WorldWideScience

Sample records for biomedical graduate studies

  1. A Study of the Information Literacy of Biomedical Graduate Students: Based on the Thesis Topic Discovery Process in Molecular Biology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhao-Yen Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The biomedical information environment is in a state of constant and rapid change due to the increase in research data and rapid technological advances. In Taiwan, few research has investigated the information literacy of biomedical graduate students. This exploratory study examined the information literacy abilities and training of biomedical graduate students in Taiwan. Semi-structured interviews based on the Association of College and Research Libraries Information Literacy Competency Standards for Science and Engineering/Technology were conducted with 20 molecular biological graduate students. The interview inquired about their information-seeking channels and information literacy education. The findings show that the biomedical graduate students developed a workable thesis topic with their advisors. Through various information-seeking channels and retrieval strategies, they obtained and critically evaluated information to address different information needs for their thesis research. Through seminars, annual conferences and papers, the interviewees were informed of current developments in their field. Subsequently, through written or oral communications, they were able to integrate and exchange the information. Most interviewees cared about the social, economic, legal, and ethical issues surrounding the use of information. College courses and labs were the main information literacy education environment for them to learn about research skills and knowledge. The study concludes four areas to address for the information literacy of biomedical graduate students, i.e., using professional information, using the current information, efficiency in assessing the domain information, and utilization of diverse information channels. Currently, the interviewees showed rather low usage of library resources, which is a concern for biomedical educators and libraries. [Article content in Chinese

  2. The art and science of selecting graduate students in the biomedical sciences: Performance in doctoral study of the foundational sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Young; Berkowitz, Oren; Symes, Karen; Dasgupta, Shoumita

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate associations between admissions criteria and performance in Ph.D. programs at Boston University School of Medicine. The initial phase of this project examined student performance in the classroom component of a newly established curriculum named "Foundations in Biomedical Sciences (FiBS)". Quantitative measures including undergraduate grade point average (GPA), graduate record examination (GRE; a standardized, computer-based test) scores for the verbal (assessment of test takers' ability to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information and concepts provided in writing) and quantitative (assessment of test takers' problem-solving ability) components of the examination, previous research experience, and competitiveness of previous research institution were used in the study. These criteria were compared with competencies in the program defined as students who pass the curriculum as well as students categorized as High Performers. These data indicated that there is a significant positive correlation between FiBS performance and undergraduate GPA, GRE scores, and competitiveness of undergraduate institution. No significant correlations were found between FiBS performance and research background. By taking a data-driven approach to examine admissions and performance, we hope to refine our admissions criteria to facilitate an unbiased approach to recruitment of students in the life sciences and to share our strategy to support similar goals at other institutions.

  3. History of the biomedical studies PhD program: a joint graduate program of the Baylor Health Care system and Baylor University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Christine R; Horton, Joshua M; Peng, Han; Xu, Kangling; Batra, Sushil K; Miles, Jonathan P; Kane, Robert R

    2008-10-01

    On a sweltering summer morning, throngs of people filed into Jones Theatre at Baylor University in Waco for the graduate student orientation. One could look around and notice the diversity of not only the student population, but also the disciplines being represented. Many students had stepped off planes only hours prior, but even those who had been traveling for days could not contain their excitement. As for me, I was nowhere near any of this. I was still 40 miles north of Waco in Waxahachie, having been pulled over for speeding. After 4 days of traveling with my life in my Volkswagon Jetta, all the way from San Francisco, on one of the most important days of my life, I was late. When I finally arrived at the Hooper Schafer Fine Arts Auditorium, out of breath from running all the way from the parking structure, all of the graduate students were quietly listening to the first introductory speech. I snuck into the back and sat down. My mind was racing, as I knew very little about Waco and Baylor University except for the growing accomplishments of the biomedical studies program. What little I did know about Baylor seemed so different from my very liberal upbringing in California. What would this experience be like for me? But, as I listened to the talks, met with other students, and finally met the entire biomedical studies entering class of 2007, I knew that I had made the right decision in coming to Baylor. This would be an experience unlike any other, and I was wholeheartedly open to embracing it. -Christine Morel, PhD candidate, Institute of Biomedical Studies.

  4. Biomedical imaging graduate curricula and courses: report from the 2005 Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Educational Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Angelique; Izatt, Joseph; Ferrara, Katherine

    2006-02-01

    We present an overview of graduate programs in biomedical imaging that are currently available in the US. Special attention is given to the emerging technologies of molecular imaging and biophotonics. Discussions from the workshop on Graduate Imaging at the 2005 Whitaker Educational Summit meeting are summarized.

  5. Interdisciplinary innovations in biomedical and health informatics graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, G

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical and health informatics (BHI) is a rapidly growing domain that relies on the active collaboration with diverse disciplines and professions. Educational initiatives in BHI need to prepare students with skills and competencies that will allow them to function within and even facilitate interdisciplinary teams (IDT). This paper describes an interdisciplinary educational approach introduced into a BHI graduate curriculum that aims to prepare informatics researchers to lead IDT research. A case study of the "gerontechnology" research track is presented which highlights how the curriculum fosters collaboration with and understanding of the disciplines of Nursing, Engineering, Computer Science, and Health Administration. Gerontechnology is a new interdisciplinary field that focuses on the use of technology to support aging. Its aim is to explore innovative ways to use information technology and develop systems that support independency and increase quality of life for senior citizens. As a result of a large research group that explores "smart home" technologies and the use of information technology, we integrated this new domain into the curriculum providing a platform for computer scientists, engineers, nurses and physicians to explore challenges and opportunities with our informatics students and faculty. The interdisciplinary educational model provides an opportunity for health informatics students to acquire the skills for communication and collaboration with other disciplines. Numerous graduate and postgraduate students have already participated in this initiative. The evaluation model of this approach is presented. Interdisciplinary educational models are required for health informatics graduate education. Such models need to be innovative and reflect the needs and trends in the domains of health care and information technology.

  6. Are Graduate Students Rational? Evidence from the Market for Biomedical Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Kohout, Margaret E.; Clack, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget expansion from 1998 through 2003 increased demand for biomedical research, raising relative wages and total employment in the market for biomedical scientists. However, because research doctorates in biomedical sciences can often take six years or more to complete, the full labor supply response to such changes in market conditions is not immediate, but rather is observed over a period of several years. Economic rational expectations models assume that prospective students anticipate these future changes, and also that students take into account the opportunity costs of their pursuing graduate training. Prior empirical research on student enrollment and degree completions in science and engineering (S&E) fields indicates that “cobweb” expectations prevail: that is, at least in theory, prospective graduate students respond to contemporaneous changes in market wages and employment, but do not forecast further changes that will arise by the time they complete their degrees and enter the labor market. In this article, we analyze time-series data on wages and employment of biomedical scientists versus alternative careers, on completions of S&E bachelor's degrees and biomedical sciences PhDs, and on research expenditures funded both by NIH and by biopharmaceutical firms, to examine the responsiveness of the biomedical sciences labor supply to changes in market conditions. Consistent with previous studies, we find that enrollments and completions in biomedical sciences PhD programs are responsive to market conditions at the time of students' enrollment. More striking, however, is the close correspondence between graduate student enrollments and completions, and changes in availability of NIH-funded traineeships, fellowships, and research assistantships. PMID:24376573

  7. Graduate Experience in Science Education: the development of a science education course for biomedical science graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Dina G; DuPré, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The University of Rochester's Graduate Experience in Science Education (GESE) course familiarizes biomedical science graduate students interested in pursuing academic career tracks with a fundamental understanding of some of the theory, principles, and concepts of science education. This one-semester elective course provides graduate students with practical teaching and communication skills to help them better relate science content to, and increase their confidence in, their own teaching abilities. The 2-h weekly sessions include an introduction to cognitive hierarchies, learning styles, and multiple intelligences; modeling and coaching some practical aspects of science education pedagogy; lesson-planning skills; an introduction to instructional methods such as case studies and problem-based learning; and use of computer-based instructional technologies. It is hoped that the early development of knowledge and skills about teaching and learning will encourage graduate students to continue their growth as educators throughout their careers. This article summarizes the GESE course and presents evidence on the effectiveness of this course in providing graduate students with information about teaching and learning that they will use throughout their careers.

  8. Leading change: curriculum reform in graduate education in the biomedical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Shoumita; Symes, Karen; Hyman, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences at the Boston University School of Medicine houses numerous dynamic graduate programs. Doctoral students began their studies with laboratory rotations and classroom training in a variety of fundamental disciplines. Importantly, with 15 unique pathways of admission to these doctoral programs, there were also 15 unique curricula. Departments and programs offered courses independently, and students participated in curricula that were overlapping combinations of these courses. This system created curricula that were not coordinated and that had redundant course content as well as content gaps. A partnership of key stakeholders began a curriculum reform process to completely restructure doctoral education at the Boston University School of Medicine. The key pedagogical goals, objectives, and elements designed into the new curriculum through this reform process created a curriculum designed to foster the interdisciplinary thinking that students are ultimately asked to utilize in their research endeavors. We implemented comprehensive student and peer evaluation of the new Foundations in Biomedical Sciences integrated curriculum to assess the new curriculum. Furthermore, we detail how this process served as a gateway toward creating a more fully integrated graduate experience, under the umbrella of the Program in Biomedical Sciences. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Beyond Preparation: Identity, Cultural Capital, and Readiness for Graduate School in the Biomedical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazley, J Lynn; Remich, Robin; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E; Keller, Jill; Campbell, Patricia B; McGee, Richard

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 52 college graduates as they entered a Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP). Our goal was to investigate what it means for these aspiring scientists, most of whom are from groups underrepresented in the sciences, to feel ready to apply to a doctoral program in the biomedical sciences. For our analysis, we developed and used a theoretical framework which integrates concepts from identity-in-practice literature with Bourdieu's formulation of cultural capital and also examined the impact of racial, ethnic, and gender identities on education and career trajectories. Five patterns of identity work for expected engagement with PREP grew out of our analysis: Credential Seekers, PI Aspirants, Path Builders, Discipline Changers, and Interest Testers. These patterns illuminate differences in perceptions of doing, being , and becoming within science; external and internal foci of identity work; and expectations for institutional and embodied cultural capital. Our findings show that preparing for graduate education is more complex than acquiring a set of credentials as it is infused with identity work which facilitates readiness beyond preparation . This deeper understanding of individual agency and perceptions allows us to shift the focus away from a deficit model where institutions and programs attempt to "fix" students, and to offer implications for programs designed to support college graduates aspiring to become scientists.

  10. Influencing the job market by the quality of graduates--a biomedical engineering example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Ewa; Augustyniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Academic teaching of a new discipline, besides its contents and formal issues, requires participation of the university in development of a target job market. This was the case of biomedical engineering in Poland ten years ago. This paper presents examples of activities, taken up by our university in cooperation with prospective employers, and evaluated with a help of our first alumni. The evaluation survey shows that despite the immature job market, the number of graduates employed accordingly to their education systematically raises each year from 72,5% in 2011 to 93,8% in 2013. Another interesting result is the distribution of job searching period: 19.2% of graduates were already employed before the graduation, further 23.1% found their job in less than one month after the diploma examination and another 28.8% in less than three months. The paper also highlights the role the former graduates play in motivating teachers and students to efforts towards a better educational outcome.

  11. Graduate Study in Psychology, 2013 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    APA Books, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Graduate Study in Psychology" is the best source of information related to graduate programs in psychology and provides information related to approximately 600 graduate programs in psychology in the U.S. and Canada. "Graduate Study in Psychology" contains information about: (1) number of applications received by a program;…

  12. Leading Change: Curriculum Reform in Graduate Education in the Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Shoumita; Symes, Karen; Hyman, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences at the Boston University School of Medicine houses numerous dynamic graduate programs. Doctoral students began their studies with laboratory rotations and classroom training in a variety of fundamental disciplines. Importantly, with 15 unique pathways of admission to these doctoral programs, there were…

  13. Design and analysis of biomedical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær

    been allocated this field. It is utterly important to utilize these ressources responsibly and efficiently by constantly striving to ensure high-quality biomedical studies. This involves the use of a sound statistical methodology regarding both the design and analysis of biomedical studies. The focus...... have conducted a literature study strongly indicating that this structure commonly is neglected in the statistical analysis. Based on this closed-form expressions for the approximate type I error rate are formulated. The type I error rates are assessed for a number of factor combinations as they appear...... in practice and in all cases the type I error rates are demonstrated to be severely inflated. Prior to conducting a study it is important to perform power and sample size determinations to ensure that reliable conclusions can be drawn from the statistical analysis. We have formulated closed-form expressions...

  14. What do job adverts tell Higher Education about the ‘shape’ of Biomedical Engineering graduates?

    OpenAIRE

    Baruah, Bidyut Jyoti; Ward, Anthony Edward; Gbadebo, Adeyosola Adekunle

    2016-01-01

    Higher Education Institutions are required, at least in some Countries, to design their curricula taking into account the needs of relevant industry. Use of Industrial Advisory Committees is a common way of demonstrating this input. This paper explores an additional window to industry needs through the textual analysis of job advertisements. 36 internet published adverts using the “Biomedical Engineering” search phrase were downloaded and textually analysed to identify the mentioned technical...

  15. Should MD-PhD programs encourage graduate training in disciplines beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ryan J; Hsu, Stephen I; Wilson, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    The goal of MD-PhD training programs is to produce physician-scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician-scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD-PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This question is especially relevant because the central value and ultimate goal of the academic medicine community is to help attain the highest level of health and health equity for all people. Advances in medical science and practice, along with improvements in health care access and delivery, are steps toward health equity, but alone they will not come close to eliminating health inequalities. Addressing the complex health issues in our communities and society as a whole requires a biomedical research workforce with knowledge, practice, and research skills well beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences. To make real progress in advancing health equity, educational pathways must prepare physician-scientists to treat both micro and macro determinants of health. The authors argue that MD-PhD programs should allow and encourage their scholars to cross boundaries into less traditional disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics, anthropology, sociology, ethics, public policy, management, economics, education, social work, informatics, communications, and marketing. To fulfill current and coming health care needs, nontraditional MD-PhD students should be welcomed and supported as valuable members of our biomedical research workforce.

  16. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design

  17. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  18. Biomedical Visual Computing: Case Studies and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Johnson, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computational geometric modeling, imaging, and simulation let researchers build and test models of increasing complexity, generating unprecedented amounts of data. As recent research in biomedical applications illustrates, visualization will be critical in making this vast amount of data usable; it\\'s also fundamental to understanding models of complex phenomena. © 2012 IEEE.

  19. Biomedical Visual Computing: Case Studies and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Johnson, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computational geometric modeling, imaging, and simulation let researchers build and test models of increasing complexity, generating unprecedented amounts of data. As recent research in biomedical applications illustrates, visualization will be critical in making this vast amount of data usable; it's also fundamental to understanding models of complex phenomena. © 2012 IEEE.

  20. Developing a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum for professionalism and scientific integrity training for biomedical graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy L; Peiffer, Ann M; Lambros, Ann; Guthold, Martin; Johnson, A Daniel; Tytell, Michael; Ronca, April E; Eldridge, J Charles

    2010-10-01

    A multidisciplinary faculty committee designed a curriculum to shape biomedical graduate students into researchers with a high commitment to professionalism and social responsibility and to provide students with tools to navigate complex, rapidly evolving academic and societal environments with a strong ethical commitment. The curriculum used problem-based learning (PBL), because it is active and learner-centred and focuses on skill and process development. Two courses were developed: Scientific Professionalism: Scientific Integrity addressed discipline-specific and broad professional norms and obligations for the ethical practice of science and responsible conduct of research (RCR). Scientific Professionalism: Bioethics and Social Responsibility focused on current ethical and bioethical issues within the scientific profession, and implications of research for society. Each small-group session examined case scenarios that included: (1) learning objectives for professional norms and obligations; (2) key ethical issues and philosophies within each topic area; (3) one or more of the RCR instructional areas; and (4) at least one type of moral reflection. Cases emphasised professional standards, obligations and underlying philosophies for the ethical practice of science, competing interests of stakeholders and oversight of science (internal and external). To our knowledge, this is the first use of a longitudinal, multi-semester PBL course to teach scientific integrity and professionalism. Both faculty and students endorsed the active learning approach for these topics, in contrast to a compliance-based approach that emphasises learning rules and regulations.

  1. Career choices on graduation--a study of recent graduates from University College Cork.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Gerald

    2010-04-23

    INTRODUCTION: Irish dental graduates are eligible to enter general dental practice immediately after qualification. Unlike their United Kingdom counterparts, there is no requirement to undertake vocational training (VT) or any pre-registration training. VT is a mandatory 12-month period for all UK dental graduates who wish to work within the National Health Service. It provides structured, supervised experience in training practices and through organised study days. AIMS: This study aimed to profile the career choices made by recent dental graduates from UCC. It aimed to record the uptake of VT and associate posts, and where the graduates gained employment. METHODOLOGY: A self-completion questionnaire was developed and circulated electronically to recent graduates from UCC. An existing database of email addresses was used and responses were returned by post or by email. A copy of the questionnaire used is included as Appendix 1. RESULTS: Questionnaires were distributed over an eight-week period and 142 were returned, giving a response rate of 68.90%. Responses were gathered from those who graduated between 2001 and 2007; however, the majority came from more recent classes. Overall, the majority of graduates took up associate positions after qualification (71.8%) with smaller numbers undertaking VT (28.2%). Increasing numbers have entered VT in recent years, including 54.3% from the class of 2007. Overall, the majority of graduates initially took up positions in England (43%); however, in recent times more have been employed in Scotland. Subsequent work profiles of the graduates illustrate that the majority are now working as associates in general practice (51.4%) and in Ireland (54.2%). CONCLUSIONS: There has been an increase in the proportion of UCC graduates undertaking VT. Graduates tended to move away from Ireland initially to gain employment. There has been a shift away from employment in England towards Scotland where the majority of new UCC graduates are now

  2. Career choices on graduation a study of recent graduates from University College Cork.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Gerald

    2009-12-01

    Irish dental graduates are eligible to enter general dental practice immediately after qualification. Unlike their United Kingdom counterparts, there is no requirement to undertake vocational training (VT) or any pre-registration training. VT is a mandatory 12-month period for all UK dental graduates who wish to work within the National Health Service. It provides structured, supervised experience in training practices and through organised study days.

  3. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  4. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-01-01

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H - , H + , and D + ). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H - cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes

  5. Multisource feedback to graduate nurses: a multimethod study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Samantha; Phillips, Nicole M; Ockerby, Cherene; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2017-11-01

    (1) To explore graduate nurses' perceptions of the influence of multisource feedback on their performance and (2) to explore perceptions of Clinical Nurse Educators involved in providing feedback regarding feasibility and benefit of the approach. Graduate registered nurses are expected to provide high-quality care for patients in demanding and unpredictable clinical environments. Receiving feedback is essential to their development. Performance appraisals are a common method used to provide feedback and typically involve a single source of feedback. Alternatively, multisource feedback allows the learner to gain insight into performance from a variety of perspectives. This study explores multisource feedback in an Australian setting within the graduate nurse context. Multimethod study. Eleven graduates were given structured performance feedback from four raters: Nurse Unit Manager, Clinical Nurse Educator, preceptor and a self-appraisal. Thirteen graduates received standard single-rater appraisals. Data regarding perceptions of feedback for both groups were obtained using a questionnaire. Semistructured interviews were conducted with nurses who received multisource feedback and the educators. In total, 94% (n = 15) of survey respondents perceived feedback was important during the graduate year. Four themes emerged from interviews: informal feedback, appropriateness of raters, elements of delivery and creating an appraisal process that is 'more real'. Multisource feedback was perceived as more beneficial compared to single-rater feedback. Educators saw value in multisource feedback; however, perceived barriers were engaging raters and collating feedback. Some evidence exists to indicate that feedback from multiple sources is valued by graduates. Further research in a larger sample and with more experienced nurses is required. Evidence resulting from this study indicates that multisource feedback is valued by both graduates and educators and informs graduates

  6. Graduates' personality characteristics and labor market entry an empirical study among dutch economics graduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semeijn, J; Boone, C; van der Velden, R; van Witteloostuijn, A; van Velden, R.K.W.

    In this study, we explore the value of personality characteristics in explaining success in labor market entry with a sample of graduates in economics from Maastricht University (the Netherlands). Specifically, the paper addresses the following twofold research question: does personality explain

  7. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    and Berns. Mi. W. User pitotora- 26. Kestel. D.. And Chou. T. C. Tumer -localizing components of the ptirph% rin diation therapy of cancer following... cancer , (2) laser tissue interactions for the study of atherosclerosis, (3) pulsed laser effects on the eye, (4) laser application in genetic...these studies. Please refer to the appropriate article/abstract for further detail. 1. Dye plus laser photosensitization of cancer . Significant

  8. Revisit of Machine Learning Supported Biological and Biomedical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang-Tian; Wang, Lu; Zeng, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Generally, machine learning includes many in silico methods to transform the principles underlying natural phenomenon to human understanding information, which aim to save human labor, to assist human judge, and to create human knowledge. It should have wide application potential in biological and biomedical studies, especially in the era of big biological data. To look through the application of machine learning along with biological development, this review provides wide cases to introduce the selection of machine learning methods in different practice scenarios involved in the whole biological and biomedical study cycle and further discusses the machine learning strategies for analyzing omics data in some cutting-edge biological studies. Finally, the notes on new challenges for machine learning due to small-sample high-dimension are summarized from the key points of sample unbalance, white box, and causality.

  9. A Case Study: Data Management in Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R. Gaudette

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a biomedical engineering lab at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, co-author Dr. Glenn R. Gaudette and his research team are investigating the effects of stem cell therapy on the regeneration of function in damaged cardiac tissue in laboratory rats. Each instance of stem cell experimentation on a rat yields hundreds of data sets that must be carefully captured, documented and securely stored so that the data will be easily accessed and retrieved for papers, reports, further research, and validation of findings, while meeting NIH guidelines for data sharing. After a brief introduction to the bioengineering field and stem cell research, this paper focuses on the experimental workflow and the data generated in one instance of stem cell experimentation; the lab’s data management practices; and how Dr. Gaudette teaches data management to the lab’s incoming graduate students each semester. The co-authors discuss the haphazard manner by which engineering and science students typically learn data management practices, and advocate for the integration of formal data management instruction in higher education STEM curricula. The paper concludes with a discussion of the Frameworks for a Data Management Curriculum developed collaboratively by the co-authors’ institutions -- the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute -- to teach data management best practices to students in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering.

  10. Teaching ethical aptitude to graduate student researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Laura S; Harvill, Eric T

    2013-01-01

    Limited time dedicated to each training areas, irrelevant case-studies, and ethics "checklists" have resulted in bare-bones Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training for present biomedical graduate student researchers. Here, we argue that science graduate students be taught classical ethical theory, such as virtue ethics, consequentialist theory, and deontological theory, to provide a basic framework to guide researchers through ethically complex situations and examine the applicability, implications, and societal ramifications of their research. Using a relevant biomedical research example to illustrate this point, we argue that proper ethics training for graduate student researchers not only will enhance current RCR training, but train more creative, responsible scientists.

  11. What Do I Want to Be with My PhD? The Roles of Personal Values and Structural Dynamics in Shaping the Career Interests of Recent Biomedical Science PhD Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Kenneth D., Jr.; Griffin, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in faculty careers decreases as graduate training progresses; however, the process underlying career-interest formation remains poorly defined. To better understand this process and whether/how it differs across social identity (i.e., race/ethnicity, gender), we conducted focus groups with 38 biomedical scientists who received PhDs…

  12. Unemployment and psychological distress among graduates: A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Van Yperen, Nico W.

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal study which addresses the relationship between unemployment and psychological distress in Dutch technical college graduates is presented. Two samples were studied: sample 1 (N = 635) consisted of students leaving technical college and sample 2 (N = 487) consisted of technical college

  13. A Study of the Differential Achievement among Graduates of the University of Qatar, 1977-81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefein, Naim A.

    Achievement of University of Qatar graduates between 1977 and 1981 was studied. For the sample of 766 graduates, information was collected on sex, nationality, major, and year of graduation. The degree to which secondary school graduation scores can predict college achievement was examined using Pearson product moment correlation coefficients. The…

  14. Formulating Employability Skills for Graduates of Public Health Study Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomariyah, Nurul; Savitri, Titi; Hadianto, Tridjoko; Claramita, Mora

    2016-01-01

    Employability skills (ES) are important for effective and successful individual participation in the workplace. The main aims of the research were to identify important ES needed by graduates of Public Health Study Program Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (PHSP UAD) and to assess the achievement of the ES development that has been carried out by PHSP UAD.…

  15. 45 CFR 2400.63 - Excluded graduate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... arts in public affairs or public administration. The Foundation may at its discretion, upon request of... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded graduate study. 2400.63 Section 2400.63 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP...

  16. Newly-graduated midwives transcending barriers: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Michele J; Hauck, Yvonne L; O'Donoghue, Thomas; Clarke, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Midwifery has developed its own philosophy to formalise its unique identity as a profession. Newly-graduated midwives are taught, and ideally embrace, this philosophy during their education. However, embarking in their career within a predominantly institutionalised and the medically focused health-care model may challenge this application. The research question guiding this study was as follows: 'How do newly graduated midwives deal with applying the philosophy of midwifery in their first six months of practice?' The aim was to generate a grounded theory around this social process. This Western Australian grounded theory study is conceptualised within the social theory of symbolic interactionism. Data were collected by means of in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 11 recent midwifery graduates. Participant and interviewer's journals provided supplementary data. The 'constant comparison' approach was used for data analysis. The substantive theory of transcending barriers was generated. Three stages in transcending barriers were identified: Addressing personal attributes, Understanding the 'bigger picture', and finally, 'Evaluating, planning and acting' to provide woman-centred care. An overview of these three stages provides the focus of this article. The theory of transcending barriers provides a new perspective on how newly-graduated midwives deal with applying the philosophy of midwifery in their first six months of practice. A number of implications for pre and post registration midwifery education and policy development are suggested, as well as recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Employability of Graduates from International Development Studies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Knowledge to shape learning This study will collect and analyze longitudinal data ... Canadian Consortium of University Programs in International Development ... Call for new OWSD Fellowships for Early Career Women Scientists now open ... an opportunity for the awardees to develop their skills and network with some of ...

  18. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  19. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Dumas-Mallet

    Full Text Available To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers.We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk. Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses.Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8% and subsequent (58/600 9.7% lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1% than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%. Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48 than subsequent ones (29/45 and than lifestyle studies (31/63. Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38 than the neurological (26/41 or somatic (40/77 ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim.Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  20. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  1. Information behaviour of graduate students: a qualitative user study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorazd Vodeb

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a qualitative user study exploring information behaviour of graduate students. The study is conceptually based on Brenda Dervin’s Sense-Making Methodology. The information behaviour is conceptualised as a process. The author conducted 13 interviews using the time-line micro moment interview technique. Data were transcribed and then condensed using the ATLAS/ti program for qualitative analysis. The basic approach to the analysis was to compare the moments of sense making instances within the situation of the same actor and also a comparison of moments across situations of different actors. The characteristics of actors’ situations was described. The most intensive information activity of graduate students was found during the completion of their studies. The proposed model consisted of three successive types of gaps: topic selection gap, topic ignorance gap and literature collecting gap. The article also presents findings about the process of writing and information habits.

  2. Employment preferences of Lithuanian MA graduates in economic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaitiekus Novikevičius

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available People may demonstrate preferences for different alternatives when choosing a workplace, for example: wages, career opportunities or workplace location. It is therefore important to determine which of the alternatives provides the maximum performance for the respondents. For this purpose, the authors have carried out extensive research of utility functions, originated theoretical models and / or employed practically. Unfortunately, there has been a lack of such research in Lithuania. The paper aims to examine the preferences and financial incentives based on the utility aspect Lithuanian master’s graduates in economic studies, including financial incentives, when they choose a workplace. The paper formulates the definition of the utility functions and the analysis its types. Moreover, it analyzes the utility functions of the MA graduates in economic studies from four universities, distinguishes their preferences and major financial incentives which give them the maximum utility.

  3. Ten years of Developing International Volcanology Graduate Study Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W. I.

    2010-12-01

    In 2000 I reported at this symposium about multi-institutional graduate field trips to IAVCEI events, such as the Bali meeting and its importance in building international collegiality and awareness among the volcanology doctoral students. NSF was an enthusiastic supporter of these field sessions and this support has continued through the highly successful Pucon and Reykjavik sessions. International volcanology graduate program development began with several exchange programs. EHaz was a highly successful program (McGill, Simon Fraser, Michigan Tech, Buffalo, UNAM and Universidad de Colima) funded by the Department of Education (FIPSE) that moved students across North America where dozens of graduate students spent semesters of their study abroad and shared annual field trips and online student led graduate seminar classes. Michigan Tech’s volcanology graduate program started a Masters International program that combined Peace Corps service with hazards mitigation graduate study and students were placed by Peace Corps in countries with prominent natural hazards. The new program funded 2 year residences in foreign environments, principally in Pacific Latin America. NSF strongly supported this program from its inception, and eventually it gained NSF PIRE support. Dozens of students have initiated the 3 year program (15 completed) to date. A similar PIRE developed at UAF with a link to volcanology in the Russian Far East. One gain is the development of many socially-conscious research selections. Beginning this year transatlantic dual degree masters programs in volcanology are being offered by a consortium of US and European volcanology programs (Michigan Tech, Buffalo, Clermont Ferrand and University of Milan Bicocca), again aided by FIPSE funding. Students have dual advisors on both sides of the Atlantic and spend about half of their two year programs in Europe and half in US. Faculty also travel in the program and the four campuses are increasingly linked by

  4. A qualitative study of male dental hygienists' experiences after graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, C C

    1999-01-01

    This report is part of a larger study undertaken in 1996 and 1997 for the author's doctoral dissertation. The study's purpose was to explore the experiences of male dental hygienists--focusing on their experiences before, during, and after graduation. The researcher interviewed 14 practicing male dental hygienists from east of the Mississippi River and one participant from the Midwest. Because of the length of the study, only their experiences following graduation from a dental hygiene program are discussed. Qualitative research methods were used to evaluate the information gained from the interviews, which entails analyzing interview transcripts and developing themes from the data. Four post-graduation themes emerged: participants experienced (1) no job-search difficulties, although some participants experienced minor problems with securing a position, most had little trouble in finding a job; (2) societal gender discrimination, mainly in relation to societal stereotypes about what men and women should do; (3) mixed feelings of acceptance by the profession, although most felt the profession accepting, there were some feelings of not belonging; and (4) career satisfaction, all but one of the participants felt satisfied with his career choice.

  5. Graduate studies on optoelectronics in Argentina: an experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Juan C.; Garea, María. T.; Isaurralde, Silvia; Perez, Liliana I.; Raffo, Carlos A.

    2014-07-01

    The number of graduate programs in Optoelectronics in Argentina is scarce. The current Optics and Photonics Education Directory lists only three programs. One of them was launched in 2001 in the Facultad de Ingeniería (College of Engineering), Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA). This was the first graduate program in the field, leading to a Master Degree in Optoelectronics. This decision arose from the demand of telecommunications industries and several estate- or private-funded research institutions working with us in the fields of lasers, optics, remote sensing, etc. A great bonus was the steady work, during several decades, of research groups in the College on the development of different type of lasers and optical non destructive tests and their engineering applications. As happened in many engineering graduate programs in Argentina at that time, few non full-time students could finish their studies, which called for 800 hours of traditional lecture-recitation classes, and the Master Thesis. In recent years Argentine Education authorities downsized the Master programs to 700 hours of blended learning and we redesigned the Graduate Optoelectronic Engineering Program to meet the challenge, dividing it in two successive one year programs, the first aimed at a professional training for almost immediate insertion in the labor market (called Especialización en Ingeniería Optoelectrónica), and the second (called Maestría en Ingeniería Optoelectrónica y Fotónica) aimed at a more academic and research target to comply with the UBA standards for Master degrees. The present work is a presentation of the new program design, which has begun in the current year.

  6. Perspectives and Plans for Graduate Studies. 14. Physics and Astronomy 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Council on Graduate Studies, Toronto. Advisory Committee on Academic Planning.

    On the instruction of the Council of Ontario Universities, the Advisory Committee on Academic Planning has conducted a planning assessment for graduate studies in physics and astronomy. Contents of the report encompass future enrollment projections in physics graduate studies, the distribution of physics graduate students among the universities,…

  7. Biomedical Engineering and Cognitive Science Secondary Science Curriculum Development: A Three Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stacy S.; Sherwood, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on a multi-year effort to create and evaluate cognitive-based curricular materials for secondary school science classrooms. A team of secondary teachers, educational researchers, and academic biomedical engineers developed a series of curriculum units that are based in biomedical engineering for secondary level students in…

  8. Balancing the Scholarship Demands of Forensics and Graduate Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Glenn

    It is difficult to strike a balance between the demands placed on graduate students and those placed on graduate forensics assistants. The combination of duties as Graduate Forensics Assistants (GFAs)--baby sitters, confidants, teachers, travel agents, administrators, clerical workers, psychologists, proofreaders, authority figures, and finally,…

  9. A Lifespan Study of Cooperative Education Graduates: Quantitative Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Patricia L.; Ferguson, Jane

    1999-01-01

    Career histories of 73 graduates of Antioch College's liberal arts co-op program, 1946-55, showed an average of 6.5 jobs before retirement and high rates of self-employment. Those with low performance in cooperative education were much more likely to have earned graduate degrees. Self-employed graduates had more varied jobs and retired later. (SK)

  10. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roozen, K.

    1995-02-15

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

  11. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  12. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roozen, K.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel's Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization

  13. Balancing Work, Family, and Student Roles: A Phenomenological Study of the Adult Female Graduate Online Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Charlene X.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of female adult learners pursuing graduate degrees online. As online graduate programs have become increasingly popular and more readily available in the last decade, more women than men are enrolling in online graduate programs in addition to…

  14. Role of institutional climate in fostering diversity in biomedical research workforce: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Gary C; Hurd, Yasmin; Palermo, Ann-Gel S; Delbrune, Denise; Saran, Suman; Zony, Chati; Krulwich, Terry A

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the barriers to diversity in biomedical research and describes the evolution of efforts to address climate issues to enhance the ability to attract, retain, and develop underrepresented minorities, whose underrepresentation is found both in science and medicine, in the graduate-school biomedical research doctoral programs (PhD and MD/PhD) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. We also describe the potential beneficial impact of having a climate that supports diversity and inclusion in the biomedical research workforce. The Mount Sinai School of Medicine diversity-climate efforts are discussed as part of a comprehensive plan to increase diversity in all institutional programs: PhD, MD/PhD, and MD, and at the residency, postdoctoral fellow, and faculty levels. Lessons learned from 4 decades of targeted programs and activities at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine may be of value to other institutions interested in improving diversity in the biomedical science and academic medicine workforce. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  15. The contribution of the health management studies program to the professional status of graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller-Hayon, Orit; Korn, Liat; Magnezi, Racheli

    2015-11-13

    This study examines the contribution of the Health Management Bachelor's degree program at an Israeli university to the professional development of its graduates. The aims of this study were: To examine the perceived gaps between acquired knowledge and required knowledge within the workforce; To explore the potential changes in the graduates' occupation conditions or professional status following their studies; To test the contribution of the curricula content studied by the graduates to their understanding, knowledge and integration within the healthcare system; and to examine the graduates perceptions towards required content, that should be added to the curricula. A structured, self-reported questionnaire was administered to 182 Health Management Department individuals whom have graduated from the Bachelors program between the years 2005 and 2009. The majority of the graduates reported the existance of a knowledge gap (greater among males, young and single than among females, older and married graduates). Most of the courses which were ranked as the lowest contributing ones were related to Management (e.g. Mathematics for Social Sciences, Accounting Fundamentals, Finance Theory), while the graduates recommended the inclusion of additional components to the curricula. The study demonstrates that a perceived gap exists between the acquired and the required knowledge of the Health Management Studies graduates. Various changes have been reported by the graduates (such as wage raise and role changes), following their study completion, suggesting that the program has partially contributed to their professional status. A 'Learning by Sharing' forum of academic staff, employers and graduates is recommended.

  16. Can informetrics shape biomedical research? A case study of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomedical research is burgeoning as new dangerous diseases and healing methods emerge. Informetrics defined as methods or a research field that uses mathematical and statistical techniques and/or models to examine patterns that show up not only in publications but also in many aspects of life, as long as the patterns ...

  17. Biomedical techniques in translational studies: The journey so far ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomedical techniques have wide clinical application in many fields of medicine such as oncology, rheumatology, immunology, genomics, cardiology and diagnostics; among others. This has been made possible with the use of genetic engineering and a number of techniques like Immunohistochemistry (IHC), Fluorescent ...

  18. Team Development Measure in Interprofessional Graduate Education: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Lora Humphrey; Roman, Marian; Skolits, Gary; Raynor, Hollie; Thompson, Dixie; Franks, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    A faculty team developed the 4-week Recovery-Based Interprofessional Distance Education (RIDE) rotation for graduate students in their disciplines. The evaluation team identified the Team Development Measure (TDM) as a potential alternative to reflect team development during the RIDE rotation. The TDM, completed anonymously online, was piloted on the second student cohort (N = 18) to complete the RIDE rotation. The overall pretest mean was 60.73 points (SD = 11.85) of a possible 100 points, indicating that students anticipated their RIDE team would function at a moderately high level during the 4-week rotation. The overall posttest mean, indicating student perceptions of actual team functioning, was 72.71 points (SD = 23.31), an average increase of 11.98 points. Although not statistically significant, Cohen's effect size (d = 0.43) indicates an observed difference of large magnitude. No other published work has used the TDM as a pre-/posttest measure of team development. The authors believe the TDM has several advantages as a measure of student response to interprofessional education offerings, particularly in graduate students with prior experience on health care teams. Further work is needed to validate and extend the findings of this pilot study. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 56(4), 18-22.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Motivating American Indians into Graduate Studies. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    There are no quick and easy tips to motivating American Indian students into graduate education. The decision to make a commitment of time and money to graduate training, particularly at the doctoral level, and the ability to succeed in such a program, is affected by a number of factors: (1) parental and peer encouragement; (2) awareness of career…

  20. Re-Engineering Graduate Skills--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Chenicheri Sid; Patil, Arun; Mertova, Patricie

    2009-01-01

    Research on student-learning outcomes indicates that university graduates do not possess important skills required by employers, such as communication, decision-making, problem-solving, leadership, emotional intelligence, social ethics skills as well as the ability to work with people of different backgrounds. Today, engineering graduates are…

  1. Perceptions of Plagiarism by STEM Graduate Students: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Michelle; Schwieder, David; Buhler, Amy; Bennett, Denise Beaubien; Royster, Melody

    2015-12-01

    Issues of academic integrity, specifically knowledge of, perceptions and attitudes toward plagiarism, are well documented in post-secondary settings using case studies for specific courses, recording discourse with focus groups, analyzing cross-cultural education philosophies, and reviewing the current literature. In this paper, the authors examine the perceptions of graduate students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines at the University of Florida regarding misconduct and integrity issues. Results revealed students' perceptions of the definition and seriousness of potential academic misconduct, knowledge of institutional procedures, and views on faculty actions, all with a focus on divergences between U.S. and internationally-educated students. The open-ended questions provide anecdotal evidence to highlight personal experiences, positive and negative, aimed at the faculty, international students and undergraduates. Combined, these findings outline an important part of the campus academic integrity culture at a major American university. Recommendations for local actions also are discussed.

