the broader career-development needs for predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees could drive talent away from science in upcoming generations. A shift is occurring, wherein universities are increasingly investing in centralized career development programs to address this need. In this Perspective, I reflect on the movement that brought biomedical PhD career development to the spotlight in recent years, and how this movement has influenced both the academic biomedical community and the field of career development. I offer recommendations for universities looking to establish or strengthen their career development programs, including recommendations for how to develop a campus culture that values career development as part of pre- and postdoctoral training. I also suggest steps that faculty might take to facilitate the career development of their mentees, regardless of the mentee's career aspirations. Finally, I reflect on recent national efforts to incentivize innovation, evaluation, and research in the field of biomedical PhD career development, and propose actions that the scientific community can take to support biomedical career development further as a scholarly discipline. These investments will enable new approaches to be rigorously tested and efficiently disseminated to support this rapidly growing field. Ultimately, strengthening biomedical career development will be essential for attracting the best talent to science and helping them efficiently move into careers that will sustain our nation's scientific enterprise.

  10. NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2009-01-01

    To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

  11. Biomedical data analysis by supervised manifold learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Meza, A M; Daza-Santacoloma, G; Castellanos-Dominguez, G

    2012-01-01

    Biomedical data analysis is usually carried out by assuming that the information structure embedded into the biomedical recordings is linear, but that statement actually does not corresponds to the real behavior of the extracted features. In order to improve the accuracy of an automatic system to diagnostic support, and to reduce the computational complexity of the employed classifiers, we propose a nonlinear dimensionality reduction methodology based on manifold learning with multiple kernel representations, which learns the underlying data structure of biomedical information. Moreover, our approach can be used as a tool that allows the specialist to do a visual analysis and interpretation about the studied variables describing the health condition. Obtained results show how our approach maps the original high dimensional features into an embedding space where simple and straightforward classification strategies achieve a suitable system performance.

  12. Addiction protein Phd of plasmid prophage P1 is a substrate of the ClpXP serine protease of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehnherr, H; Yarmolinsky, M B

    1995-01-01

    Plasmid-encoded addiction genes augment the apparent stability of various low copy number bacterial plasmids by selectively killing plasmid-free (cured) segregants or their progeny. The addiction module of plasmid prophage P1 consists of a pair of genes called phd and doc. Phd serves to prevent host death when the prophage is retained and, should retention mechanisms fail, Doc causes death on curing. Doc acts as a cell toxin to which Phd is an antidote. In this study we show that host mutants...

  13. Critical Contexts for Biomedical Research in a Native American Community: Health Care, History, and Community Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Puneet Chawla

    2012-01-01

    Native Americans have been underrepresented in previous studies of biomedical research participants. This paper reports a qualitative interview study of Native Americans' perspectives on biomedical research. In-depth interviews were conducted with 53 members of a Southwest tribal community. Many interviewees viewed biomedical research studies as a…

  14. Critical Contexts for Biomedical Research in a Native American Community: Health Care, History, and Community Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Puneet Chawla

    2012-01-01

    Native Americans have been underrepresented in previous studies of biomedical research participants. This paper reports a qualitative interview study of Native Americans' perspectives on biomedical research. In-depth interviews were conducted with 53 members of a Southwest tribal community. Many interviewees viewed biomedical research studies as a…

  15. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Richard

    Biomedical imaging, and in particular MRI and CT, is often identified as among the top 10 most significant advances in healthcare in the 20th century. This presentation will describe some of the recent advances in medical physics and imaging being funded by NIH in this century and current funding opportunities. The presentation will also highlight the role of multidisciplinary research in bringing concepts from the physical sciences and applying them to challenges in biological and biomedical research.. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging.

  16. BIMS: Biomedical Information Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Oscar; Bisbal, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present BIMS (Biomedical Information Management System). BIMS is a software architecture designed to provide a flexible computational framework to manage the information needs of a wide range of biomedical research projects. The main goal is to facilitate the clinicians' job in data entry, and researcher's tasks in data management, in high data quality biomedical research projects. The BIMS architecture has been designed following the two-level modeling paradigm, a promising...

  17. Reviewing manuscripts for biomedical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmel, Gus M

    2010-01-01

    Writing for publication is a complex task. For many professionals, producing a well-executed manuscript conveying one's research, ideas, or educational wisdom is challenging. Authors have varying emotions related to the process of writing for scientific publication. Although not studied, a relationship between an author's enjoyment of the writing process and the product's outcome is highly likely. As with any skill, practice generally results in improvements. Literature focused on preparing manuscripts for publication and the art of reviewing submissions exists. Most journals guard their reviewers' anonymity with respect to the manuscript review process. This is meant to protect them from direct or indirect author demands, which may occur during the review process or in the future. It is generally accepted that author identities are masked in the peer-review process. However, the concept of anonymity for reviewers has been debated recently; many editors consider it problematic that reviewers are not held accountable to the public for their decisions. The review process is often arduous and underappreciated, one reason why biomedical journals acknowledge editors and frequently recognize reviewers who donate their time and expertise in the name of science. This article describes essential elements of a submitted manuscript, with the hopes of improving scientific writing. It also discusses the review process within the biomedical literature, the importance of reviewers to the scientific process, responsibilities of reviewers, and qualities of a good review and reviewer. In addition, it includes useful insights to individuals who read and interpret the medical literature.

  18. Superhydrophobic materials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falde, Eric J; Yohe, Stefan T; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-10-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are actively studied across a wide range of applications and industries, and are now finding increased use in the biomedical arena as substrates to control protein adsorption, cellular interaction, and bacterial growth, as well as platforms for drug delivery devices and for diagnostic tools. The commonality in the design of these materials is to create a stable or metastable air layer at the material surface, which lends itself to a number of unique properties. These activities are catalyzing the development of new materials, applications, and fabrication techniques, as well as collaborations across material science, chemistry, engineering, and medicine given the interdisciplinary nature of this work. The review begins with a discussion of superhydrophobicity, and then explores biomedical applications that are utilizing superhydrophobicity in depth including material selection characteristics, in vitro performance, and in vivo performance. General trends are offered for each application in addition to discussion of conflicting data in the literature, and the review concludes with the authors' future perspectives on the utility of superhydrophobic biomaterials for medical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomedical photonics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-01-01

    1.Biomedical Photonics: A Revolution at the Interface of Science and Technology, T. Vo-DinhPHOTONICS AND TISSUE OPTICS2.Optical Properties of Tissues, J. Mobley and T. Vo-Dinh3.Light-Tissue Interactions, V.V. Tuchin 4.Theoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion Tomography, S.J. Norton and T. Vo-DinhPHOTONIC DEVICES5.Laser Light in Biomedicine and the Life Sciences: From the Present to the Future, V.S. Letokhov6.Basic Instrumentation in Photonics, T. Vo-Dinh7.Optical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical Applications, I. Gannot and

  20. Biomedical signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquillo, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Signals and Systems is meant to accompany a one-semester undergraduate signals and systems course. It may also serve as a quick-start for graduate students or faculty interested in how signals and systems techniques can be applied to living systems. The biological nature of the examples allows for systems thinking to be applied to electrical, mechanical, fluid, chemical, thermal and even optical systems. Each chapter focuses on a topic from classic signals and systems theory: System block diagrams, mathematical models, transforms, stability, feedback, system response, control, time

  1. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1973-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 2, is a collection of papers that discusses the basic sciences, the applied sciences of engineering, the medical sciences, and the delivery of health services. One paper discusses the models of adrenal cortical control, including the secretion and metabolism of cortisol (the controlled process), as well as the initiation and modulation of secretion of ACTH (the controller). Another paper discusses hospital computer systems-application problems, objective evaluation of technology, and multiple pathways for future hospital computer applications. The pos

  2. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1974-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 4, is a collection of papers that deals with gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy and the analysis of minute samples, as well as the role of the government in regulating the production, usage, safety, and efficacy of medical devices. One paper reviews the use of mass spectrometry and computer technology in relation to gas-phase analytical methods based on gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer instruments and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer-computer analytical systems. Many health practitioners, government and private health agencies, the legal prof

  3. Principles of Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2010-01-01

    Describing the role of engineering in medicine today, this comprehensive volume covers a wide range of the most important topics in this burgeoning field. Supported with over 145 illustrations, the book discusses bioelectrical systems, mechanical analysis of biological tissues and organs, biomaterial selection, compartmental modeling, and biomedical instrumentation. Moreover, you find a thorough treatment of the concept of using living cells in various therapeutics and diagnostics.Structured as a complete text for students with some engineering background, the book also makes a valuable refere

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites, their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  5. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  6. Polydopamine Integrated Nanomaterials and Their Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Huang, Yongshun; Yang, Gang; Li, Jiaxing; Wang, Tingting; Schulz, Olaf H; Jennings, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    In the past few decades, the applications of nanomaterials in biologic systems have become one of the most studied areas. Many novel syntheses and processing methods have been developed to generate nanomaterials to enhance biomedical applications. Among those methods, polydopamine (PDA) integrated nanomaterials have attracted considerable interest for various types of biomedical applications. This concise review outlines the basic chemistry and material science regarding PDA and discusses its successful applications in drug delivery, biosensing, antifouling and antimicrobial activities, as well as its interaction with cells.

  7. A Novel Approach to Physiology Education for Biomedical Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCecco, J.; Wu, J.; Kuwasawa, K.; Sun, Y.

    2007-01-01

    It is challenging for biomedical engineering programs to incorporate an indepth study of the systemic interdependence of cells, tissues, and organs into the rigorous mathematical curriculum that is the cornerstone of engineering education. To be sure, many biomedical engineering programs require their students to enroll in anatomy and physiology…

  8. Biomedical problems of hydrotechnical construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, A.B.; El' piner, L.I.; Delitsyn, V.M.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of hydrotechnical and water-management construction on the living conditions and health of the population was examined. The results were used to develop the scientific bases and methods of biomedical predictions in several stages: evaluating biomedical conditions in territories where a change is expected, and constructing biomedical prediction proper of the effect of hydrotechnical constructions. The development of the indicated predictions make it possible to include measures on intensifying the positive and preventing or abating undesired effects on the biomedical situation when designing hydrotechnical and water-management construction.

  9. Biomedical ontologies: a functional perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubin, Daniel L; Shah, Nigam H; Noy, Natalya F

    .... Ontologies-specifications of the entities, their attributes and relationships among the entities in a domain of discourse-are increasingly enabling biomedical researchers to accomplish these tasks...

  10. Tumor immunoscintigraphy by means of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: Multicenter studies of the Italian National Research Council--Special Project Biomedical Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siccardi, A.G. (Universita di Milano (Italy))

    1990-02-01

    Four radioimmunopharmaceuticals ({sup 99m}Tc- and 111In-labeled anti-melanoma and {sup 111}In- and {sup 131}I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen F(ab')2 fragments derived from monoclonal antibodies 225.28S and F023C5) were developed by means of a collaborative effort coordinated by the Italian National Research Council, Special Project Biomedical Engineering. After appropriate pilot studies, the radioimmunopharmaceuticals, prepared by Sorin Biomedica (Saluggia, Italy), were distributed to 31 Nuclear Medicine departments in Italy and in 10 other European countries within the framework of three immunoscintigraphy multicenter studies. A total of 1245 patients were studied, 898 of whom carried 1725 documented tumor lesions; 1596 of 2193 tumor lesions (468 of which were previously unknown) were imaged by immunoscintigraphy in 785 of 990 lesion-bearing patients. Among the occult lesions, 173 were imaged in 92 patients admitted to the study as lesion-free patients. The results have been analyzed in terms of the reliability, reproducibility, and diagnostic usefulness of the method and of each immunoradiopharmaceutical.

  11. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    CERN Document Server

    Metcalfe, Travis S

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to promote self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astr...

  12. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  13. The Virtual Observatory Powered PhD Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, I. Yu.

    2010-12-01

    The Virtual Observatory has reached sufficient maturity for its routine scientific exploitation by astronomers. To prove this statement, here I present a brief description of the complete VO-powered PhD thesis entitled “Galactic and extragalactic research with modern surveys and the Virtual Observatory” comprising 4 science cases covering various aspects of astrophysical research. These comprize: (1) homogeneous search and measurement of main physical parameters of Galactic open star clusters in huge multi-band photometric surveys; (2) study of optical-to-NIR galaxy colors using a large homogeneous dataset including spectroscopy and photometry from SDSS and UKIDSS; (3) study of faint low-mass X-ray binary population in modern observational archives; (4) search for optical counterparts of unidentified X-ray objects with large positional uncertainties in the Galactic Plane. All these projects make heavy use of the VO technologies and tools and would not be achievable without them. So refereed papers published in the frame of this thesis can undoubtedly be added to the growing list of VO-based research works.

  14. Electrosprayed calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, Sander Cornelis Gerardus

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the suitability of the Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD) technique was studied for biomedical purposes, i.e., deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings onto titanium substrates. Using ESD, which is a simple and cheap deposition method for inorganic and organic coatings, it wa

  15. Advances in Swine biomedical Model Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript is a short update on the diversity of swine biomedical models and the importance of genomics in their continued development. The swine has been used as a major mammalian model for human studies because of the similarity in size and physiology, and in organ development and disease pro...

