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Sample records for biomedical photoacoustic imaging

  1. Photoacoustics, thermoacoustics, and acousto-optics for biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M-X; Elson, D S; Li, R; Dunsby, C; Eckersley, R J

    2010-01-01

    Recently there have been significant advances in developing hybrid techniques combining electromagnetic waves with ultrasound for biomedical imaging, namely photoacoustic, thermoacoustic, and acousto-optic (or ultrasound modulated optical) tomography. All three techniques take advantage of tissue contrast offered by electromagnetic (EM) waves, while achieving good spatial resolution in deeper tissue facilitated by ultrasound. In this review the principles of the three techniques are introduced. A description of existing experimental and image reconstruction techniques is provided. Some recent key developments are highlighted and current issues in each of the areas are discussed.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustics promises to revolutionize medical imaging and may well make as dramatic a contribution to modern medicine as the discovery of the x-ray itself once did. Combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically, photoacoustics can provide deep speckle-free imaging with high electromagnetic contrast at high ultrasonic resolution and without any health risk. While photoacoustic imaging is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology, this book is the first comprehensive volume in this emerging field covering both the physics and the remarkable noninvasive applic

  3. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Lecture: Thermophotonic and Photoacoustic Radar Imaging Methods for Biomedical and Dental Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    In the first part of this presentation I will introduce thermophotonic radar imaging principles and techniques using chirped or binary-phase-coded modulation, methods which can break through the maximum detection depth/depth resolution limitations of conventional photothermal waves. Using matched-filter principles, a methodology enabling parabolic diffusion-wave energy fields to exhibit energy localization akin to propagating hyperbolic wave-fields has been developed. It allows for deconvolution of individual responses of superposed axially discrete sources, opening a new field: depth-resolved thermal coherence tomography. Several examples from dental enamel caries diagnostic imaging to metal subsurface defect thermographic imaging will be discussed. The second part will introduce the field of photoacoustic radar (or sonar) biomedical imaging. I will report the development of a novel biomedical imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection and processing coupled with a beamforming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Utilization of specific chirped modulation waveforms (``waveform engineering'') achieves dramatic signal-to-noise-ratio increase and improved axial resolution over pulsed laser photoacoustics. The talk will conclude with aspects of instrumental sensitivity of the PA Radar to optical contrast using cancerous breast tissue-mimicking phantoms, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast enhancement agents and in-vivo tissue samples.

  4. Biomedical photoacoustics: fundamentals, instrumentation and perspectives on nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chunpeng; Wu, Beibei; Dong, Yanyan; Song, Zhangwei; Zhao, Yaping; Ni, Xianwei; Yang, Yan; Liu, Zhe

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an integrated biomedical imaging modality which combines the advantages of acoustic deep penetration and optical high sensitivity. It can provide functional and structural images with satisfactory resolution and contrast which could provide abundant pathological information for disease-oriented diagnosis. Therefore, it has found vast applications so far and become a powerful tool of precision nanomedicine. However, the investigation of PAI-based imaging nanomaterials is still in its infancy. This perspective article aims to summarize the developments in photoacoustic technologies and instrumentations in the past years, and more importantly, present a bright outlook for advanced PAI-based imaging nanomaterials as well as their emerging biomedical applications in nanomedicine. Current challenges and bottleneck issues have also been discussed and elucidated in this article to bring them to the attention of the readership.

  5. Spatial angular compounding of photoacoustic images

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyun Jae; Bell, Muyinatu A Lediju; Guo, Xiaoyu; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) images utilize pulsed lasers and ultrasound transducers to visualize targets with higher optical absorption than the surrounding medium. However, they are susceptible to acoustic clutter and background noise artifacts that obfuscate biomedical structures of interest. We investigated three spatial-angular compounding methods to improve PA image quality for biomedical applications, implemented by combining multiple images acquired as an ultrasound probe was rotated about the ...

  6. Clinical photoacoustic imaging of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Willmann, Juergen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid technique that shines laser light on tissue and measures optically induced ultrasound signal. There is growing interest in the clinical community over this new technique and its possible clinical applications. One of the most prominent features of photoacoustic imaging is its ability to characterize tissue, leveraging differences in the optical absorption of underlying tissue components such as hemoglobin, lipids, melanin, collagen and water among many others. In this review, the state-of-the-art photoacoustic imaging techniques and some of the key outcomes pertaining to different cancer applications in the clinic are presented.

  7. Introduction: Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xingde; Beard, Paul C.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2010-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, “Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy,” which combines three technical areas from the 2010 Optical Society of America (OSA), Biomedical Optics (BIOMED) Topical Meeting held on 11–14 April in Miami, Florida, and includes contributions from conference attendees.

  8. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oxygen Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen level, including blood oxygen saturation (sO2 and tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2, are crucial physiological parameters in life science. This paper reviews the importance of these two parameters and the detection methods for them, focusing on the application of photoacoustic imaging in this scenario. sO2 is traditionally detected with optical spectra-based methods, and has recently been proven uniquely efficient by using photoacoustic methods. pO2, on the other hand, is typically detected by PET, MRI, or pure optical approaches, yet with limited spatial resolution, imaging frame rate, or penetration depth. Great potential has also been demonstrated by employing photoacoustic imaging to overcome the existing limitations of the aforementioned techniques.

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of lymphatic pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, Alex; Heinmiller, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.

    2017-10-01

    The lymphatic system is responsible for fluid homeostasis and immune cell trafficking and has been implicated in several diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and cancer metastasis. Despite its importance, the lack of suitable in vivo imaging techniques has hampered our understanding of the lymphatic system. This is, in part, due to the limited contrast of lymphatic fluids and structures. Photoacoustic imaging, in combination with optically absorbing dyes or nanoparticles, has great potential for noninvasively visualizing the lymphatic vessels deep in tissues. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging is capable of separating the components; however, the slow wavelength switching speed of most laser systems is inadequate for imaging lymphatic pumping without motion artifacts being introduced into the processed images. We investigate two approaches for visualizing lymphatic processes in vivo. First, single-wavelength differential photoacoustic imaging is used to visualize lymphatic pumping in the hindlimb of a mouse in real time. Second, a fast-switching multiwavelength photoacoustic imaging system was used to assess the propulsion profile of dyes through the lymphatics in real time. These approaches may have profound impacts in noninvasively characterizing and investigating the lymphatic system.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanjin Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging (PAI, also known as optoacoustic imaging, is a rapidly growing imaging modality with potential in medical diagnosis and therapy monitoring. This paper focuses on the techniques of prostate PAI and its potential applications in prostate cancer detection. Transurethral light delivery combined with transrectal ultrasound detection overcomes light scattering in the surrounding tissue and provides optimal photoacoustic signals while minimizing invasiveness. While label-free PAI based on endogenous contrast has promising potential for prostate cancer detection, exogenous contrast agents can further enhance the sensitivity and specificity of prostate cancer PAI. Further in vivo studies are required in order to achieve the translation of prostate PAI to clinical implementation. The minimal invasiveness, relatively low cost, high specificity and sensitivity, and real-time imaging capability are valuable advantages of PAI that may improve the current prostate cancer management in clinic.

  11. Wavefront Shaping and Its Application to Enhance Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction to the field in mid-1990s, photoacoustic imaging has become a fast-developing biomedical imaging modality with many promising potentials. By converting absorbed diffused light energy into not-so-diffused ultrasonic waves, the reconstruction of the ultrasonic waves from the targeted area in photoacoustic imaging leads to a high-contrast sensing of optical absorption with ultrasonic resolution in deep tissue, overcoming the optical diffusion limit from the signal detection perspective. The generation of photoacoustic signals, however, is still throttled by the attenuation of photon flux due to the strong diffusion effect of light in tissue. Recently, optical wavefront shaping has demonstrated that multiply scattered light could be manipulated so as to refocus inside a complex medium, opening up new hope to tackle the fundamental limitation. In this paper, the principle and recent development of photoacoustic imaging and optical wavefront shaping are briefly introduced. Then we describe how photoacoustic signals can be used as a guide star for in-tissue optical focusing, and how such focusing can be exploited for further enhancing photoacoustic imaging in terms of sensitivity and penetration depth. Finally, the existing challenges and further directions towards in vivo applications are discussed.

  12. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  13. Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion for identifying reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Kuniyil Ajith Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of acoustic inhomogeneities and resulting reflection artifacts is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. Absorption of light by skin and superficial optical absorbers will generate photoacoustic transients, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed, may appear in the region of interest, which causes difficulties in image interpretation. We propose a novel method to identify and potentially eliminate reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound [PAFUSion]. Our method uses focused ultrasound pulses to mimic the wave field produced by photoacoustic sources and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts in clinical combined photoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound. Simulation and phantom results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion can identify reflections in photoacoustic images and thus envisages potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  14. Contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-12-18

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  15. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging (PAI and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  16. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  17. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Springeling, Geert; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; van Soest, Gijs

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerotic plaque. We specifically imaged lipid content, a key factor in vulnerable plaques that may lead to myocardial infarction. An integrated intravascular photoacoustics (IVPA) and ultrasound (IVUS) catheter with an outer diameter of 1.25 mm was developed. The catheter comprises an angle-polished optical fiber adjacent to a 30 MHz single-element transducer. The ultrasonic transducer was optically isolated to eliminate artifacts in the PA image. We performed measurements on a cylindrical vessel phantom and isolated point targets to demonstrate its imaging performance. Axial and lateral point spread function widths were 110 μm and 550 μm, respectively, for PA and 89 μm and 420 μm for US. We imaged two fresh human coronary arteries, showing different stages of disease, ex vivo. Specific photoacoustic imaging of lipid content, is achieved by spectroscopic imaging at different wavelengths between 1180 and 1230 nm.

  18. FEM model based optimization of transducer geometry for photoacoustic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, W.; Piras, D.; van Veldhoven, S.; Prins, C; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-01-01

    We optimize the design of an ultrasound transducer for photoacoustic breast imaging using FEM analysis. We arrive at a detector design which shows significant improvement in image quality when used in photoacoustic tomographic simulations.

  19. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Jelena; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajashekar; Bohndiek, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Experimental Design We determined the presence and activity of two members of matrix metalloproteinase family (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9, suggested as biomarkers...... in living mice optically, observing the increase in Alexa750 fluorescence, and photoacoustically, using a dual wavelength imaging method. Results Active forms of both MMP2 and MMP-9 enzymes were found in FTC133 tumor homogenates, with MMP-9 detected in greater amounts. The molecular imaging agent...... for malignant thyroid lesions, in FTC133 thyroid tumors subcutaneously implanted in nude mice. The imaging agent used to visualize tumors was MMP activatable photoacoustic probe, Alexa750-CXeeeeXPLGLAGrrrrrXK-BHQ3. Cleavage of the MMP activatable agent was imaged after intratumoral and intravenous injections...

  20. Time Reversal Reconstruction Algorithm Based on PSO Optimized SVM Interpolation for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging is an innovative imaging technique to image biomedical tissues. The time reversal reconstruction algorithm in which a numerical model of the acoustic forward problem is run backwards in time is widely used. In the paper, a time reversal reconstruction algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO optimized support vector machine (SVM interpolation method is proposed for photoacoustics imaging. Numerical results show that the reconstructed images of the proposed algorithm are more accurate than those of the nearest neighbor interpolation, linear interpolation, and cubic convolution interpolation based time reversal algorithm, which can provide higher imaging quality by using significantly fewer measurement positions or scanning times.

  1. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  2. Bond-selective photoacoustic imaging by converting molecular vibration into acoustic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Hui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The quantized vibration of chemical bonds provides a way of detecting specific molecules in a complex tissue environment. Unlike pure optical methods, for which imaging depth is limited to a few hundred micrometers by significant optical scattering, photoacoustic detection of vibrational absorption breaks through the optical diffusion limit by taking advantage of diffused photons and weak acoustic scattering. Key features of this method include both high scalability of imaging depth from a few millimeters to a few centimeters and chemical bond selectivity as a novel contrast mechanism for photoacoustic imaging. Its biomedical applications spans detection of white matter loss and regeneration, assessment of breast tumor margins, and diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This review provides an overview of the recent advances made in vibration-based photoacoustic imaging and various biomedical applications enabled by this new technology.

  3. Polymer fiber detectors for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Hubert; Berer, Thomas; Pühringer, Karoline; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Günther; Burgholzer, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel imaging method for medical and biological applications, combining the advantages of Diffuse Optical Imaging (high contrast) and Ultrasonic Imaging (high spatial resolution). A short laser pulse hits the sample. The absorbed energy causes a thermoelastic expansion and thereby launches a broadband ultrasonic wave (photoacoustic signal). The distribution of absorbed energy density is reconstructed from measurements of the photoacoustic signals around the sample. For collecting photoacoustic signals either point like or extended, integrating detectors can be used. The latter integrate the pressure at least in one dimension, e.g. along a line. Thereby, the three dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a two dimensional problem. For a tomography device consisting of a scanning line detector and a rotating sample, fiber-based detectors made of polymer have been recently introduced. Fiber-based detectors are easy to use and possess a constant, high spatial resolution over their entire active length. Polymer fibers provide a better impedance matching and a better handling compared with glass fibers which were our first approach. First measurement results using polymer fiber detectors and some approaches for improving the performance are presented.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of port-wine stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Mulder, Miranda J.; Glade, Conrad P.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To optimize laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWSs), information about the vasculature as well as lesion depth is valuable. In this study we investigated the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) to obtain this information. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: PAI uses pulsed

  5. Photoacoustic Imaging of Port-Wine Stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Mulder, M.J.; Mulder, Miranda J.; Glade, Conrad P.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objective: To optimize laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWSs), information about the vasculature as well as lesion depth is valuable. In this study we investigated the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) to obtain this information. - Study Design/Materials and Methods: PAI uses

  6. Adaptive photoacoustic imaging quality optimization with EMD and reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengwen; Ding, Yao; Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-10-01

    Biomedical photoacoustic (PA) signal is characterized with extremely low signal to noise ratio which will yield significant artifacts in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) images. Since PA signals acquired by ultrasound transducers are non-linear and non-stationary, traditional data analysis methods such as Fourier and wavelet method cannot give useful information for further research. In this paper, we introduce an adaptive method to improve the quality of PA imaging based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and reconstruction. Data acquired by ultrasound transducers are adaptively decomposed into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) after a sifting pre-process. Since noise is randomly distributed in different IMFs, depressing IMFs with more noise while enhancing IMFs with less noise can effectively enhance the quality of reconstructed PAT images. However, searching optimal parameters by means of brute force searching algorithms will cost too much time, which prevent this method from practical use. To find parameters within reasonable time, heuristic algorithms, which are designed for finding good solutions more efficiently when traditional methods are too slow, are adopted in our method. Two of the heuristic algorithms, Simulated Annealing Algorithm, a probabilistic method to approximate the global optimal solution, and Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm, an optimization method inspired by the foraging behavior of bee swarm, are selected to search optimal parameters of IMFs in this paper. The effectiveness of our proposed method is proved both on simulated data and PA signals from real biomedical tissue, which might bear the potential for future clinical PA imaging de-noising.

  7. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging of two-photon absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsley, Patrick; Ren, Kui; Zhang, Rongting

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality where we intend to reconstruct optical properties of heterogeneous media from measured ultrasound signals generated by the photoacoustic effect. In recent years, there have been considerable interests in using PAT to image two-photon absorption, in addition to the usual single-photon absorption, inside diffusive media. We present a mathematical model for quantitative image reconstruction in two-photon photoacoustic tomography (TP-PAT). We propose a computational strategy for the reconstruction of the optical absorption coefficients and provide some numerical evidences based on synthetic photoacoustic acoustic data to demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative reconstructions in TP-PAT.

  8. India Ink Incorporated Multifunctional Phase-transition Nanodroplets for Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Dual-modality Imaging and Photoacoustic Effect Based Tumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms—conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic, and ultrasound imaging contrasts, but also a new avenue for photoacoustic effect mediated tumor therapy. Upon pulsed laser illumination above a relatively low energy threshold, liquid-gas phase transition of the INDs has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, offering excellent contrasts for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging. With further increased laser energy, the nanodroplets have been shown to be capable of destructing cancer cells in vivo, presumably due to the photoacoustic effect induced shock-wave generation from the carbon particles of the incorporated India ink. The demonstrated results suggest that the developed multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets have a great potential for many theranostic biomedical applications, including photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality molecular imaging and targeted, localized cancer therapy. PMID:25161702

  9. India ink incorporated multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets for photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality imaging and photoacoustic effect based tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms-conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic, and ultrasound imaging contrasts, but also a new avenue for photoacoustic effect mediated tumor therapy. Upon pulsed laser illumination above a relatively low energy threshold, liquid-gas phase transition of the INDs has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, offering excellent contrasts for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging. With further increased laser energy, the nanodroplets have been shown to be capable of destructing cancer cells in vivo, presumably due to the photoacoustic effect induced shock-wave generation from the carbon particles of the incorporated India ink. The demonstrated results suggest that the developed multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets have a great potential for many theranostic biomedical applications, including photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality molecular imaging and targeted, localized cancer therapy.

  10. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  11. Multifunctional Photosensitizer-Based Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  12. Image chorioretinal vasculature in albino rats using photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; Liu, Tan; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2011-12-01

    We imaged the microvascular network in both the retina and the choroid in an albino rat eye using photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy guided by optical coherence tomography. Relying on optical absorption and ultrasonic detection, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy can image both retinal and choroidal vessel networks with high contrast.

  13. Characterization of lens based photoacoustic imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalloor Joseph Francis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the challenges in translating photoacoustic (PA imaging to clinical applications includes limited view of the target tissue, low signal to noise ratio and the high cost of developing real-time systems. Acoustic lens based PA imaging systems, also known as PA cameras are a potential alternative to conventional imaging systems in these scenarios. The 3D focusing action of lens enables real-time C-scan imaging with a 2D transducer array. In this paper, we model the underlying physics in a PA camera in the mathematical framework of an imaging system and derive a closed form expression for the point spread function (PSF. Experimental verification follows including the details on how to design and fabricate the lens inexpensively. The system PSF is evaluated over a 3D volume that can be imaged by this PA camera. Its utility is demonstrated by imaging phantom and an ex vivo human prostate tissue sample.

  14. Low-cost photoacoustic imaging systems based on laser diode and light-emitting diode excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingkai Yao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging, an emerging biomedical imaging modality, holds great promise for preclinical and clinical researches. It combines the high optical contrast and high ultrasound resolution by converting laser excitation into ultrasonic emission. In order to generate photoacoustic signal efficiently, bulky Q-switched solid-state laser systems are most commonly used as excitation sources and hence limit its commercialization. As an alternative, the miniaturized semiconductor laser system has the advantages of being inexpensive, compact, and robust, which makes a significant effect on production-forming design. It is also desirable to obtain a wavelength in a wide range from visible to near-infrared spectrum for multispectral applications. Focussing on practical aspect, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art developments of low-cost photoacoustic system with laser diode and light-emitting diode excitation source and highlights a few representative installations in the past decade.

  15. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  16. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  17. Recent progress in photoacoustic molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V

    2018-04-06

    By acoustically detecting the optical absorption contrast, photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT) has broken the penetration limits of traditional high-resolution optical imaging. Through spectroscopic analysis of the target's optical absorption, PAT can identify a wealth of endogenous and exogenous molecules and thus is inherently capable of molecular imaging with high sensitivity. PAT's molecular sensitivity is uniquely accompanied by non-ionizing radiation, high spatial resolution, and deep penetration in biological tissues, which other optical imaging modalities cannot achieve yet. In this concise review, we summarize the most recent technological advancements in PA molecular imaging and highlight the novel molecular probes specifically made for PAT in deep tissues. We conclude with a brief discussion of the opportunities for future advancements. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoacoustic reflection artifact reduction using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound : comparison between plane-wave and element-by-element synthetic backpropagation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, M.; Jaeger, M.; Frenz, M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities constitute a major problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients from the skin and superficial optical absorbers traverse into the tissue and reflect off echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts.

  19. Biomedical signals, imaging, and informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Signals, Imaging, and Informatics, the third volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in biosignal processing, medical imaging, infrared imaging, and medical informatics.More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including biomedical s

  20. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Mo Yang

    Full Text Available We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging using acoustic reflectors to enhance planar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Robert; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2014-12-01

    Planar sensor arrays have advantages when used for photoacoustic imaging: they do not require the imaging target to be enclosed, and they are easier to manufacture than curved arrays. However, planar arrays have a limited view of the acoustic field due to their finite size; therefore, not all of the acoustic waves emitted from a photoacoustic source can be recorded. This loss of data results in artifacts in the reconstructed photoacoustic image. A detection array configuration which combines a planar Fabry–Pérot sensor with perpendicular acoustic reflectors is described and experimentally implemented. This retains the detection advantages of the planar sensor while increasing the effective detection aperture in order to improve the reconstructed photoacoustic image.

  2. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  3. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  4. Comparison of the pulsed photoacoustic technique and the optical coherence tomography from the viewpoint of biomedical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Matti; Zhao, Zuomin; Myllyla, Risto

    2005-08-01

    Laser photoacoustics (PA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are versatile and sensitive techniques for biomedical diagnostics, imaging, and measurements. In this paper, the hdamentals of PA and OCT are considered and the applications in biomedicine reviewed. The properties of the two techniques are compared to find the proper technique for a specific application. The problems and restrictions, dependent on the factors of the human body, which have to be reduced before the clinical utilization of the techniques, are pointed out. The PA technique is more suitable for measuring or imaging the objects located in deep tissue or organs and for sensing the physiological changes caused by compositions with larger absorption variation, such as hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, and melanin. OCT is more suitable for imaging tissue surface and subsurface structures and fine structures and for sensing the physiological changes caused by compositions with larger scattering and refractive index variation, such as skin water, tissue glucose, and sweat.

  5. Computational intelligence in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art computational intelligence research and technologies in biomedical images with emphasis on biomedical decision making. Biomedical imaging offers useful information on patients’ medical conditions and clues to causes of their symptoms and diseases. Biomedical images, however, provide a large number of images which physicians must interpret. Therefore, computer aids are demanded and become indispensable in physicians’ decision making. This book discusses major technical advancements and research findings in the field of computational intelligence in biomedical imaging, for example, computational intelligence in computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and brain disease, in lung function analysis, and in radiation therapy. The book examines technologies and studies that have reached the practical level, and those technologies that are becoming available in clinical practices in hospitals rapidly such as computational inte...

  6. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of tyrosinase expressing tumours in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Jathoul, Amit; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Lythgoe, Mark; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin; Beard, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Two human tumour cell lines (K562, 293T) were stably transfected to achieve the genetic expression of tyrosinase, which is involved in the production of the pigment eumelanin. The cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumour xenografts, which were imaged over a period of up to 26 days using an all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. 3D photoacoustic images of the tumours and the surrounding vasculature were acquired at excitation wavelengths ranging from 600nm to 770nm. The images showed tumour growth and continued tyrosinase expression over the full 26 day duration of the study. These findings were confirmed by histological analysis of excised tumour samples.

  7. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  8. Listening to light scattering in turbid media: quantitative optical scattering imaging using photoacoustic measurements with one-wavelength illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Li, Xiaoqi; Xi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a potential imaging modality, can visualize tissue structure and function with high spatial resolution and excellent optical contrast. It is widely recognized that the ability of quantitatively imaging optical absorption and scattering coefficients from photoacoustic measurements is essential before PAT can become a powerful imaging modality. Existing quantitative PAT (qPAT), while successful, has been focused on recovering absorption coefficient only by assuming scattering coefficient a constant. An effective method for photoacoustically recovering optical scattering coefficient is presently not available. Here we propose and experimentally validate such a method for quantitative scattering coefficient imaging using photoacoustic data from one-wavelength illumination. The reconstruction method developed combines conventional PAT with the photon diffusion equation in a novel way to realize the recovery of scattering coefficient. We demonstrate the method using various objects having scattering contrast only or both absorption and scattering contrasts embedded in turbid media. The listening-to-light-scattering method described will be able to provide high resolution scattering imaging for various biomedical applications ranging from breast to brain imaging. (papers)

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of hidden dental caries by using a fiber-based probing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Takuya; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2017-04-01

    Photoacoustic method to detect hidden dental caries is proposed. It was found that high frequency ultrasonic waves are generated from hidden carious part when radiating laser light to occlusal surface of model tooth. By making a map of intensity of these high frequency components, photoacoustic images of hidden caries were successfully obtained. A photoacoustic imaging system using a bundle of hollow optical fiber was fabricated for using clinical application, and clear photoacoustic image of hidden caries was also obtained by this system.

  10. Optimal laser wavelength for photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeeun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Young Kwak, Jin; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Ho Chang, Jin

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for real-time detection of micro-scale calcifications (e.g., breast, which are an indicator of the cancer occurrence. Optimal wavelength of incident laser for the microcalcification imaging was ascertained through ex vivo experiments with seven breast specimens of volunteers. In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum amplitude of photoacoustic signals from the microcalcifications occurred when the laser wavelength ranged from 690 to 700 nm. This result demonstrated that PAI can serve as a real-time imaging and guidance tool for diagnosis and biopsy of the breast microcalcifications.

  11. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Srikant; Wygant, Ira O.; Kuo, Paulina S.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Oralkan, Ömer; Olcott, Peter D.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2006-02-01

    In photoacoustic (optoacoustic) medical imaging, short laser pulses irradiate absorbing structures found in tissue, such as blood vessels, causing brief thermal expansions that in turn generate ultrasound waves. These ultrasound waves which correspond to the optical absorption distribution were imaged using a two dimensional array of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs). Advantages of CMUT technology for photoacoustic imaging include the ease of integration with electronics, ability to fabricate large two dimensional arrays, arrays with arbitrary geometries, wide-bandwidth arrays and high-frequency arrays. In this study, a phantom consisting of three 0.86-mm inner diameter polyethylene tubes inside a tissue mimicking material was imaged using a 16 x 16 element CMUT array. The center tube was filled with India-ink to provide optical contrast. Traditional pulse-echo data as well as photoacoustic image data were taken. 2D cross-sectional slices and 3D volume rendered images are shown. Simple array tiling was attempted, whereby a 48 x 48 element array was simulated, to illustrate the advantages of larger arrays. Finally, the sensitivity of the photoacoustics setup to the concentration of ink in the tube was also explored. For the sensitivity experiment a different phantom consisting of only one 1.14-mm inner diameter polyethylene tube inside a tissue mimicking material was used. The concentration of the ink inside the tube was varied and images were taken.

  12. Multiple speckle illumination for optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Florian; Stasio, Nicolino; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy offers exquisite and specific contrast to optical absorption. Conventional approaches generally involves raster scanning a focused spot over the sample. Here, we demonstrate that a full-field illumination approach with multiple speckle illumination can also provide diffraction-limited optical-resolution photoacoustic images. Two different proof-of-concepts are demonstrated with micro-structured test samples. The first approach follows the principle of correlation/ghost imaging,1, 2 and is based on cross-correlating photoacoustic signals under multiple speckle illumination with known speckle patterns measured during a calibration step. The second approach is a speckle scanning microscopy technique, which adapts the technique proposed in fluorescence microscopy by Bertolotti and al.:3 in our work, spatially unresolved photoacoustic measurements are performed for various translations of unknown speckle patterns. A phase-retrieval algorithm is used to reconstruct the object from the knowledge of the modulus of its Fourier Transform yielded by the measurements. Because speckle patterns naturally appear in many various situations, including propagation through biological tissue or multi-mode fibers (for which focusing light is either very demanding if not impossible), speckle-illumination-based photoacoustic microscopy provides a powerful framework for the development of novel reconstruction approaches, well-suited to compressed sensing approaches.2

  13. Advanced biomedical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    "This book covers the four major areas of image processing: Image enhancement and restoration, image segmentation, image quantification and classification, and image visualization. Image registration, storage, and compression are also covered. The text focuses on recently developed image processing and analysis operators and covers topical research"--Provided by publisher.

  14. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  15. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels in tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoelen, C.G.A.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Pongers, R.; Dekker, A.

    1998-01-01

    We applied photoacoustics as a tissue tomography technique for the detection of blood concentrations, e.g., angiogenesis around tumors. We imaged blood vessels in highly scattering samples, using 532-nm light, to depths of ,1 cm. The samples were real tissue (chicken breast) or 10% dilutions of

  16. Using high-power light emitting diodes for photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The preliminary result of using a high-power light emitting diode, LED, for photoacoustic imaging is presented. The pulsed light source is created by a 1Watt red Luxeon LED. The LED delivers light pulses with 25W peak power when supplied by 40A peak, 60ns wide current pulses. The phantom used for...

  17. Biomedical Imaging Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salzer, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    This book presents and describes imaging technologies that can be used to study chemical processes and structural interactions in dynamic systems, principally in biomedical systems. The imaging technologies, largely biomedical imaging technologies such as MRT, Fluorescence mapping, raman mapping, nanoESCA, and CARS microscopy, have been selected according to their application range and to the chemical information content of their data. These technologies allow for the analysis and evaluation of delicate biological samples, which must not be disturbed during the profess. Ultimately, this may me

  18. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  19. Photoacoustic imaging in both soft and hard biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T; Dewhurst, R J

    2010-01-01

    To date, most Photoacoustic (PA) imaging results have been from soft biotissues. In this study, a PA imaging system with a near-infrared pulsed laser source has been applied to obtain 2-D and 3-D images from both soft tissue and post-mortem dental samples. Imaging results showed that the PA technique has the potential to image human oral disease, such as early-stage teeth decay. For non-invasive photoacoustic imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. Several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict initial temperature and pressure fields within a tooth sample. Predicted initial temperature and pressure rises are below corresponding safety limits.

  20. Development of a multi-band photoacoustic tomography imaging system based on a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Pun, Sio Hang; Yu, Yuanyu; Gao, Duyang; Wang, Jiujiang; Mak, Peng Un; Lei, Kin Fong; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang; Yuan, Zhen

    2017-05-10

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) as a hybrid technology combines the high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution in a single imaging modality. However, most of the available PAT systems cannot comprehensively or accurately characterize biological systems at multiple length scales due to the use of narrow bandwidth commercial ultrasonic transducers. In this study, we fabricated a novel multi-band capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array, and first developed a CMUT-based multi-band photoacoustic tomography (MBPAT) imaging system. The MBPAT imaging system was examined by the phantom experiment, and then was successfully applied to image the zebrafish in vivo. The imaging results indicated that CMUT-array-based MBPAT can provide a more comprehensive and accurate characterization of biological tissues, which exhibit the potential of MBPAT/CMUT in various areas of biomedical imaging.

  1. Monolithic Multiband CMUTs for Photoacoustic Computed Tomography With In Vivo Biological Tissue Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Sio Hang; Yu, Yuanyu; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jiujiang; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang; Lei, Kin Fong; Yuan, Zhen; Mak, Peng Un

    2018-03-01

    Among the biomedical imaging modalities, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) was one of the emerging hybrid techniques in recent years. In designing the PACT imaging system, a finite-bandwidth transducer is one of the limited factors for the overall performance. As the target size is inversely proportional to the dominant frequency components of the generated photoacoustic (PA) signal, a broad bandwidth transducer is desired for different scales' imaging. In this paper, a monolithic multiband capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array was designed and fabricated for the reception of the wideband PA signals so as to provide high-resolution images with high-frequency CMUT arrays and present the high signal-to-noise-ratio major structure with low-frequency CMUT arrays. To demonstrate its performance, a phantom experiment was conducted to show and evaluate the various qualities of multiresolution images. In addition, an in vivo mouse model experiment was also carried out for revealing the multiscale PA imaging capability with the multiband CMUTs on biological tissues. From the obtained results, the images from different CMUT arrays could show the structures of the mouse brain in different scales. In addition, the images from the high-frequency CMUT arrays were able to reveal the major blood vasculatures, whereas the images from low-frequency CMUT arrays showed the gross macroscopic anatomy of the brain with higher contrast.

  2. Sulfates as chromophores for multiwavelength photoacoustic imaging phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Martina; An, Lu; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2017-12-01

    As multiwavelength photoacoustic imaging becomes increasingly widely used to obtain quantitative estimates, the need for validation studies conducted on well-characterized experimental phantoms becomes ever more pressing. One challenge that such studies face is the design of stable, well-characterized phantoms and absorbers with properties in a physiologically realistic range. This paper performs a full experimental characterization of aqueous solutions of copper and nickel sulfate, whose properties make them close to ideal as chromophores in multiwavelength photoacoustic imaging phantoms. Their absorption varies linearly with concentration, and they mix linearly. The concentrations needed to yield absorption values within the physiological range are below the saturation limit. The shape of their absorption spectra makes them useful analogs for oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin. They display long-term photostability (no indication of bleaching) as well as resistance to transient effects (no saturable absorption phenomena), and are therefore suitable for exposure to typical pulsed photoacoustic light sources, even when exposed to the high number of pulses required in scanning photoacoustic imaging systems. In addition, solutions with tissue-realistic, predictable, and stable scattering can be prepared by mixing sulfates and Intralipid, as long as an appropriate emulsifier is used. Finally, the Grüneisen parameter of the sulfates was found to be larger than that of water and increased linearly with concentration.

  3. Image reconstruction in transcranial photoacoustic computed tomography of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) holds great promise for transcranial brain imaging. However, the strong reflection, scattering, attenuation, and mode-conversion of photoacoustic waves in the skull pose serious challenges to establishing the method. The lack of an appropriate model of solid media in conventional PACT imaging models, which are based on the canonical scalar wave equation, causes a significant model mismatch in the presence of the skull and thus results in deteriorated reconstructed images. The goal of this study was to develop an image reconstruction algorithm that accurately models the skull and thereby ameliorates the quality of reconstructed images. The propagation of photoacoustic waves through the skull was modeled by a viscoelastic stress tensor wave equation, which was subsequently discretized by use of a staggered grid fourth-order finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The matched adjoint of the FDTD-based wave propagation operator was derived for implementing a back-projection operator. Systematic computer simulations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the back-projection operator for reconstructing images in a realistic three-dimensional PACT brain imaging system. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can successfully reconstruct images from transcranially-measured pressure data and readily be translated to clinical PACT brain imaging applications.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  5. Acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy imaging of single leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    An acoustic/photoacoustic microscope was used to create micrometer resolution images of stained cells from a blood smear. Pulse echo ultrasound images were made using a 1000 MHz transducer with 1 μm resolution. Photoacoustic images were made using a fiber coupled 532 nm laser, where energy losses through stimulated Raman scattering enabled output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm. The laser was focused onto the sample using a 20x objective, and the laser spot co-aligned with the 1000 MHz transducer opposite the laser. The blood smear was stained with Wright-Giemsa, a common metachromatic dye that differentially stains the cellular components for visual identification. A neutrophil, lymphocyte and a monocyte were imaged using acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy at two different wavelengths, 532 nm and 600 nm. Unique features in each imaging modality enabled identification of the different cell types. This imaging method provides a new way of imaging stained leukocytes, with applications towards identifying and differentiating cell types, and detecting disease at the single cell level.

  6. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be view...

  7. Advancing biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-11-24

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel.

  8. Mathematical modeling in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This volume gives an introduction to a fascinating research area to applied mathematicians. It is devoted to providing the exposition of promising analytical and numerical techniques for solving challenging biomedical imaging problems, which trigger the investigation of interesting issues in various branches of mathematics.

  9. Measurement of blood perfusion using photoacoustic, ultrasound, and strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Sethuraman, Shriram; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2007-02-01

    In many clinical and research applications including cancer diagnosis, tumor response to therapy, reconstructive surgery, monitoring of transplanted tissues and organs, and quantitative evaluation of angiogenesis, sequential and quantitative assessment of microcirculation in tissue is required. In this paper we present an imaging technique capable of spatial and temporal measurements of blood perfusion through microcirculation. To demonstrate the developed imaging technique, studies were conducted using phantoms with modeled small blood vessels of various diameters positioned at different depths. A change in the magnitude of the photoacoustic signal was observed during vessel constriction and subsequent displacement of optically absorbing liquid present in the vessels. The results of the study suggest that photoacoustic, ultrasound and strain imaging could be used to sequentially monitor and qualitatively assess blood perfusion through microcirculation.

  10. Experimental evaluation of cMUT and PZT transducers in receive only mode for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshavski, O.; Meynier, C.; Sénégond, N.; Chatain, P.; Felix, N.; Nguyen-Dinh, A.

    2016-03-01

    In photoacoustic imaging, the angular reception performance of ultrasonic transducers is a critical parameter to be considered for system designers. The quantitative comparison between cMUT and PZT emphasizes the difference between the transducer requirements and specifications between conventional ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging. In this present work, we show significant benefits of cMUT based array transducers over conventional PZT arrays for the improvement of quality in photoacoustic imaging systems.

  11. Biomedical Image Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Deserno, Thomas Martin

    2011-01-01

    In modern medicine, imaging is the most effective tool for diagnostics, treatment planning and therapy. Almost all modalities have went to directly digital acquisition techniques and processing of this image data have become an important option for health care in future. This book is written by a team of internationally recognized experts from all over the world. It provides a brief but complete overview on medical image processing and analysis highlighting recent advances that have been made in academics. Color figures are used extensively to illustrate the methods and help the reader to understand the complex topics.

  12. An algorithm for total variation regularized photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yiqiu; Görner, Torsten; Kunis, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of image data from photoacoustic measurements asks for the inversion of the spherical mean value operator. In contrast to direct inversion methods for specific geometries, we consider a semismooth Newton scheme to solve a total variation regularized least squares problem. During the iter......Recovery of image data from photoacoustic measurements asks for the inversion of the spherical mean value operator. In contrast to direct inversion methods for specific geometries, we consider a semismooth Newton scheme to solve a total variation regularized least squares problem. During...... the iteration, each matrix vector multiplication is realized in an efficient way using a recently proposed spectral discretization of the spherical mean value operator. All theoretical results are illustrated by numerical experiments....

  13. Whole-body and multispectral photoacoustic imaging of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Zebrafish is a top vertebrate model to study developmental biology and genetics, and it is becoming increasingly popular for studying human diseases due to its high genome similarity to that of humans and the optical transparency in embryonic stages. However, it becomes difficult for pure optical imaging techniques to volumetric visualize the internal organs and structures of wild-type zebrafish in juvenile and adult stages with excellent resolution and penetration depth. Even with the establishment of mutant lines which remain transparent over the life cycle, it is still a challenge for pure optical imaging modalities to image the whole body of adult zebrafish with micro-scale resolution. However, the method called photoacoustic imaging that combines all the advantages of the optical imaging and ultrasonic imaging provides a new way to image the whole body of the zebrafish. In this work, we developed a non-invasive photoacoustic imaging system with optimized near-infrared illumination and cylindrical scanning to image the zebrafish. The lateral and axial resolution yield to 80 μm and 600 μm, respectively. Multispectral strategy with wavelengths from 690 nm to 930 nm was employed to image various organs inside the zebrafish. From the reconstructed images, most major organs and structures inside the body can be precisely imaged. Quantitative and statistical analysis of absorption for organs under illumination with different wavelengths were carried out.

  14. Double Minimum Variance Beamforming Method to Enhance Photoacoustic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Paridar, Roya; Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Orooji, Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    One of the common algorithms used to reconstruct photoacoustic (PA) images is the non-adaptive Delay-and-Sum (DAS) beamformer. However, the quality of the reconstructed PA images obtained by DAS is not satisfying due to its high level of sidelobes and wide mainlobe. In contrast, adaptive beamformers, such as minimum variance (MV), result in an improved image compared to DAS. In this paper, a novel beamforming method, called Double MV (D-MV) is proposed to enhance the image quality compared to...

  15. Simultaneous imaging of ultrasound attenuation, speed of sound and optical absorption in a photoacoustic setup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Rene; Manohar, Srirang; Jose, J.; Jose, Jithin; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; van Leeuwen, Ton; McAleavey, Stephen A.; D'hooge, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a relatively new medical imaging modality. In principle it can be used to image the optical absorption distribution of an object by measurements of optically induced acoustic signals. Recently we have developed a modified photoacoustic measurement system which can be used to

  16. Biomedical signal and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Najarian, Kayvan

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SIGNAL AND IMAGE PROCESSINGSignals and Biomedical Signal ProcessingIntroduction and OverviewWhat is a ""Signal""?Analog, Discrete, and Digital SignalsProcessing and Transformation of SignalsSignal Processing for Feature ExtractionSome Characteristics of Digital ImagesSummaryProblemsFourier TransformIntroduction and OverviewOne-Dimensional Continuous Fourier TransformSampling and NYQUIST RateOne-Dimensional Discrete Fourier TransformTwo-Dimensional Discrete Fourier TransformFilter DesignSummaryProblemsImage Filtering, Enhancement, and RestorationIntroduction and Overview

  17. Optimizing the optical wavelength for the photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Hu, Jack; Francis, Sheeja; Marquardt, April; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    With the capability of assessing high resolution optical information in soft tissues at imaging depth up to several centimeters, innovative biomedical photoacoustic imaging (PAI) offers benefits to diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis, particularly in combination with more established ultrasonography (US). In this work, a PAI and US dual-modality system facilitating both imaging functions in a real-time fashion was developed and initially tested for its clinical performance on patients with active inflammatory arthritis. Photoacoustic (PA) images of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were acquired at 580-nm wavelength that provides a desired balance between optical absorption of blood and attenuation in background tissue. The results from six patients and six normal volunteers used as a control demonstrated the satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing the physiological changes in the joints, specifically enhanced blood flow as a result of active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that PAI, by revealing vascular features suggestive of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US for rheumatology clinic.

  18. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repetition rate laser is needed. In this work, we present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. The fiber was polished at 38 degree and enclosed in a glass capillary for total internal reflection. An optical/electrical rotary junction and pull-back mechanism was applied for rotating and linearly scanning the catheter to obtain three-dimensional imaging. Atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged as two frame/second at 1725 nm. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo. The results demonstrated that the developed IVPA/US imaging system is capable for high speed intravascular imaging for plaque detection.

  19. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, He; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  20. Model-Based Photoacoustic Image Reconstruction using Compressed Sensing and Smoothed L0 Norm

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Orooji, Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a novel medical imaging modality that uses the advantages of the spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging and the high contrast of pure optical imaging. Analytical algorithms are usually employed to reconstruct the photoacoustic (PA) images as a result of their simple implementation. However, they provide a low accurate image. Model-based (MB) algorithms are used to improve the image quality and accuracy while a large number of transducers and data acquisition a...

  1. Photoacoustic imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Ruiying; Xu, Song; Li, Guo; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma, one of the most common types of skin cancer, has a high mortality rate, mainly due to a high propensity for tumor metastasis. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential predictor for metastasis. Label-free imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo provides rich information on tumor progress. Here we present photoacoustic microscopy of single melanoma cells in living animals. We used a fast-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the microvasculature in mouse ears. The imaging system has sub-cellular spatial resolution and works in reflection mode. A fast-scanning mirror allows the system to acquire fast volumetric images over a large field of view. A 500-kHz pulsed laser was used to image blood and CTCs. Single circulating melanoma cells were imaged in both capillaries and trunk vessels in living animals. These high-resolution images may be used in early detection of CTCs with potentially high sensitivity. In addition, this technique enables in vivo study of tumor cell extravasation from a primary tumor, which addresses an urgent pre-clinical need.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging in scattering media by combining a correlation matrix filter with a time reversal operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Wei; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-09-18

    Acoustic scattering medium is a fundamental challenge for photoacoustic imaging. In this study, we reveal the different coherent properties of the scattering photoacoustic waves and the direct photoacoustic waves in a matrix form. Direct waves show a particular coherence on the antidiagonals of the matrix, whereas scattering waves do not. Based on this property, a correlation matrix filter combining with a time reversal operator is proposed to preserve the direct waves and recover the image behind a scattering layer. Both numerical simulations and photoacoustic imaging experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach effectively increases the image contrast and decreases the background speckles in a scattering medium. This study might improve the quality of photoacoustic imaging in an acoustic scattering environment and extend its applications.

