WorldWideScience

Sample records for biomedical imaging science

  1. Signal and image analysis for biomedical and life sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Changming; Pham, Tuan D; Vallotton, Pascal; Wang, Dadong

    2014-01-01

    With an emphasis on applications of computational models for solving modern challenging problems in biomedical and life sciences, this book aims to bring collections of articles from biologists, medical/biomedical and health science researchers together with computational scientists to focus on problems at the frontier of biomedical and life sciences. The goals of this book are to build interactions of scientists across several disciplines and to help industrial users apply advanced computational techniques for solving practical biomedical and life science problems. This book is for users in t

  2. Mining biomedical images towards valuable information retrieval in biomedical and life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical images are helpful sources for the scientists and practitioners in drawing significant hypotheses, exemplifying approaches and describing experimental results in published biomedical literature. In last decades, there has been an enormous increase in the amount of heterogeneous biomedical image production and publication, which results in a need for bioimaging platforms for feature extraction and analysis of text and content in biomedical images to take advantage in implementing effective information retrieval systems. In this review, we summarize technologies related to data mining of figures. We describe and compare the potential of different approaches in terms of their developmental aspects, used methodologies, produced results, achieved accuracies and limitations. Our comparative conclusions include current challenges for bioimaging software with selective image mining, embedded text extraction and processing of complex natural language queries. PMID:27538578

  3. Interactive Processing and Visualization of Image Data forBiomedical and Life Science Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staadt, Oliver G.; Natarjan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley,David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-02-01

    Background: Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results: We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life science applications. We present an adaptive high-resolution display system suitable for biomedical image data, algorithms for analyzing and visualization protein surfaces and retinal optical coherence tomography data, and visualization tools for 3D gene expression data. Conclusion: We demonstrated that interactive processing and visualization methods and systems can support scientists in a variety of biomedical and life science application areas concerned with massive data analysis.

  4. Interactive processing and visualization of image data for biomedical and life science applications

    OpenAIRE

    Staadt, Oliver G; Natarajan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley, David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Background: Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results: We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and l...

  5. Interactive Processing and Visualization of Image Data for Biomedical and Life Science Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Staadt, Oliver G; Natarjan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley, David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Background Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life s...

  6. Interactive processing and visualization of image data for biomedical and life science applications

    OpenAIRE

    Staadt, Oliver G.; Natarajan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley, David F; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Background Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life s...

  7. e-Science platform for translational biomedical imaging research: running, statistics, and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tusheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Mingqing; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Lisa; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-03-01

    In order to enable multiple disciplines of medical researchers, clinical physicians and biomedical engineers working together in a secured, efficient, and transparent cooperative environment, we had designed an e-Science platform for biomedical imaging research and application cross multiple academic institutions and hospitals in Shanghai and presented this work in SPIE Medical Imaging conference held in San Diego in 2012. In past the two-years, we implemented a biomedical image chain including communication, storage, cooperation and computing based on this e-Science platform. In this presentation, we presented the operating status of this system in supporting biomedical imaging research, analyzed and discussed results of this system in supporting multi-disciplines collaboration cross-multiple institutions.

  8. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  9. Holography In Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bally, G.

    1988-01-01

    Today not only physicists and engineers but also biological and medical scientists are exploring the potentials of holographic methods in their special field of work. Most of the underlying physical principles such as coherence, interference, diffraction and polarization as well as general features of holography e.g. storage and retrieval of amplitude and phase of a wavefront, 3-d-imaging, large field of depth, redundant storage of information, spatial filtering, high-resolving, non-contactive, 3-d form and motion analysis are explained in detail in other contributions to this book. Therefore, this article is confined to the applications of holography in biomedical sciences. Because of the great number of contributions and the variety of applications [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] in this review the investigations can only be mentioned briefly and the survey has to be confined to some examples. As in all fields of optics and laser metrology, a review of biomedical applications of holography would be incomplete if military developments and their utilization are not mentioned. As will be demonstrated by selected examples the increasing interlacing of science with the military does not stop at domains that traditionally are regarded as exclusively oriented to human welfare like biomedical research [9]. This fact is actually characterized and stressed by the expression "Star Wars Medicine", which becomes increasingly common as popular description for laser applications (including holography) in medicine [10]. Thus, the consequence - even in such highly specialized fields like biomedical applications of holography - have to be discussed.

  10. A comparison of image communication protocols in e-science platform for biomedical imaging research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tusheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Haibo; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    In designing of e-Science platform for biomedical imaging research and application cross multiple academic institutions and hospitals, it needs to find out the best communication protocol to transmit various kinds of biomedical images acquired from Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Source (SSRS), micro-PET, Micro-CT which includes both types of DICOM and non-DICOM images. In this presentation, we presented several image communication scenarios required in e-Science platform and several possible image communication protocols, and then tested and evaluated the performance of these image communication protocols in e-Science data flows to find out which protocol is the best candidate to be used in e-Science platform for the purpose for security, communication performance, easy implementation and management.

  11. Biomedical optical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, James G

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical optical imaging is a rapidly emerging research area with widespread fundamental research and clinical applications. This book gives an overview of biomedical optical imaging with contributions from leading international research groups who have pioneered many of these techniques and applications. A unique research field spanning the microscopic to the macroscopic, biomedical optical imaging allows both structural and functional imaging. Techniques such as confocal and multiphoton microscopy provide cellular level resolution imaging in biological systems. The integration of this tech

  12. Modern Trends in Imaging XI: Impedance Measurements in the Biomedical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick D. Coffman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological organisms and their component organs, tissues and cells have unique electrical impedance properties. Impedance properties often change with changes in structure, composition, and metabolism, and can be indicative of the onset and progression of disease states. Over the past 100 years, instruments and analytical methods have been developed to measure the impedance properties of biological specimens and to utilize these measurements in both clinical and basic science settings. This chapter will review the applications of impedance measurements in the biomedical sciences, from whole body analysis to impedance measurements of single cells and cell monolayers, and how cellular impedance measuring instruments can now be used in high throughput screening applications.

  13. Biomedical signals, imaging, and informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Signals, Imaging, and Informatics, the third volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in biosignal processing, medical imaging, infrared imaging, and medical informatics.More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including biomedical s

  14. Computational intelligence in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art computational intelligence research and technologies in biomedical images with emphasis on biomedical decision making. Biomedical imaging offers useful information on patients’ medical conditions and clues to causes of their symptoms and diseases. Biomedical images, however, provide a large number of images which physicians must interpret. Therefore, computer aids are demanded and become indispensable in physicians’ decision making. This book discusses major technical advancements and research findings in the field of computational intelligence in biomedical imaging, for example, computational intelligence in computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and brain disease, in lung function analysis, and in radiation therapy. The book examines technologies and studies that have reached the practical level, and those technologies that are becoming available in clinical practices in hospitals rapidly such as computational inte...

  15. Imaging sciences workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Terahertz biomedical science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Biomedical Studies Using Terahertz WavesJoo-Hiuk SonSection I Terahertz TechnologyTerahertz Sources and DetectorsHyunyong Choi and Joo-Hiuk SonTabletop High-Power Terahertz Pulse Generation TechniquesYun-Shik LeeTerahertz Imaging and Tomography TechniquesHyunyong Choi and Joo-Hiuk SonCompact Solid-State Electronic Terahertz Devices and CircuitsJae-Sung Rieh, Daekeun Yoon, and Jongwon Yun<

  17. Advanced biomedical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    "This book covers the four major areas of image processing: Image enhancement and restoration, image segmentation, image quantification and classification, and image visualization. Image registration, storage, and compression are also covered. The text focuses on recently developed image processing and analysis operators and covers topical research"--Provided by publisher.

  18. Biomedical Imaging Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salzer, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    This book presents and describes imaging technologies that can be used to study chemical processes and structural interactions in dynamic systems, principally in biomedical systems. The imaging technologies, largely biomedical imaging technologies such as MRT, Fluorescence mapping, raman mapping, nanoESCA, and CARS microscopy, have been selected according to their application range and to the chemical information content of their data. These technologies allow for the analysis and evaluation of delicate biological samples, which must not be disturbed during the profess. Ultimately, this may me

  19. Mathematical modeling in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This volume gives an introduction to a fascinating research area to applied mathematicians. It is devoted to providing the exposition of promising analytical and numerical techniques for solving challenging biomedical imaging problems, which trigger the investigation of interesting issues in various branches of mathematics.

  20. Biomedical Image Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Deserno, Thomas Martin

    2011-01-01

    In modern medicine, imaging is the most effective tool for diagnostics, treatment planning and therapy. Almost all modalities have went to directly digital acquisition techniques and processing of this image data have become an important option for health care in future. This book is written by a team of internationally recognized experts from all over the world. It provides a brief but complete overview on medical image processing and analysis highlighting recent advances that have been made in academics. Color figures are used extensively to illustrate the methods and help the reader to understand the complex topics.

  1. Mathematics and physics of emerging biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the mathematical sciences were used in a general way for image processing, they were of little importance in biomedical work until the development in the 1970s of computed tomography (CT) for the imaging of x-rays and isotope emission tomography. In the 1980s, MRI eclipsed the other modalities in many ways as the most informative medical imaging methodology. Besides these well-established techniques, computer-based mathematical methods are being explored in applications to other well-known methods, such as ultrasound and electroencephalography, as well as new techniques of optical imaging, impedance tomography, and magnetic source imaging. It is worth pointing out that, while the final images of many of these techniques bear many similarities to each other, the technologies involved in each are completely different and the parameters represented in the images are very different in character as well as in medical usefulness. In each case, rather different mathematical or statistical models are used, with different equations. One common thread is the paradigm of reconstruction from indirect measurements--this is the unifying theme of this report. The imaging methods used in biomedical applications that this report discusses include: (1) x-ray projection imaging; (2) x-ray computed tomography (CT); (3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy; (4) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT); (5) positron emission tomography (PET); (6) ultrasonics; (7) electrical source imaging (ESI); (8) electrical impedance tomography (EIT); (9) magnetic source imaging (MSI); and (10) medical optical imaging

  2. Biomedical signal and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Najarian, Kayvan

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SIGNAL AND IMAGE PROCESSINGSignals and Biomedical Signal ProcessingIntroduction and OverviewWhat is a ""Signal""?Analog, Discrete, and Digital SignalsProcessing and Transformation of SignalsSignal Processing for Feature ExtractionSome Characteristics of Digital ImagesSummaryProblemsFourier TransformIntroduction and OverviewOne-Dimensional Continuous Fourier TransformSampling and NYQUIST RateOne-Dimensional Discrete Fourier TransformTwo-Dimensional Discrete Fourier TransformFilter DesignSummaryProblemsImage Filtering, Enhancement, and RestorationIntroduction and Overview

  3. GPU programming for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucci, Luca; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-08-01

    Scientific computing is rapidly advancing due to the introduction of powerful new computing hardware, such as graphics processing units (GPUs). Affordable thanks to mass production, GPU processors enable the transition to efficient parallel computing by bringing the performance of a supercomputer to a workstation. We elaborate on some of the capabilities and benefits that GPU technology offers to the field of biomedical imaging. As practical examples, we consider a GPU algorithm for the estimation of position of interaction from photomultiplier (PMT) tube data, as well as a GPU implementation of the MLEM algorithm for iterative image reconstruction.

  4. Science gateways for biomedical big data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kampen, van, PJW; Olabarriaga, S.D.; Shahand, S.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical researchers are facing data deluge challenges such as dealing with large volume of complex heterogeneous data and complex and computationally demanding data processing methods. Such scale and complexity of biomedical research requires multi-disciplinary collaboration between scientists from different organizations. Data-driven or e-Science methods are defined as a combination of Information Technology (IT) and science that enables scientists to tackle the data deluge challenges. Th...

  5. Biomedical image understanding methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Joo-Hwee; Xiong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to understanding and interpreting digital images in medical and functional applications Biomedical Image Understanding focuses on image understanding and semantic interpretation, with clear introductions to related concepts, in-depth theoretical analysis, and detailed descriptions of important biomedical applications. It covers image processing, image filtering, enhancement, de-noising, restoration, and reconstruction; image segmentation and feature extraction; registration; clustering, pattern classification, and data fusion. With contributions from ex

  6. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Lecture: Thermophotonic and Photoacoustic Radar Imaging Methods for Biomedical and Dental Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    In the first part of this presentation I will introduce thermophotonic radar imaging principles and techniques using chirped or binary-phase-coded modulation, methods which can break through the maximum detection depth/depth resolution limitations of conventional photothermal waves. Using matched-filter principles, a methodology enabling parabolic diffusion-wave energy fields to exhibit energy localization akin to propagating hyperbolic wave-fields has been developed. It allows for deconvolution of individual responses of superposed axially discrete sources, opening a new field: depth-resolved thermal coherence tomography. Several examples from dental enamel caries diagnostic imaging to metal subsurface defect thermographic imaging will be discussed. The second part will introduce the field of photoacoustic radar (or sonar) biomedical imaging. I will report the development of a novel biomedical imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection and processing coupled with a beamforming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Utilization of specific chirped modulation waveforms (``waveform engineering'') achieves dramatic signal-to-noise-ratio increase and improved axial resolution over pulsed laser photoacoustics. The talk will conclude with aspects of instrumental sensitivity of the PA Radar to optical contrast using cancerous breast tissue-mimicking phantoms, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast enhancement agents and in-vivo tissue samples.

  7. Statistics and Biomedical Informatics in Forensic Sciences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana

    Brno: Masaryk University, 2007 - (Horová, I.; Hřebíček, J.). s. 126-126 ISBN 978-80-210-4333-6. [TIES 2007. Annual Meeting of the International Environmental Society /18./. 16.08.2007-20.08.2007, Mikulov] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : statistics * biomedical informatics * genetics * forensic science Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  8. Effective written communication in biomedical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugh, K S; Hahn, A W

    1996-01-01

    The written word is the biomedical scientist's most important and most enduring communication tool. Nevertheless, the development of writing skills receives little attention in most scientific disciplines and the ability to conduct research is often viewed as more important than the ability to communicate the results of that research. Consequently, many scientists lack the writing skills necessary to effectively convey essential aspects of their research. In this paper, we will discuss the importance of good writing skills, give examples of common mistakes that are made in biomedical science writing and offer suggestions on how to improve written communication. PMID:8672681

  9. Computer vision for biomedical image applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First International Workshop on Computer Vision for Biomedical Image Applications: Current Techniques and Future Trends, CVBIA 2005, held in Beijing, China, in October 2005 within the scope of ICCV 20. (orig.)

  10. Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meurer, Maria Ines [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Pathology]. E-mail: emaninha@gmail.com; Meurer, Eduardo [Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Tubarao, SC (Brazil); Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes da; Santa Barbara, Ailton [Centro de Pesquisa Renato Archer (CenPRA), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Nobre, Luiz Felipe [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Clinical Practice; Oliveira, Marilia Gerhardt de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery; Silva, Daniela Nascimento [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. of Surgery

    2008-01-15

    Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific software. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes. (author)

  11. Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific software. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes. (author)

  12. Biomedical and Environmental Sciences INFORMATION FOR AUTHORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, an international journal with emphasis on scientific findings in China, publishes articles dealing with biologic and toxic effects of environmental pollutants on man and other forms of life. The effects may be measured with pharmacological, biochemical, pathological, and immunological techniques. The journal also publishes reports dealing with the entry, transport, and fate of natural and anthropogenic chemicals in the biosphere, and their impact on human health and well-being.Papers describing biochemical, pharmacological, pathological, toxicological and immunological studies of pharmaceuticals (biotechnological products) are also welcome.

  13. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira [University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  14. Convergence of Terahertz Sciences in Biomedical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yong; Han, Haewook; Han, Joon; Ahn, Jaewook; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Park, Woong-Yang; Jeong, Young

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological breakthrough in the field of Terahertz radiation has triggered new applications in biology and biomedicine. Particularly, biological applications are based on the specific spectroscopic fingerprints of biological matter in this spectral region. Historically with the discovery of new electromagnetic wave spectrum, we have always discovered new medical diagnostic imaging systems. The use of terahertz wave was not realized due to the absence of useful terahertz sources. Now after successful generation of THz waves, it is reported that a great potential for THz wave exists for its resonance with bio-molecules. There are many challenging issues such as development of THz passive and active instrumentations, understanding of THz-Bio interaction for THz spectroscopy, THz-Bio nonlinear phenomena and safety guideline, and THz imaging systems. Eventually the deeper understanding of THz-Bio interaction and novel THz systems enable us to develop powerful THz biomedical imaging systems which can contr...

  15. Quantum Cascade Lasers in Biomedical Infrared Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Benjamin; Baker, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    Technological advances, namely the integration of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) within an infrared (IR) microscope, are enabling the development of valuable label-free biomedical-imaging tools capable of targeting and detecting salient chemical species within practical clinical timeframes. PMID:26409774

  16. Review of biomedical signal and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This article is a review of the book “Biomedical Signal and Image Processing” by Kayvan Najarian and Robert Splinter, which is published by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group. It will evaluate the contents of the book and discuss its suitability as a textbook, while mentioning highlights of the book, and providing comparison with other textbooks.

  17. Envisioning the Future (Biomedical Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the beginning, I have sought to bring to biology rigorous quantitative techniques at all levels of imaging, whether trying to diagnose disease in ... today is to understand that the complexity of biology is much greater than we ... at the local level. That is why imaging has become so important. ...

  18. Modeling and control in the biomedical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, H T

    1975-01-01

    These notes are based on (i) a series of lectures that I gave at the 14th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress held at the University of Western Ontario August 12-24, 1973 and (li) some of my lectures in a modeling course that I have cotaught in the Division of Bio-Medical Sciences at Brown during the past several years. An earlier version of these notes appeared in the Center for Dynamical Systems Lectures Notes series (CDS LN 73-1, November 1973). I have in this revised and extended version of those earlier notes incorporated a number of changes based both on classroom experience and on my research efforts with several colleagues during the intervening period. The narrow viewpoint of the present notes (use of optimization and control theory in biomedical problems) reflects more the scope of the CMC lectures given in August, 1973 than the scope of my own interests. Indeed, my real interests have included the modeling process itself as well as the contributions made by investiga­ tors who e...

  19. Biomedical Imaging and Sensing using Flatbed Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    In this Review, we provide an overview of flatbed scanner based biomedical imaging and sensing techniques. The extremely large imaging field-of-view (e.g., ~600–700 cm2) of these devices coupled with their cost-effectiveness provide unique opportunities for digital imaging of samples that are too large for regular optical microscopes, and for collection of large amounts of statistical data in various automated imaging or sensing tasks. Here we give a short introduction to the basic features o...

  20. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  1. 1st International Conference on Computational and Experimental Biomedical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, RM

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at ICCEBS 2013 – the 1st International Conference on Computational and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, which was organized in Azores, in October 2013. The included papers present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques, including active shape models, constitutive models, isogeometric elements, genetic algorithms, level sets, material models, neural networks, optimization, and the finite element method, in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving biofluids, computer simulation, computational biomechanics, image based diagnosis, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration, scaffolds, simulation, and surgical planning. The main audience for this book consists of researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to the areas of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, biology, biomechanics, computational fluid dynamics, comput...

  2. Science gateways for biomedical big data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Shahand

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical researchers are facing data deluge challenges such as dealing with large volume of complex heterogeneous data and complex and computationally demanding data processing methods. Such scale and complexity of biomedical research requires multi-disciplinary collaboration between scientists fr

  3. BIG: a Grid Portal for Biomedical Data and Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aloisio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern management of biomedical systems involves the use of many distributed resources, such as high performance computational resources to analyze biomedical data, mass storage systems to store them, medical instruments (microscopes, tomographs, etc., advanced visualization and rendering tools. Grids offer the computational power, security and availability needed by such novel applications. This paper presents BIG (Biomedical Imaging Grid, a Web-based Grid portal for management of biomedical information (data and images in a distributed environment. BIG is an interactive environment that deals with complex user's requests, regarding the acquisition of biomedical data, the "processing" and "delivering" of biomedical images, using the power and security of Computational Grids.

  4. Biomedical Image Analysis by Program "Vision Assistant" and "Labview"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Izak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces application in image analysis of biomedical images. General task is focused on analysis and diagnosis biomedical images obtained from program ImageJ. There are described methods which can be used for images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on particle analysis, pattern matching techniques. For this task was chosensophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  5. Complex biomedical systems: from basic science to translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) of the University of Southern California (BME@USC) has a longstanding tradition of advancing biomedicine through the development and application of novel engineering ideas. More than 80 primary and affiliated faculty members conduct cutting-edge research in a wide variety of areas, such as neuroengineering, biosystems and biosignal analysis, medical devices (including biomicroelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS) and bionanotechnology), biomechanics, bioimaging, and imaging informatics. Currently, the department hosts six internationally recognized research centers: the Biomimetic MicroElectronic Systems Engineering Research Center (funded by the National Science Foundation), the Biomedical Simulations Resource [funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)], the Medical Ultrasonic Transducer Center (funded by NIH), the Center for Neural Engineering, the Center for Vision Science and Technology (funded by an NIH Bioengineering Research Partnership Grant), and the Center for Genomic and Phenomic Studies in Autism (funded by NIH). BME@USC ranks in the top tier of all U.S. BME departments in terms of research funding per faculty. PMID:22850833

  6. Statistics and Biomedical Informatics in Forensic Sciences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 6 (2009), s. 743-750. ISSN 1180-4009. [TIES 2007. Annual Meeting of the International Environmental Society /18./. Mikulov, 16.08.2007-20.08.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : biomedical informatics * biomedical statistics * genetic information * forensic dentistry Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  7. BIG: a Grid Portal for Biomedical Data and Images

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Aloisio; Maria Cristina Barba; Euro Blasi; Massimo Cafaro; Sandro Fiore; Maria Mirto

    2004-01-01

    Modern management of biomedical systems involves the use of many distributed resources, such as high performance computational resources to analyze biomedical data, mass storage systems to store them, medical instruments (microscopes, tomographs, etc.), advanced visualization and rendering tools. Grids offer the computational power, security and availability needed by such novel applications. This paper presents BIG (Biomedical Imaging Grid), a Web-based Grid portal for management of biomedic...

  8. New methodology in biomedical science: methodological errors in classical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurvydas, Albertas

    2005-01-01

    The following methodological errors are observed in biomedical sciences: paradigmatic ones; those of exaggerated search for certainty; science dehumanisation; deterministic and linearity; those of making conclusions; errors of reductionism or quality decomposition as well as exaggerated enlargement; errors connected with discarding odd; unexpected or awkward facts; those of exaggerated mathematization; isolation of science; the error of "common sense"; Ceteris Paribus law's ("other things being equal" laws) error; "youth" and common sense; inflexibility of criteria of the truth; errors of restricting the sources of truth and ways of searching for truth; the error connected with wisdom gained post factum; the errors of wrong interpretation of research mission; "laziness" to repeat the experiment as well as the errors of coordination of errors. One of the basic aims for the present-day scholars of biomedicine is, therefore, mastering the new non-linear, holistic, complex way of thinking that will, undoubtedly, enable one to make less errors doing research. The aim of "scientific travelling" will be achieved with greater probability if the "travelling" itself is performed with great probability. PMID:15687745

  9. 78 FR 9066 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy...

  10. 77 FR 13347 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel;...

  11. 77 FR 71605 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel; MSM Program Review. Date: February 26,...

  12. 76 FR 370 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Person: Manana Sukhareva, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  13. 77 FR 50516 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special...., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging, And Bioengineering, National...

  14. 78 FR 3009 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite...

  15. 78 FR 46995 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Biomedical Imaging, and Bioengineering, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 959, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  16. 78 FR 76632 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, 6707 Democracy...

  17. 78 FR 25752 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health,...

  18. 78 FR 31953 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special...., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National...

  19. 78 FR 3903 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Biomedical Imaging and, Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Room...

  20. 78 FR 66373 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Grossman, DDS, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering,...

  1. 76 FR 58023 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health,...

  2. 77 FR 2987 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special..., National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707...

  3. 76 FR 53690 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes...

  4. 77 FR 74675 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Room...

  5. 77 FR 58146 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special...: John K. Hayes, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  6. 78 FR 37557 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special...: Ruth Grossman, DDS, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  7. 76 FR 572 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering,...

  8. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  9. An unsupervised strategy for biomedical image segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rodríguez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Rodríguez1, Rubén Hernández21Digital Signal Processing Group, Institute of Cybernetics, Mathematics, and Physics, Havana, Cuba; 2Interdisciplinary Professional Unit of Engineering and Advanced Technology, IPN, MexicoAbstract: Many segmentation techniques have been published, and some of them have been widely used in different application problems. Most of these segmentation techniques have been motivated by specific application purposes. Unsupervised methods, which do not assume any prior scene knowledge can be learned to help the segmentation process, and are obviously more challenging than the supervised ones. In this paper, we present an unsupervised strategy for biomedical image segmentation using an algorithm based on recursively applying mean shift filtering, where entropy is used as a stopping criterion. This strategy is proven with many real images, and a comparison is carried out with manual segmentation. With the proposed strategy, errors less than 20% for false positives and 0% for false negatives are obtained.Keywords: segmentation, mean shift, unsupervised segmentation, entropy

  10. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging. PMID:26833935

  11. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuderer, H.A.; Moody, J.B.

    1981-07-01

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences.

  12. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences

  13. Biomedical engineering and nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is predominantly a compilation of papers presented in the conference which is focused on the development in biomedical materials, biomedical devises and instrumentation, biomedical effects of electromagnetic radiation, electrotherapy, radiotherapy, biosensors, biotechnology, bioengineering, tissue engineering, clinical engineering and surgical planning, medical imaging, hospital system management, biomedical education, biomedical industry and society, bioinformatics, structured nanomaterial for biomedical application, nano-composites, nano-medicine, synthesis of nanomaterial, nano science and technology development. The papers presented herein contain the scientific substance to suffice the academic directivity of the researchers from the field of biomedicine, biomedical engineering, material science and nanotechnology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  14. 77 FR 64598 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... Hotel. A. Aging and Clinical Geriatrics........ November 28, 2012...... *VA Central Office....

  15. 75 FR 35820 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special..., ARRA Related Biomedical Research and Research Support Awards, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  16. Theory and experiment in biomedical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    A physicist might regard a person as a collection of electrons and quarks, and a biologist might regard her as an assemblage of biochemical molecules. But according to some speakers at a recent Welch conference [1] biology is a branch of physics. Then biomedical research is a branch of applied physics. Even if one adopts a more modest perspective, it is still true that physics can contribute strongly to biomedical research. An example on the experimental side is the recent studies of G protein-coupled receptors (targeted by more than 50 percent of therapeutic drugs) using synchrotron radiation and nuclear magnetic resonance. On the theory side, one might classify models as microscopic (e.g., simulations of molecules, ions, or electrons), mesoscopic (e.g., simulations of pathways within a cell), or macroscopic (e.g., calculations of processes involving the whole body). We have recently introduced a new macroscopic method for estimating the biochemical response to pharmaceuticals, surgeries, or other medical interventions, and applied it in a simple model of the response to bariatric surgeries [2]. An amazing effect is that the most widely used bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass) usually leads to remission of type 2 diabetes in days, long before there is any significant weight loss (with further beneficial effects in the subsequent months and years). Our results confirm that this effect can be largely explained by the enhanced post-meal excretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin that increases insulin secretion from the pancreas, but also suggest that other mechanisms are likely to be involved, possibly including an additional insulin-independent pathway for glucose transport into cells. [4pt] [1] Physical Biology, from Atoms to Medicine, edited by Ahmed H. Zewail (Imperial College Press, London, 2008).[0pt] [2] Roland E. Allen, Tyler D. Hughes, Jia Lerd Ng, Roberto D. Ortiz, Michel Abou Ghantous, Othmane Bouhali, Abdelilah Arredouani

  17. Biomedical science postdocs: an end to the era of expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Howard H; Justement, Louis B; Gerbi, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    After >3 decades of steady growth, the number of biological and medical science postdoctorates at doctoral degree-granting institutions recently began to decline. From 2010 through 2013, the most recent survey years, the postdoctoral population decreased from 40,970 to 38,719, a loss of 5.5%. This decline represents a notable departure from the previous long-standing increases in the number of postdoctorates in the biomedical workforce. The rate of contraction appears to be accelerating in the most recent survey years, and this has important implications for the biomedical workforce. PMID:26443818

  18. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public...

  19. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to...

  20. Research-Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorden, Joan F., Ed.; Kuh, Charlotte V., Ed.; Voytuk, James A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment" examines data on the biomedical sciences programs to gather additional insight about the talent, training environment, outcomes, diversity, and international participation in the biomedical sciences workforce. This report supports an earlier…

  1. Fullerenol - properties and applications in biomedical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Grębowski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fullerenols, the water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, are currently being recently intensively studied in the context of the possibility of their application in the biomedicine. Due to their hydrophilic properties and the ability to eliminate free radicals, fullerenols may in the future provide a solid alternative to currently used pharmacological methods in chemotherapy, treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and radiobiology. Depending on the research protocol applied, fullerenols may also act as pro oxidants. The dualistic nature of fullerenols may contribute to finding new biomedical applications of these agents in the future, by exerting a cytotoxic or protective effect respectively against cancer cells or healthy cells. Because of the encapsulated structure of fullerenols, there exists the possibility of their application in medical diagnostics in the transfer of contrast agents or in the drug transport. During the planning of an experiment designed to investigate the effects of radiation in combination with derivatives of water-soluble fullerenes, the possibility of appearance of the “dose-response effect” should be taken into consideration since it significantly contributes to one of the two possible effects: protection or sensitization. The same applies to the possibility of using these compounds as potential neuroprotectors. Fullerenol may protect neurons in the particular areas of the brain but in the definedcertain doses it may also induce cell death. A giant leap in the field of nanotechnology not only leads scientists to search for new applications of nanomaterials such as fullerenols, but also raises the question about their harmful effect on the environment. High utilization of hardly biodegradable fullerenols increases the likelihood of their accidental release into natural systems and their bioaccumulation. Despite convincing evidences about the potential applications of fullerenols in biomedicine, we still have

  2. Effective Computer Aided Instruction in Biomedical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Hause, Lawrence L.

    1985-01-01

    A menu-driven Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) package was integrated with word processing and effectively applied in five curricula at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Integration with word processing facilitates the ease of CAI development by instructors and was found to be the most important step in the development of CAI. CAI modules were developed and are currently used to reinforce lectures in medical pathology, laboratory quality control, computer programming and basic science reviews...

  3. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy in biomedical science: bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamsjäger, Sonja; Zoehrer, R.; Roschger, P.; Fratzl, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Mendelsohn, R.; Paschalis, E. P.

    2009-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIR) and Raman Microspectroscopy are powerful tools for characterizing the distribution of different chemical moieties in heterogeneous materials. FTIR and Raman measurements have been adapted to assess the maturity of the mineral and the quality of the organic component (collagen and non-collagenous proteins) of the mineralized tissue in bone. Unique to the FTIRI analysis is the capability to provide the spatial distribution of two of the major collagen cross-links (pyridinoline, and dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine) and through the study of normal and diseased bone, relate them to bone strength. These FTIR parameters have been validated based on analysis of model compounds. It is widely accepted that bone strength is determined by bone mass and bone quality. The latter is a multifactorial term encompassing the material and structural properties of bone, and one important aspect of the bone material properties is the organic matrix. The bone material properties can be defined by parameters of mineral and collagen, as determined by FTIR and Raman analysis. Considerably less attention has been directed at collagen, although there are several publications in the literature reporting altered collagen properties associated with fragile bone, in both animals and humans. Since bone is a heterogeneous tissue due to the remodeling process, microscopic areas may be carefully selected based on quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging or histological staining, thus ensuring comparison of areas with similar metabolic activity and mineral content. In conclusion, FTIRI and Raman vibrational spectroscopy are proving to be powerful tools in bone-related medical research.

  5. Foundations of image science

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Harrison H

    2013-01-01

    Winner of the 2006 Joseph W. Goodman Book Writing Award! A comprehensive treatment of the principles, mathematics, and statistics of image science In today's visually oriented society, images play an important role in conveying messages. From seismic imaging to satellite images to medical images, our modern society would be lost without images to enhance our understanding of our health, our culture, and our world. Foundations of Image Science presents a comprehensive treatment of the principles, mathematics, and st

  6. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  7. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains 698 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1981. There are 520 references to articles published in journals and books and 178 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Instrumentation and Controls, Computer Sciences, Energy, Engineering Technology, Solid State, Central Management, Operations, and Environmental Sciences. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference

  8. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J.B. (comp.)

    1982-07-01

    This bibliography contains 698 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1981. There are 520 references to articles published in journals and books and 178 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Instrumentation and Controls, Computer Sciences, Energy, Engineering Technology, Solid State, Central Management, Operations, and Environmental Sciences. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference.

  9. Managing Biomedical Image Metadata for Search and Retrieval of Similar Images

    OpenAIRE

    Korenblum, Daniel; Rubin, Daniel; Napel, Sandy; Cesar RODRIGUEZ; Beaulieu, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Radiology images are generally disconnected from the metadata describing their contents, such as imaging observations (“semantic” metadata), which are usually described in text reports that are not directly linked to the images. We developed a system, the Biomedical Image Metadata Manager (BIMM) to (1) address the problem of managing biomedical image metadata and (2) facilitate the retrieval of similar images using semantic feature metadata. Our approach allows radiologists, researchers, and ...

  10. Coherent fiber supercontinuum laser for nonlinear biomedical imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xiaomin;

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear biomedical imaging has not benefited from the well-known techniques of fiber supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, low spectral power intensity, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few techniques involving...... nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond fiber laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. These techniques pave the way for conducting point-of-care nonlinear biomedical imaging by a low-maintenance cost-effective coherent fiber supercontinuum laser, which covers a broad emission...

  11. Geometric Aspects in 3D Biomedical Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, P; Unser, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present some issues that arise when a geometric transformation is performed on an image or a volume. In particular, we illustrate the well-known problems of blocking, blurring, aliasing and ringing. Although the solution to these problems is trivial in an analog (optical) image processing system, their solution in a discrete (numeric) context is much more difficult. The modern trend of biomedical image processing is to fight these artifacts by using more sophisticated models that emphasize...

  12. Different images of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsson, Eva

      Within the science and technology centres (STC) movement there exists explicit aims and ambitions to enhance visitors' interest in and knowledge about science. Meanwhile, several researches question the choice of the scientific content in exhibitions when arguing that a too unproblematic view of...... science commonly is presented. But what images and aspects of science are visitors actually confronted with at STCs? How do staff members at STCs consider the scientific content and how do they choose what aspects of science to display in exhibitions? What ideas about visitors' learning do staff members...... images of science. Staff members at Nordic STC were therefore asked to consider to what extent they believe they display different aspects of science. The results suggest that it is possible to display different images of science depending on what aspects of science staff members choose to display. The...

  13. Biomedical Imaging Registration Trends and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares, João Manuel R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Data registration, i.e., the process of transforming a dataset so that the entities represented are properly adjusted to the homologous entities represented in a second dataset, has been a topic of huge research in various scientific fields. In Computational Vision, such transformation is commonly used on static images, but also on image sequences, and is usually known as image registration. For example, in medicine, computational methods of image registration have been assuming an essential ...

  14. The conversion of synchrotron radiation biomedical and medical images into DICOM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunling; Sun, Jianyong; Sun, Jianqi; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-03-01

    With Synchrotron Radiation light source, there was a lot of imaging methods being developed to perform biomedical and medical imaging researches such as X-ray absorption imaging, phase-contrast imaging and micro-CT imaging. In this presentation, we present an approach to transform a various kinds of SR images into proper DICOM images so that to use a rich of medical processing display software to process and display SR biomedical and medical images. The new generated SR DICOM images can be transferred, stored, processed and displayed by using most of commercial medical imaging software.

  15. 76 FR 24974 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following four panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one hour at...

  16. Ultrasmall lanthanide oxide nanoparticles for biomedical imaging and therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Gang Ho

    2014-01-01

    Most books discuss general and broad topics regarding molecular imagings. However, Ultrasmall Lanthanide Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Imaging and Therapy, will mainly focus on lanthanide oxide nanoparticles for molecular imaging and therapeutics. Multi-modal imaging capabilities will discussed, along with up-converting FI by using lanthanide oxide nanoparticles. The synthesis will cover polyol synthesis of lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Surface coatings with biocompatible and hydrophilic ligands will be discussed and TEM images and dynamic light scattering (DLS) patterns will be

  17. Bessel filters applied in biomedical image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa Lopez, Juan Pablo; Castañeda Saldarriaga, Diego Leon

    2014-06-01

    A magnetic resonance is an image obtained by means of an imaging test that uses magnets and radio waves to create body images, however, in some images it's difficult to recognize organs or foreign agents present in the body. With these Bessel filters the objective is to significantly increase the resolution of magnetic resonance images taken to make them much clearer in order to detect anomalies and diagnose the illness. As it's known, Bessel filters appear to solve the Schrödinger equation for a particle enclosed in a cylinder and affect the image distorting the colors and contours of it, therein lies the effectiveness of these filters, since the clear outline shows more defined and easy to recognize abnormalities inside the body.

  18. Biomedical Imaging and Computational Modeling in Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Iacoviello, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This book collects the state-of-art and new trends in image analysis and biomechanics. It covers a wide field of scientific and cultural topics, ranging from remodeling of bone tissue under the mechanical stimulus up to optimizing the performance of sports equipment, through the patient-specific modeling in orthopedics, microtomography and its application in oral and implant research, computational modeling in the field of hip prostheses, image based model development and analysis of the human knee joint, kinematics of the hip joint, micro-scale analysis of compositional and mechanical properties of dentin, automated techniques for cervical cell image analysis, and iomedical imaging and computational modeling in cardiovascular disease.   The book will be of interest to researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to image analysis and understanding, medical imaging, biomechanics, simulation and modeling, experimental analysis.

  19. Biomedical Image Registration Using Fuzzy Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Himadri Nath Moulick#1 , Anindita Chatterjee

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of the similarity measure is an essential theme in medical image registration. In this paper, a novel continuous medical image registration approach (CMIR) is proposed. This is our extension work of the previous one where we did a segmentation part of any particular image with a custom algorithm .The CMIR, considering the feedback from users and their preferences on the trade-off between global registration and local registration, extracts the concerned region by user interaction...

  20. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J.B. (comp.)

    1983-04-01

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division.

  1. Sodium Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madelin, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present an up-to-date overview of the potential biomedical applications of sodium MRI in vivo. Sodium MRI is a subject of increasing interest in translational research as it can give some direct and quantitative biochemical information on the tissue viability, cell integrity and function, and therefore not only help the diagnosis but also the prognosis of diseases and treatment outcomes. It has already been applied in vivo in most of human tissues, such as brain for stroke or tumor detection and therapeutic response, in breast cancer, in articular cartilage, in muscle and in kidney, and it was shown in some studies that it could provide very useful new information not available through standard proton MRI. However, this technique is still very challenging due to the low detectable sodium signal in biological tissue with MRI and hardware/software limitations of the clinical scanners. The article is divided in three parts: (1) the role of sodium in biological tissues, (2) a short review on s...

  2. 75 FR 57969 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  3. 77 FR 2737 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  4. 75 FR 6039 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  5. 76 FR 62814 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  6. 77 FR 3480 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  7. 78 FR 6126 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  8. 76 FR 5593 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  9. 77 FR 37684 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering...

  10. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometry imaging technologies is of significant current research interest. Mass spectrometry potentially is capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of chemical compounds on tissues at highly sensitive levels. The required in-situ analysis for the tissue imaging forced MS analysis being performed off the traditional conditions optimized in pharmaceutical applications with intense sample preparation. This critical review seeks to prese...