  16. Belief in AIDS Origin Conspiracy Theory and Willingness to Participate in Biomedical Research Studies: Findings in Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics in Seven Cities Across Two Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stefanie L.; Katz, Ralph V.; Wang, Min Qi; Lee, Ryan; Green, B. Lee; Kressin, Nancy R.; Claudio, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether a belief in the AIDS origin conspiracy theory is related to likelihood or fear of participation in research studies. Methods The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire was administered via random-digit-dialed telephone interview to black, white, and Hispanic participants in 4 cities in 1999 and 2000 (n = 1,133) and in 3 cities in 2003 (n = 1,162). Results In 1999, 27.8% of blacks, 23.6% of Hispanics, and 8% of whites (P ≤ .001) reported that it was “very or somewhat likely” that AIDS is “the result of a government plan to intentionally kill a certain group of people by genocide.” In 2003, 34.1% of blacks, 21.9% of Hispanics, and 8.4% of whites (P ≤ .001) reported the same. Conclusions Whereas blacks and Hispanics were more than 3 times more likely than whites to believe in this AIDS origin conspiracy theory, holding this belief was not associated with a decreased likelihood of participation in, or increased fear of participation in, biomedical research. PMID:21388939

  17. 1st International Conference on Computational and Experimental Biomedical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, RM

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at ICCEBS 2013 – the 1st International Conference on Computational and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, which was organized in Azores, in October 2013. The included papers present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques, including active shape models, constitutive models, isogeometric elements, genetic algorithms, level sets, material models, neural networks, optimization, and the finite element method, in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving biofluids, computer simulation, computational biomechanics, image based diagnosis, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration, scaffolds, simulation, and surgical planning. The main audience for this book consists of researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to the areas of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, biology, biomechanics, computational fluid dynamics, comput...

  18. BIOMedical Search Engine Framework: Lightweight and customized implementation of domain-specific biomedical search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jácome, Alberto G; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália

    2016-07-01

    meaningful to that particular scope of research. Conversely, indirect concept associations, i.e. concepts related by other intermediary concepts, can be useful to integrate information from different studies and look into non-trivial relations. The BIOMedical Search Engine Framework supports the development of domain-specific search engines. The key strengths of the framework are modularity and extensibilityin terms of software design, the use of open-source consolidated Web technologies, and the ability to integrate any number of biomedical text mining tools and information resources. Currently, the Smart Drug Search keeps over 1,186,000 documents, containing more than 11,854,000 annotations for 77,200 different concepts. The Smart Drug Search is publicly accessible at http://sing.ei.uvigo.es/sds/. The BIOMedical Search Engine Framework is freely available for non-commercial use at https://github.com/agjacome/biomsef. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dido3 PHD Modulates Cell Differentiation and Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovylyn Gatchalian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Death Inducer Obliterator 3 (Dido3 is implicated in the maintenance of stem cell genomic stability and tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Dido3 regulates the expression of stemness genes in embryonic stem cells through its plant homeodomain (PHD finger. Binding of Dido3 PHD to histone H3K4me3 is disrupted by threonine phosphorylation that triggers Dido3 translocation from chromatin to the mitotic spindle. The crystal structure of Dido3 PHD in complex with H3K4me3 reveals an atypical aromatic-cage-like binding site that contains a histidine residue. Biochemical, structural, and mutational analyses of the binding mechanism identified the determinants of specificity and affinity and explained the inability of homologous PHF3 to bind H3K4me3. Together, our findings reveal a link between the transcriptional control in embryonic development and regulation of cell division.

  20. An analysis of Ph.D. examiners' reports in engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, differ considerably from those in other fields in areas such as gender of candidates and examiners and the examiners' geographical location. We also found that assessment areas such as significance and contribution of the thesis, publications arising from the thesis, breadth, depth and recency of the literature review and communication and editorial correctness are areas in which the proportion of text of engineering examiners' comments differs significantly from other fields.

  1. Professional Identification for Biomedical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Francis M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses four methods of professional identification in biomedical engineering including registration, certification, accreditation, and possible membership qualification of the societies. Indicates that the destiny of the biomedical engineer may be under the control of a new profession, neither the medical nor the engineering. (CC)

  2. Study of magnetic and structural and optical properties of Zn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method for biomedical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rezay Marand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective(s: This paper describes synthesizing of magnetic nanocomposite with co-precipitation method. Materials and Methods: Magnetic ZnxFe3-xO4 nanoparticles with 0-14% zinc doping (x=0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1 and 0.125 were successfully synthesized by co-precipitation method. The prepared zinc-doped Fe 3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Results: results obtained from X-ray diffraction pattern have revealed the formation of single phase nanoparticles with cubic inverse spinal structures which size varies from 11.13 to 12.81 nm. The prepared nanoparticles have also possessed superparamagnetic properties at room temperature and high level of saturation magnetization with the maximum level of 74.60 emu/g for x=0.075. Ms changing in pure magnetite nanoparticles after impurities addition were explained based on two factors of “particles size” and “exchange interactions”. Optical studies results revealed that band gaps in all Zn-doped NPs are higher than pure Fe 3O4. As doping percent increases, band gap value decreases from 1.26 eV to 0.43 eV. Conclusion: these magnetic nanocomposite structures since having superparamagnetic property offer a high potential for biosensing and biomedical application.

  3. Synthesis and study of structural and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell nanocomposite for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Helmi Rashid Farimani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: This paper describes coating of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs with amorphous silica shells.   Materials and Methods: First, magnetite (Fe3O4 NPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method and then treated with stabilizer molecule of trisodium citrate to enhance their dispersibility. Afterwards, coating with silica was carried out via a sol-gel approach in which the electrostatically stabilized MNPs were used as seeds. The samples were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. Results: The results of XRD analysis implied that the prepared nanocomposite consists of two compounds of crystalline magnetite and amorphous silica that formation of their core/shell structure with the shell thickness of about 5 nm was confirmed by TEM images. The magnetic studies also indicated that produced Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell nanocomposite exhibits superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. Conclusion: These core/shell structure due to having superparamagnetic property of Fe3O4 and unique properties of SiO2, offers a high potential for many biomedical applications.

  4. Pioneering women in American mathematics the pre-1940 PhD's

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Judy

    2008-01-01

    More than 14 percent of the PhD's awarded in the United States during the first four decades of the twentieth century went to women, a proportion not achieved again until the 1980s. This book is the result of a study in which the authors identified all of the American women who earned PhD's in mathematics before 1940, and collected extensive biographical and bibliographical information about each of them. By reconstructing as complete a picture as possible of this group of women, Green and LaDuke reveal insights into the larger scientific and cultural communities in which they lived and worked. The book contains an extended introductory essay, as well as biographical entries for each of the 228 women in the study. The authors examine family backgrounds, education, careers, and other professional activities. They show that there were many more women earning PhD's in mathematics before 1940 than is commonly thought. Extended biographies and bibliographical information are available from the companion website fo...

  5. Research Career Persistence for Solar and Space Physics PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, Mark B.; Morrow, Cherilynn

    2016-06-01

    Results from a recent graduate student survey found unsurprisingly that Solar and Space Physics (S&SP) PhD graduate students almost all aspire to have research careers in Solar and Space Physics. This study reports on the research career persistence over the first decade of the new millennium for S&SP PhDs. We used publication of science citation indexed articles as the indicator for persistence in a research career. We found that nearly two thirds (64%) of PhDs who graduated between 2001 and 2009 published refereed papers in 2012 or 2013, while 17% of PhDs never published another paper beyond the year they received their PhD. The remaining 19% of PhDs stopped publishing within three years of receiving their PhD. We found no gender difference between research persistence. We also found that though there is statistically no difference on persistence of publishing research between graduates of the largest programs compared to all other programs, there are significant differences between individual programs. This study indicates that a majority of S&SP PhDs find research careers but that a significant fraction pursue careers where publishing in science citation indexed journals is not required. Graduate programs, advisors, and potential graduate students can use these data for career planning and developing mentoring programs that meet the career outcomes of all of their graduates.

  6. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies.

  7. MEMS biomedical implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tai Yuchong

    2012-01-01

    The field of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) has advanced tremendously for the last 20 years. Most commercially noticeably, the field has successfully advanced from pressure sensors to micro physical sensors, such as accelerometers and gyros, for handheld electronics application. In parallel, MEMS has also advanced into micro total analysis system(TAS) and/or lab-on-a-chip applications. This article would discuss a relatively new but promising future direction towards MEMS biomedical implants. Specifically, Parylene C has been explored to be used as a good MEMS implant material and will be discussed in detail. Demonstrated implant devices, such as retinal and spinal cord implants, are presented in this article.

  8. Piezoelectric nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Menciassi, Arianna

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale structures and materials have been explored in many biological applications because of their novel and impressive physical and chemical properties. Such properties allow remarkable opportunities to study and interact with complex biological processes. This book analyses the state of the art of piezoelectric nanomaterials and introduces their applications in the biomedical field. Despite their impressive potentials, piezoelectric materials have not yet received significant attention for bio-applications. This book shows that the exploitation of piezoelectric nanoparticles in nanomedicine is possible and realistic, and their impressive physical properties can be useful for several applications, ranging from sensors and transducers for the detection of biomolecules to “sensible” substrates for tissue engineering or cell stimulation.

  9. Tritium AMS for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.L.; Velsko, C.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-08-01

    We are developing {sup 3}H-AMS to measure {sup 3}H activity of mg-sized biological samples. LLNL has already successfully applied {sup 14}C AMS to a variety of problems in the area of biomedical research. Development of {sup 3}H AMS would greatly complement these studies. The ability to perform {sup 3}H AMS measurements at sensitivities equivalent to those obtained for {sup 14}C will allow us to perform experiments using compounds that are not readily available in {sup 14}C-tagged form. A {sup 3}H capability would also allow us to perform unique double-labeling experiments in which we learn the fate, distribution, and metabolism of separate fractions of biological compounds.

  10. Animals in biomedical space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert W.

    The use of experimental animals has been a major component of biomedical research progress. Using animals in space presents special problems, but also provides special opportunities. Rat and squirrel monkeys experiments have been planned in concert with human experiments to help answer fundamental questions concerning the effect of weightlessness on mammalian function. For the most part, these experiments focus on identified changes noted in humans during space flight. Utilizing space laboratory facilities, manipulative experiments can be completed while animals are still in orbit. Other experiments are designed to study changes in gravity receptor structure and function and the effect of weightlessness on early vertebrate development. Following these preliminary animals experiments on Spacelab Shuttle flights, longer term programs of animal investigation will be conducted on Space Station.

  11. Cell mechanics in biomedical cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the deformation behaviours of cellular entities, such as coated microbubbles and liposomes subject to a cavitation flow, become increasingly important for the advancement of ultrasonic imaging and drug delivery. Numerical simulations for bubble dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents based on the boundary integral method are presented in this work. The effects of the encapsulating shell are estimated by adapting Hoff's model used for thin-shell contrast agents. The viscosity effects are estimated by including the normal viscous stress in the boundary condition. In parallel, mechanical models of cell membranes and liposomes as well as state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative measurement of viscoelasticity for a single cell or coated microbubbles are reviewed. The future developments regarding modelling and measurement of the material properties of the cellular entities for cutting-edge biomedical applications are also discussed. PMID:26442142

  12. PhD Students' Experiences of Thesis Supervision in Malaysia: Managing Relationships in the Midst of Institutional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Steven Eric; Ismail, Ismi Arif

    2010-01-01

    Despite the plethora of studies that have been conducted on PhD supervision, little qualitative investigation has been conducted with a diverse, non-Western sample of doctoral students in an attempt to understand how the supervisory relationship is experienced. In response, eighteen students from diverse, non-Western backgrounds studying at one…

  13. De-Colonising International Collaboration: The University of Kwazulu-Natal-Mauritius Institute of Education Cohort PhD Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael Anthony; Mariaye, Hyleen

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the setting up of the partnership across the Mauritian and South African higher education contexts with respect to the development of a postgraduate PhD doctoral studies programme. The Mauritian Institute of Education (MIE) aims to develop staffing capacities through engagement with doctoral studies, especially in the context…

  14. Knowledge and Perceptions about Clinical Trials and the Use of Biomedical Samples: Findings from a Qualitative Study in Rural Northern Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Chatio

    Full Text Available Clinical trials conducted in sub-Saharan Africa have helped to address the prevalent health challenges. The knowledge about how communities perceive clinical trials is however only now evolving. This study was conducted among parents whose children participated in past clinical trials in northern Ghana to assess their knowledge and perceptions of clinical trials and the use of biomedical samples.This was a qualitative study based on eighty in-depth interviews with parents. The participants were randomly selected from among parents whose children were enrolled in a clinical trial conducted in the Kassena-Nankana districts between 2000 and 2003. The interviews were transcribed and coded into emergent themes using Nvivo 9 software. The thematic analysis framework was used to analyze the data.Study participants reported that clinical trials were carried out to determine the efficacy of drugs and to make sure that these drugs were suitable for human beings to use. The conduct of clinical trials was perceived to have helped to reduce the occurrence of diseases such as malaria, cerebrospinal meningitis and diarrhea. Quality of care was reported to be better in clinical trials than in the routine care. Parents indicated that participation in clinical trials positively influenced their health-seeking behavior. Apprehensions about blood draw and the use to which samples were put were expressed, with suspicion by a few participants that researchers sold blood samples. The issue of blood draw was most contentious.Parents perception about the conduct of clinical trials in the study districts is generally positive. However, misconceptions made about the use of blood samples in this study must be taken seriously and strategies found to improve transparency and greater community acceptability.