  3. Biomedical Optical Imaging Technologies Design and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to design of biomedical optical imaging technologies and their applications. The main topics include: fluorescence imaging, confocal imaging, micro-endoscope, polarization imaging, hyperspectral imaging, OCT imaging, multimodal imaging and spectroscopic systems. Each chapter is written by the world leaders of the respective fields, and will cover: principles and limitations of optical imaging technology, system design and practical implementation for one or two specific applications, including design guidelines, system configuration, optical design, component requirements and selection, system optimization and design examples, recent advances and applications in biomedical researches and clinical imaging. This book serves as a reference for students and researchers in optics and biomedical engineering.

  4. Biomedical signal and image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Sergio; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Anna; Caiani, Enrico; Contini, Davide; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Dercole, Fabio; Rienzo, Luca; Liberati, Diego; Mainardi, Luca; Ravazzani, Paolo; Rinaldi, Sergio; Signorini, Maria; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Generally, physiological modeling and biomedical signal processing constitute two important paradigms of biomedical engineering (BME): their fundamental concepts are taught starting from undergraduate studies and are more completely dealt with in the last years of graduate curricula, as well as in Ph.D. courses. Traditionally, these two cultural aspects were separated, with the first one more oriented to physiological issues and how to model them and the second one more dedicated to the development of processing tools or algorithms to enhance useful information from clinical data. A practical consequence was that those who did models did not do signal processing and vice versa. However, in recent years,the need for closer integration between signal processing and modeling of the relevant biological systems emerged very clearly [1], [2]. This is not only true for training purposes(i.e., to properly prepare the new professional members of BME) but also for the development of newly conceived research projects in which the integration between biomedical signal and image processing (BSIP) and modeling plays a crucial role. Just to give simple examples, topics such as brain–computer machine or interfaces,neuroengineering, nonlinear dynamical analysis of the cardiovascular (CV) system,integration of sensory-motor characteristics aimed at the building of advanced prostheses and rehabilitation tools, and wearable devices for vital sign monitoring and others do require an intelligent fusion of modeling and signal processing competences that are certainly peculiar of our discipline of BME.

  5. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Liang Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM has gained considerable attention within the biomedical imaging community during the past decade. Detecting laser-induced photoacoustic waves by optical sensing techniques facilitates the idea of all-optical PAM (AOPAM, which is of particular interest as it provides unique advantages for achieving high spatial resolution using miniaturized embodiments of the imaging system. The review presents the technology aspects of optical-sensing techniques for ultrasound detection, such as those based on optical resonators, as well as system developments of all-optical photoacoustic systems including PAM, photoacoustic endoscopy, and multi-modality microscopy. The progress of different AOPAM systems and their representative applications are summarized.

  6. Review of Biomedical Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaccio Edward J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is a review of the book: 'Biomedical Image Processing', by Thomas M. Deserno, which is published by Springer-Verlag. Salient information that will be useful to decide whether the book is relevant to topics of interest to the reader, and whether it might be suitable as a course textbook, are presented in the review. This includes information about the book details, a summary, the suitability of the text in course and research work, the framework of the book, its specific content, and conclusions.

  7. A strategy to measure electrophysiological changes with photoacoustic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepela, Rebecka J.; Sherlock, Benjamin E.; Tian, Lin; Marcu, Laura; Sack, Jon

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technology capable of both functional and structural biological imaging. Absorption and scattering in tissue limit the penetration depth of conventional microscopy techniques to live cell imaging. This technology could permit photoacoustic imaging of electrophysiological dynamics in deep tissue, such as the brain. Further optimization of this technology could lead to concurrent imaging of neural activity and hemodynamic responses, a crucial step towards understanding neurovascular coupling in the brain.

  8. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a double-ring sensor featuring a narrow angular aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic double-ring sensor, featuring a narrow angular aperture, is developed for laser-induced photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels. An integrated optical fiber enables reflection-mode detection of ultrasonic waves. By using the cross-correlation between the signals detected by the two

  9. Mathematics and physics of emerging biomedical imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    .... Incorporating input from dozens of biomedical researchers who described what they perceived as key open problems of imaging that are amenable to attack by mathematical scientists and physicists...

  10. Folding Up of Gold Nanoparticle Strings into Plasmonic Vesicles for Enhanced Photoacoustic Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yijing

    2015-11-11

    The stepwise self-assembly of hollow plasmonic vesicles with vesicular membranes containing strings of gold nanoparticles (NPs) is reported. The formation of chain vesicles can be controlled by tuning the density of the polymer ligands on the surface of the gold NPs. The strong absorption of the chain vesicles in the near-infrared (NIR) region leads to a much higher efficiency in photoacoustic (PA) imaging than for non-chain vesicles. The chain vesicles were further employed for the encapsulation of drugs and the NIR light triggered release of payloads. This work not only offers a new platform for controlling the hierarchical self-assembly of NPs, but also demonstrates that the physical properties of the materials can be tailored by controlling the spatial arrangement of NPs within assemblies to achieve a better performance in biomedical applications.

  11. Biomedical image understanding methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Joo-Hwee; Xiong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to understanding and interpreting digital images in medical and functional applications Biomedical Image Understanding focuses on image understanding and semantic interpretation, with clear introductions to related concepts, in-depth theoretical analysis, and detailed descriptions of important biomedical applications. It covers image processing, image filtering, enhancement, de-noising, restoration, and reconstruction; image segmentation and feature extraction; registration; clustering, pattern classification, and data fusion. With contributions from ex

  12. Fast photoacoustic imaging with a line scanning optical-acoustical resolution photoacoustic microscope (LS-OAR-PAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2015-07-01

    We present the concept, the setup and a preliminary experiment using optical ultrasound detection with a CCD camera combined with focused line excitation for photoacoustic microscopy. The line scanning optical-acoustical resolution photoacoustic microscope (LS-OAR-PAM) with optical ultrasound detection is capable of real-time B-scan imaging providing acoustical resolution within the individual B-scans and optical out of plane resolution up to a depth limited by optical diffusion. A 3D image is composed of reconstructed B-scan images recorded while scanning the excitation line along the sample surface. Proof of concept is shown by imaging a phantom containing black human hairs and carbon fibers. The obtained C-scan image clearly shows the different resolution in the two perpendicular directions, namely diffraction limited by optical focusing in scan direction and acoustically limited in direction parallel to line orientation by the properties of acoustic wave propagation.

  13. Photoacoustic tomography of human hepatic malignancies using intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Miyata

    Full Text Available Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10 under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases, photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical

  14. On image quality enhancement in photoacoustic image reconstruction by motion compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Rene; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a relatively new noninvasive medical imaging modality. It is a tech- nique which is harmless for the human body and uses pulsed optical energy. The process is based on the ab- sorption of the pulse of optical energy by an object leading to local temperature increases.

  15. Quinone-fused porphyrins as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Banala, Srinivas

    2017-06-27

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging non-invasive diagnostic modality with many potential clinical applications in oncology, rheumatology and the cardiovascular field. For this purpose, there is a high demand for exogenous contrast agents with high absorption coefficients in the optical window for tissue imaging, i.e. the near infrared (NIR) range between 680 and 950 nm. We herein report the photoacoustic properties of quinone-fused porphyrins inserted with different transition metals as new highly promising candidates. These dyes exhibit intense NIR absorption, a lack of fluorescence emission, and PA sensitivity in concentrations below 3 nmol mL. In this context, the highest PA signal was obtained with a Zn(ii) inserted dye. Furthermore, this dye was stable in blood serum and free thiol solution and exhibited negligible cell toxicity. Additionally, the Zn(ii) probe could be detected with an up to 3.2 fold higher PA intensity compared to the clinically most commonly used PA agent, ICG. Thus, further exploration of the \\'quinone-fusing\\' approach to other chromophores may be an efficient way to generate highly potent PA agents that do not fluoresce and shift their absorption into the NIR range.

  16. Detection of melanoma metastases in resected human lymph nodes by noninvasive multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhout, Gerrit Cornelis; Grootendorst, Diederik Johannes; Nieweg, Omgo Edo; Wouters, Michel Wilhelmus Jacobus Maria; van der Hage, Jos Alexander; Jose, Jithin; van Boven, Hester; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang; Ruers, Theodoor Jacques Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Sentinel node biopsy in patients with cutaneous melanoma improves staging, provides prognostic information, and leads to an increased survival in node-positive patients. However, frozen section analysis of the sentinel node is not reliable and definitive histopathology evaluation requires days, preventing intraoperative decision-making and immediate therapy. Photoacoustic imaging can evaluate intact lymph nodes, but specificity can be hampered by other absorbers such as hemoglobin. Near infrared multispectral photoacoustic imaging is a new approach that has the potential to selectively detect melanin. The purpose of the present study is to examine the potential of multispectral photoacoustic imaging to identify melanoma metastasis in human lymph nodes. Methods. Three metastatic and nine benign lymph nodes from eight melanoma patients were scanned ex vivo using a Vevo LAZR(©) multispectral photoacoustic imager and were spectrally analyzed per pixel. The results were compared to histopathology as gold standard. Results. The nodal volume could be scanned within 20 minutes. An unmixing procedure was proposed to identify melanoma metastases with multispectral photoacoustic imaging. Ultrasound overlay enabled anatomical correlation. The penetration depth of the photoacoustic signal was up to 2 cm. Conclusion. Multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging allowed for selective identification of melanoma metastases in human lymph nodes.

  17. Detection of Melanoma Metastases in Resected Human Lymph Nodes by Noninvasive Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Cornelis Langhout

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sentinel node biopsy in patients with cutaneous melanoma improves staging, provides prognostic information, and leads to an increased survival in node-positive patients. However, frozen section analysis of the sentinel node is not reliable and definitive histopathology evaluation requires days, preventing intraoperative decision-making and immediate therapy. Photoacoustic imaging can evaluate intact lymph nodes, but specificity can be hampered by other absorbers such as hemoglobin. Near infrared multispectral photoacoustic imaging is a new approach that has the potential to selectively detect melanin. The purpose of the present study is to examine the potential of multispectral photoacoustic imaging to identify melanoma metastasis in human lymph nodes. Methods. Three metastatic and nine benign lymph nodes from eight melanoma patients were scanned ex vivo using a Vevo LAZR© multispectral photoacoustic imager and were spectrally analyzed per pixel. The results were compared to histopathology as gold standard. Results. The nodal volume could be scanned within 20 minutes. An unmixing procedure was proposed to identify melanoma metastases with multispectral photoacoustic imaging. Ultrasound overlay enabled anatomical correlation. The penetration depth of the photoacoustic signal was up to 2 cm. Conclusion. Multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging allowed for selective identification of melanoma metastases in human lymph nodes.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of the eye: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhong Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The eye relies on the synergistic cooperation of many different ocular components, including the cornea, crystalline lens, photoreceptors, and retinal neurons, to precisely sense visual information. Complications with a single ocular component can degrade vision and sometimes cause blindness. Immediate treatment and long-term monitoring are paramount to alleviate symptoms, restore vision, and cure ocular diseases. However, successful treatment requires understanding ocular pathological mechanisms, precisely detecting and monitoring the diseases. The investigation and diagnosis of ocular diseases require advanced medical tools. In this mini review, we discuss non-invasive photoacoustic (PA imaging as a potential research tool and medical screening device. In the research setting, PA imaging can provide valuable information on the disease progression. In the clinical setting, PA imaging can potentially aid in disease detection and treatment monitoring.

  19. Overcoming the acoustic diffraction limit in photoacoustic imaging by the localization of flowing absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilov, Sergey; Arnal, Bastien; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    The resolution of photoacoustic imaging deep inside scattering media is limited by the acoustic diffraction limit. In this Letter, taking inspiration from super-resolution imaging techniques developed to beat the optical diffraction limit, we demonstrate that the localization of individual optical absorbers can provide super-resolution photoacoustic imaging well beyond the acoustic diffraction limit. As a proof-of-principle experiment, photoacoustic cross-sectional images of microfluidic channels were obtained with a 15 MHz linear capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array, while absorbing beads were flown through the channels. The localization of individual absorbers allowed us to obtain a super-resolved cross-sectional image of the channels by reconstructing both the channel width and position with an accuracy better than λ/10. Given the discrete nature of endogenous absorbers such as red blood cells, or that of exogenous particular contrast agents, localization is a promising approach to push the current resolution limits of photoacoustic imaging.

  20. Rationally encapsulated gold nanorods improving both linear and nonlinear photoacoustic imaging contrast in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Bai, Linyi; Liu, Siyu; Zhang, Ruochong; Zhang, Jingtao; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Zhao, Yanli

    2017-01-07

    Photoacoustic tomography has emerged as a promising non-invasive imaging technique that integrates the merits of high optical contrast with high ultrasound resolution in deep scattering medium. Unfortunately, the blood background in vivo seriously impedes the quality of imaging due to its comparable optical absorption with contrast agents, especially in conventional linear photoacoustic imaging modality. In this study, we demonstrated that two hybrids consisting of gold nanorods (Au NRs) and zinc tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (ZnTPP) exhibited a synergetic effect in improving optical absorption, conversion efficiency from light to heat, and thermoelastic expansion, leading to a notable enhancement in both linear (four times greater) and nonlinear (more than six times) photoacoustic signals as compared with conventional Au NRs. Subsequently, we carefully investigated the interesting factors that may influence photoacoustic signal amplification, suggesting that the coating of ZnTPP on Au NRs could result in the reduction of gold interfacial thermal conductance with a solvent, so that the heat is more confined within the nanoparticle clusters for a significant enhancement of local temperature. Hence, both the linear and nonlinear photoacoustic signals are enhanced on account of better thermal confinement. The present work not only shows that ZnTPP coated Au NRs could serve as excellent photoacoustic nanoamplifiers, but also brings a perspective for photoacoustic image-guided therapy.

  1. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V; Lanza, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M; Zeqiri, B; Beard, P C; Cox, B T

    2016-07-07

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP's acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be [Formula: see text]  =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated.

  3. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of gene expression using tyrosinase as a reporter gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Forbrich, Alexander; Harrison, Tyler; Hitt, Mary; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical reporter genes, such as green fluorescence protein, are powerful research tools that allow visualization of gene expression. We have successfully used tyrosinase as a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging. Tyrosinase is the key regulatory enzyme in the production of melanin which has a broad optical absorption spectrum. MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with tyrosinase under the control of an inducible promoter. For photoacoustic experiments, MCF-7 cells were resuspended at 108 cells/mL and injected in 700 μm (inner diameter) plastic tubing. Photoacoustic signal of MCF-7 cells expressing tyrosinase were >20-fold greater than those of untransfected MCF-7 cells. Photoacoustic signal of tyrosinaseexpressing MCF-7 cells were approximately 2-fold lesser and greater than those of blood at 576 and 650 nm, respectively, suggesting that photoacoustic signal from blood and tyrosinase-expressing cells can be separated by dualwavelength analysis. Photoacoustic signal from tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 cells covered by chicken tissue could even be detected at a laser penetration depth of 4 cm, suggesting that tyrosinase can be used to image gene expression in relatively deep tissues. The current data suggests that tyrosinase is a strong reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging.

  5. In vivo corneal neovascularization imaging by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wenzhong; Schultz, Kathryn M.; Zhang, Kevin; Sasman, Amy; Gao, Fengli; Kume, Tsutomu; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal neovascularization leads to blurred vision, thus in vivo visualization is essential for pathological studies in animal models. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging can delineate microvasculature and hemodynamics noninvasively, which is suitable for investigating corneal neovascularization. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo imaging of corneal neovascularization in the mouse eye by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), where corneal neovascularization is induced by deliberate ...

  6. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  7. Double-compression method for biomedical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yevhenii A.; Mustetsov, Timofey N.; Hamdi, Rami R.; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Orshubekov, Nurbek; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Uvaysova, Svetlana

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a double compression method (DCM) of biomedical images. A comparison of image compression factors in size JPEG, PNG and developed DCM was carried out. The main purpose of the DCM - compression of medical images while maintaining the key points that carry diagnostic information. To estimate the minimum compression factor an analysis of the coding of random noise image is presented.

  8. Optomechatronics for Biomedical Optical Imaging: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Hyungsuck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of optomechatronic technology, particularly in biomedical optical imaging, is becoming pronounced and ever increasing due to its synergistic effect of the integration of optics and mechatronics. The background of this trend is that the biomedical optical imaging for example in-vivo imaging related to retraction of tissues, diagnosis, and surgical operations have a variety of challenges due to complexity in internal structure and properties of biological body and the resulting optical phenomena. This paper addresses the technical issues related to tissue imaging, visualization of interior surfaces of organs, laparoscopic and endoscopic imaging and imaging of neuronal activities and structures. Within such problem domains the paper overviews the states of the art technology focused on how optical components are fused together with those of mechatronics to create the functionalities required for the imaging systems. Future perspective of the optical imaging in biomedical field is presented in short.

  9. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ferritin as a reporter gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, S.; Carson, A.; Kim, K.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging (PMI) of ferritin expressed in human melanoma cells (SK-24) was performed in vitro. Ferritin is a ubiquitously expressed protein which stores iron that can be detected by PA imaging, allowing ferritin to act as a reporter gene. To over-express ferritin, SK-24 cells were co-transfected with plasmid expressing Heavy chain ferritin (H-FT) and plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) using LipofectamineTM 2000. Non-transfected SK-24 cells served as a negative control. Fluorescent imaging of EGFP confirmed transfection and transgene expression in co-transfected cells. To detect iron accumulation in SK-24 cells, a focused high frequency ultrasonic transducer (60 MHz, f/1.5), synchronized to a pulsed laser (Fluorescent microscopy indicates significant accumulation of ferritin in H-FT transfected SK-24 cells, with little ferritin expression in non-transfected SK-24 cells. The PA spectral analysis clearly differentiates transfected SK-24 cells from nontransfected SK-24 cells with significantly increased iron signal at 850 ~ 950 nm, and these increased signals were associated with transfection of H-FT plasmid. As such, the feasibility of ferritin as a reporter gene for PMI has been demonstrated in vitro. The use of ferritin as a reporter gene represents a new concept for PA imaging, and may provide various opportunities for molecular imaging and basic science research.

  10. Functional photoacoustic tomography for neonatal brain imaging: developments and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Ali; Tavakoli, Emytis; Adabi, Saba; Gelovani, Juri; Avanaki, Mohammad R. N.

    2017-03-01

    Transfontanelle ultrasound imaging (TFUSI) is a routine diagnostic brain imaging method in infants who are born prematurely, whose skull bones have not completely fused together and have openings between them, so-called fontanelles. Open fontanelles in neonates provide acoustic windows, allowing the ultrasound beam to freely pass through. TFUSI is used to rule out neurological complications of premature birth including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intraventricular (IVH), subependimal (SEPH), subdural (SDH) or intracerebral (ICH) hemorrhages, as well as hypoxic brain injuries. TFUSI is widely used in the clinic owing to its low cost, safety, accessibility, and noninvasive nature. Nevertheless, the accuracy of TFUSI is limited. To address several limitations of current clinical imaging modalities, we develop a novel transfontanelle photoacoustic imaging (TFPAI) probe, which, for the first time, should allow for non-invasive structural and functional imaging of the infant brain. In this study, we test the feasibility of TFPAI for detection of experimentally-induced intra ventricular and Intraparenchymal hemorrhage phantoms in a sheep model with a surgically-induced cranial window which will serve as a model of neonatal fontanelle. This study is towards using the probe we develop for bedside monitoring of neonates with various disease conditions and complications affecting brain perfusion and oxygenation, including apnea, asphyxia, as well as for detection of various types of intracranial hemorrhages (SAH, IVH, SEPH, SDH, ICH).

  11. Genre-based Search through Biomedical Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geusebroek, J.M.; Hoang, M.A.; van Gemert, J.; Worring, M.

    2002-01-01

    We exploit the retrieval of visual information from biomedical scientific publication databses. Therefore, we consider the use of domain specific genres to automatically subdivide large image databases into smaller, consistent parts. Combination with Latent Semantic Indexing on the picture captions

  12. Quantitative ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of vascular parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Meiburger, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the development of quantitative techniques for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging in the assessment of architectural and vascular parameters. It presents morphological vascular research based on the development of quantitative imaging techniques for the use of clinical B-mode ultrasound images, and preclinical architectural vascular investigations on quantitative imaging techniques for ultrasounds and photoacoustics. The book is divided into two main parts, the first of which focuses on the development and validation of quantitative techniques for the assessment of vascular morphological parameters that can be extracted from B-mode ultrasound longitudinal images of the common carotid artery. In turn, the second part highlights quantitative imaging techniques for assessing the architectural parameters of vasculature that can be extracted from 3D volumes, using both contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and photoacoustic imaging without the addition of any contrast agent. Sharing and...

  13. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  14. 3-D Deep Penetration Photoacoustic Imaging with a 2-D CMUT Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Te-Jen; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Omer; Kamaya, Aya; Wygant, Ira O; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2010-10-11

    In this work, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging of optically absorbing targets embedded as deep as 5 cm inside a highly scattering background medium using a 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. 3-D volumetric images and 2-D maximum intensity projection images are presented to show the objects imaged at different depths. Due to the close proximity of the CMUT to the integrated frontend circuits, the CMUT array imaging system has a low noise floor. This makes the CMUT a promising technology for deep tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  15. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  16. Tissue-mimicking phantoms for photoacoustic and ultrasonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason R.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    In both photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging, overall image quality is influenced by the optical and acoustical properties of the medium. Consequently, with the increased use of combined PA and US (PAUS) imaging in preclinical and clinical applications, the ability to provide phantoms that are capable of mimicking desired properties of soft tissues is critical. To this end, gelatin-based phantoms were constructed with various additives to provide realistic acoustic and optical properties. Forty-micron, spherical silica particles were used to induce acoustic scattering, Intralipid® 20% IV fat emulsion was employed to enhance optical scattering and ultrasonic attenuation, while India Ink, Direct Red 81, and Evans blue dyes were utilized to achieve optical absorption typical of soft tissues. The following parameters were then measured in each phantom formulation: speed of sound, acoustic attenuation (from 6 to 22 MHz), acoustic backscatter coefficient (from 6 to 22 MHz), optical absorption (from 400 nm to 1300 nm), and optical scattering (from 400 nm to 1300 nm). Results from these measurements were then compared to similar measurements, which are offered by the literature, for various soft tissue types. Based on these comparisons, it was shown that a reasonably accurate tissue-mimicking phantom could be constructed using a gelatin base with the aforementioned additives. Thus, it is possible to construct a phantom that mimics specific tissue acoustical and/or optical properties for the purpose of PAUS imaging studies. PMID:22076278

  17. Photoacoustic image-guided drug delivery in the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanshan; Chen, Jian; Samant, Pratik; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-03-01

    Image guided drug delivery is a novel strategy that combines the effect of therapy and visibility into one system. Here we apply photoacoustic (PA) imaging to visualize the drug delivery process, and perform a simulation study on monitoring the photosensitizer concentration in a prostate tumor during photodynamic therapy (PDT). A 3D optical model of the human prostate is developed, and the light absorption distribution in the prostate is estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The filtered back-projection algorithm is used to reconstruct PA images. PA images of transurethral laser/transrectal ultrasound are compared to those of transrectal laser/ultrasound. Results show that the transurethral laser has a better penetration depth in the prostate compared with transrectal one. Urethral thermal safety is investigated via COMSOL Multiphysics, and the results show that the proposed pulsed transurethral laser will cause no thermal damage on the urethral surface. Regression analysis for PA signal amplitude and drug concentration demonstrates that the PA technique has the potential to monitor drug distributions in PDT, as well as in other laser-based prostate therapy modalities.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of early gastric cancer diagnosis based on long focal area ultrasound transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huaqin; Li, Zuoran; Liu, Lantian; Li, Zhifang; Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui

    2017-06-01

    We illustrated a novel imaging method to diagnose gastric neoplasms via photoacoustic tomography (PAT). Depending on the structural characteristics of gastric cavity, we used column diffusion fiber to irradiate the stomach tissue through the esophagus, and the externally placed telecentric focus ultrasonic transducer detected photoacoustic signals from the gastric tissue. We reconstructed the distribution of light energy deposition of the simulated gastric tumor, and obtained the location and size information of gastric tumor.

  19. In vivo imaging of inducible tyrosinase gene expression with an ultrasound array-based photoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the production of melanin, has shown promise as a reporter of genetic activity. While green fluorescent protein has been used extensively in this capacity, it is limited in its ability to provide information deep in tissue at a reasonable resolution. As melanin is a strong absorber of light, it is possible to image gene expression using tyrosinase with photoacoustic imaging technologies, resulting in excellent resolutions at multiple-centimeter depths. While our previous work has focused on creating and imaging MCF-7 cells with doxycycline-controlled tyrosinase expression, we have now established the viability of these cells in a murine model. Using an array-based photoacoustic imaging system with 5 MHz center frequency, we capture interleaved ultrasound and photoacoustic images of tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 tumors both in a tissue mimicking phantom, and in vivo. Images of both the tyrosinase-expressing tumor and a control tumor are presented as both coregistered ultrasound-photoacoustic B-scan images and 3-dimensional photoacoustic volumes created by mechanically scanning the transducer. We find that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible with a signal level 12dB greater than that of the control tumor in vivo. Phantom studies with excised tumors show that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible at depths in excess of 2cm, and have suggested that our imaging system is sensitive to a transfection rate of less than 1%.

  20. Imaging of acoustic attenuation and speed of sound maps using photoacoustic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Rene; Manohar, Srirang; Purwar, Y.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Slump, Cornelis H.; van Leeuwen, Ton; McAleavey, S.A.; D'Hooge, J.

    Photoacoustic imaging is an upcoming medical imaging modality with the potential of imaging both optical and acoustic properties of objects. We present a measurement system and outline reconstruction methods to image both speed of sound and acoustic attenuation distributions of an object using only

  1. Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles for Centimeters-Deep Photoacoustic Imaging in the Second Near-Infrared Window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiayingzi; You, Liyan; Lan, Lu; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Chaudhry, Saadia T; Li, Rui; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Mei, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Thienoisoindigo-based semiconducting polymer with a strong near-infrared absorbance is synthesized and its water-dispersed nanoparticles (TSPNs) are investigated as a contrast agent for photoacoustic (PA) imaging in the second near-infrared (NIR-II) window (1000-1350 nm). The TSPNs generate a strong PA signal in the NIR-II optical window, where background signals from endogenous contrast agents, including blood and lipid, are at the local minima. By embedding a TSPN-containing tube in chicken-breast tissue, an imaging depth of more than 5 cm at 1064 nm excitation is achieved with a contrast-agent concentration as low as 40 µg mL -1 . The TSPNs under the skin or in the tumor are clearly visualized at 1100 and 1300 nm, with negligible interference from the tissue background. TSPN as a PA contrast in the NIR-II window opens new opportunities for biomedical imaging of deep tissues with improved contrast. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Photoacoustic Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a hybrid in vivo imaging technique that acoustically detects optical contrast via the photoacoustic effect. Unlike pure optical microscopic techniques, PAM takes advantage of the weak acoustic scattering in tissue and thus breaks through the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in soft tissue). With its excellent scalability, PAM can provide high-resolution images at desired maximum imaging depths up to a few millimeters. Compared with backscattering-based confocal...

  3. Validating tyrosinase homologue MelA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert; Zemp, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotic drug resistance is a major worldwide issue. Development of new therapies against pathogenic bacteria requires appropriate research tools for replicating and characterizing infections. Previously fluorescence and bioluminescence modalities have been used to image infectious burden in animal models but scattering significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. We hypothesize that photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-toresolution ratio, could be useful for visualizing MelA-expressing bacteria since MelA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue involved in melanin production. Using an inducible expression system, E. coli expressing MelA were visibly black in liquid culture. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS), MelA-expressing bacteria (at different dilutions in PBS), and chicken embryo blood were injected in plastic tubes which were imaged using a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system. Photoacoustic imaging at 6 different wavelengths (680, 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900nm) enabled spectral de-mixing to distinguish melanin signals from blood. The signal to noise ratio of 9x diluted MelA bacteria was 55, suggesting that ~20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. When MelA bacteria were injected as a 100 μL bolus into a chicken embryo, photoacoustic signals from deoxy- and oxy- hemoglobin as well as MelA-expressing bacteria could be separated and overlaid on an ultrasound image, allowing visualization of the bacterial location. Photoacoustic imaging may be a useful tool for visualizing bacterial infections and further work incorporating photoacoustic reporters into infectious bacterial strains is warranted.

  4. Quantitative, Noninvasive Imaging of DNA Damage in Vivo of Prostate Cancer Therapy by Transurethral Photoacoustic (TUPA) Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    biologic effect of radiation treatment, rather than just the physical dose1-6. The first-year research goals were to develop the imaging instrumentation to...this modality is significant to tracking the biologic effect of radiation treatment, rather than just the physical dose1-6. The first-year research...the photoacoustic signal and performing ultrasound pulse-echo imaging8. 4 Figure 1 (a) Schematic of trans-urethral photoacoustic (TUPA) system

  5. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging using a two-dimensional CMUT array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Srikant; Ma, Te-Jen; Furukawa, Yukio; Wygant, Ira O; Zhuang, Xuefeng; De La Zerda, Adam; Oralkan, Omer; Kamaya, Aya; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we describe using a 2-D array of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) to perform 3-D photoacoustic and acoustic imaging. A tunable optical parametric oscillator laser system that generates nanosecond laser pulses was used to induce the photoacoustic signals. To demonstrate the feasibility of the system, 2 different phantoms were imaged. The first phantom consisted of alternating black and transparent fishing lines of 180 mum and 150 mum diameter, respectively. The second phantom comprised polyethylene tubes, embedded in chicken breast tissue, filled with liquids such as the dye indocyanine green, pig blood, and a mixture of the 2. The tubes were embedded at a depth of 0.8 cm inside the tissue and were at an overall distance of 1.8 cm from the CMUT array. Two-dimensional cross-sectional slices and 3-D volume rendered images of pulse-echo data as well as photoacoustic data are presented. The profile and beamwidths of the fishing line are analyzed and compared with a numerical simulation carried out using the Field II ultrasound simulation software. We investigated using a large aperture (64 x 64 element array) to perform photoacoustic and acoustic imaging by mechanically scanning a smaller CMUT array (16 x 16 elements). Two-dimensional transducer arrays overcome many of the limitations of a mechanically scanned system and enable volumetric imaging. Advantages of CMUT technology for photoacoustic imaging include the ease of integration with electronics, ability to fabricate large, fully populated 2-D arrays with arbitrary geometries, wide-bandwidth arrays and high-frequency arrays. A CMUT based photoacoustic system is proposed as a viable alternative to a piezoelectric transducer based photoacoustic systems.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging of human lymph nodes with endogenous lipid and hemoglobin contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Allen, Thomas J.; Plumb, Andrew; Zhang, Edward Z.; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Punwani, Shonit; Beard, Paul C.

    2015-05-01

    Lymph nodes play a central role in metastatic cancer spread and are a key clinical assessment target. Abnormal node vascularization, morphology, and size may be indicative of disease but can be difficult to visualize with sufficient accuracy using existing clinical imaging modalities. To explore the potential utility of photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of lymph nodes, images of ex vivo samples were obtained at multiple wavelengths using a high-resolution three-dimensional photoacoustic scanner. These images showed that hemoglobin based contrast reveals nodal vasculature and lipid-based contrast reveals the exterior node size, shape, and boundary integrity. These two sources of complementary contrast may allow indirect observation of cancer, suggesting a future role for photoacoustic imaging as a tool for the clinical assessment of lymph nodes.

  7. Noninvasive tumor oxygen imaging by photoacoustic lifetime imaging integrated with photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Biel, Merrill A.; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Oxygen plays a major role in cancer biology and tumor progression. In PDT, the reduction in efficacy is directly related to lack of oxygen because its molecular mechanism relies on oxygen as an energy mediator. Measuring tumor oxygenation can provide physicians with better diagnosis and optimization of treatment plans. However, clinical tools for directly assessing tissue oxygenation are limited. The gold standard is oxygen needle electrode, which is invasive and measures oxygen level at a single location. We present our work on developing a combined treatment-imaging modality that integrates PDT and photoacoustic oxygen imaging. We propose a system designed for clinical treatments of cancer of the oral cavity. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying Photoacoustic Lifetime Imaging (PALI). This technology relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue. The dye is excited by the same wavelength of illumination source for PDT. Once excited, the population of photosensitizer molecules at triplet state has a lifetime depending on the oxygen level. The transition from excited triplet state to ground state can be probe by another laser, which generate photoacoustic signal that is used to map the lifetime. The lifetime map is then converted to pO2 distribution. We expect that PDT efficacy can be improved by applying PALI imaging feedback in real-time to determine, and individually optimize, O2-enriched gas breathing parameters and PDT light-dose during treatment. Successful implementation of PALI in PDT can also drive its application in guiding other cancer treatments that are affected by hypoxia.

  8. Speed-of-sound compensated photoacoustic tomography for accurate imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Jithin; Willemink, Rene G. H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Slump, C. H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In most photoacoustic (PA) tomographic reconstructions, variations in speed-of-sound (SOS) of the subject are neglected under the assumption of acoustic homogeneity. Biological tissue with spatially heterogeneous SOS cannot be accurately reconstructed under this assumption. The authors

  9. Gel wax-based tissue-mimicking phantoms for multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneas, Efthymios; Xia, Wenfeng; Ogunlade, Olumide; Fonseca, Martina; Nikitichev, Daniil I; David, Anna L; West, Simeon J; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hebden, Jeremy C; Vercauteren, Tom; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2018-03-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms are widely used for the calibration, evaluation and standardisation of medical imaging systems, and for clinical training. For photoacoustic imaging, tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) that have tuneable optical and acoustic properties, high stability, and mechanical robustness are highly desired. In this study, gel wax is introduced as a TMM that satisfies these criteria for developing photoacoustic imaging phantoms. The reduced scattering and optical absorption coefficients were independently tuned with the addition of TiO 2 and oil-based inks. The frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation obeyed a power law; for native gel wax, it varied from 0.71 dB/cm at 3 MHz to 9.93 dB/cm at 12 MHz. The chosen oil-based inks, which have different optical absorption spectra in the range of 400 to 900 nm, were found to have good photostability under pulsed illumination with photoacoustic excitation light. Optically heterogeneous phantoms that comprised of inclusions with different concentrations of carbon black and coloured inks were fabricated, and multispectral photoacoustic imaging was performed with an optical parametric oscillator and a planar Fabry-Pérot sensor. We conclude that gel wax is well suited as a TMM for multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

  10. Deep in vivo photoacoustic imaging of mammalian tissues using a tyrosinase-based genetic reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathoul, Amit P.; Laufer, Jan; Ogunlade, Olumide; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Zhang, Edward; Johnson, Peter; Pizzey, Arnold R.; Philip, Brian; Marafioti, Teresa; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin A.; Beard, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging allows absorption-based high-resolution spectroscopic in vivo imaging at a depth beyond that of optical microscopy. Until recently, photoacoustic imaging has largely been restricted to visualizing the vasculature through endogenous haemoglobin contrast, with most non-vascularized tissues remaining invisible unless exogenous contrast agents are administered. Genetically encodable photoacoustic contrast is attractive as it allows selective labelling of cells, permitting studies of, for example, specific genetic expression, cell growth or more complex biological behaviours in vivo. In this study we report a novel photoacoustic imaging scanner and a tyrosinase-based reporter system that causes human cell lines to synthesize the absorbing pigment eumelanin, thus providing strong photoacoustic contrast. Detailed three-dimensional images of xenografts formed of tyrosinase-expressing cells implanted in mice are obtained in vivo to depths approaching 10 mm with a spatial resolution below 100 μm. This scheme is a powerful tool for studying cellular and genetic processes in deep mammalian tissues.

  11. Gel wax-based tissue-mimicking phantoms for multispectral photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneas, Efthymios; Xia, Wenfeng; Ogunlade, Olumide; Fonseca, Martina; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; David, Anna L.; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Vercauteren, Tom; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2018-01-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms are widely used for the calibration, evaluation and standardisation of medical imaging systems, and for clinical training. For photoacoustic imaging, tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) that have tuneable optical and acoustic properties, high stability, and mechanical robustness are highly desired. In this study, gel wax is introduced as a TMM that satisfies these criteria for developing photoacoustic imaging phantoms. The reduced scattering and optical absorption coefficients were independently tuned with the addition of TiO2 and oil-based inks. The frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation obeyed a power law; for native gel wax, it varied from 0.71 dB/cm at 3 MHz to 9.93 dB/cm at 12 MHz. The chosen oil-based inks, which have different optical absorption spectra in the range of 400 to 900 nm, were found to have good photostability under pulsed illumination with photoacoustic excitation light. Optically heterogeneous phantoms that comprised of inclusions with different concentrations of carbon black and coloured inks were fabricated, and multispectral photoacoustic imaging was performed with an optical parametric oscillator and a planar Fabry-Pérot sensor. We conclude that gel wax is well suited as a TMM for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. PMID:29541509

  12. Biomedical image retrieval using microscopic configuration with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G DEEP

    2018-03-10

    Mar 10, 2018 ... feature database. The selection of feature descriptors affects the image retrieval performance. In early years, Manjunath et al [7] used features based on intensity histogram for biomedical image retrieval. However, their retrieval performance is usually limited especially on large databases due to lack of ...

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  14. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9× dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ˜20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between <1 and 20 mm apart from each other, and imaged with the appropriate imaging modality. Photoacoustic imaging could resolve the two tubes of melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and

  15. Double-Stage Delay Multiply and Sum Beamforming Algorithm: Application to Linear-Array Photoacoustic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging medical imaging modality capable of providing high spatial resolution of Ultrasound (US) imaging and high contrast of optical imaging. Delay-and-Sum (DAS) is the most common beamforming algorithm in PAI. However, using DAS beamformer leads to low resolution images and considerable contribution of off-axis signals. A new paradigm namely Delay-Multiply-and-Sum (DMAS), which was originally used as a reconstruction algorithm in confocal microwave imaging...

  16. Imaging high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced tissue denaturation by multispectral photoacoustic method: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; O'Neill, Brian

    2013-03-10

    We present an ex vivo study for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in multispectral photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of tissue denaturation induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in this paper. Tissue of bovine muscle was thermally treated in a heated water bath and by HIFU, and then was imaged using a multispectral photoacoustic approach. Light at multiple optical wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm was delivered to the treated bovine muscle tissue to excite the photoacoustic signal. Apparent tissue denaturation has been observed in multispectral photoacoustic images after being treated in a water bath and by HIFU. It is interesting that the denaturation is more striking at shorter optical wavelength photoacoustic images than at longer optical wavelength photoacoustic images. Multispectral photoacoustic images of the tissue denaturation were further analyzed and the photoacoustic spectrums of the denaturized tissue were calculated in this paper. This study suggests that a multispectral PAI approach might be a promising tool to evaluate tissue denaturation induced by HIFU treatment.

  17. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira [University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  18. High-resolution photoacoustic imaging of ocular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Ronald H; Kong, Fanting; Chen, Y C; Lloyd, Harriet O; Kim, Hyung Ham; Cannata, Jonathan M; Shung, K Kirk; Coleman, D Jackson

    2010-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and ultrasound (US) are methods widely used for diagnostic imaging of the eye. These techniques detect discontinuities in optical refractive index and acoustic impedance, respectively. Because these both relate to variations in tissue density or composition, OCT and US images share a qualitatively similar appearance. In photoacoustic imaging (PAI), short light pulses are directed at tissues, pressure is generated due to a rapid energy deposition in the tissue volume and thermoelastic expansion results in generation of broadband US. PAI thus depicts optical absorption, which is independent of the tissue characteristics imaged by OCT or US. Our aim was to demonstrate the application of PAI in ocular tissues and to do so with lateral resolution comparable to OCT. We developed two PAI assemblies, both of which used single-element US transducers and lasers sharing a common focus. The first assembly had optical and 35-MHz US axes offset by a 30 degrees angle. The second assembly consisted of a 20-MHz ring transducer with a coaxial optics. The laser emitted 5-ns pulses at either 532 nm or 1064 nm, with spot sizes at the focus of 35 microm for the angled probe and 20 microm for the coaxial probe. We compared lateral resolution by scanning 12.5 microm diameter wire targets with pulse/echo US and PAI at each wavelength. We then imaged the anterior segment in whole ex vivo pig eyes and the choroid and ciliary body region in sectioned eyes. PAI data obtained at 1064 nm in the near infrared had higher penetration but reduced signal amplitude compared to that obtained using the 532 nm green wavelength. Images were obtained of the iris, choroid and ciliary processes. The zonules and anterior cornea and lens surfaces were seen at 532 nm. Because the laser spot size was significantly smaller than the US beamwidth at the focus, PAI images had superior resolution than those obtained using conventional US. Copyright 2010 World Federation for

  19. IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is a scientific conference dedicated to mathematical, algorithmic, and computational aspects of biological and biomedical imaging, across all scales of observation. It fosters knowledge transfer among different imaging communities and contributes to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging. ISBI is a joint initiative from the IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS) and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS). The 2018 meeting will include tutorials, and a scientific program composed of plenary talks, invited special sessions, challenges, as well as oral and poster presentations of peer-reviewed papers. High-quality papers are requested containing original contributions to the topics of interest including image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological, and statistical modeling. Accepted 4-page regular papers will be published in the symposium proceedings published by IEEE and included in IEEE Xplore. To encourage attendance by a broader audience of imaging scientists and offer additional presentation opportunities, ISBI 2018 will continue to have a second track featuring posters selected from 1-page abstract submissions without subsequent archival publication.

  20. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a pulsed laser diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2006-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that is based on the detection of acoustic waves generated by absorption of pulsed light by tissue chromophores such as hemoglobin in blood. For this technique, usually large and costly Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers are used. These lasers provide a pulse

  1. Porphyrin- or phthalocyanine-bridged silsesquioxane nanoparticles for two-photon photodynamic therapy or photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriello-Jimenez, Chiara; Henry, Maxime; Aggad, Dina; Raehm, Laurence; Cattoën, Xavier; Wong Chi Man, Michel; Charnay, Clarence; Alpugan, Serkan; Ahsen, Vefa; Tarakci, Deniz Kutlu; Maillard, Philippe; Maynadier, Marie; Garcia, Marcel; Dumoulin, Fabienne; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Coll, Jean-Luc; Josserand, Véronique; Durand, Jean-Olivier

    2017-11-09

    Porphyrin- or phthalocyanine-bridged silsesquioxane nanoparticles (BSPOR and BSPHT) were prepared. Their endocytosis in MCF-7 cancer cells was shown with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging. With two-photon excited photodynamic therapy (TPE-PDT), BSPOR was more phototoxic than BSPHT, which in contrast displayed a very high signal for photoacoustic imaging in mice.

  2. 3-D Deep Penetration Photoacoustic Imaging with a 2-D CMUT Array

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Te-Jen; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Ömer; Kamaya, Aya; Wygant, Ira O.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging of optically absorbing targets embedded as deep as 5 cm inside a highly scattering background medium using a 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. 3-D volumetric images and 2-D maximum intensity projection images are presented to show the objects imaged at different depths. Due to the close proximity of the CMUT to the integrated frontend circuits, the CMUT array imaging system...

  3. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a clinical ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Kang, Hyun Jae; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-06-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a popular prostate cancer treatment option that involves the permanent implantation of radioactive seeds into the prostate. However, contemporary brachytherapy procedure is limited by the lack of an imaging system that can provide real-time seed-position feedback. While many other imaging systems have been proposed, photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a potential ideal modality to address this need, since it could easily be incorporated into the current ultrasound system used in the operating room. We present such a photoacoustic imaging system built around a clinical ultrasound system to achieve the task of visualizing and localizing seeds. We performed several experiments to analyze the effects of various parameters on the appearance of brachytherapy seeds in photoacoustic images. We also imaged multiple seeds in an ex vivo dog prostate phantom to demonstrate the possibility of using this system in a clinical setting. Although still in its infancy, these initial results of a photoacoustic imaging system for the application of prostate brachytherapy seed localization are highly promising.