  2. Rules and management of biomedical waste at Vivekananda Polyclinic: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Saurabh; Boojh, Ram; Mishra, Ajai; Chandra, Hem

    2009-01-01

    Hospitals and other healthcare establishments have a 'duty of care' for the environment and for public health, and have particular responsibilities in relation to the waste they produce (i.e., biomedical waste). Negligence, in terms of biomedical waste management, significantly contributes to polluting the environment, affects the health of human beings, and depletes natural and financial resources. In India, in view of the serious situation of biomedical waste management, the Ministry of Environment and Forests, within the Government of India, ratified the Biomedical Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, in July 1998. The present paper provides a brief description of the biomedical waste (Management and Handling) Rules 1998, and the current biomedical waste management practices in one of the premier healthcare establishments of Lucknow, the Vivekananda Polyclinic. The objective in undertaking this study was to analyse the biomedical waste management system, including policy, practice (i.e., storage, collection, transportation and disposal), and compliance with the standards prescribed under the regulatory framework. The analysis consisted of interviews with medical authorities, doctors, and paramedical staff involved in the management of the biomedical wastes in the Polyclinic. Other important stakeholders that were consulted and interviewed included environmental engineers (looking after the Biomedical Waste Cell) of the State Pollution Control Board, and randomly selected patients and visitors to the Polyclinic. A general survey of the facilities of the Polyclinic was undertaken to ascertain the efficacy of the implemented measures. The waste was quantified based on random samples collected from each ward. It was found that, although the Polyclinic in general abides by the prescribed regulations for the treatment and disposal of biomedical waste, there is a need to further build the capacity of the Polyclinic and its staff in terms of providing state

  3. Electrical circuits in biomedical engineering problems with solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Keskin, Ali Ümit

    2017-01-01

    This authored monograph presents a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of electrical circuit theory in biomedical engineering, ideally suited as textbook for a course program. The book contains methods and theory, but the topical focus is placed on practical applications of circuit theory, including problems, solutions and case studies. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in electrical engineering who intend to embark on biomedical applications. The book is also very well suited for graduate students in the field. .

  4. Agricultural Education and Farming in Taiwan: A Study of the Graduates from Vocational and Technical Agriculture Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Dept. of Agricultural and Extension Education.

    A research project studied the accomplishments of 399 of the 3,780 1982 and 1984 graduates from 6 senior vocational agriculture programs and 500 of the 2,661 1984 graduates from 2 technical agriculture institutes in Taiwan. Information was also provided from the graduates' schools and about older graduates from a 1975 study. Data were gathered…

  5. [Literature cited in a study of Yugoslav biomedical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkić, S; Pejić, M; Cikić, B

    1995-01-01

    The paper reviews results of a research on literature cited in papers published in two most remarkable Yugoslav biomedical journals, Medicinski Pregled and Srpski arhiv za celokupno lekarstvo, in 1985 and 1992. The analysis included the following parameters: the amount of published papers, the quantity of cites out of the literature that has been used, frequency of citation of foreign and domestic literature as well as the quantity of self citations. According to the gathered results, foreign literature is remarkably more often cited than the domestic references, mostly in English, but the percentage of citing one's own papers is also high.

  6. Graduate studies in instrumentation at the University of Provence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carette, M.; Reynard, C.; Claire, N.; Deschaintres, J. L.; Felts, B.; Lyoussi, A.; Andre, J.; Bertin, D.

    2009-01-01

    The University of Provence instrumentation department offers a high level of graduate and post graduate engineering programs. Its mission is to form technician experts and engineers with a deep knowledge in their discipline: metrology, instrumentation, tests, Research and Development, automatism and industrial process control. The specialty of master on test facilities instrumentation has been developed in collaboration with the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) since 2004. This curriculum offers now a specialization in nuclear detection and nuclear instrumentation. More than 80% of the graduates formed by block-release training of master find a job within 6 months

  7. Bio-medical CMOS ICs

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2011-01-01

    This book is based on a graduate course entitled, Ubiquitous Healthcare Circuits and Systems, that was given by one of the editors. It includes an introduction and overview to biomedical ICs and provides information on the current trends in research.

  8. Project Alexander the Great: a study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O

    2008-01-01

    Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering is considered amongst the most reputable fields within the global arena, and will likely be the primer for any future breakthroughs in Medicine and Biology. Bioengineering/biomedical engineering education has evolved since late 1950s and is undergoing advancement in leading academic institutions worldwide. This paper delineates an original study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and bears the name 'Project Alexander the Great'. The initial step of the project was to survey all 10448 universities, recognized by the International Association of Universities, spread among the 193 member states of the United Nations within the six continents. The project aims at identifying, disseminating, and networking, through the world-wide-web, those institutions of higher learning that provide bioengineering/biomedical engineering education. The significance of this project is multifold: i) the inception of a web-based 'world-map' in bioengineering/biomedical engineering education for the potential international student desiring to pursue a career in this field; ii) the global networking of bioengineering/biomedical engineering academic/research programs; iii) the promotion of first-class bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and the catalysis of global proliferation of this field; iv) the erection of bridges among educational institutions, industry, and professional societies or organizations involved in Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering; and v) the catalysis in the establishment of framework agreements for cooperation among the identified institutions offering curricula in this field. This paper presents the results obtained from Africa and North America. The whole project is due to be completed by 2009.

  9. Are we studying what matters? Health priorities and NIH-funded biomedical engineering research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jessica B; Paltiel, A David; Saltzman, W Mark

    2010-07-01

    With the founding of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in 1999, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) made explicit its dedication to expanding research in biomedical engineering. Ten years later, we sought to examine how closely federal funding for biomedical engineering aligns with U.S. health priorities. Using a publicly accessible database of research projects funded by the NIH in 2008, we identified 641 grants focused on biomedical engineering, 48% of which targeted specific diseases. Overall, we found that these disease-specific NIH-funded biomedical engineering research projects align with national health priorities, as quantified by three commonly utilized measures of disease burden: cause of death, disability-adjusted survival losses, and expenditures. However, we also found some illnesses (e.g., cancer and heart disease) for which the number of research projects funded deviated from our expectations, given their disease burden. Our findings suggest several possibilities for future studies that would serve to further inform the allocation of limited research dollars within the field of biomedical engineering.

  10. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  11. Processes influencing the development of graduate nurse capabilities in clinical risk management: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2006-01-01

    To explore and describe key processes influencing the development of graduate nurse capabilities in clinical risk management (CRM). This study was undertaken using an exploratory descriptive case study method. Four sample units of analysis were used, notably: 2 cohorts of graduate nurses (n = 11) undertaking a 12-month graduate nurse transition program; key stakeholders (n = 34), that is, nurse unit managers, clinical teachers, preceptors, a quality manager, a librarian, and senior nurse administrators employed by the participating health service; patient outcome data; and pertinent literature. Data strongly suggested that graduate nurse capabilities in CRM were most influenced not by their supposed lack of clinical knowledge and skills but by their lack of corporate knowledge. The failure to provide new graduate nurses with pertinent information on CRM at the beginning of their employment and thereafter at pertinent intervals during the graduate nurse year program aslo hindered the development of their capabilities to manage clinical risk. Management and educational processes pertinent to informing and involving new graduate nurses in a hospital's local CRM program (including information about the organization's local policies and procedures) need to be implemented systematically at the very beginning of a new graduate's employment and thereafter throughout the remainder of the graduate nurse year.

  12. An Exploratory Study of NNES Graduate Students' Reading Comprehension of English Journal Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kate Tzu-Ching

    2017-01-01

    The academic success of non-native English speaker (NNES) graduate students greatly relies on their ability to read and comprehend English journal articles (EJA). The purpose of this study was to identify NNES graduate students' comprehension difficulties and reading strategies when reading EJA. In addition, the study explored how the relationship…

  13. Acculturation Needs of Pediatric International Medical Graduates: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osta, Amanda D; Barnes, Michelle M; Pessagno, Regina; Schwartz, Alan; Hirshfield, Laura E

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: International medical graduates (IMGs) play a key role in host countries' health systems but face unique challenges, which makes effective, tailored support for IMGs essential. Prior literature describing the acculturation needs of IMGs focused primarily on communication content and style. We conducted a qualitative study to explore acculturation that might be specific to IMG residents who care for children. In a study conducted from November 2011 to April 2012, we performed four 90-minute semistructured focus groups with 26 pediatric IMG residents from 12 countries. The focus group transcripts were analyzed using open and focused coding methodology. The focus groups and subsequent analysis demonstrated that pediatric IMG residents' socialization to their home culture impacts their transition to practice in the United States; they must adjust not only to a U.S. culture, different from their own, but also to the culture of medicine in the United States. We identified the following new acculturation themes: understanding the education system and family structure, social determinants of health, communication with African American parents, contraception, physician handoffs, physicians' role in prevention, adolescent health, and physicians' role in child advocacy. We further highlight the acculturation challenges faced by pediatric IMG residents and offer brief recommendations for the creation of a deliberate acculturation curriculum for pediatric IMG residents. Insight: Residency training is a unique period in physicians' personal and professional development and can be particularly challenging for IMGs. There is a significant gap in the identified acculturation needs and the current curricula available to IMG residents who care for children.

  14. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  15. Wage Differentials by Field of Study--The Case of German University Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Barbara S.; Goerlitz, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Using data on German university graduates, this paper analyzes wage differentials by field of study at labor market entry and five to six years later. At both points of time, graduates from arts/humanities have lower average monthly wages compared to other fields. Blinder-Oaxaca decompositions show that these wage differentials can be explained…

  16. Career Choice and Unemployment Length: A Study of Graduates from a South African University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mncayi, Precious; Dunga, Steven Henry

    2016-01-01

    Graduate unemployment is especially problematic in a country where much emphasis is placed on furthering academic studies for economic and personal rewards. This article investigates the relationship between career choice and unemployment length among graduates from a South African university. Data were collected by means of a survey questionnaire…

  17. Factors Affecting the Intention to Become an Entrepreneur: A Study from Bangladeshi Business Graduates Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir , S M; Haque , Ahasanul; Sarwar , Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The current stage of entrepreneurial culture in Bangladesh encourages rethinking about the content and approach of teaching in entrepreneurship education. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying the factors influencing Bangladeshi graduates' intention toward becoming entrepreneurs. A sample of 387 business graduate students was selected randomly from both private and public universities located in Dhaka and Rajshahi. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelin...

  18. Graduation and Withdrawal from RN Programs. A Report of the Nurse Career-Pattern Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Lucille

    Based on a larger longitudinal study, this document examines three nursing groups--those entering schools preparing registered nurses in 1962, 1965, and 1967. It describes and compares those who graduated and those who withdrew before graduation and examines the reasons why the students withdraw from both the students' and the program directors'…

  19. Follow-Up Study of 1983 Legal Technology Graduates. Volume 12, No. 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Sharrie; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to determine the employment and educational status of graduates of the Legal Technology (LTE) program 6 months after receiving their degree. Attempts were made to contact all 59 1983 LTE graduates for telephone interviews and compare their responses to findings from previous…

  20. Exploring Predictors of Graduate School and Career Success: A Case Study in Sport Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCrom, Carrie; Rufer, Lisa; Slavich, Mark; Dwyer, Brendan; Greenhalgh, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The following case study attempted to assess what factors contribute to graduate school and early-career success among sport management graduate students. As faculty members charged with admitting the next generation of leaders in the sport industry, how should admissions decisions be made and what factors should be considered? The authors…

  1. An Empirical Study on the Job Satisfaction of College Graduates in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changjun, Yue

    2014-01-01

    This study used nationwide, randomly sampled data from the Peking University Institute of Economics of Education 2011 survey of college graduates to conduct an empirical analysis of their job satisfaction. The results indicate that work-related factors have a significant effect on the job satisfaction of college graduates, while nonwork factors…

  2. Trends in Funding Selected Graduate Professional Programs in a Private Urban University: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, William Marshall

    From the 1950's to the 1970's, graduate student tuition funding trends at Saint Louis University were studied for the business administration, education, law, and medicine programs. Administration of a questionnaire to graduate degree recipients resulted in a return of 1,453 usable responses. The most important external source for tuition funding…

  3. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchem, L.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps

  4. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. (ed.); Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  5. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. [ed.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  6. Knowledge, attitude, and practices about biomedical waste management among healthcare personnel: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesh Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The waste produced in the course of healthcare activities carries a higher potential for infection and injury than any other type of waste. Inadequate and inappropriate knowledge of handling of healthcare waste may have serious health consequences and a significant impact on the environment as well. Objective: The objective was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practices of doctors, nurses, laboratory technicians, and sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was conducted among hospitals (bed capacity >100 of Allahabad city. Participants: Medical personnel included were doctors (75, nurses (60, laboratory technicians (78, and sanitary staff (70. Results: Doctors, nurses, and laboratory technicians have better knowledge than sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Knowledge regarding the color coding and waste segregation at source was found to be better among nurses and laboratory staff as compared to doctors. Regarding practices related to biomedical waste management, sanitary staff were ignorant on all the counts. However, injury reporting was low across all the groups of health professionals. Conclusion: The importance of training regarding biomedical waste management needs emphasis; lack of proper and complete knowledge about biomedical waste management impacts practices of appropriate waste disposal.

  7. Graduate and Post-MLS Study in Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blummer, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    As librarians confront the Information Age, it is imperative that they remain aware of the issues that affect the profession. Traditional library skills are no longer adequate for maintaining a competitive edge in the field. Post-graduate education in digital libraries offers information professionals an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of…

  8. Educational Leadership: An Alternative for Graduate Studies in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This paper offers a rationale and a design for a graduate program in Educational Leadership to be implemented in Venezuelan universities. The rationale for the program points out that schools are the main source of leadership development, and teachers and administrators need to be aware of their leadership roles and their roles as agents of…

  9. Relations between Study and Employment: Music Graduates in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Ileana S.; Lorenzo, Oswaldo

    2013-01-01

    Higher education programs in Puerto Rico include undergraduate degrees in music, music education, composition, popular music, jazz and Caribbean music, and, most recently, a master’s degree in music education. However, little is known about what music graduates do after concluding college. Do they work in music-related areas? Are they satisfied…

  10. Suitability of customer relationship management systems for the management of study participants in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanke, J; Rienhoff, O; Schulze, T G; Nussbeck, S Y

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal biomedical research projects study patients or participants over a course of time. No IT solution is known that can manage study participants, enhance quality of data, support re-contacting of participants, plan study visits, and keep track of informed consent procedures and recruitments that may be subject to change over time. In business settings management of personal is one of the major aspects of customer relationship management systems (CRMS). To evaluate whether CRMS are suitable IT solutions for study participant management in biomedical research. Three boards of experts in the field of biomedical research were consulted to get an insight into recent IT developments regarding study participant management systems (SPMS). Subsequently, a requirements analysis was performed with stakeholders of a major biomedical research project. The successive suitability evaluation was based on the comparison of the identified requirements with the features of six CRMS. Independently of each other, the interviewed expert boards confirmed that there is no generic IT solution for the management of participants. Sixty-four requirements were identified and prioritized in a requirements analysis. The best CRMS was able to fulfill forty-two of these requirements. The non-fulfilled requirements demand an adaption of the CRMS, consuming time and resources, reducing the update compatibility, the system's suitability, and the security of the CRMS. A specific solution for the SPMS is favored instead of a generic and commercially-oriented CRMS. Therefore, the development of a small and specific SPMS solution was commenced and is currently on the way to completion.

  11. Using Video Games to Develop Graduate Attributes: a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    It may be argued that most higher education courses are not explicitly designed to teach or develop desirable soft skills such as critical thinking, communication, resourcefulness or adaptability. While such skills – often referred to as ‘graduate attributes’ – are assumed to be developed as a by-product of a university education, there is little empirical evidence to support this assumption. Furthermore, traditional didactic teaching methods do not typically require students to exhibit such ...

  12. Advisory group meeting on stable isotope labelled compounds in biomedical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Ruiz, H.; Parr, R.M.

    1985-11-01

    The programme of the meeting was restricted to topics involving applications of stable isotopes of the lighter elements (H, C, N, O). The current status of stable isotope techniques and applications in nutritional and biomedical studies, the applicability of these techniques in developing countries and the IAEA's future programmes on this topic were discussed

  13. Indicators for the dynamics of research organizations: A biomedical case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, R.; van den Besselaar, P.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports results on a bibliometric case study of the long-term development of research organizations, using an internationally leading biomedical institute as example. Using scientometric concepts, small group theory, organizational ecology, and process-based organizational theory, we

  14. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors’ early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Methods Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974–2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. Results One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort) to 4.2% (2005 cohort) but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort). Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort). The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors’ ‘domestic circumstances’ were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while ‘enthusiasm/commitment’, ‘financial prospects’, ‘experiences of the job so far’ and ‘a particular teacher/department’ were important. Conclusions Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The correspondence between early

  15. PASSIM – an open source software system for managing information in biomedical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neogi Sudeshna

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the crucial aspects of day-to-day laboratory information management is collection, storage and retrieval of information about research subjects and biomedical samples. An efficient link between sample data and experiment results is absolutely imperative for a successful outcome of a biomedical study. Currently available software solutions are largely limited to large-scale, expensive commercial Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS. Acquiring such LIMS indeed can bring laboratory information management to a higher level, but often implies sufficient investment of time, effort and funds, which are not always available. There is a clear need for lightweight open source systems for patient and sample information management. Results We present a web-based tool for submission, management and retrieval of sample and research subject data. The system secures confidentiality by separating anonymized sample information from individuals' records. It is simple and generic, and can be customised for various biomedical studies. Information can be both entered and accessed using the same web interface. User groups and their privileges can be defined. The system is open-source and is supplied with an on-line tutorial and necessary documentation. It has proven to be successful in a large international collaborative project. Conclusion The presented system closes the gap between the need and the availability of lightweight software solutions for managing information in biomedical studies involving human research subjects.

  16. Important skills for biomedical services: The perspectives of Malaysian employers and employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntat, Yahya; Saud, Muhammad Sukri; Mokhtar, Mahani; Kamin, Yusri; Feh, Lim Set

    2016-10-17

    Increase in the occurrence of existing diseases, continual emergence of new or exotic diseases and re-emergence of old diseases have placed increasing demands on biomedical services in Malaysia. Biomedical technicians play an important role in operating biomedical instruments. However, there are no clear specifications about characteristics and traits for these semi-professional employees. Employers in a few studies claimed that biomedical graduates are not ready to enter and face challenges in the job market. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify technical and generic skills for a biomedical technician from the perspectives of the biomedical technicians and their employers. A quantitative survey design was employed whereby data were obtained through the administration of an instrument developed by the researchers. The sample consisted of 20 hospital managers and 186 biomedical technicians who are currently working in Malaysian government hospitals. The findings show that there are no difference in the perceptions of hospital managers and biomedical technicians regarding technical and non-technical skills. These findings resulted in a checklist which can be used for institutions to produce future biomedical technician graduates in order to meet job demands. However, future research is needed to validate the findings and explore the variables in depth.

  17. Graduate Students' Interest in Immunology as a Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Frimpong, Michael; Sylverken, Augustina Angelina; Arthur, Yarhands D.; Ahuno, Samuel T.; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis

    2017-01-01

    Interest and motivation significantly influence achievement; however, interest in immunology remains to be determined. Using a structured questionnaire, the current study assessed for the first time interest in immunology among biomedical graduate students in Ghana after a one-week introduction to immunology course. Our results revealed that…

  18. Newly graduated nurses use of knowledge sources in clinical decison-making - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri

    of clinical decisions, based on transparent, articulate and reflective use of knowledge sources. Furthermore, it is implied that nurses are able to retrieve, asses, implement and evaluate research evidence. To meet these requirements, nursing educations around the world have organised curricula to educate...... graduated nurses do not work within a framework of evidence-based practice. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses’ use in their clinical decision-making and why they use them in order to understand why newly graduated nurses use research and components...... within evidence-based practice to a limited extent. The thesis is based on a synthesis of findings from two studies. The aim of the first study was to explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses use in clinical decision making as reported within international qualitative research. The purpose...

  19. Preparing students for graduate study: an eLearning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintz, Christine; Posey, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the development and preliminary evaluation of an eLearning program intended to provide incoming nursing students with the basic knowledge, skills and abilities needed to succeed in graduate-level, online coursework. Using Mayer's principles (2008) for the effective design of multimedia instruction, an open-access, self-directed, online program was developed. The Graduate School Boot Camp includes five online modules focused on learning strategies and time management, academic writing, technology, research, and library skills. To motivate and engage learners, the program integrates a fun, graphical sports theme with audiovisual presentations, examples, demonstrations and practice exercises. Learners begin with a self-assessment based on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire or MSLQ (Pintrich et al., 1993). To assess change in knowledge levels before and after completing the program, learners take a pre-test and post-test. Preliminary findings indicate that the students found the information relevant and useful. They enjoyed the self-paced, multimedia format, and liked the option to return to specific content later. This innovative program offers a way to prepare students proactively, and may prove useful in identifying students at risk and connecting them with the appropriate resources to facilitate successful program completion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhan, Milo A; Akl, Elie A; Bryant, Dianne; Xie, Feng; Apolone, Giovanni; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-02-23

    Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty) and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of manuscripts.

  1. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhan Milo A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of

  2. Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research Case Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zackary Suleiman

    A publication of the College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences, University of Sierra Leone ... Case Study ... Peri-operative management of patients with significant cardio-respiratory disease ... contribute to patient safety by preventing any.

  3. The nature and implications of support in graduate nurse transition programs: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga; Currie, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that support is critical to graduate nurse transition from novice to advanced beginner-level practitioner and to the integration of neophyte practitioners into safe and effective organizational processes. Just what constitutes support, however, and why (if at all) support is important, when, ideally, support should be given, by whom, how, and for how long, have not been systematically investigated. Building on the findings (previously reported) of a year long study that had, as its focus, an exploration and description of processes influencing the successful integration of new graduate nurses into safe and effective organizational processes and systems, the findings presented in this article strongly suggest that support is critical to the process of graduate nurse transition, and that integration into "the system" is best provided during the first 4 weeks of a graduate nurse transition program and thereafter at the beginning of each ward rotation; that "informal teachers" and the graduate nurses themselves are often the best sources of support; and that the most potent barriers to support being provided are the untoward attitudes of staff toward new graduates. Drawing on the overall findings of the study, a new operational definition of support is proposed and recommendations are made for future comparative research on the issue.

  4. Biomedical and health studies with the new Canadian SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, R.E.; Hancock, R.G.V.; Isles, K.; Hill, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on clinical patients who had malnutrition, cystic fibrosis and other related electrolyte disorders. A stable activable tracer technique has been developed to determine the extracellular fluid volume (ECV) of infants. A regulated dose of sodium bromide is injected into the patient and, following short-term equilibration and dilution of this sample, a small blood sample is taken, yielding 50 μl of plasma. The plasma bromide concentration is determined by 80 Br (T=18 m) activation. Some samples were cross-checked by a microdiffusion method. The technique has been applied to 230 patients and controls, and has proved to be simple, rapid, accurate and sensitive for determining ECV to +-6%. Patients with cystic fibrosis (C.F.) were studied with respect to their growth and their sodium and electrolyte balance. In related clinical studies, hair and nail clippings from 50 C.F. patients and control children of the same age groups were activated at SLOWPOKE and Cu, Ca, Br, Cl, K, Na and I determined for use in differentiating C.F., along with a number of other elements including Zn, Mn, Al, Ti and Ni which showed little difference. A fairly good correlation of hair and nail concentrations was found for a number of the elements determined, suggesting that either tissue may be used in future studies. (T.G.)

  5. Motivations to Enroll in Education Graduate Programs in Jordan: A Qualitative Field Study at Yarmouk University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Farhan A. Alqudah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to identify the causes and motives of Yarmouk University students to enroll in graduate programs of educational disciplines in Jordan. Ten students (6 males and 4 females participated in the study. The study used qualitative research method by means of in-depth interviews during which the participants were given various open questions in each session so as to express their views about the issue under investigation. After the analysis of participants’ responses, it was found that they focused on the following motives: career advancement; creation of wider job opportunities; social motivation, which focuses on improving the social status; formation of social relationships; friends and family’s encouragement to pursue graduate studies. Then economic motives were brought in by the participants, who believed that to get a graduate degree would increase their income, career promotion, personal living standards, and job opportunities abroad. The results also pointed to the role of psychological motivation for admission to the College of Graduate Studies. This would provide psychological stability and satisfaction, and self-esteem. There was also a reference to the admission policies at universities which became more flexible than before, whereby standards have also changed. This made admission more open than before, which encouraged more students to apply to graduate programs. They also added that in view of these standards and policies, it is clear that more students will apply to the graduate programs in the future; and other new disciplines would be opened in the future as well. Keywords: Motivations of enrollment, Graduate studies, Programs, Educational disciplines, Qualitative study, Yarmouk University, Jordan.

  6. Linking biomedical engineering ethics case study approach and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrell, William; Dobie, Elizabeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we link bioengineering case study methods to the development of policy. The case study approach to ethics is an excellent way to show the complex nature of practical/moral reasoning. This approach can, however, lead to a kind of overwhelming complexity. The individual nature of each case makes it difficult to identify the most important information and difficult to see what moral considerations are most relevant. In order to make the overwhelming complexity less debilitating, we present a framework for moral decision making derived from suggestions made by W.D. Ross and Virginia Held. Ross articulates the multiple sources of morality and Held deepens the discussion by reminding us of the foundational importance of care and sympathy to our moral natures. We show how to use the notion of prima facie duty and discuss moral conflict. In doing this, we show how the framework, applied to cases, can be of assistance in helping us develop policies and codes of ethics with sufficient plasticity to be useful in the complex world of the bioengineer.

  7. Biomedical signal and image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Sergio; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Anna; Caiani, Enrico; Contini, Davide; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Dercole, Fabio; Rienzo, Luca; Liberati, Diego; Mainardi, Luca; Ravazzani, Paolo; Rinaldi, Sergio; Signorini, Maria; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Generally, physiological modeling and biomedical signal processing constitute two important paradigms of biomedical engineering (BME): their fundamental concepts are taught starting from undergraduate studies and are more completely dealt with in the last years of graduate curricula, as well as in Ph.D. courses. Traditionally, these two cultural aspects were separated, with the first one more oriented to physiological issues and how to model them and the second one more dedicated to the development of processing tools or algorithms to enhance useful information from clinical data. A practical consequence was that those who did models did not do signal processing and vice versa. However, in recent years,the need for closer integration between signal processing and modeling of the relevant biological systems emerged very clearly [1], [2]. This is not only true for training purposes(i.e., to properly prepare the new professional members of BME) but also for the development of newly conceived research projects in which the integration between biomedical signal and image processing (BSIP) and modeling plays a crucial role. Just to give simple examples, topics such as brain–computer machine or interfaces,neuroengineering, nonlinear dynamical analysis of the cardiovascular (CV) system,integration of sensory-motor characteristics aimed at the building of advanced prostheses and rehabilitation tools, and wearable devices for vital sign monitoring and others do require an intelligent fusion of modeling and signal processing competences that are certainly peculiar of our discipline of BME.

  8. Consumer nueroscience: a new area of study for biomedical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    In scientific literature, the most accepted definition of consumer neuroscience or neuromarketing is that it is a field of study concerning the application of neuroscience methods to analyze and understand human behavior related to markets and marketing exchanges. First, it might seem strange that marketers would be interested in using neuroscience to understand consumer's preferences. Yet in practice, the basic goal of marketers is to guide the design and presentation of products in such a way that they are highly compatible with consumer preferences. To understand consumers preferences, several standard research tools are commonly used by marketers, such as personal interviews with the consumers, scoring questionnaries gathered from consumers, and focus groups. The reason marketing researchers are interested in using brain imaging tools instead of simply asking people for their preferences in front of marketing stimuli, arises from the assumption that people cannot (or do not want to) fully explain their preference when explicitly asked. Researchers in the field hypothesize that neuroimaging tools can access information within the consumer's brain during the generation of a preference or the observation of a commercial advertisement. The question of will this information be useful in further promoting the product is still up for debate in marketing literature. From the marketing researchers point of view, there is a hope that this body of brain imaging techniques will provide an efficient tradeoff between costs and benefits of the research. Currently, neuroscience methodology includes powerful brain imaging tools based on the gathering of hemodynamic or electromagnetic signals related to the human brain activity during the performance of a relevant task for marketing objectives. These tools are briefly reviewed in this article.

  9. Teacher Education Graduate Tracer Study from 2010 to 2014 in One State University in Batangas, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anania B. Aquino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Teacher Education institutions primarily aim of producing competent and highly qualified graduates employable here and abroad. Tracer studies on graduates can appropriately provide valuable information for evaluating the results of the education and training of a specific institution of higher education. It collects essential information concerning the employment profile of graduates, their undergraduate experience, the first and current jobs of graduates and the relevance of their educational background and skills required in their job. The main objective of this study was to trace the employment profile of the graduates after they obtained their teacher education degree. The descriptive survey method of research was applied to this research with a survey questionnaire as the main data gathering instrument. It analyzed data from 129 respondents characterized by a preponderance of females over male as females and unmarried or single graduates as opposed to those who were married. The study found that there were more respondents who finished Bachelor of Secondary Education (BSED over Bachelor of Elementary Education. They obtained this degree as they believed that teaching is a rewarding and challenging profession, Majority are Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET passers and are employed in public schools at the time of the study. Their present job, mostly professional in nature, was also their first job and relevant to their degree. It took only a moderate period of time for most graduates to land a job. Most stay in their job for economic reason, finding communication skills and human relation skills as part of their teacher education preparation very relevant to their jobs.

  10. THE GENERAL CONTEXTUAL FRAME FOR PLACING SUPERIOR STUDIES GRADUATES IN THE WORK MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELICIA ANDRIONI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Integration in a workplace is an interaction rapport between the individual and the environment. The process of professional integration is strongly linked to the professional aspiration, individual expectations, motivation, and work satisfaction. Placing young graduates of superior studies on the labour market is a challenge for contemporary society. Identifying a suitable work place as well as the certainty of the attained work place are very important elements for young superior studies graduates in the current context of economic crysis. The difficulties in getting a job for superior studies graduates are most frequently associated with lacks in what regards the speciality practical skills and generally, insertion in the work market is achived by getting a position in fields that are related or even different from the speciality field. In an extremely unstable social and economic context, people’s ability to quickly adapt to the requirements of the labour market is fundamental. In this respect, education and professional training have an important role, contributing to the update of knowledge, skills and qualifications of superior studies graduates or future superior studies graduates, eventually allowing them to stay active, flexible, adapted to the situations and requirements of the labour market.

  11. A Student Team in a University of Michigan Biomedical Engineering Design Course Constructs a Microfluidic Bioreactor for Studies of Zebrafish Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-chi; Li, David; Al-Shoaibi, Ali; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahid; Flak, Betsy; Perrin, Catherine; Winslow, Max; Shah, Harsh; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Schmedlen, Rachael H.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish is a valuable model for teaching developmental, molecular, and cell biology; aquatic sciences; comparative anatomy; physiology; and genetics. Here we demonstrate that zebrafish provide an excellent model system to teach engineering principles. A seven-member undergraduate team in a biomedical engineering class designed, built, and tested a zebrafish microfluidic bioreactor applying microfluidics, an emerging engineering technology, to study zebrafish development. During the semester, students learned engineering and biology experimental design, chip microfabrication, mathematical modeling, zebrafish husbandry, principles of developmental biology, fluid dynamics, microscopy, and basic molecular biology theory and techniques. The team worked to maximize each person's contribution and presented weekly written and oral reports. Two postdoctoral fellows, a graduate student, and three faculty instructors coordinated and directed the team in an optimal blending of engineering, molecular, and developmental biology skill sets. The students presented two posters, including one at the Zebrafish meetings in Madison, Wisconsin (June 2008). PMID:19292670

  12. Biomedical solid waste management in an Indian hospital: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Gayathri V.; Pokhrel, Kamala

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (i) to assess the waste handling and treatment system of hospital bio-medical solid waste and its mandatory compliance with Regulatory Notifications for Bio-medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 1998, under the Environment (Protection Act 1986), Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Govt. of India, at the chosen KLE Society's J. N. Hospital and Medical Research Center, Belgaum, India and (ii) to quantitatively estimate the amount of non-infectious and infectious waste generated in different wards/sections. During the study, it was observed that: (i) the personnel working under the occupier (who has control over the institution to take all steps to ensure biomedical waste is handled without any adverse effects to human health and the environment) were trained to take adequate precautionary measures in handling these bio-hazardous waste materials, (ii) the process of segregation, collection, transport, storage and final disposal of infectious waste was done in compliance with the Standard Procedures, (iii) the final disposal was by incineration in accordance to EPA Rules 1998 (iv) the non-infectious waste was collected separately in different containers and treated as general waste, and (v) on an average about 520 kg of non-infectious and 101 kg of infectious waste is generated per day (about 2.31 kg per day per bed, gross weight comprising both infectious and non-infectious waste). This hospital also extends its facility to the neighboring clinics and hospitals by treating their produced waste for incineration

  13. Biomedical waste management: Study on the awareness and practice among healthcare workers in a tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-medical waste has a higher potential of infection and injury to the healthcare worker, patient and the surrounding community. Awareness programmes on their proper handling and management to healthcare workers can prevent the spread of infectious diseases and epidemics. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to assess the impact of training, audits and education/implementations from 2009 to 2012 on awareness and practice of biomedical waste segregation. Our study reveals focused training, strict supervision, daily surveillance, audits inspections, involvement of hospital administrators and regular appraisals are essential to optimise the segregation of biomedical waste.

  14. Biomedical waste management: study on the awareness and practice among healthcare workers in a tertiary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, L; Paul, H; Premkumar, J; Paul, R; Michael, J S

    2015-01-01

    Bio-medical waste has a higher potential of infection and injury to the healthcare worker, patient and the surrounding community. Awareness programmes on their proper handling and management to healthcare workers can prevent the spread of infectious diseases and epidemics. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to assess the impact of training, audits and education/implementations from 2009 to 2012 on awareness and practice of biomedical waste segregation. Our study reveals focused training, strict supervision, daily surveillance, audits inspections, involvement of hospital administrators and regular appraisals are essential to optimise the segregation of biomedical waste.

  15. Exploring the thesis experience of Master of Health professions education graduates: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeith, Leslie; Ridinger, Heather; Srinivasan, Sushant; Givi, Babak; Youssef, Nazih; Harris, Ilene

    2018-04-27

    To explore the thesis experience of recent Master of Health Professions Education (MHPE) graduates in the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) program. This is a qualitative case study exploring the experience of MHPE graduates between 2014 and 2016 (n=31). Using convenience sampling, all graduates with an email address (n=30) were invited to participate in an online survey and semi-structured interviews. Interviews were completed in-person or via telephone or video conference; interviewers collected detailed notes and audio recordings.  Two authors independently analyzed the data iteratively using thematic analysis and discrepancies were discussed and resolved. Survey results (n=20, 67%) revealed an average graduation of 5.1 years; 10 graduates (33%) were interviewed. Three themes related to the thesis experience were identified: success factors, challenges, and outcomes. Success factors, when present, promoted completion of a thesis; these included: a supportive program environment, time management, available resources, MHPE foundational coursework, aligning theses with career goals, and identifying a project with limited scope. Challenges made thesis completion more difficult for graduates; these included: institutional factors, personal or professional responsibilities, burnout, externally-imposed deadlines, and barriers in the research process. Despite these challenges, completing the thesis resulted in many professional or personal benefits (outcomes). Multiple success factors and challenges were identified in the master's thesis process among MHPE graduates at UIC. These findings can help students conducting education-based scholarship through the master's thesis process. This study also informs program evaluation and improvements and outlines personal and professional outcomes of completing a master's thesis.

  16. Aligning Higher Education to Workforce Needs in Liberia: A Tracer Study of University Graduates in Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flomo, John S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the congruence between higher education and the labor market from the perspectives of college graduates in Liberia. It specifically examined the alignment of the skills college students acquire in college to Liberia's labor market. The study employed a Tracer Study quantitative research methodology. Tracer study as a…

  17. Characterizing semantic mappings adaptation via biomedical KOS evolution: a case study investigating SNOMED CT and ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Julio Cesar; Pruski, Cédric; Da Silveira, Marcos; Reynaud-Delaître, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Mappings established between Knowledge Organization Systems (KOS) increase semantic interoperability between biomedical information systems. However, biomedical knowledge is highly dynamic and changes affecting KOS entities can potentially invalidate part or the totality of existing mappings. Understanding how mappings evolve and what the impacts of KOS evolution on mappings are is therefore crucial for the definition of an automatic approach to maintain mappings valid and up-to-date over time. In this article, we study variations of a specific KOS complex change (split) for two biomedical KOS (SNOMED CT and ICD-9-CM) through a rigorous method of investigation for identifying and refining complex changes, and for selecting representative cases. We empirically analyze and explain their influence on the evolution of associated mappings. Results point out the importance of considering various dimensions of the information described in KOS, like the semantic structure of concepts, the set of relevant information used to define the mappings and the change operations interfering with this set of information.

  18. The role of biomedical knowledge in echocardiographic interpretation expertise development: a correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Gøtzsche, Ole; Eika, Berit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about factors of relevance for achieving knowledge of echocardiography (TTE); one of the essential skills defined by the European Society of Cardiology Core Curriculum. Recent research in other fields suggests that biomedical knowledge plays a more prominent role in profe......Purpose: Little is known about factors of relevance for achieving knowledge of echocardiography (TTE); one of the essential skills defined by the European Society of Cardiology Core Curriculum. Recent research in other fields suggests that biomedical knowledge plays a more prominent role...... in professional practice than previously assumed. This study investigates the role of biomedical knowledge represented by physiology knowledge in the development of echocardiographic expertise. Methods: Forty-five physicians (15 novices, 15 intermediates and 15 experts) were evaluated on echocardiography...... interpretation skills. An anatomical focused checklist was developed based on Danish Cardiology Society guidelines for a standard echocardiography of adults. A TTE case of a common and complex clinical presentation was recorded and presented to participants on a portable computer using EchoPac software...

  19. Starting Out: A time-lagged study of new graduate nurses' transition to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Cummings, Greta; Leiter, Michael; Wong, Carol; MacPhee, Maura; Ritchie, Judith; Wolff, Angela; Regan, Sandra; Rhéaume-Brüning, Ann; Jeffs, Lianne; Young-Ritchie, Carol; Grinspun, Doris; Gurnham, Mary Ellen; Foster, Barbara; Huckstep, Sherri; Ruffolo, Maurio; Shamian, Judith; Burkoski, Vanessa; Wood, Kevin; Read, Emily

    2016-05-01

    As the nursing profession ages, new graduate nurses are an invaluable health human resource. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors influencing new graduate nurses' successful transition to their full professional role in Canadian hospital settings and to determine predictors of job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions over a one-year time period in their early employment. A national two-wave survey of new graduate nurses across Canada. A random sample of 3906 Registered Nurses with less than 3 years of experience currently working in direct patient care was obtained from the provincial registry databases across Canada. At Time 1, 1020 of 3743 eligible nurses returned completed questionnaires (usable response rate=27.3%). One year later, Time 1 respondents were mailed a follow-up survey; 406 returned a completed questionnaire (response rate=39.8%). Surveys containing standardized questionnaires were mailed to participants' home address. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using SPSS software. Overall, new graduate nurses were positive about their experiences and committed to nursing. However, over half of new nurses in the first year of practice reported high levels of emotional exhaustion and many witnessed or experienced incivility (24-42%) at work. Findings from hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that situational and personal factors explained significant amounts of variance in new graduate nurses' job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions. Cynicism was a significant predictor of all four outcomes one year later, while Psycap predicted job and career satisfaction and career turnover intentions. Results provide a look into the worklife experiences of Canadian new graduate nurses over a one-year time period and identify factors that influence their job-related outcomes. These findings show that working conditions for new graduate nurses are generally

  20. Exploring Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Biology Graduate Teaching Assistants through Their Participation in Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampley, Sandra A.; Gardner, Grant E.; Barlow, Angela T.

    2018-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) are responsible for teaching the majority of biology undergraduate laboratory sections, although many feel underprepared to do so. This study explored the impact of biology GTA participation in a professional development model known as lesson study. Using a case study methodology with multiple qualitative data…

  1. Addiction Studies: Exploring Students' Attitudes toward Research in a Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Raven; Simons, Lori

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted to compare addiction studies and community counseling students' attitudes toward research. A survey of 66 addiction studies and 17 community counseling students in graduate programs was used to explore interest and self-efficacy in research and the research training environment. A pre/post test design was used to…

  2. A critical assessment of the perceptions of graduates regarding their generic skills level: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elroy Eugene Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the perceptions of potential Business Management graduates regarding their generic skills level.  To achieve the aim of this article, a literature study and empirical research were undertaken.  A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 205 potential Business Management graduates at a tertiary institution. To investigate the relationship between the independent and dependent variables, thirteen null-hypotheses were tested.  The results revealed some significant relationships between these variables.  Seven predetermined generic skills factors, namely basic, communication, management, environmental awareness, intellectual, self and career management as well as interpersonal skills, were identified and empirically tested in this article.  Skills development should take place within an overall framework providing for the coordination and progression of skills development from first to final year of study.  Future curricula development should specifically focus on developing those skills lacking most by potential graduates as identified in this article.