  15. HmtDB, a Human Mitochondrial Genomic Resource Based on Variability Studies Supporting Population Genetics and Biomedical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Pappadà Graziano; Scioscia Gaetano; Lascaro Daniela; Santamaria Monica; Accetturo Matteo; Attimonelli Marcella; Russo Luigi; Zanchetta Luigi; Tommaseo-Ponzetta Mila

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Population genetics studies based on the analysis of mtDNA and mitochondrial disease studies have produced a huge quantity of sequence data and related information. These data are at present worldwide distributed in differently organised databases and web sites not well integrated among them. Moreover it is not generally possible for the user to submit and contemporarily analyse its own data comparing them with the content of a given database, both for population genetics ...

  16. Chemical, biomedical and ecological studies of SRC-I materials from the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahlum, D.D. (ed.)

    1981-01-01

    This document discusses studies performed with solvent refined coal (SRC) materials obtained from the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant during operation in the SRC-I mode. The development of analytical methodology is presented as well as results obtained from the application of these methods to light oil (LO), wash solvent (WS) and process solvent (PS). Results of cellular and animal studies with LO, WS and PS are included, along with a description of methods for the generation and characterization of LO and PS aerosols, and for exposing rats, mice and guinea pigs to these aerosols. The effects of SRC-I product on seed germination and plant growth which have also been studied are discussed. The SRC-I product, feed coal and the mineral residue have been analyzed for organic and inorganic constituents. The higher-boiling-point material, PS, exhibited significant mutagenic activity in the Ames assay; LO and WS were inactive. Process solvent also caused transformation of cultured Syrian hamster embryo cells. Additional chemical fractionation studies suggest that primary aromatic amines are major determinants of the observed mutagenic activity. Skin-painting studies with SRC-II naphtha, heavy distillate, shale oil and petroleum crude indicate a good correlation between the results of the cellular assays and skin carcinogenesis in mice. Wash solvent was more toxic after oral administration to rats than was light oil or process solvent. The effects of LO, WS and PS on development were studied after administration to pregnant rats. The tissue distribution of a number of components of PS was studied after oral administration of PS to rats. The effect of SRC-I product on the germination and growth of barley was investigated by mixing or layering the product with soil and placing the mixture in a field lysimeter.

  17. The clinical academic workforce of the future: a cross-sectional study of factors influencing career decision-making among clinical PhD students at two research-intensive UK universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Joana; Ranieri, Veronica; Lambert, Trevor; Pugh, Chris; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi J; Rees, Geraint; Best, Denise

    2017-08-28

    To examine clinical doctoral students' demographic and training characteristics, career intentions, career preparedness and what influences them as they plan their future careers. Online cross-sectional census surveys at two research-intensive medical schools in England in 2015-2016. All medically qualified PhD students (N=523) enrolled at the University of Oxford and University College London were invited to participate. We report on data from 320 participants (54% male and 44% female), who were representative by gender of the invited population. Career intentions. Respondents were mainly in specialty training, including close to training completion (25%, n=80), and 18% (n=57) had completed training. Half (50%, n=159) intended to pursue a clinical academic career (CAC) and 62% (n=198) were at least moderately likely to seek a clinical lectureship (CL). However, 51% (n=163) had little or no knowledge about CL posts. Those wanting a CAC tended to have the most predoctoral medical research experience (χ(2) (2, N=305)=22.19, p=0.0005). Key reasons cited for not pursuing a CAC were the small number of senior academic appointments available, the difficulty of obtaining research grants and work-life balance. Findings suggest that urging predoctoral clinicians to gain varied research experience while ensuring availability of opportunities, and introducing more flexible recruitment criteria for CL appointments, would foster CACs. As CL posts are often only open to those still in training, the many postdoctoral clinicians who have completed training, or nearly done so, do not currently gain the opportunity the post offers to develop as independent researchers. Better opportunities should be accompanied by enhanced career support for clinical doctoral students (eg, to increase knowledge of CLs). Finally, ways to increase the number of senior clinical academic appointments should be explored since their lack seems to significantly influence career decisions. © Article

  18. Quality Reporting of Multivariable Regression Models in Observational Studies: Review of a Representative Sample of Articles Published in Biomedical Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Jordi; Forné, Carles; Roso-Llorach, Albert; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M

    2016-05-01

    Controlling for confounders is a crucial step in analytical observational studies, and multivariable models are widely used as statistical adjustment techniques. However, the validation of the assumptions of the multivariable regression models (MRMs) should be made clear in scientific reporting. The objective of this study is to review the quality of statistical reporting of the most commonly used MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression) that were applied in analytical observational studies published between 2003 and 2014 by journals indexed in MEDLINE.Review of a representative sample of articles indexed in MEDLINE (n = 428) with observational design and use of MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression). We assessed the quality of reporting about: model assumptions and goodness-of-fit, interactions, sensitivity analysis, crude and adjusted effect estimate, and specification of more than 1 adjusted model.The tests of underlying assumptions or goodness-of-fit of the MRMs used were described in 26.2% (95% CI: 22.0-30.3) of the articles and 18.5% (95% CI: 14.8-22.1) reported the interaction analysis. Reporting of all items assessed was higher in articles published in journals with a higher impact factor.A low percentage of articles indexed in MEDLINE that used multivariable techniques provided information demonstrating rigorous application of the model selected as an adjustment method. Given the importance of these methods to the final results and conclusions of observational studies, greater rigor is required in reporting the use of MRMs in the scientific literature.

  19. Knowledge, Attitude And Practices of Healthcare Workers (HCWs Regarding Biomedical Waste (BMW Management: A Multispeciality Hospital Based CrossSectional Study In Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravishekar N. Hiremath

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evolving health care system of India, in its goal of solving health issues and minimizing possible health risks, has unavoidably created waste, which itself may be harmful for health. Inefficient and inadequate knowledge of managing health care waste may have detrimental effects on health and environment. Aim and Objectives: To asses level of Knowledge, Attitude, Practices (KAP about Biomedical Waste (BMW management among Health Care Workers (HCWs with an endeavor to improve the standards and protect the health of HCWs and the environment. Methodology: A Hospital- based cross sectional descriptive study was carried out at one of the Multispecialty Hospital in Eastern India. A total of 80 HCWs who were available at the time of study were included and the data were collected by means of 'personal interview technique' by using a pre-designed semi-structured questionnaire in Hindi (local language. The relevant data was collected, compiled and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 version. Results: Assessment of KAP with pre-decided scoring system showed, 17.5 % had excellent knowledge, 70% with good to average and 12.5% had poor knowledge with respect to BMW management. Knowledge status was not significantly associated with any of the sociodemographic characteristics. When asked about needle stick injuries, 88% felt that needle stick injury was a concern to them and 86% of them were well aware about the consequences of needle-stick injuries. Conclusion: Although the awareness level was high with various aspects of BMW management among HCWs compared to other studies, but still there exists scope for more improvement. Regular awareness capsule with proper BMW committee monitoring is the need of the hour. All measures to sensitize the HCWs against needle stick injuries including both pre and post incident measures need to be taken.

  20. Tailoring consent to context: designing an appropriate consent process for a biomedical study in a low income setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasil Tekola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently there is increasing recognition of the need for research in developing countries where disease burden is high. Understanding the role of local factors is important for undertaking ethical research in developing countries. We explored factors relating to information and communication during the process of informed consent, and the approach that should be followed for gaining consent. The study was conducted prior to a family-based genetic study among people with podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis in southern Ethiopia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adapted a method of rapid assessment validated in The Gambia. The methodology was entirely qualitative, involving focus-group discussions and in-depth interviews. Discussions were conducted with podoconiosis patients and non-patients in the community, fieldworkers, researchers, staff of the local non-governmental organisation (NGO working on prevention and treatment of podoconiosis, and community leaders. We found that the extent of use of everyday language, the degree to which expectations of potential participants were addressed, and the techniques of presentation of information had considerable impact on comprehension of information provided about research. Approaching podoconiosis patients via locally trusted individuals and preceding individual consent with community sensitization were considered the optimal means of communication. Prevailing poverty among podoconiosis patients, the absence of alternative treatment facilities, and participants' trust in the local NGO were identified as potential barriers for obtaining genuine informed consent. CONCLUSIONS: Researchers should evaluate the effectiveness of consent processes in providing appropriate information in a comprehensible manner and in supporting voluntary decision-making on a study-by-study basis.

  1. First International Student Obtains His PhD at CAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Mr. Ghulam Rasul, the first international student formally enrolled by the Graduate University of CAS (GUCAS) has received his PhD degree this summer after having passed his dissertation defense on May 21 at the CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP).

  2. Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamont, Sara; Atkinson, Paul; Parry, Odette

    This handbook is a practical guide for the novice and experienced supervisor of Ph.D. students focusing on the British system. The book is organized to follow the progress of a student from starting out to a career after the viva voce examination. The chapters are: (1) "A Most Persuasive Piece of Argument"; (2) "Caught and Held by a…

  3. Peer Mentorship and Transformational Learning: PhD Student Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jane P.; Ogenchuk, Marcella J.; Nsiah, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe our peer mentorship experiences and explain how these experiences fostered transformational learning during our PhD graduate program in educational administration. As a literature backdrop, we discuss characteristics of traditional forms of mentorship and depict how our experiences of peer mentorship was…

  4. Richard Mazurchuk, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Richard Mazurchuk received a BS in Physics and MS and PhD in Biophysics from SUNY Buffalo. His research focused on developing novel multi-modality imaging techniques, contrast (enhancing) agents and methods to assess the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. |

  5. Theo Thole as a PhD ''student''

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDuijnen, PT

    1997-01-01

    Thee Thole's Ph.D. work was the basis for the Direct Reaction Field method for incorporating a semi-classical ''solvent'' in quantum chemical calculations. The early stages of his work and later progress is reviewed and a typical example of his analytical and programming skills, so far unpublished,

  6. PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kanowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies the factors that students should consider prior to adopting this approach, in terms of university requirements, supervisors' attitudes, the research subject matter, intellectual property, capacity and working style, and issues of co-authorship. It then outlines our perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of undertaking a PhD by publication. We suggest that, in general, the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. We conclude by reflecting on how the first author's experiences relate to current discussions about fostering publications by doctoral students.

  7. Proceedings of the ICTSS 2012 PhD Workshop - Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian; Weise, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    , theoretic, and practical challenges of testing software systems, including communication protocols, services, distributed platforms, middleware, embedded systems, and security infrastructures. The aims of the ICTSS Doctoral Workshop is to provide a forum for PhD students to present preliminary results...

  8. PhD thesis: The relationship between expertise and creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Mikkel Snorre Wilms

    2015-01-01

    I Ph.d. projektet undersøges sammenhænge mellem ekspertise og kreativitet via et eksperiment, hvor eksperter og novicer laver musik ved computer. Musikken vurderes efterfølgende af en række fokusgrupper. Studiet peger overraskende på, at novicer på linje med eksperter er i stand til at skabe musi...

  9. Ph.D Afhandling: Restaurering verus instaurering og transstaurering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Grith

    2012-01-01

    Ph.d. afhandlingen udforsker holdningen som arkitektfagligt instrument. Fagudøverens "holdning" til værdisætning af arkitektoniske kulturarvsobjekter og til arkitektonisk intervention heri fungerer aktuelt som et anerkendt og konstituerende beslutningsinstrument i praksisnære processer og sammenh...

  10. A Study on Printed Multiple Solid Line by Combining Microcontact and Flexographic Printing Process for Microelectronic and Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Maksud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available : Microcontact printing (µCP is an outstanding surface patterning technique in micron scale and, even in nano scale. Surface science communities like engineers and biologists have been promoting attention in µCP, therefore they have been rich in improvement to the µCP process itself. However the process is relatively slow in production. Meanwhile flexographic technique is a high speed roll to roll process, but low in resolution and still has limitation in printing of micro-scale size. Now a day, low cost fabrication is keys to the successful introduction of printed electronics and roll to roll manufacturing processes. Therefore, study to extend flexographic into the micro-scale size resolutions, may provide an economical commercialization path for electronic devices since, flexographic is a high speed technique commonly used for printing onto very large area flexible substrates. Although low resolution and poor registration are characteristics of today's flexographic process, it has many potential to achieve fine solid line micro size by combining to microcontact printing because both of them having similarities in method of carrying printed pattern to a substrates. This study have been demonstrated that 10micron line with 10micron gap successfully printed by these 2 combinations printing techniques, using graphic ink and biological ink with is Fetal Bovine Serum.

  11. Biomedical education for clinical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Francois; Donadey, Alain; Hadjes, Pierre; Blagosklonov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical equipment Master's degree is recognized by the French Ministry of Health, since its creation in 1975 under the denomination of "Specialization for Hospital Biomedical Engineers". Since the new national status of technical staff in the public service by decree of September 5th of 1991, it allows to access directly to the level of Chief Hospital Engineer (first category, second class, by ordinance of October 23rd, 1992). Biomedical Engineers jobs in French hospitals are selected after an examination organized by the recruiting hospital. Master's graduates are most often the best qualified.