  4. NH4HCO3 gas-generating liposomal nanoparticle for photoacoustic imaging in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jizhu Xia, Gang Feng, Xiaorong Xia, Lan Hao, Zhigang Wang Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, Department of Ultrasound, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In this study, we have developed a biodegradable nanomaterial for photoacoustic imaging (PAI. Its biodegradation products can be fully eliminated from a living organism. It is a gas-generating nanoparticle of liposome-encapsulating ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3 solution, which is safe, effective, inexpensive, and free of side effects. When lasers irradiate these nanoparticles, NH4HCO3 decomposes to produce CO2, which can absorb much of the light energy under laser irradiation with a specific wavelength, and then expand under heat to generate a thermal acoustic wave. An acoustic detector can detect this wave and show it as a photoacoustic signal on a display screen. The intensity of the photoacoustic signal is enhanced corresponding to an increase in time, concentration, and temperature. During in vivo testing, nanoparticles were injected into tumor-bearing nude mice through the caudal vein, and photoacoustic signals were detected from the tumor, reaching a peak in 4 h, and then gradually disappearing. There was no damage to the skin or subcutaneous tissue from laser radiation. Our developed gas-generating nanomaterial, NH4HCO3 nanomaterial, is feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive. Therefore, it is a promising material to be used in clinical PAI. Keywords: Photoacoustic tomography, CO2, NH4HCO3, contrast agent, cancer

  5. Photo-acoustic imaging of coronary arteries with polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Broadway, Christian; Lamela, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    is useful for detection of plaques for prevention of rupture of vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques in the arteries can be distinguished using photo-acoustic imaging based on lipid accumulation with different characteristics of optical absorption. The basic principle of this imaging technique...... relies on exposing lipids to a laser capable of inducing photo-acoustic effect and a sensor affected by the induced pressure. Polymer optical fibre Bragg grating and Fabry-Perot sensors will be developed for detection of photo-acoustic signal in collaboration of Optoelectronics and Laser technology group......, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid under the TRIPOD project. TRIPOD (http://www.tripod-itn.eu) is a Marie Curie Initial Training Network located in the field of optical fibre sensors - an area where Europe has developed internationally competitive research and commercial activity. The aim is to significantly...

  6. Mathematics and physics of emerging biomedical imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    ... of Emerging Dynamic Biomedical Imaging Board on Mathematical Sciences Board on Physics and Astronomy Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications National Research Council and Board on Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders Institute of Medicine National Academy Press Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrightthe true use are Please ...

  7. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  8. Coherence-based photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds implanted in a canine prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Visualization of individual brachytherapy seed locations assists with intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Photoacoustic imaging is advantageous when compared to current ultrasound imaging methods, due to its superior sensitivity to metal surrounded by tissue. However, photoacoustic images suffer from poor contrast with insufficient laser fluence. A short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer was implemented to enhance these low-contrast photoacoustic signals. Photoacoustic imaging was performed with a transrectal ultrasound probe and an optical fiber surrounded by a light-diffusing sheath, placed at a distance of approximately 4-5 mm from the location of seeds implanted in an in vivo canine prostate. The average energy density through the tip of the sheath was varied from 8 to 167 mJ/cm2. When compared to a fast Fourier transform (FFT)- based reconstruction method, the mean contrast and signal-to-noise ratios were improved by up to 22 dB and a factor of 4, respectively, with the SLSC beamformer (12% of the receive aperture elements were included in the short-lag sum). Image artifacts that were spatially coherent had spatial frequency spectra that were quadrantally symmetric about the origin, while the spatial frequency spectra of the seed signals possessed diagonal symmetry. These differences were utilized to reduce artifacts by 9-14 dB after applying a bandpass filter with diagonal symmetry. Results indicate that advanced methods, such as SLSC beamforming or frequency-based filters, hold promise for intraoperative localization of prostate brachytherapy seeds

  9. Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging of radiofrequency ablation in the left atrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Iskander-Rizk (Sophinese); P. Kruizinga (Pieter); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); G. van Soest (Gijs)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractCatheter-based radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation has long-term success in 60-70% of cases. A better assessment of lesion quality, depth, and continuity could improve the procedure’s outcome. We investigate here photoacoustic contrast between ablated and healthy atrial-wall

  10. Using high-power light emitting diodes for photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, René Skov

    for the experiment consists of a 3mm high x 5mm wide slice of green colored gelatine overlaid by a 3cm layer of colorless gelatine. The light pulses from the LED is focused on the green gelatine. The photoacoustic response from the green gelatine is detected by a single transducer on the opposite (top) surface...... of the colorless gelatine layer....

  11. Breakthroughs in Photonics 2013: Photoacoustic Tomography in Biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is one of the fastest growing biomedical imaging modalities in the last decade. Building on its high scalability and complementary imaging contrast to other mainstream modalities, PAT has gained substantial momentum in both preclinical and clinical studies. In 2013, PAT has grown markedly in both its technological capabilities and biomedical applications. In particular, breakthroughs have been made in super-resolution imaging, deep blood flow measurement, small ...

  12. Photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds using a channel-domain ultrasound array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a technique commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer that relies on the precise placement of small radioactive seeds near the tumor location. The advantage of this technique over traditional radiation therapies is that treatment can be continuous and uniform, resulting in fewer clinic visits and a shorter treatment duration. Two important phases of this treatment are needle guidance for implantation, and post-placement verification for dosimetry. Ultrasound is a common imaging modality used for these purposes, but it can be difficult to distinguish the seeds from surrounding tissues, often requiring other imaging techniques such as MRI or CT. Photoacoustic imaging may offer a viable alternative. Using a photoacoustic system based on an L7- 4 array transducer and a realtime ultrasound array system capable of parallel channel data acquisition streamed to a multi-core computer via PCI-express, we have demonstrated imaging of these seeds at an ultrasound depth of 16 mm and laser penetration depths ranging up to 50 mm in chicken tissue with multiple optical wavelengths. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images are coregistered via an interlaced pulse sequence. Two laser pulses are used to form a photoacoustic image, and at these depths, the brachytherapy seeds are detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 26dB. To obtain this result, 1064nm light was used with a fluence of 100mJ/cm2, the ANSI limit for human skin exposure at this wavelength. This study demonstrates the potential for photoacoustic imaging as a candidate technology for brachytherapy seed placement guidance and verification.

  13. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in living mice via silica-coated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Thangaraj, Mridhula; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging is crucial for stem cell therapy to monitor the location(s), numbers, and state of the implanted cells. Real-time imaging in particular can ensure proper cell delivery for best engraftment. However, established imaging tools such as MRI are limited by their temporal resolution for guidance during delivery. In contrast, photoacoustic imaging is ideally suited for real time, image-guided therapy. Here, we use silica-coated gold nanorods as photoacoustic contrast agents and deploy them to image and quantitate mesenchymal stem cells during implant into the muscle tissue of live mice. Silica-coated gold nanorods (SiGNRs) were created with standard methods and loaded into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) without transfection agents. There was no significant (pcytokines should only minor upregulation of inflammatory markers including interleukin-6. We used electron microscopy to illustrate vacuole-bound SiGNRs inside the cells. This cell staining increased photoacoustic signal 175% relative to MSCs without contrast agent—the silica coat itself increased signal 55% relative to uncoated GNRs. Using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, we found that there were 100,000 SiGNRs per MSC. This value was 5-fold higher than a MSC population stained with GNRs in the absence of silica coat. After labeling, cells were washed and injected into murine muscle tissue to simulate a muscular dystrophy patient. Mice (N=5) treated with these SiGNRlabeled MSCs exhibited no adverse events and implants up to 5 mm deep were easily visualized. The in vivo detection limit was 90,000 cells in a 100 uL bolus in mouse thigh muscle. Here, the B-mode signal is useful for orienting the treatment area and visualizing the delivery catheter while the photoacoustic mode offers cell-specific content. The photoacoustic signal was validated with histology a long-term fluorescent tracking dye after MSC transplant.

  15. Tissue oxygen monitoring by photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) and its application to image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2015-03-01

    The oxygen partial pressure (pO2), which results from the balance between oxygen delivery and its consumption, is a key component of the physiological state of a tissue. Images of oxygen distribution can provide essential information for identifying hypoxic tissue and optimizing cancer treatment. Previously, we have reported a noninvasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor on small animals to identify hypoxia area. We also showed that PALI is able monitor changes of tissue oxygen, in an acute ischemia and breathing modulation model. Here we present our work on developing a treatment/imaging modality (PDT-PALI) that integrates PDT and a combined ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system. The system provides real-time feedback of three essential parameters namely: tissue oxygen, light penetration in tumor location, and distribution of photosensitizer. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying PALI, which relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent, excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue (MB) photosensitizer. Lifetime information can also be used to generate image showing the distribution of photosensitizer. The level and penetration depth of PDT illumination can be deduced from photoacoustic imaging at the same wavelength. All images will be combined with ultrasound B-mode images for anatomical reference.

  16. BIG: a Grid Portal for Biomedical Data and Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aloisio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern management of biomedical systems involves the use of many distributed resources, such as high performance computational resources to analyze biomedical data, mass storage systems to store them, medical instruments (microscopes, tomographs, etc., advanced visualization and rendering tools. Grids offer the computational power, security and availability needed by such novel applications. This paper presents BIG (Biomedical Imaging Grid, a Web-based Grid portal for management of biomedical information (data and images in a distributed environment. BIG is an interactive environment that deals with complex user's requests, regarding the acquisition of biomedical data, the "processing" and "delivering" of biomedical images, using the power and security of Computational Grids.

  17. Multifunctional polyelectrolyte microcapsules as a contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchenok, Alexey M; Jose, Jithin; Trochet, Philippe; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Gorin, Dmitry A

    2016-08-01

    The polyelectrolyte microcapsules that can be accurate either visualized in biological media or in tissue would enhance their further in vivo application both as a carrier of active payloads and as a specific sensor. The immobilization of active species, for instance fluorescent dyes, quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, in polymeric shell enables visualization of capsules by optical imaging techniques in aqueous solution. However, for visualization of capsules in complex media an instrument with high contrast modality requires. Herein, we show for the first time photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of multifunctional microcapsules in water and in blood. The microcapsules exhibit greater photoacoustic intensity compare to microparticles with the same composition of polymeric shell presumably their higher thermal expansion. Photoacoustic intensity form microcapsules dispersed in blood displays an enhancement (2-fold) of signal compare to blood. Photoacoustic imaging of microcapsules might contribute to non-invasive carrier visualization and further their in vivo distribution. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Preliminary results of ex vivo multispectral photoacoustic imaging in the management of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Vikram S; Chinni, Bhargava K; Valluru, Keerthi S; Moalem, Jacob; Giampoli, Ellen J; Evans, Katie; Rao, Navalgund A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate whether ex vivo multispectral photoacoustic imaging can be used to differentiate malignant tissue, benign nodules, and normal human thyroid tissue. Fifty patients undergoing thyroidectomy because of thyroid lesions participated in this study. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging was performed on surgically excised thyroid tissue, and chromophore images that represented optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure, the pathologist marked malignant tissue, benign nodules, and normal regions on histopathologic slides, and digital images of the marked histopathologic slides were obtained. The histopathologic images were coregistered with chromophore images. Areas corresponding to malignant tissue, benign nodules, and normal tissue were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each area were averaged to determine the mean intensities of deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, lipid, and water. There was a statistically significant difference between malignant and benign nodules with respect to mean intensity of deoxyhemoglobin (p = 0.014). There was a difference between malignant and normal tissue in mean intensity of deoxyhemoglobin (p = 0.003), lipid (p = 0.001), and water (p multispectral photoacoustic imaging can be used to differentiate malignant and benign nodules and normal human thyroid tissue.

  19. Label-free in vivo imaging of peripheral nerve by multispectral photoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Phillips, Evan; Wang, Pu; Goergen, Craig J; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional surgical damage to nerves is mainly due to poor visualization of nerve tissue relative to adjacent structures. Multispectral photoacoustic tomography can provide chemical information with specificity and ultrasonic spatial resolution with centimeter imaging depth, making it a potential tool for noninvasive neural imaging. To implement this label-free imaging approach, a multispectral photoacoustic tomography platform was built. Imaging depth and spatial resolution were characterized. In vivo imaging of the femoral nerve that is 2 mm deep in a nude mouse was performed. Through multivariate curve resolution analysis, the femoral nerve was discriminated from the femoral artery and chemical maps of their spatial distributions were generated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Intravascular photoacoustic detection of vulnerable plaque based on constituent selected imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jian; Xing Da, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a disease of the large arteries, is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. Over decades, atherosclerosis is characterized by thickening of the walls of the arteries, only advanced atherosclerotic disease could be observed. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid imaging technique that combines the advantages of high spatial resolution of ultrasound with contrast of optical absorption. In this paper, we present an intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging system to characterize vulnerable plaques by using the optical absorption contrast between different constituents. Epidemiological studies have revealed several important plaque constituents associated with early atherosclerosis, such as macrophage, cholesterol, lipid, calcification, and so on. We chose a section of lipid rich atherosclerosis artery and a section of normal artery as the phantom. Two IVPA images of them are given to show the difference between sick and normal. As a new method of detecting vulnerable plaque, IVPA constituents imaging will provide more details for diagnosis that offer an enticing prospect in early detecting of atherosclerosis.

  1. The characterization of an economic and portable LED-based photoacoustic imaging system to facilitate molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hariri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging (PAI is a non-invasive, high-resolution hybrid imaging modality that combines optical excitation and ultrasound detection. PAI can image endogenous chromophores (melanin, hemoglobin, etc. and exogenous contrast agents in different medical applications. However, most current equipment uses sophisticated and complicated OPO lasers with tuning and stability features inconsistent with broad clinical deployment. As the number of applications of PAI in medicine increases, there is an urgent need to make the imaging equipment more compact, portable, and affordable. Here, portable light emitting diode – based photoacoustic imaging (PLED-PAI was introduced and characterized in terms of system specifications, light source characterizations, photoacoustic spatial/temporal resolution, and penetration. The system uses two LED arrays attached to the sides of a conventional ultrasound transducer. The LED pulse repetition rate is tunable between 1 K Hz, 2 K Hz, 3 K Hz, and 4 K Hz. The axial resolution was 0.268 mm, and the lateral resolution was between 0.55 and 0.59 mm. The system could detect optical absorber (pencil lead at a depth of 3.2 cm and the detection limits of indocyanine green (ICG and methylene blue (MB were 9 μM and 0.78 mM. In vivo imaging of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells was achieved to confirm compatibility with small animal imaging. The characterization we report here may have value to other groups evaluating commercially available photoacoustic imaging equipment. Keywords: Portable photoacoustic imaging, LED, Optoacoustic imaging, Molecular imaging

  2. Elastography as a hybrid imaging technique : coupling with photoacoustics and quantitative imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widlak, T.G.

    2015-01-01

    While classical imaging methods, such as ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, are well-known and mathematically understood, a host of physiological parameters relevant for diagnostic purposes cannot be obtained by them. This gap is recently being closed by the introduction of hybrid, or coupled-physics imaging methods. They connect more then one physical modality, and aim to provide quantitative information on optical, electrical or mechanical parameters with high resolution. Central to this thesis is the mechanical contrast of elastic tissue, especially Young’s modulus or the shear modulus. Different methods of qualitative elastography provide interior information of the mechanical displacement field. From this interior data the nonlinear inverse problem of quantitative elastography aims to reconstruct the shear modulus. In this thesis, the elastography problem is seen from a hybrid imaging perspective; methods from coupled-physics inspired literature and regularization theory have been employed to recover displacement and shear modulus information. The overdetermined systems approach by G. Bal is applied to the quantitative problem, and ellipticity criteria are deduced, for one and several measurements, as well as injectivity results. Together with the geometric theory of G. Chavent, the results are used for analyzing convergence of Tikhonov regularization. Also, a convergence analysis for the Levenberg Marquardt method is provided. As a second mainstream project in this thesis, elastography imaging is developed for extracting displacements from photoacoustic images. A novel method is provided for texturizing the images, and the optical flow problem for motion estimation is shown to be regularized with this texture generation. The results are tested in cooperation with the Medical University Vienna, and the methods for quantitative determination of the shear modulus evaluated in first experiments. In summary, the overdetermined systems

  3. Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging Artifact Removal and Denoising Using Time Series Model-Based Spectral Noise Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakeviciute, Agne; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Olivo, Malini

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to solve a problem of denoising and artifact removal from in vivo multispectral photoacoustic imaging when the level of noise is not known a priori. The study analyzes Wiener filtering in Fourier domain when a family of anisotropic shape filters is considered. The unknown noise and signal power spectral densities are estimated using spectral information of images and the autoregressive of the power 1 ( AR(1)) model. Edge preservation is achieved by detecting image edges in the original and the denoised image and superimposing a weighted contribution of the two edge images to the resulting denoised image. The method is tested on multispectral photoacoustic images from simulations, a tissue-mimicking phantom, as well as in vivo imaging of the mouse, with its performance compared against that of the standard Wiener filtering in Fourier domain. The results reveal better denoising and fine details preservation capabilities of the proposed method when compared to that of the standard Wiener filtering in Fourier domain, suggesting that this could be a useful denoising technique for other multispectral photoacoustic studies.

  4. Skeletonization algorithm-based blood vessel quantification using in vivo 3D photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburger, K. M.; Nam, S. Y.; Chung, E.; Suggs, L. J.; Emelianov, S. Y.; Molinari, F.

    2016-11-01

    Blood vessels are the only system to provide nutrients and oxygen to every part of the body. Many diseases can have significant effects on blood vessel formation, so that the vascular network can be a cue to assess malicious tumor and ischemic tissues. Various imaging techniques can visualize blood vessel structure, but their applications are often constrained by either expensive costs, contrast agents, ionizing radiations, or a combination of the above. Photoacoustic imaging combines the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging, and image contrast depends on optical absorption. This enables the detection of light absorbing chromophores such as hemoglobin with a greater penetration depth compared to purely optical techniques. We present here a skeletonization algorithm for vessel architectural analysis using non-invasive photoacoustic 3D images acquired without the administration of any exogenous contrast agents. 3D photoacoustic images were acquired on rats (n  =  4) in two different time points: before and after a burn surgery. A skeletonization technique based on the application of a vesselness filter and medial axis extraction is proposed to extract the vessel structure from the image data and six vascular parameters (number of vascular trees (NT), vascular density (VD), number of branches (NB), 2D distance metric (DM), inflection count metric (ICM), and sum of angles metric (SOAM)) were calculated from the skeleton. The parameters were compared (1) in locations with and without the burn wound on the same day and (2) in the same anatomic location before (control) and after the burn surgery. Four out of the six descriptors were statistically different (VD, NB, DM, ICM, p  burn surgery). The study demonstrates an approach to obtain quantitative characterization of the vascular network from 3D photoacoustic images without any exogenous contrast agent which can assess

  5. Functional Photoacoustic Imaging of Gastric Acid Secretion Using pH-Responsive Polyaniline Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junwei; Xiao, Hong; Yoon, Soon Joon; Liu, Chengbo; Matsuura, Drew; Tai, Wanyi; Song, Liang; O'Donnell, Matthew; Cheng, Du; Gao, Xiaohu

    2016-09-01

    A stomach functional imaging technique based on photoacoustics achieves noninvasive gastric acid secretory assessment utilizing pH-responsive polyaniline nanoprobes. A testing protocol mimicking clinical practice is established using a mouse model. After imaging, the nanoprobes are excreted outside the body without inducing systematic toxicity. Further optimization and translation of this technology can help alleviate patients' suffering and side effects. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Photoacoustic Image Analysis for Cancer Detection and Building a Novel Ultrasound Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Saugata

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly emerging non-invasive soft tissue imaging modality which has the potential to detect tissue abnormality at early stage. Photoacoustic images map the spatially varying optical absorption property of tissue. In multiwavelength photoacoustic imaging, the soft tissue is imaged with different wavelengths, tuned to the absorption peaks of the specific light absorbing tissue constituents or chromophores to obtain images with different contrasts of the same tissue sample. From those images, spatially varying concentration of the chromophores can be recovered. As multiwavelength PA images can provide important physiological information related to function and molecular composition of the tissue, so they can be used for diagnosis of cancer lesions and differentiation of malignant tumors from benign tumors. In this research, a number of parameters have been extracted from multiwavelength 3D PA images of freshly excised human prostate and thyroid specimens, imaged at five different wavelengths. Using marked histology slides as ground truths, region of interests (ROI) corresponding to cancer, benign and normal regions have been identified in the PA images. The extracted parameters belong to different categories namely chromophore concentration, frequency parameters and PA image pixels and they represent different physiological and optical properties of the tissue specimens. Statistical analysis has been performed to test whether the extracted parameters are significantly different between cancer, benign and normal regions. A multidimensional [29 dimensional] feature set, built with the extracted parameters from the 3D PA images, has been divided randomly into training and testing sets. The training set has been used to train support vector machine (SVM) and neural network (NN) classifiers while the performance of the classifiers in differentiating different tissue pathologies have been determined by the testing dataset. Using the NN

  7. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  8. A photoacoustic imager with light illumination through an infrared-transparent silicon CMUT array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingkuang; Wang, Mengli; Cheng, Jui-Ching; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Li, Pai-Chi; Cheng, Xiaoyang

    2012-04-01

    A novel hardware design and preliminary experimental results for photoacoustic imaging are reported in this paper. This imaging system makes use of an infrared-transparent capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) chip for ultrasound reception and illuminates the image target through the CMUT array. The cascaded arrangement between the light source and transducer array allows for a more compact imager head and results in more uniform illumination. Taking advantage of the low optical absorption coefficient of silicon in the near infrared spectrum as well as the broad acoustic bandwidth that CMUTs provide, an infrared-transparent CMUT array has been developed for ultrasound reception. The center frequency of the polysilicon-membrane CMUT devices used in this photoacoustic system is 3.5 MHz, with a fractional bandwidth of 118% in reception mode. The silicon substrate of the CMUT array has been thinned to 100 μm and an antireflection dielectric layer is coated on the back side to improve the infrared-transmission rate. Initial results show that the transmission rate of a 1.06-μm Nd:Yag laser through this CMUT chip is 12%. This transmission rate can be improved if the thickness of silicon substrate and the thin-film dielectrics in the CMUT structure are properly tailored. Imaging of a metal wire phantom using this cascaded photoacoustic imager is demonstrated.

  9. Functional photoacoustic imaging to observe regional brain activation induced by cocaine hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-09-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to detect small animal brain activation in response to drug abuse. Cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution was injected into the blood stream of Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. The rat brain functional change in response to the injection of drug was then monitored by the PAM technique. Images in the coronal view of the rat brain at the locations of 1.2 and 3.4 mm posterior to bregma were obtained. The resulted photoacoustic (PA) images showed the regional changes in the blood volume. Additionally, the regional changes in blood oxygenation were also presented. The results demonstrated that PA imaging is capable of monitoring regional hemodynamic changes induced by drug abuse.

  10. Development of tyrosinase-based reporter genes for preclinical photoacoustic imaging of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Ruschke, Karen; Dortay, Hakan; Schreiber, Isabelle; Sass, Andrea; Qazi, Taimoor; Pumberger, Matthias; Laufer, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The capability to image stem cells in vivo in small animal models over extended periods of time is important to furthering our understanding of the processes involved in tissue regeneration. Photoacoustic imaging is suited to this application as it can provide high resolution (tens of microns) absorption-based images of superficial tissues (cm depths). However, stem cells are rare, highly migratory, and can divide into more specialised cells. Genetic labelling strategies are therefore advantageous for their visualisation. In this study, methods for the transfection and viral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells with reporter genes for the co-expression of tyrosinase and a fluorescent protein (mCherry). Initial photoacoustic imaging experiments of tyrosinase expressing cells in small animal models of tissue regeneration were also conducted. Lentiviral transduction methods were shown to result in stable expression of tyrosinase and mCherry in mesenchymal stem cells. The results suggest that photoacoustic imaging using reporter genes is suitable for the study of stem cell driven tissue regeneration in small animals.

  11. Oxygen-generating hybrid nanoparticles to enhance fluorescent/photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging guided tumor photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi; Wang, Guohao; Qin, Zainen; Wang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Guoqing; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising tumor treatment modality that can convert oxygen into cytotoxic singlet oxygen (SO) via photosensitizer to ablate tumor growth. However, the uncontrolled cancer cell proliferation during tumor development and the oxygen consumption during PDT always result in an insufficient oxygen level in tumors, which can adversely affect the PDT efficiency in turn. We designed an oxygen-generating PDT nanocomplex by encapsulating a manganese dioxide nanoparticle (MnO 2 NP) in an indocyanine green (ICG) modified hyaluronic acid nanoparticle (HANP) to overcome this limitation. Because of the excellent fluorescent and photoacoustic properties, the tumor accumulation of the ICG-HANP/MnO 2 (IHM) nanocomplex was monitored by fluorescent imaging and photoacoustic imaging after intravenous administration into the SCC7 tumor-bearing mouse model. Both high fluorescent and photoacoustic signals were detected and found peak at 6 h post-injection (tumor-muscle ratio: 4.03 ± 0.36 for fluorescent imaging and 2.93 ± 0.13 for photoacoustic imaging). In addition, due to the high reactivity of MnO 2 NP to H 2 O 2 , an unfavorable tumor cell metabolic, the oxygen content in the tumor is elevated 2.25 ± 0.07 times compared to that without IHM treatment as ultrasound imaging confirmed. After laser irradiation, significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in the IHM-treated group compared to the ICG-HANP-treated group, attributed to the beneficial oxygen-generating property of IHM for PDT. It is expected that the design of IHM will provide an alternative way of improving clinical PDT efficacy and will be widely applied in cancer theranostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of image mappers for hyperspectral biomedical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Robert T; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2010-04-01

    A new design and fabrication method is presented for creating large-format (>100 mirror facets) image mappers for a snapshot hyperspectral biomedical imaging system called an image mapping spectrometer (IMS). To verify this approach a 250 facet image mapper with 25 multiple-tilt angles is designed for a compact IMS that groups the 25 subpupils in a 5 x 5 matrix residing within a single collecting objective's pupil. The image mapper is fabricated by precision diamond raster fly cutting using surface-shaped tools. The individual mirror facets have minimal edge eating, tilt errors of <1 mrad, and an average roughness of 5.4 nm.

  13. Lensless high-resolution photoacoustic imaging scanner for in vivo skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Taiichiro; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Omuro, Toshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi

    2018-02-01

    We previously launched a high-resolution photoacoustic (PA) imaging scanner based on a unique lensless design for in vivo skin imaging. The design, imaging algorithm and characteristics of the system are described in this paper. Neither an optical lens nor an acoustic lens is used in the system. In the imaging head, four sensor elements are arranged quadrilaterally, and by checking the phase differences for PA waves detected with these four sensors, a set of PA signals only originating from a chromophore located on the sensor center axis is extracted for constructing an image. A phantom study using a carbon fiber showed a depth-independent horizontal resolution of 84.0 ± 3.5 µm, and the scan direction-dependent variation of PA signals was about ± 20%. We then performed imaging of vasculature phantoms: patterns of red ink lines with widths of 100 or 200 μm formed in an acrylic block co-polymer. The patterns were visualized with high contrast, showing the capability for imaging arterioles and venues in the skin. Vasculatures in rat burn models and healthy human skin were also clearly visualized in vivo.

  14. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Noninvasive measurement of internal jugular venous oxygen saturation by photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Erpelding, Todd N.; Ke, Haixin; Reddy, Kavya; Sharma, Anshuman; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The metabolic rate and oxygen consumption of the brain is reflected in jugular venous oxygen saturation. In many clinical conditions, such as head trauma, stroke, and low cardiac output states, the brain is at risk for hypoxic-ischemic injury. The current gold standard for monitoring brain oxygenation is invasive and requires jugular vein catheterization under fluoroscopic guidance; and therefore it is rarely used. Photo-acoustic tomography in combination with ultrasound can be used to estimate oxygen saturation of the internal jugular vein in real-time. This noninvasive method will enable earlier detection and prevention of impending hypoxic brain injury. A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser delivers light through an optical fiber bundle, and a modified commercial ultrasound imaging system (Philips iU22) detects both the pulse-echo ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) signals. A custom-built multichannel data acquisition system renders co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images at 5 frames per second. After the jugular vein was localized in healthy volunteers, dualwavelength PA images were used to calculate the blood hemoglobin oxygen saturation from the internal jugular vein in vivo. The preliminary results raise confidence that this emerging technology can be used clinically as an accurate, noninvasive indicator of cerebral oxygenation.

  16. Phantom-based image quality test methods for photoacoustic imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A; Garra, Brian S; Pfefer, T Joshua

    2017-09-01

    As photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technologies advance and applications arise, there is increasing need for standardized approaches to provide objective, quantitative performance assessment at various stages of the product development and clinical translation process. We have developed a set of performance test methods for PAI systems based on breast-mimicking tissue phantoms containing embedded inclusions. Performance standards for mature imaging modalities [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound] were used to guide selection of critical PAI image quality characteristics and experimental methods. Specifically, the tests were designed to address axial, lateral, and elevational spatial resolution, signal uniformity, penetration depth, sensitivity, spatial measurement accuracy, and PAI-ultrasound coregistration. As an initial demonstration of the utility of these test methods, we characterized the performance of a modular, bimodal PAI-ultrasound system using four clinical ultrasound transducers with varying design specifications. Results helped to inform optimization of acquisition and data processing procedures while providing quantitative elucidation of transducer-dependent differences in image quality. Comparison of solid, tissue-mimicking polymer phantoms with those based on Intralipid indicated the superiority of the former approach in simulating real-world conditions for PAI. This work provides a critical foundation for the establishment of well-validated test methods that will facilitate the maturation of PAI as a medical imaging technology. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  17. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Zhou, Lixiang; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-02-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective vs. exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  19. Tunable Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles with INDT-Based Conjugated Polymers for Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Thomas; Bofinger, Robin; Lam, Ivan; Fallon, Kealan J; Johnson, Peter; Ogunlade, Olumide; Vassileva, Vessela; Pedley, R Barbara; Beard, Paul C; Hailes, Helen C; Bronstein, Hugo; Tabor, Alethea B

    2017-06-21

    Photoacoustic imaging combines both excellent spatial resolution with high contrast and specificity, without the need for patients to be exposed to ionizing radiation. This makes it ideal for the study of physiological changes occurring during tumorigenesis and cardiovascular disease. In order to fully exploit the potential of this technique, new exogenous contrast agents with strong absorbance in the near-infrared range, good stability and biocompatibility, are required. In this paper, we report the formulation and characterization of a novel series of endogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging in vivo. These contrast agents are based on a recently reported series of indigoid π-conjugated organic semiconductors, coformulated with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, to give semiconducting polymer nanoparticles of about 150 nm diameter. These nanoparticles exhibited excellent absorption in the near-infrared region, with good photoacoustic signal generation efficiencies, high photostability, and extinction coefficients of up to three times higher than those previously reported. The absorption maximum is conveniently located in the spectral region of low absorption of chromophores within human tissue. Using the most promising semiconducting polymer nanoparticle, we have demonstrated wavelength-dependent differential contrast between vasculature and the nanoparticles, which can be used to unambiguously discriminate the presence of the contrast agent in vivo.

  20. Ultrafast ultrasound and photoacoustic co-registered imaging system based on FPGA parallel processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2012-02-01

    Co-registered Ultrasound and Photoacoustic images provide complimentary structure and functional information for cancer diagnosis and assessment of therapy response. In SPIE Photonics West 2011, we reported a system that acquires from 64 channels and displays up to 1 frame per second (fps) ultrasound pulse-echo images, 5 fps photoacoustic images, and 0.5 fps co-registered images. In this year, we report an upgraded system which acquires from 128 channels and displays up to 15 fps co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images limited by our laser pulse repetition rate. The system architecture is novel and it provides real-time co-registration of images, the ability of acquiring the channel RF data for both modalities, and the flexibility of adjusting every parameter involved in the imaging process for both modalities. The digital signal processor board is upgraded to an FPGA-based PCIe board that collects the data from the acquisition modules and transfers them to the PC memory at 2.5GT/s rate through an x8 DDR PCIe bus running at 100MHz clock frequency. The modules FPGA code is also upgraded to form a beam line in 90 microseconds and to communicate through ultrafast differential tracks with the PCIe board. Furthermore, the printed circuit board (PCB) design of the system was adjusted to provide a maximum of 80dB signal-to-noise ratio at 60dB gain, which is comparable to some commercial ultrasound machines. The real-time system allows capturing co-registered US/PAT images free of motion artifacts and also provides ultrafast dynamic information when a contrast agent is used. The system is built for clinical use to assist the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, the hardware is still under testing and evaluation stage, experimental and clinical results will be reported later.

  1. Advanced devices for photoacoustic imaging to improve cancer and cerebrovascular medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla Marien, Leonardo Gabriel

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information for breast cancer staging. Despite these promising studies, PAI remains an unfeasible option for clinics due to the cost to implement, the required large modification in user conduct and the inflexibility of the hardware to accommodate other applications for the incremental enhancement in diagnostic information. The research described in this dissertation addresses these issues by designing attachments to clinical ultrasound probes and incorporating custom detectors into commercial ultrasound scanners. The ultimate benefit of these handheld devices is to expand the capability of current ultrasound systems and facilitate the translation of PAI to enhance cancer diagnostics and neurosurgical outcomes. Photoacoustic enabling devices (PEDs) were designed as attachments to two clinical ultrasound probes optimized for breast cancer diagnostics. PAI uses pulsed laser excitation to create transient heating (2.4mm) in a phantom model. The capability to use this during surgery would suggest decreasing the risks associated with these treatments. However, clinical ultrasound arrays are not clinically feasible for microsurgical applications due to their bulky size and linear scanning requirements for 3D. Therefore, capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) two-dimensional arrays compatible with standard ultrasound scanners were used to generate real-time 3D photoacoustic images. Future probes, designed incorporating CMUT arrays, would be relatively simple to fabricate and a convenient upgrade to existing clinical ultrasound equipment. Eventually, a handheld tool with the ability to visualize, in real-time 3D, the desired microvasculature, would assist surgical procedures. The potential implications of PAI devices compatible with standard ultrasound equipment would be a streamlined cost efficient solution for translating photoacoustics into clinical

  2. Improving image quality by accounting for changes in water temperature during a photoacoustic tomography scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Sompel, Dominique; Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Dragulescu-Andrasi, Anca; Bohndiek, Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of photoacoustic tomography is rapidly evolving with many new system designs and reconstruction algorithms being published. Many systems use water as a coupling medium between the scanned object and the ultrasound transducers. Prior to a scan, the water is heated to body temperature to enable small animal imaging. During the scan, the water heating system of some systems is switched off to minimize the risk of bubble formation, which leads to a gradual decrease in water temperature and hence the speed of sound. In this work, we use a commercially available scanner that follows this procedure, and show that a failure to model intra-scan temperature decreases as small as 1.5°C leads to image artifacts that may be difficult to distinguish from true structures, particularly in complex scenes. We then improve image quality by continuously monitoring the water temperature during the scan and applying variable speed of sound corrections in the image reconstruction algorithm. While upgrading to an air bubble-free heating pump and keeping it running during the scan could also solve the changing temperature problem, we show that a software correction for the temperature changes provides a cost-effective alternative to a hardware upgrade. The efficacy of the software corrections was shown to be consistent across objects of widely varying appearances, namely physical phantoms, ex vivo tissue, and in vivo mouse imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the efficacy of modeling temporal variations in the speed of sound during photoacoustic scans, as opposed to spatial variations as focused on by previous studies. Since air bubbles pose a common problem in ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging systems, our results will be useful to future small animal imaging studies that use scanners with similarly limited heating units.

  3. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Jithin; Jose, J.; Willemink, Rene; Willemink, Rene G.H.; Resink, Steffen; Piras, D.; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; van Hespen, J.C.G.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    We present a ‘hybrid’ imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  4. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Jithin; Willemink, Rene G. H.; Resink, Steffen; Piras, Daniele; van Hespen, J. C. G.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    We present a 'hybrid' imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  5. Ultrawideband radar imaging system for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, H.M.; Liu, W.; Hranilovic, S.; Deen, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrawideband (UWB) (3-10 GHz) radar imaging systems offer much promise for biomedical applications such as cancer detection because of their good penetration and resolution characteristics. The underlying principle of UWB cancer detection is a significant contrast in dielectric properties, which is estimated to be greater than 2:1 between normal and cancerous tissue, compared to a few-percent contrast in radiographic density exploited by x rays. This article presents a feasibility study of the UWB imaging of liver cancer tumors, based on the frequency-dependent finite difference time domain method. The reflection, radiation, and scattering properties of UWB pulses as they propagate through the human body are studied. The reflected and back-scattered electromagnetic energies from cancer tumors inside the liver are also investigated. An optimized, ultrawideband antenna was designed for near field operation, allowing for the reduction of the air-skin interface. It will be placed on the fat-liver tissue phantom with a malignant tumor stimulant. By performing an incremental scan over the phantom and removing early time artifacts, including reflection from the antenna ends, images based on the back-scattered signal from the tumor can be constructed. This research is part of our effort to develop a UWB cancer detection system with good detection and localization properties

  6. PHOTOACOUSTIC NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION AND IMAGING OF CARIES IN DENTAL SAMPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.; Dewhurst, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease wherein bacterial processes damage hard tooth structure. Traditional dental radiography has its limitations for detecting early stage caries. In this study, a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with the near-infrared light source has been applied to postmortem dental samples to obtain 2-D and 3-D images. Imaging results showed that the PA technique can be used to image human teeth caries. For non-destructive photoacoustic evaluation and imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. For example, temperature rises above 5 deg. C within live human teeth will cause pulpal necrosis. Therefore, several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict temperature and pressure fields within samples. Predicted temperature levels are below corresponding safety limits, but care is required to avoid nonlinear absorption phenomena. Furthermore, PA imaging results from the phantom provide evidence for high sensitivity, which shows the imaging potential of the PA technique for detecting early stage disease.

  7. Photoacoustic image reconstruction for linear scanning geometry using particle swarm optimization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Yae-Lin; Wang, Weichung; Hung, Yukai; Li, Pai-Chi

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic reconstruction for linear scanning geometry includes the delay-and-sum method, the spectral-domain method and the time-domain based method. In practice, the data collection using the planar detection geometry is not full-view, causing the details of the reconstructed object to be blurred and distorted. In addition to the exact formulation, we adopt a heuristic reconstruction method. In this paper, we demonstrate photoacoustic reconstruction for linear scanning geometry by formulating the image reconstruction into an optimization problem, and solve the problem with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. In this method, first we guess the initial optical energy distribution. According to photoacoustic model, described by the Helmholtz equation, the generated photoacoustic wave can be collected with planar detection geometry. The spherical Radon transform is adopted for the simulation of arbitrarily guessed optical energy distribution. Next we compare the collected signals generated from the guessed optical energy distribution with the measured signals by the sum of squared differences. By minimizing the error sum among various guesses, the initial optical energy distribution is obtained. In this regard, no limited-view is encountered. To guess the initial distribution efficiently such that the sum of the squared differences is minimized is an optimization problem with the dimension of unknowns being the size of the initial optical energy distribution. PSO is a derivative-free and population-based stochastic method that has been used to solve various optimization problems due to its simplicity and efficiency. High computational costs aroused from a large number of particles required can be alleviated with the use of the graphic processing units (GPUs). The proposed reconstruction method based on the PSO algorithm along with the spherical Radon transform is implemented on a NVIDIA Telsa C1060 GPU.

  8. Characterization and modeling of Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensors with hard dielectric mirrors for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Jens; Guggenheim, James; Zhang, Edward; Scharfenorth, Chris; Spannekrebs, Bastian; Villringer, Claus; Laufer, Jan

    2017-06-10

    A Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensor with nonhygroscopic dielectric mirrors made out of Ta 2 O 5 and SiO 2 for use in photoacoustic tomography is described. The sensor offers flat frequency response up to 36 MHz, low noise-equivalent pressure (70 Pa), and near-omnidirectional response up to 20 MHz as well as optical transparency for near-infrared illumination. A numerical model was developed to predict its frequency response, and the results were validated experimentally. An image of the human palm was acquired to demonstrate in vivo imaging capabilities.

  9. Salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Yukun; Wang, Wansheng; Hu, Jin; Liu, Jing; Dai, Zhifei; Wang, Kun; Wei, Yen; Bai, Jing; Gao, Weiping

    2016-02-01

    The challenge in photothermal therapy (PTT) is to develop biocompatible photothermal transducers that can absorb and convert near-infrared (NIR) light into heat with high efficiency. Herein, we report salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in biological media to form highly efficient and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers for PTT and photothermal/photoacoustic (PT/PA) imaging of cancer. The GNP depots in situ formed by salt-induced aggregation of GNPs show strong NIR absorption induced by plasmonic coupling between adjacent GNPs and very high photothermal conversion efficiency (52%), enabling photothermal destruction of tumor cells. More interestingly, GNPs in situ aggregate in tumors to form GNP depots, enabling simultaneous PT/PA imaging and PTT of the tumors. These findings may provide a simple and effective way to develop a new class of intelligent and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers with high efficiency for PT/PA imaging and PTT.The challenge in photothermal therapy (PTT) is to develop biocompatible photothermal transducers that can absorb and convert near-infrared (NIR) light into heat with high efficiency. Herein, we report salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in biological media to form highly efficient and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers for PTT and photothermal/photoacoustic (PT/PA) imaging of cancer. The GNP depots in situ formed by salt-induced aggregation of GNPs show strong NIR absorption induced by plasmonic coupling between adjacent GNPs and very high photothermal conversion efficiency (52%), enabling photothermal destruction of tumor cells. More interestingly, GNPs in situ aggregate in tumors to form GNP depots, enabling simultaneous PT/PA imaging and PTT of the tumors. These findings may provide a simple and effective way to develop a new class of intelligent and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers with high efficiency for PT/PA imaging and PTT. Electronic supplementary

  10. A photoacoustic tomography and ultrasound combined system for proximal interphalangeal joint imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system for imaging human peripheral joints is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system on normal volunteers revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Tissue perfusion rate estimation with compression-based photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min; James Shapiro, A. M.; Zemp, Roger

    2018-01-01

    Tissue perfusion is essential for transporting blood oxygen and nutrients. Measurement of tissue perfusion rate would have a significant impact in clinical and preclinical arenas. However, there are few techniques to image this important parameter and they typically require contrast agents. A label-free methodology based on tissue compression and imaging with a high-frequency photoacoustic-ultrasound system is introduced for estimating and visualizing tissue perfusion rates. Experiments demonstrate statistically significant differences in depth-resolved perfusion rates in a human subject with various temperature exposure conditions.

  12. Toward the detection of intraplaque hemorrhage in carotid artery lesions using photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabul, Mustafa Umit; Heres, Maarten; Rutten, Marcel C. M.; van Sambeek, Marc R.; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Lopata, Richard G. P.

    2017-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) may have the ability to reveal the composition and the anatomical structure of carotid plaques, which determines its mechanical properties and vulnerability. We used PAI and plane wave ultrasound (PUS) imaging to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of endarterectomy samples ex vivo and compared the results with histology to investigate the potential of PAI-based identification of intraplaque hemorrhage. Seven carotid plaque samples were obtained from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy and imaged with a fully integrated hand-held photoacoustic (PA) probe, consisting of a pulsed diode laser (tpulse=130 ns, Epulse=1 mJ, λ=808 nm) and a linear array transducer (fc=7.5 MHz). The samples were rotated 360 deg with 10 deg steps, and data were spatially compounded to obtain complete 3-D images of the plaques. Areas of high absorption in the 3-D datasets were identified and compared to histological data of the plaques. Data in six out of seven endarterectomy samples revealed the presence of intraplaque hemorrhages that were not visible in the PUS images. Due to the noninvasive nature of PAI, this ex vivo study may elucidate preclinical studies toward the in vivo, noninvasive, vulnerability assessment of the atherosclerotic carotid plaque.