  11. Comparison of three types of XPAD3.2/CdTe single chip hybrids for hard X-ray applications in material science and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CHIPSPECT consortium aims at building a large multi-modules CdTe based photon counting detector for hard X-ray applications. For this purpose, we tested nine XPAD3.2 single chip hybrids in various configurations (i.e. Ohmic vs. Schottky contacts or electrons vs. holes collection mode) in order to select the most performing and best suited configuration for our experimental requirements. Measurements have been done using both X-ray synchrotron beams and 241Am source. Preliminary results on the image quality, calibration, stability, homogeneity and linearity of the different types of detectors are presented

  12. 78 FR 107 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Person: John K. Hayes, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  13. Computational optical biomedical spectroscopy and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, Sarhan M

    2015-01-01

    Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging in Personal Care Studies; Guojin Zhang, Roger L. McMullen, Richard Mendelsohn, and Osama M. MusaFluorescence Bioimaging with Applications to Chemistry; Ufana Riaz and S.M. AshrafNew Trends in Immunohistochemical, Genome, and Metabolomics Imaging; G. Livanos, Aditi Deshpande, C. Narayan, Ying Na, T. Quang, T. Farrahi, R. Koglin, Suman Shrestha, M. Zervakis, and George C. GiakosDeveloping a Comprehensive Taxonomy for Human Cell Types; Richard Conroy and Vinay PaiFunctional Near-Infrared S

  14. Analyser-based x-ray imaging for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyser-based imaging (ABI) is one of the several phase-contrast x-ray imaging techniques being pursued at synchrotron radiation facilities. With advancements in compact source technology, there is a possibility that ABI will become a clinical imaging modality. This paper presents the history of ABI as it has developed from its laboratory source to synchrotron imaging. The fundamental physics of phase-contrast imaging is presented both in a general sense and specifically for ABI. The technology is dependent on the use of perfect crystal monochromator optics. The theory of the x-ray optics is developed and presented in a way that will allow optimization of the imaging for specific biomedical systems. The advancement of analytical algorithms to produce separate images of the sample absorption, refraction angle map and small-angle x-ray scattering is detailed. Several detailed applications to biomedical imaging are presented to illustrate the broad range of systems and body sites studied preclinically to date: breast, cartilage and bone, soft tissue and organs. Ultimately, the application of ABI in clinical imaging will depend partly on the availability of compact sources with sufficient x-ray intensity comparable with that of the current synchrotron environment. (paper)

  15. Context-Aware Adaptive Hybrid Semantic Relatedness in Biomedical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadzadeh, Ehsan

    Text mining of biomedical literature and clinical notes is a very active field of research in biomedical science. Semantic analysis is one of the core modules for different Natural Language Processing (NLP) solutions. Methods for calculating semantic relatedness of two concepts can be very useful in solutions solving different problems such as relationship extraction, ontology creation and question / answering [1--6]. Several techniques exist in calculating semantic relatedness of two concepts. These techniques utilize different knowledge sources and corpora. So far, researchers attempted to find the best hybrid method for each domain by combining semantic relatedness techniques and data sources manually. In this work, attempts were made to eliminate the needs for manually combining semantic relatedness methods targeting any new contexts or resources through proposing an automated method, which attempted to find the best combination of semantic relatedness techniques and resources to achieve the best semantic relatedness score in every context. This may help the research community find the best hybrid method for each context considering the available algorithms and resources.

  16. Visualization and classification in biomedical terahertz pulsed imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Visualization' in imaging is the process of extracting useful information from raw data in such a way that meaningful physical contrasts are developed. 'Classification' is the subsequent process of defining parameter ranges which allow us to identify elements of images such as different tissues or different objects. In this paper, we explore techniques for visualization and classification in terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) for biomedical applications. For archived (formalin-fixed, alcohol-dehydrated and paraffin-mounted) test samples, we investigate both time- and frequency-domain methods based on bright- and dark-field TPI. Successful tissue classification is demonstrated

  17. Advanced Nanomaterials in Multimodal Imaging: Design, Functionalization, and Biomedical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomedical applications of nanoparticles in molecular imaging, drug delivery, and therapy give rise to the term nanomedicine and have led to ever-growing developments in the past decades. New generation of imaging probes (or contrast agents) and state of the art of various strategies for efficient multimodal molecular imaging have drawn much attention and led to successful preclinical uses. In this context, we intend to elucidate the fundamentals and review recent advances as well as to provide an outlook perspective in these fields.

  18. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following three panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science.... Clinical Research Program will meet on June 7-8, 2012, at *VA Central Office and not at Sheraton...

  19. 77 FR 20489 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services.... Neurobiology-A June 1, 2012..... Sheraton Suites--Old Town Alexandria. Clinical Application of June 1,...

  20. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services.... Neurobiology-A June 1, 2012........ Sheraton Suites--Old Town Alexandria. Clinical Application of June 1,...

  1. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... location changes have been made for the following panel meetings of the of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit...

  2. 78 FR 66992 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... City Hotel. Clinical Application of Genetics....... December 5, 2013 *VA Central Office....

  3. Nonlinear Polarimetric Microscopy for Biomedical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Masood

    A framework for the nonlinear optical polarimetry and polarimetric microscopy is developed. Mathematical equations are derived in terms of linear and nonlinear Stokes Mueller formalism, which comprehensively characterize the polarization properties of the incoming and outgoing radiations, and provide structural information about the organization of the investigated materials. The algebraic formalism developed in this thesis simplifies many predictions for a nonlinear polarimetry study and provides an intuitive understanding of various polarization properties for radiations and the intervening medium. For polarimetric microscopy experiments, a custom fast-scanning differential polarization microscope is developed, which is also capable of real-time three-dimensional imaging. The setup is equipped with a pair of high-speed resonant and galvanometric scanning mirrors, and supplemented by advanced adaptive optics and data acquisition modules. The scanning mirrors when combined with the adaptive optics deformable mirror enable fast 3D imaging. Deformable membrane mirrors and genetic algorithm optimization routines are employed to improve the imaging conditions including correcting the optical aberrations, maximizing signal intensities, and minimizing point-spread-functions of the focal volume. A field-programmable-gate array (FPGA) chip is exploited to rapidly acquire and process the multidimensional data. Using the nonlinear optical polarimetry framework and the home-built polarization microscope, a few biologically important tissues are measured and analyzed to gain insight as to their structure and dynamics. The structure and distribution of muscle sarcomere myosins, connective tissue collagen, carbohydrate-rich starch, and fruit fly eye retinal molecules are characterized with revealing polarization studies. In each case, using the theoretical framework, polarization sensitive data are analyzed to decipher the molecular orientations and nonlinear optical

  4. High sensitivity and high selectivity terahertz biomedical imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seongsin M. Kim; William Baughman; David S. Wilbert; Lee Butler; Michael Bolus; Soner Balci; Patrick Kung

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate two distinct emerging terahertz (THz) biomedical imaging techniques. One is based on the use of a new single frequency THz quantum cascade laser and the other is based on broadband THz time domain spectrocopy. The first method is employed to derive a metastasis lung tissue imaging at 3.7 THz with clear contrast between cancerous and healthy areas. The second approach is used to study an osseous tissue under several imaging modalities and achieve full THz spectroscopic imaging based on the frequency domain or on a fixed THz propagation time-delay. Sufficient contrast is achieved which facilitated the identification of regions with different cellular types and density compositions.%Terahertz (THz) imaging is a non-destructive,nonionizing imaging technology with potential applications in medicine,dentistry,pharmaceuticals,and homeland security[1-5].In these applications,THz biomedical imaging has become a particularly important and active field of research because of the potential for safer early screening of a disease.This will benefit the medical community tremendously and create considerable sociological impact.

  5. Developing multifunctional tissue simulating phantoms for quantitative biomedical optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronald; Xu, Jeff; Qin, Ruogu; Huang, Jiwei

    2010-02-01

    Many advantages of biomedical optical imaging modalities include low cost, portability, no radiation hazard, molecular sensitivity, and real-time non-invasive measurements of multiple tissue parameters. However, clinical acceptance of optical imaging is hampered by the lack of calibration standards and validation techniques. In this context, developing phantoms that simulate tissue structural, functional, and molecular properties is important for reliable performance and successful translation of biomedical optical imaging techniques to clinical applications. Over the years, we have developed various tissue simulating phantoms to validate imaging algorithms, to optimize instrument performance, to test contrast agents, and to calibrate acquisition systems. We also developed phantoms with multimodal contrasts for co-registration between different imaging modalities. In order to study tissue dynamic changes during medical intervention, we develop gel wax phantoms to simulate tissue optical and mechanical dynamics in response to compression load. We also dispersed heat sensitive microbubbles in agar agar gel phantoms to simulate heatinduced tissue coagulative necrosis in a cancer ablation procedure. The phantom systems developed in our lab have the potential to provide standardized traceable tools for multimodal imaging and image-guided intervention.

  6. Biochemical imaging of tissues by SIMS for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of optimal surface cleaning techniques by cluster ion beam sputtering, certain applications of SIMS for analyzing cells and tissues have been actively investigated. For this report, we collaborated with bio-medical scientists to study bio-SIMS analyses of skin and cancer tissues for biomedical diagnostics. We pay close attention to the setting up of a routine procedure for preparing tissue specimens and treating the surface before obtaining the bio-SIMS data. Bio-SIMS was used to study two biosystems, skin tissues for understanding the effects of photoaging and colon cancer tissues for insight into the development of new cancer diagnostics for cancer. Time-of-flight SIMS imaging measurements were taken after surface cleaning with cluster ion bombardment by Bin or C60 under varying conditions. The imaging capability of bio-SIMS with a spatial resolution of a few microns combined with principal component analysis reveal biologically meaningful information, but the lack of high molecular weight peaks even with cluster ion bombardment was a problem. This, among other problems, shows that discourse with biologists and medical doctors are critical to glean any meaningful information from SIMS mass spectrometric and imaging data. For SIMS to be accepted as a routine, daily analysis tool in biomedical laboratories, various practical sample handling methodology such as surface matrix treatment, including nano-metal particles and metal coating, in addition to cluster sputtering, should be studied

  7. Biochemical imaging of tissues by SIMS for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Moon, Dae Won; Choi, Won Woo; Li, Kapsok; Chung, Jin Ho

    2008-12-01

    With the development of optimal surface cleaning techniques by cluster ion beam sputtering, certain applications of SIMS for analyzing cells and tissues have been actively investigated. For this report, we collaborated with bio-medical scientists to study bio-SIMS analyses of skin and cancer tissues for biomedical diagnostics. We pay close attention to the setting up of a routine procedure for preparing tissue specimens and treating the surface before obtaining the bio-SIMS data. Bio-SIMS was used to study two biosystems, skin tissues for understanding the effects of photoaging and colon cancer tissues for insight into the development of new cancer diagnostics for cancer. Time-of-flight SIMS imaging measurements were taken after surface cleaning with cluster ion bombardment by Bi n or C 60 under varying conditions. The imaging capability of bio-SIMS with a spatial resolution of a few microns combined with principal component analysis reveal biologically meaningful information, but the lack of high molecular weight peaks even with cluster ion bombardment was a problem. This, among other problems, shows that discourse with biologists and medical doctors are critical to glean any meaningful information from SIMS mass spectrometric and imaging data. For SIMS to be accepted as a routine, daily analysis tool in biomedical laboratories, various practical sample handling methodology such as surface matrix treatment, including nano-metal particles and metal coating, in addition to cluster sputtering, should be studied.

  8. Biochemical imaging of tissues by SIMS for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Geol; Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong [Nanobio Fusion Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Dae Won [Nanobio Fusion Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: dwmoon@kriss.re.kr; Choi, Won Woo; Li, Kapsok; Chung, Jin Ho [Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    With the development of optimal surface cleaning techniques by cluster ion beam sputtering, certain applications of SIMS for analyzing cells and tissues have been actively investigated. For this report, we collaborated with bio-medical scientists to study bio-SIMS analyses of skin and cancer tissues for biomedical diagnostics. We pay close attention to the setting up of a routine procedure for preparing tissue specimens and treating the surface before obtaining the bio-SIMS data. Bio-SIMS was used to study two biosystems, skin tissues for understanding the effects of photoaging and colon cancer tissues for insight into the development of new cancer diagnostics for cancer. Time-of-flight SIMS imaging measurements were taken after surface cleaning with cluster ion bombardment by Bi{sub n} or C{sub 60} under varying conditions. The imaging capability of bio-SIMS with a spatial resolution of a few microns combined with principal component analysis reveal biologically meaningful information, but the lack of high molecular weight peaks even with cluster ion bombardment was a problem. This, among other problems, shows that discourse with biologists and medical doctors are critical to glean any meaningful information from SIMS mass spectrometric and imaging data. For SIMS to be accepted as a routine, daily analysis tool in biomedical laboratories, various practical sample handling methodology such as surface matrix treatment, including nano-metal particles and metal coating, in addition to cluster sputtering, should be studied.

  9. All-optoelectronic continuous wave THz imaging for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an all-optoelectronic THz imaging system for ex vivo biomedical applications based on photomixing of two continuous-wave laser beams using photoconductive antennas. The application of hyperboloidal lenses is discussed. They allow for f-numbers less than 1/2 permitting better focusing and higher spatial resolution compared to off-axis paraboloidal mirrors whose f-numbers for practical reasons must be larger than 1/2. For a specific histological sample, an analysis of image noise is discussed

  10. The rolling evolution of biomedical science as an essential tool in modern clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blann, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The British Journal of Biomedical Science is committed to publishing high-quality original research that represents a clear advance in the practice of biomedical science, and reviews that summarise recent advances in the field of biomedical science. The overall aim of the Journal is to provide a platform for the dissemination of new and innovative information on the diagnosis and management of disease that is valuable to the practicing laboratory scientist. The Editorial that follows describes the Journal and provides a perspective of its aims and objectives. PMID:27182669

  11. Radioanalytical and imaging techniques. Challenges and opportunities in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Where human health worldwide is under threat, radioanalytical and imaging scientists are expected to make significant difference and contribution. Diabetes, malnutrition, Alzheimer's and cardiovascular diseases can be better understood by probing elemental distributions to nano-scales and quantifying elemental compositions to ultratrace levels. As we aim towards personalized medicine, cancer management awaits new diagnostic and therapy methods which account, for example, for tissue oxygenation. In the context of such biomedical issues, recent trends and future developments are presented taking into consideration the availability of research reactors and ion beam facilities, as well as alternative and emerging techniques such as PIXE tomography (PIXE-T) and two- and three-gamma PET. (author)

  12. Digital analysis of the fringe pattern images from biomedical objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaronski, Jaroslaw W.; Podbielska, Halina; Kasprzak, Henryk T.

    1995-03-01

    Recent developments in optical, optoelectronic, and digital electronic imaging and metrology are creating opportunities for a new type of diagnostics methods and systems. Some of these techniques, established already in the field of technical and industrial non-destructive testing, have increasingly gained importance in biomedical research and may enter the clinical scene, as well. Even the laboratory investigations can have strong impact for further developments in this field. However, in experimental medicine the quantitative analysis of experimental data is sometimes required. When applying different interferometric methods, the obtained results are in the form of fringe pattern images. In this paper some of these methods, including holographic interferometry, laser interferometry and moire techniques are described and illustrated by experimental results. For acquisition and evaluation of the fringe pattern images, the Bioscan Optimas package from Bioscan, Incorporated of Edmonds, Wash., running under Microsoft Windows was used.

  13. Fundamental developments in infrared spectroscopic imaging for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Michael; Gardner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Infrared chemical imaging is a rapidly emerging field with new advances in instrumentation, data acquisition and data analysis. These developments have had significant impact in biomedical applications and numerous studies have now shown that this technology offers great promise for the improved diagnosis of the diseased state. Relying on purely biochemical signatures rather than contrast from exogenous dyes and stains, infrared chemical imaging has the potential to revolutionise histopathology for improved disease diagnosis. In this review we discuss the recent advances in infrared spectroscopic imaging specifically related to spectral histopathology (SHP) and consider the current state of the field. Finally we consider the practical application of SHP for disease diagnosis and consider potential barriers to clinical translation highlighting current directions and the future outlook. PMID:26996636

  14. Overview of imaging science.

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, R. N.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional disciplines of science are grounded in the observation and measurement of object properties. Recent advances in digital computer technology have spawned numerous computer-based imaging systems that extend the range of observation and measurement into realms that would otherwise be inaccessible. More importantly, the same set of principles, concepts, strategies, and methods may be used to address the generic issues involved in the production and use of all digitized images. Rec...

  15. Contributions on biomedical imaging, with a side-look at molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is intended as a brief introduction to the emerging scientific field of biomedical imaging. The breadth of the subject is shown and future fields of research are indicated, which hopefully will serve as a guide to the identification of starting points for the research in 'Biomedical and/or Molecular Imaging' at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health. The report starts with a brief sketch of the history. Then a - necessarily incomplete - list of research topics is presented. It is organized in two parts: the first one addresses medical imaging, and the second one is concerned with biological point aspects of the matter. (orig.)

  16. International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015) took place in the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Greece on June 18-20, 2015 and was organized by the Department of Biomedical Engineering. The scope of the conference was to provide a forum on the latest developments in Biomedical Instrumentation and related principles of Physical and Engineering sciences. Scientists and engineers from academic, industrial and health disciplines were invited to participate in the Conference and to contribute both in the promotion and dissemination of the scientific knowledge.

  17. Multidimensional biomedical image representation using a linear hypertree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibaroudene, Djaffer; Acharya, Raj S.

    1990-07-01

    Biomedical structures such as the beating heart are inherently multi-dimensional in nature. In addition to the three spatial directions which represent the object location and orientation, higher order dimensions can be assigned to represent various object parameters such as time and tissue density. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical data structure which can be mapped into a computer architecture that will efficiently store, manipulate, and display time varying images of multi-dimensional biomedical structures. This n-D object representation scheme which is called a linear hypertree is a generalization of the linear quadtree and octree from their respective 2-D and 3-D spaces to n-D environment. It is a hierarchical data structure which represents multi-dimensional volumetric information in a 2'-way branching tree. The basic properties of a linear hypertree are briefly presented along with the procedure for encoding the node rectangular coordinates into a hierarchical locational code. Two decoding techniques that transform the node locational code into its rectangular coordinate format are introduced. Some adjacency concepts in a multi-dimensional environment are defined. A neighbor finding algorithm which identifies the locational code of the adjacent hypertree node in a given direction is also presented. This algorithm does not convert the locational code to its rectangular coordinate form; instead, it operates directly on the node locational code in order to determine the neighbor's identification. Finally, Procedures for computing the locational codes of larger and smaller size neighbors are also included.

  18. Omni-tomography: Next-generation Biomedical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ge; Vannier, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Omni-tomography is enabled by interior tomography that has been developed over the past five years. By omni-tomography, we envision that the next stage of biomedical imaging will be the grand fusion of many tomographic modalities into a single gantry (all in one) for simultaneous data acquisition of numerous complementary features (all at once). This integration has great synergistic potential for development of systems biology, personalized and preventive medicine, because many physiological processes are dynamic and complicated, and must be observed promptly, comprehensively, sensitively, specifically, and non-invasively. In this perspective, we first present the background for and power of omni-tomography, then discuss its important applications in vulnerable plaque characterization and intratumor heterogeneity evaluation, review its enabling theory and technology, explain for the first time the feasibility of the CT-MRI scanner as an example, and finally suggest exciting research opportunities.

  19. 76 FR 5184 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... published in the Federal Register on January 5, 2011, 76 FR 572. This Federal Register Notice has been... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, March 14, 2011, 6 p.m. to March 16, 2011, 12...

  20. 78 FR 78982 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2013, 78 FR 64506. The meeting notice is amended to change... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, December 11, 2013, 08:30 a.m.,...

  1. 78 FR 55268 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Amended; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, November 6, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00...

  2. 78 FR 64519 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ..., which was published in the Federal Register on June 21, 2013, 78 FR 37557. The meeting notice is amended... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 3, 2013, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00...

  3. 78 FR 66755 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ..., which was published in the Federal Register on August 2, 2013, 78 FR 46995. The meeting notice is... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 10-11, 2013, 09:00 a.m.-08:00...

  4. 78 FR 64506 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ..., which was published in the Federal Register on July 26, 2013, 78 FR 45254. The meeting notice is amended... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 11, 2013, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00...

  5. 77 FR 25488 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... April 2, 2012, 77 FR 19675. The meeting location has been changed to The Bolger Center, 9600 Newbridge... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, May 21, 2012, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Bethesda...

  6. 78 FR 64966 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ..., which was published in the Federal Register on July 18, 2013, 78 FR 42970. The meeting notice is amended... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel, October 10-11, 2013, 03:00 p.m.-06:00...

  7. Modality prediction of biomedical literature images using multimodal feature representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelka, Obioma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling approaches performed to automatically predict the modality of images found in biomedical literature. Various state-of-the-art visual features such as Bag-of-Keypoints computed with dense SIFT descriptors, texture features and Joint Composite Descriptors were used for visual image representation. Text representation was obtained by vector quantisation on a Bag-of-Words dictionary generated using attribute importance derived from a χ-test. Computing the principal components separately on each feature, dimension reduction as well as computational load reduction was achieved. Various multiple feature fusions were adopted to supplement visual image information with corresponding text information. The improvement obtained when using multimodal features vs. visual or text features was detected, analysed and evaluated. Random Forest models with 100 to 500 deep trees grown by resampling, a multi class linear kernel SVM with C=0.05 and a late fusion of the two classifiers were used for modality prediction. A Random Forest classifier achieved a higher accuracy and computed Bag-of-Keypoints with dense SIFT descriptors proved to be a better approach than with Lowe SIFT.

  8. Race and Genetics: Controversies in Biomedical, Behavioral, and Forensic Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossorio, Pilar; Duster, Troy

    2005-01-01

    Among biomedical scientists, there is a great deal of controversy over the nature of race, the relevance of racial categories for research, and the proper methods of using racial variables. This article argues that researchers and scholars should avoid a binary-type argument, in which the question is whether to use race always or never.…

  9. 75 FR 57833 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... Plaza Clinical Research Program December 3, 2010 *VA Central Office Mental Hlth & Behav Sci-A December...

  10. 78 FR 22622 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... June 7, 2013 U.S. Access Board. Aging and Clinical Geriatrics........ June 10, 2013 VA Central...

  11. 75 FR 23847 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and ] Development Services Scientific Merit.... Clinical Research Program June 9, 2010 *VA Central Office. Oncology June 10-11, 2010....... L'Enfant...

  12. 76 FR 19188 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit.... Clinical Research Program June 13, 2011 VA Central Office.* Gastroenterology June 13, 2011 L'Enfant...

  13. Bridging the social and the biomedical: engaging the social and political sciences in HIV research

    OpenAIRE

    Kippax Susan C; Holt Martin; Friedman Samuel R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This supplement to the Journal of the International AIDS Society focuses on the engagement of the social and political sciences within HIV research and, in particular, maintaining a productive relationship between social and biomedical perspectives on HIV. It responds to a number of concerns raised primarily by social scientists, but also recognized as important by biomedical and public health researchers. These concerns include how best to understand the impact of medical technologi...

  14. The relevance of brain evolution for the biomedical sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Smulders, Tom V.

    2008-01-01

    Most biomedical neuroscientists realize the importance of the study of brain evolution to help them understand the differences and similarities between their animal model of choice and the human brains in which they are ultimately interested. Many think of evolution as a linear process, going from simpler brains, as those of rats, to more complex ones, as those of humans. However, in reality, every extant species' brain has undergone as long a period of evolution as has the human brain, and e...

  15. Polymers in life sciences: Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa; d'Amore, Matteo; Lamberti, Gaetano; Cascone, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the work done by prof. Titomanlio and his group in the fields of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of polymers. In particular, the main topics covered are: i) controlled drug release from pharmaceuticals based on hydrogel for oral delivery of drugs; ii) production and characterization of micro and nanoparticles based on stimuli-responsive polymers; iii) use of polymers for coronary stent gel-paving; iv) design and realization of novel methods (in-vitro and in-silico) to test polymer-based pharmaceuticals.

  16. Biomedical technical transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology is based on NASA research, using vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Additional laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Three new biomedical problems to which NASA technology is applicable are also identified. These are: a communication device for the speech impaired, the NASA development liquid-cooled garment, and miniature force transducers for heart research.

  17. Establishment of an index system for evaluating outstanding biomedical scientists for science foundation of Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-jing; CHEN Xin; REN Xu-feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To establish a scientific, objective and applicable index system for evaluating outstanding biomedical scientists for science foundation of Shanghai. Methods: According to the principal indices that have been used in the developed countries for evaluating their talented personnel and the reality of our country, an index system was set up to evaluate the outstanding biomedical scientists for Shanghai science foundation. The following parameters were used to simplify the indices: correlation coefficient,multiple correlation coefficient, partial correlation coefficient, creditability, and discriminatory power.And analytic hierarchy process was used to determine the weights of each index. Results and Conclusions:The established index system is scientific and applicable; it is helpful for cultivating and evaluating outstanding biomedical scientists.

  18. Biomedical Image Processing with Morphology and Segmentation Methods for Medical Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyjit Patra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern three-dimensional (3-D medical imaging offers the potential and promise for major advances in science and medicine as higher fidelity images are produced.It has developed into one of the most important fields within scientific imaging due to the rapid and continuing progress in computerized medical image visualization and advances in analysis methods and computer-aided diagnosis[1],and is now,for example,a vital part of the early detection,diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.The challenge is to effectively process and analyze the images in order to effectively extract, quantify,and interpret this information to gain understanding and insight into the structure and function of the organs being imaged.The general goal is to understand the information and put it to practical use.A multitude of diagnostic medical imaging systems are used to probe the human body.They comprise both microscopic (viz. cellular level and macroscopic (viz.organ and systems level modalities.Interpretation of the resulting images requires sophisticated image processing methods that enhance visual interpretation and image analysis methods that provide automated or semiautomated tissue detection,measurement, and characterization [2–4].In general,multiple transformations will be needed in order to extract the data of interest from an image,and a hierarchy in the processing steps will be evident, e.g., enhancement will precede restoration,which will precede analysis,feature extraction,and classification[5].Often,these are performed sequentially, but more sophisticated tasks will require feedback of parameters to preceding steps so that the processing includes a number of iterative loops.Segmentation is one of the key tools in medical image analysis.The objective of segmentation is to provide reliable, fast, and effective organ delineation.While traditionally, particularly in computer vision, segmentation is seen as an early vision tool used for subsequent recognition

  19. Applying Nanotechnology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Siddhartha Shrivastava; Debabrata Dash

    2009-01-01

    Recent research on biosystems at the nanoscale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, neuromorphic engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nanobiosystems research is...

  20. Biomedical and environmental sciences programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C.R.; Johnson, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences Programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the major organizational units. Following the accounts of research programs, is a list of publications and awards to its members. 6 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. 76 FR 66367 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meetings The Department of Veterans Affairs gives notice under the Public Law 92-463...

  2. The impact of blended learning technologies on student performance/learning in biomedical science higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Heugh, Sheelagh Mary Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the benefits of learning innovations in e-learning (asynchronous classrooms only) and blended learning (asynchronous virtual classrooms plus traditional learning) compared to traditional learning (classroom lectures). It specifically investigates effects on student satisfaction, retention, progression and achievement. We focussed on core biomedical science modules at London Metropolitan University: and four such modules were electronically supported using a learning and co...

  3. Biomedical and environmental sciences programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences Programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the major organizational units. Following the accounts of research programs, is a list of publications and awards to its members. 6 figs., 14 tabs

  4. [Application of the life sciences platform based on oracle to biomedical informations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Yun; Li, Tai-Huan; Yang, Hong-Qiao

    2008-03-01

    The life sciences platform based on Oracle database technology is introduced in this paper. By providing a powerful data access, integrating a variety of data types, and managing vast quantities of data, the software presents a flexible, safe and scalable management platform for biomedical data processing. PMID:18581881

  5. Science - Image in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavidovique, Bertrand; Lo Bosco, Giosue'

    pt. A. Information: data organization and communication. Statistical information: a Bayesian perspective / R. B. Stern, C. A. de B. Pereira. Multi-a(ge)nt graph patrolling and partitioning / Y. Elor, A. M. Bruckstein. The role of noise in brain function / S. Roy, R. Llinas. F-granulation, generalized rough entropy and image analysis / S. K. Pal. Fast redshift clustering with the Baire (ultra) metric / F. Murtagh, P. Contreras. Interactive classification oriented superresolution of multispectral images / P. Ruiz ... [et al.]. Blind processing in astrophysical data analysis / E. Salerno, L. Bedini. The extinction map of the orion molecular cloud / G. Scandariato (best student's paper), I. Pagano, M. Robberto -- pt. B. System: structure and behaviour. Common grounds: the role of perception in science and the nature of transitions / G. Bernroider. Looking the world from inside: intrinsic geometry of complex systems / L. Boi. The butterfly and the photon: new perspectives on unpredictability, and the notion of casual reality, in quantum physics / T. N. Palmer. Self-replicated wave patterns in neural networks with complex threshold / V. I. Nekorkin. A local explication of causation / G. Boniolo, R. Faraldo, A. Saggion. Evolving complexity, cognition, and consciousness / H. Liljenstrom. Self-assembly, modularity and physical complexity / S. E. Ahnert. The category of topological thermodynamics / R. M. Kiehn. Anti-phase spiking patterns / M. P. Igaev, A. S. Dmitrichev, V. I. Nekorkin -- pt. C. Data/system representation. Reality, models and representations: the case of galaxies, intelligence and avatars / J-C. Heudin. Astronomical images and data mining in the international virtual observatory context / F. Pasian, M. Brescia, G. Longo. Dame: a web oriented infrastructure for scientific data mining and exploration / S. Cavuoti ... [et al.]. Galactic phase spaces / D. Chakrabarty. From data to images: a shape based approach for fluorescence tomography / O. Dorn, K. E. Prieto

  6. New Software Developments for Quality Mesh Generation and Optimization from Biomedical Imaging Data

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zeyun; Wang, Jun; Gao, Zhanheng; Xu, Ming; Hoshijima, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new software toolkit for generating and optimizing surface and volumetric meshes from three-dimensional (3D) biomedical imaging data, targeted at image-based finite element analysis of some biomedical activities in a single material domain. Our toolkit includes a series of geometric processing algorithms including surface re-meshing and quality-guaranteed tetrahedral mesh generation and optimization. All methods described have been encapsulated into a user-friendly ...

  7. Hybrid-modality high-resolution imaging: for diagnostic biomedical imaging and sensing for disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murukeshan, Vadakke M.; Hoong Ta, Lim

    2014-11-01

    Medical diagnostics in the recent past has seen the challenging trend to come up with dual and multi-modality imaging for implementing better diagnostic procedures. The changes in tissues in the early disease stages are often subtle and can occur beneath the tissue surface. In most of these cases, conventional types of medical imaging using optics may not be able to detect these changes easily due to its penetration depth of the orders of 1 mm. Each imaging modality has its own advantages and limitations, and the use of a single modality is not suitable for every diagnostic applications. Therefore the need for multi or hybrid-modality imaging arises. Combining more than one imaging modalities overcomes the limitation of individual imaging method and integrates the respective advantages into a single setting. In this context, this paper will be focusing on the research and development of two multi-modality imaging platforms. The first platform combines ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for diagnostic applications in the eye. The second platform consists of optical hyperspectral and photoacoustic imaging for diagnostic applications in the colon. Photoacoustic imaging is used as one of the modalities in both platforms as it can offer deeper penetration depth compared to optical imaging. The optical engineering and research challenges in developing the dual/multi-modality platforms will be discussed, followed by initial results validating the proposed scheme. The proposed schemes offer high spatial and spectral resolution imaging and sensing, and is expected to offer potential biomedical imaging solutions in the near future.

  8. Beyond Preparation: Identity, Cultural Capital, and Readiness for Graduate School in the Biomedical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Gazley, J. Lynn; Remich, Robin; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E.; Keller, Jill; Campbell, Patricia B.; McGee, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 52 college graduates as they entered a Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP). Our goal was to investigate what it means for these aspiring scientists, most of whom are from groups underrepresented in the sciences, to feel ready to apply to a doctoral program in the biomedical sciences. For our analysis, we developed and used a theoretical framework which integrates concepts from identity-in-practice literature with Bourdieu’s ...

  9. Biomedical Image Edge Detection using an Ant Colony Optimization Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Rahebi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ant colony optimization (ACO is the algorithm that has inspired from natural behavior of ants life, which the ants leaved pheromone to search food on the ground. In this paper, ACO is introduced for resolving the edge detection in the biomedical image. Edge detection method based on ACO is able to create a matrix pheromone that shows information of available edge in each location of edge pixel which is created based on the movements of a number of ants on the biomedical image. Moreover, the movements of these ants are created by local fluctuation of biomedical image intensity values. The detected edge biomedical images have low quality rather than detected edge biomedical image resulted of a classic mask and won’t result application of these masks to edge detection biomedical image obtained of ACO. In proposed method, we use artificial neuralnetwork with supervised learning along with momentum to improve edge detection based on ACO. The experimental results shows that make use neural network are very effective in edge detection based on ACO.

  10. Graduate Experience in Science Education: the development of a science education course for biomedical science graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Dina G; DuPré, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The University of Rochester's Graduate Experience in Science Education (GESE) course familiarizes biomedical science graduate students interested in pursuing academic career tracks with a fundamental understanding of some of the theory, principles, and concepts of science education. This one-semester elective course provides graduate students with practical teaching and communication skills to help them better relate science content to, and increase their confidence in, their own teaching abilities. The 2-h weekly sessions include an introduction to cognitive hierarchies, learning styles, and multiple intelligences; modeling and coaching some practical aspects of science education pedagogy; lesson-planning skills; an introduction to instructional methods such as case studies and problem-based learning; and use of computer-based instructional technologies. It is hoped that the early development of knowledge and skills about teaching and learning will encourage graduate students to continue their growth as educators throughout their careers. This article summarizes the GESE course and presents evidence on the effectiveness of this course in providing graduate students with information about teaching and learning that they will use throughout their careers. PMID:17785406

  11. Applying Nano technology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research on bio systems at the nano scale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, necrophorum engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nano bio systems research is a priority in many countries and its relevance within nano technology is expected to increase in the future. The realisation that the nano scale has certain properties needed to solve important medical challenges and cater to unmet medical needs is driving nano medical research. The present review explores the significance of nano science and latest nano technologies for human health. Addressing the associated opportunities, the review also suggests how to manage far-reaching developments in these areas

  12. International Conference for Innovation in Biomedical Engineering and Life Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Usman, Juliana; Mohktar, Mas; Ahmad, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    This volumes presents the proceedings of ICIBEL 2015, organized by the Centre for Innovation in Medical Engineering (CIME) under Innovative Technology Research Cluster, University of Malaya. It was held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 6-8 December 2015. The ICIBEL 2015 conference promotes the latest researches and developments related to the integration of the Engineering technology in medical fields and life sciences. This includes the latest innovations, research trends and concerns, challenges and adopted solution in the field of medical engineering and life sciences. .

  13. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, A. V.; Khodanovich, M. Y.; Yarnykh, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Second International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research'' was held on the campus of the National Research Tomsk State University (Tomsk, Russia) on September 7-9, 2015. The conference was focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications for biomedical research. The main goal was to bring together basic scientists, clinical researchers and developers of new MRI techniques to bridge the gap between clinical/research needs and advanced technological solutions. The conference fostered research and development in basic and clinical MR science and its application to health care. It also had an educational purpose to promote understanding of cutting-edge MR developments. The conference provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, and to discuss unsolved problems. The program of the conference was divided into three main topics. First day of the conference was devoted to educational lectures on the fundamentals of MRI physics and image acquisition/reconstruction techniques, including recent developments in quantitative MRI. The second day was focused on developments and applications of new contrast agents. Multinuclear and spectroscopic acquisitions as well as functional MRI were presented during the third day of the conference. We would like to highlight the main developments presented at the conference and introduce the prominent speakers. The keynote speaker of the conference Dr. Vasily Yarnykh (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) presented a recently developed MRI method, macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping, as a unique tool for modifying image contrast and a unique tool for quantification of the myelin content in neural tissues. Professor Yury Pirogov (Lomonosov Moscow State University) described development of new fluorocarbon compounds and applications for biomedicine. Drs. Julia Velikina and Alexey

  14. Applying Nanotechnology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Shrivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on biosystems at the nanoscale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, neuromorphic engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nanobiosystems research is a priority in many countries and its relevance within nanotechnology is expected to increase in the future. The realisation that the nanoscale has certain properties needed to solve important medical challenges and cater to unmet medical needs is driving nanomedical research. The present review explores the significance of nanoscience and latest nanotechnologies for human health. Addressing the associated opportunities, the review also suggests how to manage far-reaching developments in these areas.

  15. Medical applications of Terahertz Imaging: a Review of Current Technology and Potential Applications in Biomedical Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Humphries, K.; Loughran, J.P.; Gradziel, M; Lanigan, W.; Ward, T.; Murphy, J. A.; O'Sullivan, C.

    2004-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging is in its early stages of development but already the potential clinical impact of this new imaging modality is clear. From cancer research to DNA analysis THz technology is improving or even making possible imaging of hitherto inaccessible phenomena. In this paper we present a short review of THz imaging from the point of view of biomedical engineering. We discuss the current state of the art in terms of THz imaging systems; describe current ap...

  16. Virtual reality techniques for the visualization of biomedical imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Maurice A.; Spillman, William B., Jr.; Meissner, Ken E.; Gabbard, Joseph

    2001-07-01

    The Optical Sciences & Engineering Research Center (OSER) at Virginia Polytechnic and State University investigates advanced laser surgery optics, biocompatible material for implants, and diagnostic patches and other diagnostic and drug delivery tools. The Center employs optics to provide new biological research tools for visualization, measurement, analysis and manipulation. The Center's Research into Multispectral Medical Analysis and Visualization techniques will allow human and veterinary medical professionals to diagnose various conditions of the body in much the same way that satellite information is used to study earth resources. Each pixel in the image has an associated spectra. Advanced image analysis techniques are combined with cross-correlation of the spectra with signatures of known conditions, allowing automated diagnostic assistance to physicians. The analysis and visualization system consists of five components: data acquisition, data storage, data standardization, data analysis, and data visualization. OSER research efforts will be directed toward investigations of these system components as an integrated tool for next generation medical diagnostics. OSER will research critical data quality and data storage issues, mult-spectral sensor technologies, data analysis techniques, and diagnostic visualization systems including the VT-CAVE, (www.cave.vt.edu). The VT-CAVE is Virginia Tech's configuration of Fakespace Systems, Inc Virtual Reality system.

  17. Modern technologies for retinal scanning and imaging: an introduction for the biomedical engineer

    OpenAIRE

    Gramatikov, Boris I.

    2014-01-01

    This review article is meant to help biomedical engineers and nonphysical scientists better understand the principles of, and the main trends in modern scanning and imaging modalities used in ophthalmology. It is intended to ease the communication between physicists, medical doctors and engineers, and hopefully encourage “classical” biomedical engineers to generate new ideas and to initiate projects in an area which has traditionally been dominated by optical physics. Most of the methods invo...

  18. Using Biomedically Relevant Multimedia Content in an Introductory Physics Course for Life Science and Pre-Health Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Dunlap, Justin C.; Christensen, Warren; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    We will describe a one-quarter pilot algebra-based introductory physics course for pre-health and life science majors. The course features videos with biomedical experts and cogent biomedically inspired physics content. The materials were used in a flipped classroom as well as an all-online environment where students interacted with multimedia…

  19. Collaborative Initiative in Biomedical Imaging to Study Complex Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Weili [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Fiddy, Michael A. [The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    2012-03-31

    The work reported addressed these topics: Fluorescence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; X-ray interferometer/phase imaging system; Quantitative imaging from scattered fields, Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy; and Multiphoton and Raman microscopy.