  12. A proposal to establish master's in biomedical sciences degree programs in medical school environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingoglia, Nicholas A

    2009-04-01

    Most graduate schools associated with medical schools offer programs leading to the PhD degree but pay little attention to master's programs. This is unfortunate because many university graduates who are interested specifically in biomedical rather than pure science fields need further education before making decisions on whether to enter clinical, research, education, or business careers. Training for these students is done best in a medical school, rather than a graduate university, environment and by faculty who are engaged in research in the biomedical sciences. Students benefit from these programs by exploring career options they might not have previously considered while learning about disease-related subjects at the graduate level. Graduate faculty can also benefit by being compensated for their teaching with a portion of the tuition revenue, funds that can help run their laboratories and support other academic expenses. Faculty also may attract talented students to their labs and to their PhD programs by exposing them to a passion for research. The graduate school also benefits by collecting masters tuition revenue that can be used toward supporting PhD stipends. Six-year outcome data from the program at Newark show that, on completion of the program, most students enter educational, clinical, or research careers and that the graduate school has established a new and significant stream of revenue. Thus, the establishment of a master's program in biomedical sciences that helps students match their academic abilities with their career goals significantly benefits students as well as the graduate school and its faculty.

  13. Barriers to biomedical care and use of traditional medicines for treatment of cervical cancer: an exploratory qualitative study in northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaka, A D; Okello, E S; Orach, C G

    2015-07-01

    Use of traditional medicines for treatment of cancers has increased worldwide. We used a qualitative approach to explore barriers to biomedical care and reasons for use of traditional medicines for the treatment of cervical cancer in Gulu, northern Uganda. We carried out 24 focus group discussions involving men and women aged 18-59 years. We employed content analyses technique in data analysis. Traditional medicines were used mainly due to barriers to biomedical care for cervical cancer. The barriers included health system factors, for example long distances to health facilities and unavailability of medicines; health workers' factors, for example negative attitudes towards patients and demands for bribes; individual patient's factors, for example inability to pay for medical care; and socio-cultural beliefs about superiority of traditional medicines and perceived greater privacy in accessing traditional healers. Barriers to biomedical care and community beliefs in the effectiveness of traditional medicines encourage use of traditional medicines for treatment of cervical cancer but might hinder help-seeking at biomedical facilities. There is need for targeted culturally sensitive awareness campaign to promote effectiveness of modern medicine and to encourage cautious use of traditional medicines in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  14. Oral biology in middle age: a history of the University at Buffalo Oral Biology PhD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, F A

    2014-05-01

    In 1960, the first Department of Oral Biology in the United States dedicated to the conduct of research, graduate biomedical research education, and the provision of basic oral science education for the DDS curriculum was established at the University at Buffalo. In 1963, the Department organized the first PhD Program in Oral Biology in the United States. This PhD program has produced a large cadre of oral health researchers, many of whom have gone on to make major contributions to dental research and education. This article provides a brief history of the program, the context within which the program was organized and developed, and a description of some of the many faculty, students, and fellows associated with the program. Additionally, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of this program, a symposium, entitled "The Oral Microbiome, Immunity and Chronic Disease", was held on June 12-14, 2013, in Buffalo, New York. The proceedings are published online in Advances in Dental Research (2014, Vol. 26).

  15. Now or Later?: An Empirical Investigation of When and Why Students Apply to Clinical Psychology PhD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimak, Eric H.; Edwards, Katie M.; Johnson, Shannon M.; Suhr, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This study used a national sample of PhD students in clinical psychology (N = 1,034) to explore when students decided to pursue their graduate degree, reasons for their decisions, and associated satisfaction. Results indicated that immediately after completing their undergraduate degree, 57% of current graduate students reported postponing…

  16. Learning to Write a Research Article: Ph.D. Students' Transitions toward Disciplinary Writing Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Montserrat; Inesta, Anna; Corcelles, Mariona

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study designed from a socially situated and activity theory perspective aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of how Ph.D. students regulate their academic writing activity. Writing regulation is a complex activity of a highly situated and social nature, involving cyclical thought-action-emotion dynamics and the…

  17. Now or Later?: An Empirical Investigation of When and Why Students Apply to Clinical Psychology PhD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimak, Eric H.; Edwards, Katie M.; Johnson, Shannon M.; Suhr, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This study used a national sample of PhD students in clinical psychology (N = 1,034) to explore when students decided to pursue their graduate degree, reasons for their decisions, and associated satisfaction. Results indicated that immediately after completing their undergraduate degree, 57% of current graduate students reported postponing…

  18. Multimodal Identity Texts as Mediational Spaces in Researching Ph.D. Students' Critical Teacher-Researcher Selves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Marlon; Herath, Sreemali

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses how two Ph.D. students used multimodal identity texts (MMITs) to document their research journeys as they engaged in their doctoral studies. Drawing on qualitative data collected from multiple pre-service teacher preparation programmes in Chile and Sri Lanka, two bi-national researchers (a Colombian-Canadian and a Sri…

  19. Listening to the voices of the general public in India on biomedical research--an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Manjulika; Vaz, Mario; Srinivasan, K

    2015-01-01

    Medical research, from clinical trials to novel research on stored samples, is growing rapidly in India. Ethical regulations largely reflect standard international guidelines and the norms of "good clinical practice". Through in-depth interviews, this study aimed to explore the perceptions, motivations and concerns of the public with respect to participation in clinical trials and biobanking-related research. It was found that the expectation of therapeutic benefit reflects "therapeutic misconception" and this, along with a poor understanding of research, leads to favourable participation in clinical trials. A relatively low level of awareness and knowledge of health matters and research (health literacy), along with the differences in the power of the doctor and the participant, lead to an unquestioning trust in the physician or the institution conducting the research. "Informed consent" is thought to protect the interests of the researcher and the institution rather than the participants' rights. Biobanking research was very new to the participants and relatively unknown. Thus, it has not yet filtered into the public consciousness. As a result, the perceptions of the general public do not appear to be sufficiently evolved.

  20. Mining Molecular Pharmacological Effects from Biomedical Text: a Case Study for Eliciting Anti-Obesity/Diabetes Effects of Chemical Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Elzbieta; Muresan, Sorel; Engkvist, Ola; Blomberg, Niklas; Chen, Hongming

    2014-05-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, efficiently mining pharmacological data from the rapidly increasing scientific literature is very crucial for many aspects of the drug discovery process such as target validation, tool compound selection etc. A quick and reliable way is needed to collect literature assertions of selected compounds' biological and pharmacological effects in order to assist the hypothesis generation and decision-making of drug developers. INFUSIS, the text mining system presented here, extracts data on chemical compounds from PubMed abstracts. It involves an extensive use of customized natural language processing besides a co-occurrence analysis. As a proof-of-concept study, INFUSIS was used to search in abstract texts for several obesity/diabetes related pharmacological effects of the compounds included in a compound dictionary. The system extracts assertions regarding the pharmacological effects of each given compound and scores them by the relevance. For each selected pharmacological effect, the highest scoring assertions in 100 abstracts were manually evaluated, i.e. 800 abstracts in total. The overall accuracy for the inferred assertions was over 90 percent.

  1. Mössbauer studies of stoichiometry of Fe3O4: characterization of nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. E.; Johnson, J. A.; Hah, H. Y.; Cole, M.; Gray, S.; Kolesnichenko, V.; Kucheryavy, P.; Goloverda, G.

    2016-12-01

    The iron oxide Fe3O4, the mineral magnetite sometimes called ferrosoferric oxide, is notoriousy non-stoichiometric even in bulk form so its formula may be written Fe3-δO4. In nanoparticle form, where it has applications in medicine and information technology, it is even more susceptible to oxidation. In this paper we report synthesis and studies of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with controlled diameters of 5.3, 10.6 and 11.9 nm. In room temperature spectra, departures from stoichiometry δ of up to 0.02 were estimated from the relative amounts of Fe 3+/ Fe 2+ and from their isomer shifts. This cannot be used for very small particles of diameter 10.6 nm and less as they are superparamagnetic at room temperature and do not show hyperfine splitting owing to fast relaxation. Such particles have promise for use in enhancing MRI signals. The magnetic spectrum is restored by the application of a relatively small magnetic field (10 kG). As the temperature is lowered the relaxation slows down and 6-line magnetic hyperfine patterns appear below a blocking temperature TB. The values of TB obtained are lower than those of many other researchers reported in the literature, suggesting that our particles are less affected by magnetic interactions between them. At low temperatures all the spectra are similar and closely resemble that of bulk Fe3O4 confirming that departures from stoichiometry are small.

  2. Study of two different thin film coating methods in transmission laser micro-joining of thin Ti-film coated glass and polyimide for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, T; Georgiev, G L; Baird, R J; Auner, G W; Newaz, G; Patwa, R; Herfurth, H J

    2009-07-01

    Biomedical devices and implants require precision joining for hermetic sealing which can be achieved with low power lasers. The effect of two different thin metal film coating methods was studied in transmission laser micro-joints of titanium-coated glass and polyimide. The coating methods were cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (CA-PVD) and electron beam evaporation (EB-PVD). Titanium-coated glass joined to polyimide film can have neural electrode application. The improvement of the joint quality will be essential for robust performance of the device. Low power fiber laser (wave length = 1100 nm) was used for transmission laser micro-joining of thin titanium (Ti) film (approximately 200 nm) coated Pyrex borosilicate 7740 glass wafer (0.5 mm thick) and polyimide (Imidex) film (0.2 mm thick). Ti film acts as the coupling agent in the joining process. The Ti film deposition rate in the CA-PVD was 5-10 A/s and in the EB-PVD 1.5 A/s. The laser joint strength was measured by a lap shear test, the Ti film surfaces were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the lap shear tested joints were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The film properties and the failure modes of the joints were correlated to joint strength. The CA-PVD produced around 4 times stronger laser joints than EB-PVD. The adhesion of the Ti film on glass by CA-PVD is better than that of the EB-PVD method. This is likely to be due to a higher film deposition rate and consequently higher adhesion or sticking coefficient for the CA-PVD particles arriving on the substrate compared to that of the EB-PVD film. EB-PVD shows poor laser bonding properties due to the development of thermal hotspots which occurs from film decohesion.

  3. What's keeping people after stroke from walking outdoors to become physically active? A qualitative study, using an integrated biomedical and behavioral theory of functioning and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outermans, Jacqueline; Pool, Jan; van de Port, Ingrid; Bakers, Japie; Wittink, Harriet

    2016-08-15

    In general people after stroke do not meet the recommendations for physical activity to conduct a healthy lifestyle. Programs to stimulate walking activity to increase physical activity are based on the available insights into barriers and facilitators to physical activity after stroke. However, these programs are not entirely successful. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively explore perceived barriers and facilitators to outdoor walking using a model of integrated biomedical and behavioral theory, the Physical Activity for people with a Disability model (PAD). Included were community dwelling respondents after stroke, classified ≥ 3 at the Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC), purposively sampled regarding the use of healthcare. The data was collected triangulating in a multi-methods approach, i.e. semi-structured, structured and focus-group interviews. A primarily deductive thematic content analysis using the PAD-model in a framework-analysis' approach was conducted after verbatim transcription. 36 respondents (FAC 3-5) participated in 16 semi-structured interviews, eight structured interviews and two focus-group interviews. The data from the interviews covered all domains of the PAD model. Intention, ability and opportunity determined outdoor walking activity. Personal factors determined the intention to walk outdoors, e.g. negative social influence, resulting from restrictive caregivers in the social environment, low self-efficacy influenced by physical environment, and also negative attitude towards physical activity. Walking ability was influenced by loss of balance and reduced walking distance and by impairments of motor control, cognition and aerobic capacity as well as fatigue. Opportunities arising from household responsibilities and lively social constructs facilitated outdoor walking. To stimulate outdoor walking activity, it seems important to influence the intention by addressing social influence, self-efficacy and attitude towards

  4. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  5. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  6. Towards automated biomedical ontology harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Gustavo A; Lopez, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomedical ontologies is increasing, especially in the context of health systems interoperability. Ontologies are key pieces to understand the semantics of information exchanged. However, given the diversity of biomedical ontologies, it is essential to develop tools that support harmonization processes amongst them. Several algorithms and tools are proposed by computer scientist for partially supporting ontology harmonization. However, these tools face several problems, especially in the biomedical domain where ontologies are large and complex. In the harmonization process, matching is a basic task. This paper explains the different ontology harmonization processes, analyzes existing matching tools, and proposes a prototype of an ontology harmonization service. The results demonstrate that there are many open issues in the field of biomedical ontology harmonization, such as: overcoming structural discrepancies between ontologies; the lack of semantic algorithms to automate the process; the low matching efficiency of existing algorithms; and the use of domain and top level ontologies in the matching process.