  13. Proceedings of the international society for optical engineering biomedical image processing 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovik, A.G.; Howard, V.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of biomedical image processing. Topics covered include: Filtering and reconstruction of biomedical images; analysis, classification and recognition of biomedical images; and 3-D microscopy

  14. 78 FR 3009 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  2. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  3. Imaging molecular signatures for clinical detection of scleroderma in the hand by multispectral photoacoustic elastic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubin; Zhang, Lingyan; Li, Sushu; Han, Xinai; Yuan, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    Scleroderma (SD) is a rare autoimmune disease, which is divided into 2 categories: the localized SD and systemic SD. The localized SD mainly causes skin thickening of the fingers, whereas the systemic SD can further affect the blood vessels and internal organs. In this pilot study, the multispectral photoacoustic elastic tomography (PAET) imaging technique was used to recover the quantitative physiological and elastic properties of biological tissues for the diagnosis of SD. Three healthy subjects and 3 SD patients were recruited and clinically examined by a rheumatologist, and then their hand/fingers were scanned by both magnetic resonance imaging and our home-made photoacoustic imaging system. Physiological parameters including oxygen saturation (S T O 2 ), deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) and oxy-hemoglobin (HbO 2 ) concentrations and mechanical properties such as bulk elastic modulus images were reconstructed using the developed PAET reconstruction method. Our imaging results demonstrated that the physiological and elastic parameters exhibit striking differences between the SD and normal fingers, indicating that these biomarkers can serve as molecular signatures for early detection of SD. These quantitative physiological properties and bulk modulus may also pave a new path for improved understanding the pathological mechanism of SD. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q; Jiang, H; Iwakuma, N; Grobmyer, S R; Sharma, P; Moudgil, B M; Wu, C; McNeill, J

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a rapidly emerging non-invasive imaging technology that integrates the merits of high optical contrast with high ultrasound resolution. The ability to quantitatively and non-invasively image nanoparticles has important implications for the development of nanoparticles as in vivo cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study, the ability of systemically administered poly(ethylene glycol)-coated (PEGylated) gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with PAT has been evaluated. We demonstrate that gold nanoparticles (20 and 50 nm) have high photoacoustic contrast as compared to mouse tissue ex vivo. Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in mice in vivo following subcutaneous administration using PAT. Following intravenous administration of PEGylated gold nanoparticles to tumor-bearing mice, accumulation of gold nanoparticles in tumors can be effectively imaged with PAT. With gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent, PAT has important potential applications in the image guided therapy of superficial tumors such as breast cancer, melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma.

  5. Functional connectivity in the mouse brain imaged by B-mode photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we imaged spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images were acquired noninvasively in B-scan mode with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. At a location relative to the bregma 0, correlations were investigated inter-hemispherically between bilaterally homologous regions, as well as intra-hemispherically within the same functional regions. The functional connectivity in different functional regions was studied. The locations of these regions agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. The functional connectivity map obtained in this study can then be used in the investigation of brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy. Our experiments show that photoacoustic microscopy is capable to detect connectivities between different functional regions in B-scan mode, promising a powerful functional imaging modality for future brain research.

  6. Curved-array-based multispectral photoacoustic imaging of human finger joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; He, Ming; Shi, Haosheng; Zhao, Yuan; Lu, Man; Zou, Xianbing; Yao, Lei; Jiang, Huabei; Xi, Lei

    2017-10-02

    In this study, we present the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a curved-array-based photoacoustic imaging system designed for imaging vasculatures inside human finger joints with multispectral strategy. The transducers was fabricated with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film with a size of 30 mm×2.8 mm, and a curvature radius of 82 mm. A detailed comparison between the PVDF transducer and commercial piezoelectric ceramic (PTZ) transducers was performed. In addition, phantom and in vivo mouse experiments were carried out to evaluate the system performance. Furthermore, we recruited healthy volunteers and did multispectral photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels in finger joints. The transducers have an average center frequency of 6.6 MHz, and a mean bandwidth of 95%. The lateral and axial resolutions of the system are 110 μm and 800 μm, respectively, and the diameter of the active imaging is larger than 50 mm. We successfully captured the drug-induced cerebral bleeding spots in intact mouse brains, and recovered both morphology and oxygen saturation of the blood vessels in human finger joints. The PVDF transducer has a better performance in bandwidth compared with commercial transducers. The curved design of the transducer offers a better sensitivity and a higher axial resolution compared with the flat design. Based on the phantom, animal and human experiments, the proposed system has the potential to be used in clinical diagnosis of early-stage arthritis.

  7. Imaging and detection of early stage dental caries with an all-optical photoacoustic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D A; Kirk, K J; Sampathkumar, A; Longbottom, C

    2015-01-01

    Tooth decay, at its earliest stages, manifests itself as small, white, subsurface lesions in the enamel. Current methods for detection in the dental clinic are visual and tactile investigations, and bite-wing X-ray radiographs. These techniques suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease due to the small size (<100μm) of the lesion. A fine-resolution (600 nm) ultra-broadband (200 MHz) all-optical photoacoustic microscopy system was is used to image the early signs of tooth decay. Ex-vivo tooth samples exhibiting white spot lesions were scanned and were found to generate a larger (one order of magnitude) photoacoustic (PA) signal in the lesion regions compared to healthy enamel. The high contrast in the PA images potentially allows lesions to be imaged and measured at a much earlier stage than current clinical techniques allow. PA images were cross referenced with histology photographs to validate our experimental results. Our PA system provides a noncontact method for early detection of white-spot lesions with a high detection bandwidth that offers advantages over previously demonstrated ultrasound methods. The technique provides the sensing depth of an ultrasound system, but with the spatial resolution of an optical system

  8. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy and autofluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2011-08-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective versus exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We have successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  9. Coherent fiber bundle based integrated photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence imaging (PAUSFI) for endoscopy and diagnostic bio-imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Joseph; Murukeshan, V M; Sathiyamoorthy, K; Woh, Lye Sun

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in diagnostic imaging and sensing focuses on deriving complementary information from the diagnosed site. From that perspective it is imperative to devise new imaging platforms where multiple distinct modalities are used either simultaneously or sequentially. Increased efforts have been devoted towards establishing such multi-modal imaging systems, which house and operate more than two imaging modalities within a single instrumentation set-up. In this context, we propose a novel multi-modal imaging platform using non-ionizing radiation that has been successfully conceptualized, established and experimentally demonstrated. This proposed GRIN lensed fiber-optic microscope and linear array transducer based PAUSFI (photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence imaging) system makes use of non-ionizing radiation sources to map optical and acoustic heterogeneities (complementary information) along the depth of the tissue at multi-scale resolution (microscopic to mesoscopic). The fiber-optic assembly enables the system to perform minimally invasive remote light delivery and high resolution fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of inaccessible areas of intact tissues or intra body cavities. It is expected that the proposed multi-modal imaging system could open up niches in bio-imaging research in the near future. (paper)

  10. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  11. Intravascular ultrasonic-photoacoustic (IVUP) endoscope with 2.2-mm diameter catheter for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Nhat Quang; Hlaing, Kyu Kyu; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Oh, Yun-Ok; Fan, Xiao Feng; Lee, Yong Wook; Nam, Seung Yun; Kang, Hyun Wook; Oh, Junghwan

    2015-10-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is extremely important for detection and characterization of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques as well as gastrointestinal diseases. Recently, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging has been used to differentiate the composition of biological tissues with high optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution. The combination of these imaging techniques could provide morphological information and molecular screening to characterize abnormal tissues, which would help physicians to ensure vital therapeutic value and prognostic significance for patients before commencing therapy. In this study, integration of a high-frequency IVUS imaging catheter (45MHz, single-element, unfocused, 0.7mm in diameter) with a multi-mode optical fiber (0.6mm in core diameter, 0.22 NA), an integrated intravascular ultrasonic-photoacoustic (IVUP) imaging catheter, was developed to provide spatial and functional information on light distribution in a turbid sample. Simultaneously, IVUS imaging was co-registered to IVPA imaging to construct 3D volumetric sample images. In a phantom study, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) tissue-mimicking arterial vessel phantom with indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB) inclusion was used to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping the biological dyes, which are used in cardiovascular and cancer diagnostics. For the ex vivo study, an excised sample of pig intestine with ICG was utilized to target the biomarkers present in the gastrointestinal tumors or the atherosclerotic plaques with the proposed hybrid technique. The results indicated that IVUP endoscope with the 2.2-mm diameter catheter could be a useful tool for medical imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 3-D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging of prostate tumor progression in the mouse window chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting their response to treatment. We describe a novel, high-resolution coregistered photoacoustic (PA) and pulse echo (PE) ultrasound system used to image the tumor microenvironment. Compared to traditional optical systems, the platform provides complementary contrast and important depth information. Three mice are implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber and injected with PC-3 prostate tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein. The ensuing tumor invasion is mapped during three weeks or more using simultaneous PA and PE imaging at 25 MHz, combined with optical and fluorescent techniques. Pulse echo imaging provides details of tumor structure and the surrounding environment with 100-μm3 resolution. Tumor size increases dramatically with an average volumetric growth rate of 5.35 mm3/day, correlating well with 2-D fluorescent imaging (R = 0.97, p therapies, and develop molecular contrast agents in vivo.

  13. Deep Tissue Photoacoustic Imaging Using a Miniaturized 2-D Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Ma, Te-Jen; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Ömer

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of light absorbing objects embedded as deep as 5 cm inside strong optically scattering phantoms using a miniaturized (4 mm × 4 mm × 500 µm), 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array of 16 × 16 elements with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. Two-dimensional tomographic images and 3-D volumetric images of the objects placed at different depths are presented. In addition, we studied the sensitivity of CMUT-based PAI to the concentration of indocyanine green dye at 5 cm depth inside the phantom. Under optimized experimental conditions, the objects at 5 cm depth can be imaged with SNR of about 35 dB and a spatial resolution of approximately 500 µm. Results demonstrate that CMUTs with integrated front-end amplifier circuits are an attractive choice for achieving relatively high depth sensitivity for PAI. PMID:22249594

  14. High resolution photoacoustic imaging of microvasculature in normal and cancerous bladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixing; Roberts, William; Carson, Paul L.; Liu, Xiaojun; Tao, Chao; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    We explored the potential of an emerging laser-based technology, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), for bladder cancer diagnosis through high resolution imaging of microvasculature in the interior bladder tissues. Images of ex vivo canine bladders demonstrated the excellent ability of PAI to map three-dimensional microvasculature in optically scattering bladder tissues. By comparing the results from human bladder specimens affected by cancer to those from the normal control, the feasibility of PAI in differentiating malignant from benign bladder tissues was explored. The reported distinctive morphometric characteristics of tumor microvasculature can be seen in the images from cancer samples, suggesting that PAI may allow in vivo assessment of neoangiogenesis that is closely associated with bladder cancer generation and progression. By presenting subsurface morphological and physiological information in bladder tissues, PAI, when performed in a similar way to that in conventional endoscopy, provides an opportunity for improved diagnosis, staging and treatment guidance of bladder cancer.

  15. 76 FR 69748 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imagin and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health,6707...

  16. Microlenses and microcameras for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanhere, Aditi

    Liquid lens technology is a rapidly progressing field driven by the promise of low cost fabrication, faster response, fewer mechanical elements, versatility and ease of customization for different applications. Here we present the use of liquid lenses for biomedical optics and medical imaging. I will specifically focus on our approaches towards the development of two liquid-lens optical systems -- laparoscopic cameras and 3D microscopy. The first part of this work is based on the development of a multi-camera laparoscopic imaging system with tunable focusing capability. The work attempts to find a solution to overcome many of the fundamental challenges faced by current laparoscopic imaging systems. The system is developed upon the key idea that widely spread multiple, tunable microcameras can cover a large range of vantage points and field of view (FoV) for intra-abdominal visualization. Our design features multiple tunable-focus microcameras integrated with a surgical port to provide panoramic intra-abdominal visualization with enhanced depth perception. Our system can be optically tuned to focus in on objects within a range of 5 mm to infinity, with a FoV adjustable between 36 degrees and 130 degrees. This unique approach also eliminates the requirement of an exclusive imaging port and need for navigation of cameras between ports during surgery. The second part of this report focuses on the application of tunable lenses in microscopy. Conventional wide-field microscopy is one of the most widely used optical microscopy technique. This technique typically captures a two dimensional image of a specimen. For a volumetric visualization of the sample or to enable depth scanning along the axial direction, it is necessary to move the sample relative to the fixed focal plane of the microscope objective. For this purpose, a mechanical z-scanning stage is typically employed. The stage enables the focal plane to move through the sample. Typical approaches used to achieve

  17. A dual-modality photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system for noninvasive sentinel lymph node detection: preliminary clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpelding, Todd N.; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Krumholz, Arie; Ke, Haixin; Maslov, Konstantin; Appleton, Catherine; Margenthaler, Julie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has emerged as an accurate, less invasive alternative to axillary lymph node dissection, and it has rapidly become the standard of care for patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) hypothesis states that the pathological status of the axilla can be accurately predicted by determining the status of the first (i.e., sentinel) lymph nodes that drain from the primary tumor. Physicians use radio-labeled sulfur colloid and/or methylene blue dye to identify the SLN, which is most likely to contain metastatic cancer cells. However, the surgical procedure causes morbidity and associated expenses. To overcome these limitations, we developed a dual-modality photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system to noninvasively detect SLNs based on the accumulation of methylene blue dye. Ultimately, we aim to guide percutaneous needle biopsies and provide a minimally invasive method for axillary staging of breast cancer. The system consists of a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, a commercial ultrasound imaging system (Philips iU22), and a multichannel data acquisition system which displays co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound images in real-time. Our clinical results demonstrate that real-time photoacoustic imaging can provide sensitive and specific detection of methylene blue dye in vivo. While preliminary studies have shown that in vivo detection of SLNs by using co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging is feasible, further investigation is needed to demonstrate robust SLN detection.

  18. Biocompatible astaxanthin as novel contrast agent for biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Phuc; Park, Suhyun; Oh, Junghwan; Wook Kang, Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid imaging modality with high resolution and sensitivity that can be beneficial for cancer staging. Due to insufficient endogenous photoacoustic (PA) contrast, the development of exogenous agents is critical in targeting cancerous tumors. The current study demonstrates the feasibility of marine-oriented material, astaxanthin, as a biocompatible PA contrast agent. Both silicon tubing phantoms and ex vivo bladder tissues are tested at various concentrations (up to 5 mg/ml) of astaxanthin to quantitatively explore variations in PA responses. A Q-switched Nd : YAG laser (λ = 532 nm) in conjunction with a 5 MHz ultrasound transducer is employed to generate and acquire PA signals from the samples. The phantom results presented that the PA signal amplitudes increase linearly with the astaxanthin concentrations (threshold detection = 0.31 mg/ml). The tissue injected with astaxanthin yields up to 16-fold higher PA signals, compared with that with saline. Due to distribution of the injected astaxanthin, PAI can image the margin of astaxanthin boles as well as quantify their volume in 3D reconstruction. Further investigations on selective tumor targeting are required to validate astaxanthin as a potential biocompatible contrast agent for PAI-assisted bladder cancer detection. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. High-resolution all-optical photoacoustic imaging system for remote interrogation of biological specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin

    2014-05-01

    Conventional photoacoustic imaging (PAI) employs light pulses to produce a photoacoustic (PA) effect and detects the resulting acoustic waves using an ultrasound transducer acoustically coupled to the target tissue. The resolution of conventional PAI is limited by the sensitivity and bandwidth of the ultrasound transducer. We have developed an all-optical versatile PAI system for characterizing ex vivo and in vivo biological specimens. The system employs noncontact interferometric detection of the acoustic signals that overcomes limitations of conventional PAI. A 532-nm pump laser with a pulse duration of 5 ns excited the PA effect in tissue. Resulting acoustic waves produced surface displacements that were sensed using a 532-nm continuous-wave (CW) probe laser in a Michelson interferometer with a GHz bandwidth. The pump and probe beams were coaxially focused using a 50X objective giving a diffraction-limited spot size of 0.48 μm. The phase-encoded probe beam was demodulated using a homodyne interferometer. The detected time-domain signal was time reversed using k-space wave-propagation methods to produce a spatial distribution of PA sources in the target tissue. Performance was assessed using PA images of ex vivo rabbit lymph node specimens and human tooth samples. A minimum peak surface displacement sensitivity of 0.19 pm was measured. The all-optical PAI (AOPAI) system is well suited for assessment of retinal diseases, caries lesion detection, skin burns, section less histology and pressure or friction ulcers.

  20. Polypyrrole coated phase-change contrast agents for sono-photoacoustic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David S.; Yoon, Soon Joon; Matula, Thomas J.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Pozzo, Lilo D.

    2017-03-01

    A new light and sound sensitive nanoemulsion contrast agent is presented. The agents feature a low boiling point liquid perfluorocarbon core and a broad light spectrum absorbing polypyrrole (PPy) polymer shell. The PPy coated nanoemulsions can reversibly convert from liquid to gas phase upon cavitation of the liquid perfluorocarbon core. Cavitation can be initiated using a sufficiently high intensity acoustic pulse or from heat generation due to light absorption from a laser pulse. The emulsions can be made between 150 and 350 nm in diameter and PPy has a broad optical absorption covering both the visible spectrum and extending into the near-infrared spectrum (peak absorption 1053 nm). The size, structure, and optical absorption properties of the PPy coated nanoemulsions were characterized and compared to PPy nanoparticles (no liquid core) using dynamic light scattering, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering. The cavitation threshold and signal intensity were measured as a function of both acoustic pressure and laser fluence. Overlapping simultaneous transmission of an acoustic and laser pulse can significantly reduce the activation energy of the contrast agents to levels lower than optical or acoustic activation alone. We also demonstrate that simultaneous light and sound cavitation of the agents can be used in a new sono-photoacoustic imaging method, which enables greater sensitivity than traditional photoacoustic imaging.

  1. Photoacoustic contrast imaging of biological tissues with nanodiamonds fabricated for high near-infrared absorbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Su, Long-Jyun; Ren, Shenqiang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Yang, Xinmai; Forrest, M Laird

    2013-02-01

    Radiation-damaged nanodiamonds (DNDs) are potentially ideal optical contrast agents for photoacoustic (PA) imaging in biological tissues due to their low toxicity and high optical absorbance. PA imaging contrast agents have been limited to quantum dots and gold particles, since most existing carbon-based nanoparticles, including fluorescent nanodiamonds, do not have sufficient optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) range. A new DND by He+ ion beam irradiation with very high NIR absorption was synthesized. These DNDs produced a 71-fold higher PA signal on a molar basis than similarly dimensioned gold nanorods, and 7.1 fmol of DNDs injected into rodents could be clearly imaged 3 mm below the skin surface with PA signal enhancement of 567% using an 820-nm laser wavelength.

  2. The state of the art in breast imaging using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope: results from 31 measurements on malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; van den Engh, F.M.; van der Schaaf, M.; Klaase, J.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Photoacoustic mammography is potentially an ideal technique, however, the amount of patient data is limited. To further our understanding of the in vivo performance of the method and to guide further research and development, we imaged 33 breast malignancies using the research system –

  3. Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Ex-vivo Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Vikram S; Chinni, Bhargava K; Valluru, Keerthi S; Joseph, Jean V; Ghazi, Ahmed; Yao, Jorge L; Evans, Katie; Messing, Edward M; Rao, Navalgund A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate if ex-vivo multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal human prostate tissue. Institutional Review Board's approval was obtained for this study. A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent. Multispectral PA imaging was performed on surgically excised prostate tissue and chromophore images that represent optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin (dHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure is completed, malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate regions were marked by the genitourinary pathologist on histopathology slides and digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained. The histopathology images were co-registered with chromophore images. Region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each ROI were then averaged to determine mean intensities of dHb, HbO2, lipid, and water. Our preliminary results show that there is statistically significant difference in mean intensity of dHb (P imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively. Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

  4. Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser at 1600 nm for photoacoustic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Zeng, Lvming; Chen, Zhongping; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2016-04-01

    We present a nanosecond Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser system operating at 1600 nm with a tunable repetition rate from 100 kHz to 1 MHz. A compact fiber coupled, acousto-optic modulator-based EDF ring cavity was used to generate a nanosecond seed laser at 1600 nm, and a double-cladding EDF based power amplifier was applied to achieve the maximum average power of 250 mW. In addition, 12 ns laser pulses with the maximum pulse energy of 2.4 μJ were obtained at 100 kHz. Furthermore, the Stokes shift by Raman scattering over a 25 km long fiber was measured, indicating that the laser can be potentially used to generate the high repetition rate pulses at the 1.7 μm region. Finally, we detected the photoacoustic signal from a human hair at 200 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 1.2 μJ, which demonstrates that a Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser can be a promising light source for the high speed functional photoacoustic imaging.

  5. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jithin; Willemink, Rene G H; Resink, Steffen; Piras, Daniele; van Hespen, J C G; Slump, Cornelis H; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-31

    We present a 'hybrid' imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of small cross-section placed in the path of the light illuminating the sample. This absorber, which we call a passive element acts as a source of ultrasound. The interaction of ultrasound with the sample can be measured in transmission, using the same ultrasound detector used for photoacoustics. Such measurements are made at various angles around the sample in a CT approach. Images of the ultrasound propagation parameters, attenuation and speed of sound, can be reconstructed by inversion of a measurement model. We validate the method on specially designed phantoms and biological specimens. The obtained images are quantitative in terms of the shape, size, location, and acoustic properties of the examined heterogeneities.

  6. Top orthogonal to bottom electrode (TOBE) 2-D CMUT arrays for 3-D photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Ryan; Sampaleanu, Alexander; Rishi, Deepak; Zemp, Roger

    2014-08-01

    Top orthogonal to bottom electrode (TOBE) capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs) are a new transducer architecture that permits large 2-D arrays to be addressed using row-column addressing. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of 3-D photoacoustic imaging using N laser pulses and N receive channels. We used a synthetic aperture approach to simulate a large 2 X 2 cm array using a smaller die. A hair phantom in an oil immersion medium was excited by a laser, and the received signal was dynamically focused to obtain high-resolution images. We found the TOBE CMUT to have a center frequency of 3.7 MHz with a bandwidth of 3.9 MHz. Lateral and axial resolutions were 866 ¿m and 296 μm, respectively.

  7. Cytotoxic Induction and Photoacoustic Imaging of Breast Cancer Cells Using Astaxanthin-Reduced Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniyan Bharathiraja

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a kind of photosynthetic pigment, was employed for gold nanoparticle formation. Nanoparticles were characterized using Ulteraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction, and the possible presence of astaxanthin functional groups were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The cytotoxic effect of synthesized nanoparticles was evaluated against MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer cells using a tetrazolium-based assay, and synthesized nanoparticles exhibited dose-dependent toxicity. The morphology upon cell death was differentiated through fluorescent microscopy using different stains that predicted apoptosis. The synthesized nanoparticles were applied in ultrasound-coupled photoacoustic imaging to obtain good images of treated cells. Astaxanthin-reduced gold nanoparticle has the potential to act as a promising agent in the field of photo-based diagnosis and therapy.

  8. In vivo tumor detection with combined MR–Photoacoustic-Thermoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a new method using combined magnetic resonance (MR–Photoacoustic (PA–Thermoacoustic (TA imaging techniques, and demonstrate its unique ability for in vivo cancer detection using tumor-bearing mice. Circular scanning TA and PA imaging systems were used to recover the dielectric and optical property distributions of three colon carcinoma bearing mice While a 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI unit with a mouse body volume coil was utilized for high resolution structural imaging of the same mice. Three plastic tubes filled with soybean sauce were used as fiducial markers for the co-registration of MR, PA and TA images. The resulting fused images provided both enhanced tumor margin and contrast relative to the surrounding normal tissues. In particular, some finger-like protrusions extending into the surrounding tissues were revealed in the MR/TA infused images. These results show that the tissue functional optical and dielectric properties provided by PA and TA images along with the anatomical structure by MRI in one picture make accurate tumor identification easier. This combined MR–PA–TA-imaging strategy has the potential to offer a clinically useful triple-modality tool for accurate cancer detection and for intraoperative surgical navigation.

  9. Indocyanine Green-Labeled Polysarcosine for in Vivo Photoacoustic Tumor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kohei; Ohashi, Manami; Kanazaki, Kengo; Makino, Akira; Ding, Ning; Deguchi, Jun; Kanada, Yuko; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2017-04-19

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been considered an attractive imaging modality for sensitive and in-depth imaging of biomolecules with a high resolution in vivo. PA imaging probes utilizing fluorescence dyes, including indocyanine green (ICG), have been proposed to enhance PA signal intensity. On the other hand, nanomicelles modified with polysarcosine (PSar), a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer, on their surface have previously achieved rapid tumor uptake, suggesting active transport of PSar into tumor tissues. Thus, we hypothesized that PSar-based materials might be utilized as diagnostic probes for targeting tumors and therefore evaluated the potential of PSar labeled with an ICG derivative, ICG-PSar, as a PA imaging probe for targeting cancer. In this study, ICG-PSars with differing molecular weights (10, 20, and 30 kDa) were synthesized. In vitro cellular uptake studies using ICG-PSar demonstrated rapid uptake in colon26 tumor cells partially via macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis. In vivo fluorescence imaging and biodistribution study indicated that ICG-PSar30k exhibited high accumulation in the tumor (8.4% dose/g), with high tumor-to-blood ratios reaching 4.6 at 24 h post injection of the probe. Finally, in vivo PA imaging studies showed that PA signal increased in tumors (251%) but not in blood vessels, achieving high contrast tumor imaging at 24 h after ICG-PSar30k probe injection. These results suggest that ICG-PSar has potential as a tumor-targeting PA imaging probe.

  10. Development of a research protocol for neurological disease using ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging; Desenvolvimento de um protocolo de investigacao de doencas neurologicas utilizando imagens de ultrassonografia e fotoacustica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, D.R.T; Carneiro, A.A.O.; Pavan, T.Z. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2015-04-15

    Neurological studies, for example, an investigation of hydrocephalus depends on the diagnostic tool used to determine the dimensions of the brain cavities. For this purpose, many studies have been used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); however, this technique is expensive, which sometimes restricts research. Another way to investigate hydrocephalus is using conventional ultrasound that produces images based on the anatomical acoustic impedance difference, providing measurements of the neurological structures size. In addition, a technique that has gained relevance in biomedical scope is called photoacoustic imaging (PA), which consists in an anatomical image based on the optical contrast, allowing differentiate tissue by optical absorption and ultrasonic waves scattering. In order to continue the development of ultrasonic techniques, we present here a protocol using conventional ultrasound and PA imaging techniques focused to provide information for neurological research. We proposed a configuration for both, conventional and FA, which acquires data in RAW format. Then we use brains post-mortem of mice as a target. The collected data was processed into B-mode images and rendered in a 3D volume. This process permitted to measure the volume of intraventricular liquid. (author)

  11. Fabricating multifunctional microbubbles and nanobubbles for concurrent ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ruogu; Xu, Jeff; Xu, Ronald; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Background: Clinical ultrasound (US) uses ultrasonic scattering contrast to characterize subcutaneous anatomic structures. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging detects the functional properties of thick biological tissue with high optical contrast. In the case of image-guided cancer ablation therapy, simultaneous US and PA imaging can be useful for intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries and ablation margins. In this regard, accurate co-registration between imaging modalities and high sensitivity to cancer cells are important. Methods: We synthesized poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microbubbles (MBs) and nanobubbles (NBs) encapsulating India ink or indocyanine green (ICG). Multiple tumor simulators were fabricated by entrapping ink MBs or NBs at various concentrations in gelatin phantoms for simultaneous US and PA imaging. MBs and NBs were also conjugated with CC49 antibody to target TAG-72, a human glycoprotein complex expressed in many epithelial-derived cancers. Results: Accurate co-registration and intensity correlation were observed in US and PA images of MB and NB tumor simulators. MBs and NBs conjugating with CC49 effectively bound with over-expressed TAG-72 in LS174T colon cancer cell cultures. ICG was also encapsulated in MBs and NBs for the potential to integrate US, PA, and fluorescence imaging. Conclusions: Multifunctional MBs and NBs can be potentially used as a general contrast agent for multimodal intraoperative imaging of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins.

  12. Aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ke; Zeng, Jianfeng; Jing, Lihong; Qiao, Ruirui; Liu, Chunyan; Jiao, Mingxia; Li, Zhen; Gao, Mingyuan

    2015-06-01

    By integrating high imaging sensitivity and high resolution in a single modality, photoacoustic (PA) imaging emerges as a promising diagnostic tool for clinical applications. Benefiting from the absorption in the near-infrared region (NIR), copper sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) as a contrast agent are potentially useful for increasing the sensitivity of PA imaging. However, the aqueous synthesis of size-tunable, biocompatible and colloidally stable copper sulfide NPs remains challenging due to the intrinsic dipole-dipole interactions among particles. In this work, aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide NPs with controllable size between 3 and 7 nm was developed. The particle size-dependent contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs for PA imaging was carefully studied both in vitro and in vivo. Although the contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs is proportional to particle size, the in vivo studies revealed that copper sulfide NPs smaller than 5 nm presented higher tumor imaging performance, especially at the tumor boundary site, which was further discussed in combination with the pharmacokinetic behaviors of differently sized particles.By integrating high imaging sensitivity and high resolution in a single modality, photoacoustic (PA) imaging emerges as a promising diagnostic tool for clinical applications. Benefiting from the absorption in the near-infrared region (NIR), copper sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) as a contrast agent are potentially useful for increasing the sensitivity of PA imaging. However, the aqueous synthesis of size-tunable, biocompatible and colloidally stable copper sulfide NPs remains challenging due to the intrinsic dipole-dipole interactions among particles. In this work, aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide NPs with controllable size between 3 and 7 nm was developed. The particle size-dependent contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs for PA imaging was carefully studied both in vitro and in

  13. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison.

  14. Photoacoustic signal amplification through plasmonic nanoparticle aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Carolyn L.; Nam, Seung Yun; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, using targeted plasmonic metallic nanoparticles, is a promising noninvasive molecular imaging method. Analysis of the photoacoustic signal generated by plasmonic metallic nanoparticles is complex because of the dependence upon physical properties of both the nanoparticle and the surrounding environment. We studied the effect of the aggregation of gold nanoparticles on the photoacoustic signal amplitude. We found that the photoacoustic signal from aggregated silica-coate...

  15. Introduction: feature issue on In Vivo Microcirculation Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Andrew K.; Leitgeb, Rainer; Wang, Ruikang K.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2011-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, “In Vivo Microcirculation Imaging,” which includes 14 contributions from the biomedical optics community, covering such imaging techniques as optical coherence tomography, photoacoustic microscopy, laser Doppler /speckle imaging, and near infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging.

  16. Possibility of transrectal photoacoustic imaging-guided biopsy for detection of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Miya; Shinchi, Masayuki; Horiguchi, Akio; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Asano, Tomohiko

    2017-03-01

    A transrectral ultrasonography (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy is mandatory for histological diagnosis in patients with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but its diagnostic accuracy is not satisfactory; therefore, a considerable number of patients are forced to have an unnecessary repeated biopsy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has the ability to visualize the distribution of hemoglobin clearly. Thus, there is the potential to acquire different maps of small vessel networks between cancerous and normal tissue. We developed an original TRUS-type PA probe consisting of a microconvex array transducer with an optical illumination system providing coregistered PA and ultrasound images. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the clinical possibility of a transrectral PA image. The prostate biopsy cores obtained by transrectal systemic biopsies under TRUS guidance were stained with HE staining and anti-CD34 antibodies as a marker of the endothelium of the blood vessel in order to find a pattern in the map of a small vessel network, which allows for imaging-based identification of prostate cancer. We analyzed the association of PA signal patterns, the cancer location by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, and the pathological diagnosis with CD34 stains as a prospective intervention study. In order to demonstrate the TRUS-merged-with-PA imaging guided targeted biopsy combined with a standard biopsy for capturing the clinically significant tumors, we developed a puncture needle guide attachment for the original TRUS-type PA probe.

  17. In vivo rat deep brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Hu, Peng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    The brain has been likened to a great stretch of unknown territory consisting of a number of unexplored continents. Small animal brain imaging plays an important role charting that territory. By using 1064 nm illumination from the side, we imaged the full coronal depth of rat brains in vivo. The experiment was performed using a real-time full-ring-array photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) imaging system, which achieved an imaging depth of 11 mm and a 100 μm radial resolution. Because of the fast imaging speed of the full-ring-array PACT system, no animal motion artifact was induced. The frame rate of the system was limited by the laser repetition rate (50 Hz). In addition to anatomical imaging of the blood vessels in the brain, we continuously monitored correlations between the two brain hemispheres in one of the coronal planes. The resting states in the coronal plane were measured before and after stroke ligation surgery at a neck artery.

  18. Laser speckle contrast imaging in biomedical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, David A; Dunn, Andrew K

    2010-01-01

    First introduced in the 1980s, laser speckle contrast imaging is a powerful tool for full-field imaging of blood flow. Recently laser speckle contrast imaging has gained increased attention, in part due to its rapid adoption for blood flow studies in the brain. We review the underlying physics of speckle contrast imaging and discuss recent developments to improve the quantitative accuracy of blood flow measures. We also review applications of laser speckle contrast imaging in neuroscience, dermatology and ophthalmology.

  19. A robust pointer segmentation in biomedical images toward building a visual ontology for biomedical article retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Daekeun; Simpson, Matthew; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Pointers (arrows and symbols) are frequently used in biomedical images to highlight specific image regions of interest (ROIs) that are mentioned in figure captions and/or text discussion. Detection of pointers is the first step toward extracting relevant visual features from ROIs and combining them with textual descriptions for a multimodal (text and image) biomedical article retrieval system. Recently we developed a pointer recognition algorithm based on an edge-based pointer segmentation method, and subsequently reported improvements made on our initial approach involving the use of Active Shape Models (ASM) for pointer recognition and region growing-based method for pointer segmentation. These methods contributed to improving the recall of pointer recognition but not much to the precision. The method discussed in this article is our recent effort to improve the precision rate. Evaluation performed on two datasets and compared with other pointer segmentation methods show significantly improved precision and the highest F1 score.

  20. Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging to monitor ocular stem cell delivery and tissue regeneration (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubelick, Kelsey; Snider, Eric; Yoon, Heechul; Ethier, C. Ross; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2017-03-01

    Glaucoma is associated with dysfunction of the trabecular meshwork (TM), a fluid drainage tissue in the anterior eye. A promising treatment involves delivery of stem cells to the TM to restore tissue function. Currently histology is the gold standard for tracking stem cell delivery and differentiation. To expedite clinical translation, non-invasive longitudinal monitoring in vivo is desired. Our current research explores a technique combining ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to track mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after intraocular injection. Adipose-derived MSCs were incubated with gold nanospheres to label cells (AuNS-MSCs) for PA imaging. Successful labeling was first verified with in vitro phantom studies. Next, MSC delivery was imaged ex vivo in porcine eyes, while intraocular pressure was hydrostatically clamped to maintain a physiological flow rate through the TM. US/PA imaging was performed before, during, and after AuNS-MSC delivery. Additionally, spectroscopic PA imaging was implemented to isolate PA signals from AuNS-MSCs. In vitro cell imaging showed AuNS-MSCs produce strong PA signals, suggesting that MSCs can be tracked using PA imaging. While the cornea, sclera, iris, and TM region can be visualized with US imaging, pigmented tissues also produce PA signals. Both modalities provide valuable anatomical landmarks for MSC localization. During delivery, PA imaging can visualize AuNS-MSC motion and location, creating a unique opportunity to guide ocular cell delivery. Lastly, distinct spectral signatures of AuNS-MSCs allow unmixing, with potential for quantitative PA imaging. In conclusion, results show proof-of-concept for monitoring MSC ocular delivery, raising opportunities for in vivo image-guided cell delivery.

  1. Pixel based focusing for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Changhan; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Chang, Jin Ho

    2014-12-01

    It is desired that the same imaging functional modules such as beamformation, envelope detection, and digital scan conversion (DSC) are employed for the efficient development of a cross-sectional photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual-modality imaging system. The beamformation can be implemented using either delay-and-sum beamforming (DAS-BF) or adaptive beamforming methods, each with their own advantages and disadvantages for the dual-modality imaging. However, the DSC is always problematic because it causes blurring the fine details of an image, e.g., edges. This paper demonstrates that the pixel based focusing method is suitable for the dual-modality imaging; beamformation is directly conducted on each display pixel and thus DSC is not necessary. As a result, the artifacts by DSC are no longer a problem, so that the proposed method is capable of providing the maximum spatial resolution achievable by DAS-BF. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated through simulation and ex vivo experiments with a microcalcification-contained breast specimen, and the results were compared with those from DAS-BF and adaptive beamforming methods with DSC. The comparison demonstrated that the proposed method effectively overcomes the disadvantages of each beamforming method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Resting-state functional connectivity imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Q.; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) imaging is an emerging neuroimaging approach that aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RSFC is altered in brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. However, conventional neuroimaging modalities cannot easily be applied to mice, the most widely used model species for human brain disease studies. For instance, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mice requires a very high magnetic field to obtain a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Functional connectivity mapping with optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) is an alternative method. Due to the diffusion of light in tissue, the spatial resolution of fcOIS is limited, and experiments have been performed using an exposed skull preparation. In this study, we show for the first time, the use of photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) to noninvasively image resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight regions, as well as several subregions. These findings agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. This study showed that PACT is a promising, non-invasive modality for small-animal functional brain imaging.

  3. Blanket illumination vs scanned-mosaicking imaging schemes for wide-area photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Quinn; Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2015-03-01

    We compare scanned-mosaicking and blanket illumination schemes for wide-field photoacoustic tomography with potential applications to breast imaging. For each illumination, a locally high-SNR image patch is reconstructed then mosaicked with image patches from other illuminations. Because the beam is not diffused over the entire area, the fluence of the beam can be maximized, therefore maximizing the signal generated. Moreover, the imaging can potentially still be done fast enough within a breath-hold. A Monte Carlo simulation as a function of beam-spot size and depth is performed to quantify this signal gain. We experimentally test both schemes using a 256-element Imasonic ring array on a tissue-mimicking phantom. We were able to verify the simulated signal gain of 2.9x under 0.5 cm of tissue with the experimental data, and measured the signal gain decrease expected when imaging deeper into the tissue. We also measured the effectiveness of averaging the diffused beam versus the scanned-mosaicking approach, and observed that for the same scan times and limited laser power output, scanned-mosaicking was able to produce a higher SNR than the blanket illumination approach. We have shown that this technique will allow wide-area PAT to utilize the maximum SNR available from any system while minimizing the number of acquisitions to reach this SNR.

  4. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  5. Broadband Absorbing Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles for Photoacoustic Imaging in Second Near-Infrared Window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuyan; Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Xie, Chen; Lyu, Yan; Zhang, Lulu; Xiong, Qihua; Pramanik, Manojit; Pu, Kanyi

    2017-08-09

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging holds great promise for preclinical research and clinical practice. However, most studies rely on the laser wavelength in the first near-infrared (NIR) window (NIR-I, 650-950 nm), while few studies have been exploited in the second NIR window (NIR-II, 1000-1700 nm), mainly due to the lack of NIR-II absorbing contrast agents. We herein report the synthesis of a broadband absorbing PA contrast agent based on semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPN-II) and apply it for PA imaging in NIR-II window. SPN-II can absorb in both NIR-I and NIR-II regions, providing the feasibility to directly compare PA imaging at 750 nm with that at 1064 nm. Because of the weaker background PA signals from biological tissues in NIR-II window, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of SPN-II resulted PA images at 1064 nm can be 1.4-times higher than that at 750 nm when comparing at the imaging depth of 3 cm. The proof-of-concept application of NIR-II PA imaging is demonstrated in in vivo imaging of brain vasculature in living rats, which showed 1.5-times higher SNR as compared with NIR-I PA imaging. Our study not only introduces the first broadband absorbing organic contrast agent that is applicable for PA imaging in both NIR-I and NIR-II windows but also reveals the advantages of NIR-II over NIR-I in PA imaging.

  6. Preparation and biological evaluation of multifunctional PLGA-nanoparticles designed for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Yvonne; Kaiser, Christian; Bost, Wolfgang; Stracke, Frank; Fournelle, Marc; Wischke, Christian; Thielecke, Hagen; Lendlein, Andreas; Kratz, Karl; Lemor, Robert

    2011-04-01

    Nanoparticulate contrast agents for molecular imaging have attracted widespread interest for diagnostic applications with high resolution in medicine. Here we introduce polymer-based multifunctional nanoparticles exhibiting a near-infrared absorption in the range of the Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 1064 nm as a novel resorbable photoacoustic (PA) contrast system and report about their biological evaluation. Submicron-sized spherical nanoparticles with a high encapsulation efficiency (>87%) were created by incorporation of near-infrared dyes (IR5/IR26) in poly[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] (PLGA) with 50 mol% glycolide content via a specific spray-drying process in good yield (>75%). Subsequent application of a centrifugation protocol produced two different size fractions with diameters in the ranges 445-540 nm and 253-305 nm; these were further used for investigation of PA properties and cytotoxic effects. The prepared PLGA nanoparticles exhibited PA properties using a Nd:YAG laser-based system. After exposure of particle concentrations up to 10 μg·ml(-1) for 2 days no effects on viability, mitochondrial activity and proliferation, and cell death of human hepatocarcinoma cells and monkey kidney cells were observed. The excellent PA properties in combination with the positive biological results qualify the dye-loaded PLGA particles as promising candidates for a resorbable PA contrast system. Photoacoustics (PA), a new modality, in which laser light is shined into tissue and absorbed by inherent proteins or synthetic particles is reflected back and received as ultrasound. This technique was shown to be effective with an erodible polymer particle containing near infrared dyes. In vitro, the PA properties of the PLGA particles persisted for 2 days in cell culture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A numerical analysis of a semi-dry coupling configuration in photoacoustic computed tomography for infant brain imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najme Meimani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the application of photoacoustic human infant brain imaging, debubbled ultrasound gel or water is commonly used as a couplant for ultrasonic transducers due to their acoustic properties. The main challenge in using such a couplant is its discomfort for the patient. In this study, we explore the feasibility of a semi-dry coupling configuration to be used in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT systems. The coupling system includes an inflatable container consisting of a thin layer of Aqualene with ultrasound gel or water inside of it. Finite element method (FEM is used for static and dynamic structural analysis of the proposed configuration to be used in PACT for infant brain imaging. The outcome of the analysis is an optimum thickness of Aqualene in order to meet the weight tolerance requirement with the least attenuation and best impedance match to recommend for an experimental setting.

  8. Photoacoustic imaging of intestinal strictures: microscopic and macroscopic assessment in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Lei, Hao; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Qifa; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2017-03-01

    The pathology of Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by obstructing intestinal strictures because of inflammation (with high levels of hemoglobin), fibrosis (high levels of collagen), or a combination of both. Inflammatory strictures are medically treated. Fibrotic strictures have to be removed surgically. The accurate characterization of the strictures is therefore critical for the management of CD. Currently the comprehensive assessment of a stricture is difficult, as the standard diagnostic procedure, endoscopic biopsy, is superficial and with limited locations as well as depth. In our previous studies, photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recovered the layered architectures and the relative content of the molecular components in human and animal tissues ex vivo. This study will investigate the capability of multispectral PAI in resolving the architecture and the molecular components of intestinal strictures in rats in vivo. PA images at 532, 1210 and 1310 nm targeting the strong optical absorption of hemoglobin, lipid and collagen were acquired using two approaches. A compact linear array, CL15-7, was used to transcutaneously acquire PA signals generated by the a fiber optics diffuser positioned within the inner lumen of the strictures. Another approach was to use an endoscopic capsule probe for acoustic resolution PA microscopy. The capsule probe is designed for human and therefore cannot fit into rat colon. The inner surface of the intestinal stricture was exposed and the probe was attached to the diseased location for imaging. The findings in PA images were confirmed by histology results.