  3. A Study of the Information Seeking Behavior of Communication Graduate Students in Their Research Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chuan Chen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thesis is the research outcome that a graduate student spends most of his or her time and energies to achieve. Therefore, the research process of student’s thesis writing is an important topic to be investigated. The main purpose of this study is to explore graduate students’ information seeking behavior during the process of thesis writing. Ten graduate students in the field of communication were interviewed, and their information horizon maps as well as bibliographical references were analyzed also. Results showed that the library, as a formal channel, is the primary source for graduate students. The documents that they used most often were theses and dissertations, monographs, and journals. In addition to the formal channels, social network also played as a very important role in students’ research process. The networks even changed their information seeking behaviors in formal channels. Students reported several problems encountered in the research process, such as lacking of the background knowledge of the interdisciplinary, being unable to find out the core and relevant documents from the search results, etc. In conclusion, graduate students’ information seeking behavior changed at different stages in the research process. [Article content in Chinese

  4. Is Effective and Structured Training Key to Successful Biomedical Waste Management in Hospital : A Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Shishir Basarkar

    2014-01-01

    Background The study is interventional in nature because the training has been done as an intervention. The study was done to find out the impact of training on knowledge level of the hospital staff who is dealing with biomedical waste on day to day basis. Methodology The study was conducted on 184 staff members during July – Sept 2012 in multispecialty tertiary care hospital. The survey form was prepared and was applied to all participants in person before and after the training was condu...

  5. Improving completion rates of students in biomedical PhD programs: an interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viđak, Marin; Tokalić, Ružica; Marušić, Matko; Puljak, Livia; Sapunar, Damir

    2017-08-25

    Analysis of graduation success at the University of Split School of Medicine PhD programs conducted in 2011 revealed that only 11% of students who enrolled and completed their graduate coursework between 1999 and 2011 earned a doctoral degree. In this prospective cohort study we evaluated and compared three PhD programs within the same medical school, where the newest program, called Translational Research in Biomedicine (TRIBE), established in the academic year 2010/11, aimed to increase the graduation rate through an innovative approach. The intervention in the new program was related to three domains: redefined recruitment strategy, strict study regulations, and changes to the curriculum. We compared performance of PhD students between the new and existing programs and analyzed their current status, time to obtain a degree (from enrolment to doctorate), age at doctorate, number of publications on which the thesis was based and the impact factor of journals in which these were published. These improvement strategies were associated with higher thesis completion rate and reduced time to degree for students enrolled in the TRIBE program. There was no change in the impact factor or number of publications that were the basis for the doctoral theses. Our study describes good practices which proved useful in the design or reform of the PhD training program.

  6. A study to assess the knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The proper handling and disposal of bio-medical waste is very imperative. Unfortunately, laxity and lack of adequate knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste disposal leads to staid health and environment apprehension. Aim: To assess the knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste management ...

  7. Improvements to a Neuroscience Graduate Program Derived from an Analysis of Previous Studies of Quality in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    money. With the cost of tuition having increased by five percent the last two years, ( Gose , 1997) the financing ofa graduate education can be an area...Maher B. (1995). Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States: Continuity and Change. Washington, D.C.: National Research Council. 102 103 Gose , B

  8. A Five Year Study of Selected Demographics of Middlesex Community College Graduates: 1985-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, John H.; Muzeroll, Terry

    This analysis of selected demographic statistics of Middlesex Community College (MxCC) graduates is intended for future academic advising, curriculum planning, and decision making. This demographic profile is comprised of data from studies published between 1985 and 1989. The study focuses on fundamental demographic indicators, such as sex, age,…

  9. Recommended Skill Requirements of Recent Management Information Systems Graduates for Employment: A Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, Michael A., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Modified Delphi study was to achieve a consensus and forecast a prediction from expert IT hiring managers on what skills are required of MIS graduates for employment. In doing so, guidance could be provided to academic leaders who design curricula for MIS students on the required skills for employment. This study was conducted…

  10. Study abroad programs: Using alumni and graduate students as affiliate faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sheri; Wing, Debra; Miles, Leslie; Heaston, Sondra; de la Cruz, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To expand student appreciation of global health and diversity, many schools of nursing offer study abroad programs. However, this type of labor-intensive program can be difficult in light of faculty shortages and constrained resources. The authors discuss how these issues were addressed using alumni and graduate students as affiliate teachers in 3 clinical study abroad settings.

  11. The Reverberations of a Graduate Study Abroad Course in India: Transformational Journeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson Sathe, Laurie; Geisler, Carol C.

    2017-01-01

    Faculty in a transdisciplinary graduate program in holistic health studies, which is grounded in transformational learning led a study abroad course in India. The focus of the course is on perspectives of health and healing in India, including an understanding of Yoga, meditation, Ayurvedic medicine, and Tibetan medicine. The purpose of this…

  12. Success Stories of Undergraduate Retention: A Pathways Study of Graduate Students in Solar and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C. A.; Stoll, W.; Moldwin, M.; Gross, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation describes results from an NSF-funded study of the pathways students in solar and space physics have taken to arrive in graduate school. Our Pathways study has documented results from structured interviews conducted with graduate students attending two, week-long, NSF-sponsored scientific workshops during the summer of 2011. Our research team interviewed 48 solar and space physics students (29 males and 19 females currently in graduate programs at US institutions,) in small group settings regarding what attracted and retained them along their pathways leading to grad school. This presentation addresses what these students revealed about the attributes and influences that supported completion of their undergraduate experience and focused their aspirations toward graduate school. In advance of the interview process, we collected 125 on-line survey responses from students at the two workshops. This 20-item survey included questions about high school and undergraduate education, as well as about research and graduate experience. A subset of the 125 students who completed this on-line survey volunteered to be interviewed. Two types of interview data were collected from the 48 interviewees: 1) written answers to a pre-interview questionnaire; and 2) detailed notes taken by researchers during group interviews. On the pre-interview questionnaire, we posed the question: "How did you come to be a graduate student in your field?" Our findings to date are based on an analysis of responses to this question, cross correlated with the corresponding on-line survey data. Our analysis reveals the importance of early research experiences. About 80% of the students participating in the Pathways study cited formative undergraduate research experiences. Moreover, about 50% of participants reported undergraduate research experiences that were in the field of their current graduate studies. Graduate students interviewed frequently cited a childhood interest in science

  13. A case study exploring the experience of graduate entry nursing students when learning in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Gemma; Pollock, Kristian; Crawford, Paul

    2015-09-01

    To explore how Graduate Entry Nursing students present and position themselves in practice in response to anti-intellectualist stereotypes and assessment structures. A complex background turbulence exists in nurse education which incorporates both pro- and anti-intellectualist positions. This represents a potentially challenging learning environment for students who are recruited onto pre-registration programmes designed to attract graduates into the nursing profession on the basis of the specific attributes they bring known as 'graduateness'. A longitudinal qualitative case study conducted over 2 years. Data were collected from eight Graduate Entry Nursing students at 6 monthly points between 2009-2011 via diaries, clinical assessment documentation and interviews. Forty interviews took place over 2 years. Additionally, three focus groups involving 12 practice assessors were conducted at the end of the study period. Data were analysed through a social constructivist lens and compared with a set of suppositions informed by existing empirical and theoretical debates. Demonstrated the interplay of performance strategies adopted by Graduate Entry Nursing students to challenge or pre-empt actual or perceived negative stereotypes held by established practitioners to gain acceptance, reduce threat and be judged as appropriately competent. Students interpreted and responded to, perceived stereotypes of nursing practice they encountered in ways which facilitated the most advantageous outcome for themselves as individuals. The data present the creative and self-affirming strategies which students adopted in response to the expectations generated by these stereotypes. They also depict how such strategies commonly involved suppression of the attributes associated with 'graduateness'. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The graduate entry generation: a qualitative study exploring the factors influencing the career expectations and aspirations of a graduating cohort of graduate entry dental students in one London institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Dentistry in the UK has a number of new graduate-entry programmes. The aim of the study was to explore the motivation, career expectations and experiences of final year students who chose to pursue a dental career through the graduate entry programme route in one institution; and to explore if, and how, their intended career expectations and aspirations were informed by this choice. Method In-depth interviews of 14 graduate entry students in their final year of study. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. Results There were three categories of factors influencing students' choice to study dentistry through graduate entry: 'push', 'pull' and 'mediating'. Mediating factors related to students' personal concerns and circumstances, whereas push and pull factors related to features of their previous and future careers and wider social factors. Routes to Graduate Entry study comprised: 'early career changers', 'established career changers' and those pursuing 'routes to specialisation'. These routes also influenced the students' practice of dentistry, as students integrated skills in their dental studies, and encountered new challenges. Factors which students believed would influence their future careers included: vocational training; opportunities for specialisation or developing special interests and policy-related issues, together with wider professional and social concerns. The graduate entry programme was considered 'hard work' but a quick route to a professional career which had much to offer. Students' felt more could have been made of their pre-dental studies and/or experience during the programme. Factors perceived as influencing students' future contribution to dentistry included personal and social influences. Overall there was strong support for the values of the NHS and 'giving back' to the system in their future career. Conclusion Graduate entry students appear to be motivated to enter dentistry by a range of

  15. The graduate entry generation: a qualitative study exploring the factors influencing the career expectations and aspirations of a graduating cohort of graduate entry dental students in one London institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul; Cabot, Lyndon; Wilson, Nairn H F; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2011-09-24

    Dentistry in the UK has a number of new graduate-entry programmes. The aim of the study was to explore the motivation, career expectations and experiences of final year students who chose to pursue a dental career through the graduate entry programme route in one institution; and to explore if, and how, their intended career expectations and aspirations were informed by this choice. In-depth interviews of 14 graduate entry students in their final year of study. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. There were three categories of factors influencing students' choice to study dentistry through graduate entry: 'push', 'pull' and 'mediating'. Mediating factors related to students' personal concerns and circumstances, whereas push and pull factors related to features of their previous and future careers and wider social factors. Routes to Graduate Entry study comprised: 'early career changers', 'established career changers' and those pursuing 'routes to specialisation'. These routes also influenced the students' practice of dentistry, as students integrated skills in their dental studies, and encountered new challenges.Factors which students believed would influence their future careers included: vocational training; opportunities for specialisation or developing special interests and policy-related issues, together with wider professional and social concerns.The graduate entry programme was considered 'hard work' but a quick route to a professional career which had much to offer. Students' felt more could have been made of their pre-dental studies and/or experience during the programme. Factors perceived as influencing students' future contribution to dentistry included personal and social influences. Overall there was strong support for the values of the NHS and 'giving back' to the system in their future career. Graduate entry students appear to be motivated to enter dentistry by a range of factors which suit their preferences and

  16. The graduate entry generation: a qualitative study exploring the factors influencing the career expectations and aspirations of a graduating cohort of graduate entry dental students in one London institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nairn HF

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dentistry in the UK has a number of new graduate-entry programmes. The aim of the study was to explore the motivation, career expectations and experiences of final year students who chose to pursue a dental career through the graduate entry programme route in one institution; and to explore if, and how, their intended career expectations and aspirations were informed by this choice. Method In-depth interviews of 14 graduate entry students in their final year of study. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. Results There were three categories of factors influencing students' choice to study dentistry through graduate entry: 'push', 'pull' and 'mediating'. Mediating factors related to students' personal concerns and circumstances, whereas push and pull factors related to features of their previous and future careers and wider social factors. Routes to Graduate Entry study comprised: 'early career changers', 'established career changers' and those pursuing 'routes to specialisation'. These routes also influenced the students' practice of dentistry, as students integrated skills in their dental studies, and encountered new challenges. Factors which students believed would influence their future careers included: vocational training; opportunities for specialisation or developing special interests and policy-related issues, together with wider professional and social concerns. The graduate entry programme was considered 'hard work' but a quick route to a professional career which had much to offer. Students' felt more could have been made of their pre-dental studies and/or experience during the programme. Factors perceived as influencing students' future contribution to dentistry included personal and social influences. Overall there was strong support for the values of the NHS and 'giving back' to the system in their future career. Conclusion Graduate entry students appear to be motivated to enter

  17. Violence against new graduated nurses in clinical settings: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Hassankhani, Hadi; Negarandeh, Reza; Jeffrey, Carol; Azizi, Azim

    2017-09-01

    Ethical studies in nursing are very important topics, and it is particularly crucial with vulnerable populations such as new graduated nurses. Neglecting ethical principles and violence toward graduates can lead to their occupational burnout, job dissatisfaction, and leaving the nursing profession. This study was designed with the aim of understanding the experience of Iranian experienced nurses' use of lateral and horizontal violence against new graduated nurses. This qualitative study used a conventional content analysis approach; it was conducted with 18 experienced nurses. Data were collected through unstructured and semi-structured interviews of various general hospital departments in northwest of Iran and analyzed using methods as described by Graneheim and Lundman. Ethical considerations: This study was approved by the Regional Committee of Medical Research Ethics. The ethical principles of voluntary participation, anonymity, and confidentiality were considered. "Psychological violence," "Verbal violence," "Physical violence," and "Source of violence" were four categories extracted through data analysis. Violence behaviors are instances of workplace maltreatment that damage individual nurses, quality of care, and the ethical climate of the healthcare settings. The lateral and hierarchical violence in nursing were explained by oppressed group model. This study provided the context for identifying details of various types of workplace violence against new graduated nurses. It should be approached as a health system priority that requires specific multi-dimensional methods to manage consisting of identification, strategic planning, policymaking, prevention, education, and research.

  18. Raising African American Student Graduation Rates: A Best Practices Study of Predominantly White Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore best practices at small, private liberal arts institutions that experienced large increases in African American graduation rates. Particular focus was on institutions that enrolled less than 17% minority students whose overall enrollment fell within the middle 50% of all SAT scores and the middle 50% of…

  19. Dropout Prevention: A Study of Prevention Programs Used by High Schools to Increase Graduation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study focused on the relationship between dropout prevention programs and graduation rates in one school district in Florida during the 2010-2011 school year. The dropout prevention program data analyzed included high school principals' perceptions in regard to perceived effectiveness, fidelity of implementation, cost efficacy,…

  20. Evaluability Assessment Thesis and Dissertation Studies in Graduate Professional Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Tamara M.; Trevisan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluability assessment (EA) has potential as a design option for thesis and dissertation studies, serving as a practical training experience for both technical and nontechnical evaluation skills. Based on a content review of a sample of EA theses and dissertations from graduate professional degree programs, the authors of this article found that…

  1. Study of the Supply of and Demand for Law School Graduates in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Higher Education Commission, Annapolis.

    This report examined 10-year trends in applications to Maryland's two law schools (the University of Baltimore School of Law and the University of Maryland School of Law), enrollment, and the first-time passage rates of graduates on the Maryland Bar Examination. Breakdowns by gender and race are also provided. The study also explored the projected…

  2. Summary Report: Admissions, Applications, and Acceptances. Graduate Study in Psychology 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Daniel S.; Cope, Caroline; Fowler, Garth A.

    2015-01-01

    The 2016 Graduate Study in Psychology Summary Report reflects data collected from more than 500 departments and programs offering master's and doctoral degrees in psychology and related training. This report represents data from the 2013-2014 academic year and aggregates these data in the following areas: survey participation; admissions review,…

  3. A Survey Study of Autonomous Learning by Chinese Non-English Major Post-Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    This thesis reports a survey study of the autonomous L2 learning by 100 first-year non-English-major Chinese post-graduates via the instruments of a questionnaire and semi-structured interview after the questionnaire. It attends to address the following research question: To what extent do Chinese postgraduate students conduct autonomous L2…

  4. Gender composition of college graduates by field of study and early fertility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bičáková, Alena; Jurajda, Štěpán

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2017), s. 1323-1343 ISSN 1569-5239 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G130 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : field-of-study gender segregation * college graduates * fertility Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics , Econometrics Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2016

  5. Gender composition of college graduates by field of study and early fertility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bičáková, Alena; Jurajda, Štěpán

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2017), s. 1323-1343 ISSN 1569-5239 Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : field-of-study gender segregation * college graduates * fertility Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics , Econometrics Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2016

  6. Why Do Tertiary Education Graduates Regret Their Study Program? A Comparison between Spain and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucel, Aleksander; Vilalta-Bufi, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the determinants of regret of study program for tertiary education graduates in Spain and the Netherlands. These two countries differ in their educational system in terms of the tracking structure in their secondary education and the strength of their education-labor market linkages in tertiary education. Therefore, by…

  7. Exploring Gender through Education Abroad Programs: A Graduate Student Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dian D.; Williams, Terry E.; Cartwright, Matthew; Jourian, T. J.; Monter, Marie; Weatherford, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This case study explores how graduate students who attended a short-term education abroad program understood gender as a result of participation in the trip. Findings reveal that students' understandings of gender are influenced by in and out of class contexts. Implications for faculty and education abroad practitioners are shared to deepen and…

  8. Graduate Students' Research Interest in Business Ethics: A Study of Dissertations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris; Guyette, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the nature of business ethics education during graduate-level training is somewhat limited. One approach in determining advanced students' research interest in the area is to examine the selection of "business ethics" topics for dissertation research. The current study addressed this issue by conducting a topical…

  9. Career Anchors and Career Paths: A Panel Study of Management School Graduates. Technical Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Edgar H.

    The first of a series, this report describes a 10-year followup study of a sample of 44 graduates of the Sloan School of Management, analyzing the interaction of personal values and career events in the lives of managers in organizations. All 44 participants were located, interviewed, and given the same attitude surveys as in the early 1960's.…

  10. Learning Sustainability Leadership: An Action Research Study of a Graduate Leadership Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    This study used action research methodology to examine the development of sustainability leadership in a graduate leadership course. The research investigated the impact of this leadership course, which was designed using transformative learning theory with attention to integrating thematic content, multiple and nondominant perspectives, a…

  11. Deaf Education Teacher Preparation: A Phenomenological Case Study of a Graduate Program with a Comprehensive Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Karen S.; MacGregor, Cynthia J.

    2018-01-01

    At a time when deaf education teacher preparation programs are declining in number, little is known about their actual effectiveness. A phenomenological case study of a graduate-level comprehensive deaf education teacher preparation program at a midwestern university explored empowered and enabled learning of teacher candidates using the Missouri…

  12. [Biomedical informatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, Daniel; Soto, Mauricio; Vivent, Macarena; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Herskovic, Jorge R

    2011-12-01

    Biomedical Informatics is a new discipline that arose from the need to incorporate information technologies to the generation, storage, distribution and analysis of information in the domain of biomedical sciences. This discipline comprises basic biomedical informatics, and public health informatics. The development of the discipline in Chile has been modest and most projects have originated from the interest of individual people or institutions, without a systematic and coordinated national development. Considering the unique features of health care system of our country, research in the area of biomedical informatics is becoming an imperative.

  13. A Pilot Study of Biomedical Text Comprehension using an Attention-Based Deep Neural Reader: Design and Experimental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongsoon; Park, Donghyeon; Choi, Yonghwa; Lee, Kyubum; Kim, Byounggun; Jeon, Minji; Kim, Jihye; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2018-01-05

    With the development of artificial intelligence (AI) technology centered on deep-learning, the computer has evolved to a point where it can read a given text and answer a question based on the context of the text. Such a specific task is known as the task of machine comprehension. Existing machine comprehension tasks mostly use datasets of general texts, such as news articles or elementary school-level storybooks. However, no attempt has been made to determine whether an up-to-date deep learning-based machine comprehension model can also process scientific literature containing expert-level knowledge, especially in the biomedical domain. This study aims to investigate whether a machine comprehension model can process biomedical articles as well as general texts. Since there is no dataset for the biomedical literature comprehension task, our work includes generating a large-scale question answering dataset using PubMed and manually evaluating the generated dataset. We present an attention-based deep neural model tailored to the biomedical domain. To further enhance the performance of our model, we used a pretrained word vector and biomedical entity type embedding. We also developed an ensemble method of combining the results of several independent models to reduce the variance of the answers from the models. The experimental results showed that our proposed deep neural network model outperformed the baseline model by more than 7% on the new dataset. We also evaluated human performance on the new dataset. The human evaluation result showed that our deep neural model outperformed humans in comprehension by 22% on average. In this work, we introduced a new task of machine comprehension in the biomedical domain using a deep neural model. Since there was no large-scale dataset for training deep neural models in the biomedical domain, we created the new cloze-style datasets Biomedical Knowledge Comprehension Title (BMKC_T) and Biomedical Knowledge Comprehension Last

  14. Caring characters and professional identity among graduate nursing students in China-A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Jie; Yang, Lei; Ji, Hai-Xia; Zhao, Qiao

    2018-06-01

    Caring is recognized as the essence of nursing and the core of nursing practice while a positive professional identity can lead to personal, social and professional fulfillment. Analyzing caring characters and professional identity yields important indications for the improvement of teaching methods. This study aims to explore the graduate nursing students' professional identity and caring characters in China, and analyze their correlation. A descriptive cross-sectional study was used to collect data from 216 graduate nursing students between January and February 2017 in China. Graduate nursing students perceived they possessed positive caring characters while their professional identity was at a low level. A significant positive correlation was found between the Nursing Caring Characters Assessment Tool and Professional Identity Scale for Nursing Students. Graduate nursing students' professional identity was not satisfactory and one strategy to improve this is to internalize caring into the education process. Nursing educators should focus more on the formation of the students' professional identity and caring as a contributing factor to it. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Research capacity building in midwifery: Case study of an Australian Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Yvonne L; Lewis, Lucy; Bayes, Sara; Keyes, Louise

    2015-09-01

    Having the research capacity to identify problems, create new knowledge and most importantly translate this knowledge into practice is essential within health care. Midwifery, as well as other health professions in Australia, is challenged in building its research capacity to contribute evidence to inform clinical practice. The aim of this project was to evaluate an innovative Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme offered at a tertiary obstetric hospital in Western Australia, to determine what was working well and how the programme could be improved. A case study approach was used to gain feedback from graduate midwives within a Graduate Research Intern (GRI) Programme. In addition outcomes were compiled of all projects the GRI midwives contributed to. Six GRI midwives participated in a survey comprising of four open ended questions to provide feedback about the programme. Findings confirm that the GRI programme increased the graduates understanding of how research works, its capacity to define a problem, generate new knowledge and inform clinical practice. The GRI midwives' feedback suggested the programme opened their thinking to future study and gave them enhanced insight into women's experiences around childbirth. To grow our knowledge as a professional group, midwives must develop and promote programmes to build our pool of research capable midwives. By sharing our programme evaluation we hope to entice other clinical settings to consider the value in replicating such a programme within their context. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Study of Hybrid Composite Hydroxyapatite (HA-Geopolymers as a Material for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to study the physical properties and microstructure characters of hybrid composites HA-geopolymers as a material for biomedical application. Hybrid composite HA–geopolymers were produced through alkaline activation method of metakaolin as a matrix and HA as the filler. HA was synthesized from eggshell particles by using a precipitation method. The addition of HA in metakaolin paste was varied from 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% relative the weight of metakaolin. FTIR was used to examine the absorption bands the composites. X-ray diffraction (XRD was used to study the crystal structure of the starting and the resulting materials. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS was used to investigate the surface morphology of the composites. The thermal properties of the samples was examined by means of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. Capacitance measurement was conducted to investigate the bioactive properties of HA. The study results suggest that hybrid composite HA-geopolymers has a potential to be applied as a biomedical such as biosensor material.

  17. Is Obesity Contagious? A Case Study of International Graduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Katare, Bhagyashree

    2014-01-01

    International students offer an unique opportunity to study the extent to which environment causes obesity. Because international students have an imperfect ability to choose their destination and are less aware of the social and cultural conditions in and around the university campus we argue that the prevalence of obesity in the surrounding area is plausibly exogenous to international students’ choice of university. In this study, we survey international students studying at 43 public unive...

  18. 45 CFR 2400.43 - Required courses of graduate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... required for the master's degree. If a Fellow must write a thesis, the topic of the thesis must relate to... study. (a) To be acceptable to the Foundation, those courses related to the Constitution referred to in... study of topics directly related to the United States Constitution. More than 12 semester hours or their...

  19. Perceptions, expectations, apprehensions and realities of graduating South African optometry students (PEAR study, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Oduntan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish the perceptions, expectations, apprehensions and realities of South Africa optometry students completing their undergraduate studies in 2006. Copies of a questionnaire containing relevant information were distributed to all graduating students at the four Universities offering Optometry. The responses were coded and analyzed. The respondents (N=143, representing 77% of the graduating students included 27.3% males and 72.7% females, aged 20 to 37 years (mean = 23.34 ± 2.75. About a third (32.9% of the respondents considered opening their own practice as the best way of entering into practice. Also, this mode of practice was considered as providing the greatest fulfilment for their personal (60.8% and professional (53.8% goals as well as offering long  term financial security (43.7%. Many (56.6% have secured employment before graduation. Upon graduation, 43.4% would like to join a franchise.  Many (79.7% felt that Government was not offering sufficient opportunities for optometrists. The majority, (70.6% felt that the South African optometry profession is fastly becoming saturated and this was of great concern to many (31.5%. About half, (50.3% have plans to go overseas to practice and the most common destinations were the UK (36.1% and Australia (15%.  The mean minimum monthly salary expected as new graduates was between R9 500 and R11 500 in the public and private sectors respectively. On a response scale, the future of optometry in South Africa was scored as 6.59 ± 1.92. Findings in this study may be useful to all stake holders in optometric education in South Africa, as they may reflect the future of the optometry profession in the country.

  20. Galleria mellonella L. as model organism used in biomedical and other studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulak, Ewa; Gliniewicz, Aleksandra; Przygodzka, Marta; Solecka, Jolanta

    2018-01-01

    Comparative of studies of genomes of invertebrates and humans shows that in invertebrates including insects there are numerous homologues of human’s genes coding proteins involved in recognition pathogens or transduction of the expression signal. Thanks this features, insects such as Drosophila melanogaster M., Blattella germanica L., Culex quinquefasciatus S., Bombyx mori L. and Galleria mellonella L. are used in studies on virulence, host resistance or in assessing the in vivo efficacy of antibiotics, fungicides and other biologically active substances. G. mellonella (greater wax moth) are rapid growth, high fertility, size and short life cycle insects- these are features that should be met by good model organisms; therefore the number of researches with larvae of wax moth as the model organism for pathogens assays grows from year to year. This is showing by number of scientific publications about infection’s model of G. mellonella. An obstacle in the wide use of G. mellonella caterpillars as a model in biomedical research is the lack of standardized breeding of these insects, which would guarantee the reproducibility of the obtained results and lack of procedures and standards according to which biomedical research will be carried out. Despite this, the G. mellonella model can be used in the initial analysis before conventional in vivo tests and to reduce the number of tests performed on mammals.

  1. Study on the Nanomechanical and Nanotribological Behaviors of PEEK and CFRPEEK for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was to investigate the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of polyether ether ketone (PEEK-based composites for biomedical applications and to gain a fundamental understanding of the effects of carbon fibers in carbon-fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFRPEEK on the mechanical properties and wear performance in a microscale. Nanoindentation tests with a Berkovich indenter and nanoscratch experiments with a diamond stylus were performed on PEEK and CFRPEEK samples. The nanowear features and mechanisms of the tested samples were analyzed using 3D white-light interfering profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The obtained results indicated that the reinforced carbon fibers increased the nanohardness and elastic modulus and decreased the friction coefficient and wear rate of PEEK. Different to many existing studies where a constant load was used in a nanoscratch test and the normal load was a key factor influencing the scratch performances of the tested specimens, stick–slip phenomena were observed on both PEEK and CFRPEEK in the nanoscratch tests with load increasing progressively. In constant load conditions, it was found that the major nanowear mechanisms of PEEK are adhesion, abrasion, and plastic deformation, while the nanowear mechanisms of CFRPEEK are dominated by severe adhesive wear, abrasive wear and mild fatigue. CFRPEEK has demonstrated superior nanomechanical and nanotribological performances, and hence can be considered a potential candidate for biomedical applications.

  2. Perspectives and Plans for Graduate Studies. 16. Biophysics 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Council on Graduate Studies, Toronto. Advisory Committee on Academic Planning.

    In March, 1973, after a review of the Ontario universities' three-year plans, a provisional embargo was placed on doctoral work in biophysics. A full-scale assessment with outside consultants was not necessary in the case of a provisional embargo. Instead, the method used to remove the embargo was self-study by the discipline group leading to a…

  3. Impact of the Medical Faculty on Study Success in Freiburg: Results from Graduate Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Silke; Boeker, Martin; Fabry, Götz; Giesler, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Using the data from graduate surveys, this study aims to analyze which factors related to teaching and learning at the Freiburg Faculty of Medicine can influence study success. Background: Study success and the factors influencing it have long been the subject of investigation, with study success being measured in terms of easily quantifiable indicators (final grades, student satisfaction, etc.). In recent years, it has also frequently been assessed in terms of graduate competency levels. Graduate surveys are considered suitable instruments for measuring these dimensions of study success. Method: Data from three Freiburg graduate surveys conducted one and a half years after graduation were drawn upon for the analysis. Study success was operationalized using four indicators: results on the written section of the M2 exam, self-assessment of medical expertise and scientific expertise, and student satisfaction. Using multiple regression analyses, the predictive power was calculated for selected variables, also measured by the graduate surveys, for the different study success indicators. Results: It was possible to identify models that contribute slightly or moderately to the prediction of study success. The score earned on the university entrance qualification demonstrated itself to be the strongest predictor for forecasting the M2 written exam: R2 is between 0.08 and 0.22 for the three surveys. Different variables specific to degree program structure and teaching are helpful for predicting medical expertise (R2=0.04-0.32) and student satisfaction (R2=0.12-0.35). The two variables, structure and curricular sequencing of the degree program and combination of theory and practice, show themselves to be significant, sample-invariant predictors (β-weightStructure=0.21-0.58, β-weightCombination=0.27-0.56). For scientific expertise, no sample-independent predictors could be determined. Conclusion: Factors describing teaching hardly provide any assistance when

  4. Impact of the Medical Faculty on Study Success in Freiburg: Results from Graduate Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biller, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Using the data from graduate surveys, this study aims to analyze which factors related to teaching and learning at the Freiburg Faculty of Medicine can influence study success.Background: Study success and the factors influencing it have long been the subject of investigation, with study success being measured in terms of easily quantifiable indicators (final grades, student satisfaction, etc.. In recent years, it has also frequently been assessed in terms of graduate competency levels. Graduate surveys are considered suitable instruments for measuring these dimensions of study success.Method: Data from three Freiburg graduate surveys conducted one and a half years after graduation were drawn upon for the analysis.Study success was operationalized using four indicators: results on the written section of the M2 exam, self-assessment of medical expertise and scientific expertise, and student satisfaction. Using multiple regression analyses, the predictive power was calculated for selected variables, also measured by the graduate surveys, for the different study success indicators.Results: It was possible to identify models that contribute slightly or moderately to the prediction of study success. The score earned on the university entrance qualification demonstrated itself to be the strongest predictor for forecasting the M2 written exam: R is between 0.08 and 0.22 for the three surveys. Different variables specific to degree program structure and teaching are helpful for predicting medical expertise (R=0.04-0.32 and student satisfaction (R=0.12-0.35. The two variables, and , show themselves to be significant, sample-invariant predictors (β-weight=0.21-0.58, β-weight=0.27-0.56. For scientific expertise, no sample-independent predictors could be determined.Conclusion: Factors describing teaching hardly provide any assistance when predicting the written M2 exam score, which makes sense to the extent that teaching goes far beyond the heavily

  5. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-07-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments.

  6. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abler, Daniel; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN’s competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR an...

  7. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments. (author)

  8. Graduates from dual qualification courses, registered nurse and health visitor: a career history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M; Porter, Elizabeth M J; Grant, Robert L

    2013-08-01

    Educationalists and managers internationally are challenged to find ways of preparing, recruiting early in their careers, and retaining nurses into public health roles in primary care. Public health nursing qualifications are post-initial nurse registration in the United Kingdom as in some other countries. In the mid twentieth century there were a number of innovative programmes of dual qualification: registered nurse and health visitor (the United Kingdom term for public health nurse). To investigate the career histories of graduates from courses integrating both nursing and health visitor qualifications. An observational, survey study. The United Kingdom. A purposive sample of graduates from integrated registered nurse and health visitor programmes, 1959-1995, from one University. Self completed, anonymous, survey sent to graduates, with contact details known to the University and through snowballing techniques, in 2011. Forty five women (56%), graduates in all four decades, returned the survey. A significant majority (82%) had taken up health visitor posts on completing the course. Over their careers, 42% of all jobs held were as health visitors. Only four never worked in a post that required a health visiting qualification. Most had undertaken paid work throughout their careers that focused on aspects of public health, often linked to child, maternal and/or family wellbeing. Many held teaching/lecturing and management posts at some point in their career. Those holding management posts were more likely to report leaving them as a result of organisational re-structuring or redundancy than those in non-management posts. Courses that prepare students to be both nurses and health visitors result in a majority of graduates who take up posts as health visitors on qualification and subsequently. Nurse education planners may find this evidence of value in determining ways of providing a future workforce for public health nursing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All

  9. Exploring a public-private partnership new-graduate physiotherapy recruitment program: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, David; Dmytryk, Neil

    2014-12-01

    Difficulty in attracting allied health staff to rural areas is well known. In 2012, a small rural health facility and local private practice created an informal public-private partnership to recruit two new-graduate physiotherapists. Graduates were employed part-time in both the public and private sectors. This qualitative case study employed an appreciative enquiry framework to explore this partnership model. Three focus groups were held, and a combination of content and thematic analysis was used to derive and organise themes arising from the data. A regional public health service and private physiotherapy practice in the Bega Valley region of south-eastern New South Wales, Australia. New-graduate and second-year physiotherapists (n = 5), private sector managers (n = 3), and public sector managers (n = 4). Perceived benefits of the partnership model and improvements that could be made to further develop the model. Organisational benefits of a shared public-private role included the ability to attract high-quality applicants to difficult-to-fill positions, reduced the risk of new-graduate attrition due to social isolation, enhanced networking between sectors, and enhanced staff skill development through a broad range of clinical and non-clinical experiences. The model relied on management flexibility and has potential to expand to other areas and professions. Dedicated funding support, targeted recruitment strategies and increased planning to ease the transition into the workplace would further enhance the model. An informal public-private partnership to overcome established workforce shortages has proven successful to the benefit of the new graduates and both the public and private sectors. © 2014 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  10. The experiences of newly graduated nurses during their first year of practice in the Sultanate of Oman - A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Awaisi, Huda; Cooke, Hannah; Pryjmachuk, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the transition experience of new graduate nurses is complex and frequently negative, leading to dissatisfaction with nursing and increased attrition. Existing studies of new graduate nurses' transition experiences tend to be concerned with the experiences of new graduate nurses in the West. To date, no study has been conducted examining the transition experience in any Middle Eastern country where the cultural context surrounding nursing education and practice is different. To explore the experiences of new graduate nurses during their transition period in the Sultanate of Oman. A qualitative case study utilising an embedded single case design was conducted to investigate the transition experience of new nursing graduates from one university in the Sultanate of Oman. Data were collected from the perspective of new graduate nurses and also from the perspective of other key informants who are key organisational actors such as clinical instructors, managers and preceptors. As is characteristic of case study design, this study employed triangulated methods including individual and focus group interviews, observation and documentary analysis. Data collected were thematically analysed using Microsoft Access. This study showed that nursing is not an attractive choice for Omani students to study and pursue as a future career. During the transition period, new graduate nurses experienced reality shock resulting mainly from a theory-practice gap. They found themselves with limited practical experience but a high level of theoretical knowledge that was difficult to utilise in practice. They experienced many competing priorities in their working environment which resulted in task-orientation and compromised patient care. Many new graduate nurses resented their involvement in basic nursing care, which they believed should not be part of their role as degree nurses. Omani new graduate nurses' transition experiences are complex and highly affected

  11. Core Competencies: The Challenge For Graduate Peace and Conflict Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windmueller, John; Wayne, Ellen Kabcenell; Botes, Johannes (Jannie)

    2009-05-01

    This article uses a case study of the assessment of a graduate program in negotiations and conflict management as a springboard for discussing several critical, but unanswered questions in our field. It raises questions regarding the lack of clear core competencies and expectations regarding curricula at the graduate-level of peace and conflict studies programs, as well as concerns over how educators in this field can or should assess their own work and train students for practice. It also addresses, via a comparative case analysis in Tajikistan, the degree to which the competencies and pedagogical approaches in this field are culturally bound. The picture that emerges from these case studies suggests that there have been important omissions in the way that the varied educational programs and the larger peace and conflict studies field itself have developed thus far.

  12. Developing a Curriculum for Information and Communications Technology Use in Global Health Research and Training: A Qualitative Study Among Chinese Health Sciences Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenyu; Yang, Li; Yang, Lan; Huang, Kaiyong; Yu, Hongping; He, Huimin; Wang, Jiaji; Cai, Le; Wang, Jie; Fu, Hua; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H; Xiao, Jian; Abdullah, Abu S

    2017-06-12

    Rapid development of information and communications technology (ICT) during the last decade has transformed biomedical and population-based research and has become an essential part of many types of research and educational programs. However, access to these ICT resources and the capacity to use them in global health research are often lacking in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) institutions. The aim of our study was to assess the practical issues (ie, perceptions and learning needs) of ICT use among health sciences graduate students at 6 major medical universities of southern China. Ten focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted from December 2015 to March 2016, involving 74 health sciences graduate students studying at 6 major medical universities in southern China. The sampling method was opportunistic, accounting for the graduate program enrolled and the academic year. All FGDs were audio recorded and thematic content analysis was performed. Researchers had different views and arguments about the use of ICT which are summarized under six themes: (1) ICT use in routine research, (2) ICT-related training experiences, (3) understanding about the pros and cons of Web-based training, (4) attitudes toward the design of ICT training curriculum, (5) potential challenges to promoting ICT courses, and (6) related marketing strategies for ICT training curriculum. Many graduate students used ICT on a daily basis in their research to stay up-to-date on current development in their area of research or study or practice. The participants were very willing to participate in ICT courses that were relevant to their academic majors and would count credits. Suggestion for an ICT curriculum included (1) both organized training course or short lecture series, depending on the background and specialty of the students, (2) a mixture of lecture and Web-based activities, and (3) inclusion of topics that are career focused. The findings of this study suggest that a need exists

  13. Biomedical signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquillo, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Signals and Systems is meant to accompany a one-semester undergraduate signals and systems course. It may also serve as a quick-start for graduate students or faculty interested in how signals and systems techniques can be applied to living systems. The biological nature of the examples allows for systems thinking to be applied to electrical, mechanical, fluid, chemical, thermal and even optical systems. Each chapter focuses on a topic from classic signals and systems theory: System block diagrams, mathematical models, transforms, stability, feedback, system response, control, time

  14. A longitudinal study of veterinary students and recent graduates. 4. Gender issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, T J; Lanyon, A

    1996-10-01

    To study differences in experiences, attitudes and opinions between female and male veterinary students and recent graduates. Longitudinal study. Students-77 males and 77 females-who began studying veterinary science at The University of Queensland in 1985 and 1986. Questionnaires were completed in the first and fifth year of the course, and in the second year after graduation. The data were analysed using the SAS System for Windows. Females decided to study veterinary science at a younger age than males and were more influenced by 'a love of animals', the image of veterinarians as portrayed on television, an interest in living things and in the scientific study of disease. Males were more influenced than females in aspects of the workplace: bosses and money. There were no gender differences in their background in relation to farms, or to animals, or in their career plans. However females when in first year expected a lower initial income than males; an expectation that was realised in the first year after graduation. As first year students and also as veterinarians, females had stronger views than males on animal welfare issues, and also felt that the veterinary profession had a lower status relative to other professions. Significant differences in attitudes and experiences exist between males and females entering the veterinary profession. The situation of females in relation to income and status is consistent with that in other professions, where females have been disadvantaged compared with males.