  20. Integrated online formative assessments in the biomedical sciences for medical students: benefits for learning

    OpenAIRE

    McNeil H Patrick; Jones Philip; Velan Gary M; Kumar Rakesh K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Online formative assessments have a sound theoretical basis, and are prevalent and popular in higher education settings, but data to establish their educational benefits are lacking. This study attempts to determine whether participation and performance in integrated online formative assessments in the biomedical sciences has measurable effects on learning by junior medical students. Methods Students enrolled in Phase 1 (Years 1 and 2) of an undergraduate Medicine program ...

  1. Biomedical Image Processing Using FCM Algorithm Based on the Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yu-hua; WANG Hui-min; LI Shi-pu

    2004-01-01

    An effective processing method for biomedical images and the Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) algorithm based on the wavelet transform are investigated.By using hierarchical wavelet decomposition, an original image could be decomposed into one lower image and several detail images. The segmentation started at the lowest resolution with the FCM clustering algorithm and the texture feature extracted from various sub-bands. With the improvement of the FCM algorithm, FCM alternation frequency was decreased and the accuracy of segmentation was advanced.

  2. Understanding and Using DICOM, the Data Interchange Standard for Biomedical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Bidgood, W. Dean; Horii, Steven C.; Prior, Fred W.; Van Syckle, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Standard specifies a non-proprietary data interchange protocol, digital image format, and file structure for biomedical images and image-related information. The fundamental concepts of the DICOM message protocol, services, and information objects are reviewed as background for a detailed discussion of the functionality of DICOM; the innovations and limitations of the Standard; and the impact of various DICOM f...

  3. Single-step colloidal processing of stable aqueous dispersions of ferroelectric nanoparticles for biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomedical applications of ferroelectric nanoparticles rely on the production of stable aqueous colloids. We report an implementation of the high energy ball milling method to produce and disperse ultrafine BaTiO3 nanoparticles in an aqueous media in a single step. This technique is low-cost, environmentally friendly and has the capability to control nanoparticle size and functionality with milling parameters. As a result, ultrafine nanoparticles with sizes as small as 6 nm can be produced. These nanoparticles maintain ferroelectricity and can be used as second harmonic generating nanoprobes for biomedical imaging. This technique can be generalized to produce aqueous nanoparticle colloids of other imaging materials. (paper)

  4. Biomedical image analysis recipes in Matlab for life scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos

    2015-01-01

    As its title suggests, this innovative book has been written for life scientists needing to analyse their data sets, and programmers, wanting a better understanding of the types of experimental images life scientists investigate on a regular basis. Each chapter presents one self-contained biomedical experiment to be analysed. Part I of the book presents its two basic ingredients: essential concepts of image analysis and Matlab. In Part II, algorithms and techniques are shown as series of 'recipes' or solved examples that show how specific techniques are applied to a biomedical experiments like

  5. Bio-medical X-ray imaging with spectroscopic pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P H; Tipples, R; Cook, N; Watts, R; Meyer, J; Bell, A J; Melzer, T R; Butler, P H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the clinical potential of spectroscopic X-ray detectors and to undertake a feasibility study using a novel detector in a clinical hospital setting. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allowing for routine use of spectroscopic bio-medical imaging. We have coined the term MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) for bio-medical images that provide spatial, temporal, and energy information. The full clinical significance of spectroscopic X-ray imaging is difficult to predict but insights can be gained by examining both image reconstruction artifacts and the current uses of dual-energy techniques. This paper reviews the known uses of energy information in vascular imaging and mammography, clinically important fields. It then presents initial results from using Medipix-2, to image human tissues within a clinical radiology department. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allo...

  6. Digital histologic images: practical pointers for successful electronic submission to biomedical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, H E; Hanley, E N; Sun, Y

    2009-12-01

    The advent of digital imaging and online submission of manuscripts has created new challenges for authors using histological images. Digital images are used routinely in today's histology research lab and authors must prepare illustrations that meet standards for resolution, color modes, image size, and digital file types for successful online submission to biomedical journals. Because authors may not be familiar with these requirements, our objective here is to present practical guidelines and information for successful image submission online. Ethical issues related to digital imaging and other current topics also are discussed with reference to available online resources. PMID:19418314

  7. Discovery informatics in biological and biomedical sciences: research challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    New discoveries in biological, biomedical and health sciences are increasingly being driven by our ability to acquire, share, integrate and analyze, and construct and simulate predictive models of biological systems. While much attention has focused on automating routine aspects of management and analysis of "big data", realizing the full potential of "big data" to accelerate discovery calls for automating many other aspects of the scientific process that have so far largely resisted automation: identifying gaps in the current state of knowledge; generating and prioritizing questions; designing studies; designing, prioritizing, planning, and executing experiments; interpreting results; forming hypotheses; drawing conclusions; replicating studies; validating claims; documenting studies; communicating results; reviewing results; and integrating results into the larger body of knowledge in a discipline. Against this background, the PSB workshop on Discovery Informatics in Biological and Biomedical Sciences explores the opportunities and challenges of automating discovery or assisting humans in discovery through advances (i) Understanding, formalization, and information processing accounts of, the entire scientific process; (ii) Design, development, and evaluation of the computational artifacts (representations, processes) that embody such understanding; and (iii) Application of the resulting artifacts and systems to advance science (by augmenting individual or collective human efforts, or by fully automating science). PMID:25592607

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering for label-free biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has established itself as an imaging technique capable of providing video-rate imaging of biological specimens through vibrational coherence of endogenous molecules. Current techniques predominantly involve the application of costly, invasive and potentially non-specific dyes or labels for imaging biomolecules. CARS microscopy can however provide a high-resolution and non-invasive alternative for imaging biomolecules of interest without the need for exogenous labels. Here we provide an overview of CARS including the technique and common instrumentation as well as its applications in biomedical imaging. We discuss the major biomedical areas where CARS has been applied such as in evaluating liver disease, progression of atherosclerosis, tumour classification and tracking drug delivery, whilst also assessing the future challenges for clinical translation. (special issue article)

  9. Measuring revolutionary biomedical science 1992-2006 using Nobel prizes, Lasker (clinical medicine) awards and Gairdner awards (NLG metric).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, the Lasker award for clinical medicine, and the Gairdner international award are given to individuals for their role in developing theories, technologies and discoveries which have changed the direction of biomedical science. These distinctions have been used to develop an NLG metric to measure research performance and trends in 'revolutionary' biomedical science with the aim of identifying the premier revolutionary science research institutions and nations from 1992-2006. I have previously argued that the number of Nobel laureates in the biomedical field should be expanded to about nine per year and the NLG metric attempts to predict the possible results of such an expansion. One hundred and nineteen NLG prizes and awards were made during the past fifteen years (about eight per year) when overlapping awards had been removed. Eighty-five were won by the USA, revealing a massive domination in revolutionary biomedical science by this nation; the UK was second with sixteen awards; Canada had five, Australia four and Germany three. The USA had twelve elite centres of revolutionary biomedical science, with University of Washington at Seattle and MIT in first position with six awards and prizes each; Rockefeller University and Caltech were jointly second placed with five. Surprisingly, Harvard University--which many people rank as the premier world research centre--failed to reach the threshold of three prizes and awards, and was not included in the elite list. The University of Oxford, UK, was the only institution outside of the USA which featured as a significant centre of revolutionary biomedical science. Long-term success at the highest level of revolutionary biomedical science (and probably other sciences) probably requires a sufficiently large number of individually-successful large institutions in open competition with one another--as in the USA. If this model cannot be replicated within smaller nations, then it implies

  10. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; Latessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-06-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.

  11. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; LaTessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  12. Biomedical Image Segmentation and Registration Using Type-2 Fuzzy Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Arya Ghosh1 , Himadri Nath Moulick2 , Susmit Karmokar

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of the similarity measure is an essential theme in medical image registration. In this paper, a novelcontinuous medical image registration approach (CMIR) is proposed. This is our extension work of the previous one where we did a segmentation part of any particular image with a custom algorithm .The CMIR, considering the feedback from users and their preferences on the trade-off between global registration and local registration, extracts the concerned region by user interaction ...

  13. Differential equation analysis in biomedical science and engineering partial differential equation applications with R

    CERN Document Server

    Schiesser, William E

    2014-01-01

    Features a solid foundation of mathematical and computational tools to formulate and solve real-world PDE problems across various fields With a step-by-step approach to solving partial differential equations (PDEs), Differential Equation Analysis in Biomedical Science and Engineering: Partial Differential Equation Applications with R successfully applies computational techniques for solving real-world PDE problems that are found in a variety of fields, including chemistry, physics, biology, and physiology. The book provides readers with the necessary knowledge to reproduce and extend the com

  14. Recent developments in fluorescence-based microscopy applied in biomedical sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present short review aims to give an overview of the most recent de velopments in fluorescence microscopy and its applications in biomedical science s. Apart from improvements in well-established methods based on conventional fl u orescence microscopy and confocal microscopy (fluorescence in situ hybridisa tion (FISH), tyramide signal amplification (TSA) in immunocytochemistry, new fluorop hores), more recently introduced techniques like fluorescence resonance energy t ransfer (FRET), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), multiphoton m icroscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) will be discussed.

  15. Differential equation analysis in biomedical science and engineering ordinary differential equation applications with R

    CERN Document Server

    Schiesser, William E

    2014-01-01

    Features a solid foundation of mathematical and computational tools to formulate and solve real-world ODE problems across various fields With a step-by-step approach to solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), Differential Equation Analysis in Biomedical Science and Engineering: Ordinary Differential Equation Applications with R successfully applies computational techniques for solving real-worldODE problems that are found in a variety of fields, including chemistry, physics, biology,and physiology. The book provides readers with the necessary knowledge to reproduce andextend the comp

  16. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  17. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, AC; Zheng, Y.; Speller, RD; Evans, PM; Allinson, NM; Wells, K.

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS Active Pixels Sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous Silicon and Selenium Flat Panel Imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non...

  18. Boundary-Work in the Health Research Field: Biomedical and Clinician Scientists' Perceptions of Social Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mathieu; Laberge, Suzanne; Hodges, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Funding agencies in Canada are attempting to break down the organizational boundaries between disciplines to promote interdisciplinary research and foster the integration of the social sciences into the health research field. This paper explores the extent to which biomedical and clinician scientists' perceptions of social science research operate…

  19. Should MD-PhD Programs Encourage Graduate Training in Disciplines Beyond Conventional Biomedical or Clinical Sciences?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Mara, Ryan J.; Hsu, Stephen I.; Wilson, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of MD–PhD training programs is to produce physician–scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician–scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD–PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This quest...

  20. New Windows based Color Morphological Operators for Biomedical Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Juan; Bouchet, Agustina; Brun, Marcel; Ballarin, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    Morphological image processing is well known as an efficient methodology for image processing and computer vision. With the wide use of color in many areas, the interest on the color perception and processing has been growing rapidly. Many models have been proposed to extend morphological operators to the field of color images, dealing with some new problems not present previously in the binary and gray level contexts. These solutions usually deal with the lattice structure of the color space, or provide it with total orders, to be able to define basic operators with required properties. In this work we propose a new locally defined ordering, in the context of window based morphological operators, for the definition of erosions-like and dilation-like operators, which provides the same desired properties expected from color morphology, avoiding some of the drawbacks of the prior approaches. Experimental results show that the proposed color operators can be efficiently used for color image processing.

  1. Light source design for spectral tuning in biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Schlangen, Sebastian; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    We propose an architecture with a remote phosphor-based modular and compact light-emitting diode (LED) light source in a noncontact dermoscope prototype for skin cancer screening. The spectrum and color temperature of the output light can easily and significantly be changed depending on spectral absorption characteristics of the tissues being imaged. The new system has several advantages compared to state-of-the-art phosphor converted ultrabright white LEDs, used in a wide range of medical imaging devices, which have a fixed spectrum and color temperature at a given operating point. In particular, the system can more easily be adapted to the requirements originating from different tissues in the human body, which have wavelength-dependent absorption and reflectivity. This leads to improved contrast for different kinds of imaged tissue components. The concept of such a lighting architecture can be vastly utilized in many other medical imaging devices including endoscopic systems. PMID:26839911

  2. Infrared thermography and image analysis for biomedical use

    OpenAIRE

    SZENTKUTI, ANDRAS; Skala Kavanagh, Hana; Grazio, Simeon

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermography is used for measuring and analyzing physiological functions and pathology related to the body’s thermal homeostasis and temperature. This review provides an overview of the technological advantages of infrared imaging, with the focus on new advances in and opportunities for infrared imaging, as a reliable medical diagnostic tool. The review has four main parts. Firstly, a short history of thermography development in medicine is given. Secondly, an overview on the cl...

  3. Image-based Informatics for Preclinical Biomedical Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Price, Jeffery R [ORNL; Wall, Jonathan [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    In 2006, the New England Journal of Medicine selected medical imaging as one of the eleven most important innovations of the past 1,000 years, primarily due to its ability to allow physicians and researchers to visualize the very nature of disease. As a result of the broad-based adoption of micro imaging technologies, preclinical researchers today are generating terabytes of image data from both anatomic and functional imaging modes. In this paper we describe our early research to apply content-based image retrieval to index and manage large image libraries generated in the study of amyloid disease in mice. Amyloidosis is associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, chronic inflammation and myeloma. In particular, we will focus on results to date in the area of small animal organ segmentation and description for CT, SPECT, and PET modes and present a small set of preliminary retrieval results for a specific disease state in kidney CT crosssections.

  4. Lecture 10: The European Bioinformatics Institute - "Big data" for biomedical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Dana, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Part 1: Big data for biomedical sciences (Tom Hancocks) Ten years ago witnessed the completion of the first international 'Big Biology' project that sequenced the human genome. In the years since biological sciences, have seen a vast growth in data. In the coming years advances will come from integration of experimental approaches and the translation into applied technologies is the hospital, clinic and even at home. This talk will examine the development of infrastructure, physical and virtual, that will allow millions of life scientists across Europe better access to biological data Tom studied Human Genetics at the University of Leeds and McMaster University, before completing an MSc in Analytical Genomics at the University of Birmingham. He has worked for the UK National Health Service in diagnostic genetics and in training healthcare scientists and clinicians in bioinformatics. Tom joined the EBI in 2012 and is responsible for the scientific development and delivery of training for the BioMedBridges pr...

  5. Biomedical image representation and classification using an entropy weighted probabilistic concept feature space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Antani, Sameer K.; Demner-Fushman, Dinna; Thoma, George R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to biomedical image representation for classification by mapping image regions to local concepts and represent images in a weighted entropy based probabilistic feature space. In a heterogeneous collection of medical images, it is possible to identify specific local patches that are perceptually and/or semantically distinguishable. The variation of these patches is effectively modeled as local concepts based on their low-level features as inputs to a multi-class SVM classifier. The probability of occurrence of each concept in an image is measured by spreading and normalizing each region's class confidence score based on the probabilistic output of the classifier. Furthermore, importance of concepts is measured as Shannon entropy based on pixel values of image patches and used to refine the feature vector to overcome the limitation of the "TF-IDF"- based weighting. In addition, to take the localization information of concepts into consideration, each image each segmented into five overlapping regions and local concept feature vectors are generated from those regions to finally obtain a combined semi-global feature vector. A systematic evaluation of image classification on two biomedical image data sets demonstrates improvement of more than 10% for the proposed feature representation approach compared to the commonly used low level and visual word-based approaches.

  6. Extended-Cavity Semiconductor Wavelength-Swept Laser for Biomedical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, S. H.; Boudoux, C.; Pierce, M. C.; de Boer, J F; Tearney, G. J.; Bouma, B. E.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact high-power rapidly swept wavelength tunable laser source based on a semiconductor optical amplifier and an extended-cavity grating filter. The laser produces excellent output characteristics for biomedical imaging, exhibiting >4-mW average output power, 80-dB noise extinction with its center wavelength swept over 100 nm at 1310 nm at variable repetition rates up to 500 Hz.

  7. High-Speed Imaging and Optical Sensing Systems for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mahjoubfar, Ata

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput real-time optical sensing and imaging instruments for capture and analysis of fast phenomena are among the most essential tools for scientific, industrial, military, and most importantly biomedical applications. The key challenge in these instruments is the fundamental trade-off between speed and sensitivity of the measurement system due to the limited signal energy collected in each measurement window. Based on two enabling technologies, namely photonic time-stretch dispersiv...

  8. World Wide Web platform-independent access to biomedical text/image databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, L. Rodney; Goh, Gin-Hua; Neve, Leif; Thoma, George R.

    1998-07-01

    The biomedical digital library of the future is expected to provide access to stores of biomedical database information containing text and images. Developing efficient methods for accessing such databases is a research effort at the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications of the National Library of Medicine. In this paper we examine issues in providing access to databases across the Web and describe a tool we have developed: the Web-based Medical Information Retrieval System (WebMIRS). We address a number of critical issues, including preservation of data integrity, efficient database design, access to documentation, quality of query and results interfaces, capability to export results to other software, and exploitation of multimedia data. WebMIRS is implemented as a Java applet that allows database access to text and to associated image data, without requiring any user software beyond a standard Web browser. The applet implementation allows WebMIRS to run on any hardware platform (such as PCs, the Macintosh, or Unix machines) which supports a Java-enabled Web browser, such as Netscape or Internet Explorer. WebMIRS is being tested on text/x-ray image databases created from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics.

  9. Biomedical laboratory science education: standardising teaching content in resource-limited countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Arneson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a worldwide shortage of qualified laboratory personnel to provide adequate testing for the detection and monitoring of diseases. In an effort to increase laboratory capacity in developing countries, new skills have been introduced into laboratory services. Curriculum revision with a focus on good laboratory practice is an important aspect of supplying entry-level graduates with the competencies needed to meet the current needs.Objectives: Gaps in application and problem-solving competencies of newly graduated laboratory personnel were discovered in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya. New medical laboratory teaching content was developed in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya using national instructors, tutors, and experts and consulting medical laboratory educators from the United States of America (USA.Method: Workshops were held in Ethiopia to create standardised biomedical laboratory science (BMLS lessons based on recently-revised course objectives with an emphasis on application of skills. In Tanzania, course-module teaching guides with objectives were developed based on established competency outcomes and tasks. In Kenya, example interactive presentations and lesson plans were developed by the USA medical laboratory educators prior to the workshop to serve as resources and templates for the development of lessons within the country itself.Results: The new teaching materials were implemented and faculty, students and other stakeholders reported successful outcomes.Conclusions: These approaches to updating curricula may be helpful as biomedical laboratory schools in other countries address gaps in the competencies of entry-level graduates.

  10. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy

  11. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Byrne, T.E. [Roane State Community College, Harriman, TN (United States); Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  12. Morphological image processing for quantitative shape analysis of biomedical structures: effective contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A contrast enhancement approach utilizing a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing is introduced. The method is quantitatively evaluated and then applied to some medical images. Image processing methods significantly contribute to visualization of images captured by biomedical modalities (such as mammography, X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and light and electron microscopy). Quantitative interpretation of the deluge of complicated biomedical images, however, poses many research challenges, one of which is to enhance structural features that are scarcely perceptible to the human eye. This study introduces a contrast enhancement approach based on a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing. The proposed method is applied to medical images for the enhancement of structural features. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated quantitatively by the contrast improvement ratio (CIR). The CIR of the proposed method is 12.1, versus 4.7 and 0.1 for two conventional contrast enhancement methods, clearly indicating the high contrasting capability of the method

  13. Biomedical and environmental sciences programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major objective of the biomedical and environmental sciences (BES) research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is to provide information on environmental, health, and safety considerations that can be used in the formulation and implementation of energy technology decisions. Research is directed at securing information required for an understanding of both the short- and long-term consequences of the processes involved in new energy technologies. Investigation of the mechanisms responsible for biological and ecological damage caused by substances associated with energy production and of repair mechanisms is a necessary component of this research. The research is carried out by the staff of four divisions and one program: Biology Division, Environmental Sciences Division, Health and Safety Research Division, Information Division, and the Life Sciences Synthetic Fuels Program. Research programs underway in each of these divisions are discussed. Information on the following subjects is also included: interactions with universities; interactions with industry; technology transfer; recent accomplishments in the areas of program, publications, awards, and patents; and new initiatives

  14. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography. (orig.)

  15. Developmental programming: State-of-the-science and future directions-summary from a Pennington biomedical symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    On December 8-9, 2014, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center convened a scientific symposium to review the state-of-the-science and future directions for the study of developmental programming of obesity and chronic disease. The objectives of the symposium were to discuss: (i) past and current s...

  16. Multiple choice questions are superior to extended matching questions to identify medicine and biomedical sciences students who perform poorly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Brand, T.L. van den; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, medical faculties at Dutch universities have implemented a legally binding study advice to students of medicine and biomedical sciences during their propaedeutic phase. Appropriate examination is essential to discriminate between poor (grade <6), moderate (grade 6-8) and excellen

  17. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building on previous work, a phase-preserving bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator was developed with the capability of performing live animal phase contrast dynamic imaging at the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called ‘magic condition’ that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used

  18. Automatic segmentation of subfigure image panels for multimodal biomedical document retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Beibei; Antani, Sameer; Stanley, R. Joe; Thoma, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical images are often referenced for clinical decision support (CDS), educational purposes, and research. The task of automatically finding the images in a scientific article that are most useful for the purpose of determining relevance to a clinical situation is traditionally done using text and is quite challenging. We propose to improve this by associating image features from the entire image and from relevant regions of interest with biomedical concepts described in the figure caption or discussion in the article. However, images used in scientific article figures are often composed of multiple panels where each sub-figure (panel) is referenced in the caption using alphanumeric labels, e.g. Figure 1(a), 2(c), etc. It is necessary to separate individual panels from a multi-panel figure as a first step toward automatic annotation of images. In this work we present methods that add make robust our previous efforts reported here. Specifically, we address the limitation in segmenting figures that do not exhibit explicit inter-panel boundaries, e.g. illustrations, graphs, and charts. We present a novel hybrid clustering algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) with fuzzy logic controller (FLC) to locate related figure components in such images. Results from our evaluation are very promising with 93.64% panel detection accuracy for regular (non-illustration) figure images and 92.1% accuracy for illustration images. A computational complexity analysis also shows that PSO is an optimal approach with relatively low computation time. The accuracy of separating these two type images is 98.11% and is achieved using decision tree.

  19. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.m@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Rm 163, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Samadi, Nazanin [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Bassey, Bassey [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Rm 163, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Gomez, Ariel [Canadian Light Source, 44 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Chapman, Dean [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Rm 163, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Building on previous work, a phase-preserving bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator was developed with the capability of performing live animal phase contrast dynamic imaging at the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called ‘magic condition’ that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used.

  20. How can we improve Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math education to encourage careers in Biomedical and Pathology Informatics?

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Uppal; Gunasheil Mandava; Romagnoli, Katrina M.; King, Andrew J.; Amie J Draper; Adam L Handen; Arielle M Fisher; Becich, Michael J; Joyeeta Dutta-Moscato

    2016-01-01

    The Computer Science, Biology, and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) program was initiated in 2011 to expose the critical role of informatics in biomedicine to talented high school students.[1] By involving them in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) training at the high school level and providing mentorship and research opportunities throughout the formative years of their education, CoSBBI creates a research infrastructure designed to develop young informaticians. Our central pr...

  1. The role biomedical science laboratories can play in improving science knowledge and promoting first-year nursing academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, Pam

    The Role Biomedical Science Laboratories Can Play In Improving Science Knowledge and Promoting First-Year Nursing Academic Success The need for additional nursing and health care professionals is expected to increase dramatically over the next 20 years. With this in mind, students must have strong biomedical science knowledge to be competent in their field. Some studies have shown that participation in bioscience laboratories can enhance science knowledge. If this is true, an analysis of the role bioscience labs have in first-year nursing academic success is apposite. In response, this study sought to determine whether concurrent enrollment in anatomy and microbiology lecture and lab courses improved final lecture course grades. The investigation was expanded to include a comparison of first-year nursing GPA and prerequisite bioscience concurrent lecture/lab enrollment. Additionally, research has indicated that learning is affected by student perception of the course, instructor, content, and environment. To gain an insight regarding students' perspectives of laboratory courses, almost 100 students completed a 20-statement perception survey to understand how lab participation affects learning. Data analyses involved comparing anatomy and microbiology final lecture course grades between students who concurrently enrolled in the lecture and lab courses and students who completed the lecture course alone. Independent t test analyses revealed that there was no significant difference between the groups for anatomy, t(285) = .11, p = .912, but for microbiology, the lab course provided a significant educational benefit, t(256) = 4.47, p = .000. However, when concurrent prerequisite bioscience lecture/lab enrollment was compared to non-concurrent enrollment for first-year nursing GPA using independent t test analyses, no significant difference was found for South Dakota State University, t(37) = -1.57, p = .125, or for the University of South Dakota, t(38) = -0.46, p

  2. Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyeeta Dutta-Moscato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC, Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park, and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical

  3. Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T; Becich, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics

  4. Advanced computational approaches to biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Punam K; Basu, Subhadip

    2014-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in biomedical engineering in recent decades, given advancements in medical imaging and physiological modelling and sensing systems, coupled with immense growth in computational and network technology, analytic approaches, visualization and virtual-reality, man-machine interaction and automation. Biomedical engineering involves applying engineering principles to the medical and biological sciences and it comprises several topics including biomedicine, medical imaging, physiological modelling and sensing, instrumentation, real-time systems, automation and control, sig

  5. Hot topics in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound therapy and its integration with ultrasonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2005-09-01

    Since the development of biomedical ultrasound imaging from sonar after WWII, there has been a clear divide between ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound therapy. While imaging techniques are designed to cause as little change as possible in the tissues through which ultrasound propagates, ultrasound therapy typically relies upon heating or acoustic cavitation to produce a desirable therapeutic effect. Concerns over the increasingly high acoustic outputs of diagnostic ultrasound scanners prompted the adoption of the Mechanical Index (MI) and Thermal Index (TI) in the early 1990s. Therapeutic applications of ultrasound, meanwhile, have evolved from deep tissue heating in sports medicine to include targeted drug delivery, tumor and plaque ablation, cauterization via high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and accelerated dissolution of blood clots. The integration of ultrasonic imaging and therapy in one device is just beginning, but the promise of improved patient outcomes is balanced by regulatory and practical impediments.

  6. Patterns of biomedical science production in a sub-Saharan research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnandji Selidji T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research activities in sub-Saharan Africa may be limited to delegated tasks due to the strong control from Western collaborators, which could lead to scientific production of little value in terms of its impact on social and economic innovation in less developed areas. However, the current contexts of international biomedical research including the development of public-private partnerships and research institutions in Africa suggest that scientific activities are growing in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aims to describe the patterns of clinical research activities at a sub-Saharan biomedical research center. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a core group of researchers at the Medical Research Unit of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital from June 2009 to February 2010 in Lambaréné, Gabon. Scientific activities running at the MRU as well as the implementation of ethical and regulatory standards were covered by the interview sessions. Results The framework of clinical research includes transnational studies and research initiated locally. In transnational collaborations, a sub-Saharan research institution may be limited to producing confirmatory and late-stage data with little impact on economic and social innovation. However, ethical and regulatory guidelines are being implemented taking into consideration the local contexts. Similarly, the scientific content of studies designed by researchers at the MRU, if local needs are taken into account, may potentially contribute to a scientific production with long-term value on social and economic innovation in sub-Saharan Africa. Conclusion Further research questions and methods in social sciences should comprehensively address the construction of scientific content with the social, economic and cultural contexts surrounding research activities.

  7. Programmatic Efforts at the National Institutes of Health to Promote and Support the Careers of Women in Biomedical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank-Bazinet, Jennifer L; Bunker Whittington, Kjersten; Cassidy, Sara K B; Filart, Rosemarie; Cornelison, Terri L; Begg, Lisa; Austin Clayton, Janine

    2016-08-01

    Although women have reached parity at the training level in the biological sciences and medicine, they are still significantly underrepresented in the professoriate and in mid- and senior-level life science positions. Considerable effort has been devoted by individuals and organizations across science sectors to understanding this disparity and to developing interventions in support of women's career development. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) formed the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) in 1990 with the goals of supporting initiatives to improve women's health and providing opportunities and support for the recruitment, retention, reentry, and sustained advancement of women in biomedical careers. Here, the authors review several accomplishments and flagship activities initiated by the NIH and ORWH in support of women's career development during this time. These include programming to support researchers returning to the workforce after a period away (Research Supplements to Promote Reentry into Biomedical and Behavioral Research Careers), career development awards made through the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health program, and trans-NIH involvement and activities stemming from the NIH Working Group on Women in Biomedical Careers. These innovative programs have contributed to advancement of women by supporting the professional and personal needs of women in science. The authors discuss the unique opportunities that accompany NIH partnerships with the scientific community, and conclude with a summary of the impact of these programs on women in science. PMID:27191836

  8. An inventory of biomedical imaging physics elements-of-competence for diagnostic radiography education in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop an inventory of biomedical physics elements-of-competence for diagnostic radiography education in Europe. Method: Research articles in the English literature and UK documentation pertinent to radiography education, competences and role development were subjected to a rigorous analysis of content from a functional and competence analysis perspective. Translations of radiography curricula from across Europe and relevant EU legislation were likewise analysed to ensure a pan-European perspective. Broad Subject Specific Competences for diagnostic radiography that included major biomedical physics components were singled out. These competences were in turn carefully deconstructed into specific elements-of-competence and those elements falling within the biomedical physics learning domain inventorised. A pilot version of the inventory was evaluated by participants during a meeting of the Higher Education Network for Radiography in Europe (HENRE), held in Marsascala, Malta, in November 2004. The inventory was further refined taking into consideration suggestions by HENRE members and scientific, professional and educational developments. Findings: The evaluation of the pilot inventory was very positive and indicated that the overall structure of the inventory was sensible, easily understood and acceptable - hence a good foundation for further development. Conclusions: Use of the inventory by radiography programme leaders and biomedical physics educators would guarantee that all necessary physics elements-of-competence underpinning the safe, effective and economical use of imaging devices are included within radiography curricula. It will also ensure the relevancy of physics content within radiography education. The inventory is designed to be a pragmatic tool for curriculum development across the entire range of radiography education up to doctorate level and irrespective of whether curriculum delivery is discipline-based or integrated, presentation

  9. Biomedical Science, Unit III: The Circulatory System in Health and Science. The Heart and Blood Vessels; Blood and Its Properties; The Urinary Tract. Student Text. Revised Version, 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    This student text presents instructional materials for a unit of science within the Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project (BICP), a two-year interdisciplinary precollege curriculum aimed at preparing high school students for entry into college and vocational programs leading to a career in the health field. Lessons concentrate on the…

  10. Biomedical image and signal de-noising using dual tree complex wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizi, F. Yousefi; Noubari, H. Ahmadi; Setarehdan, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    Dual tree complex wavelet transform(DTCWT) is a form of discrete wavelet transform, which generates complex coefficients by using a dual tree of wavelet filters to obtain their real and imaginary parts. The purposes of de-noising are reducing noise level and improving signal to noise ratio (SNR) without distorting the signal or image. This paper proposes a method for removing white Gaussian noise from ECG signals and biomedical images. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is very valuable in a large scope of de-noising problems. However, it has limitations such as oscillations of the coefficients at a singularity, lack of directional selectivity in higher dimensions, aliasing and consequent shift variance. The complex wavelet transform CWT strategy that we focus on in this paper is Kingsbury's and Selesnick's dual tree CWT (DTCWT) which outperforms the critically decimated DWT in a range of applications, such as de-noising. Each complex wavelet is oriented along one of six possible directions, and the magnitude of each complex wavelet has a smooth bell-shape. In the final part of this paper, we present biomedical image and signal de-noising by the means of thresholding magnitude of the wavelet coefficients.

  11. A bidimensional xenon-filled MWPC X-ray imaging detector for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray imaging system developed at the Rutherford Laboratory for biomedical applications is described. It consists of a bidimensional, xenon-filled MWPC operating at NTP, and capable of detecting x-rays of energies up to approximately 50 keV. The chamber data is processed in a PDP-11 computer which is capable of storing and processing the x-ray images so as to provide good pictures of biological structures with a spatial resolution of approximately 2mm. Special attention has been paid to an application in the field of x-ray absorptiometry using monochromatic x-rays of approximately 42 keV and promising results are being obtained. Other potential applications are discussed. Particular attention is drawn to the usefulness of pulse height selection in improving the spatial resolution and imaging capability of an atmospheric pressure MWPC x-ray detector. (author)

  12. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-05-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called `magic condition' that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used. PMID:25931100

  13. Image science and image-quality research in the Optical Sciences Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Myers, Kyle J.

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews the history of research into imaging and image quality at the Optical Sciences Center (OSC), with emphasis on the period 1970-1990. The work of various students in the areas of psychophysical studies of human observers of images; mathematical model observers; image simulation and analysis, and the application of these methods to radiology and nuclear medicine is summarized. The rapid progress in computational power, at OSC and elsewhere, which enabled the steady advances in imaging and the emergence of a science of imaging, is also traced. The implications of these advances to ongoing research and the current Image Science curriculum at the College of Optical Sciences are discussed.

  14. Should MD-PhD programs encourage graduate training in disciplines beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ryan J; Hsu, Stephen I; Wilson, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    The goal of MD-PhD training programs is to produce physician-scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician-scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD-PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This question is especially relevant because the central value and ultimate goal of the academic medicine community is to help attain the highest level of health and health equity for all people. Advances in medical science and practice, along with improvements in health care access and delivery, are steps toward health equity, but alone they will not come close to eliminating health inequalities. Addressing the complex health issues in our communities and society as a whole requires a biomedical research workforce with knowledge, practice, and research skills well beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences. To make real progress in advancing health equity, educational pathways must prepare physician-scientists to treat both micro and macro determinants of health. The authors argue that MD-PhD programs should allow and encourage their scholars to cross boundaries into less traditional disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics, anthropology, sociology, ethics, public policy, management, economics, education, social work, informatics, communications, and marketing. To fulfill current and coming health care needs, nontraditional MD-PhD students should be welcomed and supported as valuable members of our biomedical research workforce. PMID:25354071

  15. Sodium-22-radiolabeled silica nanoparticles as new radiotracer for biomedical applications: in vivo positron emission tomography imaging, biodistribution, and biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Faraj A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Achraf Al Faraj,1 Basem Alotaibi,2 Abjal Pasha Shaik,3 Khaled Z Shamma,1 Ibrahim Al Jammaz,2 Jürgen Gerl4 1Molecular and Cellular Imaging Lab, Department of Radiological Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, 2Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceutical Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, 3Department of Clinical Lab Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany Abstract: Despite their advantageous chemical properties for nuclear imaging, radioactive sodium-22 (22Na tracers have been excluded for biomedical applications because of their extremely long lifetime. In the current study, we proposed, for the first time, the use of 22Na radiotracers for pre-clinical applications by efficiently loading with silica nanoparticles (SiNPs and thus offering a new life for this radiotracer. Crown-ether-conjugated SiNPs (300 nm; -0.18±0.1 mV were successfully loaded with 22Na with a loading efficacy of 98.1%±1.4%. Noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging revealed a transient accumulation of 22Na-loaded SiNPs in the liver and to a lower extent in the spleen, kidneys, and lung. However, the signal gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner to become not detectable starting from 2 weeks postinjection. These observations were confirmed ex vivo by quantifying 22Na radioactivity using γ-counter and silicon content using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in the blood and the different organs of interest. Quantification of Si content in the urine and feces revealed that SiNPs accumulated in the organs were cleared from the body within a period of 2 weeks and completely in 1 month. Biocompatibility evaluations performed during the 1-month follow-up study to assess the possibility of synthesized nanocarriers to induce oxidative stress or DNA damage confirmed their safety for

  16. Integrated online formative assessments in the biomedical sciences for medical students: benefits for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil H Patrick

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online formative assessments have a sound theoretical basis, and are prevalent and popular in higher education settings, but data to establish their educational benefits are lacking. This study attempts to determine whether participation and performance in integrated online formative assessments in the biomedical sciences has measurable effects on learning by junior medical students. Methods Students enrolled in Phase 1 (Years 1 and 2 of an undergraduate Medicine program were studied over two consecutive years, 2006 and 2007. In seven consecutive courses, end-of-course (EOC summative examination marks were analysed with respect to the effect of participation and performance in voluntary online formative assessments. Online evaluation surveys were utilized to gather students' perceptions regarding online formative assessments. Results Students rated online assessments highly on all measures. Participation in formative assessments had a statistically significant positive relationship with EOC marks in all courses. The mean difference in EOC marks for those who participated in formative assessments ranged from 6.3% (95% confidence intervals 1.6 to 11.0; p = 0.009 in Course 5 to 3.2% (0.2 to 6.2; p = 0.037 in Course 2. For all courses, performance in formative assessments correlated significantly with EOC marks (p Conclusion The results support the contention that well designed formative assessments can have significant positive effects on learning. There is untapped potential for use of formative assessments to assist learning by medical students and postgraduate medical trainees.

  17. An Overview of SBIR Phase 2 Physical Sciences and Biomedical Technologies in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR Phase II projects from 2007-2012 specifically addressing areas in physical sciences and biomedical technologies in space, which is one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. There are twenty two technologies featured with emphasis on a wide spectrum of applications such as reusable handheld electrolyte, sensor for bone markers, wideband single crystal transducer, mini treadmill for musculoskeletal, and much more. Each article in this report describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA personnel including engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn of NASA SBIR's capabilities that might be crosscutting into this technology area. As the result, it would cause collaborations and partnerships between the small companies and NASA Programs and Projects resulting in benefit to both SBIR companies and NASA.

  18. Classification of visual signs in abdominal CT image figures in biomedical literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhiyun; You, Daekeun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2014-03-01

    "Imaging signs" are a critical part of radiology's language. They not only are important for conveying diagnosis, but may also aid in indexing radiology literature and retrieving relevant cases and images. Here we report our work towards representing and categorizing imaging signs of abdominal abnormalities in figures in the radiology literature. Given a region-of-interest (ROI) from a figure, our goal was to assign a correct imaging sign label to that ROI from the following seven: accordion, comb, ring, sandwich, small bowel feces, target, or whirl. As training and test data, we created our own "gold standard" dataset of regions containing imaging signs. We computed 2997 feature attributes to represent imaging sign characteristics for each ROI in training and test sets. Following feature selection they were reduced to 70 attributes and were input to a Support Vector Machine classifier. We applied image-enhancement methods to compensate for variable quality of the images in radiology articles. In particular we developed a method for automatic detection and removal of pointers/markers (arrows, arrowheads, and asterisk symbols) on the images. These pointers/markers are valuable for approximately locating ROIs; however, they degrade the classification because they are often (partially) included in the training ROIs. On a test set of 283 ROIs, our method achieved an overall accuracy of 70% in labeling the seven signs, which we believe is a promising result for using imaging signs to search/retrieve radiology literature. This work is also potentially valuable for the creation of a visual ontology of biomedical imaging entities.