  9. Biomedical Imaging and Computational Modeling in Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Iacoviello, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This book collects the state-of-art and new trends in image analysis and biomechanics. It covers a wide field of scientific and cultural topics, ranging from remodeling of bone tissue under the mechanical stimulus up to optimizing the performance of sports equipment, through the patient-specific modeling in orthopedics, microtomography and its application in oral and implant research, computational modeling in the field of hip prostheses, image based model development and analysis of the human knee joint, kinematics of the hip joint, micro-scale analysis of compositional and mechanical properties of dentin, automated techniques for cervical cell image analysis, and iomedical imaging and computational modeling in cardiovascular disease.   The book will be of interest to researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to image analysis and understanding, medical imaging, biomechanics, simulation and modeling, experimental analysis.

  10. Photoacoustic radar phase-filtered spatial resolution and co-registered ultrasound image enhancement for tumor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas; Shi, Wei; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-03-01

    Co-registered ultrasound (US) and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) imaging is reported for the first time in this paper. The merits of ultrasound and cross-correlation (radar) frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging are leveraged for accurate tumor detection. Commercial US imagers possess sophisticated, optimized software for rapid image acquisition that could dramatically speed-up PA imaging. The PAR image generated from the amplitude of the cross-correlation between detected and input signals was filtered by the standard deviation (SD) of the phase of the correlation signal, resulting in strong improvement of image spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. Application of phase-mediated image improvement is illustrated by imaging a cancer cell-injected mouse. A 14-15 dB SNR gain was recorded for the phase-filtered image compared to the amplitude and phase independently, while ~340 μm spatial resolution was seen for the phase PAR image compared to ~840 μm for the amplitude image.

  11. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging system facilitated with graphics processing unit and code parallel optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Carson, Paul L; Wang, Xueding; Liu, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with highly sensitive optical absorption contrast and excellent spatial resolution comparable to medical ultrasound (US) imaging. We report the development of a fully integrated PAT and US dual-modality imaging system, which performs signal scanning, image reconstruction, and display for both photoacoustic (PA) and US imaging all in a truly real-time manner. The back-projection (BP) algorithm for PA image reconstruction is optimized to reduce the computational cost and facilitate parallel computation on a state of the art graphics processing unit (GPU) card. For the first time, PAT and US imaging of the same object can be conducted simultaneously and continuously, at a real-time frame rate, presently limited by the laser repetition rate of 10 Hz. Noninvasive PAT and US imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo were achieved, demonstrating the satisfactory image quality realized with this system. Another experiment, simultaneous PAT and US imaging of contrast agent flowing through an artificial vessel, was conducted to verify the performance of this system for imaging fast biological events. The GPU-based image reconstruction software code for this dual-modality system is open source and available for download from http://sourceforge.net/projects/patrealtime.

  12. Ultrasmall lanthanide oxide nanoparticles for biomedical imaging and therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Gang Ho

    2014-01-01

    Most books discuss general and broad topics regarding molecular imagings. However, Ultrasmall Lanthanide Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Imaging and Therapy, will mainly focus on lanthanide oxide nanoparticles for molecular imaging and therapeutics. Multi-modal imaging capabilities will discussed, along with up-converting FI by using lanthanide oxide nanoparticles. The synthesis will cover polyol synthesis of lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Surface coatings with biocompatible and hydrophilic ligands will be discussed and TEM images and dynamic light scattering (DLS) patterns will be

  13. Linear-Array Photoacoustic Imaging Using Minimum Variance-Based Delay Multiply and Sum Adaptive Beamforming Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Kratkiewicz, Karl; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    In Photoacoustic imaging (PA), Delay-and-Sum (DAS) beamformer is a common beamforming algorithm having a simple implementation. However, it results in a poor resolution and high sidelobes. To address these challenges, a new algorithm namely Delay-Multiply-and-Sum (DMAS) was introduced having lower sidelobes compared to DAS. To improve the resolution of DMAS, a novel beamformer is introduced using Minimum Variance (MV) adaptive beamforming combined with DMAS, so-called Minimum Variance-Based D...

  14. pH-Responsive Fe(III)-Gallic Acid Nanoparticles for In Vivo Photoacoustic-Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Yong; Wen, Ling; Chen, Ling; Li, Zhen; Wu, Yongyou; Gao, Mingyuan; Chai, Zhifang

    2016-04-06

    pH-responsive biocompatible Fe(III)-gallic acid nanoparticles with strong near-infrared absorbance are very stable in mild acidic conditions, but easily decomposed in neutral conditions, which enables the nanoparticles to be stable in a tumor and easily metabolized in other organs, thus providing a safe nanoplatform for in vivo photoacoustic imaging/photothermal therapy theranostic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Applications of Micro-Raman Imaging in Biomedical Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Duindam, J.J.; Duindam, J.J.; Sijtsema, N.M.; Greve, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Recent results are presented of the application of imaging micro-Raman spectrometers in cellular biophysics and biomedical research. Various micro-Raman spectrometers have been developed that are now routinely applied in these fields. Results are presented that were obtained with a linescan Raman

  16. Double-Stage Delay Multiply and Sum Beamforming Algorithm: Application to Linear-Array Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging medical imaging modality capable of providing high spatial resolution of Ultrasound (US) imaging and high contrast of optical imaging. Delay-and-Sum (DAS) is the most common beamforming algorithm in PAI. However, using DAS beamformer leads to low resolution images and considerable contribution of off-axis signals. A new paradigm namely delay-multiply-and-sum (DMAS), which was originally used as a reconstruction algorithm in confocal microwave imaging, was introduced to overcome the challenges in DAS. DMAS was used in PAI systems and it was shown that this algorithm results in resolution improvement and sidelobe degrading. However, DMAS is still sensitive to high levels of noise, and resolution improvement is not satisfying. Here, we propose a novel algorithm based on DAS algebra inside DMAS formula expansion, double stage DMAS (DS-DMAS), which improves the image resolution and levels of sidelobe, and is much less sensitive to high level of noise compared to DMAS. The performance of DS-DMAS algorithm is evaluated numerically and experimentally. The resulted images are evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using established quality metrics including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) and contrast ratio (CR). It is shown that DS-DMAS outperforms DAS and DMAS at the expense of higher computational load. DS-DMAS reduces the lateral valley for about 15 dB and improves the SNR and FWHM better than 13% and 30%, respectively. Moreover, the levels of sidelobe are reduced for about 10 dB in comparison with those in DMAS.

  17. One-pot synthesis of gold nanostars using plant polyphenols for cancer photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zheng, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Huang-Hao; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Branched plasmonic nanostructures have been found to exhibit strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field surrounding their multi-branched petals. This feature endows them with improved performance in catalysis, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, photoacoustic imaging, and photothermal therapy. Albeit several synthesis techniques have been developed, the precisely controlled growth of highly branched nanostructures with a one-pot surfactant-free procedure is still challenging. Herein, we present a simple seedless route to synthesize gold nanostars (AuNSs) using a natural plant polyphenol, gallic acid (GA), as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The size and shape of AuNSs can be tuned by simply adjusting the amount of added GA. Under the optimum condition, the as-prepared AuNSs with diameters about 100 nm exhibit strong near-infrared absorption, good photothermal efficiency, and high biocompatibility. We demonstrate that AuNSs can be utilized for simultaneous photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy in living cancer cells. This study highlights facile synthesized AuNSs could serve as a promising platform for cancer diagnosis and therapy.Graphical AbstractGold nanostars (AuNSs) are synthesized by a simple seedless route using a natural plant polyphenol, gallic acid (GA), as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The AuNSs can be utilized for simultaneous photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy in living cancer cells. This study highlights facile synthesized AuNSs could serve as a promising platform for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  18. One-pot synthesis of gold nanostars using plant polyphenols for cancer photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Long [Mengchao Hepatobiliary Hospital of Fujian Medical University, The United Innovation of Mengchao Hepatobiliary Technology Key Laboratory of Fujian Province (China); Zheng, Cheng [Fuzhou University, The Key Lab of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety of the MOE, College of Chemistry (China); Zhang, Yun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen Institute of Rare Earth Materials, Haixi Institute (China); Yang, Huang-Hao [Fuzhou University, The Key Lab of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety of the MOE, College of Chemistry (China); Liu, Xiaolong, E-mail: xiaoloong.liu@gmail.com; Liu, Jingfeng, E-mail: drjingfeng@126.com [Mengchao Hepatobiliary Hospital of Fujian Medical University, The United Innovation of Mengchao Hepatobiliary Technology Key Laboratory of Fujian Province (China)

    2016-07-15

    Branched plasmonic nanostructures have been found to exhibit strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field surrounding their multi-branched petals. This feature endows them with improved performance in catalysis, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, photoacoustic imaging, and photothermal therapy. Albeit several synthesis techniques have been developed, the precisely controlled growth of highly branched nanostructures with a one-pot surfactant-free procedure is still challenging. Herein, we present a simple seedless route to synthesize gold nanostars (AuNSs) using a natural plant polyphenol, gallic acid (GA), as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The size and shape of AuNSs can be tuned by simply adjusting the amount of added GA. Under the optimum condition, the as-prepared AuNSs with diameters about 100 nm exhibit strong near-infrared absorption, good photothermal efficiency, and high biocompatibility. We demonstrate that AuNSs can be utilized for simultaneous photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy in living cancer cells. This study highlights facile synthesized AuNSs could serve as a promising platform for cancer diagnosis and therapy.Graphical AbstractGold nanostars (AuNSs) are synthesized by a simple seedless route using a natural plant polyphenol, gallic acid (GA), as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The AuNSs can be utilized for simultaneous photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy in living cancer cells. This study highlights facile synthesized AuNSs could serve as a promising platform for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Optimization of dual-wavelength intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic plaques using Monte Carlo optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Nicholas; Sowers, Timothy; Karpiouk, Andrei; Vanderlaan, Donald; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2017-10-01

    Coronary heart disease (the presence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques) is a significant health problem in the industrialized world. A clinical method to accurately visualize and characterize atherosclerotic plaques is needed. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is being developed to fill this role, but questions remain regarding optimal imaging wavelengths. We utilized a Monte Carlo optical model to simulate IVPA excitation in coronary tissues, identifying optimal wavelengths for plaque characterization. Near-infrared wavelengths (≤1800 nm) were simulated, and single- and dual-wavelength data were analyzed for accuracy of plaque characterization. Results indicate light penetration is best in the range of 1050 to 1370 nm, where 5% residual fluence can be achieved at clinically relevant depths of ≥2 mm in arteries. Across the arterial wall, fluence may vary by over 10-fold, confounding plaque characterization. For single-wavelength results, plaque segmentation accuracy peaked at 1210 and 1720 nm, though correlation was poor (primary wavelength (≈1.0). Results suggest that, without flushing the luminal blood, a primary and secondary wavelength near 1210 and 1350 nm, respectively, may offer the best implementation of dual-wavelength IVPA imaging. These findings could guide the development of a cost-effective clinical system by highlighting optimal wavelengths and improving plaque characterization.

  20. Optical and photoacoustic dual-modality imaging guided synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuefeng; Hu, Hao; Lin, Jing; Jin, Albert J.; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Shaoliang; Huang, Peng; Shen, Baozhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Phototherapies such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT), due to their specific spatiotemporal selectivity and minimal invasiveness, have been widely investigated as alternative treatments of malignant diseases. Graphene and its derivatives not only have been used as carriers to deliver photosensitizers for PDT, but also as photothermal conversion agents (PTCAs) for PTT. Herein, we strategically designed and produced a novel photo-theranostic platform based on sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS) photosensitizer-loaded PEGylated graphene oxide (GO-PEG-DVDMS) for enhanced fluorescence/photoacoustic (PA) dual-modal imaging and combined PDT and PTT. The GO-PEG carrier drastically improves the fluorescence of loaded DVDMS via intramolecular charge transfer. Concurrently, DVDMS significantly enhances the near-infrared (NIR) absorption of GO for improved PA imaging and PTT. The cancer theranostic capability of the as-prepared GO-PEG-DVDMS was carefully investigated both in vitro and in vivo. This novel theranostics is well suited for fluorescence/PA dual-modal imaging and synergistic PDT/PTT.

  1. Imaging and detection of early stage dental caries with an all-optical photoacoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D. A.; Sampathkumar, A.; Longbottom, C.; Kirk, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth decay, at its earliest stages, manifests itself as small, white, subsurface lesions in the enamel. Current methods for detection in the dental clinic are visual and tactile investigations, and bite-wing X-ray radiographs. These techniques suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease due to the small size (tooth decay. Ex-vivo tooth samples exhibiting white spot lesions were scanned and were found to generate a larger (one order of magnitude) photoacoustic (PA) signal in the lesion regions compared to healthy enamel. The high contrast in the PA images potentially allows lesions to be imaged and measured at a much earlier stage than current clinical techniques allow. PA images were cross referenced with histology photographs to validate our experimental results. Our PA system provides a noncontact method for early detection of white-spot lesions with a high detection bandwidth that offers advantages over previously demonstrated ultrasound methods. The technique provides the sensing depth of an ultrasound system, but with the spatial resolution of an optical system.

  2. Quantitative comparison of PZT and CMUT probes for photoacoustic imaging: Experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maëva Vallet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA signals are short ultrasound (US pulses typically characterized by a single-cycle shape, often referred to as N-shape. The spectral content of such wideband signals ranges from a few hundred kilohertz to several tens of megahertz. Typical reception frequency responses of classical piezoelectric US imaging transducers, based on PZT technology, are not sufficiently broadband to fully preserve the entire information contained in PA signals, which are then filtered, thus limiting PA imaging performance. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT are rapidly emerging as a valid alternative to conventional PZT transducers in several medical ultrasound imaging applications. As compared to PZT transducers, CMUTs exhibit both higher sensitivity and significantly broader frequency response in reception, making their use attractive in PA imaging applications. This paper explores the advantages of the CMUT larger bandwidth in PA imaging by carrying out an experimental comparative study using various CMUT and PZT probes from different research laboratories and manufacturers. PA acquisitions are performed on a suture wire and on several home-made bimodal phantoms with both PZT and CMUT probes. Three criteria, based on the evaluation of pure receive impulse response, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR respectively, have been used for a quantitative comparison of imaging results. The measured fractional bandwidths of the CMUT arrays are larger compared to PZT probes. Moreover, both SNR and CNR are enhanced by at least 6 dB with CMUT technology. This work highlights the potential of CMUT technology for PA imaging through qualitative and quantitative parameters.

  3. Quantitative comparison of PZT and CMUT probes for photoacoustic imaging: Experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Maëva; Varray, François; Boutet, Jérôme; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Caliano, Giosuè; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Vray, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) signals are short ultrasound (US) pulses typically characterized by a single-cycle shape, often referred to as N-shape. The spectral content of such wideband signals ranges from a few hundred kilohertz to several tens of megahertz. Typical reception frequency responses of classical piezoelectric US imaging transducers, based on PZT technology, are not sufficiently broadband to fully preserve the entire information contained in PA signals, which are then filtered, thus limiting PA imaging performance. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) are rapidly emerging as a valid alternative to conventional PZT transducers in several medical ultrasound imaging applications. As compared to PZT transducers, CMUTs exhibit both higher sensitivity and significantly broader frequency response in reception, making their use attractive in PA imaging applications. This paper explores the advantages of the CMUT larger bandwidth in PA imaging by carrying out an experimental comparative study using various CMUT and PZT probes from different research laboratories and manufacturers. PA acquisitions are performed on a suture wire and on several home-made bimodal phantoms with both PZT and CMUT probes. Three criteria, based on the evaluation of pure receive impulse response, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) respectively, have been used for a quantitative comparison of imaging results. The measured fractional bandwidths of the CMUT arrays are larger compared to PZT probes. Moreover, both SNR and CNR are enhanced by at least 6 dB with CMUT technology. This work highlights the potential of CMUT technology for PA imaging through qualitative and quantitative parameters.

  4. Backward-Mode Photoacoustic Imaging Using Illumination Through a CMUT With Improved Transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Wu, Xun; Adelegan, Oluwafemi Joel; Yamaner, Feysel Yalcin; Oralkan, Omer

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) with improved transparency for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) with backside illumination. The CMUT was fabricated on a glass substrate with indium-tin oxide bottom electrodes. The plate was a 1.5- silicon layer formed over the glass cavities by anodic bonding, with a 1- silicon nitride passivation layer on top. The fabricated device shows approximately 30%-40% transmission in the wavelength range from 700 to 800 nm and approximately 40%-60% transmission in the wavelength range from 800 to 900 nm, which correspond to the wavelength range commonly used for in vivo PAI. The center frequency of the CMUT was 3.62 MHz in air and 1.4 MHz in immersion. Two preliminary PAI experiments were performed to demonstrate the imaging capability of the fabricated device. The first imaging target was a 0.7-mm diameter pencil lead in vegetable oil as a line target with a subwavelength cross section. A 2-mm-diameter single CMUT element with an optical fiber bundle attached to its backside was linearly scanned to reconstruct a 2-D cross-sectional PA image of the pencil lead. We investigated the spurious signals caused by the light absorption in the 1.5- silicon plate. For pencil lead as a strong absorber and also a strong reflector, the received echo signal due to the acoustic excitation generated by the absorption in silicon is approximately 30 dB lower than the received PA signal generated by the absorption in pencil lead at the wavelength of 830 nm. The second imaging target was a "loop-shape" polyethylene tube filled with indocyanine green solution ( ) suspended using fishing lines in a tissue-mimicking material. We formed a 3-D volumetric image of the phantom by scanning the transducer in the - and -directions. The two experimental imaging results demonstrated that CMUTs with the proposed structure are promising for PAI with backside illumination.

  5. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 μm diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 μm for HFU and 150 μm for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature.

  6. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging of lymph nodes with biocompatible gold nanoparticles as a novel contrast agent (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, In-Cheol; Dumani, Diego; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2017-02-01

    A key step in staging cancer is the diagnosis of metastasis that spreads through lymphatic system. For this reason, researchers develop various methods of sentinel lymph node mapping that often use a radioactive tracer. This study introduces a safe, cost-effective, high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time method of visualizing the sentinel lymph node: ultrasound-guided photoacoustic (US/PA) imaging augmented by a contrast agent. In this work, we use clearable gold nanoparticles covered by a biocompatible polymer (glycol chitosan) to enhance cellular uptake by macrophages abundant in lymph nodes. We incubate macrophages with glycol-chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles (0.05 mg Au/ml), and then fix them with paraformaldehyde solution for an analysis of in vitro dark-field microscopy and cell phantom. The analysis shows enhanced cellular uptake of nanoparticles by macrophages and strong photoacoustic signal from labeled cells in tissue-mimicking cell phantoms consisting gelatin solution (6 %) with silica gel (25 μm, 0.3%) and fixed macrophages (13 X 105 cells). The in-vivo US/PA imaging of cervical lymph nodes in healthy mice (nu/nu, female, 5 weeks) indicates a strong photoacoustic signal from a lymph node 10 minutes post-injection (2.5 mg Au/ml, 80 μl). The signal intensity and the nanoparticle-labeled volume of tissue within the lymph node continues to increase until 4 h post-injection. Histological analysis further confirms the accumulation of gold nanoparticles within the lymph nodes. This work suggests the feasibility of molecular/cellular US/PA imaging with biocompatible gold nanoparticles as a photoacoustic contrast agent in the diagnosis of lymph-node-related diseases.

  7. 76 FR 40922 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-07-12

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  8. 75 FR 57969 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-09-23

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  9. 75 FR 54641 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-09-08

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    2010-02-05

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    2010-04-09

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    2013-07-18

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    2012-05-29

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    2013-04-24

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  15. 75 FR 18216 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-04-09

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  16. 78 FR 63998 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-10-25

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  17. 78 FR 71627 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-11-29

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  18. 77 FR 37684 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-06-22

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  19. 75 FR 25273 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-05-07

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  20. 76 FR 28795 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-18

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  1. 76 FR 28055 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-13

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  2. 76 FR 62814 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-10-11

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  3. 77 FR 38845 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-06-29

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    2010-06-23

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    2011-02-28

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    2011-02-01

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    2013-09-10

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    2011-12-13

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  9. 78 FR 6126 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting.

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    2013-01-29

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  10. 77 FR 3480 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-01-24

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  11. 77 FR 2737 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-01-19

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  12. 77 FR 49821 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-08-17

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  13. 78 FR 58547 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-09-24

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  14. Biomedical image retrieval using microscopic configuration with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G DEEP

    2018-03-10

    Mar 10, 2018 ... uniform if they contain the main part of the noise of the images. A region with no transitions is considered as a background or a flat region of the image. The LBP feature vector is extracted from each cell ..... on a core2 Quad computer with 2.66 GHz, 4 GB of memory and all methods are implemented on the ...

  15. Fluorescent quantum dots: synthesis, biomedical optical imaging, and biosafety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyuan; Peng, Fei; Zhong, Yiling; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The marriage of nanomaterials with biology has significantly promoted advancement of biological techniques, profoundly facilitating basic research and practical applications in biological and biomedical fields. Taking advantages of unique optical properties (e.g., strong fluorescence, robust photostability, size-tunable emission wavelengths, etc.), fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), appearing as high-performance biological fluorescent nanoprobes, have been extensively explored for a variety of biomedical optical imaging applications. In this review, we present representative synthetic strategies for preparation of QDs and their applications in biomedical optical imaging, as well as risk assessments in vitro and in vivo. Briefly, we first summarize recent progress in fabrication of QDs via two rudimentary approaches, i.e., organometallic route and aqueous synthesis. Next we present representative achievement in QDs-based in vitro and in vivo biomedical optical imaging applications. We further discuss the toxicity assessment of QDs, ranging from cell studies to animal models. In the final section, we discuss challenges and perspectives for the QDs-relative bioapplications in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and In Vitro Performance of Polypyrrole-Coated Iron-Platinum Nanoparticles for Photothermal Therapy and Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thi Tuong Vy; Bui, Nhat Quang; Moorthy, Madhappan Santha; Lee, Kang Dae; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-10-01

    Multifunctional nano-platform for the combination of photo-based therapy and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for cancer treatment has recently attracted much attention to nanotechnology development. In this study, we developed iron-platinum nanoparticles (FePt NPs) with the polypyrrole (PPy) coating as novel agents for combined photothermal therapy (PTT) and PAI. The obtained PPy-coated FePt NPs (FePt@PPy NPs) showed excellent biocompatibility, photothermal stability, and high near-infrared (NIR) absorbance for the combination of PTT and PAI. In vitro investigation experimentally demonstrated the effectiveness of FePt@PPy NPs in killing cancer cells with NIR laser irradiation. Moreover, the phantom test of PAI used in conjunction with FePt@PPy NPs showed a strong photoacoustic signal. Thus, the novel FePt@PPy NPs could be considered as promising multifunctional nanoparticles for further applications of photo-based diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Computational optical biomedical spectroscopy and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, Sarhan M

    2015-01-01

    Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging in Personal Care Studies; Guojin Zhang, Roger L. McMullen, Richard Mendelsohn, and Osama M. MusaFluorescence Bioimaging with Applications to Chemistry; Ufana Riaz and S.M. AshrafNew Trends in Immunohistochemical, Genome, and Metabolomics Imaging; G. Livanos, Aditi Deshpande, C. Narayan, Ying Na, T. Quang, T. Farrahi, R. Koglin, Suman Shrestha, M. Zervakis, and George C. GiakosDeveloping a Comprehensive Taxonomy for Human Cell Types; Richard Conroy and Vinay PaiFunctional Near-Infrared S

  18. Coherent fiber supercontinuum laser for nonlinear biomedical imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xiaomin

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear biomedical imaging has not benefited from the well-known techniques of fiber supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, low spectral power intensity, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few techniques involving...... nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond fiber laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. These techniques pave the way for conducting point-of-care nonlinear biomedical imaging by a low-maintenance cost-effective coherent fiber supercontinuum laser, which covers a broad emission...... wavelength of 350-1700 nm. A prototype of this laser has been demonstrated in label-free multimodal nonlinear imaging of cell and tissue samples.© (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only....

  19. Toward Fourier interferometry fluorescence excitation/emission imaging of malignant cells combined with photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Berry, John P.; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Ornek, Ceren; Monti, Marco; Leblanc, Roger M.; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Haroon, Sumaira

    2003-10-01

    Dual excitation fluorescence imaging has been used as a first step towards multi-wavelength excitation/emission fluorescence spectral imaging. Target cells are transformed keratinocytes, and other osteosarcoma, human breast and color cancer cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes, e.g. TMRM (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester), Mitotracker Green (Molecular Probes, Inc., Eugene OR,USA; a recently synthesized mitochondrial oxygen probe, [PRE,P1"- pyrene butyl)-2-rhodamine ester] allow dual excitation in the UV plus in teh blue-green spectral regions. Also, using the natural endogenous probe NAD(P)H, preliminary results indicate mitochondrial responses to metabolic challenges (e.g. glucose addition), plus changes in mitochonrial distribution and morphology. In terms of application to biomedicine (for diagnostiscs, prognostsics and drug trials) three parameters have been selected in addition to the natural probe NAD(P)H, i.e. vital fluorescence probing of mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus. It is hoped that such a multiparameter approach will allow malignant cell characterization and grading. A new area being introduced is the use of similar methodology for biotechnical applications such as the study of the hydrogen-producing alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, and possible agricultural applications, such as Saccharomyces yeast for oenology. Complementation by Photoacoustic Microscopy is also contemplated, to study the internal conversion component which follows the excitation by photons.

  20. Multifunctional BSA-Au nanostars for photoacoustic imaging and X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Lihui; Liu, Lin; Qin, Yeshan; Liu, Hongguang; Yang, Haishan

    2016-10-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bovine serum albumin-capped Au nanostars (BSA-AuNSs) for dual-modal computed tomography (CT)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging application. The BSA-AuNSs have an average size of 85nm, and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak at approximately 770nm. They have excellent biocompatibility, good X-ray attenuation, and great PA contrast enhancement properties. When injected intravenously, liver signal markedly increases in both CT and PA modalities. The in vivo biodistribution studies and pathology results showed that the BSA-AuNSs were mainly excreted through the liver and intestines with no obvious biotoxicity. These results indicate that BSA-AuNSs have high potential to be used as dual-modal CT/PA imaging contrast agents or further used to develop targeted probes. This preliminary study suggests that PA tomography may be used to non-invasively trace the kinetics and biodistribution of the nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging probe for detecting lymph nodes and spreading of cancer at various depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Jae; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Song, Hyun-Woo; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Noh, Hyung Wook; Sim, Joo Yong; Song, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Min Yong; Lee, Susung; Kim, Heewon; Zhang, Meihua; Kim, Bong Kyu

    2017-09-01

    We propose a compact and easy to use photoacoustic imaging (PAI) probe structure using a single strand of optical fiber and a beam combiner doubly reflecting acoustic waves for convenient detection of lymph nodes and cancers. Conventional PAI probes have difficulty detecting lymph nodes just beneath the skin or simultaneously investigating lymph nodes located in shallow as well as deep regions from skin without any supplementary material because the light and acoustic beams are intersecting obliquely in the probe. To overcome the limitations and improve their convenience, we propose a probe structure in which the illuminated light beam axis coincides with the axis of the ultrasound. The developed PAI probe was able to simultaneously achieve a wide range of images positioned from shallow to deep regions without the use of any supplementary material. Moreover, the proposed probe had low transmission losses for the light and acoustic beams. Therefore, the proposed PAI probe will be useful to easily detect lymph nodes and cancers in real clinical fields.

  2. Influence of nanosecond pulsed laser irradiance on the viability of nanoparticle-loaded cells: implications for safety of contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Carolyn L.; Kelvekar, Juili; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-11-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, a promising new diagnostic medical imaging modality, can provide high contrast images of molecular features by introducing highly-absorbing plasmonic nanoparticles. Currently, it is uncertain whether the absorption of low fluence pulsed light by plasmonic nanoparticles could lead to cellular damage. In our studies we have shown that low fluence pulsed laser excitation of accumulated nanoparticles at low concentration does not impact cell growth and viability, while we identify thresholds at which higher nanoparticle concentrations and fluences produce clear evidence of cell death. The results provide insights for improved design of photoacoustic contrast agents and for applications in combined imaging and therapy.

  3. 77 FR 13347 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-03-06

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    2011-12-08

    ... Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of... Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel. Date: January 30-31, 2012. Time... Sukhareva, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  5. 77 FR 27784 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-05-11

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  8. 77 FR 54581 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-09-05

    ... National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section... Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, BTRC P41 Review. Date: October 10... Sukhareva, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  9. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging of a near-infrared fluorescent marker based on dual wavelength pump-probe excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Theiss, Christoph; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has been used to determine the spatial distribution of fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, from images acquired in phantoms and in vivo. Most methods involve the acquisition of multiwavelength images and rely on differences in the absorption spectra of the tissue chromophores to estimate the spatial distribution and abundance of the latter using spectral decomposition techniques, such as model based inversion schemes. However, the inversion of 3-D images can be computationally expensive. Experimental approaches to localising contrast agents may therefore be useful, especially if quantification is not essential. This work aims to develop a method for determining the spatial distribution of a near-infrared fluorescent cell marker from images acquired using dual wavelength excitation. The excitation wavelengths coincided with the absorption and emission spectrum of the fluorophore. The contrast mechanism relies on reducing the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore by inducing stimulated emission. This changes the amount of energy thermalized by the fluorophore, and hence the photoacoustic signal amplitude. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the background may be removed by subtracting two images acquired with and without pulse delay between the pump and probe pulses. To characterise the fluorophore, the signal amplitude is measured in a cuvette as a function of pulse delay, concentration, and fluence. The spatial distribution of the fluorophore is determined from images acquired in realistic tissue phantoms. This method may be suitable for in vivo applications, such as imaging of exogenous or genetically expressed fluorescent cell markers.

  11. All-optical extravascular laser-ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of calcified atherosclerotic plaque in excised carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jami L. Johnson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA imaging may be advantageous as a safe, non-invasive imaging modality to image the carotid artery. However, calcification that accompanies atherosclerotic plaque is difficult to detect with PA due to the non-distinct optical absorption spectrum of hydroxyapatite. We propose reflection-mode all-optical laser-ultrasound (LUS imaging to obtain high-resolution, non-contact, non-ionizing images of the carotid artery wall and calcification. All-optical LUS allows for flexible acquisition geometry and user-dependent data acquisition for high repeatability. We apply all-optical techniques to image an excised human carotid artery. Internal layers of the artery wall, enlargement of the vessel, and calcification are observed with higher resolution and reduced artifacts with nonconfocal LUS compared to confocal LUS. Validation with histology and X-ray computed tomography (CT demonstrates the potential for LUS as a method for non-invasive imaging in the carotid artery. Keywords: Atherosclerosis, Photoacoustic imaging, Laser-ultrasound, Calcification, Reverse-time migration

  12. Visualization and classification in biomedical terahertz pulsed imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, Torsten; Siebert, Karsten; Czasch, Stephanie; Bauer, Tobias; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2002-01-01

    'Visualization' in imaging is the process of extracting useful information from raw data in such a way that meaningful physical contrasts are developed. 'Classification' is the subsequent process of defining parameter ranges which allow us to identify elements of images such as different tissues or different objects. In this paper, we explore techniques for visualization and classification in terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) for biomedical applications. For archived (formalin-fixed, alcohol-dehydrated and paraffin-mounted) test samples, we investigate both time- and frequency-domain methods based on bright- and dark-field TPI. Successful tissue classification is demonstrated

  13. Nanotubes-Embedded Indocyanine Green-Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles for Photoacoustic-Imaging-Guided Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohao; Zhang, Fan; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Liwen; Fu, Guifeng; Yang, Lily; Zhu, Lei

    2016-03-02

    Phototherapy is a light-triggered treatment for tumor ablation and growth inhibition via photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT). Despite extensive studies in this area, a major challenge is the lack of selective and effective phototherapy agents that can specifically accumulate in tumors to reach a therapeutic concentration. Although recent attempts have produced photosensitizers complexed with photothermal nanomaterials, the tedious preparation steps and poor tumor efficiency of therapy still hampers the broad utilization of these nanocarriers. Herein, we developed a CD44 targeted photoacoustic (PA) nanophototherapy agent by conjugating Indocyanine Green (ICG) to hyaluronic acid nanoparticles (HANPs) encapsulated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), resulting in a theranostic nanocomplex of ICG-HANP/SWCNTs (IHANPT). We fully characterized its physical features as well as PA imaging and photothermal and photodynamic therapy properties in vitro and in vivo. Systemic delivery of IHANPT theranostic nanoparticles led to the accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in tumors in a human cancer xenograft model in nude mice. PA imaging confirmed targeted delivery of the IHANPT nanoparticles into tumors (T/M ratio = 5.19 ± 0.3). The effect of phototherapy was demonstrated by low-power laser irradiation (808 nm, 0.8 W/cm(2)) to induce efficient photodynamic effect from ICG dye. The photothermal effect from the ICG and SWCNTs rapidly raised the tumor temperature to 55.4 ± 1.8 °C. As the result, significant tumor growth inhibition and marked induction of tumor cell death and necrosis were observed in the tumors in the tumors. There were no apparent systemic and local toxic effects found in the mice. The dynamic thermal stability of IHANPT was studied to ensure that PTT does not affect ICG-dependent PDT in phototherapy. Therefore, our results highlight imaging property and therapeutic effect of the novel IHANPT theranostic nanoparticle for CD44

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of intravenously injected photosensitizer in rat burn models for efficient antibacterial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    For efficient photodynamic treatment of wound infection, a photosensitizer must be distributed in the whole infected tissue region. To ensure this, depth profiling of a photosensitizer is necessary in vivo. In this study, we applied photoacoustic (PA) imaging to visualize the depth profile of an intravenously injected photosensitizer in rat burn models. In burned tissue, pharmacokinetics is complicated; vascular occlusion takes place in the injured tissue, while vascular permeability increases due to thermal invasion. In this study, we first used Evans Blue (EB) as a test drug to examine the feasibility of photosensitizer dosimetry based on PA imaging. On the basis of the results, an actual photosensitizer, talaporfin sodium was used. An EB solution was intravenously injected into a rat deep dermal burn model. PA imaging was performed on the wound with 532 nm and 610 nm nanosecond light pulses for visualizing vasculatures (blood) and EB, respectively. Two hours after injection, the distribution of EB-originated signal spatially coincided well with that of blood-originated signal measured after injury, indicating that EB molecules leaked out from the blood vessels due to increased permeability. Afterwards, the distribution of EB signal was broadened in the depth direction due to diffusion. At 12 hours after injection, clear EB signals were observed even in the zone of stasis, demonstrating that the leaked EB molecules were delivered to the injured tissue layer. The level and time course of talaporfin sodium-originated signals were different compared with those of EB-originated signals, showing animal-dependent and/or drug-dependent permeabilization and diffusion in the tissue. Thus, photosensitizer dosimetry should be needed before every treatment to achieve desirable outcome of photodynamic treatment, for which PA imaging can be concluded to be valid and useful.

  15. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  16. Nonlinear Polarimetric Microscopy for Biomedical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Masood

    A framework for the nonlinear optical polarimetry and polarimetric microscopy is developed. Mathematical equations are derived in terms of linear and nonlinear Stokes Mueller formalism, which comprehensively characterize the polarization properties of the incoming and outgoing radiations, and provide structural information about the organization of the investigated materials. The algebraic formalism developed in this thesis simplifies many predictions for a nonlinear polarimetry study and provides an intuitive understanding of various polarization properties for radiations and the intervening medium. For polarimetric microscopy experiments, a custom fast-scanning differential polarization microscope is developed, which is also capable of real-time three-dimensional imaging. The setup is equipped with a pair of high-speed resonant and galvanometric scanning mirrors, and supplemented by advanced adaptive optics and data acquisition modules. The scanning mirrors when combined with the adaptive optics deformable mirror enable fast 3D imaging. Deformable membrane mirrors and genetic algorithm optimization routines are employed to improve the imaging conditions including correcting the optical aberrations, maximizing signal intensities, and minimizing point-spread-functions of the focal volume. A field-programmable-gate array (FPGA) chip is exploited to rapidly acquire and process the multidimensional data. Using the nonlinear optical polarimetry framework and the home-built polarization microscope, a few biologically important tissues are measured and analyzed to gain insight as to their structure and dynamics. The structure and distribution of muscle sarcomere myosins, connective tissue collagen, carbohydrate-rich starch, and fruit fly eye retinal molecules are characterized with revealing polarization studies. In each case, using the theoretical framework, polarization sensitive data are analyzed to decipher the molecular orientations and nonlinear optical

  17. Highly sensitive magneto-motive photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) imaging with cyclic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, B; Wei, C-W; Li, J; Gao, X; O’Donnell, M

    2016-01-01

    Highly specific molecular imaging with photoacoustics (PA) must suppress background endogenous signals while maintaining signals from target nanoagents. Magneto-motive PA was introduced to perform motion-based background suppression using a low frequency magnetic field. Previous studies show suppression based on displacement magnitude can suffer if significant physiological motion is present. This limitation can be overcome using cyclic magneto-motive PA (cmmPA), where multiple cycles of an ac magnetic field are used and the coherence of detected displacements is the retrieved information. In this paper, we show a method to enhance the magnetic response of an electromagnet specifically for cmmPA. Several magnetic frequencies were tested and a simple model is proposed to describe displacement frequency dependence. By choosing optimal parameters based on this model, we show that the technique can detect a low number of tagged cells using either US-based or PA-based displacement estimation. In addition, robustness to physiological motion is demonstrated in a moving phantom. (paper)

  18. Biomedical imaging ontologies: A survey and proposal for future work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Smith

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ontology is one strategy for promoting interoperability of heterogeneous data through consistent tagging. An ontology is a controlled structured vocabulary consisting of general terms (such as "cell" or "image" or "tissue" or "microscope" that form the basis for such tagging. These terms are designed to represent the types of entities in the domain of reality that the ontology has been devised to capture; the terms are provided with logical defi nitions thereby also supporting reasoning over the tagged data. Aim: This paper provides a survey of the biomedical imaging ontologies that have been developed thus far. It outlines the challenges, particularly faced by ontologies in the fields of histopathological imaging and image analysis, and suggests a strategy for addressing these challenges in the example domain of quantitative histopathology imaging. Results and Conclusions: The ultimate goal is to support the multiscale understanding of disease that comes from using interoperable ontologies to integrate imaging data with clinical and genomics data.

  19. Patterned thin metal film for the lateral resolution measurement of photoacoustic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Do-Hyun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image quality assessment method of photoacoustic tomography has not been completely standardized yet. Due to the combined nature of photonic signal generation and ultrasonic signal transmission in biological tissue, neither optical nor ultrasonic traditional methods can be used without modification. An optical resolution measurement technique was investigated for its feasibility for resolution measurement of photoacoustic tomography. Methods A patterned thin metal film deposited on silica glass provides high contrast in optical imaging due to high reflectivity from the metal film and high transmission from the glass. It provides high contrast when it is used for photoacoustic tomography because thin metal film can absorb pulsed laser energy. An US Air Force 1951 resolution target was used to generate patterned photoacoustic signal to measure the lateral resolution. Transducer with 2.25 MHz bandwidth and a sample submerged in water and gelatinous block were tested for lateral resolution measurement. Results Photoacoustic signal generated from a thin metal film deposited on a glass can propagate along the surface or through the surrounding medium. First, a series of experiments with tilted sample confirmed that the measured photoacoustic signal is what is propagating through the medium. Lateral resolution of the photoacoustic tomography system was successfully measured for water and gelatinous block as media: 0.33 mm and 0.35 mm in water and gelatinous material, respectively, when 2.25 MHz transducer was used. Chicken embryo was tested for biomedical applications. Conclusions A patterned thin metal film sample was tested for its feasibility of measuring lateral resolution of a photoacoustic tomography system. Lateral resolutions in water and gelatinous material were successfully measured using the proposed method. Measured resolutions agreed well with theoretical values.

  20. Molecular imaging of neutropilin-1 receptor using photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Minsong; Liu, Bo; Miller, Kathy D.; Guo, Lili

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to develop and test a molecular probe that can detect the expression of neutropilin-1 receptor (NPR-1) in vivo using fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: NPR-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and some breast cancer cells, and binds to vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF165, a growth factor associated with pathological tumor angiogenesis. This receptor is coexpressed with VEGFR2 and shown to enhance the binding of VEGF165; therefore, it has the potential to be used as a marker of angiogenic activity and targeted for therapy. Material and Methods: A peptide specific to NPR-1 receptor was synthesized and conjugated to a NIR fluorochrome (IRDye800CW) and was intravenously injected into mice with breast tumors (MCF7VEGF). Probe kinetics was monitored in vivo via near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) within an optical imager for up to 72 hours within the tumor and compared to other organs (liver, muscle) for binding specificity. A multivariate fitting algorithm was used to spectrally deconvolve the IRDye800CW from endogenous hemoglobin signature (hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation). Results: Dynamics of the NIR fluorescence signal within the first hour after injection indicates specific binding compared to muscle, with an average tumor-to-muscle ration of 2.00 (+/- 0.27). Spectral analysis clearly indentified the presence of the NPR-1 probe. Based on calibration data, the average tumor concentration from both NIRF and PCT-S was measured to be ~200-300nM. Conclusion: These preliminary results show the capability of PCT to image an exogenous probe in vivo in addition to its hemoglobin state.

  1. Review of spectral imaging technology in biomedical engineering: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingli; He, Xiaofu; Wang, Yiting; Liu, Hongying; Xu, Dongrong; Guo, Fangmin

    2013-10-01

    Spectral imaging is a technology that integrates conventional imaging and spectroscopy to get both spatial and spectral information from an object. Although this technology was originally developed for remote sensing, it has been extended to the biomedical engineering field as a powerful analytical tool for biological and biomedical research. This review introduces the basics of spectral imaging, imaging methods, current equipment, and recent advances in biomedical applications. The performance and analytical capabilities of spectral imaging systems for biological and biomedical imaging are discussed. In particular, the current achievements and limitations of this technology in biomedical engineering are presented. The benefits and development trends of biomedical spectral imaging are highlighted to provide the reader with an insight into the current technological advances and its potential for biomedical research.

  2. India Ink Incorporated Multifunctional Phase-transition Nanodroplets for Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Dual-modality Imaging and Photoacoustic Effect Based Tumor Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms—conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic,...