  15. A STUDY ON LEARNING APPROACHES USED AMONG POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS IN RESEARCH UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roziana Shaari

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the method of learningapproaches adopted by post-graduate students in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia(UTM and to identifywhether these approaches are associated with demographic factors (age, gender,main streams, mode of study and working experience. Participants included 354post-graduate students from different faculties inUTM whereas questionnaireswere distributed via email and throughdesignated contact person. The One-WayAnalysis of Variance (ANOVA revealed that there were significant differenceson the usage of the three post-graduates’ learningapproaches across age, mainstreams and years of working experience. Significance was not seen betweenlearning approaches on gender and mode of study. Deep approach was found to bepreferred approaches to their learning methods. Ourinvestigation suggests thatapproach to learning should be included in their academics, however thesuggestion is tailored according on the tasks givento the students. Hence, weconcluded that further investigation could be carried out the effect of learningenvironment towards students dynamic in learning.

  16. The experience of graduated midwifery students about clinical education: A phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shahoei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Improvement and promotion of the quality of clinical education requires continuous assessment of the current situation, and also identifying the strengths and weaknesses. Students' views and ideas as learner can help future planning. This study aims to identify the experiences of midwifery graduates about factors affecting their clinical learning. Methods: A qualitative study using phenomenology approach was conducted. Ten midwifery graduates were selected based on purposive sampling and then interviewed. Data were analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: The extracted conceptual codes were classified into several main concepts. There were two main themes factors facilitating learning and factors preventing learning, and seven sub themes performance of instructor, pre-clinical training, students satisfaction, lack of peripheral facilities, lack of coordination of educational planning and behaviors of health care personnel. Conclusion: Trained human resources and equipment for midwifery educational planning are needed to provide a supportive learning atmosphere and promote the quality of clinical learning.

  17. A study of statistics anxiety levels of graduate dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Paul S; Jacks, Mary E; Smiley, Lynn A; Walden, Carolyn E; Clark, William D; Nguyen, Carol A

    2015-02-01

    In light of increased emphasis on evidence-based practice in the profession of dental hygiene, it is important that today's dental hygienist comprehend statistical measures to fully understand research articles, and thereby apply scientific evidence to practice. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate statistics anxiety among graduate dental hygiene students in the U.S. A web-based self-report, anonymous survey was emailed to directors of 17 MSDH programs in the U.S. with a request to distribute to graduate students. The survey collected data on statistics anxiety, sociodemographic characteristics and evidence-based practice. Statistic anxiety was assessed using the Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale. Study significance level was α=0.05. Only 8 of the 17 invited programs participated in the study. Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale data revealed graduate dental hygiene students experience low to moderate levels of statistics anxiety. Specifically, the level of anxiety on the Interpretation Anxiety factor indicated this population could struggle with making sense of scientific research. A decisive majority (92%) of students indicated statistics is essential for evidence-based practice and should be a required course for all dental hygienists. This study served to identify statistics anxiety in a previously unexplored population. The findings should be useful in both theory building and in practical applications. Furthermore, the results can be used to direct future research. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  18. Gender, Major and Wage. A Study of the Gender Pay Gap among Italian University Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Cantalini Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In Italian labour market women are paid less than men. The qualitative dimension of education, namely the field of study, might be considered as one of the most important factor behind these wage inequalities, since men and women unequally distribute across university majors and women are more likely to hold a degree in not lucrative fields. In this paper we analyze the gender wage gap among early-career Italian university graduates. First, we investigate the main factors behind women's econo...

  19. Studies on polyethylene glycol coating on NiFe2O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phadatare, M.R.; Khot, V.M.; Salunkhe, A.B.; Thorat, N.D.; Pawar, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    The NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared by the combustion method and these nanoparticles were successfully coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the possible biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery, tissue repair, magnetic fluid hyperthermia etc. The structural and magnetic characterizations of NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were carried out by x-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry techniques, respectively. The morphology of the uncoated and coated nanoparticles was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The existence of PEG layer on NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of nanocrystalline NiFe 2 O 4 by the combustion method. ► Magnetic properties of the NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles at room temperature. ► Coating of NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles by Polyethylene glycol (PEG).

  20. Comparative Study of the Electrochemical, Biomedical, and Thermal Properties of Natural and Synthetic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Kargarzadeh, Hanieh; Abdi, Mahnaz M.; Azli, Nur Farhana Waheeda Mohd; Abbasian, Maryam

    2018-04-01

    In this research, natural nanomaterials including cellulose nanocrystal (CNC), nanofiber cellulose (NFC), and synthetic nanoparticles such as carbon nanofiber (CNF) and carbon nanotube (CNT) with different structures, sizes, and surface areas were produced and analyzed. The most significant contribution of this study is to evaluate and compare these nanomaterials based on the effects of their structures and morphologies on their electrochemical, biomedical, and thermal properties. Based on the obtained results, the natural nanomaterials with low dimension and surface area have zero cytotoxicity effects on the living cells at 12.5 and 3.125 μg/ml concentrations of NFC and CNC, respectively. Meanwhile, synthetic nanomaterials with the high surface area around 15.3-21.1 m2/g and significant thermal stability (480 °C-600 °C) enhance the output of electrode by creating a higher surface area and decreasing the current flow resistance.

  1. Predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test: an evaluation and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Ferguson, Eamonn; Wakeford, Richard; Powis, David; James, David

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increase in the use of pre-admission selection tests for medicine. Such tests need to show good psychometric properties. Here, we use a paper by Emery and Bell [2009. The predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test for pre-clinical examination performance. Med Educ 43:557-564] as a case study to evaluate and comment on the reporting of psychometric data in the field of medical student selection (and the comments apply to many papers in the field). We highlight pitfalls when reliability data are not presented, how simple zero-order associations can lead to inaccurate conclusions about the predictive validity of a test, and how biases need to be explored and reported. We show with BMAT that it is the knowledge part of the test which does all the predictive work. We show that without evidence of incremental validity it is difficult to assess the value of any selection tests for medicine.

  2. E-BOOK USAGE OF GRADUATE STUDENTS STUDYING EDUCATIONAL SCIENCES IN TURKIYE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan BAKI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, we can say that almost everything is having “electronic” prefix and the way to access to information has changed substantially because of the many factors like fast advancements in computer technology and internet which is getting more and more widespread everyday. Although some people stick to printed resources, the fact that electronic resources offer innovation and irresistible options in terms of cost and time is obvious. The aim of this survey study is to detect some data that can be generalized about the graduate students’ state of using printed and electronic resources. A questionnaire, developed by Ebrary, one of the largest e-book suppliers of the world, was used as the data gathering tool. After the studies for improving the reliability and validity of the questionnaire, a questionnaire form with 16 items was obtained. 634 questionnaires were sent to graduate students via e-mail, 130 of them were sent back and 125 questionnaires were evaluated for the study. Concerning all the data, it was concluded that majority of the graduate students are aware of the comfort of the e-resources and prefer to use these resources academically.

  3. Attitudes and values expected of public health nursing students at graduation: A delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Mika; Takizawa, Hiroko

    2018-06-01

    The skills and knowledge of the competencies expected of public health nursing (PHN) students at graduation have been clarified; however, the attitudes and values have not yet been studied in Japan. The objective of this study was to identify and reach a consensus among experts on the attitudes and values expected of PHN students at graduation. This survey was conducted as a two-stage Delphi study. We selected the following experts: 248 teachers in the faculty of public health nursing at a university as academic experts, and 250 public health nurses who were also experienced clinical instructors as clinical experts. The round 1 mailed survey was conducted using a questionnaire about the necessity and importance of attitudes and values, and 211 experts responded (42.4%, clinical; n = 124, academic; n = 87). In the Round 2 survey, the experts consisted of 60.2% of the round 1 participants (clinical; n = 73, academic; n = 54). Descriptive statistics were used for multiple imputation. We identified a total of 13 attitudes and values expected of PHN students, and reached ≥90% consensus for most items (except for one). Regarding the expected achievement level at graduation, there was no difference between clinical and academic experts except for one item. Consensus was clearly achieved for 13 attitudes and values expected of PHN students, as well as importance and expected achievement level at graduation. In the future, it is important to examine strategies that can effectively develop these attitudes and values through basic and continuous education. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Motivational factors for participation in biomedical research: evidence from a qualitative study of biomedical research participation in Blantyre District, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfutso-Bengo, Joseph; Manda-Taylor, Lucinda; Masiye, Francis

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining effective informed consent from research participants is a prerequisite to the conduct of an ethically sound research. Yet it is believed that obtaining quality informed consent is generally difficult in settings with low socioeconomic status. This is so because of the alleged undue inducements and therapeutic misconception among participants. However, there is a dearth of data on factors that motivate research participants to take part in research. Hence, this study was aimed at filling this gap in the Malawian context. We conducted 18 focus group discussions with community members in urban and rural communities of Blantyre in Malawi. Most participants reported that they accepted the invitation to participate in research because of better quality treatment during study also known as ancillary care, monetary and material incentives given to participants, and thorough medical diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. A comparison study on algorithms of detecting long forms for short forms in biomedical text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Cathy H

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation With more and more research dedicated to literature mining in the biomedical domain, more and more systems are available for people to choose from when building literature mining applications. In this study, we focus on one specific kind of literature mining task, i.e., detecting definitions of acronyms, abbreviations, and symbols in biomedical text. We denote acronyms, abbreviations, and symbols as short forms (SFs and their corresponding definitions as long forms (LFs. The study was designed to answer the following questions; i how well a system performs in detecting LFs from novel text, ii what the coverage is for various terminological knowledge bases in including SFs as synonyms of their LFs, and iii how to combine results from various SF knowledge bases. Method We evaluated the following three publicly available detection systems in detecting LFs for SFs: i a handcrafted pattern/rule based system by Ao and Takagi, ALICE, ii a machine learning system by Chang et al., and iii a simple alignment-based program by Schwartz and Hearst. In addition, we investigated the conceptual coverage of two terminological knowledge bases: i the UMLS (the Unified Medical Language System, and ii the BioThesaurus (a thesaurus of names for all UniProt protein records. We also implemented a web interface that provides a virtual integration of various SF knowledge bases. Results We found that detection systems agree with each other on most cases, and the existing terminological knowledge bases have a good coverage of synonymous relationship for frequently defined LFs. The web interface allows people to detect SF definitions from text and to search several SF knowledge bases. Availability The web site is http://gauss.dbb.georgetown.edu/liblab/SFThesaurus.

  6. Psychological career resources and coping resources of the young unemployed African graduate: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2010-05-01

    Research purpose: This study explored the relationship between the psychological career resources(as measured by the Psychological Career Resources Inventory and coping resources (as measured by the Coping Resources Inventory of a sample of 196 young unemployed African graduates. Motivation for study: There is an increasing need for career counsellors and practitioners to explore the psychological attributes and career-related resources that young people employ or require to help them deal with the challenges posed by unemployment during the school-to-work transition phase of their lives. Research design, approach and method: A survey design and quantitative statistical procedures were used to achieve the research objective. Convenience sampling was used on a population of 500 unemployed graduate black people who attended a 12-week Work Readiness Programme (39% response rate. Main findings: Multiple regression analyses indicated that dimensions of psychological career resources contribute signifcantly to explaining the proportion of variance in the participants’coping resources scores. Practical implications: The insights derived from the findings can be employed by career counsellors and practitioners to construct a more comprehensive career framework for the individual in the school-to-work transition phase. Contribution/value-add: The findings add valuable new knowledge that can be used to inform career services concerned with guiding and counselling young graduates in the school-to-work transition phase.

  7. [Disclosure of sources of funding in biomedical journals. Descriptive study of four Spanish publications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, F; Borrego, A

    2015-01-01

    The source of research funding can result in bias, and its disclosure is essential in the publication of results. The aim of the study is to identify the frequency and type of sources of funding in the articles published by four Spanish biomedical journals published in Spanish. The frequency and type of financial disclosures in the articles published during 2012 in the ordinary numbers of Atención Primaria, Medicina Clínica, Revista Clínica Española and Revista Española de Cardiología were analyzed. Articles described as "Editorial", "Original article", "Consensus Document", "Review" and "Special Article" were considered. It was decided in each case whether or not the article included any funding disclosure and the type of the declared funding (public or private). Four hundred and twelve publications were analyzed. In 32.5% there was disclosure of funding: 38% in Atención Primaria, 27% in Medicina Clínica, 15% in Revista Clínica Española and 45% in Revista Española de Cardiología. By type of articles, 47% of original articles, 44% of consensus documents, 21% of reviews, 14% of special articles and 8% of editorials had a funding source. In 51.5% of the cases, funding was exclusively public, in 36.5% exclusively private and in 10% mixed. There is considerable variability in the disclosure of funding sources in articles appearing in these four Spanish biomedical journals. It would be necessary to improve the disclosure requirements of sources of funding, making them uniform, clear and transparent.

  8. Computerized test versus personal interview as admission methods for graduate nursing studies: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazut, Koren; Romem, Pnina; Malkin, Smadar; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predictive validity, economic efficiency, and faculty staff satisfaction of a computerized test versus a personal interview as admission methods for graduate nursing studies. A mixed method study was designed, including cross-sectional and retrospective cohorts, interviews, and cost analysis. One hundred and thirty-four students in the Master of Nursing program participated. The success of students in required core courses was similar in both admission method groups. The personal interview method was found to be a significant predictor of success, with cognitive variables the only significant contributors to the model. Higher satisfaction levels were reported with the computerized test compared with the personal interview method. The cost of the personal interview method, in annual hourly work, was 2.28 times higher than the computerized test. These findings may promote discussion regarding the cost benefit of the personal interview as an admission method for advanced academic studies in healthcare professions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Study of graduate curriculum in the radiological science: problems and suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Hwa Gon; Kang, Se Sik; Park, Byeong Rae; Kim, Chang Soo

    2006-01-01

    Currently, Educational program of radiological science is developed in enormous growth, our educational environments leading allied health science education program in the number of super high speed medical industry. Radiological science may be the fastest growing technologies in our medical department today. In this way, Medical industry fields converged in the daily quick, the fact that department of radiological science didn't discharged ones duties on current educational environments. The curriculum of radiological technologists that play an important part between skill and occupation's education as major and personality didn't performed one's part most effectively on current medical environments and digital radiological equipment interface. We expect improvement and suggestion to grow natural disposition as studies in the graduate of radiological science. Therefore, in this paper, current curriculum of radiological science are catched hold of trend and problems on digital radiology environments, on fact the present state of problems, for Graduate program of radiological science, graduate courses of MS and ph.D. are suggested a reform measure of major education curriculum introduction

  10. Study design and rationale for biomedical shirt-based electrocardiography monitoring in relevant clinical situations: ECG-shirt study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Paweł; Lodziński, Piotr; Tymińska, Agata; Ozierański, Krzysztof; Januszkiewicz, Łukasz; Główczyńska, Renata; Wesołowska, Katarzyna; Peller, Michał; Pietrzak, Radosław; Książczyk, Tomasz; Borodzicz, Sonia; Kołtowski, Łukasz; Borkowski, Mariusz; Werner, Bożena; Opolski, Grzegorz; Grabowski, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    Today, the main challenge for researchers is to develop new technologies which may help to improve the diagnoses of cardiovascular disease (CVD), thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving the quality of life for patients. This study aims to show the utility of biomedical shirt-based electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring of patients with CVD in different clinical situations using the Nuubo® ECG (nECG) system. An investigator-initiated, multicenter, prospective observational study was carried out in a cardiology (adult and pediatric) and cardiac rehabilitation wards. ECG monitoring was used with the biomedical shirt in the following four independent groups of patients: 1) 30 patients after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), 2) 30 cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) recipients, 3) 120 patients during cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction, and 4) 40 pediatric patients with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) before electrophysiology study. Approval for all study groups was obtained from the institutional review board. The biomedical shirt captures the electrocardiographic signal via textile electrodes integrated into a garment. The software allows the visualization and analysis of data such as ECG, heart rate, arrhythmia detecting algorithm and relative position of the body is captured by an electronic device. The major advantages of the nECG system are continuous ECG monitoring during daily activities, high quality of ECG recordings, as well as assurance of a proper adherence due to adequate comfort while wearing the shirt. There are only a few studies that have examined wearable systems, especially in pediatric populations. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov: Identifier NCT03068169. (Cardiol J 2018; 25, 1: 52-59).

  11. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  12. Effect of Performance Deficiencies on Graduation and Board Certification Rates: A 10-yr Multicenter Study of Anesthesiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judi A; Fitzsimons, Michael G; Pardo, Manuel C; Hawkins, Joy L; Huang, Yue Ming; Rudolph, Maria D D; Keyes, Mary A; Howard-Quijano, Kimberly J; Naim, Natale Z; Buckley, Jack C; Grogan, Tristan R; Steadman, Randolph H

    2016-07-01

    This multicenter, retrospective study was conducted to determine how resident performance deficiencies affect graduation and board certification. Primary documents pertaining to resident performance were examined over a 10-yr period at four academic anesthesiology residencies. Residents entering training between 2000 and 2009 were included, with follow-up through February 2016. Residents receiving actions by the programs' Clinical Competency Committee were categorized by the area of deficiency and compared to peers without deficiencies. A total of 865 residents were studied (range: 127 to 275 per program). Of these, 215 residents received a total of 405 actions from their respective Clinical Competency Committee. Among those who received an action compared to those who did not, the proportion graduating differed (93 vs. 99%, respectively, P graduating dropped to 55%. When more than three Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies were deficient, the proportion graduating also dropped significantly. Overall graduation and board certification rates were consistently high in residents with no, or isolated, deficiencies. Residents deficient in an Essential Attribute, or multiple competencies, are at high risk of not graduating or achieving board certification. More research is needed on the effectiveness and selective deployment of remediation efforts, particularly for high-risk groups.

  13. Tracer Study of Dentistry Graduates of one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines from 2008 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Maderazo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This tracer study determines the employment status of the graduates of Doctor of Dental Medicine of Lyceum of the Philippines University (LPU from 2008-2012. It assessed the relevance of the Dentistry curriculum, knowledge, skills and attitude acquired by the graduates deemed to be relevant for their employment; identify the personal and professional characteristics and job placement of Dentistry graduates and the school related factors associated with their employment. This tracer study used a descriptive research design. The study described the experiences of the graduates before and after employment. The graduates conveyed their personal observations regarding the situations they faced after graduation. The findings showed that majority of the Dentistry graduate-respondents are presently employed except for one whose primary reason is family concern and decided not to find a job. Most of the graduates had their first job as associate dentist with recommendation from the department or alumni of the college and opted to put up their own private practice after 6 months. Rewarding salaries and benefits are the main reason for staying on the job and are all enjoying a professional career in dentistry with initial gross income of 25,000 pesos and above. The following school related factors for job placement such as curriculum and instruction for the general education and professional subjects, student services and faculty instruction were found to be relevant in meeting the demands of the graduates’ dental profession. And the following are the work related values gained by the graduates such a love for God, honesty and truth, professional integrity and leadership. These values were found to be very relevant in the practice of the profession.

  14. A Winding Road--Professional Trajectories from Higher Education to Working Life: A Case Study of Political Science and Psychology Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Sofia; Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt; Dahlgren, Lars Owe

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative and longitudinal study focuses on graduate employment and the development of graduate employment paths. The aim of this article is to explore the present professional trajectory from higher education to working life, with particular reference to graduates from two different study programmes at Linkoping University in Sweden:…

  15. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  16. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events.

  17. Student engagement in biomedical courses : studies in technology-enhanced seminar learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical and biomedical curricula are designed to educate future academics contributing to new developments in science, clinical practice and society. During undergraduate programs student training is typically focused on acquisition of knowledge and understanding of these interdisciplinary

  18. A study to assess the knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Practice, Bharathi College of Pharmacy, Mandya 571401, India. 5Department of ... revealed the lack of knowledge and awareness of bio-medical waste .... Female. 43. 77. 36. 64. Qualification. MPBHW/ ANM. DMLTC. D.Pharm. 101. 10. 09. 85.

  19. Toward a Holistic View of Undergraduate Research Experiences: An Exploratory Study of Impact on Graduate/Postdoctoral Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Erin; Johnson, Deborah

    2009-12-01

    Involvement in research has become a fixture in undergraduate science education across the United States. Graduate and postdoctoral students are often called upon to mentor undergraduates at research universities, yet mentoring relationships in undergraduate—graduate/postdoctoral student dyads and undergraduate—graduate/postdoctoral student—faculty triads have been largely unexamined. Here, we present findings of an exploratory case study framed by relational theory that identifies the motives, gains, and challenges reported by graduate/postdoctoral students who mentored undergraduates in research. Graduate/postdoctoral mentors experienced a wide range of gains, including improved qualifications and career preparation, cognitive and socioemotional growth, improved teaching and communication skills, and greater enjoyment of their own apprenticeship experience. Notably, graduate/postdoctoral mentors reported twice as many gains as challenges, neither of which were limited by their motives for mentoring. Indeed, their motives were fairly narrow and immediate, focusing on how mentoring would serve as a means to an end, while the gains and challenges they reported indicated a longer-term vision of how mentoring influenced their personal, cognitive, and professional growth. We propose that understanding the impact of mentoring undergraduates on the education and training of graduate/postdoctoral students may uncover new ideas about the benefits reaped through undergraduate research experiences.

  20. Information Management Graduates' Accounts of Their Employability: A Case Study from the University of Sheffield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew M.; Al Daoud, Mohammad; Rudd, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Ensuring that graduates are employable is an important priority for universities. It is challenging for fields such as Information Management (IM), that are not fully understood by employers and where there is no very clearly defined entry level job market. This paper takes a graduate identity perspective to explore how IM graduates from the…

  1. A Seventeen-Year Study of Graduate Student Authorship in Advertising Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Rodgers, Shelly; Wang, Zongyuan; Thorson, Esther

    2016-01-01

    An examination of five leading advertising journals over seventeen years revealed that the number of graduate student "authors" increased over time. However, there was no increase in the total number of "articles" with graduate student authors. More than 70 percent of graduate students who authored or co-authored the published…

  2. Comparatively Studied Color Correction Methods for Color Calibration of Automated Microscopy Complex of Biomedical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kravtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a task of generating the requirements and creating a calibration target for automated microscopy systems (AMS of biomedical specimens to provide the invariance of algorithms and software to the hardware configuration. The required number of color fields of the calibration target and their color coordinates are mostly determined by the color correction method, for which coefficients of the equations are estimated during the calibration process. The paper analyses existing color calibration techniques for digital imaging systems using an optical microscope and shows that there is a lack of published results of comparative studies to demonstrate a particular useful color correction method for microscopic images. A comparative study of ten image color correction methods in RGB space using polynomials and combinations of color coordinate of different orders was carried out. The method of conditioned least squares to estimate the coefficients in the color correction equations using captured images of 217 color fields of the calibration target Kodak Q60-E3 was applied. The regularization parameter in this method was chosen experimentally. It was demonstrated that the best color correction quality characteristics are provided by the method that uses a combination of color coordinates of the 3rd order. The study of the influence of the number and the set of color fields included in calibration target on color correction quality for microscopic images was performed. Six train sets containing 30, 35, 40, 50, 60 and 80 color fields, and test set of 47 color fields not included in any of the train sets were formed. It was found out that the train set of 60 color fields minimizes the color correction error values for both operating modes of digital camera: using "default" color settings and with automatic white balance. At the same time it was established that the use of color fields from the widely used now Kodak Q60-E3 target does not

  3. Biomedical nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Sarah J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the roles of nanomaterials in biomedical applications, focusing on those highlighted in this volume. A brief history of nanoscience and technology and a general introduction to the field are presented. Then, the chemical and physical properties of nanostructures that make them ideal for use in biomedical applications are highlighted. Examples of common applications, including sensing, imaging, and therapeutics, are given. Finally, the challenges associated with translating this field from the research laboratory to the clinic setting, in terms of the larger societal implications, are discussed.

  4. Do you use social media? A study into new nursing and midwifery graduates' uptake of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, Anthony; Turner, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Social media use is expanding rapidly, so too is its use within hospitals and amongst healthcare professionals. This study describes the use of social media by Australian and New Zealand nursing and midwifery graduates of the Graduate e-Cohort study; there were 112 (93%) respondents from a 2014 sample of 121 nurses and midwives. Findings suggest that the professional peak body goal of using social media as a vehicle for professional education requires consideration of the social media platforms that are actually being used by new graduates. We recommend that work by the respective professions at both an undergraduate and graduate level needs to focus on the implications of social media use or policy and practice to ensure that everyone is aware of when and how to engage in social media platforms and what to do and how to behave when using social media. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Evaluating interactive technology for an evolving case study on learning and satisfaction of graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marjorie A; Schaffner, Barbara H

    2016-07-01

    Nursing education is challenged to prepare students for complex healthcare needs through the integration of teamwork and informatics. Technology has become an important teaching tool in the blended classroom to enhance group based learning experiences. Faculty evaluation of classroom technologies is imperative prior to adoption. Few studies have directly compared various technologies and their impact on student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate technology enhanced teaching methods on the learning and satisfaction of graduate students in an advanced pharmacology class using an unfolding case study. After IRB approval, students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blogging group, wiki group or webinar group. Students completed the evolving case study using the assigned interactive technology. Student names were removed from the case studies. Faculty evaluated the case study using a rubric, while blinded to the assigned technology method used. No significant difference was found on case study grades, the range of grades on the assignment demonstrated little differences between the methods used. Students indicated an overall positive impact related to networking and collaboration on a satisfaction survey. Impact of technology methods needs to be explored in other areas of graduate nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Setup of a Biomedical Facility to Study Physiologically Relevant Flow-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    The design and implementation of a closed loop biomedical facility to study arterial flows is presented. The facility has a test section of 25 inches, and is capable of generating both steady and pulsatile flows via a centrifugal and a dual piston pump respectively. The Reynolds and Womersley numbers occurring in major blood vessels can be matched. The working fluid is a solution of NaI that allows refractive index matching with both rigid glass and compliant polymer models to facilitate tomographic PIV and holographic PIV. The combination of these two techniques allows us to study both large scale flow features as well as flows very close to the wall. The polymer models can be made with different modulus of elasticity and can be pre-stressed using a 5-axis stage. Radially asymmetric patches can also be pre-fabricated and incorporated in the tube during the manufacturing process to simulate plaque formation in arteries. These tubes are doped with tracer particles allowing for the measurement of wall deformation. Preliminary flow data over rigid and compliant walls is presented. One of the aims of this study is to characterize the changes in flow as the compliancy of blood vessels change due to age or disease, and explore the fluid interactions with an evolving surface boundary.

  7. Biomedical devices and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    This volume introduces readers to the basic concepts and recent advances in the field of biomedical devices. The text gives a detailed account of novel developments in drug delivery, protein electrophoresis, estrogen mimicking methods and medical devices. It also provides the necessary theoretical background as well as describing a wide range of practical applications. The level and style make this book accessible not only to scientific and medical researchers but also to graduate students.

  8. A phenomenological study of business graduates' employment experiences in the changing economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Throy Alexander

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the perspectives of business college graduates, how technology has shaped the structures of their jobs, and the role of non-technical skills as they navigate the changing career path. Three overlapping themes emerged from the data analysis: (1) influence of increased technology capabilities on job structures and careers; (2) participation in job-related training and formal education as means of adapting to the new work environment; and (3) the role of non-technical skills in the workplace amidst the intensification of technology change. This research provides higher education practitioners and labor market researchers qualitative perspectives on work structure changes.

  9. Study of Organosilicon Plasma Polymer Used in Composite Layers with Biomedical Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeva, E.; Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D.; Iacob, E.; Vanzetti, L.; Dimitrova, R.; Krasteva, N.; Spassov, T.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the ability of plasma polymer (PP) films obtained from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) on silica glass (SG) to induce hydroxyapatite (HA)-based composite layers from a mixture of simulated body fluid (SBF) and clear solution of detonation nanodiamond (DND) by a biomimetic process. The grown composites (PPHMDS/HADND) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. FTIR spectra of the PPHMDS indicated diminishing of the polymer characteristic bands when the polymer is immersed in DND clear solution. Furthermore, after sample immersion in the SBF-DND mixture, the FTIR spectra showed the presence of carbonate-containing HA through the characteristic vibration modes of P-O in the phosphate group and C-O in the carbonate group. The formation of HA layers, rich in silica and/or carbon was confirmed by RBS and SEM. The cell viability measured after 7 days on the polymer surface is more then 95% for all samples. The results show that the PPHMDS is promising as a substrate for growing HA/DND layers and that the materials obtained are biocompatible. The variations of plasma polymerization conditions and modification of the composite layers will aid in using such materials for biomedical applications.

  10. Integrating biomedical and herbal medicine in Ghana - experiences from the Kumasi South Hospital: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Millicent Addai; Danso-Appiah, Anthony; Turkson, Bernard Kofi; Tersbøl, Britt Pinkowski

    2016-07-07

    Over the past decade there has been growing interest in the use of herbal medicine both in developed and developing countries. Given the high proportion of patients using herbal medicine in Ghana, some health facilities have initiated implementation of herbal medicine as a component of their healthcare delivery. However, the extent to which herbal medicine has been integrated in Ghanaian health facilities, how integration is implemented and perceived by different stakeholders has not been documented. The study sought to explore these critical issues at the Kumasi South Hospital (KSH) and outline the challenges and motivations of the integration process. Qualitative phenomenological exploratory study design involving fieldwork observations, focus group discussion, in-depth interviews and key informants' interviews was employed to collect data. Policies and protocols outlining the definition, process and goals of integration were lacking, with respondents sharing different views about the purpose and value of integration of herbal medicine within public health facilities. Key informants were supportive of the initiative. Whilst biomedical health workers perceived the system to be parallel than integrated, health personnel providing herbal medicine perceived the system as integrated. Most patients were not aware of the herbal clinic in the hospital but those who had utilized services of the herbal clinic viewed the clinic as part of the hospital. The lack of a regulatory policy and protocol for the integration seemed to have led to the different perception of the integration. Policy and protocol to guide the integration are key recommendations.

  11. Globalization and Desire: A Case Study of International Graduate Student Education in Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Beatrice Quarshie

    2007-01-01

    Prospective graduate students from Sub-Saharan Africa continue to choose the United States as their destination for higher education. This choice has always been somewhat of a mixed blessing for African nations; some students return to share the benefits of their education but many stay on in the West. This "brain drain" effect has…

  12. Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Sang C; Tanik, Murat M

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical Engineering: Health Care Systems, Technology and Techniques is an edited volume with contributions from world experts. It provides readers with unique contributions related to current research and future healthcare systems. Practitioners and researchers focused on computer science, bioinformatics, engineering and medicine will find this book a valuable reference.

  13. Preparing the health workforce in Ethiopia: A Cross-sectional study of competence of anesthesia graduating students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibwana, Sharon; Woldemariam, Damtew; Misganaw, Awoke; Teshome, Mihereteab; Akalu, Leulayehu; Kols, Adrienne; Kim, Young Mi; Mengistu, Samuel; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to address shortages of health workers in low-resource settings have focused on rapidly increasing the number of higher education programs for health workers. This study examines selected competencies achieved by graduating Bachelor of Science and nurse anesthetist students in Ethiopia, a country facing a critical shortage of anesthesia professionals. The study, conducted in June and July 2013, assessed skills and knowledge of 122 students graduating from anesthetist training programs at six public universities and colleges in Ethiopia; these students comprise 80% of graduates from these institutions in the 2013 academic year. Data was collected from direct observations of student performance, using an objective structured clinical examination approach, and from structured interviews regarding the adequacy of the learning environment. Student performance varied, with mean percentage scores highest for spinal anesthesia (80%), neonatal resuscitation (74%), endotracheal intubation (73%), and laryngeal mask airway insertion check (71%). Average scores were lowest for routine anesthesia machine check (37%) and preoperative screening assessment (48%). Male graduates outscored female graduates (63.2% versus 56.9%, P = 0.014), and university graduates outscored regional health science college graduates (64.5% versus 55.5%, P = 0.023). Multivariate linear regression found that competence was associated with being male and attending a university training program. Less than 10% of the students believed that skills labs had adequate staff and resources, and only 57.4% had performed at least 200 endotracheal intubations at clinical practicum sites, as required by national standards. Ethiopia has successfully expanded higher education for anesthetists, but a focus on quality of training and assessment of learners is required to ensure that graduates have mastered basic skills and are able to offer safe services.

  14. Predictors of full-time faculty appointment among MD–PhD program graduates: a national cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy A. Andriole

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The authors sought to identify variables associated with MD–PhD program graduates’ academic medicine careers. Methods: We analyzed data for a national cohort of MD–PhD program graduates from 2000 to 2005, using multivariable logistic regression to identify independent predictors of full-time academic medicine faculty appointment through 2013. Results: Of 1,860 MD–PhD program graduates in 2000–2005, we included 1,846 (99.2% who had completed residency training before 2014. Of these 1,846 graduates, 968 (52.4% held full-time faculty appointments. Graduates who attended schools with Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP funding (vs. no MSTP funding; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14–1.74 and participated in ≥1 year of research during residency (vs. no documented research year; aOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.50–2.28 were more likely to have held full-time faculty appointments. Asian/Pacific Islander (aOR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60–0.93 and under-represented minority (URM; aOR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48–0.98 graduates (each vs. white graduates, graduates who reported total debt of ≥$100,000 (vs. no debt at graduation (aOR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.39–0.88, and graduates in surgical practice (aOR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48–0.84 and other practice (aOR, 0.66, 95% CI, 0.54–0.81 specialties (each vs. ‘medicine, pediatrics, pathology, or neurology’ were less likely to have held full-time faculty appointments. Gender was not independently associated with likelihood of full-time faculty appointment. Conclusions: Over half of all MD–PhD program graduates in our study had full-time faculty appointments. Our findings regarding variables independently associated with full-time faculty appointments can inform the design of strategies to promote academic medicine career choice among MD–PhD program graduates. Further research is warranted to identify other factors amenable to intervention, in addition to those included in

  15. Open and Distance Education Systems: do they enhance Graduates' Soft Skills? The results from 2009 Universitas Terbuka Tracer Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Juliah Ratnaningsih

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The vision and mission of Universitas Terbuka (UT is to become a highly qualified open and distance education institution and to provide higher education access to all communities. Graduates of UT are expected to acquire adequate knowledge, hard skills and soft skills. Soft skills play important roles in the world of work. The aim of this article is to describe: (1 whether the open and distance education systems are capable of providing graduates with soft skills, (2 how soft skills are acquired during the period of study, and (3 how are the range of soft skills acquired by graduates and required by stakeholders at work. This article uses 2009 UT tracer study, which employed survey and in-depth interviews to selected respondents and stakeholders. 2.417 pairs data (graduates and stakeholders were analysed. The rating scales were from 1 (very poor to 4 (excellent. The attributes analysed were personal, interpersonal and situational skills. The results show that learning systems that are based on individual learning and tutorial did provide graduates with soft skills. Graduates and stakeholders perceived interpersonal skills as fair. In general, soft skills required at work were time management, self-confidence, problem solving, creativity and team-work.

  16. Effect of Performance Deficiencies on Graduation and Board Certification Rates: A 10-Year Multicenter Study of Anesthesiology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judi A.; Fitzsimons, Michael G.; Pardo, Manuel C.; Hawkins, Joy L.; Huang, Yue Ming; Rudolph, Maria D. D.; Keyes, Mary A.; Howard-Quijano, Kimberly J.; Naim, Natale Z.; Buckley, Jack C.; Grogan, Tristan R.; Steadman, Randolph H.

    2016-01-01

    Background This multi-center, retrospective study was conducted to determine how resident performance deficiencies affect graduation and board certification. Methods Primary documents pertaining to resident performance were examined over a 10-year period at four academic anesthesiology residencies. Residents entering training between 2000 and 2009 were included, with follow-up through February 2016. Residents receiving actions by the programs’ Clinical Competency Committee were categorized by the area of deficiency and compared to peers without deficiencies. Results A total of 865 residents were studied (range: 127–275 per program). Of these, 215 residents received a total of 405 actions from their respective Clinical Competency Committee. Among those who received an action compared to those who did not, the proportion graduating differed (93% versus 99%, respectively, Pgraduating dropped to 55%. When more than three Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies were deficient, the proportion graduating also dropped significantly. Conclusions Overall graduation and board certification rates were consistently high in residents with no, or isolated, deficiencies. Residents deficient in an Essential Attribute, or multiple competencies, are at high risk of not graduating or achieving board certification. More research is needed on the effectiveness and selective deployment of remediation efforts, particularly for high-risk groups. PMID:27119434

  17. Challenges of PhD Graduated Nurses for Role Acceptance as a Clinical Educator: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi Moghadam, Yousef; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Feizi, Aram

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Clinical education is the core component of nursing education. PhD graduated nurses who are faculty members can play a main role in clinical instruction. However, there is not clear understanding about the challenges which they may encounter for accepting their role as clinical educator. The aim of this study was to explore the challenges of role acceptance by PhD aduated nurses who are faculty members. Methods: In this qualitative exploratory study a total of 13 participants (8 PhD graduated in nursing, 3 head of departments of nursing, one educational vice chancellor of nursing school, and one nurse) were selected by purposive sampling method. Data were collected by semi-structured, face to face interview and analyzed by conventional content analysis approach developed by Graneheim and Lundman. Results: The main theme emerged from data analysis was "identity threat". This theme had five categories including expectations beyond ability, lack of staff's rely on the performance of PhD graduated nurses, poor clinical competencies, doubtfulness, and obligation. Conclusion: PhD graduated nurses experienced some worries about their role as clinical educators and argued that they have not been prepared for their role. Therefore, policy makers and authorities of nursing schools should support PhD graduated nurses for accepting their new roles as clinical educators. Moreover, some changes in nursing PhD curriculum is needed to improve the clinical competencies of PhD graduated and prepare them for their role as a clinical educator.

  18. Women in senior post-graduate medicine career roles in the UK: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Anthony; Eley, Lizzie; Gray, Selena; Irish, Bill

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to elicit the views, experiences, career journeys and aspirations of women in senior post-graduate medical education roles to identify steps needed to help support career progression. In-depth semi-structured telephone interviews. UK. Purposive sample of 12 women in a variety of senior leadership roles in post-graduate medical education in the UK. Self reported motivating influences, factors that helped and hindered progress, key branch points, and key educational factors and social support impacting on participants' career in postgraduate medicine. Respondents often reported that career journeys were serendipitous, rather than planned, formal or well structured. Senior women leaders reported having a high internal locus of control, with very high levels of commitment to the NHS. All reported significant levels of drive, although the majority indicated that they were not ambitious in the sense of a strong drive for money, prestige, recognition or power. They perceived that there was an under-representation of women in senior leadership positions and that high-quality female mentorship was particularly important in redressing this imbalance. Social support, such a spouse or other significant family member, was particularly valued as reaffirming and supporting women's chosen career ambition. Factors that were considered to have hindered career progression included low self-confidence and self-efficacy, the so-called glass ceiling and perceived self-limiting cultural influences. Factors indirectly linked to gender such as part-time versus working full time were reportedly influential in being overlooked for senior leadership roles. Implications of these findings are discussed in the paper. Social support, mentorship and role modelling are all perceived as highly important in redressing perceived gender imbalances in careers in post-graduate medical education.

  19. Scientific Reproducibility in Biomedical Research: Provenance Metadata Ontology for Semantic Annotation of Study Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Valdez, Joshua; Rueschman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reproducibility is key to scientific progress as it allows the research community to build on validated results, protect patients from potentially harmful trial drugs derived from incorrect results, and reduce wastage of valuable resources. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a systematic guideline titled "Rigor and Reproducibility " for supporting reproducible research studies, which has also been accepted by several scientific journals. These journals will require published articles to conform to these new guidelines. Provenance metadata describes the history or origin of data and it has been long used in computer science to capture metadata information for ensuring data quality and supporting scientific reproducibility. In this paper, we describe the development of Provenance for Clinical and healthcare Research (ProvCaRe) framework together with a provenance ontology to support scientific reproducibility by formally modeling a core set of data elements representing details of research study. We extend the PROV Ontology (PROV-O), which has been recommended as the provenance representation model by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), to represent both: (a) data provenance, and (b) process provenance. We use 124 study variables from 6 clinical research studies from the National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) to evaluate the coverage of the provenance ontology. NSRR is the largest repository of NIH-funded sleep datasets with 50,000 studies from 36,000 participants. The provenance ontology reuses ontology concepts from existing biomedical ontologies, for example the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), to model the provenance information of research studies. The ProvCaRe framework is being developed as part of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) data provenance project.