  19. A Novel Multiple Choice Question Generation Strategy: Alternative Uses for Controlled Vocabulary Thesauri in Biomedical-Sciences Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopetegui, Marcelo A; Lara, Barbara A; Yen, Po-Yin; Çatalyürek, Ümit V; Payne, Philip R O

    2015-01-01

    Multiple choice questions play an important role in training and evaluating biomedical science students. However, the resource intensive nature of question generation limits their open availability, reducing their contribution to evaluation purposes mainly. Although applied-knowledge questions require a complex formulation process, the creation of concrete-knowledge questions (i.e., definitions, associations) could be assisted by the use of informatics methods. We envisioned a novel and simple algorithm that exploits validated knowledge repositories and generates concrete-knowledge questions by leveraging concepts' relationships. In this manuscript we present the development and validation of a prototype which successfully produced meaningful concrete-knowledge questions, opening new applications for existing knowledge repositories, potentially benefiting students of all biomedical sciences disciplines. PMID:26958222

  20. Development of Biomedical Polymer-Silicate Nanocomposites: A Materials Science Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung Wu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical polymer-silicate nanocomposites have potential to become critically important to the development of biomedical applications, ranging from diagnostic and therapeutic devices, tissue regeneration and drug delivery matrixes to various bio-technologies that are inspired by biology but have only indirect biomedical relation. The fundamental understanding of polymer-nanoparticle interactions is absolutely necessary to control structure-property relationships of materials that need to work within the chemical, physical and biological constraints required by an application. This review summarizes the most recent published strategies to design and develop polymer-silicate nanocomposites (including clay based silicate nanoparticles and bioactive glass nanoparticles for a variety of biomedical applications. Emerging trends in bio-technological and biomedical nanocomposites are highlighted and potential new fields of applications are examined.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research Part 1: Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    Research in the biomedical sciences at PNL is described. Activities reported include: inhaled plutonium in dogs; national radiobiology archives; statistical analysis of data from animal studies; genotoxicity of inhaled energy effluents; molecular events during tumor initiation; biochemistry of free radical induced DNA damage; radon hazards in homes; mechanisms of radon injury; genetics of radon induced lung cancer; and in vivo/in vitro radon induced cellular damage.

  2. Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics

    OpenAIRE

    Joyeeta Dutta-Moscato; Vanathi Gopalakrishnan; Lotze, Michael T.; Becich, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) inform...

  3. Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Sang C; Tanik, Murat M

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical Engineering: Health Care Systems, Technology and Techniques is an edited volume with contributions from world experts. It provides readers with unique contributions related to current research and future healthcare systems. Practitioners and researchers focused on computer science, bioinformatics, engineering and medicine will find this book a valuable reference.

  4. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound biomedical B-scan images using discrete topological derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Nedumaran; Ramamurthy, Sivakumar; Velusamy, Sekar; Manickam, Gayathri Kanakaraj

    2012-02-01

    Over three decades, several despeckling techniques have been developed by researchers to reduce the speckle noise inherently present in ultrasound B-scan images without losing the diagnostic information. The topological derivative (TD) is the recently adopted technique in the area of biomedical image processing. In this work, we computed the topological derivative for an appropriate function associated to the ultrasound B-scan image gradient by assigning a diffusion factor k, which indicates the cost endowed to that particular image. In this article, a novel image denoising approach, called discrete topological derivative (DTD) has been implemented. The algorithm has been developed in MATLAB7.1 and tested over 200 ultrasound B-scan images of several organs such as the liver, kidney, gall bladder and pancreas. Further, the performance of the DTD algorithm has been estimated by calculating important performance metrics. A comparative study was carried out between the DTD and the traditional despeckling techniques. The calculated peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) (the ratio between the maximum possible power of a signal and the power of corrupting noise that affects the fidelity of its representation) value of the DTD despeckled liver image is found to be 28 which is comparable with the outperformed speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) filter. SRAD filter is an edge-sensitive diffusion method for speckled images of ultrasonic and radar imaging applications. Canny edge detection and visual inspection of DTD filtered images by the trained radiologist found that the DTD algorithm preserves the hypoechoic and hyperechoic regions resulting in improved diagnosis as well as tissue characterization. PMID:22230135

  5. How can we improve Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math education to encourage careers in Biomedical and Pathology Informatics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Rahul; Mandava, Gunasheil; Romagnoli, Katrina M; King, Andrew J; Draper, Amie J; Handen, Adam L; Fisher, Arielle M; Becich, Michael J; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta

    2016-01-01

    The Computer Science, Biology, and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) program was initiated in 2011 to expose the critical role of informatics in biomedicine to talented high school students.[1] By involving them in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) training at the high school level and providing mentorship and research opportunities throughout the formative years of their education, CoSBBI creates a research infrastructure designed to develop young informaticians. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be an expert in the emerging fields of biomedical informatics and pathology informatics requires accelerated learning at an early age.In our 4(th) year of CoSBBI as a part of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Academy (http://www.upci.upmc.edu/summeracademy/), and our 2nd year of CoSBBI as an independent informatics-based academy, we enhanced our classroom curriculum, added hands-on computer science instruction, and expanded research projects to include clinical informatics. We also conducted a qualitative evaluation of the program to identify areas that need improvement in order to achieve our goal of creating a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics in the era of big data and personalized medicine. PMID:26955500

  6. How can we improve Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math education to encourage careers in Biomedical and Pathology Informatics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Uppal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Computer Science, Biology, and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI program was initiated in 2011 to expose the critical role of informatics in biomedicine to talented high school students.[1] By involving them in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM training at the high school level and providing mentorship and research opportunities throughout the formative years of their education, CoSBBI creates a research infrastructure designed to develop young informaticians. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be an expert in the emerging fields of biomedical informatics and pathology informatics requires accelerated learning at an early age.In our 4th year of CoSBBI as a part of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI Academy (http://www.upci.upmc.edu/summeracademy/, and our 2nd year of CoSBBI as an independent informatics-based academy, we enhanced our classroom curriculum, added hands-on computer science instruction, and expanded research projects to include clinical informatics. We also conducted a qualitative evaluation of the program to identify areas that need improvement in order to achieve our goal of creating a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics in the era of big data and personalized medicine.

  7. 75 FR 38100 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....gov . Introduction The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Hazardous... Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  8. Comparative Analysis of Various Image Fusion Techniques For Biomedical Images: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayera Nahvi,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Image Fusion is a process of combining the relevant information from a set of images, into a single image, wherein the resultant fused image will be more informative and complete than any of the input images. This paper discusses implementation of DWT technique on different images to make a fused image having more information content. As DWT is the latest technique for image fusion as compared to simple image fusion and pyramid based image fusion, so we are going to implement DWT as the image fusion technique in our paper. Other methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA based fusion, Intensity hue Saturation (IHS Transform based fusion and high pass filtering methods are also discussed. A new algorithm is proposed using Discrete Wavelet transform and different fusion techniques including pixel averaging, min-max and max-min methods for medical image fusion. KEYWORDS:

  9. Information sources in biomedical science and medical journalism: methodological approaches and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Giovanna F; Vercellesi, Luisa; Bruno, Flavia

    2004-09-01

    Throughout the world the public is showing increasing interest in medical and scientific subjects and journalists largely spread this information, with an important impact on knowledge and health. Clearly, therefore, the relationship between the journalist and his sources is delicate: freedom and independence of information depend on the independence and truthfulness of the sources. The new "precision journalism" holds that scientific methods should be applied to journalism, so authoritative sources are a common need for journalists and scientists. We therefore compared the individual classifications and methods of assessing of sources in biomedical science and medical journalism to try to extrapolate scientific methods of evaluation to journalism. In journalism and science terms used to classify sources of information show some similarities, but their meanings are different. In science primary and secondary classes of information, for instance, refer to the levels of processing, but in journalism to the official nature of the source itself. Scientists and journalists must both always consult as many sources as possible and check their authoritativeness, reliability, completeness, up-to-dateness and balance. In journalism, however, there are some important differences and limits: too many sources can sometimes diminish the quality of the information. The sources serve a first filter between the event and the journalist, who is not providing the reader with the fact, but with its projection. Journalists have time constraints and lack the objective criteria for searching, the specific background knowledge, and the expertise to fully assess sources. To assist in understanding the wealth of sources of information in journalism, we have prepared a checklist of items and questions. There are at least four fundamental points that a good journalist, like any scientist, should know: how to find the latest information (the sources), how to assess it (the quality and

  10. Proceedings of the 1. National Forum of Science and Technology on Health; 13. Brazilian Congress on Biomedical Engineering; 4. Brazilian Congress of Physicists on Medicine; Brazilian Meeting on Biology and Nuclear Medicine; Brazilian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 1. National Forum of Science and Technology on Health presents works of several scientific institutions, including topics on bioengineering; modelling and simulation; sensors and transducers; ultrasonic on medicine; instrumentation processing of signs and medical images; biomedical informatics and clinical software; engineering of rehabilitation; bio-materials and bio-mechanical; clinical engineering; in vivo and in vitro nuclear medicine; radioisotope production and utilization; radiology; radiology protection and dosimetry; radiotherapy; evaluation of technology on health and education. (C.G.C.)

  11. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source-Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W. [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)], E-mail: tomasz.wysokinski@lightsource.ca; Chapman, Dean [Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adams, Gregg [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Renier, Michel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki (Finland); Thomlinson, William [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2007-11-11

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) Facility will provide synchrotron-specific imaging and therapy capabilities. This paper describes one of the BMIT beamlines: the bend magnet (BM) beamline 05B1-1. It plays a complementary role to the insertion device (ID) beamline 051D-2 and allows either monochromatic or filtered white beam to be used in the experimental hutch. The monochromatic spectral range will span 8-40 keV, and the beam is more than 200 mm wide in the experimental hutch for imaging studies of small and medium-size animals (up to sheep size). The experimental hutch will have a positioning system that will allow imaging (computed tomography and planar imaging) as well as radiation therapy applications with both filtered white and monochromatic X-ray beams and will handle subjects up to 120 kg. Several different focal plane detectors (cameras) will be available with resolutions ranging from 10 to 150 {mu}m.

  12. Biomedical Applications of the Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, S.M.; Levenson, R.

    1999-01-21

    The Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS) approach to spectral imaging seeks to bridge the gap between tuned multispectral and fixed hyperspectral imaging sensors. By allowing the definition of completely general spectral filter functions, truly optimal measurements can be made for a given task. These optimal measurements significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and speed, minimize data volume and data rate, while preserving classification accuracy. The following paper investigates the application of the ISIS sensing approach in two sample biomedical applications: prostate and colon cancer screening. It is shown that in these applications, two to three optimal measurements are sufficient to capture the majority of classification information for critical sample constituents. In the prostate cancer example, the optimal measurements allow 8% relative improvement in classification accuracy of critical cell constituents over a red, green, blue (RGB) sensor. In the colon cancer example, use of optimal measurements boost the classification accuracy of critical cell constituents by 28% relative to the RGB sensor. In both cases, optimal measurements match the performance achieved by the entire hyperspectral data set. The paper concludes that an ISIS style spectral imager can acquire these optimal spectral images directly, allowing improved classification accuracy over an RGB sensor. Compared to a hyperspectral sensor, the ISIS approach can achieve similar classification accuracy using a significantly lower number of spectral samples, thus minimizing overall sample classification time and cost.

  13. Using Biomedically Relevant Multimedia Content in an Introductory Physics Course for Life Science and Pre-health Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Dunlap, Justin C.; Christensen, Warren; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We will describe a one-quarter pilot algebra-based introductory physics course for pre-health and life science majors. The course features videos with biomedical experts and cogent biomedically inspired physics content. The materials were used in a flipped classroom as well as an all-online environment where students interacted with multimedia materials online and prior to engaging in classroom activities. Pre-lecture questions on both the medical content covered in the video media and the physics concepts in the written material were designed to engage students and probe their understanding of physics. The course featured group discussion and peer-lead instruction. Following in-class instruction, students engaged with homework assignments which explore the connections of physics and the medical field in a quantitative manner. Course surveys showed a positive response by the vast majority of students. Students largely indicated that the course helped them to make a connection between physics and the biomedical field. The biomedical focus and different course format were seen as an improvement to previous traditional physics instruction.

  14. Quantitative imaging biomarker ontology (QIBO) for knowledge representation of biomedical imaging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Andrew J; Liu, Tiffany Ting; Savig, Erica; Suzek, Baris E; Ouellette, M; Danagoulian, J; Wernsing, G; Rubin, Daniel L; Paik, David

    2013-08-01

    A widening array of novel imaging biomarkers is being developed using ever more powerful clinical and preclinical imaging modalities. These biomarkers have demonstrated effectiveness in quantifying biological processes as they occur in vivo and in the early prediction of therapeutic outcomes. However, quantitative imaging biomarker data and knowledge are not standardized, representing a critical barrier to accumulating medical knowledge based on quantitative imaging data. We use an ontology to represent, integrate, and harmonize heterogeneous knowledge across the domain of imaging biomarkers. This advances the goal of developing applications to (1) improve precision and recall of storage and retrieval of quantitative imaging-related data using standardized terminology; (2) streamline the discovery and development of novel imaging biomarkers by normalizing knowledge across heterogeneous resources; (3) effectively annotate imaging experiments thus aiding comprehension, re-use, and reproducibility; and (4) provide validation frameworks through rigorous specification as a basis for testable hypotheses and compliance tests. We have developed the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Ontology (QIBO), which currently consists of 488 terms spanning the following upper classes: experimental subject, biological intervention, imaging agent, imaging instrument, image post-processing algorithm, biological target, indicated biology, and biomarker application. We have demonstrated that QIBO can be used to annotate imaging experiments with standardized terms in the ontology and to generate hypotheses for novel imaging biomarker-disease associations. Our results established the utility of QIBO in enabling integrated analysis of quantitative imaging data. PMID:23589184

  15. Neutron imaging in materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kardjilov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutron imaging is a non-destructive technique that can reveal the interior of many materials and engineering components and also probe magnetic fields. Within the past few years, several new imaging modes have been introduced that extend the scope of neutron imaging beyond conventional neutron attenuation imaging, yielding both 2- and 3D information about properties and phenomena inaccessible until now. We present an overview of the most important advances in the application of neutron imaging in materials research with a focus on novel techniques such as energy-selective imaging, interferometric imaging with phase gratings, and polarized-neutron imaging. Examples given include the investigation of fluid dynamics in fuel cells, materials phases and structural heterogeneities, distribution of strains, and magnetic structures or phase transitions.

  16. Handbook of Coherent-Domain Optical Methods Biomedical Diagnostics, Environmental Monitoring, and Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This Handbook provides comprehensive coverage of laser and coherent-domain methods as applied to biomedicine, environmental monitoring, and materials science. Worldwide leaders in these fields describe the fundamentals of light interaction with random media and present an overview of basic research. The latest results on coherent and polarization properties of light scattered by random media, including tissues and blood, speckles formation in multiple scattering media, and other non-destructive interactions of coherent light with rough surfaces and tissues, allow the reader to understand the principles and applications of coherent diagnostic techniques. The expanded second edition has been thoroughly updated with particular emphasis on novel coherent-domain techniques and their applications in medicine and environmental science. Volume 1 describes state-of-the-art methods of coherent and polarization optical imaging, tomography and spectroscopy; diffusion wave spectroscopy; elastic, quasi-elastic and inelasti...

  17. Neutron imaging in materials science

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay Kardjilov; Ingo Manke; André Hilger; Markus Strobl; John Banhart

    2011-01-01

    Neutron imaging is a non-destructive technique that can reveal the interior of many materials and engineering components and also probe magnetic fields. Within the past few years, several new imaging modes have been introduced that extend the scope of neutron imaging beyond conventional neutron attenuation imaging, yielding both 2- and 3D information about properties and phenomena inaccessible until now. We present an overview of the most important advances in the application of neutron imagi...

  18. Beamlines of the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy Facility at the Canadian Light Source - Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides a world class facility with unique synchrotron-specific imaging and therapy capabilities. This paper describes Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the first experimental hutch: POE-2. The experimental methods available in POE-2 include: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT) and absorption imaging (projection and Computed Tomography (CT)). The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconductive 4.3 T wiggler, which can generate ∼30 kW of radiative power and deliver dose as high as 3000 Gy/s required for MRT program. The optics in POE-1 hutch prepares either monochromatic or filtered white beam that is used in POE-2. The Double Crystal (DC), bent Laue monochromator will prepare a beam over 10 cm wide at sample point, while spanning an energy range appropriate for imaging studies of animals (20-100+ keV). The experimental hutch will have a flexible positioning system that can handle subjects up to 120 kg. Several different cameras will be available with resolutions ranging from 4 μm to 150 μm. The latest update on the status of 05B1-1 bending magnet (BM) beamline, described in Part 1 [1], is also included.

  19. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  20. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  1. Examination of the variation of the optical diffusion properties in nanophosphor materials for use in biomedical imaging and instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaparinos, P.; Kandarakis, I.

    2015-06-01

    Granular phosphors are commonly used in several applications in biomedical imaging and instrumentation. The structural and optical properties of phosphor materials affect the optical signal transferred out and play a critical role in the quality of the final signal or image. In recent years, following developments in materials science and technology, several new methods have been successfully implemented for the preparation of nanosized phosphors. It is of interest to investigate whether nanophosphors could replace existing micro phosphors for next generation high-performance displays and imaging devices. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the variation of the optical parameters (e.g. light extinction coefficient mext, probability of light absorption p, light anisotropy factor g) in the sub-micron and nano scale under the variability of light wavelength (400-700 nm) and refractive index (e.g., two limiting values were used 1.4 and 2.0). For the case of low refractive index (1.4), by increasing the grain diameter: (a) the light extinction increases, (b) the light absorption probability decreases and (c) the anisotropy factor increases in the whole range or gran sizes (2-1000 nm). However, for the high value of the refractive index (2.0), the light extinction coefficient was found to increase up to a maximum for grain diameter: (a) 200 nm (at 400 nm light wavelength) and (b) 600 nm (at 700 nm light wavelength). Finally, at 400 nm grain diameter, the probability of light absorption was found to decrease down to a minimum while the anisotropy factor was found to increase up to maximum for all light wavelengths considered.

  2. Space Science Education with MIDEX/IMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Odenwald, S. F.; Green, J. L.; Burch, J. L.

    1996-12-01

    The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) was selected as one of two MIDEX programs approved by NASA for a year 2000 launch. Its mission is to acquire, for the first time, a variety of 3-D images of magnetospheric boundaries and plasma distributions in the near-Earth environment. It will investigate their changes due to interactions with the solar wind on time scales from minutes to months. In response to the significant opportunities inherent in the IMAGE data for enhancing K-12 education in Earth and space science, the MIDEX/IMAGE project has begun the development of a WWW-based site (URL=http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov) which includes a program called POETRY: Public Outreach, Education, Teaching and Reaching Youth. The POETRY site contains: descriptive material on the spacecraft and mission objectives; an illustrated glossary of common space science terms; a primer on the physical processes under investigation; an archive of classroom activities highlighting space science concepts; and an 'Ask Dr. Magneto' area where students and teachers can pose questions and receive answers. This paper will review the design of this site, and present a selection of representative classroom activities designed to supplement earth science and physical science curricula.

  3. LIF and fast imaging plasma jet characterization relevant for NTP biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of biomedical application, many publications report on non-thermal plasma jet potentialities for cell behaviour modifications in cancer treatment, wound healing or sterilization. However most previous plasma jet characterizations were performed when jets expend freely in air. Only recently has the influence of the targeted surface been properly considered. In this work, modifications induced by various types of targets, mimicking the biological samples, in the plasma propagation and production of hydroxyl radicals are evidenced through time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device imaging and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. A LIF model, also specifically dedicated to estimate air and water penetration inside the jet, is used and proves to be well adapted to characterize the plasma jet under biomedical application conditions. It is shown that the plasma produced by the plasma gun counter-propagates after impinging the surface which, for the same operating parameters, leads to an increase of almost one order of magnitude in the maximum OH density (from ∼2 × 1013 cm−3 for open-air propagation to ∼1 × 1014 cm−3 for a grounded metal target). The nature of the target, especially its electrical conductivity, as well as gas flow rate and voltage amplitude are playing a key role in the production of hydroxyl radicals. The strong interplay between gas flow dynamics and plasma propagation is here confirmed by air and water distribution measurements. The need for a multi-diagnostic approach, as well as great care in setting up the in situ characterization of plasma jets, is here emphasized. Special attention must not only be paid to voltage amplitude and gas flow rate but also to the nature, humidity and conductivity of the target. (paper)

  4. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source – part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1–4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6–9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20–100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to –7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT

  5. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source – part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W., E-mail: bmit@lightsource.ca [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chapman, Dean [Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adams, Gregg [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Renier, Michel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Thomlinson, William [Department of Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1–4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6–9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20–100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to –7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT

  6. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source - part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Chapman, Dean; Adams, Gregg; Renier, Michel; Suortti, Pekka; Thomlinson, William

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1-4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6-9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20-100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to -7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT, described

  7. Novel Polysaccharide Based Polymers and Nanoparticles for Controlled Drug Delivery and Biomedical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalviri, Alireza

    controlled delivery applications of larger molecular size compounds. The starch based hydrogels, polymers and nanoparticles developed in this work have shown great potentials for controlled drug delivery and biomedical imaging applications.

  8. Surveys of current status in biomedical science grant review: funding organisations' and grant reviewers' perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroter, Sara; Groves, Trish; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (a) to describe the current status of grant review for biomedical projects and programmes from the perspectives of international funding organisations and grant reviewers, and (b) to explore funders' interest in developing uniform requirements for grant review...... aimed at making the processes and practices of grant review more consistent, transparent, and user friendly....

  9. Developing a competence-based core curriculum in biomedical laboratory science: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, Gudrun

    2006-08-01

    In this study the Delphi technique has been used to develop a core curriculum for education of the biomedical scientist. The rapid development in biomedicine and the corresponding changes in methodology in biomedical laboratories demand careful planning of the education of biomedical scientists. The Delphi technique uses an anonymous panel of experts for suggestions and assessments aiming at consensus. Twenty-six experts from different kinds of hospital and university laboratories took part in the investigation. They suggested and assessed necessary competences for a recently graduated biomedical scientist, and if 75% or more of the participants agreed on a competence, it was included in the core curriculum. The final list consisted of 66 competences of varying depth, in three categories. This list contained several generic competences, concerning for example basic laboratory methods, handling of samples, dealing with apparatus and applying relevant rules and laws; basic knowledge in chemistry, preclinical medicine and laboratory methods; and finally attitudes that the panel expected in the recently graduated person. The core was sufficiently restricted to be used in a three-year programme and still leave space for about one year of electives/special study modules. It became rather traditional, e.g. it did not include competences that many recent reports consider important for the future professional. PMID:16973452

  10. Material Science and Engineering with Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumadu, D.

    This chapter summarizes some of the results related to the use of neutron imaging (radiography and tomography) as applied to the broad area of materials science and engineering research. These include multi-phase flow visualization in metal casting techniques, energy-selective imaging of materials and its use for texture and stress imaging in polycrystalline materials, characterization of discrete particle systems, flow through porous media, and stroboscopic imaging. The importance of spatial resolution and neutron detector type for given engineering applications is also addressed.

  11. Automated segmentation of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography biomedical images using Graph Cuts and neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) enables magnified images to be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique with a high space resolution for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of biomedical samples. The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to SR-μCT is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images for visualization, such as the high resolution and the phase contrast effect. In this article, we describe and assess the application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm for the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images acquired at the Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beam line at the Elettra Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). We also propose a method using EMvGC with Artificial Neural Networks (EMANNs) for correcting misclassifications due to intensity variation of phase contrast, which are important effects and sometimes indispensable in certain biomedical applications, although they impair the segmentation provided by conventional techniques. Results demonstrate considerable success in the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images, with average Dice Similarity Coefficient 99.88% for bony tissue in Wistar Rats rib samples (EMvGC), as well as 98.95% and 98.02% for scans of Rhodnius prolixus insect samples (Chagas's disease vector) with EMANNs, in relation to manual segmentation. The techniques EMvGC and EMANNs cope with the task of performing segmentation in images with the intensity variation due to phase contrast effects, presenting a superior performance in comparison to conventional segmentation techniques based on thresholding and linear/nonlinear image filtering, which is also discussed in the present article.

  12. Automated segmentation of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography biomedical images using Graph Cuts and neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson, E-mail: ameneses@ieee.org [Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, CEP 20550-900, RJ (Brazil); Giusti, Alessandro [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Parreira Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson [Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cely Barroso, Regina [Laboratory of Applied Physics on Biomedical Sciences, Physics Department, Rio de Janeiro State University, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de [Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, CEP 20550-900, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-12-21

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) X-ray micro-Computed Tomography ({mu}CT) enables magnified images to be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique with a high space resolution for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of biomedical samples. The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to SR-{mu}CT is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images for visualization, such as the high resolution and the phase contrast effect. In this article, we describe and assess the application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm for the segmentation of SR-{mu}CT biomedical images acquired at the Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beam line at the Elettra Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). We also propose a method using EMvGC with Artificial Neural Networks (EMANNs) for correcting misclassifications due to intensity variation of phase contrast, which are important effects and sometimes indispensable in certain biomedical applications, although they impair the segmentation provided by conventional techniques. Results demonstrate considerable success in the segmentation of SR-{mu}CT biomedical images, with average Dice Similarity Coefficient 99.88% for bony tissue in Wistar Rats rib samples (EMvGC), as well as 98.95% and 98.02% for scans of Rhodnius prolixus insect samples (Chagas's disease vector) with EMANNs, in relation to manual segmentation. The techniques EMvGC and EMANNs cope with the task of performing segmentation in images with the intensity variation due to phase contrast effects, presenting a superior performance in comparison to conventional segmentation techniques based on thresholding and linear/nonlinear image filtering, which is also discussed in the present article.

  13. Automated segmentation of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography biomedical images using Graph Cuts and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson; Giusti, Alessandro; de Almeida, André Pereira; Parreira Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson; Cely Barroso, Regina; deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) enables magnified images to be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique with a high space resolution for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of biomedical samples. The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to SR-μCT is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images for visualization, such as the high resolution and the phase contrast effect. In this article, we describe and assess the application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm for the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images acquired at the Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beam line at the Elettra Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). We also propose a method using EMvGC with Artificial Neural Networks (EMANNs) for correcting misclassifications due to intensity variation of phase contrast, which are important effects and sometimes indispensable in certain biomedical applications, although they impair the segmentation provided by conventional techniques. Results demonstrate considerable success in the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images, with average Dice Similarity Coefficient 99.88% for bony tissue in Wistar Rats rib samples (EMvGC), as well as 98.95% and 98.02% for scans of Rhodnius prolixus insect samples (Chagas's disease vector) with EMANNs, in relation to manual segmentation. The techniques EMvGC and EMANNs cope with the task of performing segmentation in images with the intensity variation due to phase contrast effects, presenting a superior performance in comparison to conventional segmentation techniques based on thresholding and linear/nonlinear image filtering, which is also discussed in the present article.

  14. Hyped biomedical science or uncritical reporting? Press coverage of genomics (1992-2001) in Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Eric; Gareau, Isabelle; Doucet, Hubert; Laudy, Danielle; Jobin, Guy; Schraedley-Desmond, Pamela

    2006-03-01

    Genomics integrates the promises and perils of modern biomedical science. Canada and the province of Québec embarked late but aggressively in genomics research based on the 'discourse of promise' in which genomics is embedded. This did not prevent the emergence of a 'discourse of concerns', and debates on the wider meaning of genomics and on the risks related to genomics applications such as gene therapy and gene testing. Given this context, this study aims to understand the evolution of genomics press coverage from the early days up to the publication of the draft sequence of the human genome. Accordingly, we performed a press content analysis on 749 articles reporting genomics research in Québec from 1992 to 2001. We focused on coverage of benefits and ethical issues, tone, and differences in reporting practices between press agencies and journalists. Results show an increasing number of articles, a general decline in the proportion of articles featuring ethical issues, an increased focus on the economy, and greater optimism from 1992 to 2001. In comparison to articles written by journalists, articles signed by press agencies are more optimistic and less often feature ethical issues. Results are discussed following two non-exclusive interpretations: (1) the successes of genomics and its institutionalization in Québec and Canada brought hype and greater social acceptance, and (2) uncritical reporting practices have emerged under pressures for expedient and consumable writing. We are left with two concerns: given worldwide media concentration movements, what are the challenges for the dissemination of diversified and critical information in print media? And, given limited coverage of ethical issues, and concerns about bioethics being too narrowly focused, should public debates on frontier biomedical science be promoted to broaden the scope of biomedical ethics? PMID:16174544

  15. Applications of thermal imaging in avian science

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal imaging, or infrared thermography, has been used in avian science since the 1960s. More than 30 species of birds, ranging in size from passerines to ratites, have been studied using this technology. The main strength of this technique is that it is a non-invasive and non-contact method of measuring surface temperature. Its limitations and measurement errors are well understood and suitable protocols have been developed for a variety of experimental settings. Thermal imaging has been u...

  16. Images of time mind, science, reality

    CERN Document Server

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2016-01-01

    Have you ever wondered about Time: what it is or how to discuss it? If you have, then you may have been bewildered by the many different views and opinions in many diverse fields to be found, such as physics, mathematics, philosophy, religion, history, and science fiction novels and films. This book will help you unravel fact from fiction. It provides a broad survey of many of these views, these images of time, covering historical, cultural, philosophical, biological, mathematical and physical images of time, including classical and quantum mechanics, special and general relativity and cosmology. This book gives you more than just a review of such images. It provides the reader a basis for judging the scientific soundness of these various images. It develops the reader's critical ability to distinguish Images of Time in terms of its contextual completeness. Differentiating between metaphysical images (which cannot be scientifically validated) and those that could, in principle, be put to empirical test. Showi...

  17. Patterns of biomedical science production in a sub-Saharan research center

    OpenAIRE

    Agnandji Selidji T; Tsassa Valerie; Conzelmann Cornelia; Köhler Carsten; Ehni Hans-Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Research activities in sub-Saharan Africa may be limited to delegated tasks due to the strong control from Western collaborators, which could lead to scientific production of little value in terms of its impact on social and economic innovation in less developed areas. However, the current contexts of international biomedical research including the development of public-private partnerships and research institutions in Africa suggest that scientific activities are growing ...

  18. Contributions on biomedical imaging, with a side-look at molecular imaging; Beitraege zur biomedizinischen Bildgebung mit einem Seitenblick auf Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, G. (ed.)

    2004-05-01

    This report is intended as a brief introduction to the emerging scientific field of biomedical imaging. The breadth of the subject is shown and future fields of research are indicated, which hopefully will serve as a guide to the identification of starting points for the research in 'Biomedical and/or Molecular Imaging' at the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health. The report starts with a brief sketch of the history. Then a - necessarily incomplete - list of research topics is presented. It is organized in two parts: the first one addresses medical imaging, and the second one is concerned with biological point aspects of the matter. (orig.) [German] In diesem Bericht sind einige Beitraege zum Gebiet 'Bildgebende Verfahren in Biologie und Medizin' zusammengestellt. Sie stammen saemtlich aus dem Institut fuer Biomathematik und Biometrie, IBB, am Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, GSF, in Muenchen/Neuherberg, und seinem engeren Umfeld. Ziel war es, zu sichten, was in und um diesen Themenkreis herum an Wissen und sonstiger Kompetenz hier vorhanden ist. Einige am IBB etablierte Gebiete wie Roentgen-Mammographie oder funktionelle Magnetresonanztherapie wurden ausgeblendet. Der Grund ist die Fokussierung auf ein nicht exakt definierbares, neues Gebiet der Bildgebung, das unter dem Namen 'Molecular Imaging' kursiert und derzeit Furore macht macht. (orig.)

  19. Progress toward automatic classification of human brown adipose tissue using biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Aliya; Towse, Theodore F.; Walker, Ronald C.; Avison, Malcom J.; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a small but significant tissue, which may play an important role in obesity and the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Interest in studying BAT in adult humans is increasing, but in order to quantify BAT volume in a single measurement or to detect changes in BAT over the time course of a longitudinal experiment, BAT needs to first be reliably differentiated from surrounding tissue. Although the uptake of the radiotracer 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in adipose tissue on positron emission tomography (PET) scans following cold exposure is accepted as an indication of BAT, it is not a definitive indicator, and to date there exists no standardized method for segmenting BAT. Consequently, there is a strong need for robust automatic classification of BAT based on properties measured with biomedical imaging. In this study we begin the process of developing an automated segmentation method based on properties obtained from fat-water MRI and PET-CT scans acquired on ten healthy adult subjects.

  20. Fundamental and applied studies in nanoparticle biomedical imaging, stabilization, and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansare, Vikram J.

    Nanoparticle carrier systems are gaining importance in the rapidly expanding field of biomedical whole animal imaging where they provide long circulating, real time imaging capability. This thesis presents a new paradigm in imaging whereby long wavelength fluorescent or photoacoustically active contrast agents are embedded in the hydrophobic core of nanocarriers formed by Flash NanoPrecipitation. The long wavelength allows for improved optical penetration depth. Compared to traditional contrast agents where fluorophores are placed on the surface, this allows for improved signal, increased stability, and molecular targeting capabilities. Several types of long wavelength hydrophobic dyes based on acene, cyanine, and bacteriochlorin scaffolds are utilized and animal results obtained for nanocarrier systems used in both fluorescent and photoacoustic imaging modes. Photoacoustic imaging is particularly promising due to its high resolution, excellent penetration depth, and ability to provide real-time functional information. Fundamental studies in nanoparticle stabilization are also presented for two systems: model alumina nanoparticles and charge stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles. Motivated by the need for stable suspensions of alumina-based nanocrystals for security printing applications, results are presented for the adsorption of various small molecule charged hydrophobes onto the surface of alumina nanoparticles. Results are also presented for the production of charge stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles via Flash NanoPrecipitation, allowing for the independent control of polymer molecular weight and nanoparticle size, which is not possible by traditional emulsion polymerization routes. Lastly, methods for processing nanoparticle systems are explored. The increasing use of nanoparticle therapeutics in the pharmaceutical industry has necessitated the development of scalable, industrially relevant processing methods. Ultrafiltration is particularly well suited for

  1. Introduction to biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Enderle, John

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Biomedical Engineering is a comprehensive survey text for biomedical engineering courses. It is the most widely adopted text across the BME course spectrum, valued by instructors and students alike for its authority, clarity and encyclopedic coverage in a single volume. Biomedical engineers need to understand the wide range of topics that are covered in this text, including basic mathematical modeling; anatomy and physiology; electrical engineering, signal processing and instrumentation; biomechanics; biomaterials science and tissue engineering; and medical and engineering e

  2. Combined X-ray CT and mass spectrometry for biomedical imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging technologies play a key role in many branches of science, especially in biology and medicine. They provide an invaluable insight into both internal structure and processes within a broad range of samples. There are many techniques that allow one to obtain images of an object. Different techniques are based on the analysis of a particular sample property by means of a dedicated imaging system, and as such, each imaging modality provides the researcher with different information. The use of multimodal imaging (imaging with several different techniques) can provide additional and complementary information that is not possible when employing a single imaging technique alone. In this study, we present for the first time a multi-modal imaging technique where X-ray computerized tomography (CT) is combined with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). While X-ray CT provides 3-dimensional information regarding the internal structure of the sample based on X-ray absorption coefficients, MSI of thin sections acquired from the same sample allows the spatial distribution of many elements/molecules, each distinguished by its unique mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), to be determined within a single measurement and with a spatial resolution as low as 1 μm or even less. The aim of the work is to demonstrate how molecular information from MSI can be spatially correlated with 3D structural information acquired from X-ray CT. In these experiments, frozen samples are imaged in an X-ray CT setup using Medipix based detectors equipped with a CO2 cooled sample holder. Single projections are pre-processed before tomographic reconstruction using a signal-to-thickness calibration. In the second step, the object is sliced into thin sections (circa 20 μm) that are then imaged using both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and secondary ion (SIMS) mass spectrometry, where the spatial distribution of specific molecules within the sample is determined. The

  3. International Careers of Researchers in Biomedical Sciences: A Comparison of the US and the UK.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Cornelia; Geuna, Aldo; Ana Fernández-Zubieta; Toselli, Manuel; Kataishi, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    This chapter analyses the mobility of academic biomedical researchers in the US and the UK. Both countries are at the forefront of research in biomedicine, and able to attract promising researchers from other countries as well as fostering mobility between the US and the UK. Using a database of 292 UK based academics and 327 US based academics covering the period 1956 to 2012, the descriptive analysis shows a high level of international mobility at education level (BA, PhD and Postdoc) with s...

  4. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  5. Biomedical and veterinary science can increase our understanding of coral disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T.M.; Richardson, L.L.; Reynolds, T.L.; Willis, B.L.

    2008-01-01

    A balanced approach to coral disease investigation is critical for understanding the global decline of corals. Such an approach should involve the proper use of biomedical concepts, tools, and terminology to address confusion and promote clarity in the coral disease literature. Investigating disease in corals should follow a logical series of steps including identification of disease, systematic morphologic descriptions of lesions at the gross and cellular levels, measurement of health indices, and experiments to understand disease pathogenesis and the complex interactions between host, pathogen, and the environment. This model for disease investigation is widely accepted in the medical, veterinary and invertebrate pathology disciplines. We present standard biomedical rationale behind the detection, description, and naming of diseases and offer examples of the application of Koch's postulates to elucidate the etiology of some infectious diseases. Basic epidemiologic concepts are introduced to help investigators think systematically about the cause(s) of complex diseases. A major goal of disease investigation in corals and other organisms is to gather data that will enable the establishment of standardized case definitions to distinguish among diseases. Concepts and facts amassed from empirical studies over the centuries by medical and veterinary pathologists have standardized disease investigation and are invaluable to coral researchers because of the robust comparisons they enable; examples of these are given throughout this paper. Arguments over whether coral diseases are caused by primary versus opportunistic pathogens reflect the lack of data available to prove or refute such hypotheses and emphasize the need for coral disease investigations that focus on: characterizing the normal microbiota and physiology of the healthy host; defining ecological interactions within the microbial community associated with the host; and investigating host immunity, host

  6. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  7. Improving Graduate Education to Support a Branching Career Pipeline: Recommendations Based on a Survey of Doctoral Students in the Basic Biomedical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhrmann, C. N.; Halme, D. G.; O’Sullivan, P. S.; Lindstaedt, B.

    2011-01-01

    Today's doctoral programs continue to prepare students for a traditional academic career path despite the inadequate supply of research-focused faculty positions. We advocate for a broader doctoral curriculum that prepares trainees for a wide range of science-related career paths. In support of this argument, we describe data from our survey of doctoral students in the basic biomedical sciences at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Midway through graduate training, UCSF students ...

  8. What is biomedical informatics?

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstam, Elmer V.; Smith, Jack W.; Johnson, Todd R

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of info...

  9. WebMedSA: a web-based framework for segmenting and annotating medical images using biomedical ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Francisco; Pérez, Wilson; Tello, Andrés.; Saquicela, Victor; Espinoza, Mauricio; Solano-Quinde, Lizandro; Vidal, Maria-Esther; La Cruz, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Advances in medical imaging have fostered medical diagnosis based on digital images. Consequently, the number of studies by medical images diagnosis increases, thus, collaborative work and tele-radiology systems are required to effectively scale up to this diagnosis trend. We tackle the problem of the collaborative access of medical images, and present WebMedSA, a framework to manage large datasets of medical images. WebMedSA relies on a PACS and supports the ontological annotation, as well as segmentation and visualization of the images based on their semantic description. Ontological annotations can be performed directly on the volumetric image or at different image planes (e.g., axial, coronal, or sagittal); furthermore, annotations can be complemented after applying a segmentation technique. WebMedSA is based on three main steps: (1) RDF-ization process for extracting, anonymizing, and serializing metadata comprised in DICOM medical images into RDF/XML; (2) Integration of different biomedical ontologies (using L-MOM library), making this approach ontology independent; and (3) segmentation and visualization of annotated data which is further used to generate new annotations according to expert knowledge, and validation. Initial user evaluations suggest that WebMedSA facilitates the exchange of knowledge between radiologists, and provides the basis for collaborative work among them.