  3. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and inversion for accurate quantification of chromophore distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Martina; Malone, Emma; Lucka, Felix; Ellwood, Rob; An, Lu; Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography can, in principle, provide quantitatively accurate, high-resolution, images of chromophore distributions in 3D in vivo. However, achieving this goal requires not only dealing with the optical fluence-related spatial and spectral distortion but also having access to high quality, calibrated, measurements and using image reconstruction algorithms free from inaccurate assumptions. Furthermore, accurate knowledge of experimental parameters, such as the positions of the ultrasound detectors and the illumination pattern, is necessary for the reconstruction step. A meticulous and rigorous experimental phantom study was conducted to show that highly-resolved 3D estimation of chromophore distributions can be achieved: a crucial step towards in vivo implementation. The phantom consisted of four 580 μm diameter tubes with different ratios of copper sulphate and nickel sulphate as hemoglobin analogues, submersed in a background medium of intralipid and india ink. The optical absorption, scattering, photostability, and Grüneisen parameter were characterised for all components independently. A V-shaped imaging scanner enabled 3D imaging with the high resolution, high sensitivity, and wide bandwidth characteristic of Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensors, but without the limited-view disadvantage of single-plane scanners. The optical beam profile and position were determined experimentally. Nine wavelengths between 750 and 1110 nm were used. The images of the chromophore concentrations were obtained using a model-based, two-step, procedure, that did not require image segmentation. First, the acoustic reconstruction was solved with an iterative time-reversal algorithm to obtain images of the initial acoustic pressure at each of the nine wavelengths for an 18×17×13 mm3 volume with 50μm voxels. Then, 3D high resolution estimates of the chromophore concentrations were obtained by using a diffusion model of light transport in an iterative nonlinear optimisation

  4. All-optoelectronic continuous wave THz imaging for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, Karsten J; Loeffler, Torsten; Quast, Holger; Thomson, Mark; Bauer, Tobias; Leonhardt, Rainer; Czasch, Stephanie; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2002-01-01

    We present an all-optoelectronic THz imaging system for ex vivo biomedical applications based on photomixing of two continuous-wave laser beams using photoconductive antennas. The application of hyperboloidal lenses is discussed. They allow for f-numbers less than 1/2 permitting better focusing and higher spatial resolution compared to off-axis paraboloidal mirrors whose f-numbers for practical reasons must be larger than 1/2. For a specific histological sample, an analysis of image noise is discussed

  5. Multiple-illumination photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Quinn M.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    Previously we described the potential for multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography to provide quantitative reconstructions, however this work used only simulated data. We have developed a custom photoacoustic-ultrasound tomography system capable of multiple illuminations and parallel acquisition from a 256 element 5 MHz transducer ring array with 8-cm diameter. The multiple illumination scheme uses a free-space light delivery geometry where a rotational stage scans a pulsed laser beam onto different incident locations around the sample. For each illumination location a photoacoustic image is reconstructed using a modified backprojection algorithm. Images from different source locations have the potential to be combined to form an improved deep-tissue image using our previously developed iterative algorithms. We complement the photoacoustic imaging data with unique ultrasound imaging data. Most previous ultrasound tomography methods have used migration algorithms, iterative ray-based analysis, wave-equation modeling, or frequency-based algorithms that all demand large amounts of data and computational power. We propose a new UST method that offers isotropic resolution, provides scattering contrast, as well as the potential for measuring ultrasound scattering anisotropy and decoupling density and compressibility contributions. The imaging system is driven by a Verasonics scan engine and programmed for both ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging modes. Resolution has been measured to be 150 μm for ultrasound and 200 μm for photoacoustic images. Imaging capabilities are demonstrated on phantoms with custom-tailored ultrasound scattering and optical properties, as well as in murine models.

  6. Rapid and noncontact photoacoustic tomography imaging system using an interferometer with high-speed phase modulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun [School of Physics and Telecom Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Zhilie; Wu, Yongbo [School of Physics and Telecom Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); GuangDong Province Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, IMOT, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Yi [School of Control Engineering, Northeastern University at Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2015-04-15

    We designed, fabricated, and tested a rapid and noncontact photoacoustic tomography (PAT) imaging system using a low-coherence interferometer with high-speed phase modulation technique. Such a rapid and noncontact probing system can greatly decrease the time of imaging. The proposed PAT imaging system is experimentally verified by capturing images of a simulated tissue sample and the blood vessels within the ear flap of a mouse (pinna) in vivo. The axial and lateral resolutions of the system are evaluated at 45 and ∼15 μm, respectively. The imaging depth of the system is 1 mm in a special phantom. Our results show that the proposed system opens a promising way to realize noncontact, real-time PAT.

  7. Multi-Atlas Segmentation of Biomedical Images: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Sabuncu, Mert R.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS), first introduced and popularized by the pioneering work of Rohlfing, Brandt, Menzel and Maurer Jr (2004), Klein, Mensh, Ghosh, Tourville and Hirsch (2005), and Heckemann, Hajnal, Aljabar, Rueckert and Hammers (2006), is becoming one of the most widely-used and successful image segmentation techniques in biomedical applications. By manipulating and utilizing the entire dataset of “atlases” (training images that have been previously labeled, e.g., manually by an expert), rather than some model-based average representation, MAS has the flexibility to better capture anatomical variation, thus offering superior segmentation accuracy. This benefit, however, typically comes at a high computational cost. Recent advancements in computer hardware and image processing software have been instrumental in addressing this challenge and facilitated the wide adoption of MAS. Today, MAS has come a long way and the approach includes a wide array of sophisticated algorithms that employ ideas from machine learning, probabilistic modeling, optimization, and computer vision, among other fields. This paper presents a survey of published MAS algorithms and studies that have applied these methods to various biomedical problems. In writing this survey, we have three distinct aims. Our primary goal is to document how MAS was originally conceived, later evolved, and now relates to alternative methods. Second, this paper is intended to be a detailed reference of past research activity in MAS, which now spans over a decade (2003 – 2014) and entails novel methodological developments and application-specific solutions. Finally, our goal is to also present a perspective on the future of MAS, which, we believe, will be one of the dominant approaches in biomedical image segmentation. PMID:26201875

  8. Dynamic thermal effects of epidermal melanin and plasmonic nanoparticles during photoacoustic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Quanzeng; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) employs high-power near-infrared (near-IR) laser pulses to generate structural and functional information on tissue chromophores up to several centimeters below the surface. Such insights may facilitate detection of breast cancer - the most common cancer in women. PAT mammography has been the subject of extensive research, including techniques based on exogenous agents for PAT contrast enhancement and molecular specificity. However, photothermal safety risks of PAT due to strong chromophores such as epidermal melanin and plasmonic nanoparticles have not been rigorously studied. We have used computational and experimental approaches to elucidate highly dynamic optical-thermal processes during PAT. A Monte Carlo model was used to simulate light propagation at 800 and 1064 nm in a multi-layer breast tissue geometry with different epidermal pigmentation levels and a tumorsimulating inclusion incorporating nanoparticles. Energy deposition results were then used in a bioheat transfer model to simulate temperature transients. Experimental measurements involved multi-layer hydrogel phantoms with inclusions incorporating gold nanoparticles. Phantom optical properties were measured using the inverse adding-doubling technique. Thermal imaging was performed as phantoms were irradiated with 5 ns near-IR pulses. Scenarios using 10 Hz laser irradiation of breast tissue containing various nanoparticle concentrations were implemented experimentally and computationally. Laser exposure levels were based on ANSI/IEC limits. Surface temperature measurements were compared to corresponding simulation data. In general, the effect of highly pigmented skin on temperature rise was significant, whereas unexpectedly small levels of temperature rise during nanoparticle irradiation were attributed to rapid photodegradation. Results provide key initial insights into light-tissue interactions impacting the safety and effectiveness of PAT.

  9. All-optical photoacoustic imaging and detection of early-stage dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Hughes, David A.; Longbottom, Chris; Kirk, Katherine J.

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries remain one of the most common oral diseases in the world. Current detection methods, such as dental explorer and X-ray radiography, suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease because of the small size (tooth decay. This AOPAI system provides a non-contact, non-invasive and non-ionizing means of detecting early-stage dental caries. Ex-vivo teeth exhibiting early-stage, white-spot lesions were imaged using AOPAI. Experimental scans targeted each early-stage lesion and a reference healthy enamel region. Photoacoustic (PA) signals were generated in the tooth using a 532-nm pulsed laser and the light-induced broadband ultrasound signal was detected at the surface of the tooth with an optical path-stabilized Michelson interferometer operating at 532 nm. The measured time-domain signal was spatially resolved and back-projected to form 2D and 3D maps of the lesion using k-wave reconstruction methods. Experimental data collected from areas of healthy and diseased enamel indicate that the lesion generated a larger PA response compared to healthy enamel. The PA-signal amplitude alone was able to detect a lesion on the surface of the tooth. However, time- reversal reconstructions of the PA scans also quantitatively depicted the depth of the lesion. 3D PA reconstruction of the diseased tooth indicated a sub-surface lesion at a depth of 0.6 mm, in addition to the surface lesion. These results suggest that our AOPAI system is well suited for rapid clinical assessment of early-stage dental caries. An overview of the AOPAI system, fine-resolution PA and histology results of diseased and healthy teeth will be presented.

  10. Irrigant flow during photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jon D; Jaramillo, David E; DiVito, Enrico; Peters, Ove A

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to compare fluid movements generated from photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) and passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI). Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was performed using 6-μm melamine spheres in water. Measurement areas were 3-mm-long sections of the canal in the coronal, midroot and apical regions for PIPS (erbium/yttrium-aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser set at 15 Hz with 20 mJ), or passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI, non-cutting insert at 30% unit power) was performed in simulated root canals prepared to an apical size #30/0.04 taper. Fluid movement was analysed directly subjacent to the apical ends of ultrasonic insert or fiber optic tips as well as at midroot and apically. During PUI, measured average velocities were around 0.03 m/s in the immediate vicinity of the sides and tip of the ultrasonic file. Speeds decayed to non-measureable values at a distance of about 2 mm from the sides and tip. During PIPS, typical average speeds were about ten times higher than those measured for PUI, and they were measured throughout the length of the canal, at distances up to 20 mm away. PIPS caused higher average fluid speeds when compared to PUI, both close and distant from the instrument. The findings of this study could be relevant to the debriding and disinfecting stage of endodontic therapy. Irrigation enhancement beyond needle irrigation is relevant to more effectively eradicate microorganisms from root canal systems. PIPS may be an alternative approach due to its ability to create high streaming velocities further away from the activation source compared to ultrasonic activation.

  11. A UNIX-based prototype biomedical virtual image processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahy, J.B.; Kim, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a multiprocess virtual image processor for the IBM PC/AT, in order to maximize image processing software portability for biomedical applications. An interprocess communication scheme, based on two-way metacode exchange, has been developed and verified for this purpose. Application programs call a device-independent image processing library, which transfers commands over a shared data bridge to one or more Autonomous Virtual Image Processors (AVIP). Each AVIP runs as a separate process in the UNIX operating system, and implements the device-independent functions on the image processor to which it corresponds. Application programs can control multiple image processors at a time, change the image processor configuration used at any time, and are completely portable among image processors for which an AVIP has been implemented. Run-time speeds have been found to be acceptable for higher level functions, although rather slow for lower level functions, owing to the overhead associated with sending commands and data over the shared data bridge

  12. Uyghur Text Matching in Graphic Images for Biomedical Semantic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shancheng; Xie, Hongtao; Chen, Zhineng; Liu, Yizhi; Li, Yan

    2018-01-19

    How to read Uyghur text from biomedical graphic images is a challenge problem due to the complex layout and cursive writing of Uyghur. In this paper, we propose a system that extracts text from Uyghur biomedical images, and matches the text in a specific lexicon for semantic analysis. The proposed system possesses following distinctive properties: first, it is an integrated system which firstly detects and crops the Uyghur text lines using a single fully convolutional neural network, and then keywords in the lexicon are matched by a well-designed matching network. Second, to train the matching network effectively an online sampling method is applied, which generates synthetic data continually. Finally, we propose a GPU acceleration scheme for matching network to match a complete Uyghur text line directly rather than a single window. Experimental results on benchmark dataset show our method achieves a good performance of F-measure 74.5%. Besides, our system keeps high efficiency with 0.5s running time for each image due to the GPU acceleration scheme.

  13. Selection of Quantum Dot Wavelengths for Biomedical Assays and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Taik Lim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots [QDs] are hypothesized to be excellent contrast agents for biomedical assays and imaging. A unique property of QDs is that their absorbance increases with increasing separation between excitation and emission wavelengths. Much of the enthusiasm for using QDs in vivo stems from this property, since photon yield should be proportional to the integral of the broadband absorption. In this study, we demonstrate that tissue scatter and absorbance can sometimes offset increasing QD absorption at bluer wavelengths, and counteract this potential advantage. By using a previously validated mathematical model, we explored the effects of tissue absorbance, tissue scatter, wavelength dependence of the scatter, water-to- hemoglobin ratio, and tissue thickness on QD performance. We conclude that when embedded in biological fluids and tissues, QD excitation wavelengths will often be quite constrained, and that excitation and emission wavelengths should be selected carefully based on the particular application. Based on our results, we produced near-infrared QDs optimized for imaging surface vasculature with white light excitation and a silicon CCD camera, and used them to image the coronary vasculature in vivo. Taken together, our data should prove useful in designing fluorescent QD contrast agents optimized for specific biomedical applications.

  14. Carbon Nanoparticle Enhance Photoacoustic Imaging and Therapy for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Yahfi

    Healing critical sized bone defects has been a challenge that led to innovations in tissue engineering scaffolds and biomechanical stimulations that enhance tissue regeneration. Carbon nanocomposite scaffolds have gained interest due to their enhanced mechanical properties. However, these scaffolds are only osteoconductive and not osteoinductive. Stimulating regeneration of bone tissue, osteoinductivity, has therefore been a subject of intense research. We propose the use of carbon nanoparticle enhanced photoacoustic (PA) stimulation to promote and enhance tissue regeneration in bone tissue-engineering scaffolds. In this study we test the feasibility of using carbon nanoparticles and PA for in vivo tissue engineering applications. To this end, we investigate 1) the effect of carbon nanoparticles, such as graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONP), graphene oxide nano ribbons (GONR) and graphene nano onions (GNO), in vitro on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which are crucial for bone regeneration; 2) the use of PA imaging to detect and monitor tissue engineering scaffolds in vivo; and 3) we demonstrate the potential of carbon nanoparticle enhanced PA stimulation to promote tissue regeneration and healing in an in vivo rat fracture model. The results from these studies demonstrate that carbon nanoparticles such as GNOP, GONR and GNO do not affect viability or differentiation of MSCs and could potentially be used in vivo for tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, PA imaging can be used to detect and longitudinally monitor subcutaneously implanted carbon nanotubes incorporated polymeric nanocomposites in vivo. Oxygen saturation data from PA imaging could also be used as an indicator for tissue regeneration within the scaffolds. Lastly, we demonstrate that daily stimulation with carbon nanoparticle enhanced PA increases bone fracture healing. Rats stimulated for 10 minutes daily for two weeks showed 3 times higher new cortical bone BV/TV and 1.8 times bone mineral density

  15. Characterization of novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoui, Samir

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of the high contrast of pure optical imaging and the high intrinsic resolution of ultrasound without the necessity of ionizing radiation. Photoacoustic imaging (PM) is neither purely optical nor purely acoustical in nature, but a combination of the two. It is fundamentally based on light excitation and ultrasonic detection. Photoacoustic imaging has been successful without the introduction of exogenous contrast agents; however, to image deeper regions of biological tissue, a contrast agent is necessary. Several types of photoacoustic contrast agents have been made available for diagnostic purposes; however, the majority of literature has focused on gold nanoparticle systems for which the surface-plasmon resonance effect is important. The only option currently available for molecular PM contrast agents is to choose an existing near infrared absorbing fluorescent probes with the hope that they may generate a substantial photoacoustic (PA) response. However, these dyes have been designed with an optimized fluorescence emission response and are not anticipated to generate an adequate photoacoustic response. This dissertation addresses this lack of precedence in the literature for understanding the mechanism of a photoacoustic signal generation from strongly absorbing dye molecules including BODIPY, cyanine and curcumin systems. This work represents preliminary efforts in bringing novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents (MPACs) into the photoacoustic imaging arena. To this end, photoacoustic and optical Z-scan experiments, and quenching studies were employed to demonstrate correlation of photoacoustic emission enhancement with excited state absorption mechanisms. To investigate further the photoacoustic emission in a practical imaging setting, MPACs were imaged using a recently developed photoacoustic imaging tomography system which was constructed exclusively for the purpose of this study.

  16. Contributions on biomedical imaging, with a side-look at molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, G.

    2004-05-01

    This report is intended as a brief introduction to the emerging scientific field of biomedical imaging. The breadth of the subject is shown and future fields of research are indicated, which hopefully will serve as a guide to the identification of starting points for the research in 'Biomedical and/or Molecular Imaging' at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health. The report starts with a brief sketch of the history. Then a - necessarily incomplete - list of research topics is presented. It is organized in two parts: the first one addresses medical imaging, and the second one is concerned with biological point aspects of the matter. (orig.) [de

  17. Folic acid modified Pluronic F127 coating Ag2S quantum dot for photoacoustic imaging of tumor cell-targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yun; Wang, Zhao-Yang; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Xuan, Yang; Cheng, Kai; Li, Cheng; Song, Xian-Lin; An, Jie; Hou, Xiao-Lin; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an oil-soluble Ag2S quantum dot (QD) was synthesized through thermal decomposition using the single-source precursor method, and Pluronic F127 (PF127), a triblock copolymer functionalized with folic acid (FA), was deposited on the surface of the QD, then a water-soluble PF127-FA@Ag2S nanoprobe with targeting ability was fabricated. The as-prepared PF127-FA@Ag2S exhibited spheroidal morphology and high dispersibility, with average diameters of 115 ± 20.7 nm (as observed by transmission electron microscopy). No obvious toxicity of the PF127-FA@Ag2S nanoprobe was found in standard 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and colony-formation assay, indicating good biocompatibility and safety. The resulting PF127-FA@Ag2S exhibited excellent stability between 4 °C-40 °C. Additionally, the capacity of the tumor cell-targeting high contrast enhanced photoacoustic imaging of PF127-FA@Ag2S was verified in comparison with A547 and HeLa cells. In other words, the excellent properties of PF127-FA@Ag2S show great potential in further research for targeting and photoacoustic imaging.

  18. One-pot synthesis of gold nanostars using plant polyphenols for cancer photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zheng, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Huang-Hao; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-07-01

    Branched plasmonic nanostructures have been found to exhibit strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field surrounding their multi-branched petals. This feature endows them with improved performance in catalysis, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, photoacoustic imaging, and photothermal therapy. Albeit several synthesis techniques have been developed, the precisely controlled growth of highly branched nanostructures with a one-pot surfactant-free procedure is still challenging. Herein, we present a simple seedless route to synthesize gold nanostars (AuNSs) using a natural plant polyphenol, gallic acid (GA), as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The size and shape of AuNSs can be tuned by simply adjusting the amount of added GA. Under the optimum condition, the as-prepared AuNSs with diameters about 100 nm exhibit strong near-infrared absorption, good photothermal efficiency, and high biocompatibility. We demonstrate that AuNSs can be utilized for simultaneous photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy in living cancer cells. This study highlights facile synthesized AuNSs could serve as a promising platform for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurer, Maria Ines; Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes da; Santa Barbara, Ailton; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Oliveira, Marilia Gerhardt de; Silva, Daniela Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific software. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes. (author)

  20. Co-registered Frequency-Domain Photoacoustic Radar and Ultrasound System for Subsurface Imaging in Turbid Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Frequency-domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) imaging of absorbers in turbid media and their comparison and/or validation as well as co-registration with their corresponding ultrasound (US) images are demonstrated in this paper. Also presented are the FD-PAR tomography and the effects of reducing the number of scan lines (or angles) on image quality, resolution, and contrast. The FD-PAR modality uses intensity-modulated (coded) continuous wave laser sources driven by frequency-swept (chirp) waveforms. The spatial cross-correlation function between the PA response and the reference signal used for laser source modulation produces the reconstructed image. Live animal testing is demonstrated, and images of comparable signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and spatial resolution were obtained. Various image improvement techniques to further reduce absorber spread and artifacts in the images such as normalization, filtering, and amplification were also investigated. The co-registered image produced from the combined US and PA images provides more information than both images independently. The significance of this work lies in the fact that achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial ultrasound instrument could accelerate its clinical acceptance and use. This work is aimed at functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  1. A novel biomedical image indexing and retrieval system via deep preference learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shuchao; Orgun, Mehmet A; Yu, Zhezhou

    2018-05-01

    The traditional biomedical image retrieval methods as well as content-based image retrieval (CBIR) methods originally designed for non-biomedical images either only consider using pixel and low-level features to describe an image or use deep features to describe images but still leave a lot of room for improving both accuracy and efficiency. In this work, we propose a new approach, which exploits deep learning technology to extract the high-level and compact features from biomedical images. The deep feature extraction process leverages multiple hidden layers to capture substantial feature structures of high-resolution images and represent them at different levels of abstraction, leading to an improved performance for indexing and retrieval of biomedical images. We exploit the current popular and multi-layered deep neural networks, namely, stacked denoising autoencoders (SDAE) and convolutional neural networks (CNN) to represent the discriminative features of biomedical images by transferring the feature representations and parameters of pre-trained deep neural networks from another domain. Moreover, in order to index all the images for finding the similarly referenced images, we also introduce preference learning technology to train and learn a kind of a preference model for the query image, which can output the similarity ranking list of images from a biomedical image database. To the best of our knowledge, this paper introduces preference learning technology for the first time into biomedical image retrieval. We evaluate the performance of two powerful algorithms based on our proposed system and compare them with those of popular biomedical image indexing approaches and existing regular image retrieval methods with detailed experiments over several well-known public biomedical image databases. Based on different criteria for the evaluation of retrieval performance, experimental results demonstrate that our proposed algorithms outperform the state

  2. 77 FR 54584 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of... Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, ZEB1 OSR-D(J2) P Tissue... Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Room 959, Bethesda...

  3. Self-Assembly of Semiconducting-Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles with Enhanced Optical Property for Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Song, Jibin; Dai, Yunlu; Chen, Jingyi; Wang, Feng; Lin, Lisen; Liu, Yijing; Zhang, Fuwu; Yu, Guocan; Zhou, Zijian; Fan, Wenpei; Huang, Wei; Fan, Quli; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Although various noble metal and semiconducting molecules have been developed as photoacoustic (PA) agents, the use of semiconducting polymer-metal nanoparticle hybrid materials to enhance PA signal has not been explored. A novel semiconducting-plasmonic nanovesicle was fabricated by self-assembly of semiconducting poly(perylene diimide) (PPDI) and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG) tethered gold nanoparticles (Au@PPDI/PEG). A highly localized and strongly enhanced electromagnetic (EM) field is distributed between adjacent gold nanoparticles in the vesicular shell, where the absorbing collapsed PPDI is present. Significantly, the EM field in turn enhances the light absorption efficiency of PPDI, leading to a much greater photothermal effect and a stronger photoacoustic signal compared to PDI nanoparticle or gold nanovesicle alone. The optical property of the hybrid vesicle can be further tailored by controlling the ratio of PPDI and gold nanoparticle as well as the adjustable interparticle distance of gold nanoparticles localized in the vesicular shell. In vivo imaging and therapeutic evaluation demonstrated that the hybrid vesicle is an excellent probe for cancer theranostics.

  4. Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser at 1600 nm for photoacoustic imaging application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, Zhonglie [Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Beckman Laser Institute, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, California 92612 (United States); Zeng, Lvming; Chen, Zhongping, E-mail: z2chen@uci.edu, E-mail: ckim@pusan.ac.kr [Beckman Laser Institute, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, California 92612 (United States); Kim, Chang-Seok, E-mail: z2chen@uci.edu, E-mail: ckim@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-04

    We present a nanosecond Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser system operating at 1600 nm with a tunable repetition rate from 100 kHz to 1 MHz. A compact fiber coupled, acousto-optic modulator-based EDF ring cavity was used to generate a nanosecond seed laser at 1600 nm, and a double-cladding EDF based power amplifier was applied to achieve the maximum average power of 250 mW. In addition, 12 ns laser pulses with the maximum pulse energy of 2.4 μJ were obtained at 100 kHz. Furthermore, the Stokes shift by Raman scattering over a 25 km long fiber was measured, indicating that the laser can be potentially used to generate the high repetition rate pulses at the 1.7 μm region. Finally, we detected the photoacoustic signal from a human hair at 200 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 1.2 μJ, which demonstrates that a Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser can be a promising light source for the high speed functional photoacoustic imaging.

  5. Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser at 1600 nm for photoacoustic imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Zeng, Lvming; Chen, Zhongping; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2016-04-04

    We present a nanosecond Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser system operating at 1600 nm with a tunable repetition rate from 100 kHz to 1 MHz. A compact fiber coupled, acousto-optic modulator-based EDF ring cavity was used to generate a nanosecond seed laser at 1600 nm, and a double-cladding EDF based power amplifier was applied to achieve the maximum average power of 250 mW. In addition, 12 ns laser pulses with the maximum pulse energy of 2.4  μ J were obtained at 100 kHz. Furthermore, the Stokes shift by Raman scattering over a 25 km long fiber was measured, indicating that the laser can be potentially used to generate the high repetition rate pulses at the 1.7  μ m region. Finally, we detected the photoacoustic signal from a human hair at 200 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 1.2  μ J, which demonstrates that a Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser can be a promising light source for the high speed functional photoacoustic imaging.

  6. Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser at 1600 nm for photoacoustic imaging application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Zeng, Lvming; Chen, Zhongping; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2016-01-01

    We present a nanosecond Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser system operating at 1600 nm with a tunable repetition rate from 100 kHz to 1 MHz. A compact fiber coupled, acousto-optic modulator-based EDF ring cavity was used to generate a nanosecond seed laser at 1600 nm, and a double-cladding EDF based power amplifier was applied to achieve the maximum average power of 250 mW. In addition, 12 ns laser pulses with the maximum pulse energy of 2.4 μJ were obtained at 100 kHz. Furthermore, the Stokes shift by Raman scattering over a 25 km long fiber was measured, indicating that the laser can be potentially used to generate the high repetition rate pulses at the 1.7 μm region. Finally, we detected the photoacoustic signal from a human hair at 200 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 1.2 μJ, which demonstrates that a Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser can be a promising light source for the high speed functional photoacoustic imaging.

  7. Dual in vivo Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Imaging of HER2 Expression in Breast Tumors for Diagnosis, Margin Assessment, and Surgical Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker-specific imaging probes offer ways to improve molecular diagnosis, intraoperative margin assessment, and tumor resection. Fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging probes are of particular interest for clinical applications because the combination enables deeper tissue penetration for tumor detection while maintaining imaging sensitivity compared to a single optical imaging modality. Here we describe the development of a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeting imaging probe to visualize differential levels of HER2 expression in a breast cancer model. Specifically, we labeled trastuzumab with Black Hole Quencher 3 (BHQ3 and fluorescein for photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging of HER2 overexpression, respectively. The dual-labeled trastuzumab was tested for its ability to detect HER2 overexpression in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated an over twofold increase in the signal intensity for HER2-overexpressing tumors in vivo, compared to low–HER2-expressing tumors, using photoacoustic imaging. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of detecting tumors and positive surgical margins by fluorescence imaging. These results suggest that multimodal HER2-specific imaging of breast cancer using the BHQ3-fluorescein trastuzumab enables molecular-level detection and surgical margin assessment of breast tumors in vivo. This technique may have future clinical impact for primary lesion detection, as well as intraoperative molecular-level surgical guidance in breast cancer.

  8. Nanoparticles for biomedical imaging, therapy, and quantitative diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust, Brian G.

    Nanoparticles and nanomaterials are known to exhibit extraordinary characteristics and have a wide range of application which utilizes their unique properties. In particular, nanoparticles have shown great promise towards advancing the state of biological and biomedical techniques such as in vivo and in vitro imaging modalities, biosensing, and disease detection and therapy. Nanocrystalline hosts: NaYF4, KYF4, KGdF4, NaMF3, and KMF3 (M=Mg, Ba, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cr) doped with rare earth ions have been synthesized by thermolysis, solvothermal, and hydrothermal methods. The morphology and spectroscopic properties have been thoroughly characterized. These nanoparticles (NP) are particularly useful for biomedical purposes since both the exciting and emitting wavelengths are in the near-infrared, where most tissues do not strongly absorb or scatter light. In vivo and in vitro imaging was performed with a 980 nm excitation source. Finally, NPs were conjugated with zinc phthalocyanine, a photosensitizer with a large absorption coefficient in the red and NIR regions, to illustrate the efficacy of these NPs as a platform for dual-mode infrared-activated imaging and photodynamic platforms. In addition, nonlinear optical nanomaterials, such as BaTiO3 and Ag@BaTiO3, were also synthesized and characterized. The nonlinear optical properties were investigated, and it is demonstrated that these nanoparticles can produce phase conjugate waves when used in a counterpropagating four wave mixing setup. The third order susceptibility is quantified using the z-scan technique, and the toxicity of these nanoparticles is also explored.

  9. Gold nanocage decorated pH-sensitive micelle for highly effective photothermo-chemotherapy and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoyong; Xiao, Hong; Li, Xiaoxia; Huang, Yi; Song, Wei; Song, Liang; Chen, Meiwan; Cheng, Du; Shuai, Xintao

    2017-12-01

    A pH-sensitive copolymer PAsp(DIP)-b-PAsp(MEA) (PDPM) was synthesized and self-assembled to micelle loading chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) and introducing a gold nanocage structure for photothermo-chemotherapy and photoacoustic imaging. After further surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), the DOX-loaded pH-sensitive gold nanocage (D-PGNC) around 100 nm possessed a uniform spherical structure with a pH-sensitive core of PAsp(DIP) incorporating DOX, an interlayer crosslinked via disulfide bonds and decorated with discontinuous gold shell, and a PEG corona. The release of DOX from D-PGNC was turned off in bloodstream due to the cross-linking and gold decoration of interlayer but turned on inside tumor tissue by multiple stimulations including the low pH value of tumor tissue (≈6.8), the low lysosomal pH value of cancer cells (≈5.0) and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. The gold nanocage receiving NIR irradiation could generate hyperthermia to ablate tumor cells. Moreover, the photoacoustic (PA) imaging and analysis of DOX fluorescence inside tumor tissue demonstrated that photothermal therapy based on the gold nanocage effectively drove DOX penetration inside tumor. Owing to the rapid intratumor release and deep tissue penetration of drug favorable for killing cancer cells survived the photothermal therapy, the combined therapy based on D-PGNC via NIR irradiation exhibited a synergistic treatment effect superior to either chemotherapy or NIR-induced photothermal therapy alone. The novelty of the manuscript is its multifunctional system which incorporates anticancer drug DOX in its pH-sensitive core and acts as a template to introduce a gold nanocage. This nanomedicine presents potentials of sequestrating drug molecules in blood circulation but releasing them inside tumor upon responding to the acidic microenvironment therein. Exposure to NIR laser further expedited the pH-sensitive DOX release and promoted DOX penetration into cancer

  10. Biomedical nanotechnology for molecular imaging, diagnostics, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuming

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical nanotechnology is a cross-disciplinary area of research in science, engineering and medicine with broad applications for molecular imaging, molecular diagnosis, and targeted therapy. The basic rationale is that nanometer-sized particles such as semiconductor quantum dots and iron oxide nanocrystals have optical, magnetic or structural properties that are not available from either molecules or bulk solids. When linked with biotargeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides or small molecules, these nanoparticles can be used to target diseased cells and organs (such as malignant tumors and cardiovascular plaques) with high affinity and specificity. In the "mesoscopic" size range of 5-100 nm diameter, nanoparticles also have large surface areas and functional groups for conjugating to multiple diagnostic (e.g., optical, radioisotopic, or magnetic) and therapeutic (e.g., anticancer) agents.

  11. 75 FR 39547 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... and Bioengineering, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Room 960, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-8775, grossmanrs...

  12. 77 FR 72365 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Bioengineering. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below. This will be a virtual meeting. Please... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering NACBIB, January 25...

  13. 77 FR 25488 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, May 21, 2012, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Bethesda Marriott...

  14. 78 FR 78982 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, December 11, 2013, 08:30 a.m., National...

  15. 78 FR 64519 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

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    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 3, 2013, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m...

  16. 78 FR 37557 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Bioengineering, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Room 960, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-8775, [email protected

  17. 75 FR 15715 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... and Bioengineering, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Room 960, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-8775, grossmanrs...

  18. 78 FR 76634 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Bioengineering. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below. This will be a virtual meeting. Please... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. Date: January 22...

  19. 75 FR 76019 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Bioengineering. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to space... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  20. 78 FR 77474 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-12-23

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  1. 78 FR 107 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-01-02

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  2. 77 FR 19675 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

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    2012-04-02

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    2011-01-04

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  5. 76 FR 75888 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

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    2011-12-05

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  6. 78 FR 17937 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Meeting

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    2013-03-25

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  7. 78 FR 64506 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

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    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 11, 2013, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m...

  8. 75 FR 14175 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

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    2010-03-24

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  9. 78 FR 66755 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

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    2013-11-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 10-11, 2013, 09:00 a.m.-08:00 p.m...

  10. 78 FR 39740 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

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  14. 78 FR 64966 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

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    2013-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 10-11, 2013, 03:00 p.m.-06:00 p.m...

  15. 78 FR 55268 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Amended; Notice of Meeting

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    2013-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, November 6, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m...

  16. 76 FR 40923 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Meeting

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    2011-07-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Bioengineering. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to space... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  17. WE-H-206-01: Photoacoustic Tomography: Multiscale Imaging From Organelles to Patients by Ultrasonically Beating the Optical Diffusion Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L. [Washington University (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  18. WE-H-206-01: Photoacoustic Tomography: Multiscale Imaging From Organelles to Patients by Ultrasonically Beating the Optical Diffusion Limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    2016-01-01

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  19. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography

  20. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V., E-mail: LHWANG@WUSTL.EDU [Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  1. Modality prediction of biomedical literature images using multimodal feature representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelka, Obioma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling approaches performed to automatically predict the modality of images found in biomedical literature. Various state-of-the-art visual features such as Bag-of-Keypoints computed with dense SIFT descriptors, texture features and Joint Composite Descriptors were used for visual image representation. Text representation was obtained by vector quantisation on a Bag-of-Words dictionary generated using attribute importance derived from a χ-test. Computing the principal components separately on each feature, dimension reduction as well as computational load reduction was achieved. Various multiple feature fusions were adopted to supplement visual image information with corresponding text information. The improvement obtained when using multimodal features vs. visual or text features was detected, analysed and evaluated. Random Forest models with 100 to 500 deep trees grown by resampling, a multi class linear kernel SVM with C=0.05 and a late fusion of the two classifiers were used for modality prediction. A Random Forest classifier achieved a higher accuracy and computed Bag-of-Keypoints with dense SIFT descriptors proved to be a better approach than with Lowe SIFT.

  2. Minimize the Percentage of Noise in Biomedical Images Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Khader Jilani Saudagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of the research is to improve the quality of biomedical image for telemedicine with minimum percentages of noise in the retrieved image and to take less computation time. The novelty of this technique lies in the implementation of spectral coding for biomedical images using neural networks in order to accomplish the above objectives. This work is in continuity of an ongoing research project aimed at developing a system for efficient image compression approach for telemedicine in Saudi Arabia. We compare the efficiency of this technique against existing image compression techniques, namely, JPEG2000, in terms of compression ratio, peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR, and computation time. To our knowledge, the research is the primary in providing a comparative study with other techniques used in the compression of biomedical images. This work explores and tests biomedical images such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and positron emission tomography (PET.

  3. CuS-Based Theranostic Micelles for NIR-Controlled Combination Chemotherapy and Photothermal Therapy and Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guojun; Ma, Ben; Wang, Yuyuan; Xie, Ruosen; Li, Chun; Dou, Kefeng; Gong, Shaoqin

    2017-12-06

    Cancer remains a major threat to human health due to low therapeutic efficacies of currently available cancer treatment options. Nanotheranostics, capable of simultaneous therapy and diagnosis/monitoring of diseases, has attracted increasing amounts of attention, particularly for cancer treatment. In this study, CuS-based theranostic micelles capable of simultaneous combination chemotherapy and photothermal therapy (PTT), as well as photoacoustic imaging, were developed for targeted cancer therapy. The micelle was formed by a CuS nanoparticle (NP) functionalized by thermosensitive amphiphilic poly(acrylamide-acrylonitrile)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymers. CuS NPs under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation induced a significant temperature elevation, thereby enabling NIR-triggered PTT. Moreover, the hydrophobic core formed by poly(acrylamide-acrylonitrile) segments used for drug encapsulation exhibited an upper critical solution temperature (UCST; ∼38 °C), which underwent a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition once the temperature rose above the UCST induced by NIR-irradiated CuS NPs, thereby triggering a rapid drug release and enabling NIR-controlled chemotherapy. The CuS-based micelles conjugated with GE11 peptides were tested in an epidermal growth factor receptor-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer model. In both two-dimensional monolayer cell and three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroid models, GE11-tagged CuS-based micelles under NIR irradiation, enabling the combination chemotherapy and PTT, exhibited the best therapeutic outcome due to a synergistic effect. These CuS-based micelles also displayed a good photoacoustic imaging ability under NIR illumination. Taken together, this multifunctional CuS-based micelle could be a promising nanoplatform for targeted cancer nanotheranostics.

  4. Towards non-invasive imaging of surgical suture degradation with photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Dalmau, Jordi; Aguirre, Juan; Funk, Lutz; Jara, Francesc; Turon, Pau; Durduran, Turgut

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of the degradation of surgical sutures (~500 μm diameter) up to ~9 mm in tissue phantoms and up to ~3 mm depth in euthanized mice, and its potential application in in vivo animals is demonstrated using a custom dark-field photo-acoustic microscope (PAM). By using a simple theoretical approach and modelling the characteristics of our ultrasound transducer, both theoretical and experimental observations are in good agreement. The implications of this work for industrial applications are discussed by comparing the measurements with an optical microscope and with a developed algorithm on tissue simulating phantoms and with ex vivo measurements using PAM.

  5. Rational design of nanoparticles for biomedical imaging and photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Haiyan

    2011-07-01

    This thesis aims to rationally design nanoparticles and promote their applications in biomedical imaging and photovoltaic cells. Quantum dots (QDs) are promising fluorescent probes for biomedical imaging. We have fabricated two types of MSA capped QDs: CdTe/ZnSe core/shell QDs synthesized via an aqueous method and CdTe QDs via a hydrothermal method. They present high quantum yields (QYs), narrow emission band widths, high photo- and pH-stability, and low cytotoxicity. QD-IgG probes were produced and applied for labeling breast cancer marker HER2 proteins on MCF-7 cells. For the purpose of single molecule tracking using QDs as fluorescent probes, we use small affibodies instead of antibodies to produce QD-affibody probes. Smaller QD-target protein complexes are obtained using a direct immunofluorescence approach. These QD-affibody probes are developed to study the dynamic motion of single HER2 proteins on A431 cell membranes. Fluorescence blinking in single QDs is harmful for dynamic tracking due to information loss. We have experimentally studied the blinking phenomenon and the mechanism behind. We have discovered an emission bunching effect that two nearby QDs tend to emit light synchronously. The long-range Coulomb potential induced by the negative charge on the QD surface is found to be the major cause for the single QD blinking and the emission bunching in QD pairs. We have studied the in vitro cytotoxicity of CdTe QDs to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The QDs treatment increases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential. The protein expression levels indicate that the mitochondria apoptosis is the main cause of HUVCEs apoptosis induced by CdTe QDs. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are scattering probes due to their tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced scattering spectrum. In order to control the yield and morphology of GNRs, we have systematically studied the effects of composition

  6. Imaging Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Biomedical Engineering Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Paul; Tuyl, John Van; Engel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    A disease initially associated with boxers ninety years ago, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is now recognized as a significant risk to boxers, American football players, ice hockey players, military personnel or anyone to whom recurrent head injuries are a distinct possibility. Diagnosis is currently confirmed at autopsy, although CTE's presumed sufferers have symptoms of depression, suicidal thoughts, mood and personality changes, and loss of memory. CTE sufferers also complain of losing cognitive ability, dysfunction in everyday activities, inability to keep regular employment, violent tendencies and marital strife. Dementia may develop over the long term. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus in regards to pathology, with both number and severity of head injuries being linked to disease progression. Despite the slow advancement of this disease, there are no clinical methods to diagnose or monitor prognosis in presumed patients, limiting clinicians' efforts to symptom management. The lack of diagnostic tools fuels the need for biomedical engineers to develop techniques for in vivo detection of CTE. This review examines efforts made with various magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging techniques, with a view towards improving the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic imaging for CTE.

  7. High Resolution Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging of Orthotopic Lung Cancer in Mice: New Perspectives for Onco-Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Florian; Sobilo, Julien; Le Mée, Marilyne; Rétif, Stéphanie; Natkunarajah, Sharuja; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Le Pape, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a relevant preclinical model associated with a specific imaging protocol dedicated to onco-pharmacology studies in mice. We optimized both the animal model and an ultrasound imaging procedure to follow up longitudinally the lung tumor growth in mice. Moreover we proposed to measure by photoacoustic imaging the intratumoral hypoxia, which is a crucial parameter responsible for resistance to therapies. Finally, we compared ultrasound data to x-ray micro computed tomography and volumetric measurements to validate the relevance of this approach on the NCI-H460 human orthotopic lung tumor. This study demonstrates the ability of ultrasound imaging to detect and monitor the in vivo orthotopic lung tumor growth by high resolution ultrasound imaging. This approach enabled us to characterize key biological parameters such as oxygenation, perfusion status and vascularization of tumors. Such an experimental approach has never been reported previously and it would provide a nonradiative tool for assessment of anticancer therapeutic efficacy in mice. Considering the absence of ultrasound propagation through the lung parenchyma, this strategy requires the implantation of tumors strictly located in the superficial posterior part of the lung.

  8. Model control of image processing for telerobotics and biomedical instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An Huu

    1993-06-01

    This thesis has model control of image processing (MCIP) as its major theme. By this it is meant that there is a top-down model approach which already knows the structure of the image to be processed. This top-down image processing under model control is used further as visual feedback to control robots and as feedforward information for biomedical instrumentation. The software engineering of the bioengineering instrumentation image processing is defined in terms of the task and the tools available. Early bottom-up image processing such as thresholding occurs only within the top-down control regions of interest (ROI's) or operating windows. Moment computation is an important bottom-up procedure as well as pyramiding to attain rapid computation, among other considerations in attaining programming efficiencies. A distinction is made between initialization procedures and stripped down run time operations. Even more detailed engineering design considerations are considered with respect to the ellipsoidal modeling of objects. Here the major axis orientation is an important additional piece of information, beyond the centroid moments. Careful analysis of various sources of errors and considerable benchmarking characterized the detailed considerations of the software engineering of the image processing procedures. Image processing for robotic control involves a great deal of 3D calibration of the robot working environment (RWE). Of special interest is the idea of adapting the machine scanpath to the current task. It was important to pay careful attention to the hardware aspects of the control of the toy robots that were used to demonstrate the general methodology. It was necessary to precalibrate the open loop gains for all motors so that after initialization the visual feedback, which depends on MCIP, would be able to supply enough information quickly enough to the control algorithms to govern the robots under a variety of control configurations and task operations

  9. Signal and image analysis for biomedical and life sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Changming; Pham, Tuan D; Vallotton, Pascal; Wang, Dadong

    2014-01-01

    With an emphasis on applications of computational models for solving modern challenging problems in biomedical and life sciences, this book aims to bring collections of articles from biologists, medical/biomedical and health science researchers together with computational scientists to focus on problems at the frontier of biomedical and life sciences. The goals of this book are to build interactions of scientists across several disciplines and to help industrial users apply advanced computational techniques for solving practical biomedical and life science problems. This book is for users in t

  10. Human CIK Cells Loaded with Au Nanorods as a Theranostic Platform for Targeted Photoacoustic Imaging and Enhanced Immunotherapy and Photothermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Xia, Fangfang; Zhang, Chunlei; Qian, Qirong; Zhi, Xiao; Yue, Caixia; Sun, Rongjin; Cheng, Shangli; Fang, Shan; Jin, Weilin; Yang, Yuming; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-06-01

    How to realize targeted photoacoustic imaging, enhanced immunotherapy, and photothermal therapy of gastric cancer has become a great challenge. Herein, we reported for the first time that human cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) loaded with gold nanorods were used for targeted photoacoustic imaging, enhanced immunotherapy, and photothermal therapy of gastric cancer. Silica-modified gold nanorods were prepared; then incubated with human cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK), resultant human CIK cells loaded with Au nanorods were evaluated for their cytotoxicity, targeted ability of gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo, immunotherapy, and photothermal therapy efficacy. In vitro cell experiment shows that human CIK cells labeled with gold nanorods actively target gastric cancer MGC803 cells, inhibit growth of MGC803 cells by inducing cell apoptosis, and kill MGC803 cells under low power density near-infrared (NIR) laser treatment (808-nm continuous wave laser, 1.5 W/cm2, 3 min). In vivo experiment results showed that human CIK cells labeled with gold nanorods could target actively and image subcutaneous gastric cancer vessels via photoacoustic imaging at 4 h post-injection, could enhance immunotherapy efficacy by up-regulating cytokines such as IL-1, IL-12, IL-2, IL-4, IL-17, and IFN-γ, and kill gastric cancer tissues by photothermal therapy via direct injection into tumor site under near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. High-performance human CIK cells labeled with Au nanorods are a good novel theranostic platform to exhibit great potential in applications such as tumor-targeted photoacoustic imaging, enhanced immunotherapy, and photothermal therapy in the near future.