  20. Nurses' views of interprofessional education and collaboration: a comparative study of recent graduates from three universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Margaretha; Svensson, Annemie; Timpka, Toomas; Faresjö, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    Today interprofessional education (IPE) is spread throughout the world. In Sweden only one of the existing nursing programs has an IPE curriculum on several levels during the training. The aim of this study was to examine how nurses who recently graduated from universities with IPE or non-IPE curricula perceive the importance of different educational goals and whether they found themselves prepared for their profession, and especially for collaboration with other professions. Three universities with different commitments to IPE were studied. We used a survey with eight different targets: communication skills, cooperation with other professions, problem-solving capability, self-directed learning skills, whether their education has prepared them to work professionally, to perform research, to take care of acutely ill patients, to work preventively and working as a nurse. The participants were asked whether their undergraduate education had prepared them for these targets and whether they perceived that the targets were important goals for their education. A main result in this study was that nurses who had recently graduated from the IPE university perceived to a greater extent that their undergraduate training had prepared them to work together with other professions in comparison with nursing students from non-IPE universities.

  1. A REFLECTION ON UNIVERSITY STUDIES AND FURTHER CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF CHOSEN CULS FACULTIES’ GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymešová, Pavla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on professional orientation and direction of the careers of graduates of Faculty of Economics and Management (FEM and Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources (FAFNR at Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CULS. The general information and theoretical part is devoted to the topic of career, its concept and definition, and it deals with chosen determinants of career orientation and career development. The concept of career is considered within the sphere of specialized terminology mainly used in humanities disciplines, it defines subjective and objective career. Moreover, the concepts of life developmental tasks and career maturity are being mapped. The existence of typical stages of development is also discussed, for which there are typical qualitative differences on the level of information, in relation to a given profession and in motivation towards the profession (with regard to the stage that includes university studies. Significant influence of objective and situational factors, which interfere with career orientation and the choice of a profession, is further included. A look at a person’s personality with respect to the determinants of career orientation and career development also forms a part of the general information part. In its first part of the empirical section, the article is focused on the concept and definition of career from the beginning of the 1990s. This includes the views of Czech as well as foreign authors. In the second part, the article tries to present practical consequences of students’ career orientation and it deals with processing an estimate whether the observed faculties’ graduates remain working in the field related to what they studied within five years from graduation. A part of the study is also formed by a description of the main motives leading to choosing a profession during university studies. The chosen attributes were monitored among a selected group of

  2. Nursing students' intentions to use research as a predictor of use one year post graduation: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Henrietta; Wallin, Lars; Gustavsson, Petter; Rudman, Ann

    2012-09-01

    Graduating nursing students are expected to have acquired the necessary skills to provide research-based care to patients. However, recent studies have shown that new graduate nurses report their extent of research use as relatively low. Because behavior intention is a well-known predictor of subsequent behavior, this gives reasons to further investigate graduating nursing students' intentions to use research in clinical practice after undergraduate study. To investigate graduating nursing students' intentions to use research in clinical practice and, furthermore, to investigate whether intention in itself and as a mediating variable can predict subsequent research use behavior in clinical practice one year post graduation. A follow-up study was performed of graduating nursing students in their final semester of undergraduate study (2006) and at one year post graduation (2008). Data were collected within the larger national survey LANE (Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education). A sample of 1319 respondents was prospectively followed. Graduating nursing students' intentions to use research instrumentally were studied as a predictor of their subsequent instrumental research use one year post graduation. A statistical full mediation model was tested to evaluate the effects of intention and factors from undergraduate study on subsequent research use in daily care. Thirty-four percent of the nursing students intended to use research on more than half or almost every working shift in their future clinical practice. Intention showed a direct effect on research use behavior. In addition, significant indirect effects on research use were shown for capability beliefs (regarding practicing the principles of evidence-based practice) and perceived support for research use (from campus and clinical education), where intention acted as a mediating factor for those effects. Students rated a modest level of intention to use research evidence. Intentions close to graduation acted

  3. Simulation study of a high power density rectenna array for biomedical implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Yoon, Hargsoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    2016-04-01

    The integration of wireless power transmission devices using microwaves into the biomedical field is close to a practical reality. Implanted biomedical devices need a long lasting power source or continuous power supply. Recent development of high efficiency rectenna technology enables continuous power supply to these implanted devices. Due to the size limit of most of medical devices, it is imperative to minimize the rectenna as well. The research reported in this paper reviews the effects of close packing the rectenna elements which show the potential of directly empowering the implanted devices, especially within a confined area. The rectenna array is tested in the X band frequency range.

  4. A core competency model for Chinese baccalaureate nursing graduates: a descriptive correlational study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang Yu; Zhao, Rong Rong; Liu, Yi Si; Wu, Ying; Jin, Ning Ning; Li, Rui Ying; Shi, Shu Ping; Shao, Yue Ying; Guo, Ming; Arthur, David; Elliott, Malcolm

    2013-12-01

    A review of the literature showed that the core competencies needed by newly graduated Chinese nurses were not as of yet undocumented. To develop a psychometrically sound instrument for identifying and measuring the core competencies needed by Chinese nursing baccalaureate graduates. Descriptive correlational and multicentre study. Seven major tertiary teaching hospitals and three major medical universities in Beijing. 790 subjects, including patients, nursing faculty members, doctors and nurses. A reliable and valid self-report instrument, consisting of 58 items, was developed using multiple methods. It was then distributed to 790 subjects to measure nursing competency in a broader Chinese context. The psychometric characteristics of reliability and validity were supported by descriptive and inferential analyses. The final instrument consists of six dimensions with 47 items. The content validity index was 0.90. The overall scale reliability was 0.97 with dimensions range from 0.87 to 0.94. Six domains of core competencies were identified: professionalism; direct care; support and communication; application of professional knowledge; personal traits; and critical thinking and innovation. The findings of this study provide valuable evidence for a psychometrically sound measurement tool, as well as for competency-based nursing curriculum reform. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antecedents of perceived graduate employability: A study of student volunteers in a community-based organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki Goodman

    2016-05-01

    Research purpose: This study aimed at investigating motivations to volunteer, perceived graduate competencies, extent of participating in volunteering, along with gender and faculty of registration, as antecedents of perceived graduate employability among student volunteers and to compare the relative contributions of these antecedences in predicting perceived employability. Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional research design and a quantitative data collection method were used. The relative weights analysis was conducted to answer the research question. Main findings: Overall, the results demonstrated, firstly, that different sets of predictors statistically significantly predict Perceived External Employability and Perceived Internal Employability, respectively. In the case of Perceived External Employability, a biographical predictor (faculty of registration is the strongest predictor, whereas in the case of Internal Employability, a questionnaire measurement (of Social Motivation comes out on top. Practical implications/managerial implications: The social motivation factor as a predictor of perceived internal employability suggests that the more students valued the social interactions brought about by their volunteering activities, the better they saw themselves equipped for employment. This gives some weight to the argument that engaging in volunteer activities can help equip students with competencies that make them more prepared for the world of work. Contribution/value-add: The study provided support for the construct validity of the scale for the measurement of perceived employability and evidence that different sets of predictors contribute to perceived internal and external employability.

  6. Awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the US presidential apology and their influence on minority participation in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ralph V; Kegeles, S Stephen; Kressin, Nancy R; Green, B Lee; James, Sherman A; Wang, Min Qi; Russell, Stefanie L; Claudio, Cristina

    2008-06-01

    We compared the influence of awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the presidential apology for that study on the willingness of Blacks, non-Hispanic Whites, and Hispanics to participate in biomedical research. The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire was administered to 1133 adults in 4 US cities. This 60-item questionnaire addressed issues related to the recruitment of minorities into biomedical studies. Adjusted multivariate analysis showed that, compared with Whites, Blacks were nearly 4 times as likely to have heard of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, more than twice as likely to have correctly named Clinton as the president who made the apology, and 2 to 3 times more likely to have been willing to participate in biomedical studies despite having heard about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (odds ratio [OR]=2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.4, 6.2) or the presidential apology (OR=2.3; 95% CI=1.4, 3.9). These marked differences likely reflect the cultural reality in the Black community, which has been accustomed to increased risks in many activities. For Whites, this type of information may have been more shocking and at odds with their expectations and, thus, led to a stronger negative impact.

  7. Employability and career experiences of international graduates of MSc Public Health: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buunaaisie, C; Manyara, A M; Annett, H; Bird, E L; Bray, I; Ige, J; Jones, M; Orme, J; Pilkington, P; Evans, D

    2018-05-08

    This article aims to describe the public health career experiences of international graduates of a Master of Science in Public Health (MSc PH) programme and to contribute to developing the evidence base on international public health workforce capacity development. A sequential mixed methods study was conducted between January 2017 and April 2017. Ninety-seven international graduates of one UK university's MSc PH programme were invited to take part in an online survey followed by semistructured interviews, for respondents who consented to be interviewed. We computed the descriptive statistics of the quantitative data obtained, and qualitative data were thematically analysed. The response rate was 48.5%. Most respondents (63%) were employed by various agencies within 1 year after graduation. Others (15%) were at different stages of doctor of philosophy studies. Respondents reported enhanced roles after graduation in areas such as public health policy analysis (74%); planning, implementation and evaluation of public health interventions (74%); leadership roles (72%); and research (70%). The common perceived skills that were relevant to the respondents' present jobs were critical analysis (87%), multidisciplinary thinking (86%), demonstrating public health leadership skills (84%) and research (77%). Almost all respondents (90%) were confident in conducting research. Respondents recommended the provision of longer public health placement opportunities, elective courses on project management and advanced statistics, and 'internationalisation' of the programme's curriculum. The study has revealed the relevance of higher education in public health in developing the career prospects and skills of graduates. International graduates of this MSc PH programme were satisfied with the relevance and impact of the skills they acquired during their studies. The outcomes of this study can be used for curriculum reformation. Employers' perspectives of the capabilities of these

  8. Financial Relationships between Organizations That Produce Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Biomedical Industry: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campsall, Paul; Colizza, Kate; Straus, Sharon; Stelfox, Henry T

    2016-05-01

    ): guidelines produced by organizations reporting more comprehensive conflict of interest policies (per additional procedure, range 5-17) included fewer positive (rate ratio [RR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.86-0.95) and more negative (RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.09-1.60) recommendations regarding patented biomedical products. The clinical practice guidelines produced by organizations reporting more comprehensive conflict of interest policies were also more likely to include disclosure statements for direct funding sources (odds ratio [OR] 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.56) and financial relationships of guideline committee members (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.09-1.79), but not financial relationships of the organizations (0 disclosures). Limitations of the study include the use of the National Guideline Clearinghouse as the single source of clinical practice guidelines and the self-report of survey responses and organizations' website postings. Financial relationships between organizations that produce clinical practice guidelines and biomedical companies are common and infrequently disclosed in guidelines. Our study highlights the need for an effective policy to manage organizational conflicts of interest and disclosure of financial relationships.

  9. Career choices for public health: cohort studies of graduates from UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldacre, Michael J; Laxton, Louise; Lambert, Trevor W; Webster, Premila

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe UK-trained doctors' early intentions about seeking careers in public health and their eventual speciality destinations. Analysis of longitudinal studies of medical graduates from all UK medical schools in selected year-of-qualification cohorts from 1974 to 2008; data collected by postal questionnaires at various times after qualifying; and selection, for this paper, of doctors who expressed an early preference for a career in public health and/or who eventually practised in it. Of all doctors eventually practising in public health, for whom we had early choices, public health had been the unreserved first choice of 8% (10/125) in their first post-qualification year, 27% (33/122) in their third year and 59% (51/86) in their fifth year. Including first choices for public health 'tied' with an equal preference for a different speciality, and doctors' second and third choices for public health, 19% (24/125) of practising public health doctors had considered public health as a possible career in their first post-graduation year, 41% (50/122) in the third and 83% (71/86) in the fifth year. Comparisons with other specialities show that doctors in public health chose their speciality relatively late after qualification.

  10. International symposium on Biomedical Data Infrastructure (BDI 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Dhillon, Sarinder; Advances in biomedical infrastructure 2013

    2013-01-01

    Current Biomedical Databases are independently administered in geographically distinct locations, lending them almost ideally to adoption of intelligent data management approaches. This book focuses on research issues, problems and opportunities in Biomedical Data Infrastructure identifying new issues and directions for future research in Biomedical Data and Information Retrieval, Semantics in Biomedicine, and Biomedical Data Modeling and Analysis. The book will be a useful guide for researchers, practitioners, and graduate-level students interested in learning state-of-the-art development in biomedical data management.

  11. Student Dropout at the Hellenic Open University: Evaluation of the Graduate Program, "Studies in Education"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Vergidis

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This study traces the root causes of dropout rates in one post-graduate course “Studies in Education,” offered by the Hellenic Open University (HOU. From our research findings, it was found that the main cause of dropping out stem from a combination of adult learners’ obligations, specifically balancing their academic workload with their employment commitments and family obligations (mainly for female students. The second reason for dropout rates among adult distance education learners include students’ miscalculation of the available time for studying and their underestimation of the extra effort required for effective learning. These reasons can be compared to the educational material, which, in general, was not considered overly difficult and did not appear to compel students to abandon their studies.

  12. Hospital graduate social work field work programs: a study in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showers, N

    1990-02-01

    Twenty-seven hospital field work programs in New York City were studied. Questionnaires were administered to program coordinators and 238 graduate social work students participating in study programs. High degrees of program structural complexity and variation were found, indicating a state of art well beyond that described in the general field work literature. High rates of student satisfaction with learning, field instructors, programs, and the overall field work experience found suggest that the complexity of study programs may be more effective than traditional field work models. Statistically nonsignificant study findings indicate areas in which hospital social work departments may develop field work programs consistent with shifting organizational needs, without undue risk to educational effectiveness. Statistically significant findings suggest areas in which inflexibility in program design may be more beneficial in the diagnostic related groups era.

  13. Contribution for labelling study of cellular and molecular structures of biomedical interest with technetium 99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebello, L.H.; Piotkwosky, M.C.; Pereira, J.A.A.; Boasquevisque, E.M.; Silva, J.R.M.; Reis, R.J.N.; Pires, E.T.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    1992-01-01

    The methodologies for labelling bacteria, planaria and cercaria from schistosomiasis evolution cycle and in oxamniquine with technetium 99 m, developed in the Biomedical Center of Rio de Janeiro University and in the Research Center of National Institute of Cancer are shown. (C.G.C.)

  14. Feasibility study of the production of biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy by powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzoni, L; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2015-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are characterized by an exceptional combination of properties like high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility which makes them suitable materials for biomedical prosthesis and devices. The wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloy is generally favored in comparison to other metallic biomaterials due to its relatively low elastic modulus and it has been long used to obtain products for biomedical applications. In this work an alternative route to fabricate biomedical implants made out of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. Specifically, the feasibility of the conventional powder metallurgy route of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering is addressed by considering two types of powders (i.e. blended elemental and prealloyed). The characterization of physical properties, chemical analysis, mechanical behavior and microstructural analysis is carried out in-depth and the properties are correlated among them. On the base of the results found, the produced alloys are promising materials for biomedical applications as well as cheaper surgical devices and tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Education of biomedical engineering in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Kao, Tsair; Wang, Jia-Jung; Chen, Mei-Jung; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical Engineers (BME) play an important role in medical and healthcare society. Well educational programs are important to support the healthcare systems including hospitals, long term care organizations, manufacture industries of medical devices/instrumentations/systems, and sales/services companies of medical devices/instrumentations/system. In past 30 more years, biomedical engineering society has accumulated thousands people hold a biomedical engineering degree, and work as a biomedical engineer in Taiwan. Most of BME students can be trained in biomedical engineering departments with at least one of specialties in bioelectronics, bio-information, biomaterials or biomechanics. Students are required to have internship trainings in related institutions out of campus for 320 hours before graduating. Almost all the biomedical engineering departments are certified by IEET (Institute of Engineering Education Taiwan), and met the IEET requirement in which required mathematics and fundamental engineering courses. For BMEs after graduation, Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering (TSBME) provides many continue-learning programs and certificates for all members who expect to hold the certification as a professional credit in his working place. In current status, many engineering departments in university are continuously asked to provide joint programs with BME department to train much better quality students. BME is one of growing fields in Taiwan.

  16. Assessing Learning Styles of Graduate Entry Nursing Students as a Classroom Research Activity: A quantitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lucia K; Glaser, Dale; Howland, Lois; Clark, Mary Jo; Hutchins, Susie; Macauley, Karen; Close, Jacqueline F; Leveque, Noelle Lipkin; Failla, Kim Reina; Brooks, Raelene; Ward, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    A number of studies across different disciplines have investigated students' learning styles. Differences are known to exist between graduate and baccalaureate nursing students. However, few studies have investigated the learning styles of students in graduate entry nursing programs. . Study objective was to describe graduate entry nursing students' learning styles. A descriptive design was used for this study. The Index of Learning Styles (ILS) was administered to 202 graduate entry nursing student volunteers at a southwestern university. Descriptive statistics, tests of association, reliability, and validity were performed. Graduate nursing students and faculty participated in data collection, analysis, and dissemination of the results. Predominant learning styles were: sensing - 82.7%, visual - 78.7%, sequential - 65.8%, and active - 59.9%. Inter-item reliabilities for the postulated subscales were: sensing/intuitive (α=0.70), visual/verbal (α=0.694), sequential/global (α=0.599), and active/reflective (α=0.572). Confirmatory factor analysis for results of validity were: χ 2 (896)=1110.25, pnursing students. This study provided faculty with numerous opportunities for actively engaging students in data collection, analysis, and dissemination of results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fertility patterns of college graduates by field of study, US women born 1960-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelmore, Katherine; Musick, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Building on recent European studies, we used the Survey of Income and Program Participation to provide the first analysis of fertility differences between groups of US college graduates by their undergraduate field of study. We used multilevel event-history models to investigate possible institutional and selection mechanisms linking field of study to delayed fertility and childlessness. The results are consistent with those found for Europe in showing an overall difference of 10 percentage points between levels of childlessness across fields, with the lowest levels occurring for women in health and education, intermediate levels for women in science and technology, and the highest levels for women in arts and social sciences. The mediating roles of the following field characteristics were assessed: motherhood employment penalties; percentage of men; family attitudes; and marriage patterns. Childlessness was higher among women in fields with a moderate representation of men, less traditional family attitudes, and late age at first marriage.

  18. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de; Falchete do Prado, Renata; Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto; Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys

  19. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Falchete do Prado, Renata, E-mail: renatafalchete@hotmail.com [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto [Division of Materials, Air and Space Institute, CTA, Praça Mal. do Ar Eduardo Gomes, 14, São José dos Campos 12904-000, SP (Brazil); Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys.

  20. Using typed dependencies to study and recognise conceptualisation zones in biomedical literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Groza

    Full Text Available In the biomedical domain, authors publish their experiments and findings using a quasi-standard coarse-grained discourse structure, which starts with an introduction that sets up the motivation, continues with a description of the materials and methods, and concludes with results and discussions. Over the course of the years, there has been a fair amount of research done in the area of scientific discourse analysis, with a focus on performing automatic recognition of scientific artefacts/conceptualisation zones from the raw content of scientific publications. Most of the existing approaches use Machine Learning techniques to perform classification based on features that rely on the shallow structure of the sentence tokens, or sentences as a whole, in addition to corpus-driven statistics. In this article, we investigate the role carried by the deep (dependency structure of the sentences in describing their rhetorical nature. Using association rule mining techniques, we study the presence of dependency structure patterns in the context of a given rhetorical type, the use of these patterns in exploring differences in structure between the rhetorical types, and their ability to discriminate between the different rhetorical types. Our final goal is to provide a series of insights that can be used to complement existing classification approaches. Experimental results show that, in particular in the context of a fine-grained multi-class classification context, the association rules emerged from the dependency structure are not able to produce uniform classification results. However, they can be used to derive discriminative pair-wise classification mechanisms, in particular for some of the most ambiguous types.

  1. The Other Side of the Coin: A Self-Study of Graduate Student Exposure to International Experiences of Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a retrospective understanding of self-study by re-living a study abroad experience through critical reflection. It will explain and clarify how reflection and self-study of the personal experiences of a graduate student can enhance the meaning of inclusion. This paper begins with a brief conceptualization of self-study,…

  2. The Validity of Graduate Management Admission Test Scores: A Summary of Studies Conducted from 1997 to 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento-Miller, Eileen; Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2008-01-01

    The validity of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores is examined by summarizing 273 studies conducted between 1997 and 2004. Each of the studies was conducted through the Validity Study Service of the test sponsor and contained identical variables and statistical methods. Validity coefficients from each of the studies were corrected…

  3. Maximising value from a United Kingdom Biomedical Research Centre: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Ovseiko, Pavel V; Fahy, Nick; Shaw, Sara; Kerr, Polly; Rushforth, Alexander D; Channon, Keith M; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki

    2017-08-14

    Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country's international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients, and to improve efficiency and reduce waste in healthcare. As NIHR Oxford BRC (Oxford BRC) enters its third 5-year funding period, we seek to (1) apply the evidence base on how best to support the various partnerships in this large, multi-stakeholder research system and (2) research how these partnerships play out in a new, ambitious programme of translational research. Organisational case study, informed by the principles of action research. A cross-cutting theme, 'Partnerships for Health, Wealth and Innovation' has been established with multiple sub-themes (drug development, device development, business support and commercialisation, research methodology and statistics, health economics, bioethics, patient and public involvement and engagement, knowledge translation, and education and training) to support individual BRC research themes and generate cross-theme learning. The 'Partnerships' theme will support the BRC's goals by facilitating six types of partnership (with patients and citizens, clinical services, industry, across the NIHR infrastructure, across academic disciplines, and with policymakers and payers) through a range of engagement platforms and activities. We will develop a longitudinal progress narrative centred around exemplar case studies, and apply theoretical models from innovation studies (Triple Helix), sociology of science (Mode 2 knowledge production) and business studies (Value Co-creation). Data sources will be the empirical research studies within individual BRC research themes (who will apply separately for NHS ethics approval), plus documentary analysis and interviews and ethnography with research

  4. Epidemiology and Reporting Characteristics of Systematic Reviews of Biomedical Research: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Page

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews (SRs can help decision makers interpret the deluge of published biomedical literature. However, a SR may be of limited use if the methods used to conduct the SR are flawed, and reporting of the SR is incomplete. To our knowledge, since 2004 there has been no cross-sectional study of the prevalence, focus, and completeness of reporting of SRs across different specialties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a more recent cross-section of SRs.We searched MEDLINE to identify potentially eligible SRs indexed during the month of February 2014. Citations were screened using prespecified eligibility criteria. Epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a random sample of 300 SRs were extracted by one reviewer, with a 10% sample extracted in duplicate. We compared characteristics of Cochrane versus non-Cochrane reviews, and the 2014 sample of SRs versus a 2004 sample of SRs. We identified 682 SRs, suggesting that more than 8,000 SRs are being indexed in MEDLINE annually, corresponding to a 3-fold increase over the last decade. The majority of SRs addressed a therapeutic question and were conducted by authors based in China, the UK, or the US; they included a median of 15 studies involving 2,072 participants. Meta-analysis was performed in 63% of SRs, mostly using standard pairwise methods. Study risk of bias/quality assessment was performed in 70% of SRs but was rarely incorporated into the analysis (16%. Few SRs (7% searched sources of unpublished data, and the risk of publication bias was considered in less than half of SRs. Reporting quality was highly variable; at least a third of SRs did not report use of a SR protocol, eligibility criteria relating to publication status, years of coverage of the search, a full Boolean search logic for at least one database, methods for data extraction, methods for study risk of bias assessment, a primary outcome, an

  5. The Collapse of the Graduate Labour Market in South Africa: Evidence from Recent Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, Andre

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the problem of rising unemployment among graduates from post-school institutions in South Africa such as the further education and training (FET) colleges, universities of technology and universities. Although an emerging problem elsewhere in the world, the rate of growth of unemployed graduates is escalating at a rapid pace…

  6. Graduate Student Services: A Study of the Delivery of Services at the Location Where Students Matriculate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlison, John G.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates and explores the best method for the delivery of graduate student services. Essentially, there are two methods for delivery of these services. They can be delivered by virtue of centralization or decentralization. Decentralized delivery, for the purpose of this dissertation is the delivery of graduate student…

  7. Navigating the Path to a Biomedical Science Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Andrea McNeely

    The number of biomedical PhD scientists being trained and graduated far exceeds the number of academic faculty positions and academic research jobs. If this trend is compelling biomedical PhD scientists to increasingly seek career paths outside of academia, then more should be known about their intentions, desires, training experiences, and career path navigation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand the process through which biomedical PhD scientists are trained and supported for navigating future career paths. In addition, the study sought to determine whether career development support efforts and opportunities should be redesigned to account for the proportion of PhD scientists following non-academic career pathways. Guided by the social cognitive career theory (SCCT) framework this study sought to answer the following central research question: How does a southeastern tier 1 research university train and support its biomedical PhD scientists for navigating their career paths? Key findings are: Many factors influence PhD scientists' career sector preference and job search process, but the most influential were relationships with faculty, particularly the mentor advisor; Planned activities are a significant aspect of the training process and provide skills for career success; and Planned activities provided skills necessary for a career, but influential factors directed the career path navigated. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  8. How do scientists perceive the current publication culture? A qualitative focus group interview study among Dutch biomedical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijdink, J K; Schipper, K; Bouter, L M; Maclaine Pont, P; de Jonge, J; Smulders, Y M

    2016-02-17

    To investigate the biomedical scientist's perception of the prevailing publication culture. Qualitative focus group interview study. Four university medical centres in the Netherlands. Three randomly selected groups of biomedical scientists (PhD, postdoctoral staff members and full professors). Main themes for discussion were selected by participants. Frequently perceived detrimental effects of contemporary publication culture were the strong focus on citation measures (like the Journal Impact Factor and the H-index), gift and ghost authorships and the order of authors, the peer review process, competition, the funding system and publication bias. These themes were generally associated with detrimental and undesirable effects on publication practices and on the validity of reported results. Furthermore, senior scientists tended to display a more cynical perception of the publication culture than their junior colleagues. However, even among the PhD students and the postdoctoral fellows, the sentiment was quite negative. Positive perceptions of specific features of contemporary scientific and publication culture were rare. Our findings suggest that the current publication culture leads to negative sentiments, counterproductive stress levels and, most importantly, to questionable research practices among junior and senior biomedical scientists. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Early career retention of Malawian medical graduates: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, Kate L; Ulaya, Godwin; Lagarde, Mylene; Gwesele, Lyson; Dzowela, Titha; Hanson, Kara; Muula, Adamson S

    2015-01-01

    There have been longstanding concerns over Malawian doctors migrating to high-income countries. Early career is a particularly vulnerable period. After significant policy changes, we examined the retention of recent medical graduates within Malawi and the public sector. We obtained data on graduates between 2006 and 2012 from the University of Malawi College of Medicine and Malawi Ministry of Health. We utilised the alumni network to triangulate official data and contacted graduates directly for missing or uncertain data. Odds ratios and chi-squared tests were employed to investigate relationships by graduation year and gender. We traced 256 graduates, with complete information for more than 90%. Nearly 80% of registered doctors were in Malawi (141/178, 79.2%), although the odds of emigration doubled with each year after graduation (odds ratio = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.54-2.56, P < 0.0001). Of the 37 graduates outside Malawi (14.5%), 23 (62.2%) were training in South Africa under a College of Medicine sandwich programme. More than 80% of graduates were working in the public sector (185/218, 82.6%), with the odds declining by 27% for each year after graduation (odds ratio = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.61-0.86, P < 0.0001). While most doctors remain in Malawi and the public sector during their early careers, the odds of leaving both increase with time. The majority of graduates outside Malawi are training in South Africa under visa restrictions, reflecting the positive impact of postgraduate training in Malawi. Concerns over attrition from the public sector are valid and require further exploratory work. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Students' experiences of embedded academic literacy support in a graduate entry nursing program: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjan, Lucie M; Maneze, Della; Everett, Bronwyn; Glew, Paul; Trajkovski, Suza; Lynch, Joan; Salamonson, Yenna

    2018-01-01

    Graduate entry nursing (GEN) programs were designed to address the predicted nursing shortfall. In Australia, although these programs attract students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, the workload is compounded by cultural differences and a new academic learning environment which presents additional challenges. This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of GEN students enrolled in the introductory unit of their nursing program with embedded academic literacy support in Sydney, Australia. Twenty-four commencing GEN students were interviewed in January 2016. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Three main themes emerged which illustrated that GEN students were 'diamonds in the rough'. They possessed a raw natural beauty that required some shaping and polishing to ensure academic needs were met. To ensure retention is high, institutions need to evaluate how best to support and harness the potential of these unique students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Newly graduated nurses use of knowledge sources in clinical decison-making - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri

    Evidence-based practice has been introduced internationally as a standard for healthcare delivery to improve the quality of care, thus ensuring safe care and treatment. Evidence-based practice calls for a decision-making that specifically requires nurses to place the patient at the centre...... of clinical decisions, based on transparent, articulate and reflective use of knowledge sources. Furthermore, it is implied that nurses are able to retrieve, asses, implement and evaluate research evidence. To meet these requirements, nursing educations around the world have organised curricula to educate...... and support future nurses, enabling them to work within a framework of evidence-based practice. Recent studies underline that despite curricula interventions, newly graduated nurses’ use of research evidence and components within evidence-based practice is limited. However, it is unclear why the newly...

  12. Specialist training in Fiji: Why do graduates migrate, and why do they remain? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usher Kim

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialist training was established in the late 1990s at the Fiji School of Medicine. Losses of graduates to overseas migration and to the local private sector prompted us to explore the reasons for these losses from the Fiji public workforce. Methods Data were collected on the whereabouts and highest educational attainments of the 66 Fiji doctors who had undertaken specialist training to at least the diploma level between 1997 and 2004. Semistructured interviews focusing on career decisions were carried out with 36 of these doctors, who were purposively sampled to include overseas migrants, temporary overseas trainees, local private practitioners and public sector doctors. Results 120 doctors undertook specialist training to at least the diploma level between 1997 and 2004; 66 of the graduates were Fiji citizens or permanent residents; 54 originated from other countries in the region. Among Fiji graduates, 42 completed a diploma and 24 had either completed (21 or were enrolled (3 in a master's programme. Thirty-two (48.5% were working in the public sectors, four (6.0% were temporarily training overseas, 30.3% had migrated overseas and the remainder were mostly in local private practice. Indo-Fijian ethnicity and non-completion of full specialist training were associated with lower retention in the public sectors, while gender had little impact. Decisions to leave the public sectors were complex, with concerns about political instability and family welfare predominating for overseas migrants, while working conditions not conducive to family life or frustrations with career progression predominated for local private practitioners. Doctors remaining in the public sectors reported many satisfying aspects to their work despite frustrations, though 40% had seriously considered resigning from the public service and 60% were unhappy with their career progression. Conclusion Overall, this study provides some support for the view that

  13. Maximising value from a United Kingdom Biomedical Research Centre: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Ovseiko, Pavel V.; Fahy, Nick; Shaw, Sara; Kerr, Polly; Rushforth, Alexander D.; Channon, Keith M.; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    Background Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country’s international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients, and to improve efficiency and reduce waste in healthcare. As NIHR Oxford BRC (Oxford BRC) enters its third 5-year funding period, we seek to (1) a...

  14. Knowledge, attitude, and practices about biomedical waste management among healthcare personnel: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Vanesh Mathur; S Dwivedi; M A Hassan; R P Misra

    2011-01-01

    Background: The waste produced in the course of healthcare activities carries a higher potential for infection and injury than any other type of waste. Inadequate and inappropriate knowledge of handling of healthcare waste may have serious health consequences and a significant impact on the environment as well. Objective: The objective was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practices of doctors, nurses, laboratory technicians, and sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Material...

  15. An eHealth Capabilities Framework for Graduates and Health Professionals: Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Deborah; Keep, Melanie; Janssen, Anna; Spallek, Heiko; Quinn, Deleana; Jones, Aaron; Tseris, Emma; Yeung, Wilson; Togher, Leanne; Solman, Annette; Shaw, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Background The demand for an eHealth-ready and adaptable workforce is placing increasing pressure on universities to deliver eHealth education. At present, eHealth education is largely focused on components of eHealth rather than considering a curriculum-wide approach. Objective This study aimed to develop a framework that could be used to guide health curriculum design based on current evidence, and stakeholder perceptions of eHealth capabilities expected of tertiary health graduates. Methods A 3-phase, mixed-methods approach incorporated the results of a literature review, focus groups, and a Delphi process to develop a framework of eHealth capability statements. Results Participants (N=39) with expertise or experience in eHealth education, practice, or policy provided feedback on the proposed framework, and following the fourth iteration of this process, consensus was achieved. The final framework consisted of 4 higher-level capability statements that describe the learning outcomes expected of university graduates across the domains of (1) digital health technologies, systems, and policies; (2) clinical practice; (3) data analysis and knowledge creation; and (4) technology implementation and codesign. Across the capability statements are 40 performance cues that provide examples of how these capabilities might be demonstrated. Conclusions The results of this study inform a cross-faculty eHealth curriculum that aligns with workforce expectations. There is a need for educational curriculum to reinforce existing eHealth capabilities, adapt existing capabilities to make them transferable to novel eHealth contexts, and introduce new learning opportunities for interactions with technologies within education and practice encounters. As such, the capability framework developed may assist in the application of eHealth by emerging and existing health care professionals. Future research needs to explore the potential for integration of findings into workforce development

  16. Biomedical Engineering Education: A Conservative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Eugene E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the demand for graduates from biomedical engineering programs as being not yet fully able to absorb the supply. Suggests small schools interested in entering the field consider offering their programs at the undergraduate level via a minor or an option. Examples of such options and student projects are included. (CC)

  17. The continuous education as a process of academic studies for graduate students at high educational levels in Sonora (Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Andrade Paco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The continuous education, that the productive sector demands, is not only the accumulation of new knowledge, supported inthe education-learning process, but also a focus on the new tendencies that the labor field demands, where the universities havethe opportunity to extend their involvement, through graduations or specializations, that contribute the strength of the acquiredskills in the classroom. The objective is to know the kind of graduation interests that motivate the graduates, as a process ofcontinuous education. The study is based on the application of a questionnaire to 50 students of different degrees from publicuniversities in Sonora, whose excellent results are: 51% of those surveyed, indicate that at the end of their degree they do notobtain the tools to compete in their labor field. 92% of the students mention that universities should offer within the educativeprogram some area of financial or specialization, related to other disciplines. Another important data is that the financial areasthat graduates prefer are related to the social administrative and financial areas and in smaller proportion they prefer the engineeringdisciplines. 70% of those surveyed, indicate that universities have infrastructure, learning spaces and the skilled humanresources to offer this type of courses. The conclusion of this work, is that public universities follow training programs related tocertain areas and disciplines, centered on the student and learning, like part of their formation, but they do not have the educativeflexibility and the graduates will need to know other disciplines to complement their professional education.

  18. PLAB and UK graduates' performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Wakeford, Richard

    2014-04-17

    To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Physicians and the Royal College of General Practitioners on performance of PLAB graduates and UK graduates at the MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations. Doctors in training for internal medicine or general practice in the United Kingdom. 7829, 5135, and 4387 PLAB graduates on their first attempt at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments from 2001 to 2012 compared with 18,532, 14,094, and 14,376 UK graduates taking the same assessments; 3160 PLAB1 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP AKT during 2007-12 compared with 14,235 UK graduates; and 1411 PLAB2 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP CSA during 2010-12 compared with 6935 UK graduates. Performance at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments, and MRCGP AKT and CSA assessments in relation to performance on PLAB1 and PLAB2 assessments, as well as to International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores. MRCP(UK), MRCGP, and PLAB results were analysed as marks relative to the pass mark at the first attempt. PLAB1 marks were a valid predictor of MRCP(UK) Part 1, MRCP(UK) Part 2, and MRCGP AKT (r=0.521, 0.390, and 0.490; all PIELTS scores correlated significantly with later performance, multiple regression showing that the effect of PLAB1 (β=0.496) was much stronger than the effect of IELTS (β=0.086). Changes to PLAB pass marks that would result in international medical graduate and UK medical graduate equivalence were assessed in two ways. Method 1 adjusted PLAB pass marks to equate median performance of PLAB

  19. A Comparitive Study of Subject Knowledge of B.Ed Graduates of Formal and Non-Formal Teacher Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Perveen; Reba, Amjad; ud Din, Jalal

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the subject knowledge of B.Ed graduates of formal and non-formal teacher education systems. The population of the study included all teachers from Girls High and Higher Secondary Schools both from private and public sectors from the district of Peshawar. Out of the total population, twenty schools were randomly…

  20. Even the Best Have Difficulties: A Study of Finnish Straight-A Graduates' Resource-Oriented Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Mari; Määttä, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    To achieve top scores, students need not only talents and study skills but also they have to conquer various adversities successfully. This research focused on the study paths, the concept adopted from Hickman, Bartholomew, Mathwig, and Heinrich (2008), of Finnish straight-A graduates in general upper secondary education. In this article, we refer…

  1. Competencies Needed by Korean HRD Master's Graduates: A Comparison between the ASTD WLP Competency Model and the Korean Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yonghak

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify competencies needed by current human resource development (HRD) master's degree graduate students in Korea. The study used a quantitative method, the Delphi technique, in combination with a qualitative method consisting of a series of in-depth interviews. The Delphi technique was conducted using a…

  2. The Power of Relationship Building in International Short-Term Field Study Experiences at the Graduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brittany; Coryell, Joellen E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper derives from a case study of a 10-day cross-cultural field study experience held in Italy in which graduate students from master and doctoral levels in adult education participated. During group reflections, several students who participated in the course expressed the value of learning through personal connections made with students as…

  3. Evaluating Executive Strategies (Management Strategies and Teaching-Learning Strategies) of Graduate Curriculum: Case Study in Isfahan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanpour, Muhammad; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Hatami, Mostafa; Mirzaee, Hamzeh

    2017-01-01

    The present study seeks to evaluate executive strategies in graduate Curriculum of Isfahan University from the point of view of management and teaching-learning strategies. This study is an applied survey. The population comprised BA students and faculty members of the University of Isfahan. In order to do so, 141 professors and 278 students were…

  4. Outcome survey of auditory-verbal graduates: study of clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D M; Flexer, C

    1993-05-01

    Audiologists must be knowledgeable about the efficacy of aural habilitation practices because we are often the first professionals to inform parents about their child's hearing impairment. The purpose of this investigation was to document the status of graduates of one aural habilitation option; auditory-verbal. A consumer survey was completed by graduates from auditory-verbal programs in the United States and Canada. Graduates were queried regarding degree and etiology of hearing loss, age of onset, amplification, and educational and employment history, among other topics. Results indicated that the majority of the respondents were integrated into regular learning and living environments.

  5. Experiences and perspectives of African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students: A national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Kenneth I; Wimms, Harriette E; Grant, Sheila K; Wittig, Michele A; Rogers, Margaret R; Vasquez, Melba J T

    2011-01-01

    A national, Web-based survey of 1,219 African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity within the academic environment, were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color perceived less fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology than European American students, and a greater linkage between aspects of the graduate school experience and their ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed.

  6. Research Ethics Education in Post-Graduate Medical Curricula in I.R. Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravanfard, Nazila; Khorasanizadeh, Faezeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2017-08-01

    Research ethics training during post-graduate education is necessary to improve ethical standards in the design and conduct of biomedical research. We studied quality and quantity of research ethics training in the curricula of post-graduate programs in the medical science in I.R. Iran. We evaluated curricula of 125 post-graduate programs in medical sciences in I.R. Iran. We qualitatively studied the curricula by education level, including the Master and PhD degrees and analyzed the contents and the amount of teaching allocated for ethics training in each curriculum. We found no research ethics training in 72 (58%) of the programs. Among the 53 (42%) programs that considered research ethics training, only 17 programs had specific courses for research ethics and eight of them had detailed topics on their courses. The research ethics training was optional in 25% and mandatory in 76% of the programs. Post-graduate studies that were approved in the more recent years had more attention to the research ethics training. Research ethics training was neglected in most of the medical post-graduate programs. We suggest including sufficient amount of mandatory research ethics training in Master and PhD programs in I.R. Iran. Further research about quality of research ethics training and implementation of curricula in the biomedical institutions is warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. PLAB and UK graduates' performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, I. C.; Wakeford, R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. DESIGN: Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Phys...