  7. New Directions for Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plonsey, Robert

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the definition of "biomedical engineering" and the development of educational programs in the field. Includes detailed descriptions of the roles of bioengineers, medical engineers, and chemical engineers. (CC)

  8. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  9. Hydroxyapatite coatings for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings are of great importance in the biological and biomedical coatings fields, especially in the current era of nanotechnology and bioapplications. With a bonelike structure that promotes osseointegration, hydroxyapatite coating can be applied to otherwise bioinactive implants to make their surface bioactive, thus achieving faster healing and recovery. In addition to applications in orthopedic and dental implants, this coating can also be used in drug delivery. Hydroxyapatite Coatings for Biomedical Applications explores developments in the processing and property characteri

  10. Biomedical Free Electron Laser Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    appearance of antibodies. We have now published data on killing HIV, CMV, Herpes , etc. virus using DHE and laser light in which viral kill was 99.999...egg white), equine liver alcohol dehydrogenase, sperm whale and tuna myoglobin, nuclease A from Staphlococcus aureus, human RBC superoxide dismutase...constant between at least 0.1 - 0.9 gig and thus the assay parameters are not in an enzyme limited range. Equine liver alcohol dehydrogenase reaction

  11. PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajakumara, Eerappa; Wang, Zhentian; Ma, Honghui; Hu, Lulu; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan; Guo, Rui; Wu, Feizhen; Li, Haitao; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Shi, Yang (MSKCC); (Constellation); (Fudan); (Tsinghua)

    2011-08-29

    Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

  12. Management control of biomedical research and pharmaceutical innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omta, S.W.F.; Bouter, L.M.; van Engelen, J.M.L.

    This paper investigates management and organization factors which may enhance the effectiveness of biomedical research and pharmaceutical innovation. The study consists of 222 survey questionnaires returned by senior scientific staff of academic hospitals and large health research institutes in the

  13. Biomedical ontologies: a functional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Daniel L; Shah, Nigam H; Noy, Natalya F

    2008-01-01

    The information explosion in biology makes it difficult for researchers to stay abreast of current biomedical knowledge and to make sense of the massive amounts of online information. Ontologies--specifications of the entities, their attributes and relationships among the entities in a domain of discourse--are increasingly enabling biomedical researchers to accomplish these tasks. In fact, bio-ontologies are beginning to proliferate in step with accruing biological data. The myriad of ontologies being created enables researchers not only to solve some of the problems in handling the data explosion but also introduces new challenges. One of the key difficulties in realizing the full potential of ontologies in biomedical research is the isolation of various communities involved: some workers spend their career developing ontologies and ontology-related tools, while few researchers (biologists and physicians) know how ontologies can accelerate their research. The objective of this review is to give an overview of biomedical ontology in practical terms by providing a functional perspective--describing how bio-ontologies can and are being used. As biomedical scientists begin to recognize the many different ways ontologies enable biomedical research, they will drive the emergence of new computer applications that will help them exploit the wealth of research data now at their fingertips.

  14. The impact of formative testing on study behaviour and study performance of (bio)medical students: a smartphone application intervention study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameris, A.L.L.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Formative testing can increase knowledge retention but students often underuse available opportunities. Applying modern technology to make the formative tests more attractive for students could enhance the implementation of formative testing as a learning tool. This study aimed to

  15. On the Importance of PhD Institute in Establishing a Long-Term Research Career in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, B K; Vassiliadis, E; Sevenster, M N; Jones, D H; Thornberry, R K; Gibson, Brad K.; Buxton, Michelle; Vassiliadis, Emanuel; Sevenster, Maartje N.; Thornberry, Rebecca K.

    1999-01-01

    We have examined the success rates of 19 American, Canadian, Australian, and Dutch graduate programs in producing astronomers. A 20-year baseline was considered (1975-1994), incorporating 897 PhD recipients. The major conclusion from our study is that the fraction of PhD graduates still involved in astronomical research is surprisingly insensitive to the institutional source of one's PhD. With few exception, 55-75% of graduates, regardless of PhD source, remain active in the astronomical research community. While it remains true that graduates of so-called ``prestigious'' programs preferentially populate the same, it is also clear that an abundance of opportunities exist at smaller ``non-prestigious'' institutions, liberal arts colleges, government, and industry. The latter, of course, generally carry enhanced administrative and/or teaching duties, but, on the other hand, do not entirely preclude a role in the research community. A Kepler-Meier survival analysis of two disparate institutes demonstrates that `...

  16. Device interoperability and authentication for telemedical appliance based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 Personal Health Device (PHD) Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranguian, Luther Paul R; Pancho-Festin, Susan; Sison, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we focused on the interoperability and authentication of medical devices in the context of telemedical systems. A recent standard called the ISO/IEEE 11073 Personal Health Device (X73-PHD) Standards addresses the device interoperability problem by defining common protocols for agent (medical device) and manager (appliance) interface. The X73-PHD standard however has not addressed security and authentication of medical devices which is important in establishing integrity of a telemedical system. We have designed and implemented a security policy within the X73-PHD standards. The policy will enable device authentication using Asymmetric-Key Cryptography and the RSA algorithm as the digital signature scheme. We used two approaches for performing the digital signatures: direct software implementation and use of embedded security modules (ESM). The two approaches were evaluated and compared in terms of execution time and memory requirement. For the standard 2048-bit RSA, ESM calculates digital signatures only 12% of the total time for the direct implementation. Moreover, analysis shows that ESM offers more security advantage such as secure storage of keys compared to using direct implementation. Interoperability with other systems was verified by testing the system with LNI Healthlink, a manager software that implements the X73-PHD standard. Lastly, security analysis was done and the system's response to common attacks on authentication systems was analyzed and several measures were implemented to protect the system against them.

  17. Bioengineered collagens: emerging directions for biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications.

  18. Combinatorial nanodiamond in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae Gon; Prim, Racelly Ena; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kang, Eunah; Park, Kinam; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-11-30

    One of the newly emerging carbon materials, nanodiamond (ND), has been exploited for use in traditional electric materials and this has extended into biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Recently, NDs have attained significant interests as a multifunctional and combinational drug delivery system. ND studies have provided insights into granting new potentials with their wide ranging surface chemistry, complex formation with biopolymers, and combination with biomolecules. The studies that have proved ND inertness, biocompatibility, and low toxicity have made NDs much more feasible for use in real in vivo applications. This review gives an understanding of NDs in biomedical engineering and pharmaceuticals, focusing on the classified introduction of ND/drug complexes. In addition, the diverse potential applications that can be obtained with chemical modification are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. THE DEVELOPMENT STUDIES OF BIOMEDICAL COMPOSITE MATERIALS%生物医用复合材料的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于成; 赵卫生; 贾伟

    2012-01-01

    Biomedical composite has rapid development today. According to the classification of the matrix material , the paper introduced the developments of ceramic-based, metal-based, polymer-based biomedical composite materials, pointed out the carbon fiber composite materials would develop fast in the field of medical materials in the future.%生物医用复合材料在当今已得到了飞速发展.本文按基体材料的分类分别介绍了陶瓷基、金属基、高分子基生物医用复合材料的发展情况,指出碳纤维复合材料作为具有优异性能的材料在未来医疗领域将得到飞速发展.

  20. Scientific Growth and Identity Development during a Postbaccalaureate Program: Results from a Multisite Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remich, Robin; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E; Gazley, J Lynn; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This report builds upon our previous study, which described five patterns of why college graduates join National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded diversity-focused Postbaccalaureate Research Education Programs (PREP). A 2015 report from the NIH showed that a high fraction of PREP participants matriculate into PhD and MD/PhD programs. This current study reveals how participants change during PREP, the program elements that facilitate change, and how identity as a graduate student and future scientist develops. Data come from in-depth interviews done at the beginning and end of PREP with 48 individuals from seven PREP programs. Results reveal three domains of development: academics, research, and presentation of oneself; each domain contains a developmental continuum. Key attributes of PREP enabling development include opportunities to attend graduate-level classes and seminars; time to practice reading literature; extended lab time with one's own project; high and explicit expectations from mentors; and multiple opportunities to talk about science and improve communication skills. PREP enabled participants to develop their identities as graduate students and to anticipate being seen by others as highly prepared for PhD training. After PREP, 85% (n = 41) started the PhD or MD/PhD, making PREP an intervention approach with great potential to broaden participation in biomedical PhD programs.

  1. Evolution of biomedical research during combat operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzfeld, Jennifer J; Childs, John D; Dempsey, Michael P; Chapman, Gail D; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Brininger, Teresa; Tamminga, Cindy; Richardson, Roxanne T; Alexander, Stefan; Chung, Kevin K

    2013-08-01

    The implementation of a human research protection program in Afghanistan and the mobilization of the combat casualty research team have made it possible to design and efficiently conduct multifaceted, multisite, and prospective research studies in a combat environment. Still, to conduct research in such an environment, several unique challenges must be overcome. This article describes the development and conduct of three ongoing trauma-related biomedical research studies in Afghanistan, highlighting the challenges and lessons learned within the context of these studies. Key challenges include the process of developing and getting approval for in-theater research protocols, the informed consent process, and logistics of conducting a biomedical research study in an austere environment. Despite these challenges, important lessons learned that can contribute to the success of a protocol include the need for clear operating procedures, judicious selection for which data points must be collected in-theater, and the importance anticipating the "fog and friction" of war. As we continue the journey toward more sophisticated research capabilities in combat, this article will help inform the design and conduct of future research performed in a theater of war. Conducting biomedical research in a combat zone is an important but difficult element of military medicine.

  2. The impact of formative testing on study behaviour and study performance of (bio)medical students: a smartphone application intervention study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameris, A.L.L.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Formative testing can increase knowledge retention but students often underuse available opportunities. Applying modern technology to make the formative tests more attractive for students could enhance the implementation of formative testing as a learning tool. This study aimed to determ

  3. [Basis of art phonetics in biomedical engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Li, Gelin; Ouyang, Kai; Liu, Yongxiang

    2002-01-01

    Art phonetics' medicine, a new branch of traditional medicine, has not been developed perfectly, especially in the aspects of objective and scientific study. In this paper, the acoustical and anatiomical basis of art phonetics in viewpoint of biomedical engineering is explored, and then our work of quantitative measurement and analysis of art phonetic is introduced. The experiment data show further that quantitative measurement and analysis plays an important role in art phonetic medicine.

  4. The Importance of Zebrafish in Biomedical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Ana Bárbara Tavares dos; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an ideal model organism for the study of vertebrate development. This is due to the large clutches that each couple produces, with up to 200 embryos every 7 days, and to the fact that the embryos and larvae are small, transparent and undergo rapid external development. Material and Methods: Using scientific literature research tools available online and the keywords Zebrafish, biomedical research, human disease, and drug screening, we reviewed original...

  5. Soybean GmPHD-type transcription regulators improve stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD played a major role in DNA binding. Using a protoplast assay system, we find that GmPHD1 to GmPHD5 had transcriptional suppression activity whereas GmPHD6 did not have. In yeast assay, the GmPHD6 can form homodimer and heterodimer with the other GmPHDs except GmPHD2. The N-terminal plus the variable regions but not the PHD-finger is required for the dimerization. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the GmPHD2 showed salt tolerance when compared with the wild type plants. This tolerance was likely achieved by diminishing the oxidative stress through regulation of downstream genes. SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide important clues for soybean stress tolerance through manipulation of PHD-type transcription regulator.

  6. Club of Bologna International Best PhD Prize 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Club of Bologna, in collaboration with UNACOMA, will be awarding a prize for the best PhD theses on subjects related to agricultural machinery design and development. Up to ten theses will be selected and the best five of these will have the chance of being presented during the annual Club of Bologna meeting that will be held from 9 to 10 November 2012, on occasion of the EIMA. The authors of the best three PhD theses will also receive a cash prize. The winners will be guests in Bologna of UNACOMA who will cover travelling expenses and hotel accommodation for 2 nights. They will also meet farm machinery manufacturers attending the international trade fair. The winners of the Club of Bologna Prize 2012 will be announced here. Application forms and further information can be downloaded from the Club of Bologna website (http://www.clubofbologna.org/.

  7. Zirconium: biomedical and nephrological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David B N; Roberts, Martin; Bluchel, Christian G; Odell, Ross A

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid increase in the use of zirconium (Zr)-containing compounds in artificial internal organs. Examples include dental implants and other restorative practices, total knee and hip replacement, and middle-ear ossicular chain reconstruction. In nephrological practice, Zr-containing sorbents have been used in hemofiltration, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and in the design and construction of wearable artificial kidneys. Zr compounds continue to be widely and extensively used in deodorant and antiperspirant preparations. In the public health arena, Zr compounds have been studied or used in controlling phosphorus pollution and in the reclamation of poison and bacteria-contaminated water. Experimental and clinical studies support the general consensus that Zr compounds are biocompatible and exhibit low toxicity. Reports on possible Zr-associated adverse reactions are rare and, in general, have not rigorously established a cause-and-effect relationship. Although publications on the use of Zr compounds have continued to increase in recent years, reports on Zr toxicity have virtually disappeared from the medical literature. Nevertheless, familiarity with, and continued vigilant monitoring of, the use of these compounds are warranted. This article provides an updated review on the biomedical use of Zr compounds.

  8. Ph.d. om interne sociale medier : Det sociale intranet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Vibeke Thøis

    2017-01-01

    Det sociale intranet eller interne sociale medier vækker drømme hos virksomheder, som ser en mulighed for at involvere og engagere medarbejderne. Det sociale intranet bliver opfattet som en genvej til mere innovative og effektive virksomheder. En ny ph.d. om medarbejderne som kommunikatører på...... interne sociale medier viser imidlertid, at virksomheder kæmper med at skabe en aktiv og levende kommunikation på det sociale intranet...