  11. H2O2-responsive liposomal nanoprobe for photoacoustic inflammation imaging and tumor theranostics via in vivo chromogenic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liang, Chao; Sun, Xiaoqi; Chen, Jiawen; Yang, Zhijuan; Zhao, He; Feng, Liangzhu; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-05-23

    Abnormal H 2 O 2 levels are closely related to many diseases, including inflammation and cancers. Herein, we simultaneously load HRP and its substrate, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), into liposomal nanoparticles, obtaining a Lipo@HRP&ABTS optical nanoprobe for in vivo H 2 O 2 -responsive chromogenic assay with great specificity and sensitivity. In the presence of H 2 O 2 , colorless ABTS would be converted by HRP into the oxidized form with strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, enabling photoacoustic detection of H 2 O 2 down to submicromolar concentrations. Using Lipo@HRP&ABTS as an H 2 O 2 -responsive nanoprobe, we could accurately detect the inflammation processes induced by LPS or bacterial infection in which H 2 O 2 is generated. Meanwhile, upon systemic administration of this nanoprobe we realize in vivo photoacoustic imaging of small s.c. tumors (∼2 mm in size) as well as orthotopic brain gliomas, by detecting H 2 O 2 produced by tumor cells. Interestingly, local injection of Lipo@HRP&ABTS further enables differentiation of metastatic lymph nodes from those nonmetastatic ones, based on their difference in H 2 O 2 contents. Moreover, using the H 2 O 2 -dependent strong NIR absorbance of Lipo@HRP&ABTS, tumor-specific photothermal therapy is also achieved. This work thus develops a sensitive H 2 O 2 -responsive optical nanoprobe useful not only for in vivo detection of inflammation but also for tumor-specific theranostic applications.

  12. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubin; Wang, Yating; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT) system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases.

  13. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases.

  14. Magneto-Plasmonic Janus Vesicles for Magnetic Field-Enhanced Photoacoustic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumors

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yijing

    2016-11-10

    Magneto-plasmonic Janus vesicles (JVs) integrated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and magnetic NPs (MNPs) were prepared asymmetrically in the membrane for in vivo cancer imaging. The hybrid JVs were produced by coassembling a mixture of hydrophobic MNPs, free amphiphilic block copolymers (BCPs), and AuNPs tethered with amphiphilic BCPs. Depending on the size and content of NPs, the JVs acquired spherical or hemispherical shapes. Among them, hemispherical JVs containing 50 nm AuNPs and 15 nm MNPs showed a strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) window and enhanced the transverse relaxation (T2) contrast effect, as a result of the ordering and dense packing of AuNPs and MNPs in the membrane. The magneto-plasmonic JVs were used as drug delivery vehicles, from which the release of a payload can be triggered by NIR light and the release rate can be modulated by a magnetic field. Moreover, the JVs were applied as imaging agents for in vivo bimodal photoacoustic (PA) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of tumors by intravenous injection. With an external magnetic field, the accumulation of the JVs in tumors was significantly increased, leading to a signal enhancement of approximately 2–3 times in the PA and MR imaging, compared with control groups without a magnetic field.

  15. All-optically integrated photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qiao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available All-optically integrated photoacoustic (PA and optical coherence tomography (OCT dual-mode imaging technology that could offer comprehensive pathological information for accurate diagnosis in clinic has gradually become a promising imaging technology in the aspect of biomedical imaging during the recent years. This review refers to the technology aspects of all-optical PA detection and system evolution of optically integrated PA and OCT, including Michelson interferometer dual-mode imaging system, Fabry–Perot (FP interferometer dual-mode imaging system and Mach–Zehnder interferometer dual-mode imaging system. It is believed that the optically integrated PA and OCT has great potential applications in biomedical imaging.

  16. Spectroscopic Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer using a B7-H3-targeted ICG Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Jensen, Kristen; Machtaler, Steven; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer imaging methods lack diagnostic accuracy, in particular for patients with dense breast tissue, and improved techniques are critically needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antibody-indocyanine green (ICG) conjugates, which undergo dynamic absorption spectrum shifts after cellular endocytosis and degradation, and spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging to differentiate normal breast tissue from breast cancer by imaging B7-H3, a novel breast cancer associated molecular target. Methods: Quantitative immunohistochemical staining of endothelial and epithelial B7-H3 expression was assessed in 279 human breast tissue samples, including normal (n=53), benign lesions (11 subtypes, n=129), and breast cancers (4 subtypes, n=97). After absorption spectra of intracellular and degraded B7-H3-ICG and Isotype control-ICG (Iso-ICG) were characterized, sPA imaging in a transgenic murine breast cancer model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTVPyMT)634Mul) was performed and compared to imaging of control conditions [B7-H3-ICG in tumor negative animals (n=60), Iso-ICG (n=30), blocking B7-H3+B7-H3-ICG (n=20), and free ICG (n=20)] and validated with ex vivo histological analysis. Results: Immunostaining showed differential B7-H3 expression on both the endothelium and tumor epithelium in human breast cancer with an area under the ROC curve of 0.93 to differentiate breast cancer vs non-cancer. Combined in vitro/in vivo imaging showed that sPA allowed specific B7-H3-ICG detection down to the 13 nM concentration and differentiation from Iso-ICG. sPA molecular imaging of B7-H3-ICG showed a 3.01-fold (Pbreast cancer. Leveraging antibody-ICG contrast agents and their dynamic optical absorption spectra allows for highly specific sPA imaging of breast cancer.

  17. Visualization of Protease Activity In Vivo Using an Activatable Photo-Acoustic Imaging Probe Based on CuS Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Nie, Liming; Sun, Xiaolian; Cheng, Liang; Wu, Chenxi; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we for the first time report a novel activatable photoacoustic (PA) imaging nano-probe for in vivo detection of cancer-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). A black hole quencher 3 (BHQ3) which absorbs red light is conjugated to near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles via a MMP-cleavable peptide linker. The obtained CuS-peptide-BHQ3 (CPQ) nano-probe exhibits two distinctive absorption peaks at 630 nm and 930 nm. Inside the tumor microenviorment where MMPs present, the MMP-sensitive peptide would be cleaved, releasing BHQ3 from the CuS nanoparticles, the former of which as a small molecule is then rapidly cleared out from the tumor, whereas the latter of which as large nanoparticles would retain inside the tumor for a much longer period of time. As the result, the PA signal at 680 nm which is contributed by BHQ3 would be quickly diminished while that at 930 nm would be largely retained. The PA signal ratio of 680 nm / 930 nm could thus serve as an in vivo indicator of MMPs activity inside the tumor. Our work presents a novel strategy of in vivo sensing of MMPs based on PA imaging, which should offer remarkably improved detection depth compared with traditional optical imaging techniques. PMID:24465271

  18. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases.

  19. Highly specific spectroscopic photoacoustic molecular imaging of dynamic optical absorption shifts of an antibody-ICG contrast agent (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bachawal, Sunitha; Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Jensen, Kristen C.; Machtaler, Steven; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Juergen K.

    2017-03-01

    Improved techniques for breast cancer screening are critically needed as current methods lack diagnostic accuracy. Using spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) molecular imaging with a priori knowledge of optical absorption spectra allows suppression of endogenous background signal, increasing the overall sensitivity and specificity of the modality to exogenous contrast agents. Here, sPA imaging was used to monitor antibody-indocyanine green (ICG) conjugates as they undergo optical absorption spectrum shifts after cellular endocytosis and degradation to allow differentiation between normal murine mammary glands from breast cancer by enhancing molecular imaging signal from target (B7-H3)-bound antibody-ICG. First, B7-H3 was shown to have highly specific (AUC of 0.93) expression on both vascular endothelium and tumor stroma in malignant lesions through quantitative immunohistochemical staining of B7-H3 on 279 human samples (normal (n=53), benign lesions (11 subtypes, n=182), breast cancers (4 subtypes, n=97)), making B7-H3 a promising target for sPA imaging. Second, absorption spectra of intracellular and degraded B7-H3-ICG and Isotype control (Iso-ICG) were characterized through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Finally, a transgenic murine breast cancer model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTVPyMT)634Mul) was imaged, and sPA imaging in found a 3.01 (IQR 2.63, 3.38, Pcontrast agents, which have dynamic optical absorption spectra representative of molecular interactions, allows for highly specific sPA imaging of murine breast cancer.

  20. A low-cost photoacoustic microscopy system with a laser diode excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianheng; Nandy, Sreyankar; Salehi, Hassan S.; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is capable of mapping microvasculature networks in biological tissue and has demonstrated great potential for biomedical applications. However, the clinical application of the PAM system is limited due to the use of bulky and expensive pulsed laser sources. In this paper, a low-cost optical-resolution PAM system with a pulsed laser diode excitation has been introduced. The lateral resolution of this PAM system was estimated to be 7 µm by imaging a carbon fiber. The phantoms made of polyethylene tubes filled with blood and a mouse ear were imaged to demonstrate the feasibility of this PAM system for imaging biological tissues. PMID:25401019

  1. Real-time co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on FPGA and DSP architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Co-registering ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a logical extension to conventional ultrasound because both modalities provide complementary information of tumor morphology, tumor vasculature and hypoxia for cancer detection and characterization. In addition, both modalities are capable of providing real-time images for clinical applications. In this paper, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) module-based real-time US/PA imaging system is presented. The system provides real-time US/PA data acquisition and image display for up to 5 fps* using the currently implemented DSP board. It can be upgraded to 15 fps, which is the maximum pulse repetition rate of the used laser, by implementing an advanced DSP module. Additionally, the photoacoustic RF data for each frame is saved for further off-line processing. The system frontend consists of eight 16-channel modules made of commercial and customized circuits. Each 16-channel module consists of two commercial 8-channel receiving circuitry boards and one FPGA board from Analog Devices. Each receiving board contains an IC† that combines. 8-channel low-noise amplifiers, variable-gain amplifiers, anti-aliasing filters, and ADC's‡ in a single chip with sampling frequency of 40MHz. The FPGA board captures the LVDSξ Double Data Rate (DDR) digital output of the receiving board and performs data conditioning and subbeamforming. A customized 16-channel transmission circuitry is connected to the two receiving boards for US pulseecho (PE) mode data acquisition. A DSP module uses External Memory Interface (EMIF) to interface with the eight 16-channel modules through a customized adaptor board. The DSP transfers either sub-beamformed data (US pulse-echo mode or PAI imaging mode) or raw data from FPGA boards to its DDR-2 memory through the EMIF link, then it performs additional processing, after that, it transfer the data to the PC** for further image processing. The PC code

  2. Single-cell photoacoustic thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Liu, Yan; Ke, Haixin; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-02-01

    A novel photoacoustic thermometric method is presented for simultaneously imaging cells and sensing their temperature. With three-seconds-per-frame imaging speed, a temperature resolution of 0.2°C was achieved in a photo-thermal cell heating experiment. Compared to other approaches, the photoacoustic thermometric method has the advantage of not requiring custom-developed temperature-sensitive biosensors. This feature should facilitate the conversion of single-cell thermometry into a routine lab tool and make it accessible to a much broader biological research community.

  3. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood–brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for ...

  4. Development of real-time photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin; Yao, Junjie; Li, Li; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography detecting ultrasound signals generated from photon absorption provides optical absorption contrast in vivo for structural, functional and molecular imaging. Although photoacoustic tomography technology has grown fast in recent years, real-time photoacoustic imaging with cellular spatial resolution are still strongly demanded. We developed a photoacoustic microscopy which has video-rate imaging capability with cellular spatial resolution. The system consists of a single-element focused ultrasound transducer, a fiber-based light-delivery subsystem, a voice-coil translation stage, a motion controller, and a data acquisition subsystem. A compact cube is employed to split optical and acoustic beams. The mass of the entire scanning photoacoustic probe is less than 40 grams, which minimizes potential vibrations and inertial effects, therefore, makes it capable to scan fast. The imaging system is capable of acquiring 20 cross-sectional (B-scan) images per second over 9 mm, and up to 40 B-scan images per second over 1 mm. Focused laser beams provide a lateral resolution of five microns. Confocal deployment of optical and acoustic focuses provides higher SNR than optical scanning approach. Micron-sized carbon particles flowing in silicone tubing and in vivo blood flows were imaged in video-rate, which demonstrated the capability to image highly dynamic biological processes in vivo with cellular resolution. This real-time high-resolution photoacoustic imaging system provides a promising approach for various in vivo imaging and quantitative studies.

  5. Linear-array photoacoustic imaging using minimum variance-based delay multiply and sum adaptive beamforming algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Kratkiewicz, Karl; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-02-01

    In photoacoustic imaging, delay-and-sum (DAS) beamformer is a common beamforming algorithm having a simple implementation. However, it results in a poor resolution and high sidelobes. To address these challenges, a new algorithm namely delay-multiply-and-sum (DMAS) was introduced having lower sidelobes compared to DAS. To improve the resolution of DMAS, a beamformer is introduced using minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming combined with DMAS, so-called minimum variance-based DMAS (MVB-DMAS). It is shown that expanding the DMAS equation results in multiple terms representing a DAS algebra. It is proposed to use the MV adaptive beamformer instead of the existing DAS. MVB-DMAS is evaluated numerically and experimentally. In particular, at the depth of 45 mm MVB-DMAS results in about 31, 18, and 8 dB sidelobes reduction compared to DAS, MV, and DMAS, respectively. The quantitative results of the simulations show that MVB-DMAS leads to improvement in full-width-half-maximum about 96%, 94%, and 45% and signal-to-noise ratio about 89%, 15%, and 35% compared to DAS, DMAS, MV, respectively. In particular, at the depth of 33 mm of the experimental images, MVB-DMAS results in about 20 dB sidelobes reduction in comparison with other beamformers. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  6. Linear-array photoacoustic imaging using minimum variance-based delay multiply and sum adaptive beamforming algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Kratkiewicz, Karl; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-02-01

    In photoacoustic imaging, delay-and-sum (DAS) beamformer is a common beamforming algorithm having a simple implementation. However, it results in a poor resolution and high sidelobes. To address these challenges, a new algorithm namely delay-multiply-and-sum (DMAS) was introduced having lower sidelobes compared to DAS. To improve the resolution of DMAS, a beamformer is introduced using minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming combined with DMAS, so-called minimum variance-based DMAS (MVB-DMAS). It is shown that expanding the DMAS equation results in multiple terms representing a DAS algebra. It is proposed to use the MV adaptive beamformer instead of the existing DAS. MVB-DMAS is evaluated numerically and experimentally. In particular, at the depth of 45 mm MVB-DMAS results in about 31, 18, and 8 dB sidelobes reduction compared to DAS, MV, and DMAS, respectively. The quantitative results of the simulations show that MVB-DMAS leads to improvement in full-width-half-maximum about 96%, 94%, and 45% and signal-to-noise ratio about 89%, 15%, and 35% compared to DAS, DMAS, MV, respectively. In particular, at the depth of 33 mm of the experimental images, MVB-DMAS results in about 20 dB sidelobes reduction in comparison with other beamformers.

  7. Bioinspired Multifunctional Melanin-Based Nanoliposome for Photoacoustic/Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Efficient Photothermal Ablation of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Sheng, Danli; Wang, Dong; Yao, Yuanzhi; Yang, Ke; Wang, Zhigang; Deng, Liming; Chen, Yu

    2018-01-01

    Background: The construction of theranostic nanosystems with concurrently high biosafety and therapeutic performance is a challenge but has great significance for the clinical translation of nanomedicine for combating cancer. Methods: Bio-inspired melanin-based nanoliposomes (Lip-Mel) as theranostic agents were constructed for simultaneous photoacoustic (PA) imaging- and T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided photothermal ablation of tumors, which was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo . The high biosafety of Lip-Mel was also systematically evaluated. Results: The achieved Lip-Mel nanoliposomes demonstrated their imaging capability for both PA and T 1 -weighted MR imaging (r 1 = 0.25 mM -1 ·s -1 ) both in vitro and in vivo , providing the potential for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. Importantly, the desirable photothermal-conversion efficiency of the as-prepared Lip-Mel achieved complete eradication of tumors in breast cancer-bearing mice, exhibiting remarkable photothermal-based therapeutic performance. In particular, the efficient encapsulation of melanin into the PEGylated liposome mitigated the potential toxicity of melanin and improved the photothermal performance of the loaded melanin. Systematic in vivo biosafety evaluations demonstrated the high biocompatibility of Lip-Mel at a high dose of 100 mg/kg. Conclusion: In this work, we reported a bioinspired strategy where melanin, a natural product in the human body, is encapsulated into PEGylated nanoliposomes for efficient theranostics with high biocompatibility. This work provides a new strategy for creating desirable theranostic agents with concurrent high biocompatibility and satisfactory theranostic performance through the use of materials that totally originate from biosystems.

  8. Enhanced delivery of gold nanoparticles by acoustic cavitation for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsin; Liao, Ai-Ho; Lin, Jia-Yu; Lee, Cheng-Ru; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Min; Wang, Churng-Ren; Li, Pai-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Gold-nanorods incorporated with microbubbles (AuMBs) were introduced as a photoacoustic/ultrasound dual- modality contrast agent in our previous study. The application can be extended to theragnosis purpose. With the unique physical characteristics of AuMBs, we propose an enhanced delivery method for the encapsulated particles. For example, laser thermotherapy mediated by plasmonic nanoparticles can be made more effective by using microbubbles as a targeted carrier and acoustic cavitation for enhanced sonoporation. The hypothesis was experimentally tested. Firts, these AuMBs first act as molecular probes with binding to specific ligands. The improved targeting efficacy was macroscopically observed by an ultrasound system. The extended retention of targeted AuMB was observed and recorded for 30 minutes in a CT-26 tumor bearing mouse. Secondly, cavitation induced by time-varying acoustic field was also applied to disrupt the microbubbles and cause increased transient cellular permeability (a.k.a., sonoporation). Multimodal optical microscope based on a Cr:forsterite laser was used to directly observe these effects. The microscope can acquired third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon fluorescent (2PF) signals produced by the AuMBs. In vitro examination shows approximately a 60% improvement in terms of fluorescence signals from the cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles after sonoporation treatment. Therefore, we conclude that the controlled release is feasible and can further improve the therapeutic effects of the nanoparticles.

  9. A novel photoacoustic nanoprobe of ICG@PEG-Ag2S for atherosclerosis targeting and imaging in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenxin; Zhang, Yejun; Li, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively accumulated in the region of atherosclerotic plaque due to the lipophilicity of the C18 chain to the atherosclerosis microenvironment, and thus the atherosclerosis was real-time monitored by high contrast-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging of ICG. Combining the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high spatial resolution fluorescence imaging of Ag2S QDs in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) and related histological assessment in vitro, the feasibility of this new nanoprobe for atherosclerosis targeting in an Apoe-/- mouse model was verified. Additionally, hemolysis and coagulation assays of the ICG@PEG-Ag2S revealed its decent hemocompatibility and no histological changes were observed in the main organs of the mouse. Such a simple, multifunctional nanoprobe for targeting and PA imaging of atherosclerosis will have a great potential for future clinical applications.Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively

  10. Rapid volumetric photoacoustic tomographic imaging with a Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensor depicts peripheral arteries and microvascular vasomotor responses to thermal stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Andrew A; Huynh, Nam Trung; Guggenheim, Jamie; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul

    2018-03-01

    To determine if a new photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system successfully depicts (1) peripheral arteries and (2) microvascular circulatory changes in response to thermal stimuli. Following ethical permission, 8 consenting subjects underwent PAI of the dorsalis pedis (DP) artery, and 13 completed PAI of the index fingertip. Finger images were obtained after immersion in warm (30-35 °C) or cold (10-15 °C) water to promote vasodilation or vasoconstriction. The PAI instrument used a Fabry-Perot interferometeric ultrasound sensor and a 30-Hz 750-nm pulsed excitation laser. Volumetric images were acquired through a 14 × 14 × 14-mm volume over 90 s. Images were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively to determine if PAI could depict cold-induced vasoconstriction. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of resolvable vessels was measured. Fingertip vessels were visible in all participants, with mean FWHM of 125 μm. Two radiologists used PAI to correctly identify vasoconstricted fingertip capillary beds with 100% accuracy (95% CI 77.2-100.0%, p thermal stimuli. • Fabry-Perot interferometer-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) generates volumetric, high-resolution images of the peripheral vasculature. • The system reliably detects thermally induced peripheral vasoconstriction (100% correct identification rate, p < 0.001). • Vessels measuring less than 100 μm in diameter can be depicted in vivo.

  11. Laser scanning laser diode photoacoustic microscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Kumavor, Patrick D; Zhu, Quing

    2018-03-01

    The development of low-cost and fast photoacoustic microscopy systems enhances the clinical applicability of photoacoustic imaging systems. To this end, we present a laser scanning laser diode-based photoacoustic microscopy system. In this system, a 905 nm, 325 W maximum output peak power pulsed laser diode with 50 ns pulsewidth is utilized as the light source. A combination of aspheric and cylindrical lenses is used for collimation of the laser diode beam. Two galvanometer scanning mirrors steer the beam across a focusing aspheric lens. The lateral resolution of the system was measured to be ∼21 μm using edge spread function estimation. No averaging was performed during data acquisition. The imaging speed is ∼370 A-lines per second. Photoacoustic microscopy images of human hairs, ex vivo mouse ear, and ex vivo porcine ovary are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and potentials of the proposed system.

  12. BODIPY derivatives as molecular photoacoustic contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoui, Samir; Bag, Seema; Dantiste, Olivier; Frenette, Mathieu; Hatamimoslehabadi, Maryam; Bellinger-Buckley, Stephanie; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Rochford, Jonathan; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is emerging as a key in vivo imaging technique. Endogenous contrast agents alone are insufficient to obtain high contrast images necessitating a need for synthetic exogenous contrast agents. In recent years a great deal of research has been devoted to the development of nanoparticle based contrast agents with little effort on molecular systems. Here we report on the design and evaluation of BODIPY inspired molecular photoacoustic contrast agents (MPACs). Through chemical modification of the established BODIPY fluorophore, increasing its vibrational freedom and appending with non-emissive functionalities, it is demonstrated that the S0-S1 absorbed excitation energy is redirected towards a nonradiative excited-state decay pathway. Optical and photoacoustic characterization of the modified BODIPY MPACs demonstrates a stronger photoacoustic signal compared to the corresponding fluorescent BODIPY probes.

  13. Interactive Processing and Visualization of Image Data forBiomedical and Life Science Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staadt, Oliver G.; Natarjan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley,David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-02-01

    Background: Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results: We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life science applications. We present an adaptive high-resolution display system suitable for biomedical image data, algorithms for analyzing and visualization protein surfaces and retinal optical coherence tomography data, and visualization tools for 3D gene expression data. Conclusion: We demonstrated that interactive processing and visualization methods and systems can support scientists in a variety of biomedical and life science application areas concerned with massive data analysis.

  14. Collaborative Initiative in Biomedical Imaging to Study Complex Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Weili [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Fiddy, Michael A. [The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    2012-03-31

    The work reported addressed these topics: Fluorescence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; X-ray interferometer/phase imaging system; Quantitative imaging from scattered fields, Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy; and Multiphoton and Raman microscopy.

  15. A review of microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging: Excitation source, data acquisition system and biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Cui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI is a noninvasive modality based on the differences in microwave absorption of various biological tissues. TAI has been extensively researched in recent years, and several studies have revealed that TAI possesses advantages such as high resolution, high contrast, high imaging depth and fast imaging speed. In this paper, we reviewed the development of the TAI technique, its excitation source, data acquisition system and biomedical applications. It is believed that TAI has great potential applications in biomedical research and clinical study.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging for differential diagnosis of benign polyps versus malignant polyps of the gallbladder: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Hee Dong; Lee, Jae Young; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin Young; Kang, Mee Joo [Div. of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jin Ho; Kang, Jeeun [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate the feasibility of ex vivo multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging in differentiating cholesterol versus neoplastic polyps, and benign versus malignant polyps, of the gallbladder. A total of 38 surgically confirmed gallbladder polyps (24 cholesterol polyps, 4 adenomas, and 10 adenocarcinomas) from 38 patients were prospectively included in this study. The surgical specimens were set on a gel pad immersed in a saline-filled container. The PA intensities of polyps were then measured, using two separate wavelength intervals (421–647 nm and 692–917 nm). Mann-Whitney U test was performed for the comparison of normalized PA intensities between the cholesterol and neoplastic polyps, and between the benign and malignant polyps. Kruskal-Wallis test was conducted for the comparison of normalized PA intensities among the cholesterol polyps, adenomas, and adenocarcinomas. A significant difference was observed in the normalized PA intensities between the cholesterol and neoplastic polyps at 459 nm (median, 1.00 vs. 0.73; p = 0.032). Comparing the benign and malignant polyps, there were significant differences in the normalized PA intensities at 765 nm (median, 0.67 vs. 0.78; p = 0.013), 787 nm (median, 0.65 vs. 0.77; p = 0.034), and 853 nm (median, 0.59 vs. 0.85; p = 0.028). The comparison of the normalized PA intensities among cholesterol polyps, adenomas, and adenocarcinomas demonstrated marginally significant differences at 765 nm (median, 0.67 vs. 0.66 vs. 0.78, respectively; p = 0.049). These preliminary results indicate that benign versus malignant gallbladder polyps might exhibit different spectral patterns on multispectral PA imaging.

  17. Photo-Acoustic Ultrasound Imaging to Distinguish Benign from Malignant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    University Page 2 of 13 1. INTRODUCTION: Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves at frequencies above the human hearing range to image organs within the body ... Imaging of phantom in a rotating water tank which revolves the sample around the probe body . (D) Deconstructed ultrasound image of the phantom...other disciplines ? This work will have a substantial impact on multiple disciplines including medical imaging , focal therapies, and medical

  18. Fully integrated reflection-mode photoacoustic, two-photon, and second harmonic generation microscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Zhan, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Song, Liang

    2016-08-01

    The ability to obtain comprehensive structural and functional information from intact biological tissue in vivo is highly desirable for many important biomedical applications, including cancer and brain studies. Here, we developed a fully integrated multimodal microscopy that can provide photoacoustic (optical absorption), two-photon (fluorescence), and second harmonic generation (SHG) information from tissue in vivo, with intrinsically co-registered images. Moreover, using a delicately designed optical-acoustic coupling configuration, a high-frequency miniature ultrasonic transducer was integrated into a water-immersion optical objective, thus allowing all three imaging modalities to provide a high lateral resolution of ~290 nm with reflection-mode imaging capability, which is essential for studying intricate anatomy, such as that of the brain. Taking advantage of the complementary and comprehensive contrasts of the system, we demonstrated high-resolution imaging of various tissues in living mice, including microvasculature (by photoacoustics), epidermis cells, cortical neurons (by two-photon fluorescence), and extracellular collagen fibers (by SHG). The intrinsic image co-registration of the three modalities conveniently provided improved visualization and understanding of the tissue microarchitecture. The reported results suggest that, by revealing complementary tissue microstructures in vivo, this multimodal microscopy can potentially facilitate a broad range of biomedical studies, such as imaging of the tumor microenvironment and neurovascular coupling.

  19. Adaptive optics photoacoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Minshan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Puliafito, Carmen A; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2010-10-11

    We have developed an adaptive optics photoacoustic microscope (AO-PAM) for high-resolution imaging of biological tissues, especially the retina. To demonstrate the feasibility of AO-PAM we first designed the AO system to correct the wavefront errors of the illuminating light of PAM. The aberrations of the optical system delivering the illuminating light to the sample in PAM was corrected with a close-loop AO system consisting of a 141-element MEMS-based deformable mirror (DM) and a Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensor operating at 15 Hz. The photoacoustic signal induced by the illuminating laser beam was detected by a custom-built needle ultrasonic transducer. When the wavefront errors were corrected by the AO system, the lateral resolution of PAM was measured to be better than 2.5 µm using a low NA objective lens. We tested the system on imaging ex vivo ocular samples, e.g., the ciliary body and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of a pig eye. The AO-PAM images showed significant quality improvement. For the first time we were able to resolve single RPE cells with PAM.

  20. New software developments for quality mesh generation and optimization from biomedical imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zeyun; Wang, Jun; Gao, Zhanheng; Xu, Ming; Hoshijima, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a new software toolkit for generating and optimizing surface and volumetric meshes from three-dimensional (3D) biomedical imaging data, targeted at image-based finite element analysis of some biomedical activities in a single material domain. Our toolkit includes a series of geometric processing algorithms including surface re-meshing and quality-guaranteed tetrahedral mesh generation and optimization. All methods described have been encapsulated into a user-friendly graphical interface for easy manipulation and informative visualization of biomedical images and mesh models. Numerous examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the described methods and toolkit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging-directed re-endothelialization of acellular vasculature leads to improved vascular performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Ryan J; Ouyang, Yafei; Keller, Renee; Nam, Seung Yun; Malik, George R; Emelianov, Stanislav Y; Suggs, Laura J; Schmidt, Christine E

    2016-03-01

    As increasing effort is dedicated to investigating the regenerative capacity of decellularized tissues, research has progressed to recellularizing these tissues prior to implantation. The delivery and support of cells seeded throughout acellular scaffolds are typically conducted through the vascular axis of the tissues. However, it is unclear how cell concentration and injection frequency can affect the distribution of cells throughout the scaffold. Furthermore, what effects re-endothelialization have on vascular patency and function are not well understood. We investigated the use of ultrasound-guided photoacoustic (US/PA) imaging as a technique to visualize the distribution of microvascular endothelial cells within an optimized acellular construct upon re-endothelialization and perfusion conditioning. We also evaluated the vascular performance of the re-endothelialized scaffold using quantitative vascular corrosion casting (qVCC) and whole-blood perfusion. We found US/PA imaging was an effective technique to visualize the distribution of cells. Cellular retention following perfusion conditioning was also detected with US/PA imaging. Finally, we demonstrated that a partial recovery of vascular performance is possible following re-endothelialization-confirmed by fewer extravasations in qVCC and improved blood clearance following whole-blood perfusion. Re-endothelialization is a method that enables decellularized tissue to become useful as a tissue engineering construct by creating a nutrient delivery and waste removal system for the entire construct. Our approach utilizes a decellularization method that retains the basement ECM of a highly vascularized tissue upon which endothelial cells can be injected to form an endothelium. The US/PA method allows for rapid visualization of cells within a construct several cm thick. This approach can be experimentally used to observe changes in cellular distribution over large intervals of time, to help optimize cell seeding

  2. Bio-medical X-ray imaging with spectroscopic pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P H; Tipples, R; Cook, N; Watts, R; Meyer, J; Bell, A J; Melzer, T R; Butler, P H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the clinical potential of spectroscopic X-ray detectors and to undertake a feasibility study using a novel detector in a clinical hospital setting. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allowing for routine use of spectroscopic bio-medical imaging. We have coined the term MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) for bio-medical images that provide spatial, temporal, and energy information. The full clinical significance of spectroscopic X-ray imaging is difficult to predict but insights can be gained by examining both image reconstruction artifacts and the current uses of dual-energy techniques. This paper reviews the known uses of energy information in vascular imaging and mammography, clinically important fields. It then presents initial results from using Medipix-2, to image human tissues within a clinical radiology department. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allo...

  3. Advances in biomedical signal and image processing – A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rajeswari

    Full Text Available Biomedical signal and image processing establish a dynamic area of specialization in both academic as well as research aspects of biomedical engineering. The concepts of signal and image processing have been widely used for extracting the physiological information in implementing many clinical procedures for sophisticated medical practices and applications. In this paper, the relationship between electrophysiological signals, i.e., electrocardiogram (ECG, electromyogram (EMG, electroencephalogram (EEG and functional image processing and their derived interactions have been discussed. Examples have been investigated in various case studies such as neurosciences, functional imaging, and cardiovascular system, by using different algorithms and methods. The interaction between the extracted information obtained from multiple signals and modalities seems to be very promising. The advanced algorithms and methods in the area of information retrieval based on time-frequency representation have been investigated. Finally, some examples of algorithms have been discussed in which the electrophysiological signals and functional images have been properly extracted and have a significant impact on various biomedical applications. Keywords: Biomedical signals and images, Processing, Analysis

  4. Preparation and In Vitro Evaluation of a Multifunctional Iron Silicate@Liposome Nanohybrid for pH-Sensitive Doxorubicin Delivery and Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehua Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For preventing premature drug release in neutral environment and avoiding them being trapped into the endosomal/lysosomal system, we developed a novel iron silicate@liposome hybrid (ILH formulation, which can be used as a carrier to transport doxorubicin (DOX in a pH-sensitive manner and to escape from endosomal/lysosomal trapping through “proton-sponge” effect. The high intensity of photoacoustic signal from in vitro photoacoustic imaging (PAI experiments suggests that it is a promising candidate for PAI agent, providing the potential for simultaneously bioimaging and cancer-targeting drug delivery. Cytotoxicity of our formulation toward tumor cells was remarkably higher than free DOX (48.4±7.7% and 26.2±8.4%, P<0.001. Confocal laser scanning microscopy experiments showed the enhanced transportation and enrichment process of DOX in QSG-7703 cells. Taking together, we developed an easy approach to construct a multifunctional anticancer drug delivery/imaging system with a potency as a PAI agent. The strategy of combining drug carrier and imaging agent is an emerging platform for further construction of nanoparticle and may play a significant role in cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  5. Biomedical image analysis recipes in Matlab for life scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos

    2015-01-01

    As its title suggests, this innovative book has been written for life scientists needing to analyse their data sets, and programmers, wanting a better understanding of the types of experimental images life scientists investigate on a regular basis. Each chapter presents one self-contained biomedical experiment to be analysed. Part I of the book presents its two basic ingredients: essential concepts of image analysis and Matlab. In Part II, algorithms and techniques are shown as series of 'recipes' or solved examples that show how specific techniques are applied to a biomedical experiments like

  6. Filled carbon nanotubes in biomedical imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincic, Markus; Tobias, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been advocated as promising candidates in the biomedical field in the areas of diagnosis and therapy. In terms of drug delivery, the use of carbon nanotubes can overcome some limitations of 'free' drugs by improving the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs, allowing targeted delivery and even enabling the co-delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. Two different approaches are currently being explored for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents by carbon nanotubes, namely attachment of the payload to the external sidewalls or encapsulation into the inner cavities. Although less explored, the latter confers additional stability to the chosen diagnostic or therapeutic agents, and leaves the backbone structure of the nanotubes available for its functionalization with dispersing and targeting moieties. Several drug delivery systems and diagnostic agents have been developed in the last years employing the inner tubular cavities of carbon nanotubes. The research discussed in this review focuses on the use of carbon nanotubes that contain in their interior drug molecules and diagnosis-related compounds. The approaches employed for the development of such nanoscale vehicles along with targeting and releasing strategies are discussed. The encapsulation of both biomedical contrast agents and drugs inside carbon nanotubes is further expanding the possibilities to allow an early diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  7. Upconversion nanoparticles and their composite nanostructures for biomedical imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Wang, Chao; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-12-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), particularly lanthanide-doped nanocrystals, which emit high energy photons under excitation by the near-infrared (NIR) light, have found potential applications in many different fields, including biomedicine. Compared with traditional down-conversion fluorescence imaging, the NIR light excited upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging relying on UCNPs exhibits improved tissue penetration depth, higher photochemical stability, and is free of auto-fluorescence background, which promises biomedical imaging with high sensitivity. On the other hand, the unique upconversion process of UCNPs may be utilized to activate photosensitive therapeutic agents for applications in cancer treatment. Moreover, the integration of UCNPs with other functional nanostructures could result in the obtained nanocomposites having highly enriched functionalities, useful in imaging-guided cancer therapies. This review article will focus on the biomedical imaging and cancer therapy applications of UCNPs and their nanocomposites, and discuss recent advances and future prospects in this emerging field.

  8. Biomedical applications of nanodiamonds in imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevedentseva, Elena; Lin, Yu-Chung; Jani, Mona; Cheng, Chia-Liang

    2013-12-01

    Nanodiamonds have attracted remarkable scientific attention for bioimaging and therapeutic applications owing to their low toxicity with many cell lines, convenient surface properties and stable fluorescence without photobleaching. Newer techniques are being applied to enhance fluorescence. Interest is also growing in exploring the possibilities for modifying the nanodiamond surface and functionalities by attaching various biomolecules of interest for interaction with the targets. The potential of Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence properties of nanodiamonds has been explored for bioimaging and drug delivery tracing. The interest in nanodiamonds' biological/medical application appears to be continuing with enhanced focus. In this review an attempt is made to capture the scope, spirit and recent developments in the field of nanodiamonds for biomedical applications.

  9. [Nondestructive imaging of elements distribution in biomedical samples by X-ray fluorescence computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qun; Deng, Biao; Lü, Wei-Wei; Du, Guo-Hao; Yan, Fu-Hua; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Xu, Hong-Jie

    2011-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography is a stimulated emission tomography that allows nondestructive reconstruction of the elements distribution in the sample, which is important for biomedical investigations. Owing to the high flux density and easy energy tunability of highly collimated synchrotron X-rays, it is possible to apply X-ray fluorescence CT to biomedical samples. Reported in the present paper, an X-ray fluorescence CT system was established at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility for the investigations of trace elements distribution inside biomedical samples. By optimizing the experiment setup, the spatial resolution was improved and the data acquisition process was obviously speeded up. The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was introduced for the image reconstruction, which remarkably improved the imaging accuracy of element distributions. The developed system was verified by the test sample and medical sample respectively. The results showed that the distribution of interested elements could be imaged correctly, and the spatial resolution of 150 m was achieved. In conclusion, the developed system could be applied to the research on large-size biomedical samples, concerning imaging accuracy, spatial resolution and data collection time.

  10. Endovascular Device Testing with Particle Image Velocimetry Enhances Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Priya; Ankeny, Casey J.; Ryan, Justin; Okcay, Murat; Frakes, David H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of a new system, HemoFlow™, which utilizes state of the art technologies such as particle image velocimetry to test endovascular devices as part of an undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. Students deployed an endovascular stent into an anatomical model of a cerebral aneurysm and measured intra-aneurysmal flow…

  11. Molecular mass spectrometry imaging in biomedical and life science research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pól, Jaroslav; Strohalm, Martin; Havlíček, Vladimír; Volný, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 5 (2010), s. 423-443 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GPP206/10/P018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Mass spectrometry * Chemical imaging * Molecular imaging Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.727, year: 2010

  12. Advanced Contrast Agents for Multimodal Biomedical Imaging Based on Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Daniel; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2018-01-01

    Clinical imaging modalities have reached a prominent role in medical diagnosis and patient management in the last decades. Different image methodologies as Positron Emission Tomography, Single Photon Emission Tomography, X-Rays, or Magnetic Resonance Imaging are in continuous evolution to satisfy the increasing demands of current medical diagnosis. Progress in these methodologies has been favored by the parallel development of increasingly more powerful contrast agents. These are molecules that enhance the intrinsic contrast of the images in the tissues where they accumulate, revealing noninvasively the presence of characteristic molecular targets or differential physiopathological microenvironments. The contrast agent field is currently moving to improve the performance of these molecules by incorporating the advantages that modern nanotechnology offers. These include, mainly, the possibilities to combine imaging and therapeutic capabilities over the same theranostic platform or improve the targeting efficiency in vivo by molecular engineering of the nanostructures. In this review, we provide an introduction to multimodal imaging methods in biomedicine, the sub-nanometric imaging agents previously used and the development of advanced multimodal and theranostic imaging agents based in nanotechnology. We conclude providing some illustrative examples from our own laboratories, including recent progress in theranostic formulations of magnetoliposomes containing ω-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids to treat inflammatory diseases, or the use of stealth liposomes engineered with a pH-sensitive nanovalve to release their cargo specifically in the acidic extracellular pH microenvironment of tumors.

  13. Neurovascular photoacoustic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular coupling refers to the relationship between neuronal activities and downstream hemodynamic responses. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT, enabling comprehensive label-free imaging of hemodynamic activities with highly scalable penetration and spatial resolution, has great potential in the study of neurovascular coupling. In this review, we first introduce the technical basis of hemodynamic PAT—including label-free quantification of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygenation, and blood flow—as well as its applications in hemodynamic monitoring. Then, we demonstrate the potential application of PAT in neurovascular imaging by highlighting representative studies on cerebral vascular responses to whisker stimulation and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, potential research directions and associated technical challenges are discussed.

  14. A software package for biomedical image processing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, J.G.M.; Mealha, O.

    1988-01-01

    The decreasing cost of computing power and the introduction of low cost imaging boards justifies the increasing number of applications of digital image processing techniques in the area of biomedicine. There is however a large software gap to be fulfilled, between the application and the equipment. The requirements to bridge this gap are twofold: good knowledge of the hardware provided and its interface to the host computer, and expertise in digital image processing and analysis techniques. A software package incorporating these two requirements was developed using the C programming language, in order to create a user friendly image processing programming environment. The software package can be considered in two different ways: as a data structure adapted to image processing and analysis, which acts as the backbone and the standard of communication for all the software; and as a set of routines implementing the basic algorithms used in image processing and analysis. Hardware dependency is restricted to a single module upon which all hardware calls are based. The data structure that was built has four main features: hierchical, open, object oriented, and object dependent dimensions. Considering the vast amount of memory needed by imaging applications and the memory available in small imaging systems, an effective image memory management scheme was implemented. This software package is being used for more than one and a half years by users with different applications. It proved to be an excellent tool for helping people to get adapted into the system, and for standardizing and exchanging software, yet preserving flexibility allowing for users' specific implementations. The philosophy of the software package is discussed and the data structure that was built is described in detail

  15. An optimized ultrasound detector for photoacoustic breast tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has proven to be able to detect vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast associated with tumors. In order to detect breast tumors located a few centimeter deep in tissue, a sensitive ultrasound detector is of crucial importance for photoacoustic mammography. Further,

  16. An optimized ultrasound detector for photoacoustic breast tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, W.; Piras, D.; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; van Veldhoven, S.; Prins, C; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Photoacoustic imaging has proven to be able to detect vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast associated with tumors. In order to detect breast tumors located a few centimeter deep in tissue, a sensitive ultrasound detector is of crucial importance for photoacoustic mammography.

  17. In vitro and in vivo mapping of drug release after laser ablation thermal therapy with doxorubicin-loaded hollow gold nanoshells using fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Min; Bouchard, Richard R.; Mitcham, Trevor; Wallace, Michael; Stafford, R. Jason; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay; Melancon, Marites P.