  10. Mentoring Strategies and Outcomes of Two Federally Funded Cancer Research Training Programs for Underrepresented Students in the Biomedical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Marvella E; Abraham, Latecia M; Harrison, Anita L; Jefferson, Melanie S; Hazelton, Tonya R; Varner, Heidi; Cannady, Kimberly; Frichtel, Carla S; Bagasra, Omar; Davis, Leroy; Rivers, David E; Slaughter, Sabra C; Salley, Judith D

    2016-06-01

    The US is experiencing a severe shortage of underrepresented biomedical researchers. The purpose of this paper is to present two case examples of cancer research mentoring programs for underrepresented biomedical sciences students. The first case example is a National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute (NIH/NCI) P20 grant titled "South Carolina Cancer Disparities Research Center (SC CaDRe)" Training Program, contributing to an increase in the number of underrepresented students applying to graduate school by employing a triple-level mentoring strategy. Since 2011, three undergraduate and four graduate students have participated in the P20 SC CaDRe program. One graduate student published a peer-reviewed scientific paper. Two graduate students (50 %) have completed their master's degrees, and the other two graduate students will receive their degrees in spring 2015. Two undergraduate students (67 %) are enrolled in graduate or professional school (grad./prof. school), and the other graduate student is completing her final year of college. The second case example is a prostate cancer-focused Department of Defense grant titled "The SC Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Training Program," providing 24 students training since 2009. Additionally, 47 students made scientific presentations, and two students have published peer-reviewed scientific papers. All 24 students took a GRE test preparation course; 15 (63 %) have applied to graduate school, and 11 of them (73 %) are enrolled in grad./prof. school. Thirteen remaining students (54 %) are applying to grad./prof. school. Leveraged funding provided research-training opportunities to an additional 201 National Conference on Health Disparities Student Forum participants and to 937 Ernest E. Just Research Symposium participants at the Medical University of South Carolina. PMID:25869579

  11. Metal micro-detector TimePix imaging synchrotron radiation beams at the ESRF Bio-Medical Beamline ID17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization studies of the metal micro-detector TimePix measuring dose distribution at the Minibeam Radiation Therapy setup (Bio-Medical Beamline ID17, ESRF) were performed. The results obtained for high intensity synchrotron radiation minibeams illustrate an excellent performance of the TimePix providing in real time 2D image of the dose distribution over many beams in a 14×14 mm2 area. Peak-to-Valley–Dose–Ratios measured by TimePix and gafhromic films agree well.

  12. Metal micro-detector TimePix imaging synchrotron radiation beams at the ESRF Bio-Medical Beamline ID17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugatch, V., E-mail: pugatch@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine); Campbell, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Chaus, A.; Kovalchuk, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine); Llopart, X. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Okhrimenko, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine); Pospisil, S. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Prezado, Y.; Renier, M. [ESRF, Grenoble (France); Tlustos, L. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-08-01

    Characterization studies of the metal micro-detector TimePix measuring dose distribution at the Minibeam Radiation Therapy setup (Bio-Medical Beamline ID17, ESRF) were performed. The results obtained for high intensity synchrotron radiation minibeams illustrate an excellent performance of the TimePix providing in real time 2D image of the dose distribution over many beams in a 14 Multiplication-Sign 14 mm{sup 2} area. Peak-to-Valley-Dose-Ratios measured by TimePix and gafhromic films agree well.

  13. Athena Wide Field Imager Key Science Drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Arne; Aird, James; Comastri, Andrea; Dauser, Thomas; Merloni, Andrea; Pratt, Gabriel W; Reiprich, Thomas H; Fabian, Andy C; Georgakakis, Antonis; Güdel, Manuel; Różańska, Agata; Sanders, Jeremy S; Sasaki, Manami; Vaughan, Simon; Wilms, Jörn; Meidinger, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of two instruments for the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena). In this paper we summarise three of the many key science objectives for the WFI - the formation and growth of supermassive black holes, non-gravitational heating in clusters of galaxies, and spin measurements of stellar mass black holes - and describe their translation into the science requirements and ultimately instrument requirements. The WFI will be designed to provide excellent point source sensitivity and grasp for performing wide area surveys, surface brightness sensitivity, survey power, and absolute temperature and density calibration for in-depth studies of the outskirts of nearby clusters of galaxies and very good high-count rate capability, throughput, and low pile-up, paired with very good spectral resolution, for detailed explorations of bright Galactic compact objects.

  14. Beyond Preparation: Identity, Cultural Capital, and Readiness for Graduate School in the Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazley, J. Lynn; Remich, Robin; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E.; Keller, Jill; Campbell, Patricia B.; McGee, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 52 college graduates as they entered a Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP). Our goal was to investigate what it means for these aspiring scientists, most of whom are from groups underrepresented in the sciences, to feel ready to apply to a doctoral program in the biomedical…

  15. Making Bioinformatics Projects a Meaningful Experience in an Undergraduate Biotechnology or Biomedical Science Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Iain C.; Cummings, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    Bioinformatics has emerged as an important discipline within the biological sciences that allows scientists to decipher and manage the vast quantities of data (such as genome sequences) that are now available. Consequently, there is an obvious need to provide graduates in biosciences with generic, transferable skills in bioinformatics. We present…

  16. Inelastic photon scattering: Effects and applications in biomedical science and industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, G.

    1997-07-01

    Compton scattering is widely used to analyse electron momentum distributions in solid state systems. Perhaps less well-known is its role as the major cause of image contrast in medical and industrial radiography. This article discusses the principles and applications of a technique, known as Compton scatter imaging (CSI), which is based on direct registration of the Compton scatter radiation. Following a historical survey of the major developments in this field, the strengths and weaknesses of transmission radiography and Compton scatter imaging are compared in order to determine those measurement situations to which the latter is best suited. A description is given of several disturbing effects to which CSI is prone and ways in which these may be accounted for to yield quantitative density data are presented. The most important types of imaging system based on Compton scatter are discussed and compared. The ComScan (an acronym for Compton scatter scanner) is a commercially-available backscatter imaging system which is discussed here in some detail. ComScan images taken from applications of topical and historical interest are presented.

  17. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  18. Healthcare and biomedical technology in the 21st century an introduction for non-science majors

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, George R; Samuel, Solomon Praveen

    2014-01-01

    This textbook introduces students not pursuing degrees in science or engineering to the remarkable new applications of technology now available to physicians and their patients and discusses how these technologies are evolving to permit new treatments and procedures.  The book also elucidates the societal and ethical impacts of advances in medical technology, such as extending life and end of life decisions, the role of genetic testing, confidentiality, costs of health care delivery, scrutiny of scientific claims, and provides background on the engineering approach in healthcare and the scientific method as a guiding principle. This concise, highly relevant text enables faculty to offer a substantive course for students from non-scientific backgrounds that will empower them to make more informed decisions about their healthcare by significantly enhancing their understanding of these technological advancements. This book also: ·         Presents scientific concepts from modern medical science using r...

  19. Severo Ochoa and the Biomedical Sciences in Spain under Franco, 1959-1975

    OpenAIRE

    Santesmases, María Jesús

    2000-01-01

    The influence of Severo Ochoa in the establishment of biochemistry and molecular biology in Spain is the central topic of this essay. From the time he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1959, Ochoa's links with Spanish scientists and top authorities in education and science became instrumental to the development of these areas in the country of his birth. Ochoa's influence is analyzed through investigation of three "events": the reception of the award in Spain and some o...

  20. Nanodiamond-Based Composite Structures for Biomedical Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M; Vlasov, Igor I; Burikov, Sergey A; Dolenko, Tatiana A; Shenderova, Olga A

    2015-02-01

    Nanodiamond particles are widely recognized candidates for biomedical applications due to their excellent biocompatibility, bright photoluminescence based on color centers and outstanding photostability. Recently, more complex architectures with a nanodiamond core and an external shell or nanostructure which provides synergistic benefits have been developed, and their feasibility for biomedical applications has been demonstrated. This review is aimed at summarizing recent achievements in the fabrication and functional demonstrations of nanodiamond-based composite structures, along with critical considerations that should be taken into account in the design of such structures from a biomedical point of view. A particular focus of the review is core/shell structures of nanodiamond surrounded by porous silica shells, which demonstrate a remarkable increase in drug loading efficiency; as well as nanodiamonds decorated with carbon dots, which have excellent potential as bioimaging probes. Other combinations are also considered, relying on the discussed inherent properties of the inorganic materials being integrated in a way to advance inorganic nanomedicine in the quest for better health-related nanotechnology. PMID:26353602

  1. Choosing and Using Images in Environmental Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthersbaugh, Debbie Smick

    2012-01-01

    Although using images for teaching has been a common practice in science classrooms (Gordon & Pea, 1995) understanding the purpose or how to choose images has not typically been intentional. For this dissertation three separate studies relating to choosing and using images are prepared with environmental science in mind. Each of the studies…

  2. Iodine-129 AMS for Earth Science, Biomedical, and National Security Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project created the capability to analyze the radionuclide iodine-129 (129I) by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in the CAMS facility at LLNL, and enhanced our scientific foundation for its application through development of sample preparation technology required for environmental, biomedical, and national security applications. The project greatly improved our environmental iodine extraction and concentration methodology, and developed new techniques for the analysis of small quantities of 129I. The project can be viewed as having two phases, one in which the basic instrumental and chemical extraction methods necessary for general 129I analysis were developed, and a second in which these techniques were improved and new techniques were developed to enable broader and more sophisticated applications. The latter occurred through the mechanism of four subprojects that also serve as proof-of-principle demonstrations of our newly developed 129I capabilities. The first subproject determined the vertical distribution of bomb-pulse 129I (129Iv distributed globally as fallout from 1950's atmospheric nuclear testing) through 5 meters in the upper vadose zone in the arid southwestern United States. This characterizes migration mechanisms of contaminant 129I, or 129I released by nuclear fuel reprocessing, as well as the migration of labile iodine in soils relative to moisture flux, permitting a determination of nutrient cycling. The second subproject minimized the amount of iodine required in an AMS sample target. Because natural iodine abundances are very low in almost all environments, many areas of research had been precluded or made extremely difficult by the demands of sample size. Also, certain sample types of potential interest to national security are intrinsically small - for example iodine on air filters. The result of this work is the ability to measure the 129I/127I ratio at the 2E-07 level or higher in a sample

  3. Iodine-129 AMS for Earth Science, Biomedical, and National Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G; Brown, T; Tumey, S; Marchetti, A; Vu, A

    2007-02-20

    This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project created the capability to analyze the radionuclide iodine-129 ({sup 129}I) by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in the CAMS facility at LLNL, and enhanced our scientific foundation for its application through development of sample preparation technology required for environmental, biomedical, and national security applications. The project greatly improved our environmental iodine extraction and concentration methodology, and developed new techniques for the analysis of small quantities of {sup 129}I. The project can be viewed as having two phases, one in which the basic instrumental and chemical extraction methods necessary for general {sup 129}I analysis were developed, and a second in which these techniques were improved and new techniques were developed to enable broader and more sophisticated applications. The latter occurred through the mechanism of four subprojects that also serve as proof-of-principle demonstrations of our newly developed {sup 129}I capabilities. The first subproject determined the vertical distribution of bomb-pulse {sup 129}I ({sup 129}Iv distributed globally as fallout from 1950's atmospheric nuclear testing) through 5 meters in the upper vadose zone in the arid southwestern United States. This characterizes migration mechanisms of contaminant {sup 129}I, or {sup 129}I released by nuclear fuel reprocessing, as well as the migration of labile iodine in soils relative to moisture flux, permitting a determination of nutrient cycling. The second subproject minimized the amount of iodine required in an AMS sample target. Because natural iodine abundances are very low in almost all environments, many areas of research had been precluded or made extremely difficult by the demands of sample size. Also, certain sample types of potential interest to national security are intrinsically small - for example iodine on air filters. The result of this work is the ability to measure the

  4. Development of A Biomedical Imaging Informatics System for Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Geoffrey; Wang, May D.

    2003-01-01

    The medical imaging technologies have been used for detecting tumors through the years. Tumors that can be viewed in imaging are usually big enough to contain billion tumor cells. Some patients may be cured if detected earlier and the surgery is performed well. Those lead to molecular imaging and image-guided surgery research activities, which post new challenges on large scale imaging data management and 3-D visualization. The goal of this project is to develop 3-D imaging informatics system...

  5. Biomedical Science, Unit II: Nutrition in Health and Medicine. Digestion of Foods; Organic Chemistry of Nutrients; Energy and Cell Respiration; The Optimal Diet; Foodborne Diseases; Food Technology; Dental Science and Nutrition. Student Text. Revised Version, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    This student text presents instructional materials for a unit of science within the Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project (BICP), a two-year interdisciplinary precollege curriculum aimed at preparing high school students for entry into college and vocational programs leading to a career in the health field. Lessons concentrate on…

  6. Interferometric microstructured polymer optical fiber ultrasound sensor for optoacoustic endoscopic imaging in biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, Daniel; Sáez-Rodríguez, David; Webb, David;

    2014-01-01

    We report a characterization of the acoustic sensitivity of microstructured polymer optical fiber interferometric sensors at ultrasonic frequencies from 100kHz to 10MHz. The use of wide-band ultrasonic fiber optic sensors in biomedical ultrasonic and optoacoustic applications is an open alternative...... to conventional piezoelectric transducers. These kind of sensors, made of biocompatible polymers, are good candidates for the sensing element in an optoacoustic endoscope because of its high sensitivity, its shape and its non-brittle and non-electric nature. The acoustic sensitivity of the intrinsic fiber optic...

  7. Career Coaches as a Source of Vicarious Learning for Racial and Ethnic Minority PhD Students in the Biomedical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Simon N.; Thakore, Bhoomi K.; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many recent mentoring initiatives have sought to help improve the proportion of underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities (URMs) in academic positions across the biomedical sciences. However, the intractable nature of the problem of underrepresentation suggests that many young scientists may require supplemental career development beyond what many mentors are able to offer. As an adjunct to traditional scientific mentoring, we created a novel academic career “coaching” intervention for PhD students in the biomedical sciences. Objective To determine whether and how academic career coaches can provide effective career-development-related learning experiences for URM PhD students in the biomedical sciences. We focus specifically on vicarious learning experiences, where individuals learn indirectly through the experiences of others. Method The intervention is being tested as part of a longitudinal randomized control trial (RCT). Here, we describe a nested qualitative study, using a framework approach to analyze data from a total of 48 semi-structured interviews from 24 URM PhD students (2 interviews per participant, 1 at baseline, 1 at 12-month follow-up) (16 female, 8 male; 11 Black, 12 Hispanic, 1 Native-American). We explored the role of the coach as a source of vicarious learning, in relation to the students’ goal of being future biomedical science faculty. Results Coaches were resources through which most students in the study were able to learn vicariously about how to pursue, and succeed within, an academic career. Coaches were particularly useful in instances where students’ research mentors are unable to provide such vicarious learning opportunities, for example because the mentor is too busy to have career-related discussions with a student, or because they have, or value, a different type of academic career to the type the student hopes to achieve. Implications Coaching can be an important way to address the lack of structured career

  8. Biomedical engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D; Bronzino, Joseph D

    2006-01-01

    Over the last century,medicine has come out of the "black bag" and emerged as one of the most dynamic and advanced fields of development in science and technology. Today, biomedical engineering plays a critical role in patient diagnosis, care, and rehabilitation. As such, the field encompasses a wide range of disciplines, from biology and physiology to informatics and signal processing. Reflecting the enormous growth and change in biomedical engineering during the infancy of the 21st century, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook enters its third edition as a set of three carefully focused and

  9. Handbook of coherent domain optical methods biomedical diagnostics, environmental and material science

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    For the first time in one set of books, coherent-domain optical methods are discussed in the framework of various applications, which are characterized by a strong light scattering. A few chapters describe basic research containing the updated results on coherent and polarized light non-destructive interactions with a scattering medium, in particular, diffraction, interference, and speckle formation at multiple scattering. These chapters allow for understanding coherent-domain diagnostic techniques presented in later chapters. A large portion of Volume I is dedicated to analysis of various aspects of optical coherence tomography (OCT) - a very new and growing field of coherent optics. Two chapters on laser scanning confocal microscopy give insight to recent extraordinary results on in vivo imaging and compare the possibilities and achievements of confocol, excitation multiphoton, and OCT microscopy. This two volume reference contains descriptions of holography, interferometry and optical heterodyning techniqu...

  10. A game-based platform for crowd-sourcing biomedical image diagnosis and standardized remote training and education of diagnosticians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve; Woo, Minjae; Chandramouli, Krithika; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, crowd-sourcing complex image analysis tasks to a human crowd has emerged as an alternative to energy-inefficient and difficult-to-implement computational approaches. Following this trend, we have developed a mathematical framework for statistically combining human crowd-sourcing of biomedical image analysis and diagnosis through games. Using a web-based smart game (BioGames), we demonstrated this platform's effectiveness for telediagnosis of malaria from microscopic images of individual red blood cells (RBCs). After public release in early 2012 (http://biogames.ee.ucla.edu), more than 3000 gamers (experts and non-experts) used this BioGames platform to diagnose over 2800 distinct RBC images, marking them as positive (infected) or negative (non-infected). Furthermore, we asked expert diagnosticians to tag the same set of cells with labels of positive, negative, or questionable (insufficient information for a reliable diagnosis) and statistically combined their decisions to generate a gold standard malaria image library. Our framework utilized minimally trained gamers' diagnoses to generate a set of statistical labels with an accuracy that is within 98% of our gold standard image library, demonstrating the "wisdom of the crowd". Using the same image library, we have recently launched a web-based malaria training and educational game allowing diagnosticians to compare their performance with their peers. After diagnosing a set of ~500 cells per game, diagnosticians can compare their quantified scores against a leaderboard and view their misdiagnosed cells. Using this platform, we aim to expand our gold standard library with new RBC images and provide a quantified digital tool for measuring and improving diagnostician training globally.

  11. Development of highly luminescent and water-dispersible lanthanide-based nanomaterials for potential bio-medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanayake, Gayanthi Kumari

    Lanthanide metal ions exhibit fascinating optical and magnetic properties. Lanthanide-based nanomaterials have potential applications in optical devices, telecommunication, electroluminescent devices, bio-analytical sensors, and bio-medical imaging technology. Despite the recent developments, low luminescence characteristics, poor water solubility, and poor cell selectivity of lanthanide-based materials limit their use in bio-medical applications. This project is designed to mainly improve the luminescence properties of Eu(III)-based nanomaterials for their potential use in biomedical applications. In addition, we explore synthetic methods to enhance the water dispersibility and melanoma cell selectivity of the nanoparticles. Current research is designed to address the above mentioned drawbacks of lanthanide-based nanomaterials. Two different nanoparticle systems were developed in this project. i. europium (Eu)-based down-converting nanoparticles, ii. ytterbium (Yb)- erbium (Er)-based upconverting nanoparticles. Many down-converting nanoparticle systems suffer from low-luminescence efficiencies due to their poor light absorption by direct excitation of the lanthanide ions. In order to improve the luminescence characteristics, we have designed a novel nanomaterial by surface-coating it with organic chromophores having strong light absorption properties. LaEuF3.AEP (La=lanthanum, AEP = aminoethyl phosphate) nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a low temperature heating method and Eu-based NaYF4 nanoparticles were synthesized using a high temperature heating method. A ligand exchange procedure was developed to functionalize the surface of the nanoparticles with an organic chromophore, TTA (thenoyltrifluoroacetone). The TTA functionalized Eu(III)-based nanoparticles exhibit impressive luminescence enhancements utilizing the sensitization effect. Poor water solubility is the main drawback of the upconverting nanoparticles for bio-medical applications. We

  12. Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Bioengineering, and Related Technologies for the Development of Biomarkers of Pancreatic Disease: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kimberly A; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Christina H; Singh, Vikesh K; Srivastava, Sudhir; Wasan, Ajay D; Yadav, Dhiraj; Andersen, Dana K

    2015-11-01

    A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering focused on research gaps and opportunities in the development of new biomarkers of pancreatic disease. The session was held on July 22, 2015, and structured into 6 sessions: 1) Introduction and Overview; 2) Keynote Address; 3) New Approaches to the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis; 4) Biomarkers of Pain and Inflammation; 5) New Approaches to the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer; and 6) Shed Exosomes, Shed Cells, and Shed Proteins. Recent advances in the fields of pancreatic imaging, functional markers of pancreatic disease, proteomics, molecular and cellular imaging, and detection of circulating cancer cells and exosomes were reviewed. Knowledge gaps and research needs were highlighted. The development of new methods for the noninvasive determination of pancreatic pathology; the use of cellular markers of pancreatic function, inflammation, pain, and malignancy; and the refinement of methods to identify cells and cellular constituents of pancreatic cancer were discussed. The further refinement of sophisticated technical methods and the need for clinical studies to validate these new approaches in large-scale studies of patients at risk for the development of pancreatic disease were repeatedly emphasized. PMID:26465948

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes progress on Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) biomedical and health effects research conducted at PNL in FY 1983 to develop the information required for a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of energy-related pollutants with living organisms. The first section is devoted to an evaluation of possible health effects among nuclear workers. The next three sections, which contain reports of health effects research in biological systems, are grouped according to the major endpoint being studied: carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, and systems damage. Since some projects have multiple objectives, a section may contain data concerning other endpoints as well. The section on carcinogenesis presents results from laboratory animal dose-effect relationship studies from both nuclear and synfuels materials. These data, along with metabolism and modeling studies, provide a basis for predicting human risks in the absence of relevant human exposure. This year we include a report on our 22nd Hanford Life Sciences Symposium, which dealt with this problem of extrapolating the results of animal studies to man. Of particular importance in carcinogenesis has been the demonstration that the carcinogenic potencies of complex organic synfuel mixtures may be much lower (or, occasionally, higher) than the sum of the potencies of the individual components. The mutagenesis section is primarily concerned with the results of microbial mutagenesis studies with synfuel materials. These studies provide valuable information on the carcinogenic potential of these complex organic mixtures. With results from studies reported in the carcinogenesis section, they are also being used to establish an adequate data base for determining the correlation between mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each program for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes progress on Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) biomedical and health effects research conducted at PNL in FY 1983 to develop the information required for a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of energy-related pollutants with living organisms. The first section is devoted to an evaluation of possible health effects among nuclear workers. The next three sections, which contain reports of health effects research in biological systems, are grouped according to the major endpoint being studied: carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, and systems damage. Since some projects have multiple objectives, a section may contain data concerning other endpoints as well. The section on carcinogenesis presents results from laboratory animal dose-effect relationship studies from both nuclear and synfuels materials. These data, along with metabolism and modeling studies, provide a basis for predicting human risks in the absence of relevant human exposure. This year we include a report on our 22nd Hanford Life Sciences Symposium, which dealt with this problem of extrapolating the results of animal studies to man. Of particular importance in carcinogenesis has been the demonstration that the carcinogenic potencies of complex organic synfuel mixtures may be much lower (or, occasionally, higher) than the sum of the potencies of the individual components. The mutagenesis section is primarily concerned with the results of microbial mutagenesis studies with synfuel materials. These studies provide valuable information on the carcinogenic potential of these complex organic mixtures. With results from studies reported in the carcinogenesis section, they are also being used to establish an adequate data base for determining the correlation between mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each program for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  15. Rare earths based nir luminomagnetic nanoparticles and their multimodal applications in biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimun, L. Christopher

    Medical imaging is one of the most important techniques in the medical field for diagnostics and analysis of biological tissues. The most common imaging modalities are X-ray, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and optical imaging. In each of these imaging techniques, several contrast agents are used to improve the image resolution. There are several contrast agents available that are specific for a particular application and only include one functionality. In addition, most of the contrast agents available today have several limitations such as low image resolution, low thermal stability, toxicity, cost of production etc. The development of an ideal contrast agent with multiple functionalities that overcome most of these limitations is a challenging topic in the medical industry. Furthermore, by adding multiple functionalities into a single contrast agent the benefits would provide a decrease in cost and time by imaging multiple modalities simultaneously. Though there are various attempts in this area by several researchers around the world, the idea of developing a core-shell free multifunctional contrast agent with near infrared (NIR) imaging features and magnetic properties is novel. This doctoral dissertation is focused on the investigation of rare earth doped, NIR active, luminomagnetic nanocrystals (NCs) that have the potential to be effective contrast with multiple modalities. The main content of the thesis is about the development, characterization, and implementation of Nd 3+ doped YF3, GdF3, and Na(Lu0.5Gd 0.5)F4. The "as prepared" and surface functionalized NCs are characterized for their phase, morphology, and detailed optical characteristics such as absorption, emission and quantum yield. Magnetic properties are studied by magnetization experiments. In order to show the proof of concept as a multifunctional imaging agent various imaging experiments such as confocal intracellular imaging, NIR optical imaging, X-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging

  16. The potential improvement of team-working skills in Biomedical and Natural Science students using a problem-based learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough L. Nowrouzian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Teamwork has become an integral part of most organisations today, and it is clearly important in Science and other disciplines. In Science, research teams increase in size while the number of single-authored papers and patents decline. Team-work in laboratory sciences permits projects that are too big or complex for one individual to be tackled. This development requires that students gain experience of team-work before they start their professional career. Students working in teams this may increase productivity, confidence, innovative capacity and improvement of interpersonal skills. Problem-based learning (PBL is an instructional approach focusing on real analytical problems as a means of training an analytical scientist. PBL may have a positive impact on team-work skills that are important for undergraduates and postgraduates to enable effective collaborative work. This survey of the current literature explores the development of the team-work skills in Biomedical Science students using PBL.

  17. The Multispectral Imaging Science Working Group. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Results of the deliberations of the six multispectral imaging science working groups (Botany, Geography, Geology, Hydrology, Imaging Science and Information Science) are summarized. Consideration was given to documenting the current state of knowledge in terrestrial remote sensing without the constraints of preconceived concepts such as possible band widths, number of bands, and radiometric or spatial resolutions of present or future systems. The findings of each working group included a discussion of desired capabilities and critical developmental issues.

  18. Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Wardak, Mirwais

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique and powerful imaging technique that is used to visualize and quantify various biological processes in living subjects in health and disease. PET imaging can also provide biological information for the assessment of therapies. In this dissertation, we will cover three projects that utilize the quantitative capability of PET for studying two neurological disorders: Alzheimer's disease and brain tumors.One of the goals in PET imaging is to produce...

  19. A laboratory-based X-ray phase contrast imaging scanner with applications in biomedical and non-medical disciplines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) provides a much higher visibility of low-absorbing details than conventional, attenuation-based radiography. This is due to the fact that image contrast is determined by the unit decrement of the real part of the complex refractive index of an object rather than by its imaginary part (the absorption coefficient), which can be up to 1000 times larger for energies in the X-ray regime. This finds applications in many areas, including medicine, biology, material testing, and homeland security. Until lately, XPCi has been restricted to synchrotron facilities due to its demanding coherence requirements on the radiation source. However, edge illumination XPCi, first developed by one of the authors at the ELETTRA Synchrotron in Italy, substantially relaxes these requirements and therefore provides options to overcome this problem. Our group has built a prototype scanner that adapts the edge-illumination concept to standard laboratory conditions and extends it to large fields of view. This is based on X-ray sources and detectors available off the shelf, and its use has led to impressive results in mammography, cartilage imaging, testing of composite materials and security inspection. This article presents the method and the scanner prototype, and reviews its applications in selected biomedical and non-medical disciplines. (author)

  20. Biomedical imaging modality classification using combined visual features and textual terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xian-Hua; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We describe an approach for the automatic modality classification in medical image retrieval task of the 2010 CLEF cross-language image retrieval campaign (ImageCLEF). This paper is focused on the process of feature extraction from medical images and fuses the different extracted visual features and textual feature for modality classification. To extract visual features from the images, we used histogram descriptor of edge, gray, or color intensity and block-based variation as global features and SIFT histogram as local feature. For textual feature of image representation, the binary histogram of some predefined vocabulary words from image captions is used. Then, we combine the different features using normalized kernel functions for SVM classification. Furthermore, for some easy misclassified modality pairs such as CT and MR or PET and NM modalities, a local classifier is used for distinguishing samples in the pair modality to improve performance. The proposed strategy is evaluated with the provided modality dataset by ImageCLEF 2010. PMID:21912534

  1. Biomedical Imaging Modality Classification Using Combined Visual Features and Textual Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hua Han

    2011-01-01

    extraction from medical images and fuses the different extracted visual features and textual feature for modality classification. To extract visual features from the images, we used histogram descriptor of edge, gray, or color intensity and block-based variation as global features and SIFT histogram as local feature. For textual feature of image representation, the binary histogram of some predefined vocabulary words from image captions is used. Then, we combine the different features using normalized kernel functions for SVM classification. Furthermore, for some easy misclassified modality pairs such as CT and MR or PET and NM modalities, a local classifier is used for distinguishing samples in the pair modality to improve performance. The proposed strategy is evaluated with the provided modality dataset by ImageCLEF 2010.

  2. Functional Biomedical Images of Alzheimer's Disease. A Green's Function-based Empirical Mode Decomposition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baddai, S; Neubauer, A; Tomé, A M; Vigneron, V; Salas-Gonzalez, D; Górriz, J M; Puntonet, C G; Lang, E W; The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a functional imaging modality to detect signs of dementias in human brains. Two-dimensional empirical mode decomposition (2D-EMD) provides means to analyze such images. It decomposes the latter into characteristic modes which represent textures on different spatial scales. These textures provide informative features for subsequent classification purposes. The study proposes a new EMD variant which relies on a Green's function based estimation method including a tension parameter to fast and reliably estimate the envelope hypersurfaces interpolating extremal points of the twodimensional intensity distrubution of the images. The new method represents a fast and stable bi-dimensional EMD which speeds up computations roughly 100-fold. In combination with proper classifiers these exploratory feature extraction techniques can form a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system to assist clinicians in identifying various diseases from functional images alone. PET images of subjects suffering from Alzheimer's disease are taken to illustrate this ability. PMID:27001676

  3. A General System for Automatic Biomedical Image Segmentation Using Intensity Neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation is important with applications to several problems in biology and medicine. While extensively researched, generally, current segmentation methods perform adequately in the applications for which they were designed, but often require extensive modifications or calibrations before being used in a different application. We describe an approach that, with few modifications, can be used in a variety of image segmentation problems. The approach is based on a supervised learning strategy that utilizes intensity neighborhoods to assign each pixel in a test image its correct class based on training data. We describe methods for modeling rotations and variations in scales as well as a subset selection for training the classifiers. We show that the performance of our approach in tissue segmentation tasks in magnetic resonance and histopathology microscopy images, as well as nuclei segmentation from fluorescence microscopy images, is similar to or better than several algorithms specifically designed for each of these applications.

  4. Biomedical sensing and imaging for the anterior segment of the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Tae Joong; Yoo, Young-Sik; Lee, Yong-Eun; Kim, Beop-Min; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2015-07-01

    Eye is an optical system composed briefly of cornea, lens, and retina. Ophthalmologists can diagnose status of patient's eye from information provided by optical sensors or images as well as from history taking or physical examinations. Recently, we developed a prototype of optical coherence tomography (OCT) image guided femtosecond laser cataract surgery system. The system combined a swept-source OCT and a femtosecond (fs) laser and afford the 2D and 3D structure information to increase the efficiency and safety of the cataract procedure. The OCT imaging range was extended to achieve the 3D image from the cornea to lens posterior. A prototype of OCT image guided fs laser cataract surgery system. The surgeons can plan the laser illumination range for the nuclear division and segmentation, and monitor the whole cataract surgery procedure using the real time OCT. The surgery system was demonstrated with an extracted pig eye and in vivo rabbit eye to verify the system performance and stability.

  5. Center for Advanced Signal and Imaging Sciences Workshop 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClellan, J H; Carrano, C; Poyneer, L; Palmer, D; Baker, K; Chen, D; London, R; Weinert, G; Brase, J; Paglieroni, D; Lopez, A; Grant, C W; Wright, W; Burke, M; Miller, W O; DeTeresa, S; White, D; Toeppen, J; Haugen, P; Kamath, C; Nguyen, T; Manay, S; Newsam, S; Cantu-Paz, E; Pao, H; Chang, J; Chambers, D; Leach, R; Paulson, C; Romero, C E; Spiridon, A; Vigars, M; Welsh, P; Zumstein, J; Romero, K; Oppenheim, A; Harris, D B; Dowla, F; Brown, C G; Clark, G A; Ong, M M; Clance, T J; Kegelmeyer, l M; Benzuijen, M; Bliss, E; Burkhart, S; Conder, A; Daveler, S; Ferguson, W; Glenn, S; Liebman, J; Norton, M; Prasad, R; Salmon, T; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hafiz, O; Cheung, S; Fodor, I; Aufderheide, M B; Bary, A; Martz, Jr., H E; Burke, M W; Benson, S; Fisher, K A; Quarry, M J

    2004-11-15

    Welcome to the Eleventh Annual C.A.S.I.S. Workshop, a yearly event at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, presented by the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences, or CASIS, and sponsored by the LLNL Engineering Directorate. Every November for the last 10 years we have convened a diverse set of engineering and scientific talent to share their work in signal processing, imaging, communications, controls, along with associated fields of mathematics, statistics, and computing sciences. This year is no exception, with sessions in Adaptive Optics, Applied Imaging, Scientific Data Mining, Electromagnetic Image and Signal Processing, Applied Signal Processing, National Ignition Facility (NIF) Imaging, and Nondestructive Characterization.

  6. DOIs for DICOM Raw Images: Enabling Science Reproducibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bourne, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    By being a front-runner, the imaging community has everything to gain, because original DICOM raw data exposure to the wider science audience is likely to speed standardized image acquisition as well as engender greater confidence in the clinical imaging literature.

  7. A Novel Light Source Design for Spectral Tuning in Biomedical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Chandrajit; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel architecture with a remote phosphor based modular and compact light source in a non-contact dermoscope prototype for skin cancer screening. The spectrum and color temperature of the output light can easily and significantly be changed depending on spectral absorption characteristics of the tissues being imaged. The new system has several advantages compared to state-of-the-art phosphor converted ultra-bright white LEDs, used in a wide range of medical imaging devices, which have a fixed spectrum and color temperature at a given operating point. In particular, the system can more easily be adapted to the requirements originating from different tissues in the human body which have wavelength dependent absorption and reflectivity. This leads to improved contrast for different kinds of imaged tissue components. The concept of such a lighting architecture can be vastly utilized in many other medical imaging devices including endoscopic systems.

  8. A general non-stationarity measure : Application to biomedical image and signal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yanli

    2013-01-01

    The intensity variation is often used in signal or image processing algorithms after being quantified by a measurement method. The method for measuring and quantifying the intensity variation is called a « change measure », which is commonly used in methods for signal change detection, image edge detection, edge-based segmentation models, feature-preserving smoothing, etc. In these methods, the « change measure » plays such an important role that their performances are greatly affected by the...

  9. Three-dimensional laser optoacoustic and laser ultrasound imaging system for biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey A.; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, Andre; Oruganti, Tanmayi; Wang, Kun; Anis, Fatima; Anastasio, Mark A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we introduce an improved prototype of the imaging system that combines three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography (3D-OAT) and laser ultrasound tomography slicer (2D-LUT) to obtain coregistered maps of tissue optical absorption and speed of sound (SOS). The imaging scan is performed by a 360 degree rotation of a phantom/mouse with respect to a static arc-shaped array of ultrasonic transducers. A Q-switched laser system is used to establish optoacoustic illumination pattern appropriate for deep tissue imaging with a tunable (730-840 nm) output wavelengths operated at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate. For the LUT slicer scans, the array is pivoted by 90 degrees with respect to the central transducers providing accurate registration of optoacoustic and SOS maps, the latter being reconstructed using waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) technique. The coregistered OAT-LUT modality is validated by imaging a phantom and a live mouse. SOS maps acquired in the imaging system can be employed by an iterative optoacoustic reconstruction algorithm capable of compensating for acoustic wavefield aberrations. The most promising applications of the imaging system include 3D angiography, cancer research, and longitudinal studies of biological distributions of optoacoustic contrast agents (carbon nanotubes, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, fluorophores, etc.).

  10. A game-based crowdsourcing platform for rapidly training middle and high school students to perform biomedical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve; Woo, Min-jae; Kim, Hannah; Kim, Eunso; Ki, Sojung; Shao, Lei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    We developed an easy-to-use and widely accessible crowd-sourcing tool for rapidly training humans to perform biomedical image diagnostic tasks and demonstrated this platform's ability on middle and high school students in South Korea to diagnose malaria infected red-blood-cells (RBCs) using Giemsa-stained thin blood smears imaged under light microscopes. We previously used the same platform (i.e., BioGames) to crowd-source diagnostics of individual RBC images, marking them as malaria positive (infected), negative (uninfected), or questionable (insufficient information for a reliable diagnosis). Using a custom-developed statistical framework, we combined the diagnoses from both expert diagnosticians and the minimally trained human crowd to generate a gold standard library of malaria-infection labels for RBCs. Using this library of labels, we developed a web-based training and educational toolset that provides a quantified score for diagnosticians/users to compare their performance against their peers and view misdiagnosed cells. We have since demonstrated the ability of this platform to quickly train humans without prior training to reach high diagnostic accuracy as compared to expert diagnosticians. Our initial trial group of 55 middle and high school students has collectively played more than 170 hours, each demonstrating significant improvements after only 3 hours of training games, with diagnostic scores that match expert diagnosticians'. Next, through a national-scale educational outreach program in South Korea we recruited >1660 students who demonstrated a similar performance level after 5 hours of training. We plan to further demonstrate this tool's effectiveness for other diagnostic tasks involving image labeling and aim to provide an easily-accessible and quickly adaptable framework for online training of new diagnosticians.

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drucker, H.

    1983-02-01

    Biomedical and health effects research conducted at PNL in 1982 on the evaluation of risk to man from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies are described. Most of the studies described in this report relate to activities for three major energy technologies: nuclear fuel cycle; fossil fuel cycle (oil, gas, and coal process technologies, mining, and utilization; synfuel development), and fudion (biomagnetic effects). The report is organized under these technologies. In addition, research reports are included on the application of nuclear energy to biomedical problems. Individual projects are indexed separately.

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomedical and health effects research conducted at PNL in 1982 on the evaluation of risk to man from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies are described. Most of the studies described in this report relate to activities for three major energy technologies: nuclear fuel cycle; fossil fuel cycle (oil, gas, and coal process technologies, mining, and utilization; synfuel development), and fudion (biomagnetic effects). The report is organized under these technologies. In addition, research reports are included on the application of nuclear energy to biomedical problems. Individual projects are indexed separately

  13. Comparison of no-prior and soft-prior regularization in biomedical microwave imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H Golnabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave imaging for medical applications is attractive because the range of dielectric properties of different soft tissues can be substantial. Breast cancer detection and monitoring of treatment response are areas where this technology could be important because of the contrast between normal and malignant tissue. Unfortunately, the technique is unable to achieve the high spatial resolution at depth in tissue which is available from other conventional modalities such as x-ray computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We have incorporated a soft-prior regularization strategy within our microwave reconstruction algorithm and compared it with the images obtained with traditional no-prior (Levenberg-Marquardt regularization. Initial simulation and phantom results show a significant improvement of the recovered electrical properties. Specifically, errors in the microwave property estimates were improved by as much as 95%. The effects of a false-inclusion region were also evaluated and the results show that a small residual property bias of 6% in permittivity and 15% in conductivity can occur that does not otherwise degrade the property recovery accuracy of inclusions that actually exist. The work sets the stage for integrating microwave imaging with MR for improved resolution and functional imaging of the breast in the future.

  14. Refraction-based X-ray Computed Tomography for Biomedical Purpose Using Dark Field Imaging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    We have proposed a tomographic x-ray imaging system using DFI (dark field imaging) optics along with a data-processing method to extract information on refraction from the measured intensities, and a reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct a refractive-index field from the projections generated from the extracted refraction information. The DFI imaging system consists of a tandem optical system of Bragg- and Laue-case crystals, a positioning device system for a sample, and two CCD (charge coupled device) cameras. Then, we developed a software code to simulate the data-acquisition, data-processing, and reconstruction methods to investigate the feasibility of the proposed methods. Finally, in order to demonstrate its efficacy, we imaged a sample with DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) excised from a breast cancer patient using a system constructed at the vertical wiggler beamline BL-14C in KEK-PF. Its CT images depicted a variety of fine histological structures, such as milk ducts, duct walls, secretions, adipose and fibrous tissue. They correlate well with histological sections.