  8. Using Animal Instincts to Design Efficient Biomedical Studies via Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jiaheng; Chen, Ray-Bing; Wang, Weichung; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-10-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is an increasingly popular metaheuristic algorithm for solving complex optimization problems. Its popularity is due to its repeated successes in finding an optimum or a near optimal solution for problems in many applied disciplines. The algorithm makes no assumption of the function to be optimized and for biomedical experiments like those presented here, PSO typically finds the optimal solutions in a few seconds of CPU time on a garden-variety laptop. We apply PSO to find various types of optimal designs for several problems in the biological sciences and compare PSO performance relative to the differential evolution algorithm, another popular metaheuristic algorithm in the engineering literature.

  9. Examination Phase of the Master's Thesis: A Plausible Cause of Delayed Completion of Graduate Studies at Makerere University, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonyu, Joseph C.; Wamala, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the examination stage of student theses on the completion time of graduate studies at Makerere University, Uganda. The assessment is based on the administrative data of 504 Master's degree students in the 2000 to 2008 enrollment cohorts at the School of Education, Makerere University. The total elapsed time…

  10. Developing Intercultural Competence in Future Student Affairs Professionals through a Graduate Student Global Study Course to Doha, Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Paige; Getz, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a 2-week global study course to Doha, Qatar for graduate students in the higher education leadership and student affairs program at the University of San Diego. The course sought to develop intercultural competence with a specific focus on understanding Qatari and Middle Eastern perspectives and culture, understanding the…

  11. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Legal Tech Graduates, 1984-1988. Volume XVIII, No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John A.; Hildebrandt, Sharrie

    In order to provide information for the 1989-90 program review at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) and to fulfill American Bar Association accreditation guidelines, a long-term, follow-up study was conducted of all Legal Tech program alumni who graduated between 1984 and 1988. A telephone survey generated usable responses from 106 (73%) of the…

  12. Preparing the health workforce in Ethiopia : A Cross-sectional study of competence of anesthesia graduating students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kibwana, Sharon; Woldemariam, Damtew; Misganaw, Awoke; Teshome, Mihereteab; Akalu, Leulayehu; Kols, Adrienne; Kim, Young Mi; Mengistu, Samuel; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efforts to address shortages of health workers in low-resource settings have focused on rapidly increasing the number of higher education programs for health workers. This study examines selected competencies achieved by graduating Bachelor of Science and nurse anesthetist students in

  13. The Employers' View of "Work-Ready" Graduates: A Study of Advertisements for Marketing Jobs in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Ellen; Kubacki, Krzysztof; Pang, Bo; Alcaraz, Celeste

    2017-01-01

    This study of job advertisements extends our understanding of how employers, rather than researchers, describe the specific skills and attributes sought in candidates for employment in graduate marketing roles in Australia. The article presents the findings of a content analysis of 359 marketing job advertisements downloaded in 2016, in two…

  14. Challenges in Academic Reading and Overcoming Strategies in Taught Master Programmes: A Case Study of International Graduate Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on research into academic reading practices of international graduate students in taught Master programmes in a Malaysian university. The purpose of the study was to examine the challenges faced in the academic reading practices as well as the strategies employed to overcome the challenges in the academic reading practices.…

  15. State Merit-Based Aid and Enrolling in Graduate Study: Evidence from the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    This study considers the effect of a state merit-based aid program for undergraduate students on subsequent enrollment in graduate school. It uses student unit record data to analyze the impact of the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES). Price theory is used as a framework for understanding the incentives provided by KEES. Using a…

  16. Computational intelligence in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art computational intelligence research and technologies in biomedical images with emphasis on biomedical decision making. Biomedical imaging offers useful information on patients’ medical conditions and clues to causes of their symptoms and diseases. Biomedical images, however, provide a large number of images which physicians must interpret. Therefore, computer aids are demanded and become indispensable in physicians’ decision making. This book discusses major technical advancements and research findings in the field of computational intelligence in biomedical imaging, for example, computational intelligence in computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and brain disease, in lung function analysis, and in radiation therapy. The book examines technologies and studies that have reached the practical level, and those technologies that are becoming available in clinical practices in hospitals rapidly such as computational inte...

  17. Credentialism among Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodt, Martha McGinty; Thielens, Wagner, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An exploratory study of students entering four elite fields found that most sought both credentials and competence. Stiff competition within chosen occupations led the majority of students to seek every advantage that graduate education could provide. (Author/MLW)

  18. Why Don’t They Participate? A Self-Study of Chinese Graduate Students’ Classroom:Involvement in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Lu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available China is now the world’s largest source of international students. In terms of learning performance, Chinese graduate students studying in North America exhibit distinct differences from students who are born and raised in North America. Conflicting cultural values compel Chinese students to reconcile East-West cultures, and put an onus on North American instructors to implement culturally-sensitive pedagogy. Employing the theoretic framework of yin-yang theory, this paper examines Chinese graduate students’ classroom performance against the backdrop of East-West cultural negotiation, and specifically seeks to identify which factors inhibit Chinese graduate students’ participation in North American classrooms. Drawing from their own living experiences, the authors employ self-study in the methodological form of narrative inquiry – in conjunction with references from existing literature – to investigate Chinese graduates’ classroom challenges. Results reveal six factors impacting students’ classroom performance: language; knowledge of the education system; knowledge of the social system; personality; influence of traditional culture; and social/economic/political changes. Future research directions are also suggested.Key words: Chinese graduates, East-West, cross-culture, North America, classroom involvement, self-study 

  19. The trend of governmental support from post-graduated Iranian students in medical fields to study abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghdoost, Aa; Ghazi, M; Rafiee, Z; Afshari, M

    2013-01-01

    To explore the trend and composition of post-graduate Iranian students who received governmental scholarship during the last two decades. Detailed information about the awarded scholarships and also about the number of post graduate students in clinical and basic sciences in domestic universities were collected from the related offices within the ministry of health and medical education and their trends were triangulated. A sharp drop was observed in the number of awarded scholarships, from 263 in 1992 to 46 in 2009. In the beginning, almost all of scholarships fully supported students for a whole academic course; while in recent years most of scholarships supported students for a short fellowship or complementary course (more than 80%). Students studied in a wide range of colleges within 30 countries; more than 50% in Europe. Although one third of students studied in UK in the first years, only 4% of students selected this country in recent years. conversely, the number of scholarships to Germany and sweden have increased more than 10 and 3 times during this period. In parallel, the capacity of domestic universities for training of post-graduate students has been expanded dramatically. Although expanding post-graduate education has been one of the main strategic objectives of the ministry of health and medical education in last two decades, it was obtained using different approaches. By time, more attention was to expanding the capacities of Iranian universities, and choosing less but more targeted students to continue their studies abroad.

  20. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application – the frutalin case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eOliveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly-glycosylated alpha-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that batch-to-batch variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine.

  1. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application – the frutalin case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A.; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly glycosylated α-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit) seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that “batch-to-batch” variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine. PMID:25152749

  2. Career in mental health still an unlikely career choice for nursing graduates: a replicated longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, John; Browne, Graeme; Graham, Iain

    2013-06-01

    The lack of qualified mental health nurses is at critical level with the problem likely to worsen as the aging mental health nursing workforce retires. This study investigates the career preferences of undergraduate nursing students by comparing preferences at the start, middle, and end of the Bachelor of Nursing program. The comparison of the cohorts gave an indication of the change in preferences over the intervening years. It replicates research completed in 1992, 1997, and 2001, and develops a profile of nursing career preferences and the rationale underpinning those preferences in a cohort of students (n = 150) who began their Bachelor of Nursing studies in 2007 and completed in 2009. The main findings included that, like the previous studies, mental health nursing is one of the least desirable career choices for most nurses at the start of their course and remains so as they approach graduation. The reasons change but the outcome remains the same. The current system of using the Bachelor of Nursing award to produce mental health nurses in Australia does not encourage nurses to consider a career in mental health nursing. Which begs the question: where will mental health nurses in the future come from? © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. An eHealth Capabilities Framework for Graduates and Health Professionals: Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Melissa; McGregor, Deborah; Keep, Melanie; Janssen, Anna; Spallek, Heiko; Quinn, Deleana; Jones, Aaron; Tseris, Emma; Yeung, Wilson; Togher, Leanne; Solman, Annette; Shaw, Tim

    2018-05-15

    The demand for an eHealth-ready and adaptable workforce is placing increasing pressure on universities to deliver eHealth education. At present, eHealth education is largely focused on components of eHealth rather than considering a curriculum-wide approach. This study aimed to develop a framework that could be used to guide health curriculum design based on current evidence, and stakeholder perceptions of eHealth capabilities expected of tertiary health graduates. A 3-phase, mixed-methods approach incorporated the results of a literature review, focus groups, and a Delphi process to develop a framework of eHealth capability statements. Participants (N=39) with expertise or experience in eHealth education, practice, or policy provided feedback on the proposed framework, and following the fourth iteration of this process, consensus was achieved. The final framework consisted of 4 higher-level capability statements that describe the learning outcomes expected of university graduates across the domains of (1) digital health technologies, systems, and policies; (2) clinical practice; (3) data analysis and knowledge creation; and (4) technology implementation and codesign. Across the capability statements are 40 performance cues that provide examples of how these capabilities might be demonstrated. The results of this study inform a cross-faculty eHealth curriculum that aligns with workforce expectations. There is a need for educational curriculum to reinforce existing eHealth capabilities, adapt existing capabilities to make them transferable to novel eHealth contexts, and introduce new learning opportunities for interactions with technologies within education and practice encounters. As such, the capability framework developed may assist in the application of eHealth by emerging and existing health care professionals. Future research needs to explore the potential for integration of findings into workforce development programs. ©Melissa Brunner, Deborah Mc

  4. Study designs for identifying risk compensation behavior among users of biomedical HIV prevention technologies: balancing methodological rigor and research ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Kristen

    2013-10-01

    The growing evidence base for biomedical HIV prevention interventions - such as oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, microbicides, male circumcision, treatment as prevention, and eventually prevention vaccines - has given rise to concerns about the ways in which users of these biomedical products may adjust their HIV risk behaviors based on the perception that they are prevented from infection. Known as risk compensation, this behavioral adjustment draws on the theory of "risk homeostasis," which has previously been applied to phenomena as diverse as Lyme disease vaccination, insurance mandates, and automobile safety. Little rigorous evidence exists to answer risk compensation concerns in the biomedical HIV prevention literature, in part because the field has not systematically evaluated the study designs available for testing these behaviors. The goals of this Commentary are to explain the origins of risk compensation behavior in risk homeostasis theory, to reframe risk compensation as a testable response to the perception of reduced risk, and to assess the methodological rigor and ethical justification of study designs aiming to isolate risk compensation responses. Although the most rigorous methodological designs for assessing risk compensation behavior may be unavailable due to ethical flaws, several strategies can help investigators identify potential risk compensation behavior during Phase II, Phase III, and Phase IV testing of new technologies. Where concerns arise regarding risk compensation behavior, empirical evidence about the incidence, types, and extent of these behavioral changes can illuminate opportunities to better support the users of new HIV prevention strategies. This Commentary concludes by suggesting a new way to conceptualize risk compensation behavior in the HIV prevention context. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Graduates' Perceptions of Learning Affordances in Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships: A Dual-Institution, Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latessa, Robyn A; Swendiman, Robert A; Parlier, Anna Beth; Galvin, Shelley L; Hirsh, David A

    2017-09-01

    The authors explored affordances that contribute to participants' successful learning in longitudinal integrated clerkships (LICs). This dual-institutional, mixed-methods study included electronic surveys and semistructured interviews of LIC graduates who completed their core clinical (third) year of medical school. These LIC graduates took part in LICs at Harvard Medical School from 2004 to 2013 and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine-Asheville campus from 2009 to 2013. The survey questions asked LIC graduates to rate components of LICs that they perceived as contributing to successful learning. A research assistant interviewed a subset of study participants about their learning experiences. The authors analyzed aggregate data quantitatively and performed a qualitative content analysis on interview data. The graduates reported multiple affordances that they perceive contributed to successful learning in their LIC. The most reported components included continuity and relationships with preceptors, patients, place, and peers, along with integration of and flexibility within the curriculum. As LIC models grow in size and number, and their structures and processes evolve, learners' perceptions of affordances may guide curriculum planning. Further research is needed to investigate to what degree and by what means these affordances support learning in LICs and other models of clinical education.

  6. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies-the need for more transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puhan, Milo A.; Akl, Elie A.; Bryant, Dianne; Xie, Feng; Apolone, Giovanni; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being

  7. A Sociolinguistic Study of Deviant Orthographic Representation of Graduating Students' Names in a Nigerian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladunjoye J. Faleye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is habitual for graduating students of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, to roll out the drums the very day they finish writing their final examination. Characteristic of such a ritualistic exercise, among other things, are the brand names the students coin for themselves from their original names. This study focuses on the creative rewriting of the names on such an occasion and examines the linguistic habits exhibited therein. It analyses the phonological/graphematic features that mark the rewritng of the names and discusses the sociolinguistic implications for the phenomena of social identity construction and language contact situation. Data for the study was sourced mainly through participant-observation technique with a supplemment of an oral interview conducted for some of the subjects between year 2007 and 2009. The data was selected through a purposive random sampling technique which yielded fifty names that were considered representative of the respelling conventions. The paper employs mainly Hempenstall's (2003 Phonological Sensitivity Skills to analyse the linguistic practices in the reconfigured names and then applies Tajfel's and Turner's (1979 Social Identity Theory to explain how it is that people develop a sense of membership and belonging in particular groups. The article reveals that the deviant orthographic conventions are a major fallout of youth culture with great influence from computer-mediated communication. It also shows that their linguistic experimentation foray in the discourse greatly undermines the orthographic system of the indigenous language (Yoruba and the cultural values embedded in the original names.

  8. READING HABITS AND PREFERENCES OF EFL POST GRADUATES: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorizah Mohd. Noor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more emphasis has been given on the role of the learner in the language learning process considering that language learning is primarily a learner’s oriented activity. Thus, learners’ needs and interests should be taken into consideration for effective language learning and teaching to take place. One significant area where learners’ preferences influence their learning can be seen in reading. In any academic or higher learning context, reading is perceived as the most prominent academic language skill for all second and foreign language learners. It is through reading that these learners learn new information and become able to synthesize, evaluate and interpret in order to learn more about their subject matter. Pursuing a postgraduate study requires extensive reading practices which will enable the learners to extend their literacy development.  The present study examines the reading habits and preferences of a group of EFL graduate students. Data was collected through a questionnaire and analysed quantitatively. The findings will report on: i the types of reading materials preferred ii reasons for reading and iii the preferred language for reading. To conclude, the paper will further discuss the implications of the findings in terms of instructional materials development within an EFL context. Key words: EFL learners, reading habits, reading preferences, reading behaviour

  9. The Vulnerability of Study Participants in the Context of Transnational Biomedical Research: From Conceptual Considerations to Practical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Helen Grete; Schicktanz, Silke

    2017-08-01

    Outsourcing clinical trials sponsored by pharmaceutical companies from industrialized countries to low- (middle)-income countries - summarized as transnational biomedical research (TBR) - has lead to many concerns about ethical standards. Whether study participants are particularly vulnerable is one of those concerns. However, the concept of vulnerability is still vague and varies in its definition. Despite the fact that important international ethical guidelines such as the Declaration of Helsinki by the World Medical Association or the Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects by the Council of International Organizations of Medical Sciences refer to vulnerability as ethical principle, each of their approaches are different. To overcome these shortcomings, we analyze and unite different approaches of vulnerability and develop practical criteria in order to operationalize the concept especially for the context of TBR. These criteria refer to the context of a study as well as the characteristics and the current living situation of study participants. Based on a case study of an HIV-vaccine-trial conducted in India we demonstrate how those criteria can be applied in a retrospective way to identify potential ethical conflicts. The criteria can also indicate a prospective function for ethical pre-assessment. For this, we provide an outlook for three major topics: 1. Vulnerability as a normative concept: Different ways of protection; 2. The relevance of transparency and 3. Vulnerability as an instrument to increase decision participation of human subjects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Summer Biomedical Engineering Institute 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloatch, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The five problems studied for biomedical applications of NASA technology are reported. The studies reported are: design modification of electrophoretic equipment, operating room environment control, hematological viscometry, handling system for iridium, and indirect blood pressure measuring device.

  11. New graduate nurses' experiences in a clinical specialty: a follow up study of newcomer perceptions of transitional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Rafic; Everett, Bronwyn; Ramjan, Lucie M; Hu, Wendy; Salamonson, Yenna

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing complexity of acute care settings, high patient acuity and demanding workloads, new graduate nurses continue to require greater levels of support to manage rising patient clinical care needs. Little is known about how change in new graduate nurses' satisfaction with clinical supervision and the practice environment impacts on their transitioning experience and expectations during first year of practice. This study aimed to examine change in new graduate nurses' perceptions over the 12-month Transitional Support Program, and identify how organizational factors and elements of clinical supervision influenced their experiences. Using a convergent mixed methods design, a prospective survey with open-ended questions was administered to new graduate nurses' working in a tertiary level teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Nurses were surveyed at baseline (8-10 weeks) and follow-up (10-12 months) between May 2012 and August 2013. Two standardised instruments: the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS-26) and the Practice Environment Scale Australia (PES-AUS) were used. In addition to socio-demographic data, single -item measures were used to rate new graduate nurses' confidence, clinical capability and support received. Participants were also able to provide open-ended comments explaining their responses. Free-text responses to the open-ended questions were initially reviewed for emergent themes, then coded as either positive or negative aspects of these preliminary themes. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data and the qualitative data was analysed using conventional content analysis (CCA). The study was approved by the relevant Human Research Ethics Committees. Eighty seven new graduate nurses completed the follow-up surveys, representing a 76% response rate. The median age was 23 years (Range: 20 to 53). No change was seen in new graduate nurses' satisfaction with clinical supervision (mean MCSS

  12. Qualified nurses' perceptions of nursing graduates' abilities vary according to specific demographic and clinical characteristics. A descriptive quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missen, Karen; McKenna, Lisa; Beauchamp, Alison; Larkins, Jo-Ann

    2016-10-01

    Evidence from the literature and anecdotally from clinical settings suggests that newly graduated nurses are not fully prepared to be independent practitioners in healthcare settings. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of qualified nurses in relation to the practice readiness of newly registered nursing graduates and determine whether these views differ according to specific demographic characteristics, clinical settings, and geographical locations. A descriptive quantitative design was used. An online survey tool was used to assess how qualified nurses (n=201) in Victoria, Australia, rated newly graduated nurses' abilities on 51 individual clinical skills/competencies in eight key skill areas. A composite score was calculated for each skill area and a comparative analysis was undertaken on the various cohorts of participants according to their demographic and clinical characteristics using one-way ANOVA and post hoc tests. Newly graduated nurses were found to be lacking competence in two key skill areas and were rated as performing adequately in the remaining six skill areas assessed. Significant differences (p≤0.05) in performance were found according to the age of the nurse, number of years registered, the educational setting in which they undertook their nurse education, their role, and the clinical area in which they worked. There were no significant differences according to whether the nurse worked in the private or public healthcare sector. Few differences were found between nurses working in a metropolitan vs. regional/rural healthcare setting. This is the first study to quantify the scale of this problem. Our findings serve as a reference for both nurse education providers and healthcare settings in better preparing nursing graduates to be competent, safe practitioners in all clinical areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Design Study of a Mini Cyclotron for the Application of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Yun, Chong-Chul; Youn, Min-Yong; Wang, Sonjong

    2009-01-01

    A small cyclotron has been considered for the use of biomedical accelerator mass spectrometer (BAMS). Over a decade ago a few cyclotrons had been constructed and tested for AMS, but technical problems of instability and poor transmission efficiency caused to discontinue further developments. The major reason of the demise of cyclotron AMS was the dominance of commercial Tandem-based AMS facilities. Now BAMS may ask for more compact system, and perhaps using positive ions to accelerate isotope tracers is a favorable feature. The design of a cyclotron to meet the requirements of BAMS has been performed by adopting a compact magnet with high stability and a flat-topping rf system to increase transmission efficiency.

  14. Studies on novel radiopaque methyl methacrylate: glycidyl methacrylate based polymer for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawlee, S; Jayakrishnan, A; Jayabalan, M

    2009-12-01

    A new class of radiopaque copolymer using methyl methacrylate (MMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers was synthesized and characterized. The copolymer was made radiopaque by the epoxide ring opening of GMA using the catalyst o-phenylenediamine and the subsequent covalent attachment of elemental iodine. The copolymer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, energy dispersive X-ray analysis using environmental scanning electron microscope (EDAX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). X-ray visibility of the copolymer was checked by X-radiography. Blood compatibility and cytotoxicity of the newly synthesized copolymer were also evaluated. The iodinated copolymer was thermally stable, blood compatible, non-cytotoxic, and highly radiopaque. The presence of bulky iodine group created a new copolymer with modified properties for potential use in biomedical applications.

  15. Testing an integrated behavioural and biomedical model of disability in N-of-1 studies with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Francis; Johnston, Marie; Johnston, Derek W

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has supported an integrated biomedical and behavioural model explaining activity limitations. However, further tests of this model are required at the within-person level, because while it proposes that the constructs are related within individuals, it has primarily been tested between individuals in large group studies. We aimed to test the integrated model at the within-person level. Six correlational N-of-1 studies in participants with arthritis, chronic pain and walking limitations were carried out. Daily measures of theoretical constructs were collected using a hand-held computer (PDA), the activity was assessed by self-report and accelerometer and the data were analysed using time-series analysis. The biomedical model was not supported as pain impairment did not predict activity, so the integrated model was supported partially. Impairment predicted intention to move around, while perceived behavioural control (PBC) and intention predicted activity. PBC did not predict activity limitation in the expected direction. The integrated model of disability was partially supported within individuals, especially the behavioural elements. However, results suggest that different elements of the model may drive activity (limitations) for different individuals. The integrated model provides a useful framework for understanding disability and suggests interventions, and the utility of N-of-1 methodology for testing theory is illustrated.

  16. Biomedical engineering and nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.H.; Khyalappa, R.J.; Yakhmi, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    This book is predominantly a compilation of papers presented in the conference which is focused on the development in biomedical materials, biomedical devises and instrumentation, biomedical effects of electromagnetic radiation, electrotherapy, radiotherapy, biosensors, biotechnology, bioengineering, tissue engineering, clinical engineering and surgical planning, medical imaging, hospital system management, biomedical education, biomedical industry and society, bioinformatics, structured nanomaterial for biomedical application, nano-composites, nano-medicine, synthesis of nanomaterial, nano science and technology development. The papers presented herein contain the scientific substance to suffice the academic directivity of the researchers from the field of biomedicine, biomedical engineering, material science and nanotechnology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  17. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: The present study  is a Cross sectional Study carried out to assess the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Paramedical staff posted at District Hospital, Etawah. The change in knowledge was assessed using pre- test and post- test questionnaire.Result: A total of 72 paramedical staff participated in the study. Majority of the participants were unaware about the hazards associated with the improper handing f Biomedical wastes. The knowledge about the different color codes used for the segregation of biomedical waste was also very low. Similarly, the awareness about the vehicle used for the transportation of biomedical waste was also poor.Conclusion: The present study concludes that there is an urgent need for regular training for paramedical staff posted at District Hospital and other government hospital located in small District & town as awareness about the Biomedical waste among them is very low.

  18. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: The present study  is a Cross sectional Study carried out to assess the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Paramedical staff posted at District Hospital, Etawah. The change in knowledge was assessed using pre- test and post- test questionnaire.Result: A total of 72 paramedical staff participated in the study. Majority of the participants were unaware about the hazards associated with the improper handing f Biomedical wastes. The knowledge about the different color codes used for the segregation of biomedical waste was also very low. Similarly, the awareness about the vehicle used for the transportation of biomedical waste was also poor.Conclusion: The present study concludes that there is an urgent need for regular training for paramedical staff posted at District Hospital and other government hospital located in small District & town as awareness about the Biomedical waste among them is very low.

  19. Member Perceptions of Informal Science Institution Graduate Certificate Program: Case Study of a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lois A.

    This research attempted to understand the experiences of a cohort of informal and formal science educators and informal science institution (ISI) community representatives during and after completion of a pilot graduate certificate program. Informal science educators (ISEs) find limited opportunities for professional development and support which influence their contributions to America's science literacy and school science education. This emergent design nested case study described how an innovative program provided professional development and enabled growth in participants' abilities to contribute to science literacy. Data were collected through interviews, participant observations, and class artifacts. The program by design and constituency was the overarching entity that accounted for members' experiences. Three principal aspects of the ISI certificate program and cohort which influenced perceptions and reported positive outcomes were (1) the cohort's composition and their collaborative activities which established a vigorous community of practice and fostered community building, mentoring, and networking, (2) long term program design and implementation which promoted experiential learning in a generative classroom, and (3) ability of some members who were able to be independent or autonomous learners to embrace science education reform strategies for greater self-efficacy and career advancement. This research extends the limited literature base for professional development of informal science educators and may benefit informal science institutions, informal and formal science educators, science education reform efforts, and public education and science-technology-society understanding. The study may raise awareness of the need to establish more professional development opportunities for ISEs and to fund professional development. Further, recognizing and appreciating informal science educators as a diverse committed community of professionals who positively

  20. Exploring cultural and linguistic influences on clinical communication skills: a qualitative study of International Medical Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anju; Griffin, Ann; Dacre, Jane; Elder, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    International Medical Graduates (IMGs) are known to perform less well in many postgraduate medical examinations when compared to their UK trained counterparts. This "differential attainment" is observed in both knowledge-based and clinical skills assessments. This study explored the influence of culture and language on IMGs clinical communication skills, in particular, their ability to seek, detect and acknowledge patients' concerns in a high stakes postgraduate clinical skills examination. Hofstede's cultural dimensions framework was used to look at the impact of culture on examination performance. This was a qualitative, interpretative study using thematic content analysis of video-recorded doctor-simulated patient consultations of candidates sitting the MRCP(UK) PACES examination, at a single examination centre in November 2012. The research utilised Hofstede's cultural dimension theory, a framework for comparing cultural factors amongst different nations, to help understand the reasons for failure. Five key themes accounted for the majority of communication failures in station 2, "history taking" and station 4, "communication skills and ethics" of the MRCP(UK) PACES examination. Two themes, the ability to detect clues and the ability to address concerns, related directly to the overall construct managing patients' concerns. Three other themes were found to impact the whole consultation. These were building relationships, providing structure and explanation and planning. Hofstede's cultural dimensions may help to contextualise some of these observations. In some cultures doctor and patient roles are relatively inflexible: the doctor may convey less information to the patient (higher power distance societies) and give less attention to building rapport (high uncertainty avoidance societies.) This may explain why cues and concerns presented by patients were overlooked in this setting. Understanding cultural differences through Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory

  1. The Rest of the Story: A Qualitative Study of Chinese and Indian Women's Graduate Education Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakaboski, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Previous migration discourse views educational migration through narrowly defined push-pull forces, which ignores overseas graduate education as a path for maneuvering through restrictive gendered and cultural experiences. The purpose of this exploratory research is to expand migration research and view women's migration decisions as employing…

  2. Argumentative Knowledge Construction in an Online Graduate Mathematics Course: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayazit, Nermin; Clarke, Pier Angeli Junor; Vidakovic, Draga

    2018-01-01

    The authors report on three students' argumentative knowledge construction in an asynchronous online graduate level geometry course designed for in-service secondary mathematics (ISM) teachers. Using Weinberger and Fischer's framework, they analyzed the ISM teachers' (a) geometry autobiography and (b) discussion board posts (both comments and…

  3. How First-Generation Students Learn to Navigate Education Systems: A Case Study of First Graduate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Ben; Saldivar, Manuel Gerardo; Tracy, Rita

    2011-01-01

    Students from underrepresented groups who seek to become the first in their family to attend college confront economically and racially stratified education systems. This article reports findings from an evaluation of First Graduate, an organization that offers college advising, mentoring, tutoring, and case management to first-generation students…

  4. Perceptions Regarding the Professional Identity of Counselor Education Doctoral Graduates in Private Practice: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swickert, Mary Lee

    1997-01-01

    Reports on interviews of 10 doctoral graduates of counselor education programs to determine how they viewed professional identity. Results focus on uniqueness of counselors, career development issues, dislike of research, grouping for support, dislike of managed care, anger over turf wars, and affinity with holistic and preventive medicine. (RJM)

  5. Oxidative Damage in Diabetics: Insights from a Graduate Study in La Reunion University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Dorothée; Rondeau, Philippe; Catan, Aurélie; Planesse, Cynthia; Giraud, Pierre; Bourdon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Due to the growing incidence of diabetes in developed nations, there is a compelling case to be made for teaching graduate students more deeply about mechanisms underlying this disease. Diabetes is associated with enhanced oxidative stress and protein glycation via the covalent binding of glucose molecules. Albumin represents the major plasmatic…

  6. Master of Business Administration (MBA) Student Outcomes in Vietnam: Graduate Student Insights from a Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Chau Thi Minh; Vickers, Margaret H.; Fernandez, Santha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Exploratory insights into the graduate student experiences of offshore MBA programmes in Vietnam are presented. Students are considered key stakeholders in the higher education (HE) debate, and their views were sought in light of recent shifts in HE worldwide, associated business education changes, nagging questions around the quality of…

  7. Coordination of improvement of higher education personnel: regulatory officer field of post-graduate studies in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Junior Boratim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present a sociological reflection on the role of the Coordination of Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES as the regulator that institutionalized the field of postgraduate studies in Brazil with public universities. The methodological and theoretical assumptions underpin the theory of the scientific field of Pierre Bourdieu and seek to demonstrate that the CAPES as a political entity linked to the federal government brokered and legitimized the involvement of the holders of teacher-researchers greater symbolic capital (scientific recognition among peers-competitors , giving them the prerogative to set rules for the evaluation and funding of post-graduate studies. Nevertheless, these legitimate borrowers (dominant in the field of post-graduate consolidated merit system amalgamated by one academic productivism, establishing universities within a performance culture that brings the trailer individualism, utilitarianism and the casualization of labor and relations in the university field.

  8. The tablet device in hospital neurology and in neurology graduate medical education: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Pravin; Newey, Christopher R; Bhimraj, Adarsh

    2015-01-01

    There is limited literature on tablet devices for neurohospitalists and in neurological graduate medical education. This study evaluated utilization, benefits, and limitations of customized tablets on inpatient neurology practice and resident education. The hypothesis was the perception of the tablet would be positive, given their portability, convenience to accessing point-of-care reference, and accessibility to the electronic medical record. Second-generation iPads with neurology-specific applications and literature were provided to our in-hospital general, stroke, and consult neurology teams. After 1 year, residents on these teams were surveyed on demographic data, familiarity, and utilization of the iPad and their perceptions of the device. All 27 residents responded to the survey. Most participants (23 of 27) used a tablet while on inpatient service. Twelve regularly utilized the neurology-specific apps and/or accessed scientific articles. Technologically savvy residents felt significantly more comfortable using tablets and were more quickly acquainted with the features. Thirteen respondents wanted a formal orientation on the advanced features of the tablet independent of their familiarity with the device or level of technological comfort. Overall, the perception was that the tablet was beneficial for inpatient clinical care and as an educational reference. Participants became easily familiarized with the device features quickly, regardless of whether they owned one previously or not. Most physicians indicated interest in advanced features of tablets; however, a formal orientation may be beneficial for optimal utilization. A reliable network connection is essential to in-hospital use of tablet devices. Additional research pertaining to patient outcomes, objective educational benefit, and cost-effectiveness is necessary.

  9. Employment goals, expectations, and migration intentions of nursing graduates in a Canadian border city: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michelle; Baumann, Andrea; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Blythe, Jennifer; Fisher, Anita

    2012-12-01

    Internationally, nurse migration in border cities has received little attention. Nurses who graduate from nursing programs in Canadian border communities have the option of working in Canada or the United States. They are able to cross the international border each day as commuter migrants returning to their home country after work. Despite recent investment by Canada to increase the number of nursing students, the migration intentions of graduating nurses and the factors influencing their decision making has not been explored. The objective of this study is to explore the migration intentions of a graduating class of baccalaureate nursing students in a Canadian border community and the factors influencing their decision making. An explanatory sequential mixed methods design was used. In the first quantitative phase, data was collected by a web-based self-report survey. In the qualitative phase, semi-structured interviews were conducted. Data collection took place between February and July 2011. The response rate to the survey was 40.9% (n=115). Eighty-six percent of graduates preferred to work in Canada although two thirds identified that they were considering migrating for work outside of Canada. Knowing a nurse who worked in the US (Michigan) influenced intention to migrate and living in a border community was a strong predictor of migration. Migrants had significantly higher expectations that their economic, professional development, healthy work environment, adventure and autonomy values would be met in another country than Canada. Evidence from the interviews revealed that clinical instructors and clinical experiences played a significant role in framing students' perceptions of the work environment, influencing their choice of specialty, and where they secured their first job. The value-expectancy framework offered a novel approach to identifying job factors driving migration intentions. The study offered a snapshot of the graduates' perception of the work

  10. A beam optics study of the biomedical beam line at a proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chong Cheoul; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-01-01

    A biomedical beam line has been designed for the experimental area of a proton therapy facility to deliver mm to sub-mm size beams in the energy range of 20-50 MeV using the TRANSPORT/TURTLE beam optics codes and a newly-written program. The proton therapy facility is equipped with a 230 MeV fixed-energy cyclotron and an energy selection system based on a degrader and slits, so that beam currents available for therapy decrease at lower energies in the therapeutic beam energy range of 70-230 MeV. The new beam line system is composed of an energy-degrader, two slits, and three quadrupole magnets. The minimum beam sizes achievable at the focal point are estimated for the two energies of 50 and 20 MeV. The focused FWHM beam size is approximately 0.3 mm with an expected beam current of 20 pA when the beam energy is reduced to 50 MeV from 100 MeV, and roughly 0.8 mm with a current of 10 pA for a 20 MeV beam

  11. Using case studies and videotaped vignettes to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are an essential component of nursing and crucial to nursing practice. Case studies with videotaped vignettes were used to help facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses. Results revealed a statistically significant increase (p = .041) on the overall Health Sciences Reasoning Test score. It is essential for educators to be aware of educational strategies that can affect the development of critical thinking skills.

  12. A longitudinal study of the characteristics and performances of medical students and graduates from the Arab countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekian, Ara; Boulet, John

    2015-11-05

    While international physician migration has been studied extensively, more focused and regional explorations are not commonplace. In many Arab countries, medical education is conducted in English and students/graduates seek postgraduate opportunities in other countries such as the United States (US). Eligibility for residency training in the US requires certification by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG). This study investigates ECFMG application trends, examination performance, and US physician practice data to quantify the abilities and examine the career pathways of Arab-trained physicians. Medical students and graduates from 15 Arab countries where English is the language of medical school instruction were studied. The performances (1(st) attempt pass rates) of individuals on the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1, Step 2CK (clinical knowledge), and and a combination of Step 2CS (clinical skills) and ECFMG CSA (clinical skills assessment) were tallied and contrasted by country. Based on physician practice data, the contribution of Arab-trained physicians to the US healthcare workforce was explored. Descriptive statistics (means, frequencies) were used to summarize the collected data. Between 1998 and 2012, there has been an increase in the number of Arab trained students/graduates seeking ECFMG certification. Examination performance varied considerably across countries, suggesting differences in the quality of medical education programs in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Based on current US practice data, physicians from some Arab countries who seek postgraduate opportunities in the US are less likely to stay in the US following specialty training. Countries, or regions, with concerns about physician migration, physican performance, or the pedagogical quality of their training programs should conduct longitudinal research studies to help inform medical education policies.

  13. Optical Polarizationin Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tuchin, Valery V; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A

    2006-01-01

    Optical Polarization in Biomedical Applications introduces key developments in optical polarization methods for quantitative studies of tissues, while presenting the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium as a basis for the quantitative description of polarized light interaction with tissues. This theory uses the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters and predicts the polarization structure of multiple scattered optical fields. The backscattering polarization matrices (Jones matrix and Mueller matrix) important for noninvasive medical diagnostic are introduced. The text also describes a number of diagnostic techniques such as CW polarization imaging and spectroscopy, polarization microscopy and cytometry. As a new tool for medical diagnosis, optical coherent polarization tomography is analyzed. The monograph also covers a range of biomedical applications, among them cataract and glaucoma diagnostics, glucose sensing, and the detection of bacteria.

  14. Educating change agents: a qualitative descriptive study of graduates of a Master's program in evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Grete Oline; Brenna, Sissel Johansson; Graverholt, Birgitte; Ciliska, Donna; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen

    2016-02-25

    Health care professionals are expected to build decisions upon evidence. This implies decisions based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence, informed by clinical expertise and patient values. A multi-professional master's program in evidence-based practice was developed and offered. The aims of this study were to explore how students in this program viewed their ability to apply evidence-based practice and their perceptions of what constitute necessary conditions to implement evidence-based practice in health care organizations, one year after graduation. A qualitative descriptive design was chosen to examine the graduates' experiences. All students in the first two cohorts of the program were invited to participate. Six focus-group interviews, with a total of 21 participants, and a telephone interview of one participant were conducted. The data was analyzed thematically, using the themes from the interview guide as the starting point. The graduates reported that an overall necessary condition for evidence-based practice to occur is the existence of a "readiness for change" both at an individual level and at the organizational level. They described that they gained personal knowledge and skills to be "change-agents" with "self-efficacy, "analytic competence" and "tools" to implement evidence based practice in clinical care. An organizational culture of a "learning organization" was also required, where leaders have an "awareness of evidence- based practice", and see the need for creating "evidence-based networks". One year after graduation the participants saw themselves as "change agents" prepared to improve clinical care within a learning organization. The results of this study provides useful information for facilitating the implementation of EBP both from educational and health care organizational perspectives.

  15. What Google Maps can do for biomedical data dissemination: examples and a design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianu, Radu; Laidlaw, David H

    2013-05-04

    Biologists often need to assess whether unfamiliar datasets warrant the time investment required for more detailed exploration. Basing such assessments on brief descriptions provided by data publishers is unwieldy for large datasets that contain insights dependent on specific scientific questions. Alternatively, using complex software systems for a preliminary analysis may be deemed as too time consuming in itself, especially for unfamiliar data types and formats. This may lead to wasted analysis time and discarding of potentially useful data. We present an exploration of design opportunities that the Google Maps interface offers to biomedical data visualization. In particular, we focus on synergies between visualization techniques and Google Maps that facilitate the development of biological visualizations which have both low-overhead and sufficient expressivity to support the exploration of data at multiple scales. The methods we explore rely on displaying pre-rendered visualizations of biological data in browsers, with sparse yet powerful interactions, by using the Google Maps API. We structure our discussion around five visualizations: a gene co-regulation visualization, a heatmap viewer, a genome browser, a protein interaction network, and a planar visualization of white matter in the brain. Feedback from collaborative work with domain experts suggests that our Google Maps visualizations offer multiple, scale-dependent perspectives and can be particularly helpful for unfamiliar datasets due to their accessibility. We also find that users, particularly those less experienced with computer use, are attracted by the familiarity of the Google Maps API. Our five implementations introduce design elements that can benefit visualization developers. We describe a low-overhead approach that lets biologists access readily analyzed views of unfamiliar scientific datasets. We rely on pre-computed visualizations prepared by data experts, accompanied by sparse and intuitive

  16. Aligning library instruction with the needs of basic sciences graduate students: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Donna; Delwiche, Frances A

    2012-10-01

    How can an existing library instruction program be reconfigured to reach basic sciences graduate students and other patrons missed by curriculum-based instruction? The setting is an academic health sciences library that serves both the university and its affiliated teaching hospital. The existing program was redesigned to incorporate a series of seven workshops that encompassed the range of information literacy skills that graduate students in the basic sciences need. In developing the new model, the teaching librarians made changes in pedagogy, technology, marketing, and assessment strategies. Total attendance at the sessions increased substantially in the first 2 years of the new model, increasing from an average of 20 per semester to an average of 124. Survey results provided insight about what patrons wanted to learn and how best to teach it. Modifying the program's content and structure resulted in a program that appealed to the target audience.