  9. Application of infrared to biomedical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Etehadtavakol, Mahnaz

    2017-01-01

    The book covers the latest updates in the application of infrared to biomedical sciences, a non-invasive, contactless, safe and easy approach imaging of skin and tissue temperatures. Its diagnostic procedure allows practitioners to identify the locations of abnormal chemical and blood vessel activity such as angiogenesis in body tissue. Its non-invasive approach works by applying the technology of the infrared camera and state-of-the-art software, where high-resolution digital infrared imaging technology benefits highly from enhanced image production, standardized image interpretation protocols, computerized comparison and storage, and sophisticated image enhancement and analysis. The book contains contributions from global prominent scientists in the area of infrared applications in biomedical studies. The target audience includes academics, practitioners, clinicians and students working in the area of infrared imaging in biomedicine.

  10. Pairwise Comparison Versus Likert Scale for Biomedical Image Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Phelps, AS; Naeger, DM; Courtier, JL; Lambert, JW; Marcovici, PA; Villanueva-Meyer, JE; MacKenzie, JD

    2015-01-01

    © American Roentgen Ray Society. OBJECTIVE Biomedical imaging research relies heavily on the subjective and semiquantitative reader analysis of images. Current methods are limited hy interreader variability and fixed upper and lower limits. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of two assessment methods, pairwise comparison and Likert scale, for improved analysis of biomedical images. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A set of 10 images with varying degrees of image sharpness was crea...

  11. Improvement of PubMed Literature Searching using Biomedical Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Zuoshuang Xiang; Yongqun He

    2009-01-01

    PubMed articles are annotated using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) to increase search efficiency. However, MeSH contains limited information on many biomedical domains (e.g., vaccine). Biomedical ontologies may be used to improve PubMed searching capability. This study demonstrates that Vaccine Ontology (VO) can be used to significantly improve PubMed searching efficacy in the vaccine domain. The recall and precision of the ontology-based literature mining approach are analyzed and discu...

  12. Electrical circuits in biomedical engineering problems with solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Keskin, Ali Ümit

    2017-01-01

    This authored monograph presents a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of electrical circuit theory in biomedical engineering, ideally suited as textbook for a course program. The book contains methods and theory, but the topical focus is placed on practical applications of circuit theory, including problems, solutions and case studies. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in electrical engineering who intend to embark on biomedical applications. The book is also very well suited for graduate students in the field. .

  13. The multisensor PHD filter: II. Erroneous solution via Poisson magic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    The theoretical foundation for the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter is the FISST multitarget differential and integral calculus. The "core" PHD filter presumes a single sensor. Theoretically rigorous formulas for the multisensor PHD filter can be derived using the FISST calculus, but are computationally intractable. A less theoretically desirable solution-the iterated-corrector approximation-must be used instead. Recently, it has been argued that an "elementary" methodology, the "Poisson-intensity approach," renders FISST obsolete. It has further been claimed that the iterated-corrector approximation is suspect, and in its place an allegedly superior "general multisensor intensity filter" has been proposed. In this and a companion paper I demonstrate that it is these claims which are erroneous. The companion paper introduces formulas for the actual "general multisensor intensity filter." In this paper I demonstrate that (1) the "general multisensor intensity filter" fails in important special cases; (2) it will perform badly in even the easiest multitarget tracking problems; and (3) these rather serious missteps suggest that the "Poisson-intensity approach" is inherently faulty.

  14. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardharajula S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sandhya Vardharajula,1 Sk Z Ali,2 Pooja M Tiwari,1 Erdal Eroğlu,1 Komal Vig,1 Vida A Dennis,1 Shree R Singh11Center for NanoBiotechnology and Life Sciences Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA; 2Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cytotoxicity, functionalization, biomedical applications

  15. Finding biomedical categories in Medline®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganova Lana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several humanly defined ontologies relevant to Medline. However, Medline is a fast growing collection of biomedical documents which creates difficulties in updating and expanding these humanly defined ontologies. Automatically identifying meaningful categories of entities in a large text corpus is useful for information extraction, construction of machine learning features, and development of semantic representations. In this paper we describe and compare two methods for automatically learning meaningful biomedical categories in Medline. The first approach is a simple statistical method that uses part-of-speech and frequency information to extract a list of frequent nouns from Medline. The second method implements an alignment-based technique to learn frequent generic patterns that indicate a hyponymy/hypernymy relationship between a pair of noun phrases. We then apply these patterns to Medline to collect frequent hypernyms as potential biomedical categories. Results We study and compare these two alternative sets of terms to identify semantic categories in Medline. We find that both approaches produce reasonable terms as potential categories. We also find that there is a significant agreement between the two sets of terms. The overlap between the two methods improves our confidence regarding categories predicted by these independent methods. Conclusions This study is an initial attempt to extract categories that are discussed in Medline. Rather than imposing external ontologies on Medline, our methods allow categories to emerge from the text.

  16. Handbook on advanced design and manufacturing technologies for biomedical devices

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The last decades have seen remarkable advances in computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing technologies, multi-variable simulation tools, medical imaging, biomimetic design, rapid prototyping, micro and nanomanufacturing methods and information management resources, all of which provide new horizons for the Biomedical Engineering fields and the Medical Device Industry. Handbook on Advanced Design and Manufacturing Technologies for Biomedical Devices covers such topics in depth, with an applied perspective and providing several case studies that help to analyze and understand the key factors of the different stages linked to the development of a novel biomedical device, from the conceptual and design steps, to the prototyping and industrialization phases. Main research challenges and future potentials are also discussed, taking into account relevant social demands and a growing market already exceeding billions of dollars. In time, advanced biomedical devices will decisively change methods and resu...

  17. Selected Topics in MicroNano-robotics for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Selected Topics in Micro/Nano-robotics for Biomedical Applications features a system approach and incorporates modern methodologies in autonomous mobile robots for programmable and controllable micro/nano-robots aiming at biomedical applications. The book provides chapters of instructional materials and cutting-edge research results in micro/nanorobotics for biomedical applications. The book presents new sensing technology on nanofibers, new power supply techniques including miniature fuel cells and energy harvesting devices, and manipulation techniques including AFM-based nano-robotic manipulation, robot-aided optical tweezers, and robot-assisted catheter surgery systems. It also contains case studies on using micro/nano-robots in biomedical environments and in biomedicine, as well as a design example to conceptually develop a Vitamin-pill sized robot to enter human’s gastrointestinal tract. Each chapter covers a different topic of the highly interdisciplinary area. Bring together the selected topics into ...

  18. Innovations in Biomedical Engineering 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Tkacz, Ewaryst; Paszenda, Zbigniew; Piętka, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the “Innovations in Biomedical Engineering IBE’2016” Conference held on October 16–18, 2016 in Poland, discussing recent research on innovations in biomedical engineering. The past decade has seen the dynamic development of more and more sophisticated technologies, including biotechnologies, and more general technologies applied in the area of life sciences. As such the book covers the broadest possible spectrum of subjects related to biomedical engineering innovations. Divided into four parts, it presents state-of-the-art achievements in: • engineering of biomaterials, • modelling and simulations in biomechanics, • informatics in medicine • signal analysis The book helps bridge the gap between technological and methodological engineering achievements on the one hand and clinical requirements in the three major areas diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation on the other.

  19. Biomedical applications of graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chul; Kim, Young-Kwan; Shin, Dolly; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Min, Dal-Hee

    2013-10-15

    Graphene has unique mechanical, electronic, and optical properties, which researchers have used to develop novel electronic materials including transparent conductors and ultrafast transistors. Recently, the understanding of various chemical properties of graphene has facilitated its application in high-performance devices that generate and store energy. Graphene is now expanding its territory beyond electronic and chemical applications toward biomedical areas such as precise biosensing through graphene-quenched fluorescence, graphene-enhanced cell differentiation and growth, and graphene-assisted laser desorption/ionization for mass spectrometry. In this Account, we review recent efforts to apply graphene and graphene oxides (GO) to biomedical research and a few different approaches to prepare graphene materials designed for biomedical applications. Because of its excellent aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, surface functionalizability, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and fluorescence quenching ability, GO chemically exfoliated from oxidized graphite is considered a promising material for biological applications. In addition, the hydrophobicity and flexibility of large-area graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allow this material to play an important role in cell growth and differentiation. The lack of acceptable classification standards of graphene derivatives based on chemical and physical properties has hindered the biological application of graphene derivatives. The development of an efficient graphene-based biosensor requires stable biofunctionalization of graphene derivatives under physiological conditions with minimal loss of their unique properties. For the development graphene-based therapeutics, researchers will need to build on the standardization of graphene derivatives and study the biofunctionalization of graphene to clearly understand how cells respond to exposure to graphene derivatives. Although several

  20. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  1. Electroactive polymers for healthcare and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Siegfried

    2017-04-01

    Electroactivity was noticed early in biological substances, including proteins, polynucleotides and enzymes, even piezoand pyroelectricity were found in wool, hair, wood, bone and tendon. Recently, ferroelectricity has been identified in a surprisingly large number of biologically relevant materials, including hydroxyapatite, aortic walls and elastin. Inspired by the variety of natural electroactive materials, a wealth of new elastomers and polymers were designed recently, including an all organic elastomer electret and self-healing dielectric elastomers. Let's further draw inspiration from nature and widen the utilization of electroactive polymers towards (mobile) healthcare and biomedical applications. Ferroelectrets, internally charged polymer foams with a strong piezoelectric thickness coefficient are employed in biomedical sensing, for example as blood pressure and pulse sensor, as vital signs monitor or for the detection of tonicclonic seizures. Piezo- and pyroelectric polymers are booming in printed electronics research. They provide electronic skin the ability to "feel" pressure and temperature changes, or to generate electrical energy from vibrations and motions, even from contractile and relaxation motions of the heart and lung. Dielectric elastomers are pioneered by StretchSense as wearable motion capture sensors, monitoring pressure, stretch, bend and shear, quantifying comfort in sports and healthcare. On the cellular level, electroactive polymer arrays are used to study mechanotransduction of individual cells. Ionic electroactive polymers show potential to be used in implantable electroactive biomedical devices. Already with the currently available science and technology, we are at the verge of witnessing the demonstration of truly complex bionic systems.

  2. Ethical behaviour of authors in biomedical journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Joan C

    2002-03-01

    Biomedical journals communicate new information that changes health-care decisions. If authors ignore the fundamental values of honesty and trust, that information becomes flawed, and society or patients may be harmed. By describing two cases of unethical behaviour by authors, and using them as a focus to review acceptable ethics in publication, this article aims to educate readers who have not considered the ethical implications in writing manuscripts for biomedical journals. Two cases of unethical behaviour by authors occurred when the results of new drug trials were reported. They were discovered after publication in a biomedical journal, and in the review process after the submission of a manuscript for publication respectively. In the first case, duplicate publication was identified because the same control data were used, but not acknowledged, in three publications by the same investigators. In the second, ghost writing by a pharmaceutical company writer was suspected because of the atypical presentation of a senior author's work. The editor consulted with the authors of both reports. In the first case, the authors concurred about the duplication, and the editors of the three journals wrote editorials to record the duplicate publications. The second case of ghost writing was unconfirmed by the authors, but the submission was withdrawn, and the article was later published in another journal. These cases draw attention to recently recognized types of scientific misconduct that influence the perception of scientific work. Duplicate publication and ghost writing not only deceive the reader, but may also conceal flawed study design and conflict of interest.

  3. Semantic biomedical resource discovery: a Natural Language Processing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfakianaki, Pepi; Koumakis, Lefteris; Sfakianakis, Stelios; Iatraki, Galatia; Zacharioudakis, Giorgos; Graf, Norbert; Marias, Kostas; Tsiknakis, Manolis

    2015-09-30

    A plethora of publicly available biomedical resources do currently exist and are constantly increasing at a fast rate. In parallel, specialized repositories are been developed, indexing numerous clinical and biomedical tools. The main drawback of such repositories is the difficulty in locating appropriate resources for a clinical or biomedical decision task, especially for non-Information Technology expert users. In parallel, although NLP research in the clinical domain has been active since the 1960s, progress in the development of NLP applications has been slow and lags behind progress in the general NLP domain. The aim of the present study is to investigate the use of semantics for biomedical resources annotation with domain specific ontologies and exploit Natural Language Processing methods in empowering the non-Information Technology expert users to efficiently search for biomedical resources using natural language. A Natural Language Processing engine which can "translate" free text into targeted queries, automatically transforming a clinical research question into a request description that contains only terms of ontologies, has been implemented. The implementation is based on information extraction techniques for text in natural language, guided by integrated ontologies. Furthermore, knowledge from robust text mining methods has been incorporated to map descriptions into suitable domain ontologies in order to ensure that the biomedical resources descriptions are domain oriented and enhance the accuracy of services discovery. The framework is freely available as a web application at ( http://calchas.ics.forth.gr/ ). For our experiments, a range of clinical questions were established based on descriptions of clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov registry as well as recommendations from clinicians. Domain experts manually identified the available tools in a tools repository which are suitable for addressing the clinical questions at hand, either

  4. Biomedical applications of magnetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mefford, Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic particles are increasingly being used in a wide variety of biomedical applications. Written by a team of internationally respected experts, this book provides an up-to-date authoritative reference for scientists and engineers. The first section presents the fundamentals of the field by explaining the theory of magnetism, describing techniques to synthesize magnetic particles, and detailing methods to characterize magnetic particles. The second section describes biomedical applications, including chemical sensors and cellular actuators, and diagnostic applications such as drug delivery, hyperthermia cancer treatment, and magnetic resonance imaging contrast.