  15. Management and Analysis of Biological and Clinical Data: How Computer Science May Support Biomedical and Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Pierangelo

    The use of computer based solutions for data management in biology and clinical science has contributed to improve life-quality and also to gather research results in shorter time. Indeed, new algorithms and high performance computation have been using in proteomics and genomics studies for curing chronic diseases (e.g., drug designing) as well as supporting clinicians both in diagnosis (e.g., images-based diagnosis) and patient curing (e.g., computer based information analysis on information gathered from patient). In this paper we survey on examples of computer based techniques applied in both biology and clinical contexts. The reported applications are also results of experiences in real case applications at University Medical School of Catanzaro and also part of experiences of the National project Staywell SH 2.0 involving many research centers and companies aiming to study and improve citizen wellness.

  16. Bevalac biomedical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the physical layout of the Bevalac Facility and the research programs carried out at the facility. Beam time on the Bevalac is divided between two disciplines: one-third for biomedical research and two-thirds for nuclear science studies. The remainder of the paper discusses the beam delivery system including dosimetry, beam sharing and beam scanning

  17. Accurate Interactive Visualization of Large Deformations and Variability in Biomedical Image Ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Max; Schunke, Anja C; Schultz, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Large image deformations pose a challenging problem for the visualization and statistical analysis of 3D image ensembles which have a multitude of applications in biology and medicine. Simple linear interpolation in the tangent space of the ensemble introduces artifactual anatomical structures that hamper the application of targeted visual shape analysis techniques. In this work we make use of the theory of stationary velocity fields to facilitate interactive non-linear image interpolation and plausible extrapolation for high quality rendering of large deformations and devise an efficient image warping method on the GPU. This does not only improve quality of existing visualization techniques, but opens up a field of novel interactive methods for shape ensemble analysis. Taking advantage of the efficient non-linear 3D image warping, we showcase four visualizations: 1) browsing on-the-fly computed group mean shapes to learn about shape differences between specific classes, 2) interactive reformation to investigate complex morphologies in a single view, 3) likelihood volumes to gain a concise overview of variability and 4) streamline visualization to show variation in detail, specifically uncovering its component tangential to a reference surface. Evaluation on a real world dataset shows that the presented method outperforms the state-of-the-art in terms of visual quality while retaining interactive frame rates. A case study with a domain expert was performed in which the novel analysis and visualization methods are applied on standard model structures, namely skull and mandible of different rodents, to investigate and compare influence of phylogeny, diet and geography on shape. The visualizations enable for instance to distinguish (population-)normal and pathological morphology, assist in uncovering correlation to extrinsic factors and potentially support assessment of model quality. PMID:26390470

  18. Do Physicians Make Their Articles Readable for Their Blind or Low-Vision Patients? An Analysis of Current Image Processing Practices in Biomedical Journals from the Point of View of Accessibility

    OpenAIRE

    Splendiani, Bruno; Ribera, Mireia; Garcia, Roberto; Termens, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    Visual content in biomedical academic papers is a growing source of critical information, but it is not always fully readable for people with visual impairments. We aimed to assess current image processing practices, accessibility policies, and submission policies in a sample of 12 highly cited biomedical journals. We manually checked the application of text-based alternative image descriptions for every image in 12 articles (one for each journal). We determined whether the journals claimed t...

  19. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science

    OpenAIRE

    Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Nychas, George-John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of fo...

  20. The preparation and characterization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for biomedical imaging and therapeutic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jonathan W.

    Effective clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancer is reliant upon the positive identification of damaged tissue before and after surgical or radiation treatment. The promise of next generation contrast agents is the sensitive and selective recognition of cancerous tissue using highly specific targeting ligands. Multimodal nanoparticles may fill this role as cell-targeted agents capable of exhibiting contrast enhancement in both magnetic resonance (MR) and optical imaging. Specifically, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with biocompatible polymers serve as both a biodegradable MR imaging agent as well as a platform for small molecule, protein and fluorophore modification. In the work presented here, iron oxide nanoparticles have been coated with either poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or a graft copolymer chitosan-PEG for prolonged stability, and functionalized with: (1) peptide-major histocompatibility complexes for T-cell trafficking during immunotherapy, (2) annexin V for apoptosis detection during post-therapy evaluation, or (3) biotin for fusion protein pretreatment imaging (e.g. for use in non-Hodgekin's lymphoma). Each nanoparticle system has been characterized for proper surface modification, physical profile, targeting functionality and bioactivity. Additionally, two novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for sensitive iron oxide nanoparticle quantification, and direct PEG coating quantification of nanoparticles. These techniques may be applicable to multiple nanoparticle formulations using NMR systems ubiquitous in academic and professional laboratories. The development of new nanoparticle systems for a variety of clinical applications, as well as novel characterization techniques will offer new possibilities for both clinicians and researchers alike.

  1. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center; Imagen molecular an investigation biomedica. La Unidad de Imagen Molecular del Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-07-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  2. Biomedical imaging and therapy with physically and physiologically tailored magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandhar, Amit Praful

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) are emerging imaging and therapy approaches that have the potential to improve diagnostic safety and disease management of heart disease and cancer - the number 1 and 2 leading causes of deaths in the United States. MPI promises real-time, tomographic and quantitative imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) tracers distributed in vivo, and is targeted to offer a safer angiography alternative for its first clinical application. MFH uses ac-fields to dissipate heat from SPIONs that can be delivered locally to promote hyperthermia therapy (~42°C) in cancer cells. Both technologies use safe radiofrequency magnetic fields to exploit the fundamental magnetic relaxation properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), which must be tailored for optimal imaging in the case of MPI, and maximum hyperthermia potency in the case of MFH. Furthermore, the magnetic core and shell of SPIONs are both central to the optimization process; the shell, in particular, bridges the translational gap between the optimized core and its safe and effective use in the physiological environment. Unfortunately, existing SPIONs that were originally designed as MRI contrast agents lack the basic physical properties that enable the clinical translation of MPI and MFH. In this work, the core and shell of monodisperse SPIONs were optimized in concert to accomplish two equally important objectives: (1) biocompatibility, and (2) MPI and MFH efficacy of SPIONs in physiological environments. Critically, it was found that the physical and physiological responses of SPIONs are coupled, and impacting one can have consequences on the other. It was shown that the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based shell when properly optimized reduced protein adsorption to SPION surface and phagocytic uptake in macrophages - both prerequisites for designing long-circulating SPIONs. In MPI, tailoring the surface coating

  3. Brucellar spondylitis: evaluation by NMR imaging, CT and biomedical radiography - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 50-year-old white woman presented with a 4-month history of low pain with lower extremity irradiation. Image studies showed inflammatory changes of the vertebral bodies and invertebral disk at L3-L4 level. Considering she had no previous spinal surgery, negative tests for tuberculosis and a positive history of exposure to brucellosis, further studies were done, and the serologic tests were positive for brucellar antibodies. Follow-up studies within the first two months demonstrated the progressive spinal changes in brucellar spondylitis. (author)

  4. Parallel Multi-Dimensional LSTM, With Application to Fast Biomedical Volumetric Image Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Stollenga, Marijn F.; Byeon, Wonmin; Liwicki, Marcus; Schmidhuber, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) can be shifted across 2D images or 3D videos to segment them. They have a fixed input size and typically perceive only small local contexts of the pixels to be classified as foreground or background. In contrast, Multi-Dimensional Recurrent NNs (MD-RNNs) can perceive the entire spatio-temporal context of each pixel in a few sweeps through all pixels, especially when the RNN is a Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM). Despite these theoretical advantages, however, ...

  5. Nanodiamonds as novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications: drug delivery and imaging systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Randeep Kaur, Ildiko BadeaDrug Design and Discovery Research Group, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaAbstract: Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs are emerging as delivery vehicles for small chemical drugs and macromolecular biotechnology products due to their primary particle size of 4 to 5 nm, stable inert core, reactive surface, and ability to form hydrogels. Nanoprobe technology capitalizes on the intrinsic fluorescence, high refractive index, and unique Raman signal of the NDs, rendering them attractive for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. This review provides a brief introduction of the various types of NDs and describes the development of procedures that have led to stable single-digit-sized ND dispersions, a crucial feature for drug delivery systems and nanoprobes. Various approaches used for functionalizing the surface of NDs are highlighted, along with a discussion of their biocompatibility status. The utilization of NDs to provide sustained release and improve the dispersion of hydrophobic molecules, of which chemotherapeutic drugs are the most investigated, is described. The prospects of improving the intracellular delivery of nucleic acids by using NDs as a platform are exemplified. The photoluminescent and optical scattering properties of NDs, together with their applications in cellular labeling, are also reviewed. Considering the progress that has been made in understanding the properties of NDs, they can be envisioned as highly efficient drug delivery and imaging biomaterials for use in animals and humans.Keywords: dispersion, surface functionalization, toxicity, carriers, fluorescence, light scattering

  6. Against negative image of science: history of science in the physics & chemistry Education

    OpenAIRE

    Solbes Matarredona, Jordi; Traver i Ribes, Manel Josep

    2003-01-01

    Abstract. After a first approach to analyze which is today¿s status of the history of science in high school Physics and Chemistry classes, we attempt to demonstrate that an appropriate introduction of several aspects of History and Sociology of Science in our classes can operate a significant improvement in pupils¿ image and attitudes in science and science teaching. We will show that several groups of pupils from 15 to 17 can improve significantly their interest in science after at least a ...

  7. A purification system for 64Cu produced by a biomedical cyclotron for antibody PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange is a simple and efficient method for separating no-carrier-added 64Cu from an irradiated Ni target. We developed a semi-automated two-round 64Cu separation system equipped with a strong-base anion exchange resin column. We first verified the efficiency of the system using a non-radioactive substitute consisting of 25 mg of Ni and 127 ng of Cu, and confirmed that Cu was completely eluted at the second round of the separation step. After the bombardment, separation of 64Cu from the Ni target was achieved with high radiochemical purity. 64Cu produced and separated in this study had an extremely low level of Ni impurity. It could be used for labeling monoclonal antibodies for antibody positron emission tomography imaging and synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  8. Secure Transmission and Recovery of Embedded Patient Information from Biomedical Images of Different Modalities through a Combination of Cryptography and Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhajit Koley

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new type of information hiding skill in biomedical images is proposed through a combination of cryptography and digital watermarking to achieve the enhancement in confidential and authenticated data storage and secured transmission. Here patient's name and doctor's name are considered as patient's information which is encrypted using cryptography and embedded in the scan image of that patient through watermarking. RSA algorithm is used for encryption and higher order bit LSB replacement technique is used for embedding the information. The private keys are also embedded in the cover image to have better security and accurate recovery of the hidden information. The outcome of the proposed methodology shows that the hidden information doesn't affect the cover image and it can be recovered efficiently even from several noisy images. The strength of the proposed embedding scheme is also supported by several image quality matrices.

  9. Interest, Attitudes and Images Related to Science: Combining Students' Voices with the Voices of School Science, Teachers, and Popular Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidou, Vasilia

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades students' science-related interests, attitudes, and images of science and scientists, and their differentiations according to gender, culture, and socio-economic status have been investigated by a multitude of research studies. These aspects of students' voices seem to be interrelated and to also affect students'…

  10. Signal and imaging sciences workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-11-01

    Papers are presented in the areas of: Medical Technologies; Non-Destructive Evaluation; Applications of Signal/Image Processing; Laser Guide Star and Adaptive Optics; Computational Electromagnetic, Acoustics and Optics; Micro-Impulse Radar Processing; Optical Applications; TANGO Space Shuttle.

  11. Signal and imaging sciences workshop. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers are presented in the areas of: Medical Technologies; Non-Destructive Evaluation; Applications of Signal/Image Processing; Laser Guide Star and Adaptive Optics; Computational Electromagnetic, Acoustics and Optics; Micro-Impulse Radar Processing; Optical Applications; TANGO Space Shuttle

  12. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zacharias Fourie; Janalt Damstra; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years.Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines,particularly in the fields of orthodontics,maxillofacial surgery,plastic and reconstructive surgery,neurosurgery and forensic sciences.In most cases,3D facial imaging overcomes the limitations of traditional 2D methods and provides the clinician with more accurate information regarding the soft-tissues and the underlying skeleton.The aim of this study was to review the types of imaging methods used for facial imaging.It is important to realize the difference between the types of 3D imaging methods as application and indications thereof may differ.Since 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging will play an increasingly importanl role in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery,special emphasis should be placed on discussing CBCT applications in facial evaluations.

  13. Telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosolovska, Vita V.

    2010-08-01

    The telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system is created to share medical information for the control of health rights and timely and rapid response to crisis. The system includes the main blocks: bioprocessor, analog-digital converter biomedical images, optoelectronic module for image processing, optoelectronic module for parallel recording and storage of biomedical imaging and matrix screen display of biomedical images. Rated temporal characteristics of the blocks defined by a particular triggering optoelectronic couple in analog-digital converters and time imaging for matrix screen. The element base for hardware implementation of the developed matrix screen is integrated optoelectronic couples produced by selective epitaxy.

  14. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  15. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1973-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 2, is a collection of papers that discusses the basic sciences, the applied sciences of engineering, the medical sciences, and the delivery of health services. One paper discusses the models of adrenal cortical control, including the secretion and metabolism of cortisol (the controlled process), as well as the initiation and modulation of secretion of ACTH (the controller). Another paper discusses hospital computer systems-application problems, objective evaluation of technology, and multiple pathways for future hospital computer applications. The pos

  16. Science and Different Images of the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2016-07-01

    They are both intersubjective and non arbitrary. What are, however, these two images, and are they really alternative? Let us note, from the onset, that the two images we just mentioned are both idealizations in the same sense of Max Weber’s “ideal types”. This means that, in order to discover their actual presence, we need having recourse to a good deal of philosophical abstraction. In other words, they are not disclosed by mere empirical recognition. For instance, we live in the commonsense view of the world, and only a complex process of reflection makes us understand that we, as human beings, share a common view of the world, which is in turn determined by the fact that our physical structure bounds us to conceive of reality in a certain way rather than in another. Think about the importance that light, for example, has not only in daily life, but even in our philosophical conceptualization of the world. The story is complicated by the fact that each image has a history, and while the manifest image dates back to pre-history, the scientific image is constantly changing shape.

  17. Multimission image processing and science data visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, William B.

    1993-01-01

    The Operational Science Analysis (OSA) Functional area supports science instrument data display, analysis, visualization and photo processing in support of flight operations of planetary spacecraft managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). This paper describes the data products generated by the OSA functional area, and the current computer system used to generate these data products. The objectives on a system upgrade now in process are described. The design approach to development of the new system are reviewed, including use of the Unix operating system and X-Window display standards to provide platform independence, portability, and modularity within the new system, is reviewed. The new system should provide a modular and scaleable capability supporting a variety of future missions at JPL.

  18. The imaging science of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the goals of converging molecular imaging with molecular biology and molecular medicine, there is a need to define the strategy and structure for perfecting the accuracy of functional images derived using PET. This also relates directly to how clinical research, diagnostic questions and challenges from the pharmaceutical industry are addressed. In order to exploit the sensitivity and specificity of PET, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach is imperative. The structure to provide this needs to been seen in the context of an institutional approach, collaborations within the academic and industrial sectors and the funding needed to meet the challenges of addressing difficult questions. (orig.)

  19. NASA IMAGESEER: NASA IMAGEs for Science, Education, Experimentation and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Grubb, Thomas G.; Milner, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    A number of web-accessible databases, including medical, military or other image data, offer universities and other users the ability to teach or research new Image Processing techniques on relevant and well-documented data. However, NASA images have traditionally been difficult for researchers to find, are often only available in hard-to-use formats, and do not always provide sufficient context and background for a non-NASA Scientist user to understand their content. The new IMAGESEER (IMAGEs for Science, Education, Experimentation and Research) database seeks to address these issues. Through a graphically-rich web site for browsing and downloading all of the selected datasets, benchmarks, and tutorials, IMAGESEER provides a widely accessible database of NASA-centric, easy to read, image data for teaching or validating new Image Processing algorithms. As such, IMAGESEER fosters collaboration between NASA and research organizations while simultaneously encouraging development of new and enhanced Image Processing algorithms. The first prototype includes a representative sampling of NASA multispectral and hyperspectral images from several Earth Science instruments, along with a few small tutorials. Image processing techniques are currently represented with cloud detection, image registration, and map cover/classification. For each technique, corresponding data are selected from four different geographic regions, i.e., mountains, urban, water coastal, and agriculture areas. Satellite images have been collected from several instruments - Landsat-5 and -7 Thematic Mappers, Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and Hyperion, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). After geo-registration, these images are available in simple common formats such as GeoTIFF and raw formats, along with associated benchmark data.

  20. Imaging Spectroscopy Instrumentation for Earth Science and Solar System Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert; Vane, Gregg

    2016-07-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method based in physics that is used to investigate questions and test hypotheses across an extraordinary range of scientific disciplines as well as for quantitative applications. In the late 1970's the concept for an instrument that measured spectra for every point in an image was conceived and proposed using the most advanced infrared detector array available at the time. The Airborne Imaging Spectrometer as developed and first flew in 1982. New discoveries were made with the first flights of this instrument. Since that time increasingly advanced airborne and space imaging spectrometer have been developed and deployed. These instruments have been used for science and applications on Earth and for science and exploration throughout the solar system. This talk presents the advances in imaging spectrometer instrumentation and key discoveries of imaging spectrometers for Earth and elsewhere in our solar system. It also presents examples of new imaging spectrometer architectures enabled by new detectors and spectrometer design forms as well as some of the science and applications objectives that can be pursued ranging 50 micron spatial imaging for planetary surface rovers to spectroscopic instruments measuring exoplanet composition and structure.

  1. Materials science with SR using x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some examples of applications of synchrotron radiation to materials science demonstrate the importance of microstructure information within structural as well as functional materials in order to control their properties and quality as designed for industrial purposes. To collect such information, x-ray imaging in quasi real time is required in either the microradiographic mode or the diffraction (in transmission) mode. New measurement technologies based on imaging are applied to polycrystalline materials, single crystal materials and multilayered device materials to illustrate what kind of synchrotron radiation facility is most desirable for materials science and engineering. (author)

  2. Imaging Sciences Workshop, Proceedings, November 15-16, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1995-11-01

    Welcome to the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.I.S., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. Many programs at LLNL use advanced signal and image processing techniques, and the Center was established to encourage the exchange of ideas and to promote collaboration by individuals from these programs. This Workshop is an opportunity for LLNL personnel and invited speakers from other organizations not only to present new work, but, perhaps more importantly, to discuss problems in an informal and friendly setting. This year marks the opening of the CASIS Reference Library in Building 272, and we encourage all attendees to stop by for a look and to make use of it in the future. The Technical Program covers a wide variety of applications at LLNL including physical systems for collecting data and processing techniques for recovering and enhancing images. We hope that you enjoy the presentations, and we encourage you to participate in the discussions. Thanks for attending.

  3. Two-photon probes for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Su Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-photon microscopy (TPM, which uses two photons oflower energy as the excitation source, is a vital tool in biologyand clinical science, due to its capacity to image deep insideintact tissues for a long period of time. To make TPM a moreversatile tool in biomedical research, we have developed avariety of two-photon probes for specific applications. In thismini review, we will briefly discuss two-photon probes forlipid rafts, lysosomes, mitochondria, and pH, and theirbiomedical applications. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(4: 188-194

  4. Cassini Imaging Science: Initial Results on Phoebe and Iapetus

    OpenAIRE

    Porco, C. C.; Dyudina, U.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem acquired high-resolution imaging data on the outer Saturnian moon, Phoebe, during Cassini's close flyby on 11 June 2004 and on Iapetus during a flyby on 31 December 2004. Phoebe has a heavily cratered and ancient surface, shows evidence of ice near the surface, has distinct layering of different materials, and has a mean density that is indicative of an ice-rock mixture. Iapetus's dark leading side (Cassini Regio) is ancient, heavily cratered terrain bise...

  5. How to display science since images have no mass

    CERN Document Server

    Chevrier, Joel; Marchi, Florence; Jones, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Education, science, in fact the whole society, extensively use images. Between us and the world are the visual displays. Screens, small and large, individual or not, are everywhere. Images are increasingly the 2D substrate of our virtual interaction with reality. However images will never support a complete representation of the reality. Three-dimensional representations will not change that. Images are primarily a spatial representation of our world dedicated to our sight. Key aspects such as energy and the associated forces are not spatially materialized. In classical physics, interaction description is based on Newton equations with trajectory and force as the dual central concepts. Images can in real time show all aspects of trajectories but not the associated dynamical aspects described by forces and energies. Contrary to the real world, the world of images opposes no constrain, nor resistance to our actions. Only the physical quantities, that do not contain mass in their dimension can be satisfactory re...

  6. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  7. Grants for Science Education 1997. Including Grants for Research Resources in the United States and for Biomedical Scientists Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD. Office of Grants and Special Programs.

    The data presented in this document provide information about those individuals and organizations that received funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1997. Following a description of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute programs, details on the funding of graduate science education, undergraduate biological sciences education,…

  8. Magnetosphere imager science definition team interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Johnson, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    For three decades, magnetospheric field and plasma measurements have been made by diverse instruments flown on spacecraft in may different orbits, widely separated in space and time, and under various solar and magnetospheric conditions. Scientists have used this information to piece together an intricate, yet incomplete view of the magnetosphere. A simultaneous global view, using various light wavelengths and energetic neutral atoms, could reveal exciting new data nd help explain complex magnetospheric processes, thus providing a clear picture of this region of space. This report documents the scientific rational for such a magnetospheric imaging mission and provides a mission concept for its implementation.

  9. Magnetosphere imager science definition team: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Gallagher, D. L.; Johnson, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    For three decades, magnetospheric field and plasma measurements have been made by diverse instruments flown on spacecraft in many different orbits, widely separated in space and time, and under various solar and magnetospheric conditions. Scientists have used this information to piece together an intricate, yet incomplete view of the magnetosphere. A simultaneous global view, using various light wavelengths and energetic neutral atoms, could reveal exciting new data and help explain complex magnetospheric processes, thus providing a clear picture of this region of space. This report summarizes the scientific rationale for such a magnetospheric imaging mission and outlines a mission concept for its implementation.

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 1, Biomedical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at PNL in FY 1986. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause health effects. The report is arranged to reflect the PNL research relative to OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health effects, concerns statistical and epidemiological methods for assessing health risks among nuclear workers. The next two sections, which contain reports of health-effects research in biological systems, include effects of radiation and of energy-related chemicals. The last section is related to medical applications of nuclear technology

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 1, Biomedical Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1988-02-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1987. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause health effects. The report is arranged to reflect PNL research relative to OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health effects, concerns statistical and epidemiological studies for assessing health risks. The next section, which contains reports of health-effects research in biological systems, includes research with radiation and chemicals. The last section is related to medical applications of nuclear technology.

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 1, Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1987-02-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at PNL in FY 1986. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause health effects. The report is arranged to reflect the PNL research relative to OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health effects, concerns statistical and epidemiological methods for assessing health risks among nuclear workers. The next two sections, which contain reports of health-effects research in biological systems, include effects of radiation and of energy-related chemicals. The last section is related to medical applications of nuclear technology.

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 1, Biomedical Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1989-06-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at PNL in FY 1988. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause health effects. The report is arranged to reflect PNL research relative to OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health effects, concerns statistical and epidemiological studies for assessing health risks. The next section, which contains reports of health-effects research in biological systems, includes research with radiation and chemicals.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1986-02-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at PNL in FY 1985 to develop information for a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of energy-related radiation and chemicals with man. Our continuing emphasis on decreasing the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates to man from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies supports the DOE goal of increasing and diversifying national energy resources and decreasing risks to human health. The report is arranged to reflect the PNL research relative to OHER programmatic needs. The first section concerns evaluation of possible health effects among nuclear workers. The next two sections, which contain reports of health-effects research in biological systems, include health effects of radiation and health effects of chemical mixtures. The last section is related to medical applications of nuclear technology.

  15. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at PNL in FY 1985 to develop information for a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of energy-related radiation and chemicals with man. Our continuing emphasis on decreasing the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates to man from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies supports the DOE goal of increasing and diversifying national energy resources and decreasing risks to human health. The report is arranged to reflect the PNL research relative to OHER programmatic needs. The first section concerns evaluation of possible health effects among nuclear workers. The next two sections, which contain reports of health-effects research in biological systems, include health effects of radiation and health effects of chemical mixtures. The last section is related to medical applications of nuclear technology

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 1, Biomedical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes progress on OHER biomedical and health-effects research conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1987. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health-effects risk estimates from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause health effects. The report is arranged to reflect PNL research relative to OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health effects, concerns statistical and epidemiological studies for assessing health risks. The next section, which contains reports of health-effects research in biological systems, includes research with radiation and chemicals. The last section is related to medical applications of nuclear technology

  17. Biomedical photonics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-01-01

    1.Biomedical Photonics: A Revolution at the Interface of Science and Technology, T. Vo-DinhPHOTONICS AND TISSUE OPTICS2.Optical Properties of Tissues, J. Mobley and T. Vo-Dinh3.Light-Tissue Interactions, V.V. Tuchin 4.Theoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion Tomography, S.J. Norton and T. Vo-DinhPHOTONIC DEVICES5.Laser Light in Biomedicine and the Life Sciences: From the Present to the Future, V.S. Letokhov6.Basic Instrumentation in Photonics, T. Vo-Dinh7.Optical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical Applications, I. Gannot and

  18. Towards Effective Biomedical Knowledge Discovery through Subject-Centric Semantic Integration of the Life-Science Information Space

    OpenAIRE

    Nenova, Karamfilka Krasimirova

    2009-01-01

    Within the last two decades, a vast knowledge gap has emerged between the generated volume of information and discovered novel knowledge in life-science. Accordingly to bridge this crucial gap, biological information has to be integrated and provided not only in a homogenous way, but also in the right context, which represents still a demanding knowledge management task. The objective of this thesis was the development of an integrative approach applicable for the life-science information spa...

  19. Computer literacy and E-learning perception in Cameroon: the case of Yaounde Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Bediang, Georges Wylfred; Stoll, Beat; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Klohn, Axel Maximo; Stuckelberger, Astrid; Nko'o, Samuel; Chastonay, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Health science education faces numerous challenges: assimilation of knowledge, management of increasing numbers of learners or changes in educational models and methodologies. With the emergence of e-learning, the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and Internet to improve teaching and learning in health science training institutions has become a crucial issue for low and middle income countries, including sub-Saharan Africa. In this perspective, the Faculty of ...

  20. Optical Waveguide Sensing and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Wojtek J; Tanev, Stoyan

    2008-01-01

    The book explores various aspects of existing and emerging fiber and waveguide optics sensing and imaging technologies including recent advances in nanobiophotonics. The focus is both on fundamental and applied research as well as on applications in civil engineering, biomedical sciences, environment, security and defence. The main goal of the multi-disciplinarry team of Editors was to provide an useful reference of state-of-the-art overviews covering a variety of complementary topics on the interface of engineering and biomedical sciences.

  1. Aquisição e manipulação de imagens por tomografia computadorizada da região maxilofacial visando à obtenção de protótipos biomédicos Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Meurer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O processo de construção de protótipos biomédicos surgiu da união das tecnologias de prototipagem rápida e do diagnóstico por imagens. No entanto, este processo é complexo, em função da necessária interação entre as ciências biomédicas e a engenharia. Para que bons resultados sejam obtidos, especial atenção deve ser dispensada à aquisição das imagens por tomografia computadorizada e à manipulação dessas imagens em softwares específicos. Este artigo apresenta a experiência multidisciplinar de um grupo de pesquisadores com a aquisição e a manipulação de imagens por tomografia computadorizada do complexo maxilofacial, visando à construção de protótipos biomédicos com finalidade cirúrgica.Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific softwares. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes.

  2. Diagnostic imaging over the last 50 years: research and development in medical imaging science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last 50 years, diagnostic imaging has grown from a state of infancy to a high level of maturity. Many new imaging modalities have been developed. However, modern medical imaging includes not only image production but also image processing, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), image recording and storage, and image transmission, most of which are included in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The content of this paper includes a short review of research and development in medical imaging science and technology, which covers (a) diagnostic imaging in the 1950s, (b) the importance of image quality and diagnostic performance, (c) MTF, Wiener spectrum, NEQ and DQE, (d) ROC analysis, (e) analogue imaging systems, (f) digital imaging systems, (g) image processing, (h) computer-aided diagnosis, (i) PACS, (j) 3D imaging and (k) future directions. Although some of the modalities are already very sophisticated, further improvements will be made in image quality for MRI, ultrasound and molecular imaging. The infrastructure of PACS is likely to be improved further in terms of its reliability, speed and capacity. However, CAD is currently still in its infancy, and is likely to be a subject of research for a long time. (review)

  3. Voyager 2 at neptune: imaging science results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B A; Soderblom, L A; Banfield, D; Barnet, C; Basilevsky, A T; Beebe, R F; Bollinger, K; Boyce, J M; Brahic, A; Briggs, G A; Brown, R H; Chyba, C; Collins, S A; Colvin, T; Cook, A F; Crisp, D; Croft, S K; Cruikshank, D; Cuzzi, J N; Danielson, G E; Davies, M E; De Jong, E; Dones, L; Godfrey, D; Goguen, J; Grenier, I; Haemmerle, V R; Hammel, H; Hansen, C J; Helfenstein, C P; Howell, C; Hunt, G E; Ingersoll, A P; Johnson, T V; Kargel, J; Kirk, R; Kuehn, D I; Limaye, S; Masursky, H; McEwen, A; Morrison, D; Owen, T; Owen, W; Pollack, J B; Porco, C C; Rages, K; Rogers, P; Rudy, D; Sagan, C; Schwartz, J; Shoemaker, E M; Showalter, M; Sicardy, B; Simonelli, D; Spencer, J; Sromovsky, L A; Stoker, C; Strom, R G; Suomi, V E; Synott, S P; Terrile, R J; Thomas, P; Thompson, W R; Verbiscer, A; Veverka, J

    1989-12-15

    Voyager 2 images of Neptune reveal a windy planet characterized by bright clouds of methane ice suspended in an exceptionally clear atmosphere above a lower deck of hydrogen sulfide or ammonia ices. Neptune's atmosphere is dominated by a large anticyclonic storm system that has been named the Great Dark Spot (GDS). About the same size as Earth in extent, the GDS bears both many similarities and some differences to the Great Red Spot of Jupiter. Neptune's zonal wind profile is remarkably similar to that of Uranus. Neptune has three major rings at radii of 42,000, 53,000, and 63,000 kilometers. The outer ring contains three higher density arc-like segments that were apparently responsible for most of the ground-based occultation events observed during the current decade. Like the rings of Uranus, the Neptune rings are composed of very dark material; unlike that of Uranus, the Neptune system is very dusty. Six new regular satellites were found, with dark surfaces and radii ranging from 200 to 25 kilometers. All lie inside the orbit of Triton and the inner four are located within the ring system. Triton is seen to be a differentiated body, with a radius of 1350 kilometers and a density of 2.1 grams per cubic centimeter; it exhibits clear evidence of early episodes of surface melting. A now rigid crust of what is probably water ice is overlain with a brilliant coating of nitrogen frost, slightly darkened and reddened with organic polymer material. Streaks of organic polymer suggest seasonal winds strong enough to move particles of micrometer size or larger, once they become airborne. At least two active plumes were seen, carrying dark material 8 kilometers above the surface before being transported downstream by high level winds. The plumes may be driven by solar heating and the subsequent violent vaporization of subsurface nitrogen. PMID:17755997

  4. Prototyping a Global Soft X-ray Imaging Instrument for Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chornay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Keller, John W.; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kuntz, Kip; Read, Any M.; Robertson, Ina P.; Sembay, Steve; Snowden, Steven; Thomas, Nick

    2012-01-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the FSA AXIOM mission

  5. Prototyping a Global Soft X-Ray Imaging Instrument for Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Carter, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Chornay, D. J.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Keller, J. W.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K.; Read, A. M.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S.; Snowden, S.; Thomas, N.

    2012-01-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobstereye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the ESA AXIOM mission.

  6. Biomedical Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jiang; ZHOU Yanling

    2011-01-01

    @@ Biomedical materials, biomaterials for short, is regarded as "any substance or combination of substances, synthetic or natural in origin, which can be used for any period of time, as a whole or as part of a system which treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ or function of the body" (Vonrecum & Laberge, 1995).Biomaterials can save lives, relieve suffering and enhance the quality of life for human being.

  7. Medicine's perception of reality - a split picture: critical reflections on apparent anomalies within the biomedical theory of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkengen, Anna Luise; Ekeland, Tor-Johan; Getz, Linn; Hetlevik, Irene; Schei, Edvin; Ulvestad, Elling; Vetlesen, Arne Johan

    2016-08-01

    Escalating costs, increasing multi-morbidity, medically unexplained health problems, complex risk, poly-pharmacy and antibiotic resistance can be regarded as artefacts of the traditional knowledge production in Western medicine, arising from its particular worldview. Our paper presents a historically grounded critical analysis of this view. The materialistic shift of Enlightenment philosophy, separating subjectivity from bodily matter, became normative for modern medicine and yielded astonishing results. The traditional dichotomies of mind/body and subjective/objective are, however, incompatible with modern biological theory. Medical knowledge ignores central tenets of human existence, notably the physiological impact of subjective experience, relationships, history and sociocultural contexts. Biomedicine will not succeed in resolving today's poorly understood health problems by doing 'more of the same'. We must acknowledge that health, sickness and bodily functioning are interwoven with human meaning-production, fundamentally personal and biographical. This implies that the biomedical framework, although having engendered 'success stories' like the era of antibiotics, needs to be radically revised. PMID:25967850

  8. MIST Final Report: Multi-sensor Imaging Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Michael A.; Medvick, Patricia A.; Foley, Michael G.; Foote, Harlan P.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Nuffer, Lisa L.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Renholds, Andrea S.

    2008-03-15

    The Multi-sensor Imaging Science and Technology (MIST) program was undertaken to advance exploitation tools for Long Wavelength Infra Red (LWIR) hyper-spectral imaging (HSI) analysis as applied to the discovery and quantification of nuclear proliferation signatures. The program focused on mitigating LWIR image background clutter to ease the analyst burden and enable a) faster more accurate analysis of large volumes of high clutter data, b) greater detection sensitivity of nuclear proliferation signatures (primarily released gasses) , and c) quantify confidence estimates of the signature materials detected. To this end the program investigated fundamental limits and logical modifications of the more traditional statistical discovery and analysis tools applied to hyperspectral imaging and other disciplines, developed and tested new software incorporating advanced mathematical tools and physics based analysis, and demonstrated the strength and weaknesses of the new codes on relevant hyperspectral data sets from various campaigns. This final report describes the content of the program and the outlines the significant results.

  9. A Review of Biomedical Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴珊珊

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the review of the biomedical composite materials.It introduces the operational definition,the classification of biomedical composite materials,and its constituents within itself.In this thesis,the last part presents the application of this kind of material.By writing this paper,I hope that people will get a comprehensive knowledge of the biomedical composite material and make further and deeper research in this material by which way to animate the material science industry.

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1: Biomedical Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, C.C. [ed.; Park, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    This report summarizes FY 1993 progress in biological and general life sciences research programs conducted for the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental REsearch (OHER) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This research provides knowledge of fundamental principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of exposure to energy-related radiation and chemicals. The Biological Research section contains reports of studies using laboratory animals, in vitro cell systems, and molecular biological systems. This research includes studies of the impact of radiation, radionuclides, and chemicals on biological responses at all levels of biological organization. The General Life Sciences Research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome program.

  11. The use of non-human primates in biomedical research: addressing the replacement impasse through the social dynamics of science

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson-Shore, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Non-human primate experimentation provokes passionate and opposing exchanges, particularly in the UK. This disagreement contributes to an impasse which in turn has prevented the exploration of the important question, if and how primate research could be ended. This project aims to support the examination of this question of impasse presenting data on how it might be overcome by providing a novel and challenging perspective using a multi-method approach, and insights from science and technolog...

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1, Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes progress in OHER biological research and general life sciences research programs conducted conducted at PNL in FLY 1991. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long- term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health risk estimates from existing and newly developed energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of the ways in which radiation and chemicals cause biological damage.

  13. Curricular impact on elementary students' images of science: Informational science text read aloud and scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tammy Colburn

    Understanding what influences images elementary students create about science has been researched for 30 years. This researcher sought to understand how the way science is presented in school influences images elementary students hold about science. The study's questions included: (1) What images of science do 2nd and 4th grade students portray through dialogue as they experience read alouds of informational science texts? (2) What images of science do 2nd and 4th grade students portray through dialogue as they experience science through inquiry with manipulative objects? and (3) What lifeworld resources influence students' images of science? Drawing upon symbolic interaction within a sociocultural framework, this qualitative study began during the summer of 2005 while students were enrolled in a summer program at their school and continued into the fall of 2007. Primary data included transcripts of students' dialogue during sessions, interviews, observations, field notes, demographic data, and assessment data. The researcher conducted 3 sessions with each of 4 groups of 3 students, spending 30 minutes observing, listening, and taping students in each session. All 12 students were interviewed after each of the 3 sessions on the same day resulting in approximately 18 hours of audiotapes. The researcher met with reading coaches, parents, and the selected students' teachers. Observations of the students and teachers in the context of their school environment were also made throughout the 2006-2007 regular school year. Emergent themes suggest that despite students using process skills in both sessions, the informational book reading sessions were ritualized such that the students viewed the experience as a reading exercise only and not being a scientist. In contrast, students in the manipulative sessions saw themselves as acting like or being scientists. Last, students in both sessions drew upon funds of knowledge accrued from sociocultural influences and home

  14. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Newman

    Full Text Available Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations.From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement.Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted.This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as

  15. Image Segmentation Analysis for NASA Earth Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    NASA collects large volumes of imagery data from satellite-based Earth remote sensing sensors. Nearly all of the computerized image analysis of this data is performed pixel-by-pixel, in which an algorithm is applied directly to individual image pixels. While this analysis approach is satisfactory in many cases, it is usually not fully effective in extracting the full information content from the high spatial resolution image data that s now becoming increasingly available from these sensors. The field of object-based image analysis (OBIA) has arisen in recent years to address the need to move beyond pixel-based analysis. The Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation (RHSEG) software developed by the author is being used to facilitate moving from pixel-based image analysis to OBIA. The key unique aspect of RHSEG is that it tightly intertwines region growing segmentation, which produces spatially connected region objects, with region object classification, which groups sets of region objects together into region classes. No other practical, operational image segmentation approach has this tight integration of region growing object finding with region classification This integration is made possible by the recursive, divide-and-conquer implementation utilized by RHSEG, in which the input image data is recursively subdivided until the image data sections are small enough to successfully mitigat the combinatorial explosion caused by the need to compute the dissimilarity between each pair of image pixels. RHSEG's tight integration of region growing object finding and region classification is what enables the high spatial fidelity of the image segmentations produced by RHSEG. This presentation will provide an overview of the RHSEG algorithm and describe how it is currently being used to support OBIA or Earth Science applications such as snow/ice mapping and finding archaeological sites from remotely sensed data.