  17. Post-graduation migration intentions of students of Lebanese medical schools: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakr Mazen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The international migration of physicians is a global public health problem. Lebanon is a source country with the highest emigration factor in the Middle East and North Africa and the 7th highest in the World. Given that residency training abroad is a critical step in the migration of physicians, the objective of this study was to survey students of Lebanese medical schools about their intentions to train abroad and their post training plans. Methods Our target population consisted of all students of Lebanese medical schools in the pre-final and final years of medical school. We developed the survey questionnaire based on the results of a qualitative study assessing the intentions and motives for students of Lebanese medical schools to train abroad. The questionnaire inquired about student's demographic and educational characteristics, intention to train abroad, the chosen country of abroad training, and post-training intention of returning to Lebanon. Results Of 576 eligible students, 425 participated (73.8% response rate. 406 (95.5% respondents intended to travel abroad either for specialty training (330 (77.6% or subspecialty training (76 (17.9%. Intention to train abroad was associated with being single compared with being married. The top 4 destination countries were the US (301(74.1%, France (49 (12.1%, the United Kingdom (31 (7.6% and Canada (17 (4.2%. One hundred and two (25.1% respondents intended to return to Lebanon directly after finishing training abroad; 259 (63.8% intended to return to Lebanon after working abroad temporarily for a varying number or years; 43 (10.6% intended to never return to Lebanon. The intention to stay indefinitely abroad was associated male sex and having a 2nd citizenship. It was inversely associated with being a student of one of the French affiliated medical schools and a plan to train in a surgical specialty. Conclusion An alarming percentage of students of Lebanese medical schools

  18. Post-graduation migration intentions of students of Lebanese medical schools: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Maroun, Nancy; Major, Stella; Afif, Claude; Abdo, Abir; Choucair, Jacques; Sakr, Mazen; Li, Carl K; Grant, Brydon Jb; Schünemann, Holger J

    2008-06-02

    The international migration of physicians is a global public health problem. Lebanon is a source country with the highest emigration factor in the Middle East and North Africa and the 7th highest in the World. Given that residency training abroad is a critical step in the migration of physicians, the objective of this study was to survey students of Lebanese medical schools about their intentions to train abroad and their post training plans. Our target population consisted of all students of Lebanese medical schools in the pre-final and final years of medical school. We developed the survey questionnaire based on the results of a qualitative study assessing the intentions and motives for students of Lebanese medical schools to train abroad. The questionnaire inquired about student's demographic and educational characteristics, intention to train abroad, the chosen country of abroad training, and post-training intention of returning to Lebanon. Of 576 eligible students, 425 participated (73.8% response rate). 406 (95.5%) respondents intended to travel abroad either for specialty training (330 (77.6%)) or subspecialty training (76 (17.9%)). Intention to train abroad was associated with being single compared with being married. The top 4 destination countries were the US (301(74.1%)), France (49 (12.1%)), the United Kingdom (31 (7.6%)) and Canada (17 (4.2%)). One hundred and two (25.1%) respondents intended to return to Lebanon directly after finishing training abroad; 259 (63.8%) intended to return to Lebanon after working abroad temporarily for a varying number or years; 43 (10.6%) intended to never return to Lebanon. The intention to stay indefinitely abroad was associated male sex and having a 2nd citizenship. It was inversely associated with being a student of one of the French affiliated medical schools and a plan to train in a surgical specialty. An alarming percentage of students of Lebanese medical schools intend to migrate for post graduate training, mainly

  19. Generation of physician-scientists manpower: a follow-up study of the first 294 graduates of the Harvard-MIT Program of Health Sciences and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelmann, W H; Nave, B D; Wilkerson, L

    1997-06-01

    The MD program of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology was founded in 1970. One of its goals was the application of the academic resources of the two universities to the education of leaders in academic medicine and biomedical sciences. The first MD class was admitted in 1971. Prerequisites for admission are a strong background in quantitative sciences and demonstrated interest in research. Research and a thesis are obligatory. Enrollment in a PhD program is elective. Questionnaires were sent to 293 alumni who graduated from the MD program between 1975 and 1988, followed up by letters and telephone calls. By 1988, 296 students had graduated, 207 with an MD only, 89 with MD-PhD degrees. Follow-up by questionnaires of 293 living graduates (92%), plus indirect data on 11 others, revealed that 212 (75%) held faculty appointments in 64 medical schools. Overall, 73.5% of respondents were engaged in research: 68% of MDs and 86% of MD-PhDs. One hundred and four (38%) respondents spent more than 50% of their time on research: 54 (29%) of MDs and 50 (60%) of MD-PhDs. Seventy-five percent of respondents were active in teaching. Our experience indicates that both an MD-PhD program and a research-oriented MD program are effective in producing physician-scientists and leaders in academic medicine.

  20. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liming, E-mail: wangliming@ihep.ac.cn; Chen, Chunying, E-mail: chenchy@nanoctr.cn

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs.

  1. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs

  2. Biomedical engineering: A platform for research and innovation in ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christy K.

    2004-05-01

    An undergraduate or graduate degree in biomedical engineering prepares students to solve problems at the interface between engineering and medicine. Biomedical engineering encompasses evolving areas such as advanced medical imaging for diagnosis and treatment of disease, tissue engineering for designing and manufacturing biological implants for damaged or diseased tissues and organs, and bioinformatics for determining which genes play a major role in health and disease. Biomedical engineering academic programs produce graduates with the ability to pursue successful careers in the biomedical device industry or to obtain advanced degrees leading to careers in biomedical engineering research, medicine, law or business. Biomedical engineering majors take courses in biology, anatomy, physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and medical product design and value life-long learning. Students learn to work effectively in interdisciplinary teams comprised of individuals with diverse social, cultural and technical backgrounds. Biomedical engineering is becoming increasingly important in imaging and image-guided research. Some examples of innovative ultrasound technology under development are ultrasound devices to accelerate the dissolution of blood clots, advanced surgical instruments with ultrasound guidance and ultrasound contrast agents for targeted drug delivery. Biomedical engineering is a great career choice for technically minded individuals who endeavor to work on applied problems that are medically relevant.

  3. Nurse practitioner graduates "Speak Out" about the adequacy of their educational preparation to care for older adults: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacqueline; Kotthoff-Burrell, Ernestine; Kass-Wolff, Jane; Brownrigg, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    With a shortage of primary care providers prepared to care for an aging U.S. population, nurse practitioner (NP) programs are integrating gerontological content. This qualitative descriptive study explored NP graduate perceptions on the adequacy of their education to prepare them to care for seniors. Twenty-three graduates of NP program options at two universities in the western U.S. participated in focus group discussions or interviews. Participants shared their perceptions of their NP educational preparation and suggestions for enhancing gerontologic curriculum. Four main domains emerged from analysis of qualitative data: (a) "Getting your boots on and getting into the role"; (b) "Older people are more complex than we were prepared to care for"; (c) "It is very different as a provider, but I am so glad I was a nurse with experience first"; (d) "NPs have a scope of practice, physician assistants (PAs) have a job description-but I wish we had their [procedural] preparation." Graduates identified a need for more educational content and clinical experiences specific to the care of older adults. Some suggested a postgraduate residency or mentoring option to assist NP role transition and progression and limit role confusion. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. The information manager profile: a study from the graduates of the course of the UFPE information management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyane Lucia Cruz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With the recent social and economic changes come new possibilities for performance of information professionals. In this context, it is part of the Manager of information, which can contribute to finding solutions to the major challenges related to the collection, processing and use of information. Objective: To study the relationship between academic Manager information egress from UFPE, and your professional performance. Methodology: a literature review; b mapping of the graduates; c preparation of the questionnaire; d provision of the questionnaire; e tabulation and data formatting; f data analysis. Results: 54 of the 71 graduates responded to the questionnaire (76%, a percentage considered satisfactory. It highlights the following results: 85% of graduates are developing professional activities; 56% of the employed are working in activities related to the field of Information Management; professional business segments are different, especially the service sector (34%. In the organizational pyramid, it was found that the level of activity is most representative operating (43%. On the issue of disciplines, it drew attention that managers have a greater need to employ the knowledge related to Information Technology. Conclusions: We emphasize the importance of today's information manager, emphasizing the need to improve this new profession in relation to the demands of society

  5. Teaching Experiences for Graduate Student Researchers: A Study of the Design and Implementation of Science Courses for Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anne Wrigley

    Modern science education reform recommends that teachers provide K-12 science students a more complete picture of the scientific enterprise, one that lies beyond content knowledge and centers more on the processes and culture of scientists. In the case of Research Experience for Teachers (RET) programs, the "teacher" becomes "researcher" and it is expected that he/she will draw from the short-term science research experience in his/her classroom, offering students more opportunities to practice science as scientists do. In contrast, this study takes place in a program that allows graduate students, engaged in research full-time, to design and implement a short-duration course for high school students on Saturdays; the "researcher" becomes "teacher" in an informal science program. In this study, I investigated eleven graduate students who taught in the Saturday Science (SS) program. Analyses revealed participants' sophisticated views of the nature of science. Furthermore, participants' ideas about science clearly resonated with the tenets of NOS recommended for K-12 education (McComas et al., 1998). This study also highlighted key factors graduate students considered when designing lessons. Instructors took great care to move away from models of traditional, "lecture"-based, university science teaching. Nonetheless, instruction lacked opportunities for students to engage in scientific inquiry. In instances when instructors included discussions of NOS in SS courses, opportunities for high school students to learn NOS were not explicit enough to align with current science reform recommendations (e.g., AAAS, 2009). Graduate students did, however, offer high school students access to their own science or engineering research communities. These findings have significant implications for K-12 classroom reform. Universities continue to be a valuable resource for K-12 given access to scientists, materials or equipment, and funding. Nonetheless, and as was the case with

  6. Changes in physiotherapy students' knowledge and perceptions of EBP from first year to graduation: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Maureen P; Lewis, Lucy K; Luker, Julie

    2018-05-11

    Dedicated Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) courses are often included in health professional education programs. It is important to understand the effectiveness of this training. This study investigated EBP outcomes in entry-level physiotherapy students from baseline to completion of all EBP training (graduation). Mixed methods with an explanatory sequential design. Physiotherapy students completed two psychometrically-tested health professional EBP instruments at baseline and graduation. The Evidence-Based Practice Profile questionnaire collected self-reported data (Terminology, Confidence, Practice, Relevance, Sympathy), and the Knowledge of Research Evidence Competencies instrument collected objective data (Actual Knowledge). Focus groups with students were conducted at graduation to gain a deeper understanding of the factors impacting changes in students' EBP knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and competency. Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests, 95% CI and effect sizes (ES) were used to examine changes in outcome scores from baseline to graduation. Transcribed focus group data were analysed following a qualitative descriptive approach with thematic analysis. A second stage of merged data analysis for mixed methods studies was undertaken using side-by-side comparisons to explore quantitatively assessed EBP measures with participants' personal perceptions. Data were analysed from 56 participants who completed both instruments at baseline and graduation, and from 21 focus group participants. Large ES were reported across most outcomes: Relevance (ES 2.29, p ≤ 0.001), Practice (1.8, p ≤ 0.001), Confidence (1.67, p ≤ 0.001), Terminology (3.13, p ≤ 0.001) and Actual Knowledge (4.3, p ≤ 0.001). A medium ES was found for Sympathy (0.49, p = 0.008). Qualitative and quantitative findings mostly aligned but for statistical terminology, participants' self-reported understanding was disparate with focus group reported experiences. Qualitative

  7. Learning more by being taught less: A "time-for-self-study" theory explaining curricular effects on graduation rate and study duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); J. Cohen-Schotanus (Janke); H.T. van der Molen (Henk); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); C. van den Bulte (Christophe); R. Holdrinet (Rob); H.J.M. van Rossum (Herman)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn this article, an alternative for Tinto's integration theory of student persistence is proposed and tested. In the proposed theory, time available for individual study is considered a major determinant of both study duration and graduation rate of students in a particular curriculum.

  8. Learning more by being taught less : a "time-for-self-study" theory explaining curricular effects on graduation rate and study duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, H.G.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; van der Molen, H.T.; Splinter, T.A.W.; Bulte, J.; Holdrinet, R.; van Rossum, H.J.M.

    In this article, an alternative for Tinto's integration theory of student persistence is proposed and tested. In the proposed theory, time available for individual study is considered a major determinant of both study duration and graduation rate of students in a particular curriculum. In this view,

  9. Learning More by Being Taught Less: A "Time-for-Self-Study" Theory Explaining Curricular Effects on Graduation Rate and Study Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Henk G.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; van der Molen, Henk T.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Bulte, Jan; Holdrinet, Rob; van Rossum, Herman J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an alternative for Tinto's integration theory of student persistence is proposed and tested. In the proposed theory, time available for individual study is considered a major determinant of both study duration and graduation rate of students in a particular curriculum. In this view, other activities in the curriculum, in…

  10. National High School Graduation Rate: Are Recent Birth Cohorts Taking More Time to Graduate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Myungkook; Kim, Jeounghee

    2016-01-01

    Debates about the national high school graduation rate have heated up as various national high school graduation estimates based on the Common Core of Data (CCD) and the Current Population Survey (CPS) do not coincide with one another partially due to different assumptions about graduation age. This study found that (a) while graduation rate by…

  11. Biomedical engineering and society: policy and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, J A; Lazareck, L

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical engineering impacts health care and contributes to fundamental knowledge in medicine and biology. Policy, such as through regulation and research funding, has the potential to dramatically affect biomedical engineering research and commercialization. New developments, in turn, may affect society in new ways. The intersection of biomedical engineering and society and related policy issues must be discussed between scientists and engineers, policy-makers and the public. As a student, there are many ways to become engaged in the issues surrounding science and technology policy. At the University of Washington in Seattle, the Forum on Science Ethics and Policy (FOSEP, www.fosep.org) was started by graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in improving the dialogue between scientists, policymakers and the public and has received support from upper-level administration. This is just one example of how students can start thinking about science policy and ethics early in their careers.

  12. Building the biomedical data science workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michelle C; Bourne, Philip E

    2017-07-01

    This article describes efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 2013 to 2016 to train a national workforce in biomedical data science. We provide an analysis of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) training program strengths and weaknesses with an eye toward future directions aimed at any funder and potential funding recipient worldwide. The focus is on extramurally funded programs that have a national or international impact rather than the training of NIH staff, which was addressed by the NIH's internal Data Science Workforce Development Center. From its inception, the major goal of BD2K was to narrow the gap between needed and existing biomedical data science skills. As biomedical research increasingly relies on computational, mathematical, and statistical thinking, supporting the training and education of the workforce of tomorrow requires new emphases on analytical skills. From 2013 to 2016, BD2K jump-started training in this area for all levels, from graduate students to senior researchers.

  13. Biomedical engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Engineering Fundamentals, the first volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in physiological systems, biomechanics, biomaterials, bioelectric phenomena, and neuroengineering. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including cardia

  14. Toward defining and measuring social accountability in graduate medical education: a stakeholder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anjani T; Lazreg, Sonia A; Phillips, Robert L; Bazemore, Andrew W; Lucan, Sean C

    2013-09-01

    Since 1965, Medicare has publically financed graduate medical education (GME) in the United States. Given public financing, various advisory groups have argued that GME should be more socially accountable. Several efforts are underway to develop accountability measures for GME that could be tied to Medicare payments, but it is not clear how to measure or even define social accountability. We explored how GME stakeholders perceive, define, and measure social accountability. Through purposive and snowball sampling, we completed semistructured interviews with 18 GME stakeholders from GME training sites, government agencies, and health care organizations. We analyzed interview field notes and audiorecordings using a flexible, iterative, qualitative group process to identify themes. THREE THEMES EMERGED IN REGARDS TO DEFINING SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY: (1) creating a diverse physician workforce to address regional needs and primary care and specialty shortages; (2) ensuring quality in training and care to best serve patients; and (3) providing service to surrounding communities and the general public. All but 1 stakeholder believed GME institutions have a responsibility to be socially accountable. Reported barriers to achieving social accountability included training time constraints, financial limitations, and institutional resistance. Suggestions for measuring social accountability included reviewing graduates' specialties and practice locations, evaluating curricular content, and reviewing program services to surrounding communities. Most stakeholders endorsed the concept of social accountability in GME, suggesting definitions and possible measures that could inform policy makers calls for increased accountability despite recognized barriers.

  15. A practical report of “Studies in School Mental Health” at graduate school coursework toward the development of mental health literacy education in elementary and secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    今田, 雄三

    2018-01-01

    According to changes in social environment, practicing regional psychological assistance should be extended to nationwide contribution for people’s mental health enhancement. In response to the changes, the author reports the details of the 2017 coursework "Studies School Mental Health" at graduate school. As the unique practice of this university, graduate students training for psychological experts at elementary and secondary school education cultivate practical skills for mental health lit...

  16. Introduction to biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Enderle, John D; Blanchard, Susan M

    2005-01-01

    Under the direction of John Enderle, Susan Blanchard and Joe Bronzino, leaders in the field have contributed chapters on the most relevant subjects for biomedical engineering students. These chapters coincide with courses offered in all biomedical engineering programs so that it can be used at different levels for a variety of courses of this evolving field. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, Second Edition provides a historical perspective of the major developments in the biomedical field. Also contained within are the fundamental principles underlying biomedical engineering design, analysis, and modeling procedures. The numerous examples, drill problems and exercises are used to reinforce concepts and develop problem-solving skills making this book an invaluable tool for all biomedical students and engineers. New to this edition: Computational Biology, Medical Imaging, Genomics and Bioinformatics. * 60% update from first edition to reflect the developing field of biomedical engineering * New chapters o...

  17. Biomedical applications of batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Roger [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Linford, Roger [The Research Office, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Schlindwein, Walkiria [School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-31

    An overview is presented of the many ways in which batteries and battery materials are used in medicine and in biomedical studies. These include the use of batteries as power sources for motorised wheelchairs, surgical tools, cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, dynamic prostheses, sensors and monitors for physiological parameters, neurostimulators, devices for pain relief, and iontophoretic, electroporative and related devices for drug administration. The various types of battery and fuel cell used for this wide range of applications will be considered, together with the potential harmful side effects, including accidental ingestion of batteries and the explosive nature of some of the early cardiac pacemaker battery systems.

  18. Gender-related perceptions of careers in surgery among new medical graduates: results of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J Edward F; Tang, Siau-Wei; Ravindra, Pravisha; Maxwell-Armstrong, Charles A

    2013-07-01

    Despite promotional measures at a national level, female surgeons account for only 10% of the consultant workforce in the United Kingdom. With rising proportions of female medical graduates, it is important that surgery continues to recruit the most able candidates regardless of sex. This study investigates the differing perceptions of surgical careers among recent medical school graduates and identifies factors discouraging female doctors from pursuing a career in surgery. Newly qualified graduates from the University of Nottingham Medical School, Nottingham, UK, were invited to complete a nonmandatory questionnaire investigating career intentions and factors influencing this. Two hundred and eight questionnaires were returned (a 66% response rate). Male respondents were significantly more likely to rate surgery as an attractive or very attractive career (P = .0116). Overall, only 33 (25%) female doctors expressed interest in a surgical career as opposed to 33 (42%) male doctors (P = .010). Frequently cited reasons included no interest in surgery itself (21%) and negative attitudes toward women in surgery among the surgical teams (18%). Irrespective of career interests, 59% of male and 68% of female respondents believed surgery was not a career welcoming women (P = .186). Reasons included difficulty maintaining family life, limited flexible training, and lack of role models. This study identifies significant sex differences in the perception of surgical careers. The majority believes surgery does not welcome female trainees. Future strategies to promote surgery must address attitudes and behaviors in both sexes while taking active steps to support female surgeons during their training and in the workplace. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prepared to practice? Perception of career preparation and guidance of recent medical graduates at two campuses of a transnational medical school: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Sameer S; McGowan, Yvonne; McGee, Hannah; Whitford, David L

    2016-02-09

    Graduating medical students enter the workforce with substantial medical knowledge and experience, yet little is known about how well they are prepared for the transition to medical practice in diverse settings. We set out to compare perceptions of medical school graduates' career guidance with their perceptions of preparedness to practice as interns. We also set out to compare perceptions of preparedness for hospital practice between graduates from two transnational medical schools. This was a cross-sectional study. A Preparedness for Hospital Practice (PHPQ) survey and career guidance questionnaire was sent to recent medical graduates, incorporating additional free text responses on career preparation. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and tests of association including Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Forty three percent (240/555) of graduates responded to the survey: 39 % of respondents were domestic (Dublin, Ireland or Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain) and interning locally; 15 % were overseas students interning locally; 42 % were overseas students interning internationally and 4 % had not started internship. Two variables explained 13 % of the variation in preparedness for hospital practice score: having planned postgraduate education prior to entering medical school and having helpful career guidance in medical school. Overseas graduates interning internationally were more likely to have planned their postgraduate career path prior to entering medical school. Dublin graduates found their career guidance more helpful than Bahrain counterparts. The most cited shortcomings were lack of structured career advice and lack of advice on the Irish and Bahraini postgraduate systems. This study has demonstrated that early consideration of postgraduate career preparation and helpful medical school career guidance has a strong association with perceptions of preparedness of medical graduates for hospital practice. In an era of increasing

  20. Factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout development, job satisfaction and patient care quality: a time-lagged study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila A; Read, Emily A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2017-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model linking new graduate nurses' perceptions of their manager's authentic leadership behaviours to structural empowerment, short-staffing and work-life interference and subsequent burnout, job satisfaction and patient care quality. Authentic leadership and structural empowerment have been shown to reduce early career burnout among nurses. Short-staffing and work-life interference are also linked to burnout and may help explain the impact of positive, empowering leadership on burnout, which in turn influences job satisfaction and patient care quality. A time-lagged study of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted. At Time 1, surveys were sent to 3,743 nurses (November 2012-March 2013) and 1,020 were returned (27·3% response rate). At Time 2 (May-July 2014), 406 nurses who responded at Time 1 completed surveys (39·8% response rate). Descriptive analysis was conducted in SPSS. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to test the hypothesized model. The hypothesized model was supported. Authentic leadership had a significant positive effect on structural empowerment, which in turn decreased both short-staffing and work-life interference. Short-staffing and work-life imbalance subsequently resulted in nurse burnout, lower job satisfaction and lower patient care quality 1 year later. The findings suggest that short-staffing and work-life interference are important factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout. Developing nurse managers' authentic leadership behaviours and working with them to create and sustain empowering work environments may help reduce burnout, increase nurse job satisfaction and improve patient care quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Master course in biomedical engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbágy, Akos; Benyó, Zoltán; Monos, Emil

    2009-11-22

    The Bologna Declaration aims at harmonizing the European higher education structure. In accordance with the Declaration, biomedical engineering will be offered as a master (MSc) course also in Hungary, from year 2009. Since 1995 biomedical engineering course has been held in cooperation of three universities: Semmelweis University, Budapest Veterinary University, and Budapest University of Technology and Economics. One of the latter's faculties, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, has been responsible for the course. Students could start their biomedical engineering studies - usually in parallel with their first degree course - after they collected at least 180 ECTS credits. Consequently, the biomedical engineering course could have been considered as a master course even before the Bologna Declaration. Students had to collect 130 ECTS credits during the six-semester course. This is equivalent to four-semester full-time studies, because during the first three semesters the curriculum required to gain only one third of the usual ECTS credits. The paper gives a survey on the new biomedical engineering master course, briefly summing up also the subjects in the curriculum.

  2. Density functional theory (DFT) study on the hydrolysis behavior of degradable Mg/Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezafati, Marjan

    Magnesium-based (Mg and/or Mg alloys) materials possess many advantageous physicochemical/biological characteristics such as good biocompatibility and similarity of the mechanical properties to the human bone tissue, which renders this material a promising candidate for the biomedical and implant applications. One of the most attractive features of Mg-based materials is the degradability in the physiological environment. With the burst of research on the biodegradable materials for the healthcare device applications, Mg and its alloys attracted a strong attention in the bioengineering field in recent years. However, the major limitation of applying Mg-based materials to biomedical applications is the fast degradation/corrosion rate with regards to the healing process time-span. In the present thesis, an atomistic model employing the density-functional theory (DFT) has been developed to study the hydrolysis process by understanding the influences of commonly used alloying elements (zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), aluminum (Al), and yttrium (Y)) and the crystallographic orientation of the dissolution surfaces (basal (0001), prism (1010), and pyramidal (1011) planes) on the corrosion behavior. These parameters are known to strongly impact the initial hydrolysis phenomena of Mg-based materials. To develop the atomistic computational model, we have implemented the Dmol3 software package in conjunction with PBE (Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof) correlation energy functional in the GGA (generalized gradient approximation) scheme. Throughout the thesis, we performed three sets of calculations, i) surface energy, ii) dissolution potential, and iii) water adsorption computations, to examine the hydrolysis mechanism and the subsequent corrosion/degradation of Mg/Mg alloys. The total energy changes of various Mg-based systems in different conditions for these surface energies, dissolution behavior, and tendency of the system for adsorbing the water molecule were quantified. The results

  3. Biomedical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wriggers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    During the last years computational methods lead to new approaches that can be applied within medical practice. Based on the tremendous advances in medical imaging and high-performance computing, virtual testing is able to help in medical decision processes or implant designs. Current challenges in medicine and engineering are related to the application of computational methods to clinical medicine and the study of biological systems at different scales. Additionally manufacturers will be able to use computational tools and methods to predict the performance of their medical devices in virtual patients. The physical and animal testing procedures could be reduced by virtual prototyping of medical devices. Here simulations can enhance the performance of alternate device designs for a range of virtual patients. This will lead to a refinement of designs and to safer products. This book summarizes different aspects of approaches to enhance function, production, initialization and complications of different types o...

  4. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Statistics in biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Manteiga, Wenceslao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The discipline of biostatistics is nowadays a fundamental scientific component of biomedical, public health and health services research. Traditional and emerging areas of application include clinical trials research, observational studies, physiology, imaging, and genomics. The present article reviews the current situation of biostatistics, considering the statistical methods traditionally used in biomedical research, as well as the ongoing development of new methods in response to the new problems arising in medicine. Clearly, the successful application of statistics in biomedical research requires appropriate training of biostatisticians. This training should aim to give due consideration to emerging new areas of statistics, while at the same time retaining full coverage of the fundamentals of statistical theory and methodology. In addition, it is important that students of biostatistics receive formal training in relevant biomedical disciplines, such as epidemiology, clinical trials, molecular biology, genetics, and neuroscience.La Bioestadística es hoy en día una componente científica fundamental de la investigación en Biomedicina, salud pública y servicios de salud. Las áreas tradicionales y emergentes de aplicación incluyen ensayos clínicos, estudios observacionales, fisología, imágenes, y genómica. Este artículo repasa la situación actual de la Bioestadística, considerando los métodos estadísticos usados tradicionalmente en investigación biomédica, así como los recientes desarrollos de nuevos métodos, para dar respuesta a los nuevos problemas que surgen en Medicina. Obviamente, la aplicación fructífera de la estadística en investigación biomédica exige una formación adecuada de los bioestadísticos, formación que debería tener en cuenta las áreas emergentes en estadística, cubriendo al mismo tiempo los fundamentos de la teoría estadística y su metodología. Es importante, además, que los estudiantes de

  6. Inequalities in Educational Access in Mexico: A Study with Graduates Students of a High Performance Technical High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pérez-Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Access to the higher education system in Mexico has been characterized by educational inequalities explained by social and reproductionist currents. The phenomenon occurs in graduate students with a high school diploma and coming from different contexts (social, cultural, economic, institutional and academic ones that create a process of transition far away from equal opportunities. Therefore, the differences due to cultural diversity do not generate equitable access to higher education institutions. The aim of this study was to identify the social, cultural and academic factors affecting the access to or the abandonment of the academic education of students with expectations of entering the higher education system. The research was based on the results obtained from forty technicians who studied at a vocational high school with high academic performance in Mexico, and were supposed to enter the higher level. It was an exploratory descriptive investigation with qualitative approach, using two multiple-choice item questionnaires whose results were analyzed interpretively. The sampling was non-probability, with the technique of “snowball” and “convenience”. The results showed that the level of parents’ schooling, social relations, and academic career of graduates were decisive to enter the higher education; so it can be concluded that the students’ origin generate inequality in educational achievement.

  7. In silico assessment of biomedical products: The conundrum of rare but not so rare events in two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconti, Marco; Cobelli, Claudio; Haddad, Tarek; Himes, Adam; Kovatchev, Boris; Palmer, Mark

    2017-05-01

    In silico clinical trials, defined as "The use of individualized computer simulation in the development or regulatory evaluation of a medicinal product, medical device, or medical intervention," have been proposed as a possible strategy to reduce the regulatory costs of innovation and the time to market for biomedical products. We review some of the the literature on this topic, focusing in particular on those applications where the current practice is recognized as inadequate, as for example, the detection of unexpected severe adverse events too rare to be detected in a clinical trial, but still likely enough to be of concern. We then describe with more details two case studies, two successful applications of in silico clinical trial approaches, one relative to the University of Virginia/Padova simulator that the Food and Drug Administration has accepted as possible replacement for animal testing in the preclinical assessment of artificial pancreas technologies, and the second, an investigation of the probability of cardiac lead fracture, where a Bayesian network was used to combine in vivo and in silico observations, suggesting a whole new strategy of in silico-augmented clinical trials, to be used to increase the numerosity where recruitment is impossible, or to explore patients' phenotypes that are unlikely to appear in the trial cohort, but are still frequent enough to be of concern.

  8. A pilot Tuning Project-based national study on recently graduated medical students' self-assessment of competences--the TEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo Diogo, Pedro; Barbosa, Joselina; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2015-12-19

    The Tuning Project is an initiative funded by the European Commission that developed core competences for primary medical degrees in Europe. Students' grouped self-assessments are used for program evaluation and improvement of curricula. The TEST study aimed to assess how do Portuguese medical graduates self-assess their acquisition of core competences and experiences of contact with patients in core settings according to the Tuning framework. Translation of the Tuning's competences (Clinical Practice - CP), Knowledge (K) items and Clinical Settings (CS) was performed. Questionnaires were created in paper and electronic formats and distributed to 1591 graduates from seven Portuguese medical schools (July 2014). Items were rated in a 6-point Likert scale (0-5) of levels of competence. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted and Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate the internal consistency of the questionnaire. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were used for multiple comparisons. Three hundred eighty seven questionnaires were analyzed, corresponding to 24% of the target population. EFA yielded an 11-factor solution for CP and a 6-factor solution for K items. The median value of CP factors was 2.8 (p25 = 2.0; p75 = 3.5) and the median value of K factors was 2.6 (2.0; 3.2). Factor scores ranged from 1.3 (Legal principles) to 4.0 (Ethical principles). Clinical presentations, psychological aspects of illness, evidence-based medicine and promotion of health showed the highest results. Lower scores were detected in medical emergencies, practical procedures, prescribing drugs and legal principles. More than 90% of graduates experienced having contact with patients in 8 CS but only 24% of graduates had contact in all 14 CS. Graduates had the least contact with patients in the emergency rooms, intensive care units, palliative, rehabilitation and anesthetic care. Significant differences (p competences in medical education. Results suggest that Portuguese

  9. Biomedical applications of control engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hacısalihzade, Selim S

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Applications of Control Engineering is a lucidly written textbook for graduate control engin­eering and biomedical engineering students as well as for medical prac­ti­tioners who want to get acquainted with quantitative methods. It is based on decades of experience both in control engineering and clinical practice.   The book begins by reviewing basic concepts of system theory and the modeling process. It then goes on to discuss control engineering application areas like ·         Different models for the human operator, ·         Dosage and timing optimization in oral drug administration, ·         Measuring symptoms of and optimal dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson’s disease, ·         Measure­ment and control of blood glucose le­vels both naturally and by means of external controllers in diabetes, and ·         Control of depth of anaesthesia using inhalational anaesthetic agents like sevoflurane using both fuzzy and state feedback controllers....

  10. Developing the Intercultural Competence of Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nanda; Dawson, Debra L.; Olsen, Karyn C.; Meadows, Ken N.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how teaching development programs may facilitate the development of intercultural competence in graduate students and prepare them for communicating effectively in the global workplace after graduation. First, we describe the concept of intercultural teaching competence and examine the skills that graduate students may need to…

  11. A Study on Factors Affecting Navy Officers’ Decisions to Pursue Funded Graduate Education: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    especially when 6 faced with uncertainty within an environment and specifically how graduate education enables officers to establish an extensive array...Navy flag officer is responsible to the Vice Chief of Naval Operations for ensuring the education programs, especially higher level programs, are...California, is the primary source of graduate education for naval officers, especially SWO officers. It is a fully 10 funded graduate level institution

  12. Are They Fit For Purpose? Exploring Managers' Experiences of UK HR Graduates & Employability Implications: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to expand on existing understandings of graduate employability through exploring the lived experiences and perceptions of key informants, in this case, those with direct line management responsibilities for graduates. The context of this research is focused on Human Resources (HR) graduates, a discipline that has seen little qualitative inquiry across the Higher Education (HE), employability and HR literature, and which is currently dominated by skills-led appr...

  13. A randomized study of a method for optimizing adolescent assent to biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Robert D; Brody, Janet L; Scherer, David G; Turner, Charles W; Dalen, Jeanne; Raissy, Hengameh

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary consent/assent with adolescents invited to participate in research raises challenging problems. No studies to date have attempted to manipulate autonomy in relation to assent/consent processes. This study evaluated the effects of an autonomy-enhanced individualized assent/consent procedure embedded within a randomized pediatric asthma clinical trial. Families were randomly assigned to remain together or separated during a consent/assent process; the latter we characterize as an autonomy-enhanced assent/consent procedure. We hypothesized that separating adolescents from their parents would improve adolescent assent by increasing knowledge and appreciation of the clinical trial and willingness to participate. Sixty-four adolescent-parent dyads completed procedures. The together versus separate randomization made no difference in adolescent or parent willingness to participate. However, significant differences were found in both parent and adolescent knowledge of the asthma clinical trial based on the assent/consent procedure and adolescent age. The separate assent/consent procedure improved knowledge of study risks and benefits for older adolescents and their parents but not for the younger youth or their parents. Regardless of the assent/consent process, younger adolescents had lower comprehension of information associated with the study medication and research risks and benefits, but not study procedures or their research rights and privileges. The use of an autonomy-enhanced assent/consent procedure for adolescents may improve their and their parent's informed assent/consent without impacting research participation decisions. Traditional assent/consent procedures may result in a "diffusion of responsibility" effect between parents and older adolescents, specifically in attending to key information associated with study risks and benefits.

  14. Pitting corrosion studies on nitrogen implanted 316L SS for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaiyan, M.; Veerabadran, K.M.; Thampi, N.S.; Kanwar Krishnan; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Dayal, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, human bone fracture and defects have been corrected using metal and alloy fixing devices. Austenitic stainless steels (such as 316L alloy studied here) are favoured because of low cost, compared to titanium alloys, ease of fabrication and fair corrosion resistance. Localized attack on 316l stainless steel, however, results in iron, chromium and nickel ions leaching into surrounding body fluids. This study reports on the successful use of nitrogen ion implantation into 316lSS to evaluate the optimum dose needed to minimise this localised attack, in a physiological saline solution. (UK)

  15. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain); Mariani, Valentina [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Cohen, Dror [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Madi, Lea [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Garanger, Elisabeth [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Rossi, François [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Korenstein, Rafi [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Lecommandoux, Sébastien [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Ponti, Jessica [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro, E-mail: heredia@gaiker.es [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)-block–poly(l-glutamic acid) (PTMC-b–PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-block–poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PEG-b–PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood–serum–protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC-b–PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG-b–PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  16. Culture & differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell into osteoblast on degradable biomedical composite scaffold: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan G Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a significant bone tissue loss in patients from diseases and traumatic injury. The current autograft transplantation gold standard treatment has drawbacks, namely donor site morbidity and limited supply. The field of tissue engineering has emerged with a goal to provide alternative sources for transplantations to bridge this gap between the need and lack of bone graft. The aim of this study was to prepare biocomposite scaffolds based on chitosan (CHT, polycaprolactone (PCL and hydroxyapatite (HAP by freeze drying method and to assess the role of scaffolds in spatial organization, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs in vitro, in order to achieve bone graft substitutes with improved physical-chemical and biological properties. Methods: Pure chitosan (100CHT and composites (40CHT/HAP, 30CHT/HAP/PCL and 25CHT/HAP/PCL scaffolds containing 40, 30, 25 parts per hundred resin (phr filler, respectively in acetic acid were freeze dried and the porous foams were studied for physicochemical and in vitro biological properties. Results: Scanning electron microscope (SEM images of the scaffolds showed porous microstructure (20-300 μm with uniform pore distribution in all compositions. Materials were tested under compressive load in wet condition (using phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4. The in vitro studies showed that all the scaffold compositions supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation as visible from SEM images, [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP assay and quantitative reverse transcription (qRT-PCR. Interpretation & conclusions: Scaffold composition 25CHT/HAP/PCL showed better biomechanical and osteoinductive properties as evident by mechanical test and alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast specific gene expression studies. This study suggests that this novel

  17. Biomedical Imaging Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salzer, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    This book presents and describes imaging technologies that can be used to study chemical processes and structural interactions in dynamic systems, principally in biomedical systems. The imaging technologies, largely biomedical imaging technologies such as MRT, Fluorescence mapping, raman mapping, nanoESCA, and CARS microscopy, have been selected according to their application range and to the chemical information content of their data. These technologies allow for the analysis and evaluation of delicate biological samples, which must not be disturbed during the profess. Ultimately, this may me

  18. Biomedical engineering principles

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Arthur B; Valdevit, Antonio; Ascione, Alfred N

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Modeling of Physiological ProcessesCell Physiology and TransportPrinciples and Biomedical Applications of HemodynamicsA Systems Approach to PhysiologyThe Cardiovascular SystemBiomedical Signal ProcessingSignal Acquisition and ProcessingTechniques for Physiological Signal ProcessingExamples of Physiological Signal ProcessingPrinciples of BiomechanicsPractical Applications of BiomechanicsBiomaterialsPrinciples of Biomedical Capstone DesignUnmet Clinical NeedsEntrepreneurship: Reasons why Most Good Designs Never Get to MarketAn Engineering Solution in Search of a Biomedical Problem

  19. Fundamental of biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sawhney, GS

    2007-01-01

    About the Book: A well set out textbook explains the fundamentals of biomedical engineering in the areas of biomechanics, biofluid flow, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation and use of computing in biomedical engineering. All these subjects form a basic part of an engineer''s education. The text is admirably suited to meet the needs of the students of mechanical engineering, opting for the elective of Biomedical Engineering. Coverage of bioinstrumentation, biomaterials and computing for biomedical engineers can meet the needs of the students of Electronic & Communication, Electronic & Instrumenta

  20. Fertility patterns of college graduates by field of study, U.S. women born 1960--79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelmore, Katherine; Musick, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Building on recent European studies, we used the Survey of Income and Program Participation to provide the first analysis of fertility differences between groups of U.S. college graduates by their undergraduate field of study. We used multilevel event-history models to investigate possible institutional and selection mechanisms linking field of study to delayed fertility and childlessness. The results are consistent with those found for Europe in showing an overall difference of 10 percentage points between levels of childlessness across fields, with the lowest levels occurring for women in health and education, intermediate levels for women in science and technology, and the highest levels for women in arts and social sciences. The mediating roles of the following field characteristics were assessed: motherhood employment penalties; percentage of men; family attitudes; and marriage patterns. Childlessness was higher among women in fields with a moderate representation of men, less traditional family attitudes, and late age at first marriage. PMID:24266547

  1. Studying the influence of nanodiamonds over the elasticity of polymer/nanodiamond composites for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikov, T.; Mitev, D.; Radeva, E.; Iglic, A.; Presker, R.; Daniel, M.; Sepitka, J.; Krasteva, N.; Keremidarska, M.; Cvetanov, I.; Pramatarova, L.