  5. For 481 biomedical open access journals, articles are not searchable in the Directory of Open Access Journals nor in conventional biomedical databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Open access (OA) journals allows access to research papers free of charge to the reader. Traditionally, biomedical researchers use databases like MEDLINE and EMBASE to discover new advances. However, biomedical OA journals might not fulfill such databases' criteria, hindering...... dissemination. The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a database exclusively listing OA journals. The aim of this study was to investigate DOAJ's coverage of biomedical OA journals compared with the conventional biomedical databases. Methods. Information on all journals listed in four conventional...

  6. Building Better Bridges: An Evaluation of The Bridge to the Ph.D. Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellyn Sanderson, Robyn; Lobel, Caroline; Agueros, Marcel A.; Anderson, Vanessa; Ash, Summer; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Romero-Canyas, Rainer; Walker, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Columbia University's Bridge to the Ph.D. in the Natural Sciences Program is increasing the number of underrepresented scholars entering graduate programs and equipping them to succeed in these programs. In a given year, three to five Bridge participants are hired as full-time Columbia University research assistants for up to two years. Now in its seventh year, the Program supports seven participants, and its alumni (including five astronomers) have gone on to Ph.D. programs across the country. Although to date fewer than 40 people have participated in the Program, a number too small for an exclusively statistical evaluation of its effectiveness, we are collecting invaluable longitudinal data on the career progressions of underrepresented aspiring scientists across the natural sciences. At least a dozen Bridge alumni will earn their Ph.D. in the next two-three years, and we will then learn much more about the impact that the Bridge Program has had on our participants' trajectories. Among other things, we hope to use these data to determine the Program's effectiveness in developing feelings of self-efficacy and participants' confidence in their ability to succeed in doctoral programs, to measure the rate at which Bridge alumni successfully complete doctoral programs relative to their peers, and to identify the aspects of the Program that participants find most helpful to their progress at different stages of their paths to and through doctoral programs. Here we describe the data we have already obtained as part of our on-going study, and preliminary results from our analysis.

  7. Quantifying the impact and extent of undocumented biomedical synonymy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Blair

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous relationships among biomedical terms are extensively annotated within specialized terminologies, implying that synonymy is important for practical computational applications within this field. It remains unclear, however, whether text mining actually benefits from documented synonymy and whether existing biomedical thesauri provide adequate coverage of these linguistic relationships. In this study, we examine the impact and extent of undocumented synonymy within a very large compendium of biomedical thesauri. First, we demonstrate that missing synonymy has a significant negative impact on named entity normalization, an important problem within the field of biomedical text mining. To estimate the amount synonymy currently missing from thesauri, we develop a probabilistic model for the construction of synonym terminologies that is capable of handling a wide range of potential biases, and we evaluate its performance using the broader domain of near-synonymy among general English words. Our model predicts that over 90% of these relationships are currently undocumented, a result that we support experimentally through "crowd-sourcing." Finally, we apply our model to biomedical terminologies and predict that they are missing the vast majority (>90% of the synonymous relationships they intend to document. Overall, our results expose the dramatic incompleteness of current biomedical thesauri and suggest the need for "next-generation," high-coverage lexical terminologies.

  8. Biomedical Science Technologists in Lagos Universities: Meeting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Technologists in Lagos Universities: Meeting Modern Standards in Biomedical Research. ... science terms; 6) their use of the Internet for professional information. ... SOTA biomedical science needs adequate financial investment for the ...

  9. Biomedical nanomaterials from design to implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical Nanomaterials brings together the engineering applications and challenges of using nanostructured surfaces and nanomaterials in healthcare in a single source. Each chapter covers important and new information in the biomedical applications of nanomaterials.

  10. Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research publishes papers in all fields of ... and Allied Health Sciences including Basic Medical Sciences, Clinical Sciences, Dental Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Molecular ...

  11. National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health En Español | Site Map | ... 2016 VIEW MORE NEWS AND HIGHLIGHTS Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams Challenge RSS LISTSERV YOUTUBE FACEBOOK TWITTER ...

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility studies of Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf biomedical shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B L; Li, L; Zheng, Y F, E-mail: blwang@hrbeu.edu.c, E-mail: lili_heu@hrbeu.edu.c, E-mail: yfzheng@pku.edu.c [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility of the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf biomedical shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated by cell culture (L-929 fibroblast cell), hemolytic test and platelet adhesion test, with CP Ti as a reference material. The cytotoxicity test indicates that all the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf SMAs show over 94% cell viability for different incubation times (2, 4 and 7 days) in comparison with a negative control and CP Ti. The cell morphology observation shows good polygon-like adherent growth and proliferation of L-929 in the extracts of all the test samples and CP Ti. These results suggest excellent cytocompatibility for the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf SMAs. The hemolytic test reveals that the hemolysis ratios of the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf alloys are far less than 5%, so they cannot give rise to acute hemolysis. The platelet morphology observation shows almost the same adhered platelet morphology and activation ratio for the test samples in comparison with CP Ti, except the Ti-22Nb-6Hf alloy, which shows a lower activation ratio of platelets, indicating excellent blood compatibility. Therefore, it is proposed that the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf SMAs will be candidates to replace Ti-Ni for biomedical applications.

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility studies of Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf biomedical shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B L; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility of the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf biomedical shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated by cell culture (L-929 fibroblast cell), hemolytic test and platelet adhesion test, with CP Ti as a reference material. The cytotoxicity test indicates that all the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf SMAs show over 94% cell viability for different incubation times (2, 4 and 7 days) in comparison with a negative control and CP Ti. The cell morphology observation shows good polygon-like adherent growth and proliferation of L-929 in the extracts of all the test samples and CP Ti. These results suggest excellent cytocompatibility for the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf SMAs. The hemolytic test reveals that the hemolysis ratios of the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf alloys are far less than 5%, so they cannot give rise to acute hemolysis. The platelet morphology observation shows almost the same adhered platelet morphology and activation ratio for the test samples in comparison with CP Ti, except the Ti-22Nb-6Hf alloy, which shows a lower activation ratio of platelets, indicating excellent blood compatibility. Therefore, it is proposed that the Ti-Nb, Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Hf SMAs will be candidates to replace Ti-Ni for biomedical applications.

  14. Environmental/Biomedical Terminology Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffstetler, J.K.; Dailey, N.S.; Rickert, L.W.; Chilton, B.D.

    1976-12-01

    The Information Center Complex (ICC), a centrally administered group of information centers, provides information support to environmental and biomedical research groups and others within and outside Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In-house data base building and development of specialized document collections are important elements of the ongoing activities of these centers. ICC groups must be concerned with language which will adequately classify and insure retrievability of document records. Language control problems are compounded when the complexity of modern scientific problem solving demands an interdisciplinary approach. Although there are several word lists, indexes, and thesauri specific to various scientific disciplines usually grouped as Environmental Sciences, no single generally recognized authority can be used as a guide to the terminology of all environmental science. If biomedical terminology for the description of research on environmental effects is also needed, the problem becomes even more complex. The building of a word list which can be used as a general guide to the environmental/biomedical sciences has been a continuing activity of the Information Center Complex. This activity resulted in the publication of the Environmental Biomedical Terminology Index (EBTI).

  15. Mathematical modeling in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This volume reports on recent mathematical and computational advances in optical, ultrasound, and opto-acoustic tomographies. It outlines the state-of-the-art and future directions in these fields and provides readers with the most recently developed mathematical and computational tools.  It is particularly suitable for researchers and graduate students in applied mathematics and biomedical engineering.

  16. Integrated Biomaterials for Biomedical Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi

    2012-01-01

    This cutting edge book provides all the important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in materials in biomedical technology, especially structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, as well as the applications. The volume consists of 12 chapters written by acknowledged experts of the biomaterials field and covers a wide range of topics and applications.

  17. Mathematical modeling in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This volume gives an introduction to a fascinating research area to applied mathematicians. It is devoted to providing the exposition of promising analytical and numerical techniques for solving challenging biomedical imaging problems, which trigger the investigation of interesting issues in various branches of mathematics.

  18. Biomedical Engineering Education in Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, Richard J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses recent developments in the health care industry and their impact on the future of biomedical engineering education. Indicates that a more thorough understanding of the complex functions of the living organism can be acquired through the application of engineering techniques to problems of life sciences. (CC)

  19. Biomedical applications of magnesium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, W.H.; Bormann, D.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with the emerging field of biomedical applications for magnesium-based materials, envisioning degradable implants that dissolve in the human body after having cured a particular medical condition. After outlining the background of this interest, some major aspects concerning degra

  20. BioDARA: Data Summarization Approach to Extracting Bio-Medical Structuring Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung S. Kheau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Due to the ever growing amount of biomedical datasets stored in multiple tables, Information Extraction (IE from these datasets is increasingly recognized as one of the crucial technologies in bioinformatics. However, for IE to be practically applicable, adaptability of a system is crucial, considering extremely diverse demands in biomedical IE application. One should be able to extract a set of hidden patterns from these biomedical datasets at low cost. Approach: In this study, a new method is proposed, called Bio-medical Data Aggregation for Relational Attributes (BioDARA, for automatic structuring information extraction for biomedical datasets. BioDARA summarizes biomedical data stored in multiple tables in order to facilitate data modeling efforts in a multi-relational setting. BioDARA has the advantages or capabilities to transform biomedical data stored in multiple tables or databases into a Vector Space model, summarize biomedical data using the Information Retrieval theory and finally extract frequent patterns that describe the characteristics of these biomedical datasets. Results: the results show that data summarization performed by DARA, can be beneficial in summarizing biomedical datasets in a complex multi-relational environment, in which biomedical datasets are stored in a multi-level of one-to-many relationships and also in the case of datasets stored in more than one one-to-many relationships with non-target tables. Conclusion: This study concludes that data summarization performed by BioDARA, can be beneficial in summarizing biomedical datasets in a complex multi-relational environment, in which biomedical datasets are stored in a multi-level of one-to-many relationships.

  1. On Biomedical Research Policy in the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    0 ON BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH POLICY IN THE FUTURE Albert P. Williams January 1989 DTIC ELECTE P-7520 "’T,, . The RAND Corporation Papers are issued by...BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH POLICY IN THE FUTURE[l] Mr. Walden, members of the Science Policy Task Force, I am honored to be invited to appear on this panel and...to offer my thoughts on future biomedical research policy . My perspective is that of an outsider with a longstanding interest in federal biomedical

  2. Publishing priorities of biomedical research funders

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To understand the publishing priorities, especially in relation to open access, of 10 UK biomedical research funders. Design Semistructured interviews. Setting 10 UK biomedical research funders. Participants 12 employees with responsibility for research management at 10 UK biomedical research funders; a purposive sample to represent a range of backgrounds and organisation types. Conclusions Publicly funded and large biomedical research funders are committed to open access publishin...

  3. The Role of Gender in the Employment, Career Perception and Research Performance of Recent PhD Graduates from Dutch Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Cathelijn J F Waaijer; Sonneveld, Hans; Buitendijk, Simone E.; van Bochove, Cornelis A.; van der Weijden, Inge C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent decades have seen a sharp increase in the number of female PhD graduates in the Netherlands. Currently, the share of females among newly graduated PhDs is almost on par with that of males. A considerable body of scientific studies has investigated the role of gender in the academic workplace. However, the role of gender in the careers of all PhD graduates, including those outside academia, has been studied less. In this study, we investigate gender differences in type of job, occupatio...

  4. Identifying most important skills for PhD students in Food Science and Technology: a comparison between industry and academic stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelo González-Martínez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is an increasing need of new skills for PhD students to face the future labour market prospects. PhD graduates must have qualities attractive not only in academia but also outside, in both manufacture and service-oriented enterprises, in small innovative companies, and in the civil services and public administration, among others. To know what the needs of these future employees are, is of great importance to be able to improve their personal and academic formation. The aim of this work was, in the framework of the EC-funded ISEKI_Food 4 network, to evaluate the most desirable specific and soft skills that PhD students should acquire by the end of their doctoral studies. To this aim, several surveys were conducted and sent to the different stakeholders (academia and food industry partners in order to collect the information needed. Results showed that competences related to research skills and techniques, research management, personal effectiveness and communication skills were considered to be the most valuable skills to be acquired by our PhD students to meet the future needs of the labour market.  The importance of these skills was appreciated differently, depending on the stakeholder. To sum up, some recommendations to integrate such valuable skills into the curricula of the PhD student are given.