  16. Optical Polarizationin Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tuchin, Valery V; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A

    2006-01-01

    Optical Polarization in Biomedical Applications introduces key developments in optical polarization methods for quantitative studies of tissues, while presenting the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium as a basis for the quantitative description of polarized light interaction with tissues. This theory uses the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters and predicts the polarization structure of multiple scattered optical fields. The backscattering polarization matrices (Jones matrix and Mueller matrix) important for noninvasive medical diagnostic are introduced. The text also describes a number of diagnostic techniques such as CW polarization imaging and spectroscopy, polarization microscopy and cytometry. As a new tool for medical diagnosis, optical coherent polarization tomography is analyzed. The monograph also covers a range of biomedical applications, among them cataract and glaucoma diagnostics, glucose sensing, and the detection of bacteria.

  17. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Tsakanikas

    Full Text Available Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing's outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE Office of Energy Research - Part 1: Biomedical Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER human health, biological, general life sciences, and medical applications research programs conducted at PNL in FY 1989. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health risk estimates from existing and developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause biological damage. The sequence of this report of PNL research reflects the OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health research, concerns statistical and epidemiological studies for assessing health risks. The next section contains reports of biological research in laboratory animals and in vitro cell systems, including research with radionuclides and chemicals. The general life sciences research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome research program, and the medical applications section summarizes commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities at DOE facilities. 6 refs., 50 figs., 35 tabs.

  19. Biomedical Social Science, Unit I: Health and Society. Basic Social Science Inquiry Into Health-Related Problems. Instructor's Manual. Revised Version, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    This guide presents lesson plans to accompany the lessons presented in the associated student text. The lessons are designed to teach social science concepts that enhance the prospective health care practitioner's ability to interact effectively with people and to anticipate the demands of health care delivery situations. An introduction to the…

  20. Integrated Biomaterials for Biomedical Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi

    2012-01-01

    This cutting edge book provides all the important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in materials in biomedical technology, especially structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, as well as the applications. The volume consists of 12 chapters written by acknowledged experts of the biomaterials field and covers a wide range of topics and applications.

  1. Radiological considerations for POE-1 photon shutters, collimators and beam stops of the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Juhachi; Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Smith, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    A study of radiation levels due to primary and secondary gas bremsstrahlung is carried out for the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The BMIT beamline, being built at present, is a major research and diagnostic tool for X-ray imaging and X-ray radiation therapy for animals and humans. For the BMIT beamline to be as flexible as possible, a movable tungsten collimator is designed. This can move vertically and assumes two positions; up and down. The BMIT beamline is, thus, able to perform two modes of operation: one white beam, the other monochromatic. Gas bremsstrahlung produced in the vacuum chamber propagates with synchrotron radiation and may enter the imaging or therapy hutch. In this study, the dose behind the collimator is investigated in each mode by assessing the energy deposition in a water phantom that surrounds the entire copper shutter-tungsten collimator unit. When estimating the dose, particular attention is given to the opening area of the collimator, since this passage leads to the imaging or therapy hutch. Also examined are the doses when a tungsten safety shutter is closed.

  2. Radiological considerations for POE-1 photon shutters, collimators and beam stops of the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of radiation levels due to primary and secondary gas bremsstrahlung is carried out for the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The BMIT beamline, being built at present, is a major research and diagnostic tool for X-ray imaging and X-ray radiation therapy for animals and humans. For the BMIT beamline to be as flexible as possible, a movable tungsten collimator is designed. This can move vertically and assumes two positions; up and down. The BMIT beamline is, thus, able to perform two modes of operation: one white beam, the other monochromatic. Gas bremsstrahlung produced in the vacuum chamber propagates with synchrotron radiation and may enter the imaging or therapy hutch. In this study, the dose behind the collimator is investigated in each mode by assessing the energy deposition in a water phantom that surrounds the entire copper shutter-tungsten collimator unit. When estimating the dose, particular attention is given to the opening area of the collimator, since this passage leads to the imaging or therapy hutch. Also examined are the doses when a tungsten safety shutter is closed

  3. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  4. REVIEW ARTICLE: Level Set Methods and Their Applications in Image Science

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Richard; Osher, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the question "What Level Set Methods can do for image science". We examine the scope of these techniques in image science, in particular in image segmentation, and introduce some relevant level set techinquies that are potnetially useful for this class of applications. We will show that image science demands multi-disciplinary knowledge and flexible but still robust methods. That is why the Level Set Method has become a thriving technique in th...

  5. Three-dimensional force microscope: A nanometric optical tracking and magnetic manipulation system for the biomedical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. K.; Cummings, J. R.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Weigle, C.; Bishop, G.; Taylor, R. M.; Davis, C. W.; Boucher, R. C.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2005-05-01

    We report here the development of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic force microscope for applying forces to and measuring responses of biological systems and materials. This instrument combines a conventional optical microscope with a free-floating or specifically bound magnetic bead used as a mechanical probe. Forces can be applied by the bead to microscopic structures of interest (specimens), while the reaction displacement of the bead is measured. This enables 3D mechanical manipulations and measurements to be performed on specimens in fluids. Force is generated by the magnetically permeable bead in reaction to fields produced by external electromagnets. The displacement is measured by interferometry using forward light scattered by the bead from a focused laser beam. The far-field interference pattern is imaged on a quadrant photodetector from which the 3D displacement can be computed over a limited range about the focal point. The bead and specimen are mounted on a 3D translation stage and feedback techniques are used to keep the bead within this limited range. We demonstrate the system with application to beads attached to cilia in human lung cell cultures.

  6. The Gemini Planet Imager: From Science to Design to Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macintosh, B; Graham, J R; Palmer, D; Doyon, R; Dunn, J; Gavel, D; Larkin, J; Oppenheimer, B; Saddlemyer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Wallace, J K; Bauman, B; Erickson, D; Marois, C; Poyneer, L; Soummer, R

    2008-07-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a facility instrument under construction for the 8-m Gemini South telescope. It combines a 1500 subaperture AO system using a MEMS deformable mirror, an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph, a high-accuracy IR interferometer calibration system, and a near-infrared integral field spectrograph to allow detection and characterization of self-luminous extrasolar planets at planet/star contrast ratios of 10{sup -7}. I will discuss the evolution from science requirements through modeling to the final detailed design, provide an overview of the subsystems and show models of the instrument's predicted performance.

  7. Planet Formation Imager (PFI): science vision and key requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Stefan; Ireland, Michael J; Duchene, Gaspard; Espaillat, Catherine; Hoenig, Sebastian; Juhasz, Attila; Mordasini, Chris; Olofsson, Johan; Paladini, Claudia; Stassun, Keivan; Turner, Neal; Vasisht, Gautam; Harries, Tim J; Bate, Matthew R; Gonzalez, Jean-Francois; Matter, Alexis; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Panic, Olja; Regaly, Zsolt; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Meru, Farzana; Wolf, Sebastian; Ilee, John; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Zhao, Ming; Kral, Quentin; Morlok, Andreas; Bonsor, Amy; Ciardi, David; Kane, Stephen R; Kratter, Kaitlin; Laughlin, Greg; Pepper, Joshua; Raymond, Sean; Labadie, Lucas; Nelson, Richard P; Weigelt, Gerd; Brummelaar, Theo ten; Pierens, Arnaud; Oudmaijer, Rene; Kley, Wilhelm; Pope, Benjamin; Jensen, Eric L N; Bayo, Amelia; Smith, Michael; Boyajian, Tabetha; Quiroga-Nunez, Luis Henry; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Chiavassa, Andrea; Gallenne, Alexandre; Reynold, Mark; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Wittkowski, Markus; Millour, Florentin; Gandhi, Poshak; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Herrero, Almudena Alonso; Packham, Chris; Kishimoto, Makoto; Tristram, Konrad R W; Pott, Joerg-Uwe; Surdej, Jean; Buscher, David; Haniff, Chris; Lacour, Sylvestre; Petrov, Romain; Ridgway, Steve; Tuthill, Peter; van Belle, Gerard; Armitage, Phil; Baruteau, Clement; Benisty, Myriam; Bitsch, Bertram; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Pinte, Christophe; Masset, Frederic; Rosotti, Giovanni P

    2016-01-01

    The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) project aims to provide a strong scientific vision for ground-based optical astronomy beyond the upcoming generation of Extremely Large Telescopes. We make the case that a breakthrough in angular resolution imaging capabilities is required in order to unravel the processes involved in planet formation. PFI will be optimised to provide a complete census of the protoplanet population at all stellocentric radii and over the age range from 0.1 to about 100 Myr. Within this age period, planetary systems undergo dramatic changes and the final architecture of planetary systems is determined. Our goal is to study the planetary birth on the natural spatial scale where the material is assembled, which is the "Hill Sphere" of the forming planet, and to characterise the protoplanetary cores by measuring their masses and physical properties. Our science working group has investigated the observational characteristics of these young protoplanets as well as the migration mechanisms that mig...

  8. The Mars Science Laboratory Mars Hand Lens Imager (MSL MAHLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minitti, Michelle E.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Msl Mastcam/Mahli/Mardi Team

    2007-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, slated to begin Martian surface operations in 2010, seeks to explore the past and present habitability of a yet-to-be-selected site on Mars. Armed with a suite of instruments capable of spectral, chemical, mineralogical, organic and isotopic analyses, MSL will comprehensively study the Martian atmosphere and rocks and soils on the Martian surface. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), the "geologist's handlens" for MSL, supports habitability studies through aiding the selection of samples for in-depth analysis and placing such samples in a geologic and geomorphic context. More broadly, the goal of MAHLI is to examine the texture, morphology, structure, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of rocks, soils, frost and ice at the microscale. MAHLI will achieve this objective using capabilities new to Martian cameras including a CCD with a Bayer Pattern Filter coupled with a focusable lens. The Bayer Pattern Filter produces RGB color images akin to those taken by the standard commercial digital camera. Placement of MAHLI by the MSL Robotic Arm (RA) at a particular distance from the sample of interest and MAHLI's internal focus mechanism combine to achieve a desired image resolution. At its closest placement (22.5 mm), MAHLI has 9 µm/pixel resolution. In practice, RA placement may be sufficiently uncertain that 9 µm/pixel will not be achieved regularly; however, resolutions in the 12-15 µm/pixel range are expected for typical high resolution images. Depending on the target distance and its surface relief, the target may not be in focus over the entire image. For those cases, MAHLI acquires a series of images taken at a range of focus positions that bracket the location of best focus. MAHLI's onboard software is capable of merging this stack of images, into a single best-focus image. MAHLI can image in natural illumination but it also possesses four, white light emitting diodes (LED) for illumination of samples in shadow or at

  9. Environmental/Biomedical Terminology Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffstetler, J.K.; Dailey, N.S.; Rickert, L.W.; Chilton, B.D.

    1976-12-01

    The Information Center Complex (ICC), a centrally administered group of information centers, provides information support to environmental and biomedical research groups and others within and outside Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In-house data base building and development of specialized document collections are important elements of the ongoing activities of these centers. ICC groups must be concerned with language which will adequately classify and insure retrievability of document records. Language control problems are compounded when the complexity of modern scientific problem solving demands an interdisciplinary approach. Although there are several word lists, indexes, and thesauri specific to various scientific disciplines usually grouped as Environmental Sciences, no single generally recognized authority can be used as a guide to the terminology of all environmental science. If biomedical terminology for the description of research on environmental effects is also needed, the problem becomes even more complex. The building of a word list which can be used as a general guide to the environmental/biomedical sciences has been a continuing activity of the Information Center Complex. This activity resulted in the publication of the Environmental Biomedical Terminology Index (EBTI).

  10. Environmental/Biomedical Terminology Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Information Center Complex (ICC), a centrally administered group of information centers, provides information support to environmental and biomedical research groups and others within and outside Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In-house data base building and development of specialized document collections are important elements of the ongoing activities of these centers. ICC groups must be concerned with language which will adequately classify and insure retrievability of document records. Language control problems are compounded when the complexity of modern scientific problem solving demands an interdisciplinary approach. Although there are several word lists, indexes, and thesauri specific to various scientific disciplines usually grouped as Environmental Sciences, no single generally recognized authority can be used as a guide to the terminology of all environmental science. If biomedical terminology for the description of research on environmental effects is also needed, the problem becomes even more complex. The building of a word list which can be used as a general guide to the environmental/biomedical sciences has been a continuing activity of the Information Center Complex. This activity resulted in the publication of the Environmental Biomedical Terminology Index

  11. Main Achievements 2003-2004 - Interdisciplinary Research - Applications of nuclear methods to biomedical physics, environmental biology, environmental physics, and medical physics - Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomedical studies have been carried out at the IFJ PAN using magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to develop new methods of noninvasive diagnostics (e.g. spinal cord injuries using diffusion tensor imaging). It has been shown for the first time that in the human cervical spinal cord at high gradient factor b-values, up to 7000 s/mm2, diffusion is biexponential. The slow diffusion component could be useful in diagnosing White Matter fiber pathology. The first experiment of simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging fMRI in the rat spinal cord and brain has also been performed. Functional activity was evoked by electrical stimulation of the rat's forepaw. The time-course of the activated voxels from the brain and spinal cord were analysed and compared. High correlation (p≤0.001) of the detected activity to the applied stimulation was demonstrated. This experiment, carried out in collaboration with the Institute for Biodiagnostics in Clagary, should be extended into clinical applications in the human central nervous system

  12. The OPFOS microscopy family: High-resolution optical-sectioning of biomedical specimens

    CERN Document Server

    Buytaert, Jan A N; Adriaens, Dominique; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2011-01-01

    We report on the recently emerging (Laser) Light Sheet based Fluorescence Microscopy field (LSFM). The techniques used in this field allow to study and visualize biomedical objects non-destructively in high-resolution through virtual optical sectioning with sheets of laser light. Fluorescence originating in the cross section of the sheet and sample is recorded orthogonally with a camera. In this paper, the first implementation of LSFM to image biomedical tissue in three dimensions - Orthogonal-Plane Fluorescence Optical Sectioning microscopy (OPFOS) - is discussed. Since then many similar and derived methods have surfaced (SPIM, Ultramicroscopy, HR-OPFOS, mSPIM, DSLM, TSLIM...) which we all briefly discuss. All these optical sectioning methods create images showing histological detail. We illustrate the applicability of LSFM on several specimen types with application in biomedical and life sciences.

  13. All Sky Imager Network for Science and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, A.; Kendall, E. A.; Zalles, D. R.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Kaltenbacher, E.

    2012-12-01

    A new all sky imager network for space weather monitoring and education outreach has been developed by SRI International. The goal of this program is to install sensitive, low-light all-sky imagers across the continental United States to observe upper atmospheric airglow and aurora in near real time. While aurora borealis is often associated with the high latitudes, during intense geomagnetic storms it can extend well into the continental United States latitudes. Observing auroral processes is instrumental in understanding the space weather, especially in the times of increasing societal dependence on space-based technologies. Under the THEMIS satellite program, Canada has installed a network of all-sky imagers across their country to monitor aurora in real-time. However, no comparable effort exists in the United States. Knowledge of the aurora and airglow across the entire United States in near real time would allow scientists to quickly assess the impact of a geomagnetic storm in concert with data from GPS networks, ionosondes, radars, and magnetometers. What makes this effort unique is that we intend to deploy these imagers at high schools across the country. Selected high-schools will necessarily be in rural areas as the instrument requires dark night skies. At the commencement of the school year, we plan to give an introductory seminar on space weather at each of these schools. Science nuggets developed by SRI International in collaboration with the Center for GeoSpace Studies and the Center for Technology in Learning will be available for high school teachers to use during their science classes. Teachers can use these nuggets as desired within their own curricula. We intend to develop a comprehensive web-based interface that will be available for students and scientific community alike to observe data across the network in near real time and also to guide students towards complementary space weather data sets. This interface will show the real time extent of

  14. Do physicians make their articles readable for their blind or low-vision patients? An analysis of current image processing practices in biomedical journals from the point of view of accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendiani, Bruno; Ribera, Mireia; Garcia, Roberto; Termens, Miquel

    2014-08-01

    Visual content in biomedical academic papers is a growing source of critical information, but it is not always fully readable for people with visual impairments. We aimed to assess current image processing practices, accessibility policies, and submission policies in a sample of 12 highly cited biomedical journals. We manually checked the application of text-based alternative image descriptions for every image in 12 articles (one for each journal). We determined whether the journals claimed to follow an accessibility policy and we reviewed their submission policy and their guidelines related to the visual content. We identified important features concerning the processing of images and the characteristics of the visual and the retrieval options of visual content offered by the publishers. The evaluation shows that the actual practices of textual image description in highly cited biomedical journals do not follow general guidelines on accessibility. The images within the articles analyzed lack alternative descriptions or have uninformative descriptions, even in the case of journals claiming to follow an accessibility policy. Consequently, the visual information of scientific articles is not accessible to people with severe visual disabilities. Instructions on image submission are heterogeneous and a declaration of accessibility guidelines was only found in two thirds of the sample of journals, with one third not explicitly following any accessibility policy, although they are required to by law. PMID:24504831

  15. A study on knowledge and practice regarding biomedical waste management among staff nurses and nursing students of Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi

    OpenAIRE

    Shamim Haider; Sneha Kumari; Vivek Kashyap; Shalini Sunderam; Shashi Bhushan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hospitals are the centre of cure and also the important centres of infectious waste generation. Effective management of Biomedical Waste (BMW) is not only a legal necessity but also a social responsibility. Aims and Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practice in managing the biomedical wastes among nursing staff and student nurses in RIMS, Ranchi. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at RIMS, Ranchi from Oct 2013 to March 2014 (6 months). It was a descriptive, hospi...

  16. Learning in a Belgian Hospital: Conditions of biomedical innovation in the Sector of Health Sciences at the Université catholique de Louvain.

    OpenAIRE

    Moyson, Stéphane; Aubin, David

    2009-01-01

    markdownabstract__INTRODUCTION __ This report is part of “Medlearn”. Medlearn is a research project coordinated by Prof. E. MONTPETIT (Université de Montréal, Canada), in collaboration with Prof. D. AUBIN (Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium) and Prof. M. ATKINSON (University of Saskatchewan, Canada). Academic Medical Centers (AMCs) are often at the center of biomedical innovation. The objective of this research project is to better understand the conditions of biomedical innovation wit...

  17. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) during MRO's Primary Science Phase (PSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Banks, M.E.; Baugh, N.; Becker, K.; Boyd, A.; Bergstrom, J.W.; Beyer, R.A.; Bortolini, E.; Bridges, N.T.; Byrne, S.; Castalia, B.; Chuang, F.C.; Crumpler, L.S.; Daubar, I.; Davatzes, A.K.; Deardorff, D.G.; DeJong, A.; Alan, Delamere W.; Dobrea, E.N.; Dundas, C.M.; Eliason, E.M.; Espinoza, Y.; Fennema, A.; Fishbaugh, K.E.; Forrester, T.; Geissler, P.E.; Grant, J. A.; Griffes, J.L.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Gulick, V.C.; Hansen, C.J.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Heyd, R.; Jaeger, W.L.; Jones, D.; Kanefsky, B.; Keszthelyi, L.; King, R.; Kirk, R.L.; Kolb, K.J.; Lasco, J.; Lefort, A.; Leis, R.; Lewis, K.W.; Martinez-Alonso, S.; Mattson, S.; McArthur, G.; Mellon, M.T.; Metz, J.M.; Milazzo, M.P.; Milliken, R.E.; Motazedian, T.; Okubo, C.H.; Ortiz, A.; Philippoff, A.J.; Plassmann, J.; Polit, A.; Russell, P.S.; Schaller, C.; Searls, M.L.; Spriggs, T.; Squyres, S. W.; Tarr, S.; Thomas, N.; Thomson, B.J.; Tornabene, L.L.; Van Houten, C.; Verba, C.; Weitz, C.M.; Wray, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) acquired 8 terapixels of data in 9137 images of Mars between October 2006 and December 2008, covering ???0.55% of the surface. Images are typically 5-6 km wide with 3-color coverage over the central 20% of the swath, and their scales usually range from 25 to 60 cm/pixel. Nine hundred and sixty stereo pairs were acquired and more than 50 digital terrain models (DTMs) completed; these data have led to some of the most significant science results. New methods to measure and correct distortions due to pointing jitter facilitate topographic and change-detection studies at sub-meter scales. Recent results address Noachian bedrock stratigraphy, fluvially deposited fans in craters and in or near Valles Marineris, groundwater flow in fractures and porous media, quasi-periodic layering in polar and non-polar deposits, tectonic history of west Candor Chasma, geometry of clay-rich deposits near and within Mawrth Vallis, dynamics of flood lavas in the Cerberus Palus region, evidence for pyroclastic deposits, columnar jointing in lava flows, recent collapse pits, evidence for water in well-preserved impact craters, newly discovered large rayed craters, and glacial and periglacial processes. Of particular interest are ongoing processes such as those driven by the wind, impact cratering, avalanches of dust and/or frost, relatively bright deposits on steep gullied slopes, and the dynamic seasonal processes over polar regions. HiRISE has acquired hundreds of large images of past, present and potential future landing sites and has contributed to scientific and engineering studies of those sites. Warming the focal-plane electronics prior to imaging has mitigated an instrument anomaly that produces bad data under cold operating conditions. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem observations of Titan's south polar cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. A.; Del Genio, A. D.; Barbara, J. M.; Toledo, D.; Lavvas, P.; Rannou, P.; Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.

    2016-05-01

    In May of 2012 images of Titan obtained by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) showed a newly-formed cloud patch near the southern pole. The cloud has unusual morphology and texture suggesting that it is formed by condensation at an altitude much higher than expected for any of the known organics in Titan's atmosphere. We measured the altitude to be 300 ± 10 km from images when the feature was on the limb. Limb images suggest that the initial stages of the formation began in late 2011. It was just visible in images obtained in 2014 but is not expected to be visible in the future due to enveloping darkness as the season progresses. The feature has a slightly different color than the surrounding haze. Its optical thickness is near 2 at 889 nm wavelength and the particle imaginary refractive index must be less than 5 × 10-4 at that wavelength. Wind vectors derived from a time series show that it is rotating about a center offset by 4.5° from Titan's solid-body spin axis, consistent with that found from the temperature field by Achterberg et al. (Achterberg, R.K., Conrath, B.J., Gierasch, P.J., Flasar, F.M., Nixon, C.A. [2008a]. Icarus 197, 549-555) and subsequent measurements. The feature rotates at an angular velocity near the rate expected for transport of angular momentum from the low latitudes to the pole. The clumpy texture of the feature resembles that of terrestrial cloud fields undergoing open cell convection, an unusual configuration initiated by downwelling.

  19. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: the science case

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, Elizabeth J; Moore, Anna M; Wright, Shelley A; Crampton, David; Simard, Luc; Macintosh, Bruce; Cote, Patrick; Barth, Aaron J; Ghez, Andrea M; Lu, Jessica R; Davidge, T J; Law, David R

    2010-01-01

    The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is a first-light instrument being designed for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is a combination of an imager that will cover a 16.4" field of view at the diffraction limit of TMT (4 mas sampling), and an integral field unit spectrograph that will sample objects at 4-50 mas scales. IRIS will open up new areas of observational parameter space, allowing major progress in diverse fields of astronomy. We present the science case and resulting requirements for the performance of IRIS. Ultimately, the spectrograph will enable very well-resolved and sensitive studies of the kinematics and internal chemical abundances of high-redshift galaxies, shedding light on many scenarios for the evolution of galaxies at early times. With unprecedented imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets, IRIS will allow detailed exploration of a range of planetary systems that are inaccessible with current technology. By revealing details about resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies, it...

  20. Reconstruction of color biomedical images by means of quaternion generic Jacobi-Fourier moments in the framework of polar pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Bello, César; Padilla-Vivanco, Alfonso; Toxqui-Quitl, Carina; Báez-Rojas, José Javier

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the quaternion generic Jacobi-Fourier moments (QGJFMs) for color image description is presented. In order to reach numerical stability, a recursive approach is used during the computation of the generic Jacobi radial polynomials. Moreover, a search criterion is performed to establish the best values for the parameters [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] of the radial Jacobi polynomial families. Additionally, a polar pixel approach is taken into account to increase the numerical accuracy in the calculation of the QGJFMs. To prove the mathematical theory, some color images from optical microscopy and human retina are used. Experiments and results about color image reconstruction are presented. PMID:27014716

  1. Material Science Image Analysis using Quant-CT in ImageJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Bianchi, Andrea G. C.; DeBianchi, Christina; Bethel, E. Wes

    2015-01-05

    We introduce a computational analysis workflow to access properties of solid objects using nondestructive imaging techniques that rely on X-ray imaging. The goal is to process and quantify structures from material science sample cross sections. The algorithms can differentiate the porous media (high density material) from the void (background, low density media) using a Boolean classifier, so that we can extract features, such as volume, surface area, granularity spectrum, porosity, among others. Our workflow, Quant-CT, leverages several algorithms from ImageJ, such as statistical region merging and 3D object counter. It also includes schemes for bilateral filtering that use a 3D kernel, for parallel processing of sub-stacks, and for handling over-segmentation using histogram similarities. The Quant-CT supports fast user interaction, providing the ability for the user to train the algorithm via subsamples to feed its core algorithms with automated parameterization. Quant-CT plugin is currently available for testing by personnel at the Advanced Light Source and Earth Sciences Divisions and Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), LBNL, as part of their research on porous materials. The goal is to understand the processes in fluid-rock systems for the geologic sequestration of CO2, and to develop technology for the safe storage of CO2 in deep subsurface rock formations. We describe our implementation, and demonstrate our plugin on porous material images. This paper targets end-users, with relevant information for developers to extend its current capabilities.

  2. H-ATLAS: PACS imaging for the Science Demonstration Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibar, Edo; Ivison, R. J.; Cava, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Buttiglione, S.; Temi, P.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Leeuw, L.; Baes, M.; Rigby, E.; Verma, A.; Serjeant, S.; Müller, T.; Auld, R.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Maddox, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Smith, D.; de Zotti, G.; Vaccari, M.; Hopwood, R.; Cooray, A.; Burgarella, D.; Jarvis, M.

    2010-11-01

    We describe the reduction of data taken with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory in the Science Demonstration Phase of the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey, specifically data obtained for a 4 × 4 deg2 region using Herschel's fast-scan (60arcsecs-1) parallel mode. We describe in detail a pipeline for data reduction using customized procedures within HIPE from data retrieval to the production of science-quality images. We found that the standard procedure for removing cosmic ray glitches also removed parts of bright sources and so implemented an effective two-stage process to minimize these problems. The pronounced 1/f noise is removed from the timelines using 3.4- and 2.5-arcmin boxcar high-pass filters at 100 and 160μm. Empirical measurements of the point spread function (PSF) are used to determine the encircled energy fraction as a function of aperture size. For the 100- and 160-μm bands, the effective PSFs are ~9 and ~13arcsec (FWHM), and the 90-per cent encircled energy radii are 13 and 18arcsec. Astrometric accuracy is good to advertised prior to launch. For a pair of cross-scans, the 5σ point-source sensitivities are 125-165mJy for 9-13 arcsec radius apertures at 100μm and 150-240mJy for 13-18 arcsec radius apertures at 160μm.

  3. H-ATLAS: PACS imaging for the Science Demonstration Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Ibar, Edo; Cava, A; Rodighiero, G; Buttiglione, S; Temi, P; Frayer, D; Fritz, J; Leeuw, L; Baes, M; Rigby, E; Verma, A; Serjeant, S; Muller, T; Auld, R; Dariush, A; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Maddox, S; Panuzzo, P; Pascale, E; Pohlen, M; Smith, D; de Zotti, G; Vaccari, M; Hopwood, R; Cooray, A; Burgarella, D; Jarvis, M

    2010-01-01

    We describe the reduction of data taken with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory in the Science Demonstration Phase of the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey, specifically data obtained for a 4x4-deg^2 region using Herschel's fast-scan (60 arcsec/s) parallel mode. We describe in detail a pipeline for data reduction using customised procedures within HIPE from data retrieval to the production of science-quality images. We found that the standard procedure for removing Cosmic-Ray glitches also removed parts of bright sources and so implemented an effective two-stage process to minimise these problems. The pronounced 1/f noise is removed from the timelines using 3.4- and 2.5-arcmin boxcar high-pass filters at 100 and 160-um. Empirical measurements of the point-spread function (PSF) are used to determine the encircled energy fraction as a function of aperture size. For the 100- and 160-um bands, the effective PSFs are ~9 and ~13 arcsec (FWHM), and the 90-per-cent encircled energy radii are 13...

  4. Full-Field and Single-Shot Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography: A Novel Technique for Biomedical Imaging Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hrebesh Molly Subhash

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction, optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology has advanced dramatically in various field of both clinical and fundamental research. Full-field and Single-shot full-field OCT (FF-OCT and SS-FF-OCT) are alternative OCT concepts, which aims to improve the image acquisition speed and to simplify the optical setup of conventional point-scan OCT by realizing direct line field or full-field sample imaging onto an array or line detector such as CCD or CMOS camera. FF-OCT and ...

  5. Spectral domain interferometry: A high-sensitivity, high-speed approach to quantitative phase imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Ruibo

    2015-01-01

    Many biological specimens are transparent and in weak intensity contrast, making it invisible using conventional bright field microscopes. Therefore, the phase-based optical microscopy techniques play important roles in the development of the modern biomedical science. Furthermore, the ability to achieve quantitative phase measurement of the tiny structures of biomedical specimens is of great importance for many biomedical applications. Thus, quantitative phase imaging becomes an important te...

  6. Intercomparison of EMCCD- and sCMOS-based imaging spectrometers for biomedical applications in low-light conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Palacios, J.; Randeberg, L. L.

    2012-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging provides means for characterizing large biological samples with microscopic spatial resolution and a narrow spectral sampling interval. However, this approach requires having a measurable light signal in each spectral band. Overcoming the limitations imposed by working with biological samples requires the use of a highly sensitive sensor to detect weak signals. For this study we have built and compared the performance of two imaging spectrometers using optimized for low light environments: an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) and a scientific CMOS (sCMOS). Both systems have been designed to lower the risk of damaging photosensitive samples, delay the bleaching of fluorophores and detect weak fluorescence signals. The cameras work within the VNIR spectral region (400 nm - 900 nm) with a spectral sampling lower than 4 nm. The produced images have scene pixel sizes smaller than 25 μm and a field of view larger than 25 mm. The systems have been tested side to side measuring the diffusion front of a fluorescent tag in samples of porcine skin in challenging light conditions. The study aimed to show the advantages and limitations of each approach. Preliminary results show good performance of the EMCCD for fluorescence applications, whereas more experimental results are needed to be able to conclude on the performance of the sCMOS sensor. However, the sCMOS appears promising for imaging scenes with high dynamics in low light settings.

  7. The Science Case for the Planet Formation Imager (PFI)

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Stefan; Harries, Tim; Dong, Ruobing; Bate, Matthew; Whitney, Barbara; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Buscher, David; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Haniff, Chris; Ireland, Mike; Labadie, Lucas; Lacour, Sylvestre; Petrov, Romain; Ridgway, Steve; Surdej, Jean; Brummelaar, Theo ten; Tuthill, Peter; van Belle, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work has already been, and is still being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project (PFI) has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planet-hosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case...

  8. The science case for the Planet Formation Imager (PFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Stefan; Monnier, John; Harries, Tim; Dong, Ruobing; Bate, Matthew; Whitney, Barbara; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Buscher, David; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Haniff, Chris; Ireland, Mike; Labadie, Lucas; Lacour, Sylvestre; Petrov, Romain; Ridgway, Steve; Surdej, Jean; ten Brummelaar, Theo; Tuthill, Peter; van Belle, Gerard

    2014-07-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work has already been, and is still being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project (PFI; http://www.planetformationimager.org) has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planethosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case of PFI. For this purpose, we briefly review our knowledge about the planet-formation process and discuss recent observational results that have been obtained on the class of transition disks. Spectro-photometric and multi-wavelength interferometric studies of these systems revealed the presence of extended gaps and complex density inhomogeneities that might be triggered by orbiting planets. We present detailed 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of disks with single and multiple embedded planets, from which we compute synthetic images at near-infrared, mid-infrared, far-infrared, and sub-millimeter wavelengths, enabling a direct comparison of the signatures that are detectable with PFI and complementary facilities such as ALMA. From these simulations, we derive some preliminary specifications that will guide the array design and technology roadmap of the facility.

  9. The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem: Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument was designed for long-range, high resolution imaging of Saturn and its system of rings and moons. It consists of two cameras, a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC, 2000 mm focal length) and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC, 200 mm focal length). The NAC has sensitivity from 200 nm to 1100 nm. The WAC is sensitive from 350 nm to 1100 nm. Among the mission highlights thus far for ISS have been discoveries of particulate plumes from Enceladus, details of surface topography along the 'tiger stripes', the discovery of an equatorial ridge on Iapetus, detailed images of small inner moons and distant moons Phoebe and Hyperion, features in Saturn's rings including perturbed edges near embedded moons, 'propellers', ephemeral clumps, and evidence for impacts in the rings and free-oscillation modes in Saturn's interior. The camera documented the aftermath of a methane/ethane 'rain' storm on Titan as well as seasonal behavior in the detached haze and visible airglow generated by magnetospheric plasma. The cameras documented the formation and evolution of a giant storm on Saturn, lightning from storms on Saturn, and determined that eddies are powering Saturn's zonal jets. In the F-ring and Proximal orbits ISS will obtain even better resolution on the rings, planet and inner moons.

  10. Lab-on-a-chip techniques, circuits, and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghallab, Yehya H

    2010-01-01

    Here's a groundbreaking book that introduces and discusses the important aspects of lab-on-a-chip, including the practical techniques, circuits, microsystems, and key applications in the biomedical, biology, and life science fields. Moreover, this volume covers ongoing research in lab-on-a-chip integration and electric field imaging. Presented in a clear and logical manner, the book provides you with the fundamental underpinnings of lab-on-a-chip, presents practical results, and brings you up to date with state-of-the-art research in the field. This unique resource is supported with over 160 i

  11. Statistics in biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Manteiga, Wenceslao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The discipline of biostatistics is nowadays a fundamental scientific component of biomedical, public health and health services research. Traditional and emerging areas of application include clinical trials research, observational studies, physiology, imaging, and genomics. The present article reviews the current situation of biostatistics, considering the statistical methods traditionally used in biomedical research, as well as the ongoing development of new methods in response to the new problems arising in medicine. Clearly, the successful application of statistics in biomedical research requires appropriate training of biostatisticians. This training should aim to give due consideration to emerging new areas of statistics, while at the same time retaining full coverage of the fundamentals of statistical theory and methodology. In addition, it is important that students of biostatistics receive formal training in relevant biomedical disciplines, such as epidemiology, clinical trials, molecular biology, genetics, and neuroscience.La Bioestadística es hoy en día una componente científica fundamental de la investigación en Biomedicina, salud pública y servicios de salud. Las áreas tradicionales y emergentes de aplicación incluyen ensayos clínicos, estudios observacionales, fisología, imágenes, y genómica. Este artículo repasa la situación actual de la Bioestadística, considerando los métodos estadísticos usados tradicionalmente en investigación biomédica, así como los recientes desarrollos de nuevos métodos, para dar respuesta a los nuevos problemas que surgen en Medicina. Obviamente, la aplicación fructífera de la estadística en investigación biomédica exige una formación adecuada de los bioestadísticos, formación que debería tener en cuenta las áreas emergentes en estadística, cubriendo al mismo tiempo los fundamentos de la teoría estadística y su metodología. Es importante, además, que los estudiantes de

  12. Biomedical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wriggers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    During the last years computational methods lead to new approaches that can be applied within medical practice. Based on the tremendous advances in medical imaging and high-performance computing, virtual testing is able to help in medical decision processes or implant designs. Current challenges in medicine and engineering are related to the application of computational methods to clinical medicine and the study of biological systems at different scales. Additionally manufacturers will be able to use computational tools and methods to predict the performance of their medical devices in virtual patients. The physical and animal testing procedures could be reduced by virtual prototyping of medical devices. Here simulations can enhance the performance of alternate device designs for a range of virtual patients. This will lead to a refinement of designs and to safer products. This book summarizes different aspects of approaches to enhance function, production, initialization and complications of different types o...

  13. Biomedical engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Engineering Fundamentals, the first volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in physiological systems, biomechanics, biomaterials, bioelectric phenomena, and neuroengineering. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including cardia

  14. Images of Science Linked to Labwork: A Survey of Secondary School and University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sere, Marie-Genevieve; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Manuel; Gallegos, Jose A.; Gonzalez-Garcia, Francisco; De Manuel, Esteban; Perales, F. Javier; Leach, John

    2001-01-01

    Presents findings of the images of science drawn upon in laboratory work by upper secondary and university students in academic streams with a science focus. Questions required students to comment on laboratory investigations carried out by research scientists or science students. Shows that students' reasoning has an epistemological and an…

  15. Biomedical wellness challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, John F.

    2012-06-01

    The mission of ONR's Human and Bioengineered Systems Division is to direct, plan, foster, and encourage Science and Technology in cognitive science, computational neuroscience, bioscience and bio-mimetic technology, social/organizational science, training, human factors, and decision making as related to future Naval needs. This paper highlights current programs that contribute to future biomedical wellness needs in context of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. ONR supports fundamental research and related technology demonstrations in several related areas, including biometrics and human activity recognition; cognitive sciences; computational neurosciences and bio-robotics; human factors, organizational design and decision research; social, cultural and behavioral modeling; and training, education and human performance. In context of a possible future with automated casualty evacuation, elements of current science and technology programs are illustrated.

  16. Brucellar spondylitis: evaluation by NMR imaging, CT and biomedical radiography - a case report; Espondilite por brucelose - relato de um caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Juliana C. de; Marins, Jose Luiz C.; Pereira, Rubens Marcondes [Centro Radiologico, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    1999-03-01

    A 50-year-old white woman presented with a 4-month history of low pain with lower extremity irradiation. Image studies showed inflammatory changes of the vertebral bodies and invertebral disk at L3-L4 level. Considering she had no previous spinal surgery, negative tests for tuberculosis and a positive history of exposure to brucellosis, further studies were done, and the serologic tests were positive for brucellar antibodies. Follow-up studies within the first two months demonstrated the progressive spinal changes in brucellar spondylitis. (author)

  17. Applications of computational intelligence in biomedical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Majernik, Jaroslav; Pancerz, Krzysztof; Zaitseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This book presents latest results and selected applications of Computational Intelligence in Biomedical Technologies. Most of contributions deal with problems of Biomedical and Medical Informatics, ranging from theoretical considerations to practical applications. Various aspects of development methods and algorithms in Biomedical and Medical Informatics as well as Algorithms for medical image processing, modeling methods are discussed. Individual contributions also cover medical decision making support, estimation of risks of treatments, reliability of medical systems, problems of practical clinical applications and many other topics  This book is intended for scientists interested in problems of Biomedical Technologies, for researchers and academic staff, for all dealing with Biomedical and Medical Informatics, as well as PhD students. Useful information is offered also to IT companies, developers of equipment and/or software for medicine and medical professionals.  .

  18. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  19. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well. (paper)

  20. Biomedical Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halas, Naomi

    2010-03-01

    The near infrared region of the optical spectrum provides a window into the human body that can be exploited for diagnostics and therapeutics, offering an opportunity to merge these concepts. We have shown that the strong light-absorbing and light-scattering properties of noble metal nanoparticles can be controlled by manipulating their shape: in a core-shell geometry, the metallic shell layer can be easily tuned to this spectral region. This `nanoshell' geometry has proven to be ideal for enhancing both diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for cancer. Nanoshells can serve as light scattering beacons, strong enhancers of fluorescent markers for optical tomography, and impart a highly effective, targeted therapeutic response via their unparalleled light-to-heat conversion properties. This latter effect has been used to induce cell death and tumor remission in animals at greater than 90% efficacy, and is currently in clinical trials. This nanoparticle platform can be combined with MRI contrast agents for the enhancement of dual imaging modalities, and also shows promise as a light-controlled nonviral vector for intracellular gene delivery.