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin-loaded hollow nanoshells (Dox@PEG-HAuNS) increases the efficacy of photothermal ablation (PTA) by not only mediating efficient PTA but also through chemotherapy, and therefore have potential utility for local anticancer therapy. However, in vivo real-time monitoring of Dox release and temperature achieved during the laser ablation technique has not been previously demonstrated before. In this study, we used fluorescence optical imaging to map the release of Dox from Dox@PEG-HAuNS and photoacoustic imaging to monitor the tumor temperature achieved during near-infrared laser–induced photothermal heating in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, treatment with a 3-W laser was sufficient to initiate the release of Dox from Dox@PEG-HAuNS (1:3:1 wt/wt, 1.32×1012 particles/mL). Laser powers of 3 and 6 W achieved ablative temperatures of more than 50 °C. In 4T1 tumor–bearing nude mice that received intratumoral or intravenous injections of Dox@PEG-HAuNS, fluorescence optical imaging (emission wavelength = 600 nm, excitation wavelength = 500 nm) revealed that the fluorescence intensity in surface laser–treated tumors 24 h after treatment was significantly higher than that in untreated tumors (p=0.015 for intratumoral, p=0.008 for intravenous). Similar results were obtained using an interstitial laser to irradiate tumors following the intravenous injection of Dox@PEG-HAuNS (p=0.002 at t=24h). Photoacoustic imaging (acquisition wavelength = 800 nm) revealed that laser treatment caused a substantial increase in tumor temperature, from 37 °C to ablative temperatures of more than 50 °C. Ex vivo analysis revealed that the fluorescence intensity of laser-treated tumors was twice as high as that of untreated tumors (p=0.009). Histological analysis confirmed that intratumoral injection of Dox@PEG-HAuNS and laser treatment caused significantly more tumor necrosis compared to tumors that were not treated with laser (pimaging and photoacoustic imaging are promising

  18. Melanin-Based Contrast Agents for Biomedical Optoacoustic Imaging and Theranostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Dario Livio; Stefania, Rachele; Aime, Silvio; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2017-08-07

    Optoacoustic imaging emerged in early 1990s as a new biomedical imaging technology that generates images by illuminating tissues with short laser pulses and detecting resulting ultrasound waves. This technique takes advantage of the spectroscopic approach to molecular imaging, and delivers high-resolution images in the depth of tissue. Resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is scalable, so that biomedical systems from cellular organelles to large organs can be visualized and, more importantly, characterized based on their optical absorption coefficient, which is proportional to the concentration of absorbing chromophores. Optoacoustic imaging was shown to be useful in both preclinical research using small animal models and in clinical applications. Applications in the field of molecular imaging offer abundant opportunities for the development of highly specific and effective contrast agents for quantitative optoacoustic imaging. Recent efforts are being made in the direction of nontoxic biodegradable contrast agents (such as nanoparticles made of melanin) that are potentially applicable in clinical optoacoustic imaging. In order to increase the efficiency and specificity of contrast agents and probes, they need to be made smart and capable of controlled accumulation in the target cells. This review was written in recognition of the potential breakthroughs in medical optoacoustic imaging that can be enabled by efficient and nontoxic melanin-based optoacoustic contrast agents.

  19. Feasibility of telemammography as biomedical application for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckerman, Barbara G.; Batsell, Stephen G.; MacIntyre, Lawrence P.; Sarraf, Hamed S.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Schnall, Mitchell D.

    1999-07-01

    Mammographic screening is an important tool in the early detection of breast cancer. The migration of mammography from the current mode of x-ray mammography using a film screen image detector and display to a digital technology provides an opportunity to improve access and performance of breast cancer screening. The sheer size and volume of the typical screening exam, the need to have previous screening data readily available, and the need to view other breast imaging data together to provide a common consensus and to plan treatment, make telemammography an ideal application for breast imaging. For telemammography to be a viable option, it must overcome the technical challenges related to transmission, archiving, management, processing and retrieval of large data sets. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Chicago and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems/Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a framework for transmission of large-scale medical images over high-speed networks, leveraged existing high-speed networks between research and medical facilities; tested the feasibility of point-to-point transmission of mammographic images in a near-real time environment; evaluated network performance and transmission scenarios; and investigated the impact of image preprocessing on an experimental computer-aided diagnosis system. Results of the initial study are reported here.

  20. In vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    algorithms have been developed to de- convolute the individual chromophore PA images. Five dyes (IRDye800CW, AlexaFluor750, Cy7-NHS- ester, Cy7...specific biomarker. Thi the PA signal spectrum of endogenous or exogenous dye components and algorithms have been developed to de-convolve the... incubated in a 4 µM solution of the TMIA in PBS, washed thrice in PBS by centrifugation and resuspension, and Fig. 5. Sensitivity of IRDye800CW using

  1. Fabrication of naphthalocyanine nanoparticles by laser ablation in liquid and application to contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Ryuga; Asahi, Tsuyoshi; Ishibashi, Yukihide; Odawara, Osamu; Wada, Hiroyuki

    2018-03-01

    Naphthalocyanine nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation in liquid using second-harmonics of nanosecond Nd:YAG laser as an excitation light sauce at various laser fluence, and the properties of naphthalocyanine nanoparticles, such as shape, size, zeta potential, chemical structure and optical absorption were examined. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed that the particle size of the nanoparticles could be controlled by the laser fluence. The IR spectra of the nanoparticles indicated the formation of carboxylate anion species at laser fluences above 100 mJ/cm2, which will result the zeta potential of the nanoparticles depending on the laser fluence. We also examined the potential application to contrast agents for photoacoustic, and confirmed that the naphthalocyanine nanoparticles generated a strong photoacoustic signal.

  2. Noninvasive imaging of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation for detection of osteoarthritis in the finger joints using multispectral three-dimensional quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    We present quantitative imaging of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in in vivo finger joints and evaluate the feasibility of detecting osteoarthritis (OA) in the hand using three-dimensional (3D) multispectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography (3D qPAT). The results show that both the anatomical structures and quantitative chromophore concentrations (oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin) of different joint tissues (hard phalanges and soft cartilage/synovial fluid between phalanges) can be imaged in vivo with the multispectral 3D qPAT. Enhanced hemoglobin concentrations and dropped oxygen saturations in osteoarthritic phalanges and soft joint tissues in joint cavities have been observed. This study indicates that the multispectral 3D qPAT is a promising approach to detect the angiogenesis and hypoxia associated with OA disease and a potential clinical tool for early OA detection in the finger joints. (paper)

  3. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seunghoon; Kim, Sehui; Kim, Jeehyun; Lee, Changho; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-01-01

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo

  4. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  5. Annotating image ROIs with text descriptions for multimodal biomedical document retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Daekeun; Simpson, Matthew; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Regions of interest (ROIs) that are pointed to by overlaid markers (arrows, asterisks, etc.) in biomedical images are expected to contain more important and relevant information than other regions for biomedical article indexing and retrieval. We have developed several algorithms that localize and extract the ROIs by recognizing markers on images. Cropped ROIs then need to be annotated with contents describing them best. In most cases accurate textual descriptions of the ROIs can be found from figure captions, and these need to be combined with image ROIs for annotation. The annotated ROIs can then be used to, for example, train classifiers that separate ROIs into known categories (medical concepts), or to build visual ontologies, for indexing and retrieval of biomedical articles. We propose an algorithm that pairs visual and textual ROIs that are extracted from images and figure captions, respectively. This algorithm based on dynamic time warping (DTW) clusters recognized pointers into groups, each of which contains pointers with identical visual properties (shape, size, color, etc.). Then a rule-based matching algorithm finds the best matching group for each textual ROI mention. Our method yields a precision and recall of 96% and 79%, respectively, when ground truth textual ROI data is used.

  6. Photoacoustic tomography using integrating line detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgholzer, P.; Berer, T.; Gruen, H.; Roitner, H.; Bauer-Marschallinger, J.; Nuster, R.; Paltauf, G.

    2010-03-01

    Photoacoustic Imaging (also known as thermoacoustic or optoacoustic imaging) is a novel imaging method which combines the advantages of Diffuse Optical Imaging (high contrast) and Ultrasonic Imaging (high spatial resolution). In photoacoustic imaging, a short laser pulse excites the sample. The absorbed energy causes a thermoelastic expansion and thereby launches a broadband ultrasonic wave (photoacoustic signal). This way one can measure the optical contrast of a sample with ultrasonic resolution. For collecting photoacoustic signals our group introduced so called integrating detectors a few years ago. Such integrating detectors integrate the pressure in one or two dimensions (line or plane detectors). Thereby the three dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a two or a one dimensional problem for the pressure projections for line or plane detectors, respectively. Several reconstruction methods like Fourier or F-SAFT reconstruction or back projection are used for the two dimensional first step, but the model-based time reversal method shows a significant advantage: acoustical heterogeneity and attenuation, which both cause blurring of reconstructions, can be directly implemented in the reconstruction method. The integrating detectors are mainly optical detectors and thus can provide a high bandwidth up to several 100 MHz. Using these detectors the resolution is often limited by the acoustic attenuation in the sample itself, because attenuation increases with higher frequencies. For thin layers, small cylinders, and small spherical inclusions the effect of attenuation in human fat is simulated and the influence of dispersion on image reconstruction is shown.

  7. An efficient sampling algorithm for uncertain abnormal data detection in biomedical image processing and disease prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Xi; Jia, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computer information processing algorithm that can be used for biomedical image processing and disease prediction. A biomedical image is considered a data object in a multi-dimensional space. Each dimension is a feature that can be used for disease diagnosis. We introduce a new concept of the top (k1,k2) outlier. It can be used to detect abnormal data objects in the multi-dimensional space. This technique focuses on uncertain space, where each data object has several possible instances with distinct probabilities. We design an efficient sampling algorithm for the top (k1,k2) outlier in uncertain space. Some improvement techniques are used for acceleration. Experiments show our methods' high accuracy and high efficiency.

  8. A facile synthesis of versatile Cu2-xS nanoprobe for enhanced MRI and infrared thermal/photoacoustic multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Juan; Liu, Chengbo; Li, Pei; Chen, Yu; Xu, Huixiong; Wei, Chenyang; Song, Liang; Shi, Jianlin; Chen, Hangrong

    2015-07-01

    A novel type of intelligent nanoprobe by using single component of Cu2-xS for multimodal imaging has been facilely and rapidly synthesized in scale via thermal decomposition followed by biomimetic phospholipid modification, which endows them with uniform and small nanoparticle size (ca.15 nm), well phosphate buffer saline (PBS) dispersity, high stability, and excellent biocompatibility. The as-synthesized Cu2-xS nanoprobes (Cu2-xS NPs) are capable of providing contrast enhancement for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as demonstrated by the both in vitro and in vivo imaging investigations for the first time. In addition, due to their strong near infrared (NIR) optical absorption, they can also serve as a candidate contrast agent for enhanced infrared thermal/photoacoustic imaging, to meet the shortfalls of MRI. Hence, complementary and potentially more comprehensive information can be acquired for the early detection and accurate diagnosis of cancer. Furthermore, negligible systematic side effects to the blood and tissue were observed in a relatively long period of 3 months. The distinctive multimodal imaging capability with excellent hemo/histocompatibility of the Cu2-xS NPs could open up a new molecular imaging possibility for detecting and diagnosing cancer or other diseases in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Morphological image processing for quantitative shape analysis of biomedical structures: effective contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    A contrast enhancement approach utilizing a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing is introduced. The method is quantitatively evaluated and then applied to some medical images. Image processing methods significantly contribute to visualization of images captured by biomedical modalities (such as mammography, X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and light and electron microscopy). Quantitative interpretation of the deluge of complicated biomedical images, however, poses many research challenges, one of which is to enhance structural features that are scarcely perceptible to the human eye. This study introduces a contrast enhancement approach based on a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing. The proposed method is applied to medical images for the enhancement of structural features. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated quantitatively by the contrast improvement ratio (CIR). The CIR of the proposed method is 12.1, versus 4.7 and 0.1 for two conventional contrast enhancement methods, clearly indicating the high contrasting capability of the method

  10. Morphological image processing for quantitative shape analysis of biomedical structures: effective contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kimori@orion.ac.jp [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 5-1 Higashiyama, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    A contrast enhancement approach utilizing a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing is introduced. The method is quantitatively evaluated and then applied to some medical images. Image processing methods significantly contribute to visualization of images captured by biomedical modalities (such as mammography, X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and light and electron microscopy). Quantitative interpretation of the deluge of complicated biomedical images, however, poses many research challenges, one of which is to enhance structural features that are scarcely perceptible to the human eye. This study introduces a contrast enhancement approach based on a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing. The proposed method is applied to medical images for the enhancement of structural features. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated quantitatively by the contrast improvement ratio (CIR). The CIR of the proposed method is 12.1, versus 4.7 and 0.1 for two conventional contrast enhancement methods, clearly indicating the high contrasting capability of the method.

  11. Original Research. Photoacoustic Microscopy in Dental Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Adrian Tudor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Photoacoustic microscopy, also known as optoacoustic imaging, is a comparatively new method of investigation in dental medicine, which uses a laser-generated ultrasound (short laser pulses to achieve images for interpretation. Photoacoustic microscopy can be used in a broad spectrum, from detecting tooth decay at its earliest stages to dental anatomy analysis. Material and methods: The energy emitted by the photoacoustic pulse is moderately absorbed by the target and exchanged into heat, leading to a local transitory temperature upsurge. The tension propagates and grows as ultrasonic waves, distinguished by the ultrasonic transducers which are planted apart from the tissue. The photoacoustic microscope has a tunable dye laser which passes through a condensing lens, an objective and ultimately an ultrasonic transducer attached to an acoustic lens to capture and receive information about the scanned probe from a sample moved on the X, Y dimensions. Results: The precise anatomy of layered concentric structures can be clearly observed in photoacoustic microscopy. The image value of the inner layer can be higher, indicating strong optical absorption, while the image value of the outer layer is lower, indicating weaker optical absorption. Meanwhile, the inner layer has the exact same size as the dentin structure and the outer layer has the exact same size as the enamel structure in this cross-section. Conclusions: The photoacoustic microscope (all-optical comes out to be a future and promising tool for detecting early-stage caries and lesions on the surface of the teeth, where micro-leakage occurs at the interface of tooth restoration, and also the anatomy of dental tissues.

  12. Medical imaging education in biomedical engineering curriculum: courseware development and application through a hybrid teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weizhao; Li, Xiping; Chen, Hairong; Manns, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Medical Imaging is a key training component in Biomedical Engineering programs. Medical imaging education is interdisciplinary training, involving physics, mathematics, chemistry, electrical engineering, computer engineering, and applications in biology and medicine. Seeking an efficient teaching method for instructors and an effective learning environment for students has long been a goal for medical imaging education. By the support of NSF grants, we developed the medical imaging teaching software (MITS) and associated dynamic assessment tracking system (DATS). The MITS/DATS system has been applied to junior and senior medical imaging classes through a hybrid teaching model. The results show that student's learning gain improved, particularly in concept understanding and simulation project completion. The results also indicate disparities in subjective perception between junior and senior classes. Three institutions are collaborating to expand the courseware system and plan to apply it to different class settings.

  13. Fabrication of a small animal restraint for synchrotron biomedical imaging using a rapid prototyper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ying; Zhang Honglin; McCrea, Richard; Bewer, Brian; Wiebe, Sheldon; Nichol, Helen; Ryan, Christopher; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical research at synchrotron facilities may involve imaging live animals that must remain motionless for extended periods of time to obtain quality images. Even breathing movements reduce image quality but on the other hand excessive restraint of animals increases morbidity and mortality. We describe a humane animal restraint designed to eliminate head movements while promoting animal survival. This paper describes how an animal restraint that conforms to the shape of an animal's head was fabricated by a 3D prototyper. The method used to translate medical computed tomography (CT) data to a 3D stereolithography format is described and images of its use at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) are shown. This type of restraint holds great promise in improving image quality and repeatability while reducing stress on experimental animals

  14. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    obtained from the TVM-enhanced meth- od are the results of 15 or more iterations. Parallel code was used to perform these calculations on Beowulf clusters...results of twenty or more iterations. Parallel code was used to speed up these calculations on Beowulf clusters with 8 CPUs. The computational speed can

  15. 3D UWB Magnitude-Combined Tomographic Imaging for Biomedical Applications. Algorithm Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Capdevila

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical microwave imaging is a topic of continuous research for its potential in different areas especially in breast cancer detection. In this paper, 3D UWB Magnitude-Combined tomographic algorithm is assessed for this recurrent application, but also for a more challenging one such as brain stroke detection. With the UWB Magnitude-Combined concept, the algorithm can take advantage of both the efficiency of Fourier Diffraction Theorem-based tomographic formulation and the robustness and image quality improvement provided by a multi-frequency combination.

  16. Automatic segmentation of subfigure image panels for multimodal biomedical document retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Beibei; Antani, Sameer; Stanley, R. Joe; Thoma, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical images are often referenced for clinical decision support (CDS), educational purposes, and research. The task of automatically finding the images in a scientific article that are most useful for the purpose of determining relevance to a clinical situation is traditionally done using text and is quite challenging. We propose to improve this by associating image features from the entire image and from relevant regions of interest with biomedical concepts described in the figure caption or discussion in the article. However, images used in scientific article figures are often composed of multiple panels where each sub-figure (panel) is referenced in the caption using alphanumeric labels, e.g. Figure 1(a), 2(c), etc. It is necessary to separate individual panels from a multi-panel figure as a first step toward automatic annotation of images. In this work we present methods that add make robust our previous efforts reported here. Specifically, we address the limitation in segmenting figures that do not exhibit explicit inter-panel boundaries, e.g. illustrations, graphs, and charts. We present a novel hybrid clustering algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) with fuzzy logic controller (FLC) to locate related figure components in such images. Results from our evaluation are very promising with 93.64% panel detection accuracy for regular (non-illustration) figure images and 92.1% accuracy for illustration images. A computational complexity analysis also shows that PSO is an optimal approach with relatively low computation time. The accuracy of separating these two type images is 98.11% and is achieved using decision tree.

  17. A theoretical-experimental methodology for assessing the sensitivity of biomedical spectral imaging platforms, assays, and analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J; Sweat, Brenner; Abbott, Caitlyn; Favreau, Peter; Rich, Thomas C

    2018-01-01

    Spectral imaging technologies have been used for many years by the remote sensing community. More recently, these approaches have been applied to biomedical problems, where they have shown great promise. However, biomedical spectral imaging has been complicated by the high variance of biological data and the reduced ability to construct test scenarios with fixed ground truths. Hence, it has been difficult to objectively assess and compare biomedical spectral imaging assays and technologies. Here, we present a standardized methodology that allows assessment of the performance of biomedical spectral imaging equipment, assays, and analysis algorithms. This methodology incorporates real experimental data and a theoretical sensitivity analysis, preserving the variability present in biomedical image data. We demonstrate that this approach can be applied in several ways: to compare the effectiveness of spectral analysis algorithms, to compare the response of different imaging platforms, and to assess the level of target signature required to achieve a desired performance. Results indicate that it is possible to compare even very different hardware platforms using this methodology. Future applications could include a range of optimization tasks, such as maximizing detection sensitivity or acquisition speed, providing high utility for investigators ranging from design engineers to biomedical scientists. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Prototype client/server application for biomedical text/image retrieval on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, L. Rodney; Berman, Lewis E.; Thoma, George R.

    1996-03-01

    At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a research and development division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), a prototype image database retrieval system has been built. This medical information retrieval system (MIRS) is a client/server application which provides Internet access to biomedical databases, including both text search/retrieval and retrieval/display of medical images associated with the text records. The MIRS graphical user interface (GUI) allows a user to formulate queries by simple, intuitive interactions with screen buttons, list boxes, and edit boxes; these interactions create structured query language (SQL) queries, which are submitted to a database manager running at NLM. The result of a MIRS query is a display showing both scrollable text records and scrollable images returned for all of the 'hits' of the query. MIRS is designed as an information-delivery vehicle intended to provide access to multiple collections of medical text and image data. The database used for initial MIRS evaluation consists of national survey data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics, including 17,000 spinal x-ray images. This survey, conducted on a sample of 27,801 persons, collected demographic, socioeconomic, and medical information, including both interview results and results acquired by direct examination by physician.

  19. A framework for biomedical figure segmentation towards image-based document retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Luis D; Yu, Jingyi; Arighi, Cecilia; Tudor, Catalina O; Torii, Manabu; Huang, Hongzhan; Vijay-Shanker, K; Wu, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    The figures included in many of the biomedical publications play an important role in understanding the biological experiments and facts described within. Recent studies have shown that it is possible to integrate the information that is extracted from figures in classical document classification and retrieval tasks in order to improve their accuracy. One important observation about the figures included in biomedical publications is that they are often composed of multiple subfigures or panels, each describing different methodologies or results. The use of these multimodal figures is a common practice in bioscience, as experimental results are graphically validated via multiple methodologies or procedures. Thus, for a better use of multimodal figures in document classification or retrieval tasks, as well as for providing the evidence source for derived assertions, it is important to automatically segment multimodal figures into subfigures and panels. This is a challenging task, however, as different panels can contain similar objects (i.e., barcharts and linecharts) with multiple layouts. Also, certain types of biomedical figures are text-heavy (e.g., DNA sequences and protein sequences images) and they differ from traditional images. As a result, classical image segmentation techniques based on low-level image features, such as edges or color, are not directly applicable to robustly partition multimodal figures into single modal panels. In this paper, we describe a robust solution for automatically identifying and segmenting unimodal panels from a multimodal figure. Our framework starts by robustly harvesting figure-caption pairs from biomedical articles. We base our approach on the observation that the document layout can be used to identify encoded figures and figure boundaries within PDF files. Taking into consideration the document layout allows us to correctly extract figures from the PDF document and associate their corresponding caption. We combine pixel

  20. Deformable Registration of Biomedical Images using 2D Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Renuka; Shih, Min-Chi; Rose, Kenneth

    2016-07-18

    Robust registration of unimodal and multimodal images is a key task in biomedical image analysis, and is often utilized as an initial step on which subsequent analysis techniques critically depend. We propose a novel probabilistic framework, based on a variant of the 2D hidden Markov model, namely the turbo hidden Markov model, to capture the deformation between pairs of images. The HMM is tailored to capture spatial transformations across images via state transitions, and modalityspecific data costs via emission probabilities. The method is derived for the unimodal setting (where simpler matching metrics may be used) as well as the multimodal setting, where different modalities may provide very different representations for a given class of objects, necessitating the use of advanced similarity measures. We utilize a rich model with hundreds of model parameters to describe the deformation relationships across such modalities. We also introduce a local edge-adaptive constraint to allow for varying degrees of smoothness between object boundaries and homogeneous regions. The parameters of the described method are estimated in a principled manner from training data via maximum likelihood learning, and the deformation is subsequently estimated using an efficient dynamic programming algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed approach over state-ofthe- art deformable registration techniques, on both unimodal and multimodal biomedical datasets.

  1. Photoacoustic determination of blood vessel diameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Klaessens, John H.G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Hopman, Jeroen C.W.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Thijssen, Johan M.; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2004-01-01

    A double-ring sensor was applied in photoacoustic tomographic imaging of artificial blood vessels as well as blood vessels in a rabbit ear. The peak-topeak time (τ pp) of the laser (1064 nm) induced pressure transient was used to estimate the axial vessel diameter. Comparison with the actual vessel

  2. An inventory of biomedical imaging physics elements-of-competence for diagnostic radiography education in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruana, Carmel J. [University of Malta, Institute of Health Care, St Lukes Hospital, Gwardamangia (Malta)]. E-mail: carmel.j.caruana@um.edu.mt; Plasek, Jaromir [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Institute of Physics, Division of Biophysics, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-08-15

    Purpose: To develop an inventory of biomedical physics elements-of-competence for diagnostic radiography education in Europe. Method: Research articles in the English literature and UK documentation pertinent to radiography education, competences and role development were subjected to a rigorous analysis of content from a functional and competence analysis perspective. Translations of radiography curricula from across Europe and relevant EU legislation were likewise analysed to ensure a pan-European perspective. Broad Subject Specific Competences for diagnostic radiography that included major biomedical physics components were singled out. These competences were in turn carefully deconstructed into specific elements-of-competence and those elements falling within the biomedical physics learning domain inventorised. A pilot version of the inventory was evaluated by participants during a meeting of the Higher Education Network for Radiography in Europe (HENRE), held in Marsascala, Malta, in November 2004. The inventory was further refined taking into consideration suggestions by HENRE members and scientific, professional and educational developments. Findings: The evaluation of the pilot inventory was very positive and indicated that the overall structure of the inventory was sensible, easily understood and acceptable - hence a good foundation for further development. Conclusions: Use of the inventory by radiography programme leaders and biomedical physics educators would guarantee that all necessary physics elements-of-competence underpinning the safe, effective and economical use of imaging devices are included within radiography curricula. It will also ensure the relevancy of physics content within radiography education. The inventory is designed to be a pragmatic tool for curriculum development across the entire range of radiography education up to doctorate level and irrespective of whether curriculum delivery is discipline-based or integrated, presentation

  3. An inventory of biomedical imaging physics elements-of-competence for diagnostic radiography education in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruana, Carmel J.; Plasek, Jaromir

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an inventory of biomedical physics elements-of-competence for diagnostic radiography education in Europe. Method: Research articles in the English literature and UK documentation pertinent to radiography education, competences and role development were subjected to a rigorous analysis of content from a functional and competence analysis perspective. Translations of radiography curricula from across Europe and relevant EU legislation were likewise analysed to ensure a pan-European perspective. Broad Subject Specific Competences for diagnostic radiography that included major biomedical physics components were singled out. These competences were in turn carefully deconstructed into specific elements-of-competence and those elements falling within the biomedical physics learning domain inventorised. A pilot version of the inventory was evaluated by participants during a meeting of the Higher Education Network for Radiography in Europe (HENRE), held in Marsascala, Malta, in November 2004. The inventory was further refined taking into consideration suggestions by HENRE members and scientific, professional and educational developments. Findings: The evaluation of the pilot inventory was very positive and indicated that the overall structure of the inventory was sensible, easily understood and acceptable - hence a good foundation for further development. Conclusions: Use of the inventory by radiography programme leaders and biomedical physics educators would guarantee that all necessary physics elements-of-competence underpinning the safe, effective and economical use of imaging devices are included within radiography curricula. It will also ensure the relevancy of physics content within radiography education. The inventory is designed to be a pragmatic tool for curriculum development across the entire range of radiography education up to doctorate level and irrespective of whether curriculum delivery is discipline-based or integrated, presentation

  4. Investigation of biomedical inner microstructures with hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Hang [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Zhu Peiping [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Chen Bo [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Liu Bo; Yin Hongxia [Capital University of Medical Sciences, 100054 Beijing (China); Li Enrong [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Liu Yijin [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wang Junyue [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Yuan Qingxi; Huang Wanxia; Fang Shouxian [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, 100049 Beijing (China); National Center for NanoScience and Technology, 100080 Beijing (China)], E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2007-09-21

    Hard X-ray Phase-Contrast Imaging (HX-PCI) is a new and valuable method that may provide information of the inner parts of an opaque object. Previous reports demonstrated its applicability in soft and hard tissue imaging. Here we provide further evidence for improved image quality and the effective capability to distinguish inner microstructures in real biomedical systems such as cochlea. Experiments performed both at the 4W1A beamline of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) and at the Taiwan National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC) clearly show details of samples' inner microstructure with a resolution of a few microns. The improved spatial resolution is a relevant achievement for future improved understanding and clinical trials.

  5. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of cancer using indocyanine green-labeled monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kohei; Ohashi, Manami; Kanazaki, Kengo; Ding, Ning; Deguchi, Jun; Kanada, Yuko; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-08-28

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an attractive imaging modality for sensitive and depth imaging of biomolecules with high resolution in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (panitumumab; Pan) labeled with indocyanine green derivative (ICG-EG4-Sulfo-OSu), Pan-EG4-ICG, as a PA imaging probe to target cancer-associated EGFR. In vitro PA imaging studies demonstrated that Pan-EG4-ICG yielded high EGFR-specific PA signals in EGFR-positive cells. To determine the optimal injection dose and scan timing, we investigated the biodistribution of radiolabeled Pan-EG4-ICG (200-400 μg) in A431 tumor (EGFR++)-bearing mice. The highest tumor accumulation (29.4% injected dose/g) and high tumor-to-blood ratio (2.1) was observed 7 days after injection of Pan-EG4-ICG (400 μg). In in vivo PA imaging studies using Pan-EG4-ICG (400 μg), the increase in PA signal (114%) was observed in A431 tumors inoculated in the mammary glands 7 days post-injection. Co-injection of excess Pan resulted in a 35% inhibition of this PA signal, indicating the EGFR-specific accumulation. In conclusion, the ICG-labeled monoclonal antibody (i.e., panitumumab) has the potential to enhance target-specific PA signal, leading to the discrimination of aggressiveness and metastatic potential of tumors and the selection of effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Semiconducting polymer-based nanoparticles with strong absorbance in NIR-II window for in vivo photothermal therapy and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ziyang; Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Guobing; Wang, Junxia; Shen, Song; Li, Dongdong; Yang, Xianzhu

    2018-02-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-induced photothermal therapy (PTT) has attracted much interest in recent years. In the NIR region, tissue penetration ability of the second biological near-infrared window (1000-1350 nm) is recognized to be stronger than that of the first window (650-950 nm). However, NIR light absorbers in the second NIR region (NIR-II) have been scant even though various NIR light absorbers in the first NIR region (NIR-I) have been widely explored. In this work, a thieno-isoindigo derivative-based semiconducting polymer, PBTPBF-BT, were formulated into PEGylated nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticle NP PBTPBF-BT exhibited strong absorption in NIR-II region, inherent high photothermal conversion efficacy, and excellent photostability. The in vitro and in vivo PTT study employing 1064 nm laser in NIR-II window revealed that NP PBTPBF-BT could efficiently ablate tumor cell at a power density of 0.42 W/cm 2 (the skin tolerance threshold value). Moreover, NP PBTPBF-BT with excellent photostability exhibited enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor in living mice, suggesting the great probability of using NP PBTPBF-BT for in vivo PA imaging-guided PTT in the NIR-II window. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Music-of-light stethoscope: a demonstration of the photoacoustic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitichev, D. I.; Xia, W.; Hill, E.; Mosse, C. A.; Perkins, T.; Konyn, K.; Ourselin, S.; Desjardins, A. E.; Vercauteren, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a system aimed at demonstrating the photoacoustic (PA) effect for educational purposes. PA imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that requires no contrast agent and has a great potential for spine and brain lesion characterisation, breast cancer and blood flow monitoring notably in the context of fetal surgery. It relies on combining light excitation with ultrasound reception. Our brief was to present and explain PA imaging in a public-friendly way suitable for a variety of ages and backgrounds. We developed a simple, accessible demonstration unit using readily available materials. We used a modulated light emitting diode (LED) torch and an electronic stethoscope. The output of a music player was used for light modulation and the chest piece of the stethoscope covered by a black tape was used as an absorbing target and an enclosed chamber. This demonstration unit was presented to the public at the Bloomsbury Festival On Light in October 2015. Our stall was visited by over 100 people of varying ages. Twenty families returned in-depth evaluation questionnaires, which show that our explanations of the photoacoustic effect were well understood. Their interest in biomedical engineering was increased.

  8. Combined multimodal photoacoustic tomography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT based angiography system for in vivo imaging of multiple skin disorders in human(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Chen, Zhe; Sinz, Christoph; Rank, Elisabet; Zabihian, Behrooz; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Kittler, Harald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    All optical photoacoustic tomography (PAT) using a planar Fabry-Perot interferometer polymer film sensor has been demonstrated for in vivo human palm imaging with an imaging penetration depth of 5 mm. The relatively larger vessels in the superficial plexus and the vessels in the dermal plexus are visible in PAT. However, due to both resolution and sensitivity limits, all optical PAT cannot reveal the smaller vessels such as capillary loops and venules. Melanin absorption also sometimes causes difficulties in PAT to resolve vessels. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) based angiography, on the other hand, has been proven suitable for microvasculature visualization in the first couple millimeters in human. In our work, we combine an all optical PAT system with an OCT system featuring a phase stable akinetic swept source. This multimodal PAT/OCT/OCT-angiography system provides us co-registered human skin vasculature information as well as the structural information of cutaneous. The scanning units of the sub-systems are assembled into one probe, which is then mounted onto a portable rack. The probe and rack design gives six degrees of freedom, allowing the multimodal optical imaging probe to access nearly all regions of human body. Utilizing this probe, we perform imaging on patients with various skin disorders as well as on healthy controls. Fused PAT/OCT-angiography volume shows the complete blood vessel network in human skin, which is further embedded in the morphology provided by OCT. A comparison between the results from the disordered regions and the normal regions demonstrates the clinical translational value of this multimodal optical imaging system in dermatology.

  9. The effect of graphite sources on preparation of Photoluminescent graphene nano-sheets for biomedical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Moasses Ghafary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Graphene as two-dimensional (2D materials have attracted wide attention in different fields such as biomedical imaging. Ultra-small graphene nano-sheets (UGNSs have been designated as low dimensional graphene sheets with lateral dimensions less than few nanometres (≤ 500 nm in one, two or few layers. Several studies have proven that the process of acidic exfoliation and oxidation is one of the most effective methods to synthesize low dimensional graphene sheets. The band gap of graphene can be changed through changing the reaction temperature resulting in different photoluminescent colors. The aim of our study is synthesis of multi-color photoluminescent UGNSs for biomedical imaging.Materials and Methods: Two different UGNSs were synthesized from two different graphite sources via acidic treatment with a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids. The prepared UGNSs were characterized by UV-Vis, photoluminescent, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The photoluminescence colors of the prepared UGNSs were detected under excitation wavelength of 470 nm using optical filters.Results: The results showed that the graphite primary source is a determinant factor in the synthesis of different UGNSs. While altering reaction temperature didn't significantly change the emission wavelengths; however it affected their photoluminescent emission intensity.Conclusion: Overall, nontoxic UGNSs synthesized by simple acidic treatment of graphite with different photoluminescent colors (green, yellow and red can be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging.

  10. Photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography of dog prostates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Haixin; Guo, Zijian; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Grubb, Robert L., III; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    We developed a tri-modal system combining photoacoustic (PA) tomography, thermoacoustic (TA) tomography, and ultrasound (US) imaging. Acquired images of an excised dog prostate were compared to histology results. All three modalities can image distinct features. Features like the urethra were shown in both TA and US images, but TA gave a higher contrast-to-noise ratio. Fibrous tissue was more clearly imaged by TA, while the duct structure was better shown in PA images. These experimental results demonstrate the potential advantages of our tri-modal imaging system.

  11. MARS Spectral Imaging: From High-Energy Physics to a Biomedical Business

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract MARS spectral scanners provide colour X-Ray images. Current MARS pre-clinical scanners enable researchers and clinicians to measure biochemical and physiological processes in specimens, and animal models of disease. The scanners have developed from a 10 year scientific collaboration between New Zealand and CERN. In parallel a company, MARS Bioimaging Ltd, was founded to commercialise the technology by productising the scanner and selling it to biomedical users around the world. The New Zealand team is now more than 30 people including staff and students from the fields of physics, engineering, computing, maths, radiology, cardiology, biochemistry, oncology, and orthopaedics. Current work with pre-clinical scanners has concluded that the technology will be  useful in heart disease, stroke, arthritis, joint replacements, and cancer. In late 2014, the government announced funding for NZ to build a MARS scanner capable of imaging humans. Bio Professor Anthony Butler is a radiologist wit...

  12. A nanocomposite of Au-AgI core/shell dimer as a dual-modality contrast agent for x-ray computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orza, Anamaria; Wu, Hui; Li, Yuancheng; Mao, Hui, E-mail: hmao@emory.edu, E-mail: Xiangyang.Tang@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and Center for Systems Imaging, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang, E-mail: hmao@emory.edu, E-mail: Xiangyang.Tang@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Feng, Ting; Wang, Xueding [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Yang, Lily [Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a core/shell nanodimer of gold (core) and silver iodine (shell) as a dual-modal contrast-enhancing agent for biomarker targeted x-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) applications. Methods: The gold and silver iodine core/shell nanodimer (Au/AgICSD) was prepared by fusing together components of gold, silver, and iodine. The physicochemical properties of Au/AgICSD were then characterized using different optical and imaging techniques (e.g., HR- transmission electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Z-potential, and UV-vis). The CT and PAI contrast-enhancing effects were tested and then compared with a clinically used CT contrast agent and Au nanoparticles. To confer biocompatibility and the capability for efficient biomarker targeting, the surface of the Au/AgICSD nanodimer was modified with the amphiphilic diblock polymer and then functionalized with transferrin for targeting transferrin receptor that is overexpressed in various cancer cells. Cytotoxicity of the prepared Au/AgICSD nanodimer was also tested with both normal and cancer cell lines. Results: The characterizations of prepared Au/AgI core/shell nanostructure confirmed the formation of Au/AgICSD nanodimers. Au/AgICSD nanodimer is stable in physiological conditions for in vivo applications. Au/AgICSD nanodimer exhibited higher contrast enhancement in both CT and PAI for dual-modality imaging. Moreover, transferrin functionalized Au/AgICSD nanodimer showed specific binding to the tumor cells that have a high level of expression of the transferrin receptor. Conclusions: The developed Au/AgICSD nanodimer can be used as a potential biomarker targeted dual-modal contrast agent for both or combined CT and PAI molecular imaging.

  13. Biomedical Applications of the Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, S.M.; Levenson, R.

    1999-01-21

    The Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS) approach to spectral imaging seeks to bridge the gap between tuned multispectral and fixed hyperspectral imaging sensors. By allowing the definition of completely general spectral filter functions, truly optimal measurements can be made for a given task. These optimal measurements significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and speed, minimize data volume and data rate, while preserving classification accuracy. The following paper investigates the application of the ISIS sensing approach in two sample biomedical applications: prostate and colon cancer screening. It is shown that in these applications, two to three optimal measurements are sufficient to capture the majority of classification information for critical sample constituents. In the prostate cancer example, the optimal measurements allow 8% relative improvement in classification accuracy of critical cell constituents over a red, green, blue (RGB) sensor. In the colon cancer example, use of optimal measurements boost the classification accuracy of critical cell constituents by 28% relative to the RGB sensor. In both cases, optimal measurements match the performance achieved by the entire hyperspectral data set. The paper concludes that an ISIS style spectral imager can acquire these optimal spectral images directly, allowing improved classification accuracy over an RGB sensor. Compared to a hyperspectral sensor, the ISIS approach can achieve similar classification accuracy using a significantly lower number of spectral samples, thus minimizing overall sample classification time and cost.

  14. JAtlasView: a Java atlas-viewer for browsing biomedical 3D images and atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guangjie; Burton, Nick; Hill, Bill; Davidson, Duncan; Kerwin, Janet; Scott, Mark; Lindsay, Susan; Baldock, Richard

    2005-03-09

    Many three-dimensional (3D) images are routinely collected in biomedical research and a number of digital atlases with associated anatomical and other information have been published. A number of tools are available for viewing this data ranging from commercial visualization packages to freely available, typically system architecture dependent, solutions. Here we discuss an atlas viewer implemented to run on any workstation using the architecture neutral Java programming language. We report the development of a freely available Java based viewer for 3D image data, descibe the structure and functionality of the viewer and how automated tools can be developed to manage the Java Native Interface code. The viewer allows arbitrary re-sectioning of the data and interactive browsing through the volume. With appropriately formatted data, for example as provided for the Electronic Atlas of the Developing Human Brain, a 3D surface view and anatomical browsing is available. The interface is developed in Java with Java3D providing the 3D rendering. For efficiency the image data is manipulated using the Woolz image-processing library provided as a dynamically linked module for each machine architecture. We conclude that Java provides an appropriate environment for efficient development of these tools and techniques exist to allow computationally efficient image-processing libraries to be integrated relatively easily.

  15. Biomedical engineering and nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.H.; Khyalappa, R.J.; Yakhmi, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    This book is predominantly a compilation of papers presented in the conference which is focused on the development in biomedical materials, biomedical devises and instrumentation, biomedical effects of electromagnetic radiation, electrotherapy, radiotherapy, biosensors, biotechnology, bioengineering, tissue engineering, clinical engineering and surgical planning, medical imaging, hospital system management, biomedical education, biomedical industry and society, bioinformatics, structured nanomaterial for biomedical application, nano-composites, nano-medicine, synthesis of nanomaterial, nano science and technology development. The papers presented herein contain the scientific substance to suffice the academic directivity of the researchers from the field of biomedicine, biomedical engineering, material science and nanotechnology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  16. NeuroTerrain--a client-server system for browsing 3D biomedical image data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Carl; Bug, William J; Nissanov, Jonathan

    2007-02-05

    Three dimensional biomedical image sets are becoming ubiquitous, along with the canonical atlases providing the necessary spatial context for analysis. To make full use of these 3D image sets, one must be able to present views for 2D display, either surface renderings or 2D cross-sections through the data. Typical display software is limited to presentations along one of the three orthogonal anatomical axes (coronal, horizontal, or sagittal). However, data sets precisely oriented along the major axes are rare. To make fullest use of these datasets, one must reasonably match the atlas' orientation; this involves resampling the atlas in planes matched to the data set. Traditionally, this requires the atlas and browser reside on the user's desktop; unfortunately, in addition to being monolithic programs, these tools often require substantial local resources. In this article, we describe a network-capable, client-server framework to slice and visualize 3D atlases at off-axis angles, along with an open client architecture and development kit to support integration into complex data analysis environments. Here we describe the basic architecture of a client-server 3D visualization system, consisting of a thin Java client built on a development kit, and a computationally robust, high-performance server written in ANSI C++. The Java client components (NetOStat) support arbitrary-angle viewing and run on readily available desktop computers running Mac OS X, Windows XP, or Linux as a downloadable Java Application. Using the NeuroTerrain Software Development Kit (NT-SDK), sophisticated atlas browsing can be added to any Java-compatible application requiring as little as 50 lines of Java glue code, thus making it eminently re-useable and much more accessible to programmers building more complex, biomedical data analysis tools. The NT-SDK separates the interactive GUI components from the server control and monitoring, so as to support development of non-interactive applications

  17. Bio-degradable highly fluorescent conjugated polymer nanoparticles for bio-medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repenko, Tatjana; Rix, Anne; Ludwanowski, Simon; Go, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2017-09-07

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles exhibit strong fluorescence and have been applied for biological fluorescence imaging in cell culture and in small animals. However, conjugated polymer particles are hydrophobic and often chemically inert materials with diameters ranging from below 50 nm to several microns. As such, conjugated polymer nanoparticles cannot be excreted through the renal system. This drawback has prevented their application for clinical bio-medical imaging. Here, we present fully conjugated polymer nanoparticles based on imidazole units. These nanoparticles can be bio-degraded by activated macrophages. Reactive oxygen species induce scission of the conjugated polymer backbone at the imidazole unit, leading to complete decomposition of the particles into soluble low molecular weight fragments. Furthermore, the nanoparticles can be surface functionalized for directed targeting. The approach opens a wide range of opportunities for conjugated polymer particles in the fields of medical imaging, drug-delivery, and theranostics.Conjugated polymer nanoparticles have been applied for biological fluorescence imaging in cell culture and in small animals, but cannot readily be excreted through the renal system. Here the authors show fully conjugated polymer nanoparticles based on imidazole units that can be bio-degraded by activated macrophages.

  18. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively decoupled by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area had a clear vascular pattern and spread wider than the somatosensory region. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism. PMID:22940116

  19. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, A. V.; Khodanovich, M. Y.; Yarnykh, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Second International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research'' was held on the campus of the National Research Tomsk State University (Tomsk, Russia) on September 7-9, 2015. The conference was focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications for biomedical research. The main goal was to bring together basic scientists, clinical researchers and developers of new MRI techniques to bridge the gap between clinical/research needs and advanced technological solutions. The conference fostered research and development in basic and clinical MR science and its application to health care. It also had an educational purpose to promote understanding of cutting-edge MR developments. The conference provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, and to discuss unsolved problems. The program of the conference was divided into three main topics. First day of the conference was devoted to educational lectures on the fundamentals of MRI physics and image acquisition/reconstruction techniques, including recent developments in quantitative MRI. The second day was focused on developments and applications of new contrast agents. Multinuclear and spectroscopic acquisitions as well as functional MRI were presented during the third day of the conference. We would like to highlight the main developments presented at the conference and introduce the prominent speakers. The keynote speaker of the conference Dr. Vasily Yarnykh (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) presented a recently developed MRI method, macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping, as a unique tool for modifying image contrast and a unique tool for quantification of the myelin content in neural tissues. Professor Yury Pirogov (Lomonosov Moscow State University) described development of new fluorocarbon compounds and applications for biomedicine. Drs. Julia Velikina and Alexey

  20. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Wells, K; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Allinson, N M

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this