  5. Pro Isomerization in MLL1 PHD3-Bromo Cassette Connects H3K4me Readout to CyP33 and HDAC-Mediated Repression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhanxin; Song, Jikui; Milne, Thomas A.; Wang, Gang G.; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC); (Rockefeller)

    2010-09-13

    The MLL1 gene is a frequent target for recurrent chromosomal translocations, resulting in transformation of hematopoietic precursors into leukemia stem cells. Here, we report on structure-function studies that elucidate molecular events in MLL1 binding of histone H3K4me3/2 marks and recruitment of the cyclophilin CyP33. CyP33 contains a PPIase and a RRM domain and regulates MLL1 function through HDAC recruitment. We find that the PPIase domain of CyP33 regulates the conformation of MLL1 through proline isomerization within the PHD3-Bromo linker, thereby disrupting the PHD3-Bromo interface and facilitating binding of the MLL1-PHD3 domain to the CyP33-RRM domain. H3K4me3/2 and CyP33-RRM target different surfaces of MLL1-PHD3 and can bind simultaneously to form a ternary complex. Furthermore, the MLL1-CyP33 interaction is required for repression of HOXA9 and HOXC8 genes in vivo. Our results highlight the role of PHD3-Bromo cassette as a regulatory platform, orchestrating MLL1 binding of H3K4me3/2 marks and cyclophilin-mediated repression through HDAC recruitment.

  6. Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, 1920-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckling, Frederick W; Lo Vecchio, Janolyn G; Reckling, JoAnn B

    2004-05-01

    Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, was an orthopaedic surgeon, academician, administrator, laboratory investigator, historian, and mentor. His career spanned nearly six decades, beginning with graduate education at the University of Minnesota (UM) under the auspices of Owen H. Wangensteen, MD, PhD. In addition to obtaining a PhD in physiology in the UM Graduate School, he completed general and orthopaedic surgery residencies and attained board certification in each specialty. He served in the US Army Occupation Force Medical Corps in Germany just after World War II. In 1957, at 37 years old, he assumed the chairmanship of the orthopaedic training program at the University of Kansas. In 1971, he couldn't resist the opportunity to become one of the founding members of the "start-up" University of Arizona College of Medicine, accepting an appointment as chair of the new orthopaedic training program, where he remained until his retirement in 1990. He took clinical problems to the laboratory, and made important scientific contributions, particularly in the area of fat embolism and in using calcium sulfate (plaster of Paris) to fill bone defects. He served on governing boards of national professional organizations and presided over the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma from 1980-1981. Throughout his career, he was fascinated by, and published extensively in, the history of medicine arena. Known fondly as "the professor" to many of his residents and colleagues, he had a pragmatic, honest, upbeat, and often humorous approach to life's challenges, valuing personal integrity above other virtues. He explored various eclectic interests far beyond his professional contributions while maintaining his family as a central priority. With his exemplary productivity and interests in the surgical and laboratory sciences, history of medicine, appreciation of fine arts, and perceptive and effective interactions with family, friends, patients, and colleagues, the memory of Leonard

  7. Expanded radio art as PhD practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radio After Radio: Redefining Radio Art in the Light of New Media Technology through Expanded Practice is the title of my PhD practice based research. This paper focuses on the extended boundaries of radio art, considering how radio art might be defined in relation to sound art, music, and media art. Mapping the shifting parameters of radio art in the digital era has prompted a consideration of how radio can be seen to be moving from being a predominantly shared "live" event to one consumed "...

  8. Hrvoje Tomić, PhD in Technical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Mastelić Ivić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hrvoje Tomić defended his PhD thesis Geospatial Data Analysis for the Purpose of Real Estate Valuation in Urban Areas at the Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, on November 15, 2010. His mentor was Prof. Dr. Siniša Mastelić Ivić, and the other two members of the Grading and Defence Committee were Assist. Prof. Dr. Vlado Cetl and Prof. Dr. Goran Poljanec from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb.

  9. MODELING MICROBUBBLE DYNAMICS IN BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAHINE Georges L.; HSIAO Chao-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    Controlling mierobubble dynamics to produce desirable biomedical outcomes when and where necessary and avoid deleterious effects requires advanced knowledge,which can be achieved only through a combination of experimental and numerical/analytical techniques.The present communication presents a multi-physics approach to study the dynamics combining viscousinviseid effects,liquid and structure dynamics,and multi bubble interaction.While complex numerical tools are developed and used,the study aims at identifying the key parameters influencing the dynamics,which need to be included in simpler models.

  10. AIRE-PHD fingers are structural hubs to maintain the integrity of chromatin-associated interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Matafora, Vittoria; Saare, Mario; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Mollica, Luca; Quilici, Giacomo; Chignola, Francesca; Mannella, Valeria; Zucchelli, Chiara; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    Mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the expression of peripheral-tissue antigens to mediate deletional tolerance, thereby preventing self-reactivity. AIRE contains two plant homeodomains (PHDs) which are sites of pathological mutations. AIRE-PHD fingers are important for AIRE transcriptional activity and presumably play a crucial role in the formation of multimeric protein complexes at chromatin level which ultimately control immunological tolerance. As a step forward the understanding of AIRE-PHD fingers in normal and pathological conditions, we investigated their structure and used a proteomic SILAC approach to assess the impact of patient mutations targeting AIRE-PHD fingers. Importantly, both AIRE-PHD fingers are structurally independent and mutually non-interacting domains. In contrast to D297A and V301M on AIRE-PHD1, the C446G mutation on AIRE-PHD2 destroys the structural fold, thus causing aberrant AIRE localization and reduction of AIRE target genes activation. Moreover, mutations targeting AIRE-PHD1 affect the formation of a multimeric protein complex at chromatin level. Overall our results reveal the importance of AIRE-PHD domains in the interaction with chromatin-associated nuclear partners and gene regulation confirming the role of PHD fingers as versatile protein interaction hubs for multiple binding events.

  11. Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meurer, Maria Ines [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Pathology]. E-mail: emaninha@gmail.com; Meurer, Eduardo [Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Tubarao, SC (Brazil); Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes da; Santa Barbara, Ailton [Centro de Pesquisa Renato Archer (CenPRA), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Nobre, Luiz Felipe [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Clinical Practice; Oliveira, Marilia Gerhardt de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery; Silva, Daniela Nascimento [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. of Surgery

    2008-01-15

    Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific software. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes. (author)

  12. Advanced Methods of Biomedical Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    This book grew out of the IEEE-EMBS Summer Schools on Biomedical Signal Processing, which have been held annually since 2002 to provide the participants state-of-the-art knowledge on emerging areas in biomedical engineering. Prominent experts in the areas of biomedical signal processing, biomedical data treatment, medicine, signal processing, system biology, and applied physiology introduce novel techniques and algorithms as well as their clinical or physiological applications. The book provides an overview of a compelling group of advanced biomedical signal processing techniques, such as mult

  13. Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Herbert F

    2011-01-01

    The future challenges to medical and biological engineering, sometimes referred to as biomedical engineering or simply bioengineering, are many. Some of these are identifiable now and others will emerge from time to time as new technologies are introduced and harnessed. There is a fundamental issue regarding "Branding the bio/biomedical engineering degree" that requires a common understanding of what is meant by a B.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering, or Biological Engineering. In this paper we address some of the issues involved in branding the Bio/Biomedical Engineering degree, with the aim of clarifying the Bio/Biomedical Engineering brand.

  14. [Application of elastin in biomedical materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Decai; Wang, Xiaoli; Hou, Xin; Yao, Kangde

    2008-12-01

    Elastin is a natural biomedical material of great potential. Being endowed with the special crosslinking and hydrophobic structure, elastin retains many good properties such as good elasticity, ductibility, biocompatibility, biodegradability and so on. Nowadays, elastin as a material, which is gradually attracting people' s attention in the biomedical materials field, has been used as tissue engineering scaffolds, derma substitutes and other biomedical materials. In this context, a systematic review on the characteristics of elastin as a biomedical material and on the actuality of its application is presented. Future developments of elastin in the field of biomedical applications are also discussed.

  15. The Growth of Thin Epitaxial Copper Films on Ruthenium (0001)and Oxygen-Precovered Ruthenium (0001) as studied by x-rayphotoelectron diffraction. University of California, Davis, Department of Physics, Ph.D. Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebush, Scott Daniel [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, the variation of mean emitter depths with direction for core photoelectron emission from single crystals, including the effects of both isotropic inelastic scattering and single and multiple elastic scattering was theoretically studied. The mean emitter depth was found to vary by as much as ±30% with direction. In the second part of this dissertation, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) was used to study the structure and growth mechanisms of Cu films grown on a clean and an oxygen-precovered Ru(0001) surface. Experimental Cu 2p3/2 (Ekin = 556 eV) and Ru 3d (Ekin = 1205 eV) intensities were measured for Cu coverages from submonolayer up to several monolayer (ML) on the clean Ru(0001) surface. In addition, the O 1s (Ekin = 958 eV) intensity was measured for Cu grown on oxygen precovered Ru(0001). These XPD intensities have been analyzed using single scattering cluster (SSC) and multiple scattering cluster (MSC) models. The first Cu layer has been found to grow pseudomorphically on the Ru(0001) surface in agreement with prior studies of the Cu/Ru(0001) system. Thus, the initial growth is layer-by-layer. For higher coverages, XPD shows that the short-range structure of the Cu films is fcc Cu(111), but with significant interlayer relaxation (compared to bulk Cu(111)) that persists up to >8 ML. When oxygen is preadsorbed on the Ru(0001) surface before Cu film growth (possibly to act as a surfactant promoting smoother growth), XPD shows that the first ~3 ML of Cu grow as 3-D islands. In addition, XPD shows that, during Cu growth, all of the oxygen "floats" on the CU surface, in contrast to prior studies which found that 30% of the oxygen remains at the Cu/Ru intetiace. XPD also indicates that the oxygen is highly disordered on the Cu overlayer surface. In thicker layers with oxygen prsent, the Cu grows as Cu(111) with equal occupations of two possible domains rotated by 1800 from each other. In

  16. Training in psychodiagnostic testing in APA-approved PsyD and PhD clinical psychology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, C; Zalewski, C

    1993-10-01

    Fifty-one percent (N = 80) of directors of doctoral PhD and PsyD programs in clinical psychology, accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), responded to a survey on assessment training. The study was a replication of an earlier survey by Piotrowski and Keller (1984b) on instruction, practices, and attitudes on testing. Our findings indicated that training emphasis in assessment coursework has changed very little over the past decade. Intelligence testing was emphasized in most programs, followed by objective and projective personality assessment. However, training in behavioral assessment techniques was required in only half of the responding programs. There were no significant differences between PhD and PsyD programs concerning required coursework in assessment. Factors that influence the perennial importance of testing in the clinical core curriculum are discussed.

  17. Biomedical and Environmental Sciences INFORMATION FOR AUTHORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, an international journal with emphasis on scientific findings in China, publishes articles dealing with biologic and toxic effects of environmental pollutants on man and other forms of life. The effects may be measured with pharmacological, biochemical, pathological, and immunological techniques. The journal also publishes reports dealing with the entry, transport, and fate of natural and anthropogenic chemicals in the biosphere, and their impact on human health and well-being.Papers describing biochemical, pharmacological, pathological, toxicological and immunological studies of pharmaceuticals (biotechnological products) are also welcome.

  18. Biomedical Applications of Biodegradable Polyesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Manavitehrani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus in the field of biomedical engineering has shifted in recent years to biodegradable polymers and, in particular, polyesters. Dozens of polyester-based medical devices are commercially available, and every year more are introduced to the market. The mechanical performance and wide range of biodegradation properties of this class of polymers allow for high degrees of selectivity for targeted clinical applications. Recent research endeavors to expand the application of polymers have been driven by a need to target the general hydrophobic nature of polyesters and their limited cell motif sites. This review provides a comprehensive investigation into advanced strategies to modify polyesters and their clinical potential for future biomedical applications.

  19. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  20. Erythropoietin inhibits HIF-1α expression via upregulation of PHD-2 transcription and translation in an in vitro model of hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvenir, Rhonda; Flores, Jerry J; Ostrowski, Robert P; Manaenko, Anatol; Duris, Kamil; Tang, Jiping

    2014-02-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α is the central transcriptional factor for the regulation of oxygen-associated genes in response to hypoxia. Erythropoietin (EPO), a hematopoietic growth factor, increases oxygen availability during hypoxia/ischemia and is associated with neuroprotection following hypoxia-ischemia in laboratory models of stroke. However, EPO has failed to translate in a clinical setting. Thus, it is critical to elucidate the key players in EPO-induced neuroprotection. Our preliminary studies have shown that EPO, as a downstream gene of HIF, inhibits HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner in an in vitro model of hypoxia-ischemia. This study is designed to elucidate the primary mediator of EPO-induced HIF-1α inhibition and subsequent cell survival/neuroprotection. Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of nerve growth factor-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells were used to model hypoxia-ischemia in an in vitro environment. The profile of HIF-1α, HIF-2α and prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 (PHD-2) expression; HIF-1α and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD-2) mRNA levels; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9; and cell death was evaluated in the presence and absence of either EPO or PHD-2 inhibitor during OGD. Our findings showed that EPO treatment resulted in an increase in PHD-2 transcription and translation, inhibition of HIF-1α expression, reactive oxygen species formation, and MMP-9 activity, resulting in increased cell survival after OGD. We also observed that EPO-induced cell survival/neuroprotection was reversed by siRNA silencing of PHD-2. This led to the conclusion that PHD-2 is a key mediator of EPO-induced HIF-1α inhibition and subsequent neuroprotection in an in vitro model of hypoxia-ischemia.