  1. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy: the potential for imaging science research to improve cancer treatment outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The role of medical imaging in the planning and delivery of radiation therapy (RT) is rapidly expanding. This is being driven by two developments: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and biological image-based planning (BIBP). IGRT is the systematic use of serial treatment-position imaging to improve geometric targeting accuracy and/or to refine target definition. The enabling technology is the integration of high-performance three-dimensional (3D) imaging systems, e.g., onboard kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam CT, into RT delivery systems. IGRT seeks to adapt the patient's treatment to weekly, daily, or even real-time changes in organ position and shape. BIBP uses non-anatomic imaging (PET, MR spectroscopy, functional MR, etc.) to visualize abnormal tissue biology (angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, etc.) leading to more accurate clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and more accurate targeting of high doses to tissue with the highest tumor cell burden. In both cases, the goal is to reduce both systematic and random tissue localization errors (2-5 mm for conventional RT) conformality so that planning target volume (PTV) margins (varying from 8 to 20 mm in conventional RT) used to ensure target volume coverage in the presence of geometric error, can be substantially reduced. Reduced PTV expansion allows more conformal treatment of the target volume, increased avoidance of normal tissue and potential for safe delivery of more aggressive dose regimens. This presentation will focus on the imaging science challenges posed by the IGRT and BIBP. These issues include: Development of robust and accurate nonrigid image-registration (NIR) tools: Extracting locally nonlinear mappings that relate, voxel-by-voxel, one 3D anatomic representation of the patient to differently deformed anatomies acquired at different time points, is essential if IGRT is to move beyond simple translational treatment plan adaptations. NIR is needed to map segmented and labeled anatomy from the

  2. Design and realisation of integrated circuits for the readout of pixel sensors in high-energy physics and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation tolerant pixel-readout chip for the ATLAS pixel detector has been designed, implemented in a deep-submicron CMOS technology and successfully tested. The chip contains readout-channels with complex analog and digital circuits. Chip for steering of the DEPFET active-pixel matrix has been implemented in a high-voltage CMOS technology. The chip contains channels which generate fast sequences of high-voltage signals. Detector containing this chip has been successfully tested. Pixel-readout test chip for an X-ray imaging pixel sensor has been designed, implemented in a CMOS technology and tested. Pixel-readout channels are able to simultaneously count the signals generated by passage of individual photons and to sum the total charge generated during exposure time. (orig.)

  3. Design and realisation of integrated circuits for the readout of pixel sensors in high-energy physics and biomedical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peric, I.

    2004-08-01

    Radiation tolerant pixel-readout chip for the ATLAS pixel detector has been designed, implemented in a deep-submicron CMOS technology and successfully tested. The chip contains readout-channels with complex analog and digital circuits. Chip for steering of the DEPFET active-pixel matrix has been implemented in a high-voltage CMOS technology. The chip contains channels which generate fast sequences of high-voltage signals. Detector containing this chip has been successfully tested. Pixel-readout test chip for an X-ray imaging pixel sensor has been designed, implemented in a CMOS technology and tested. Pixel-readout channels are able to simultaneously count the signals generated by passage of individual photons and to sum the total charge generated during exposure time. (orig.)

  4. The effects of gender stereotypic and counter-stereotypic textbook images on science performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jessica J; Woodzicka, Julie A; Wingfield, Lylan C

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of gender stereotypic and counter-stereotypic images on male and female high school students' science comprehension and anxiety. We predicted stereotypic images to induce stereotype threat in females and impair science performance. Counter-stereotypic images were predicted to alleviate threat and enhance female performance. Students read one of three chemistry lessons, each containing the same text, with photograph content varied according to stereotype condition. Participants then completed a comprehension test and anxiety measure. Results indicate that female students had higher comprehension after viewing counter-stereotypic images (female scientists) than after viewing stereotypic images (male scientists). Male students had higher comprehension after viewing stereotypic images than after viewing counter-stereotypic images. Implications for alleviating the gender gap in science achievement are discussed. PMID:20397590

  5. Applications of Novel X-Ray Imaging Modalities in Food Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Schou

    science for understanding and designing food products. In both of these aspects, X-ray imaging methods such as radiography and computed tomography provide a non-destructive solution. However, since the conventional attenuation-based modality suers from poor contrast in soft matter materials, modalities......-eld imaging produces a contrast based on dierences in microstructure. In order to increase the use of X-ray imaging within food science, possible applications of X-ray phase-contrast and X-ray dark-eld imaging should be studied. To reach these applications, improvements are needed on several aspects of the...... possible applications of novel X-ray imaging modalities within food science. The first two studies mainly concern the image acquisition process of taking the image. Using dark-eld radiography, raw, frozen and defrosted fruit were distinguished, and structural changes in barley seeds during germination were...

  6. From Science History and Applications Developments of Life System to Bio-Imaging Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANLi-min; LOUWei; HEGuo-sen

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents brief science history and application developments of imaging technology,and discusses the bio-imaging technology. Real-time image measurement techniques and parallel processing of a realistic example is given. Finally coming converging technology of nano-bio-Info-cgno (NBIC) is extended for future trend.

  7. 15th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the 15th ICMBE held from 4th to 7th December 2013, Singapore. Biomedical engineering is applied in most aspects of our healthcare ecosystem. From electronic health records to diagnostic tools to therapeutic, rehabilitative and regenerative treatments, the work of biomedical engineers is evident. Biomedical engineers work at the intersection of engineering, life sciences and healthcare. The engineers would use principles from applied science including mechanical, electrical, chemical and computer engineering together with physical sciences including physics, chemistry and mathematics to apply them to biology and medicine. Applying such concepts to the human body is very much the same concepts that go into building and programming a machine. The goal is to better understand, replace or fix a target system to ultimately improve the quality of healthcare. With this understanding, the conference proceedings offer a single platform for individuals and organisations working i...

  8. Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS): science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Revercomb, H. E.; Zhou, D. K.; Bingham, G. E.; Feltz, W. F.; Huang, H. L.; Knuteson, R. O.; Larar, A. M.; Liu, X.; Reisse, R.; Tobin, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    A revolutionary satellite weather forecasting instrument, called the "GIFTS" which stands for the "Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer", was recently completed and successfully tested in a space chamber at the Utah State University's Space Dynamics Laboratory. The GIFTS was originally proposed by the NASA Langley Research Center, the University of Wisconsin, and the Utah State University and selected for flight demonstration as NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Observing-3 (EO-3) mission, which was unfortunately cancelled in 2004. GIFTS is like a digital 3-d movie camera that, when mounted on a geostationary satellite, would provide from space a revolutionary four-dimensional view of the Earth's atmosphere. GIFTS will measure the distribution, change, and movement of atmospheric moisture, temperature, and certain pollutant gases, such as carbon monoxide and ozone. The observation of the convergence of invisible water vapor, and the change of atmospheric temperature, provides meteorologists with the observations needed to predict where, and when, severe thunderstorms, and possibly tornados, would occur, before they are visible on radar or in satellite cloud imagery. The ability of GIFTS to observe the motion of moisture and clouds at different altitudes enables atmospheric winds to be observed over vast, and otherwise data sparse, oceanic regions of the globe. These wind observations would provide the means to greatly improve the forecast of where tropical storms and hurricanes will move and where and when they will come ashore (i.e., their landfall position and time). GIFTS, if flown into geostationary orbit, would provide about 80,000 vertical profiles per minute, each one like a low vertical resolution (1-2km) weather balloon sounding, but with a spacing of 4 km. GIFTS is a revolutionary atmospheric sensing tool. A glimpse of the science measurement capabilities of GIFTS is provided through airborne measurements with the NPOESS Airborne

  9. VI Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hadad, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the CLAIB 2014, held in Paraná, Entre Ríos, Argentina 29, 30 & 31 October 2014. The proceedings, presented by the Regional Council of Biomedical Engineering for Latin America (CORAL) offer research findings, experiences and activities between institutions and universities to develop Bioengineering, Biomedical Engineering and related sciences. The conferences of the American Congress of Biomedical Engineering are sponsored by the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE), Society for Engineering in Biology and Medicine (EMBS) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), among other organizations and international agencies and bringing together scientists, academics and biomedical engineers in Latin America and other continents in an environment conducive to exchange and professional growth. The Topics include: - Bioinformatics and Computational Biology - Bioinstrumentation; Sensors, Micro and Nano Technologies - Biomaterials, Tissu...

  10. `Am I Like a Scientist?': Primary children's images of doing science in school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Junqing; Jocz, Jennifer Ann; Tan, Aik-Ling

    2014-03-01

    A considerable body of evidence highlights how inquiry-based science can enhance students' epistemic and conceptual understanding of scientific concepts, principles, and theories. However, little is known about how students view themselves as learners of science. In this paper, we explore primary children's images of doing science in school and how they compare themselves with 'real' scientists. Data were collected through the use of a questionnaire, drawing activity, and interviews from 161 Grade 4 (ages 9-10) students in Singapore. Results indicate that 'doing science as conducting hands-on investigations', 'doing science as learning from the teacher', 'doing science as completing the workbook', and 'doing science as a social process' are the images of learning science in school that most of the students held. In addition, students reported that they need to be well behaved first and foremost, while scientists are more likely to work alone and do things that are dangerous. Moreover, students often viewed themselves as 'acting like a scientist' in class, especially when they were doing experiments. Nevertheless, some students reported that they were unlike a scientist because they believed that scientists work alone with dangerous experiments and do not need to listen to the teacher and complete the workbook. These research findings further confirm the earlier argument that young children can make distinctions between school science and 'real' science. This study suggests that the teaching of science as inquiry and by inquiry will shape how students view their classroom experiences and their attitudes towards science.

  11. The Potential Improvement of Team-Working Skills in Biomedical and Natural Science Students Using a Problem-Based Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzian, Forough L.; Farewell, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork has become an integral part of most organisations today, and it is clearly important in Science and other disciplines. In Science, research teams increase in size while the number of single-authored papers and patents decline. Team-work in laboratory sciences permits projects that are too big or complex for one individual to be tackled.…

  12. Introduction to biomedical engineering technology

    CERN Document Server

    Street, Laurence J

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionHistory of Medical DevicesThe Role of Biomedical Engineering Technologists in Health CareCharacteristics of Human Anatomy and Physiology That Relate to Medical DevicesSummaryQuestionsDiagnostic Devices: Part OnePhysiological Monitoring SystemsThe HeartSummaryQuestionsDiagnostic Devices: Part TwoCirculatory System and BloodRespiratory SystemNervous SystemSummaryQuestionsDiagnostic Devices: Part ThreeDigestive SystemSensory OrgansReproductionSkin, Bone, Muscle, MiscellaneousChapter SummaryQuestionsDiagnostic ImagingIntroductionX-RaysMagnetic Resonance Imaging ScannersPositron Emissio

  13. The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: latest science cases and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Shelley A; Do, Tuan; Marshall, Daniel; Larkin, James E; Moore, Anna M; Adamkovics, Mate; Andersen, David; Armus, Lee; Barth, Aaron; Cote, Patrick; Cooke, Jeff; Chisholm, Eric M; Davidge, Timothy; Dunn, Jennifer S; Dumas, Christophe; Ellerbroeck, Brent L; Ghez, Andrea M; Hao, Lei; Hayano, Yutaka; Liu, Michael; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Lu, Jessica R; Mao, Shude; Marois, Christian; Pandey, Shashi B; Philips, Andrew C; Schoeck, Matthias; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Subramanian, Smitha; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tan, Jonathan C; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Treu, Tommaso; Simard, Luc; Weiss, Jason L; Wincensten, James; Wong, Michael; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) will complete its preliminary design phase in 2016. The IRIS instrument design includes a near-infrared (0.85 - 2.4 micron) integral field spectrograph (IFS) and imager that are able to conduct simultaneous diffraction-limited observations behind the advanced adaptive optics system NFIRAOS. The IRIS science cases have continued to be developed and new science studies have been investigated to aid in technical performance and design requirements. In this development phase, the IRIS science team has paid particular attention to the selection of filters, gratings, sensitivities of the entire system, and science cases that will benefit from the parallel mode of the IFS and imaging camera. We present new science cases for IRIS using the latest end-to-end data simulator on the following topics: Solar System bodies, the Galactic center, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and distant gravitationally-lensed galaxies. We then briefl...

  14. Biomedical engineering principles

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Arthur B; Valdevit, Antonio; Ascione, Alfred N

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Modeling of Physiological ProcessesCell Physiology and TransportPrinciples and Biomedical Applications of HemodynamicsA Systems Approach to PhysiologyThe Cardiovascular SystemBiomedical Signal ProcessingSignal Acquisition and ProcessingTechniques for Physiological Signal ProcessingExamples of Physiological Signal ProcessingPrinciples of BiomechanicsPractical Applications of BiomechanicsBiomaterialsPrinciples of Biomedical Capstone DesignUnmet Clinical NeedsEntrepreneurship: Reasons why Most Good Designs Never Get to MarketAn Engineering Solution in Search of a Biomedical Problem

  15. Fundamental of biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sawhney, GS

    2007-01-01

    About the Book: A well set out textbook explains the fundamentals of biomedical engineering in the areas of biomechanics, biofluid flow, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation and use of computing in biomedical engineering. All these subjects form a basic part of an engineer''s education. The text is admirably suited to meet the needs of the students of mechanical engineering, opting for the elective of Biomedical Engineering. Coverage of bioinstrumentation, biomaterials and computing for biomedical engineers can meet the needs of the students of Electronic & Communication, Electronic & Instrumenta

  16. Abstract Proceedings Signal and Imaging Sciences Workshop CASIS Workshop 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R

    2006-11-07

    These abstracts cover the following topics: (1) Analysis of massive datasets; (2) Nondestructive evaluation; (3) Imaging methodology; (4) NIF optics inspection; (5) Model-based signal processing and estimation; and (6) Image processing and analysis.

  17. Clay Mineral Image Collection for Education in Geotechnical Engineering and the Earth Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Gordon; Dove, Joseph E.; Han, Nizhou; Dove, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This file contains a collection of scanning electron microscope images of Kaolinite and Bentonite pure clay minerals, and the fine portion of a natural soil. National Science Foundation Grant No. 1301124

  18. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) during MRO’s Primary Science Phase (PSP)

    OpenAIRE

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Banks, Maria E.; Baugh, Nicole; Becker, Kris; Boyd, Aaron; Bergstrom, James W.; Beyer, Ross A.; Bortolini, Edward; Bridges, Nathan T.; Byrne, Shane; Castalia, Bradford; Chuang, Frank C.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Daubar, Ingrid; Davatzes, Alix K.

    2010-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) acquired 8 terapixels of data in 9137 images of Mars between October 2006 and December 2008, covering ~0.55% of the surface. Images are typically 5–6 km wide with 3-color coverage over the central 20% of the swath, and their scales usually range from 25 to 60 cm/pixel. Nine hundred and sixty stereo pairs were acquired and more than 50 digital terrain models (DTMs) completed; these data have led to...

  19. A generalized approach for producing, quantifying, and validating citizen science data from wildlife images.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Swanson; Kosmala, M; Lintott, C.; Packer, C

    2016-01-01

    Citizen science has the potential to expand the scope and scale of research in ecology and conservation, but many professional researchers remain skeptical of data produced by nonexperts. We devised an approach for producing accurate, reliable data from untrained, nonexpert volunteers. On the citizen science website www.snapshotserengeti.org, more than 28,000 volunteers classified 1.51 million images taken in a large-scale camera-trap survey in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Each image wa...

  20. Biomedical and environmental applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of syntheses and applications of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at the Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology. Three families of oxide MNPs, magnetite, manganite and spinel ferrite materials, were prepared in various ways: coprecipitation, sol–gel and high energy mechanical milling. Basic properties of MNPs were characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Physical Properties Measurement Systems (PPMS). As for biomedical application, the aim was to design a novel multifunctional, nanosized magnetofluorescent water-dispersible Fe3O4-curcumin conjugate, and its ability to label, target and treat tumor cells was described. The conjugate possesses a magnetic nano Fe3O4 core, chitosan (CS) or Oleic acid (OL) as an outer shell and entrapped curcumin (Cur), serving the dual function of naturally autofluorescent dye as well as antitumor model drug. Fe3O4-Cur conjugate exhibited a high loading cellular uptake with the help of a macrophage, which was clearly visualized dually by Fluorescence Microscope and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (LSCM), as well as by magnetization measurement (PPMS). A preliminary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study also showed a clear contrast enhancement by using the conjugate. As for the environmental aspect, the use of magnetite MNPs for the removal of heavy toxic metals, such as Arsenic (As) and Lead (Pb), from contaminated water was studied

  1. Manpower development for the biomedical industry space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, James C H

    2013-01-01

    The Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Cluster is one of four key pillars of the Singapore economy. The Singapore Government has injected research funding for basic and translational research to attract companies to carry out their commercial R&D activities. To further intensify the R&D efforts, the National Research Foundation (NRF) was set up to coordinate the research activities of different agencies within the larger national framework and to fund strategic R&D initiatives. In recent years, funding agencies began to focus on support of translational and clinical research, particularly those with potential for commercialization. Translational research is beginning to have traction, in particular research funding for the development of innovation medical devices. Therefore, the Biomedical Sciences sector is projected to grow which means that there is a need to invest in human capital development to achieve sustainable growth. In support of this, education and training programs to strengthen the manpower capabilities for the Biomedical Sciences industry have been developed. In recent years, undergraduate and graduate degree courses in biomedical engineering/bioengineering have been developing at a rapid rate. The goal is to train students with skills to understand complex issues of biomedicine and to develop and implement of advanced technological applications to these problems. There are a variety of career opportunities open to graduates in biomedical engineering, however regardless of the type of career choices, students must not only focus on achieving good grades. They have to develop their marketability to employers through internships, overseas exchange programs, and involvement in leadership-type activities. Furthermore, curriculum has to be developed with biomedical innovation in mind and ensure relevance to the industry. The objective of this paper is to present the NUS Bioengineering undergraduate program in relation to manpower development for the biomedical

  2. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) for the 209 Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, K. S.; Bell, J. F., III; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Heydari, E.; Kah, L. C.; Minitti, M. E.; Olson, T. S.; Rowland, S. K.; Schieber, J.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The MArs Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) is a small, RGB-color camera designed to examine geologic material at 12.5-75 microns/pixel resolution at the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing site. MAHLI is a PI-led investigation competitively selected by NASA in December 2004 as part of the science payload for the MSL rover launching in 2009. The instrument is being fabricated by, and will be operated by, Malin Space Science Systems of San Diego, California.

  3. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs

  4. The potential improvement of team-working skills in Biomedical and Natural Science students using a problem-based learning approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nowrouzian, Forough L.; Anne Farewell

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork has become an integral part of most organisations today, and it is clearly important in Science and other disciplines. In Science, research teams increase in size while the number of single-authored papers and patents decline. Team-work in laboratory sciences permits projects that are too big or complex for one individual to be tackled. This development requires that students gain experience of team-work before they start their professional career. Students working in teams this may ...

  5. 3rd International Conference on Nanotechnologies and Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Tiginyanu, Ion

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Nanotechnologies and Biomedical Engineering which was held on September 23-26, 2015 in Chisinau, Republic of Moldova. ICNBME-2015 continues the series of International Conferences in the field of nanotechnologies and biomedical engineering. It aims at bringing together scientists and engineers dealing with fundamental and applied research for reporting on the latest theoretical developments and applications involved in the fields. Topics include Nanotechnologies and nanomaterials Plasmonics and metamaterials Bio-micro/nano technologies Biomaterials Biosensors and sensors systems Biomedical instrumentation Biomedical signal processing Biomedical imaging and image processing Molecular, cellular and tissue engineering Clinical engineering, health technology management and assessment; Health informatics, e-health and telemedicine Biomedical engineering education Nuclear and radiation safety and security Innovations and technology transfer...

  6. Image Processing: A State-of-the-Art Way to Learn Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Jacqueline; Greenberg, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Teachers participating in the Image Processing for Teaching Process, begun at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in 1989, find this technology ideal for encouraging student discovery, promoting constructivist science or math experiences, and adapting in classrooms. Because image processing is not a computerized text, it…

  7. 5th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering in Vietnam

    CERN Document Server

    Phuong, Tran

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on the Development of Biomedical Engineering in Vietnam which was held from June 16-18, 2014 in Ho Chi Minh City. The volume reflects the progress of Biomedical Engineering and discusses problems and solutions. I aims identifying new challenges, and shaping future directions for research in biomedical engineering fields including medical instrumentation, bioinformatics, biomechanics, medical imaging, drug delivery therapy, regenerative medicine and entrepreneurship in medical devices.

  8. Higher Education Program in Biomedical Informatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana

    Buenos Aires: Hospital Italiano, 2008, s. 1-4. [IMIA Working Group on Health and Medical Informatics. Education Meeting. Buenos Aires (AR), 27.10.2008-28.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : education * biomedical informatics * e- Learning Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  9. Images - RPSD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ures of the proteins of plant seven kinds, such as rice. Data file File name: rpsd_images.zip File URL: ftp:...//ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/rpsd/LATEST/rpsd_images.zip File size: 18.3 MB Sim

  10. A study on knowledge and practice regarding biomedical waste management among staff nurses and nursing students of Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Haider

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are the centre of cure and also the important centres of infectious waste generation. Effective management of Biomedical Waste (BMW is not only a legal necessity but also a social responsibility. Aims and Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practice in managing the biomedical wastes among nursing staff and student nurses in RIMS, Ranchi. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at RIMS, Ranchi from Oct 2013 to March 2014 (6 months. It was a descriptive, hospital based, cross-sectional study. A total of 240 nurses participated in the present study, randomly chosen from various departments A pre-designed, pre-tested, structured proforma was used for data collection after getting their informed consent. Self-made scoring system was used to categorize the participants as having good, average and poor scores. Data was tabulated and analyzed using percentages and chi-square test. Results: The knowledge regarding general information about BMW management was assessed(with scores 0-8,it was found  that level of knowledge was better in student nurses than staff nurses as student nurses scored good(6-8correct answers in more than half of the questions (65%.Whereas staff nurses scored good in only 33.33% questions. When the practical information regarding the BMW management is assessed (with scores 0-8, it was found that staff nurses had relatively better practice regarding BMW management than students as they scored good(6-8correct answers in 40% and 30% respectively. Conclusion: Though overall knowledge of study participants was good but still they need good quality training to improve their current knowledge about BMW. 

  11. An evaluation of an enquiry based learning strategy for the science of imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic radiography is a science based health course. Due to the variation in science background of the students at entry level the imaging science modules can be problematic. Enquiry based learning (EBL) was introduced as teaching strategy in an imaging science module in order to promote learner autonomy and enhance the student experience. The module was evaluated using a questionnaire containing both open and closed questions. The impact of working as a team was a strong theme emerging from the evaluation of the project, with the majority of students viewing teamwork as beneficial to their learning. It was identified that they gained support from the team, and this assisted their learning. The enhancement of transferable skills and the promotion of learner autonomy were achieved. Areas for further investigation are the utilisation of peer assessment and a science event for the summative assessment.

  12. Identifying the prevailing images in library and information science profession: is the landscape changing?

    OpenAIRE

    Βασιλακάκη, Ευγενία; Μονιάρου-Παπακωνσταντίνου, Βαλεντίνη; Vasilakaki, Evgenia; Moniarou-Papaconstantinou, Valentini

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a systematic review on library and information science (LIS) profession’s image and stereotypes from 1999 to 2013. In particular, it aims to identify and analyze the prevailing images of librarians in various contexts and explore possible changes occurring over time. Design/methodology/approach – The method of systematic review is adopted to identify the prevailing images in LIS profession. Specifically, 60 papers were selected and five main themes emerged such as “...

  13. A forensic science perspective on the role of images in crime investigation and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliet, Quentin; Delémont, Olivier; Margot, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    This article presents a global vision of images in forensic science. The proliferation of perspectives on the use of images throughout criminal investigations and the increasing demand for research on this topic seem to demand a forensic science-based analysis. In this study, the definitions of and concepts related to material traces are revisited and applied to images, and a structured approach is used to persuade the scientific community to extend and improve the use of images as traces in criminal investigations. Current research efforts focus on technical issues and evidence assessment. This article provides a sound foundation for rationalising and explaining the processes involved in the production of clues from trace images. For example, the mechanisms through which these visual traces become clues of presence or action are described. An extensive literature review of forensic image analysis emphasises the existing guidelines and knowledge available for answering investigative questions (who, what, where, when and how). However, complementary developments are still necessary to demystify many aspects of image analysis in forensic science, including how to review and select images or use them to reconstruct an event or assist intelligence efforts. The hypothetico-deductive reasoning pathway used to discover unknown elements of an event or crime can also help scientists understand the underlying processes involved in their decision making. An analysis of a single image in an investigative or probative context is used to demonstrate the highly informative potential of images as traces and/or clues. Research efforts should be directed toward formalising the extraction and combination of clues from images. An appropriate methodology is key to expanding the use of images in forensic science. PMID:25498936

  14. Biomedical applications of functionalized fullerene-based nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranga Partha

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Ranga Partha, Jodie L ConyersCenter for Translational Injury Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USAAbstract: Since their discovery in 1985, fullerenes have been investigated extensively due to their unique physical and chemical properties. In recent years, studies on functionalized fullerenes for various applications in the field of biomedical sciences have seen a significant increase. The ultimate goal is towards employing these functionalized fullerenes in the diagnosis and therapy of human diseases. Functionalized fullerenes are one of the many different classes of compounds that are currently being investigated in the rapidly emerging field of nanomedicine. In this review, the focus is on the three categories of drug delivery, reactive oxygen species quenching, and targeted imaging for which functionalized fullerenes have been studied in depth. In addition, an exhaustive list of the different classes of functionalized fullerenes along with their applications is provided. We will also discuss and summarize the unique approaches, mechanisms, advantages, and the aspect of toxicity behind utilizing functionalized fullerenes for biomedical applications.Keywords: fullerenes, functionalized fullerenes, nanomedicine, drug delivery, buckysomes, radiation protection

  15. Planet Formation Imager (PFI): science vision and key requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Stefan; Monnier, John D.; Ireland, Michael J.; Duchene, Gaspard; Espaillat, Catherine; Hoenig, Sebastian; Juhasz, Attila; Mordasini, Chris; Olofsson, Johan; Paladini, Claudia; Stassun, Keivan; Turner, Neal; Vasisht, Gautam; Harries, Tim J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) project aims to provide a strong scientific vision for ground-based optical astronomy beyond the upcoming generation of Extremely Large Telescopes. We make the case that a breakthrough in angular resolution imaging capabilities is required in order to unravel the processes involved in planet formation. PFI will be optimised to provide a complete census of the protoplanet population at all stellocentric radii and over the age range from 0.1 to about 100 Myr. W...

  16. Data Science of Stroke Imaging and Enlightenment of the Penumbra

    OpenAIRE

    Scalzo, Fabien; Nour, May; David S. Liebeskind

    2015-01-01

    Imaging protocols of acute ischemic stroke continue to hold significant uncertainties regarding patient selection for reperfusion therapy with thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. Given that patient inclusion criteria can easily introduce biases that may be unaccounted for, the reproducibility and reliability of the patient screening method is of utmost importance in clinical trial design. The optimal imaging screening protocol for selection in targeted populations remains uncertain. Acu...

  17. Mobile Phone Images and Video in Science Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanayake, Sakunthala Yatigammana; Wishart, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article reports a study into how mobile phones could be used to enhance teaching and learning in secondary school science. It describes four lessons devised by groups of Sri Lankan teachers all of which centred on the use of the mobile phone cameras rather than their communication functions. A qualitative methodological approach was used to…

  18. Handbook of biomedical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical optics holds tremendous promise to deliver effective, safe, non- or minimally invasive diagnostics and targeted, customizable therapeutics. Handbook of Biomedical Optics provides an in-depth treatment of the field, including coverage of applications for biomedical research, diagnosis, and therapy. It introduces the theory and fundamentals of each subject, ensuring accessibility to a wide multidisciplinary readership. It also offers a view of the state of the art and discusses advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.Organized into six sections, this handbook: Contains intr

  19. Biomedical applications of polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Gebelein, C G

    1991-01-01

    The biomedical applications of polymers span an extremely wide spectrum of uses, including artificial organs, skin and soft tissue replacements, orthopaedic applications, dental applications, and controlled release of medications. No single, short review can possibly cover all these items in detail, and dozens of books andhundreds of reviews exist on biomedical polymers. Only a few relatively recent examples will be cited here;additional reviews are listed under most of the major topics in this book. We will consider each of the majorclassifications of biomedical polymers to some extent, inclu

  20. Powering biomedical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Edwar

    2013-01-01

    From exoskeletons to neural implants, biomedical devices are no less than life-changing. Compact and constant power sources are necessary to keep these devices running efficiently. Edwar Romero's Powering Biomedical Devices reviews the background, current technologies, and possible future developments of these power sources, examining not only the types of biomedical power sources available (macro, mini, MEMS, and nano), but also what they power (such as prostheses, insulin pumps, and muscular and neural stimulators), and how they work (covering batteries, biofluids, kinetic and ther

  1. Biomedical Engineering Desk Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Ratner, Buddy D; Schoen, Frederick J; Lemons, Jack E; Dyro, Joseph; Martinsen, Orjan G; Kyle, Richard; Preim, Bernhard; Bartz, Dirk; Grimnes, Sverre; Vallero, Daniel; Semmlow, John; Murray, W Bosseau; Perez, Reinaldo; Bankman, Isaac; Dunn, Stanley; Ikada, Yoshito; Moghe, Prabhas V; Constantinides, Alkis

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop Desk Reference, for Biomedical Engineers involved in the ever expanding and very fast moving area; this is a book that will not gather dust on the shelf. It brings together the essential professional reference content from leading international contributors in the biomedical engineering field. Material covers a broad range of topics including: Biomechanics and Biomaterials; Tissue Engineering; and Biosignal Processing* A hard-working desk reference providing all the essential material needed by biomedical and clinical engineers on a day-to-day basis * Fundamentals, key techniques,

  2. Launching the "Journal of Biomedical Discovery and Collaboration"

    OpenAIRE

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Biomedical Discovery and Collaboration was created to provide, for the first time, a unified forum to consider all factors that affect scientific practice and scientific discovery – with an emphasis on the changing face of contemporary biomedical science. In this endeavor we are bringing together three different groups of scholars: a) laboratory investigators, who make the discoveries that are the currency of the scientific enterprise; b) computer science and informatics invest...

  3. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  4. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  5. Sensors for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, Piet

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the impact during the last decade of modern IC technology, microelectronics, thin- and thick-film technology, fibre optic technology, etc. on the development of sensors for biomedical applications.

  6. Functional requirements for a central research imaging data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas; Gruetz, Romanus; Dickmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The current situation at many university medical centers regarding the management of biomedical research imaging data leaves much to be desired. In contrast to the recommendations of the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the German Council of Sciences and Humanities regarding the professional management of research data, there are commonly many individual data pools for research data in each institute and the management remains the responsibility of the researcher. A possible solution for this situation would be to install local central repositories for biomedical research imaging data. In this paper, we developed a scenario based on abstracted use-cases for institutional research undertakings as well as collaborative biomedical research projects and analyzed the functional requirements that a local repository would have to fulfill. We determined eight generic categories of functional requirements, which can be viewed as a basic guideline for the minimum functionality of a central repository for biomedical research imaging data. PMID:23920564

  7. Going Beyond RGB: How to Create Color Composite Images that Convey the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Travis A.; Levay, Z. G.; Frattare, L. M.; English, J.; Pu'uohau-Pummill, K.

    2010-01-01

    The quality of modern astronomical data and the agility of current image-processing software enable new ways to visualize data as images. Two developments in particular have led to a fundamental change in how astronomical images may be assembled. First, the availability of high-quality multiwavelength and narrowband data allow for images that do not correspond to the wavelength sensitivity of the human eye, thereby introducing ambiguity in the usage and interpretation of color. Second, many image-processing software packages now use a layering metaphor that allows for any number of astronomical datasets to be combined into a color composite image. Furthermore, any color may be assigned to each dataset, not just red, green or blue. With this technique, images with as many as eight datasets have been produced. Each dataset is intensity scaled and colorized independently, creating an immense parameter space that may be used to assemble the image. Since such images are intended for data visualization, scaling and color schemes must be chosen that best illustrate the science. I will demonstrate how color composite images can be assembled in Photoshow and GIMP. I will also give examples of how color can be effectively used to convey the science of interest.

  8. Sharing big biomedical data

    OpenAIRE

    Toga, Arthur W.; Dinov, Ivo D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The promise of Big Biomedical Data may be offset by the enormous challenges in handling, analyzing, and sharing it. In this paper, we provide a framework for developing practical and reasonable data sharing policies that incorporate the sociological, financial, technical and scientific requirements of a sustainable Big Data dependent scientific community. Findings Many biomedical and healthcare studies may be significantly impacted by using large, heterogeneous and incongruent data...

  9. Biomedical signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Akay, Metin

    1994-01-01

    Sophisticated techniques for signal processing are now available to the biomedical specialist! Written in an easy-to-read, straightforward style, Biomedical Signal Processing presents techniques to eliminate background noise, enhance signal detection, and analyze computer data, making results easy to comprehend and apply. In addition to examining techniques for electrical signal analysis, filtering, and transforms, the author supplies an extensive appendix with several computer programs that demonstrate techniques presented in the text.

  10. Biomedical signal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M

    2015-01-01

    The book will help assist a reader in the development of techniques for analysis of biomedical signals and computer aided diagnoses with a pedagogical examination of basic and advanced topics accompanied by over 350 figures and illustrations. Wide range of filtering techniques presented to address various applications. 800 mathematical expressions and equations. Practical questions, problems and laboratory exercises. Includes fractals and chaos theory with biomedical applications.

  11. "Science in Tales": Analysis of the images of scientist in young people's fictional literature

    CERN Document Server

    Pujalte, Alejandro; Aduriz-Bravo, Agustin

    2013-01-01

    In the research field on the "images of scientists" that appear in fictional literature, we focus on a set of tales produced by students of secondary school. Our aim is to connect some traits of the stereotypical scientist that appear in those texts with the traits underlying other cultural productions, since those productions may constitute the probable source of the stereotype. Many common representations of the scientist emerge from an image of science that is inadequate from the point of view of science teaching. It correlates to a lack of interest towards science courses. This lack of interest would contribute to stagnation in the number of students pursuing science and technology careers in Ibero-America in general and especially in Argentina.

  12. Data Science of Stroke Imaging and Enlightenment of the Penumbra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien eScalzo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging protocols of acute ischemic stroke continue to hold significant uncertainties regarding patient selection for reperfusion therapy with thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. Given that patient inclusion criteria can easily introduce biases that may be unaccounted for, the reproducibility and reliability of the patient screening method is of utmost importance in clinical trial design. The optimal imaging screening protocol for selection in targeted populations remains uncertain. Acute neuroimaging provides a snapshot in time of the brain parenchyma and vasculature. By identifying the at-risk but still viable penumbral tissue, imaging can help estimate the potential benefit of a reperfusion therapy in these patients. This paper provides a perspective about the assessment of the penumbral tissue in the context of acute stroke and reviews several neuroimaging models that have recently been developed to assess the penumbra in a more reliable fashion. The complexity and variability of imaging features and techniques used in stroke will ultimately require advanced data driven software tools to provide quantitative measures of risk/benefit of recanalization therapy and help aid in making the most favorable clinical decisions.

  13. Data science of stroke imaging and enlightenment of the penumbra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Nour, May; Liebeskind, David S

    2015-01-01

    Imaging protocols of acute ischemic stroke continue to hold significant uncertainties regarding patient selection for reperfusion therapy with thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. Given that patient inclusion criteria can easily introduce biases that may be unaccounted for, the reproducibility and reliability of the patient screening method is of utmost importance in clinical trial design. The optimal imaging screening protocol for selection in targeted populations remains uncertain. Acute neuroimaging provides a snapshot in time of the brain parenchyma and vasculature. By identifying the at-risk but still viable penumbral tissue, imaging can help estimate the potential benefit of a reperfusion therapy in these patients. This paper provides a perspective about the assessment of the penumbral tissue in the context of acute stroke and reviews several neuroimaging models that have recently been developed to assess the penumbra in a more reliable fashion. The complexity and variability of imaging features and techniques used in stroke will ultimately require advanced data driven software tools to provide quantitative measures of risk/benefit of recanalization therapy and help aid in making the most favorable clinical decisions. PMID:25798125

  14. Science means business: medical imaging shows colour of money

    CERN Multimedia

    Macfie, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Doctors have used x-ray machines for 100 years, but they remain an imprecise and limited diagnostic tool. But a team of Canterbury University researchers is aiming to revolutionise medical x-ray technology with high-precision colour imaging. (1,5 page)

  15. Advances in biomedical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symposium was organized in order to focus on the problems, developments and areas of further research in the life sciences. Forty-nine papers were presented dealing with instrumentation, techniques, experimental and theoretical studies. They included neutron sources and mixed-field dosimetry; developments (e.g. thermocurrent dosimetry) in dosimetry; physical aspects of radiation therapy, and treatment planning; international, national and regional radiation metrology programmes; diagnostic medical x-ray sources, imaging systems and patient doses; high-energy electron and γ-ray dosimetry; and doses determination for ingested or administered radionuclides

  16. The Image of Science: How People Percept S&T Achievements

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Shuvalova

    2007-01-01

    In the previous issue we examined in detail the "image" of science that has emerged among the Russians at the beginning of XXI century. In this case, we presented relatively contradictory views of the widest strata of the population: on the need for state support of science on research priorities (economic development, improved healthcare and education, the environment and strengthening national defense); on unfairly low prestige of scientists as compared with other professions but at the sam...

  17. Biomedical Visual Computing: Case Studies and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Johnson, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computational geometric modeling, imaging, and simulation let researchers build and test models of increasing complexity, generating unprecedented amounts of data. As recent research in biomedical applications illustrates, visualization will be critical in making this vast amount of data usable; it\\'s also fundamental to understanding models of complex phenomena. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. Improving Graduate Education to Support a Branching Career Pipeline: Recommendations Based on a Survey of Doctoral Students in the Basic Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, C. N.; Halme, D. G.; O'Sullivan, P. S.; Lindstaedt, B.

    2011-01-01

    Today's doctoral programs continue to prepare students for a traditional academic career path despite the inadequate supply of research-focused faculty positions. We advocate for a broader doctoral curriculum that prepares trainees for a wide range of science-related career paths. In support of this argument, we describe data from our survey of…

  19. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheridan C. Mayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image low-density materials, which do not absorb X-rays sufficiently to form a conventional X-ray image. In the context of materials science, X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography have particular value in the 2D and 3D characterization of low-density materials, the detection of cracks and voids and the analysis of composites and multiphase materials where the different components have similar X-ray attenuation coefficients. Here we review the use of phase-contrast imaging and tomography for a wide variety of materials science characterization problems using both synchrotron and laboratory sources and further demonstrate the particular benefits of phase contrast in the laboratory setting with a series of case studies.

  20. Hyperspectral Imaging and Related Field Methods: Building the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Steffen, Konrad; Wessman, Carol

    1999-01-01

    The proposal requested funds for the computing power to bring hyperspectral image processing into undergraduate and graduate remote sensing courses. This upgrade made it possible to handle more students in these oversubscribed courses and to enhance CSES' summer short course entitled "Hyperspectral Imaging and Data Analysis" provided for government, industry, university and military. Funds were also requested to build field measurement capabilities through the purchase of spectroradiometers, canopy radiation sensors and a differential GPS system. These instruments provided systematic and complete sets of field data for the analysis of hyperspectral data with the appropriate radiometric and wavelength calibration as well as atmospheric data needed for application of radiative transfer models. The proposed field equipment made it possible to team-teach a new field methods course, unique in the country, that took advantage of the expertise of the investigators rostered in three different departments, Geology, Geography and Biology.