    2014-12-01

    The combined unique properties offered by organic and inorganic constituents within a single material on a nanoscale level make nanocomposites attractive for the next generation of biocompatible materials. The composite materials of the detonation nanodiamond/polymer type possess spatial organization of components with new structural features and physical properties, as well as complex functions due to the strong synergistic effects between the nanoparticles and the polymer [1]. The plasma polymerization (PP) method was chosen to obtain composites of silicon-based polymers, in which detonation generated nanodiamond (DND) particles were incorporated. The composite layers are homogeneous, chemically resistant, thermally and mechanically stable, thus allowing a large amount of biological components to be loaded onto their surface and to be used in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, implants, stents, biosensors and other medical and biological devices. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the main focus of research in regenerative medicine due to their extraordinary potential to differentiate into different kinds of cells including osteoblasts, which are needed for various bone disease treatments. However, for optimal usage of MSCs knowledge about the factors that influence their initial distribution in the human system, tissue-specific activation and afterwards differentiation into osteoblasts is required. In recent studies it was found that one of these factors is the elasticity of the substrates [2]. The choice of the proper material which specifically guides the differentiation of stem cells even in the absence of growth factors is very important when building modern strategy for bone regeneration. One of the reasons for there not being many studies in this area worldwide is the lack of suitable biomaterials which support these kinds of experiments. The goal of this study is to create substrates suitable for cell culture with a range of mechanical properties

  2. Studying the influence of nanodiamonds over the elasticity of polymer/nanodiamond composites for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikov, T; Iglic, A; Presker, R; Daniel, M; Sepitka, J; Krasteva, N; Keremidarska, M; Mitev, D; Radeva, E; Cvetanov, I; Pramatarova, L

    2014-01-01

    The combined unique properties offered by organic and inorganic constituents within a single material on a nanoscale level make nanocomposites attractive for the next generation of biocompatible materials. The composite materials of the detonation nanodiamond/polymer type possess spatial organization of components with new structural features and physical properties, as well as complex functions due to the strong synergistic effects between the nanoparticles and the polymer [1]. The plasma polymerization (PP) method was chosen to obtain composites of silicon-based polymers, in which detonation generated nanodiamond (DND) particles were incorporated. The composite layers are homogeneous, chemically resistant, thermally and mechanically stable, thus allowing a large amount of biological components to be loaded onto their surface and to be used in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, implants, stents, biosensors and other medical and biological devices. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the main focus of research in regenerative medicine due to their extraordinary potential to differentiate into different kinds of cells including osteoblasts, which are needed for various bone disease treatments. However, for optimal usage of MSCs knowledge about the factors that influence their initial distribution in the human system, tissue-specific activation and afterwards differentiation into osteoblasts is required. In recent studies it was found that one of these factors is the elasticity of the substrates [2]. The choice of the proper material which specifically guides the differentiation of stem cells even in the absence of growth factors is very important when building modern strategy for bone regeneration. One of the reasons for there not being many studies in this area worldwide is the lack of suitable biomaterials which support these kinds of experiments. The goal of this study is to create substrates suitable for cell culture with a range of mechanical properties

  3. Magnetic properties study of iron-oxide nanoparticles/PVA ferrogels with potential biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza Zélis, P.; Muraca, D.; Gonzalez, J. S.; Pasquevich, G. A.; Alvarez, V. A.; Pirota, K. R.; Sánchez, F. H.

    2013-01-01

    A study of the magnetic behavior of maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer matrices prepared by physical cross-linking is reported. The magnetic nanocomposites (ferrogels) were obtained by the in situ co-precipitation of iron salts in the presence of PVA polymer, and subsequently subjected to freezing–thawing cycles. The magnetic behavior of these ferrogels was compared with that of similar systems synthesized using the glutaraldehyde. This type of chemical cross-linking agents presents several disadvantages due to the presence of residual toxic molecules in the gel, which are undesirable for biological applications. Characteristic particle size determined by several techniques are in the range 7.9–9.3 nm. The iron oxidation state in the NPs was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Mössbauer measurements showed that the NP magnetic moments present collective magnetic excitations and superparamagnetic relaxations. The blocking and irreversibility temperatures of the NPs in the ferrogels, and the magnetic anisotropy constant, were obtained from magnetic measurements. An empirical model including two magnetic contributions (large NPs slightly departed from thermodynamic equilibrium below 200 K, and small NPs at thermodynamic equilibrium) was used to fit the experimental magnetization curves. A deviation from the superparamagnetic regime was observed. This deviation was explained on the basis of an interacting superparamagnetic model. From this model, relevant magnetic and structural properties were obtained, such as the magnitude order of the dipolar interaction energy, the NPs magnetic moment, and the number of NPs per ferrogel mass unit. This study contributes to the understanding of the basic physics of a new class of materials that could emerge from the PVA-based magnetic ferrogels.

  4. Stream computing for biomedical signal processing: A QRS complex detection case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B M; O'Driscoll, C; Boylan, G B; Lightbody, G; Marnane, W P

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in "Big Data" have brought significant gains in the ability to process large amounts of data on commodity server hardware. Stream computing is a relatively new paradigm in this area, addressing the need to process data in real time with very low latency. While this approach has been developed for dealing with large scale data from the world of business, security and finance, there is a natural overlap with clinical needs for physiological signal processing. In this work we present a case study of streams processing applied to a typical physiological signal processing problem: QRS detection from ECG data.

  5. Breathability studies of electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive for bio-medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Mehra, Dayal Singh; Niyogi, Utpal Kumar; Sabharwal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) commonly used in surgical dressing has been made by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. In contact with biological substrate like skin, PSAs generally lose their adhesive strength due to very low moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR). In the present study, effects of varying e-beam dose and different crosslinkers on the MVTR of the PU-PSA have been investigated. A comparative study of effects of different crosslinkers showed that PU-PSA with IPDI has the least while that with TAC has the highest gel content and crystallinity and a reverse trend was observed for the MVTR. - Highlights: • On increasing e-beam dose from 5 kGy to 60 kGy the MVTR decreased continuously. • Increasing crosslinker concentration from 2% to10% resulted in decrease of MVTR. • IPDI has the highest and TAC has the least MVTR in PU-PSA system among the crosslinkers. • MVTR/peel adhesion/shear adhesion/initial tack: IPDI>MDI>CMDI>PMDI>TAIC>TAC. • Gel content/T g /crystallinity: TAC>TAIC>PMDI>CMDI>MDI>IPDI

  6. Student perception about working in rural Nepal after graduation: a study among first- and second-year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal is a developing country in South Asia with a population of 29.8 million. In September 2011, there were 18 medical schools with 14 being in the private sector. KIST Medical College is a private school in Lalitpur district. The present study was conducted to obtain information on student perceptions about working in rural Nepal after graduation. Methods The study was conducted among first- and second-year undergraduate medical students using a semi-structured questionnaire developed by the authors using inputs from the literature and their experiences of teaching medical students. Year of study, gender, method of financing of medical education, place of family residence and occupation of parents were noted. Participant responses were analysed, grouped together and the number of respondents stating a particular response was noted. Results Of the 200 students, 185 (92.5% participated with 95 being from the first year and 90 from the second. Most students were self-financing and from urban areas. Regarding the question of working in rural Nepal after graduation, 134 (72.4% said they will work after their undergraduate course. Students preferred to work in the government or nongovernmental sector. Student felt doctors are reluctant to serve in rural Nepal due to inadequate facilities, low salary, less security, problems with their professional development, less equipment in health centres, decreased contact with family and difficulties in communicating with an illiterate, rural population. About 43% of respondents felt medical education does not adequately prepare them for rural service. Repeated rural exposure, postings in rural hospitals and health centres, and training students to diagnose and treat illness with less technology were suggested. The median monthly salary expected was 60 000 Nepalese rupees (US$ 820 and was significantly higher among first-year students. Conclusions The

  7. Staff perception on biomedical or health care waste management: a qualitative study in a rural tertiary care hospital in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Chandra Joshi

    Full Text Available Health care or biomedical waste, if not managed properly, can be of high risk to the hospital staff, the patients, the community, public health and the environment, especially in low and middle income settings where proper disposal norms are often not followed. Our aim was to explore perceptions of staff of an Indian rural tertiary care teaching hospital on hospital waste management.A qualitative study was conducted using 10 focus group discussions (FGDs, with different professional groups, cleaning staff, nurses, medical students, doctors and administrators. The FGD guide included the following topics: (i role of Health Care Waste Management (HCWM in prevention of health care associated infections, (ii awareness of and views about HCWM-related guidelines/legislation, (iii current HCWM practices, (iv perception and preparedness related to improvements of the current practices, and (v proper implementation of the available guidelines/legislation. The FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated to English (when conducted in Hindi and analysed using content analysis.Two themes were identified: Theme (A, 'Challenges in integration of HCWM in organizational practice,' with the categories (I Awareness and views about HCWM, (II Organizational practices regarding HCWM, and (III Challenges in Implementation of HCWM; and Theme (B, 'Interventions to improve HCWM,' with three categories, (I Educational and motivational interventions, (II Organizational culture change, and (III Policy-related interventions.A gap between knowledge and actual practice regarding HCWM was highlighted in the perception of the hospital staff. The participants suggested organizational changes, training and monitoring to address this. The information generated is relevant not merely to the microsystem studied but to other institutions in similar settings.

  8. Biomedical Engineering curriculum at UAM-I: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Licona, Fabiola; Azpiroz-Leehan, Joaquin; Urbina Medal, E Gerardo; Cadena Mendez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum at Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM) has undergone at least four major transformations since the founding of the BME undergraduate program in 1974. This work is a critical assessment of the curriculum from the point of view of its results as derived from an analysis of, among other resources, institutional databases on students, graduates and their academic performance. The results of the evaluation can help us define admission policies as well as reasonable limits on the maximum duration of undergraduate studies. Other results linked to the faculty composition and the social environment can be used to define a methodology for the evaluation of teaching and the implementation of mentoring and tutoring programs. Changes resulting from this evaluation may be the only way to assure and maintain leadership and recognition from the BME community.

  9. A cytotoxicity study of silicon oxycarbide nanowires as cell scaffold for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagonegro, P.; Rossi, F. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Galli, C., E-mail: carlo.galli@unipr.it [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Smerieri, A. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Alinovi, R.; Pinelli, S. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Rimoldi, T. [Physics and Earth Science Department, Parma University, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Attolini, G. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Macaluso, G.; Macaluso, C. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Saddow, S.E. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, ENB118 Tampa, Florida (United States); Salviati, G. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy)

    2017-04-01

    Goal: Nanowires are promising biomaterials in multiple clinical applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of carbon-doped silica nanowires (SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs) on a fibroblastic cell line in vitro. Materials and methods: SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs were grown on Si substrates by CVD process. Murine L929 fibroblasts were cultured in complete DMEM and indirect and direct cytotoxicity tests were performed in agreement with ISO 19003-5, by quantitating cell viability at MTT and chemiluminescent assay. Cell cultures were investigated at Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and immunocytochemistry to observe their morphology and investigate cell-NWs interactions. Furthermore, hemocompatibility with Platelet-rich Plasma was assayed at SEM and by ELISA assay. Results: SiOxCy NWs proved biocompatible and did not impair cell proliferation at contact assays. L929 were able to attach on NWs and proliferate. Most interestingly, L929 reorganised the NW scaffold by displacing the nanostructure and creating tunnels within the NW network. NWs moreover did not impair platelet activation and behaved similarly to flat SiO{sub 2}. Conclusions: Our data show that SiOxCy NWs did not release cytotoxic species and acted as a viable and adaptable scaffold for fibroblastic cells, thus representing a promising platform for implantable devices. - Highlights: • NWs did not release cytotoxic species. • Fibroblasts reorganised the NWs network, adapting it to their needs. • Blood tests with platelet-rich plasma and dynamic blood coagulation tests showed oxycarbide NWs induced platelet activation. • Carbon-doped SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs network are a promising biomaterial for implantable scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

  10. Tracer Study of BS in Information Technology (BSIT Graduates of Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges, Nabua, Camarines Sur from 2004 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARLY B. BALINGBING

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tracer studies enhance curriculum relevance and marketability of educational programs. Knowledge on employment of CSPC graduates assists in formulating policy towards combating unemployment and producing globally competitive BSIT graduates. This study determines the employability of BSIT graduates of SY 2004-2010 and unveil specifically their personal profile, level of competency alongknowledge, skills and attitudes, significant relationship of the level of competency and the level of difficulties encountered along knowledge, skills, and attitudes and the measures to enhance their competitiveness. The study used descriptive method. Data gathered through a questionnaire from 155 respondents were statistically treated using averaging, percentage, weighted mean and Spearman Rho. Most respondents were female, 20-25 years old, TESDA-certified, employed in private sectors, incompetent in SY 2003-2004, competent in SY 2005-2010and encountered difficulty along knowledge, skills, and attitudes. There is no significant relationship in the level of competencies among graduates per school year and theirlevel of difficulty along knowledge, skills and attitudes. Some measures to enhance their competitivenessinclude conducting TESDA Assessment and Civil Service examination review and IT Faculty in-house trainings and strengthening English Proficiency Program. BSIT graduates of SY 2004-2010 are competent despite difficulties encountered along skills, attitudes and knowledge.

  11. A pilot Tuning Project-based national study on recently graduated medical students? self-assessment of competences - the TEST study

    OpenAIRE

    Grilo Diogo, Pedro; Barbosa, Joselina; Am?lia Ferreira, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The Tuning Project is an initiative funded by the European Commission that developed core competences for primary medical degrees in Europe. Students' grouped self-assessments are used for program evaluation and improvement of curricula. The TEST study aimed to assess how do Portuguese medical graduates self-assess their acquisition of core competences and experiences of contact with patients in core settings according to the Tuning framework. Methods Translation of the Tuning's co...

  12. International Experience, Universities Support and Graduate Employability--Perceptions of Chinese International Students Studying in UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Turner, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    Recent policy developments in English Higher Education have resulted in employability placed in the spotlight, whereby the success of universities will be measured based on graduate employment. This represents the latest focus placed on employability in the sector, as universities are increasingly expected to provide employment-ready graduates to…

  13. From Study to Work: Methodological Challenges of a Graduate Destination Survey in the Western Cape, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Jacques; Kraak, Andre; Favish, Judy; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2014-01-01

    Current literature proposes several strategies for improving response rates to student evaluation surveys. Graduate destination surveys pose the difficulty of tracing graduates years later when their contact details may have changed. This article discusses the methodology of one such a survey to maximise response rates. Compiling a sample frame…

  14. Data-Driven Approaches for Computation in Intelligent Biomedical Devices: A Case Study of EEG Monitoring for Chronic Seizure Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Verma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent biomedical devices implies systems that are able to detect specific physiological processes in patients so that particular responses can be generated. This closed-loop capability can have enormous clinical value when we consider the unprecedented modalities that are beginning to emerge for sensing and stimulating patient physiology. Both delivering therapy (e.g., deep-brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, etc. and treating impairments (e.g., neural prosthesis requires computational devices that can make clinically relevant inferences, especially using minimally-intrusive patient signals. The key to such devices is algorithms that are based on data-driven signal modeling as well as hardware structures that are specialized to these. This paper discusses the primary application-domain challenges that must be overcome and analyzes the most promising methods for this that are emerging. We then look at how these methods are being incorporated in ultra-low-energy computational platforms and systems. The case study for this is a seizure-detection SoC that includes instrumentation and computation blocks in support of a system that exploits patient-specific modeling to achieve accurate performance for chronic detection. The SoC samples each EEG channel at a rate of 600 Hz and performs processing to derive signal features on every two second epoch, consuming 9 μJ/epoch/channel. Signal feature extraction reduces the data rate by a factor of over 40×, permitting wireless communication from the patient’s head while reducing the total power on the head by 14×.

  15. An Exploratory Study of Effective Online Learning: Assessing Satisfaction Levels of Graduate Students of Mathematics Education Associated with Human and Design Factors of an Online Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joohi Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory research project investigated graduate students’ satisfaction levels with online learning associated with human (professor/instructor and instructional associate and design factors (course structure and technical aspects using a survey study. A total of 81 graduate students (master’s students who majored in math and science education enrolled in an online math methods course (Conceptual Geometry participated in this study. According to the results of this study, student satisfaction level is closely associated with clear guidelines on assignment, rubrics, and constructive feedback. In addition, student satisfaction level is related to professor’s (or course instructor’s knowledge of materials.

  16. Biomedical applications engineering tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenger, C. J., Sr.

    1976-01-01

    The engineering tasks performed in response to needs articulated by clinicians are described. Initial contacts were made with these clinician-technology requestors by the Southwest Research Institute NASA Biomedical Applications Team. The basic purpose of the program was to effectively transfer aerospace technology into functional hardware to solve real biomedical problems.

  17. Graduate Formation in Intellectual Property in Brazil: A Study Based on Academic Production of Thesis and Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor de Paula Filho

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present information on the graduate formation in Intellectual Property in Brazil based on academic production of thesis and dissertations. This study analyzed data from 278 documents indexed in Bank of Thesis of Capes. The results show that: 1 only in the last years started the formation of professionals at the master’s and doctorate degree levels being necessary efforts for learning and training in the area; 2 the formation of competences is much concentrated in the Southeast and South regions of the country and in the area of Law being necessary to correct these asymmetries; and 3 the principal focus of this academic production is related to intellectual property policy followed by patents.

  18. Career Coaches as a Source of Vicarious Learning for Racial and Ethnic Minority PhD Students in the Biomedical Sciences: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Simon N; Thakore, Bhoomi K; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Many recent mentoring initiatives have sought to help improve the proportion of underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities (URMs) in academic positions across the biomedical sciences. However, the intractable nature of the problem of underrepresentation suggests that many young scientists may require supplemental career development beyond what many mentors are able to offer. As an adjunct to traditional scientific mentoring, we created a novel academic career "coaching" intervention for PhD students in the biomedical sciences. To determine whether and how academic career coaches can provide effective career-development-related learning experiences for URM PhD students in the biomedical sciences. We focus specifically on vicarious learning experiences, where individuals learn indirectly through the experiences of others. The intervention is being tested as part of a longitudinal randomized control trial (RCT). Here, we describe a nested qualitative study, using a framework approach to analyze data from a total of 48 semi-structured interviews from 24 URM PhD students (2 interviews per participant, 1 at baseline, 1 at 12-month follow-up) (16 female, 8 male; 11 Black, 12 Hispanic, 1 Native-American). We explored the role of the coach as a source of vicarious learning, in relation to the students' goal of being future biomedical science faculty. Coaches were resources through which most students in the study were able to learn vicariously about how to pursue, and succeed within, an academic career. Coaches were particularly useful in instances where students' research mentors are unable to provide such vicarious learning opportunities, for example because the mentor is too busy to have career-related discussions with a student, or because they have, or value, a different type of academic career to the type the student hopes to achieve. Coaching can be an important way to address the lack of structured career development that students receive in their home training

  19. A cross-disciplinary assessment of student loans debt, financial support for study and career preferences upon graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Craig S; Ling, Christopher; Barrow, Mark; Poole, Phillippa; Henning, Marcus

    2017-07-21

    To explore relationships between student loans debt, financial support and career preferences upon graduation for all healthcare disciplines offered at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland. The Faculty Tracking Project is a longitudinal study which invites students to complete a questionnaire at the beginning and end of their educational programmes, including questions on debt, financial support and career preference. Our analysis comprised three phases: (1) a descriptive analysis of data related to debt and financial support; (2) a principal component analysis in order to find related categories of career choice; and (3) logistic regression models to determine how career preference categories could be explained by either levels of student loans debt or financial support. Data from 2,405 participating students were included. Students in health sciences, nursing and pharmacy typically accrue levels of student loans debt of around $15,000 to $29,999, while optometry students accrue debt around $15,000 higher. Medical students show debt distributed around modes of $0 and $90,000 or more. All students typically access three sources of financial support during study. Career preferences at graduation reduced to four categories for all health disciplines. We found five significant effects, involving students in health sciences, medicine and pharmacy, relating the number of sources of financial support to the four categories of career preference. No significant effects were found related to level of student loans debt. Our results suggest that financial support is a more strongly determining factor in career choices than the level of student loans debt. The four-category framework for student career preferences appears to be a useful model for further research.

  20. The 'global interconnectedness' of dentist migration: a qualitative study of the life-stories of international dental graduates in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie D

    2015-05-01

    The migration of dentists is a major challenge contributing to the oral health system crisis in many countries. This paper explores the origins of the dentist migration problem through a study on international dental graduates, who had migrated to Australia. Life-stories of 49 international dental graduates from 22 countries were analysed in order to discern significant themes and patterns. We focused on their home country experience, including stories on early life and career choice; dental student life; professional life; social and political life; travels; and coming to Australia. Our participants exhibited a commitment to excellence in earlier stages of life and had cultivated a desire to learn more and be involved with the latest technology. Dentists from low- and middle-income countries were also disappointed by the lack of opportunity and were unhappy with the local ethos. Some pointed towards political unrest. Interestingly, participants also carried prior travel learnings and unforgettable memories contributing to their migration. Family members and peers had also influenced participants. These considerations were brought together in four themes explaining the desire to migrate: 'Being good at something', 'Feelings of being let down', 'A novel experience' and 'Influenced by someone'. Even if one of these four themes dominated the narrative, we found that more than one theme, however, coexisted for most participants. We refer to this worldview as 'Global interconnectedness', and identify the development of migration desire as a historical process, stimulated by a priori knowledge (and interactions) of people, place and things. This qualitative study has enriched our understanding on the complexity of the dental migration experience. It supports efforts to achieve greater technical co-operation in issues such as dental education, workforce surveillance and oral health service planning within the context of ongoing global efforts on health professional

  1. Socialization in the Neoliberal Academy of STEM Scholars: A Case Study of Negotiating Dispositions in an International Graduate Student in Entomology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakil Rabbi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how neoliberal orders of discourse shape the dispositions to academic literacies of an international graduate student in entomology. As this ideology of market logic consolidates its hegemony in universities of excellence and US culture at large, academic socialization and disciplinary activities increasingly aim to create scholarly dispositions and subjectivities that align with it. Such processes are further complicated by the backgrounds of international graduate students—an ever-larger proportion of graduate students in STEM who often hail from educational cultures significantly different from the U.S. Our analysis of an international graduate student’s literacy practices in terms of motivations and outcomes shows that his literacies echo the dispositions pushed by neoliberal ideologies, but are not over-determined by them. Rather, as our case study illustrates, his socialization is a layered process, with ambiguous implications and strategic calculations making up literacies and disciplinary outcomes. We believe closely mapping such tensions in literacies and socialization processes increases humanities scholars’ awareness both of the potential contradictions of educating international graduate students into the neoliberal model and of how the university can still be used to develop the dispositions needed to renegotiate the neoliberal order of discourse for more ethical and empowering purposes.

  2. Teaching, leadership, scholarly productivity, and level of activity in the chiropractic profession: a study of graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic radiology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kenneth J; Siordia, Lawrence

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to track the graduates of the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC) radiology residency program, review their scholarly productivity, and report those involved in teaching and leadership positions. Former LACC residents' career information was identified through publicly available electronic documents including Web sites and social media. PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature databases were searched for chiropractic graduate job surveys, and proportional comparisons were made between the career paths of LACC radiology residency graduates and those of non-residency-trained chiropractors. Of 47 former LACC residents, 28 (60%) have or previously had careers in tertiary (chiropractic) education; and 12 (26%) have attained a department chair position or higher at tertiary teaching institutions. Twenty-two (47%) have or previously had private radiology practices, whereas 11 (23%) have or previously had clinical chiropractic practices. Often, residency graduates hold or have held 2 of these positions at once; and one, all 3. Chapters or books were authored by 13 (28%). Radiology residency LACC graduates are professionally active, particularly in education, and demonstrate scholarly productivity.

  3. Biomedical applications of nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ana P; Cruz, Marcos A E; Tovani, Camila B; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    The ability to investigate substances at the molecular level has boosted the search for materials with outstanding properties for use in medicine. The application of these novel materials has generated the new research field of nanobiotechnology, which plays a central role in disease diagnosis, drug design and delivery, and implants. In this review, we provide an overview of the use of metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-nanotubes, liposomes, and nanopatterned flat surfaces for specific biomedical applications. The chemical and physical properties of the surface of these materials allow their use in diagnosis, biosensing and bioimaging devices, drug delivery systems, and bone substitute implants. The toxicology of these particles is also discussed in the light of a new field referred to as nanotoxicology that studies the surface effects emerging from nanostructured materials.

  4. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as highlighting

  5. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A.; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. Methods From 2008–2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Results Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of “community”; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. Conclusions This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the

  6. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Newman

    Full Text Available Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations.From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement.Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted.This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as

  7. Graduate School and You: A Guide for Prospective Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue; LaPidus, Jules B.

    This pamphlet guides the college graduate in determining whether graduate school is an appropriate choice in career planning. Chapter titles include: "Why Graduate School?,""What is Graduate Education?,""Preparation for Graduate School,""Career Options with a Graduate Degree,""Making the Decision,""Financing a Graduate Education,""Choosing a…

  8. Those Who Graduate: A Brief Look at the UNO Graduating Class of 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) conducted a study of 1,358 bachelor's degree graduates of the class of 1986 to examine two factors: (1) age at entrance and graduation, and (2) length of time required for graduation from several specified beginning points. The study required four sets of data: demographic, age related data, time-frame…

  9. Linking Work Integrated Learning and Competency of Graduates Pursuing Graduate Diploma in Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncreobutr, Vichian; Malee; Somjate

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the level of work integrated learning (WIL), and the competency of the teaching profession based on the standards of knowledge of the graduates at St. Theresa International College. The study group consisted of 115 graduates pursuing Graduate Diploma in Teaching Profession Program. The questionnaire was…

  10. [Selection of medical graduates for residency posts. A comparative study of the methodologies used in different countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ramiro D; Lagares, Alfonso; Villena, Victoria; García Seoane, Jorge; Jiménez-Roldán, Luis; Munarriz, Pablo M; Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Alén, José F

    2015-01-01

    The design of an appropriate method for the selection of medical graduates for residency posts is extremely important, not only for the efficiency of the method itself (accurate identification of most competent candidates), but also for its influence on the study and teaching methodologies operating in medical schools. Currently, there is a great variation in the criteria used in different countries and there is no definitively appropriate method. The use of isolated or combined criteria, such as the marks obtained by students in medical schools, their performance in tests of theoretical knowledge and evaluations of clinical competence, or personal interviews, have a limited value for identifying those candidates who will perform better during the residency and later on during independent practice. To analyse the variability in the methodologies used for the selection of residents employed in different countries, in particular those used in the United Kingdom and USA, where external agencies and medical schools make systematic analyses of curriculum development. The advantages and disadvantages of national or transnational licensing examinations on the process of convergence and harmonization of medical degrees and residency programmes through Europe are discussed. The present analysis is used to design a new and more efficient multi-criteria methodology for resident selection in Spain, which will be published in the next issue of this journal. Since the multi-criteria methods used in UK and USA appear to be most consistent, these have been employed for designing the new methodology that could be applied in Spain. Although many experts in medical education reject national examinations for awarding medical degrees or ranking candidates for residency posts, it seems that, when appropriately designed, they can be used to verify the level of competence of graduating students without necessarily distorting curriculum implementation or improvement. Copyright © 2014

  11. A retrospective study of past graduates of a residential life skills program for youth with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsnorth, S; King, G; McPherson, A; Jones-Galley, K

    2015-05-01

    Young people with physical disabilities experience issues regarding employment, schooling, independent living and establishing meaningful personal relationships. A lack of life skills has been recognized as an important factor contributing to this lag. The Independence Program (TIP) is a short-term residential life skills program that aims to equip youth with the foundational life skills required to assume adult roles. This study retrospectively examined the achievements, skills acquired and program attributions of youth and young adults who took part in this three-week immersive teen independence program over a 20-year period. A total of 162 past graduates were invited to take part, with 78 doing so (a 48% response rate). These past graduates completed an online survey assessing objective outcomes such as employment and independent living; subjective outcomes such as feeling in control and living meaningful lives; and reflections on skills acquired, opportunities experienced and attributions to TIP. The majority of respondents were female (71%), had a diagnosis of cerebral palsy (55%) and ranged from 20 to 35 years of age (92%). Despite a range of outcomes related to the achievement of adult roles, high levels of life satisfaction and overall quality of life were reported. Nearly every respondent reported using the skills they learned at the program in their lives afterwards and a high percentage attributed the acquisition and consolidation of core life skills to participating in this intensive immersive program. Although causality cannot be assumed, respondents reflected very positively on the opportunities provided by TIP to develop their independent living and life skills, extend their social networks and understand their strengths and weaknesses. Such findings validate the importance of targeted skill development to assist young people with physical disabilities in attaining their life goals and encourage focused investigations of key features in program

  12. A Comparative Study of the Perceptions of Accounting Educators and Accountants on Skills Required of Accounting Education Graduates in Automated Offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokike, Felicia Ogonnia; Eya, Gloria Mgboyibo

    2015-01-01

    The study dealt with perception of accounting educators and senior accountants on skills required of accounting education graduates for effective job performance in automated offices. The study adopted a descriptive research design.The population consisted of 149 respondents, made up of 80 accounting educators in public tertiary institutions and…

  13. A Follow-Up Study of Graduates with Learning Disabilities from a College of Education: Impact of the Disability on Personal and Professional Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russak, Susie; Daniel Hellwing, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined three issues connected to the experiences of graduates with learning disabilities (LD) from a college of education (N = 45): support services that had been most beneficial during studies, positive and negative effects of the disability on personal, and professional life. Additionally, demographic data were collected. A…

  14. Experiences and Perspectives of African-American, Latina/o, Asian-American and European-American Psychology Graduate Students: A National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Kenneth I.; Wimms, Harriette E.; Grant, Sheila K.; Wittig, Michele A.; Rogers, Margaret R.; Vasquez, Melba J. T.

    2013-01-01

    A national, web-based survey of 1,222 African-American, Latina/o, Asian-American and European-American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color differed from European-American students in perceptions of fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology, and in aspects of the graduate school experience perceived as linked to ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed. PMID:21341899

  15. Biomedical applications of polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Gebelein, C G

    1991-01-01

    The biomedical applications of polymers span an extremely wide spectrum of uses, including artificial organs, skin and soft tissue replacements, orthopaedic applications, dental applications, and controlled release of medications. No single, short review can possibly cover all these items in detail, and dozens of books andhundreds of reviews exist on biomedical polymers. Only a few relatively recent examples will be cited here;additional reviews are listed under most of the major topics in this book. We will consider each of the majorclassifications of biomedical polymers to some extent, inclu

  16. Handbook of biomedical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical optics holds tremendous promise to deliver effective, safe, non- or minimally invasive diagnostics and targeted, customizable therapeutics. Handbook of Biomedical Optics provides an in-depth treatment of the field, including coverage of applications for biomedical research, diagnosis, and therapy. It introduces the theory and fundamentals of each subject, ensuring accessibility to a wide multidisciplinary readership. It also offers a view of the state of the art and discusses advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.Organized into six sections, this handbook: Contains intr

  17. Biomedical Engineering Desk Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Ratner, Buddy D; Schoen, Frederick J; Lemons, Jack E; Dyro, Joseph; Martinsen, Orjan G; Kyle, Richard; Preim, Bernhard; Bartz, Dirk; Grimnes, Sverre; Vallero, Daniel; Semmlow, John; Murray, W Bosseau; Perez, Reinaldo; Bankman, Isaac; Dunn, Stanley; Ikada, Yoshito; Moghe, Prabhas V; Constantinides, Alkis

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop Desk Reference, for Biomedical Engineers involved in the ever expanding and very fast moving area; this is a book that will not gather dust on the shelf. It brings together the essential professional reference content from leading international contributors in the biomedical engineering field. Material covers a broad range of topics including: Biomechanics and Biomaterials; Tissue Engineering; and Biosignal Processing* A hard-working desk reference providing all the essential material needed by biomedical and clinical engineers on a day-to-day basis * Fundamentals, key techniques,

  18. Powering biomedical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Edwar

    2013-01-01

    From exoskeletons to neural implants, biomedical devices are no less than life-changing. Compact and constant power sources are necessary to keep these devices running efficiently. Edwar Romero's Powering Biomedical Devices reviews the background, current technologies, and possible future developments of these power sources, examining not only the types of biomedical power sources available (macro, mini, MEMS, and nano), but also what they power (such as prostheses, insulin pumps, and muscular and neural stimulators), and how they work (covering batteries, biofluids, kinetic and ther

  19. The relationship of high school graduation exams to graduation rates and SAT scores.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory J. Marchant; Sharon E. Paulson

    2005-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of high school graduation exams on states' graduation rates, states' aggregated SAT scores, and individual students' SAT scores. Three data sources were used: One source identified states requiring a standardized test for graduation; the NCES provided state aggregated data on graduation rates for the class of 2002; and the College Board provided its 2001 SAT database for all test-takers. After controlling for students' demographic characteristics (e.g., r...

  20. Graduate Attributes and Employability Skills: Graduates' Perspectives on Employers' Expectations in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belwal, Rakesh; Priyadarshi, Pushpendra; Al Fazari, Mariam Humaid

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Supply and demand characteristics, influenced by the pre- and post-oil economy of Oman, have caused unemployment challenges to Omani graduates. The purpose of this paper is to explore the most common graduate attributes as they apply to graduates' employability in Oman. Design/methodology/approach: The study uses the principles of…

  1. Earnings Expectation and Graduate Employment: Evidence from Recent Chinese College Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Chinese college graduates have faced increasing labor market competition since the expansion of tertiary education. Given rigid market demand, graduates with realistic earnings expectations may experience a more efficient job search. Using the 2008 MYCOS College Graduate Employment Survey, this study finds that a 1000 yuan reduction in a…

  2. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF DIVERSIFIED MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS AMONG GRADUATE STUDENTS AND THEIR ADVISORS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bodden, Krystin R.

    2014-01-01

    Minorities and women continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. In graduate education, factors such as racism, prejudice, discrimination, sexism, stereotypes, tokenism, and a lack of role models can all plague students and contribute to uncompleted degrees and non-entrance into STEM fields. One of the tools being used to combat these barriers is effective mentoring. Graduate students and their advisors generally have close working relat...

  3. The Significance of Family, Environment, and College Preparation: A Study of Factors Influencing Graduation and Persistence Rates of African American Males Playing Division I Basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Enzley, IV

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify specific external factors including family composition, pre-college environment, and college preparation that contribute to why some African American males playing basketball at the NCAA Division I level graduate and persist while others do not. Despite an aggressive advertising campaign from the NCAA…

  4. Animal Science Experts' Opinions on the Non-Technical Skills Secondary Agricultural Education Graduates Need for Employment in the Animal Science Industry: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusher, Wendy L.; Robinson, J. Shane; Edwards, M. Craig

    2010-01-01

    Non-technical, employability skills are in high demand for entry-level job-seekers. As such, this study sought to describe the perceptions of Oklahoma's animal science industry leaders as it related to the employability skills needed for entry-level employment of high school graduates who had completed coursework in Oklahoma's Agricultural, Food…

  5. Significant Learning Experiences and Ignatian Pedagogy: A Case Study of Curricula, Academic Practices, and Graduate Outcomes in Jesuit Universities' Honors Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampel, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative, multisite case study used Dee Fink's taxonomy of significant learning as a lens through which to examine the curricular structure, academic practices, and graduate outcomes for honors programs at Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States. Special attention was given to the distinctive quality of Ignatian pedagogy and…

  6. Recruiting highly educated graduates: a study on the relationship between recruitment information sources, the theory of planned behavior, and actual job pursuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaidi, Y.; van Hooft, E.A.J.; Arends, L.R.

    2011-01-01

    Using the theory of planned behavior, we examined the effects of different recruitment-related information sources on the job pursuit of highly educated graduates. The study was conducted using a real-life longitudinal design. Participants reported on potential employers they were interested in. We

  7. An Exploratory Study of the Experiences of Recent Graduates Who Participated in the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Zaducka T. C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of recent graduates who participated in the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program at a medium-size southeastern university. This research used a phenomenological approach, as well as qualitative interviews, to provide a detailed and insightful description about…

  8. An Alternative Model to Determine the Financing Structure of PPP-Based Young Graduate Apartments in China : A Case Study of Hangzhou

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Y.; Peng, Y.; Qian, K.; Chan, A.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPP) can be employed to provide public rental housing for young graduates, which has been urgent to achieve social sustainability in China. However, few studies have been conducted to investigate the financing structure of PPPs, particularly the ratio of private

  9. Academic research training for a nonacademic workplace: a case study of graduate student alumni who work in conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Matthew J; Schwartz, Mark W

    2009-12-01

    Graduate education in conservation biology has been assailed as ineffective and inadequate to train the professionals needed to solve conservation problems. To identify how graduate education might better fit the needs of the conservation workplace, we surveyed practitioners and academics about the importance of particular skills on the job and the perceived importance of teaching those same skills in graduate school. All survey participants (n = 189) were alumni from the University of California Davis Graduate Group in Ecology and received thesis-based degrees from 1973 to 2008. Academic and practitioner respondents clearly differed in workplace skills, although there was considerably more agreement in training recommendations. On the basis of participant responses, skill sets particularly at risk of underemphasis in graduate programs are decision making and implementation of policy, whereas research skills may be overemphasized. Practitioners in different job positions, however, require a variety of skill sets, and we suggest that ever-increasing calls to broaden training to fit this multitude of jobs will lead to a trade-off in the teaching of other skills. Some skills, such as program management, may be best developed in on-the-job training or collaborative projects. We argue that the problem of graduate education in conservation will not be solved by restructuring academia alone. Conservation employers need to communicate their specific needs to educators, universities need to be more flexible with their opportunities, and students need to be better consumers of the skills offered by universities and other institutions.

  10. NDE in biomedical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, Aditya; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical Engineering (BME) is an interdisciplinary field, marking the conjunction of Medical and Engineering disciplines. It combines the design and problem solving skills of engineering with medical and biological sciences to advance health care treatment, including diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy

  11. Biomedical signal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M

    2015-01-01

    The book will help assist a reader in the development of techniques for analysis of biomedical signals and computer aided diagnoses with a pedagogical examination of basic and advanced topics accompanied by over 350 figures and illustrations. Wide range of filtering techniques presented to address various applications. 800 mathematical expressions and equations. Practical questions, problems and laboratory exercises. Includes fractals and chaos theory with biomedical applications.

  12. Barriers to publishing in biomedical journals perceived by a sample of French researchers: results of the DIAzePAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duracinsky, Martin; Lalanne, Christophe; Rous, Laurence; Dara, Aichata Fofana; Baudoin, Lesya; Pellet, Claire; Descamps, Alexandre; Péretz, Fabienne; Chassany, Olivier

    2017-07-10

    As publishing is essential but competitive for researchers, difficulties in writing and submitting medical articles to biomedical journals are disabling. The DIAzePAM (Difficultés des Auteurs à la Publication d'Articles Médicaux) survey aimed to assess the difficulties experienced by researchers in the AP-HP (Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, i.e., Paris Hospitals Board, France), the largest public health institution in Europe, when preparing articles for biomedical journals. The survey also aimed to assess researchers' satisfaction and perceived needs. A 39-item electronic questionnaire based on qualitative interviews was addressed by e-mail to all researchers registered in the AP-HP SIGAPS (Système d'Interrogation, de Gestion et d'Analyse des Publications Scientifiques) bibliometric database. Between 28 May and 15 June 2015, 7766 researchers should have received and read the e-mail, and 1191 anonymously completed the questionnaire (write (79%) or submit (27%), limited skills in English (40%) or in writing (32%), and difficulty in starting writing (35%). 87% of respondents would accept technical support, especially in English reediting (79%), critical reediting (63%), formatting (52%), and/or writing (41%), to save time (92%) and increase high-impact-factor journal submission and acceptance (75%). 79% of respondents would appreciate funding support for their future publications, for English reediting (56%), medical writing (21%), or publication (38%) fees. They considered that this funding support could be covered by AP-HP (73%) and/or by the added financial value obtained by their department from previous publications (56%). The DIAzePAM survey highlights difficulties experienced by researchers preparing articles for biomedical journals, and details room for improvement.

  13. Building on Successes: Reflections from Two Approaches to Study Abroad for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Sandra; McGaha, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This essay offers suggestions for faculty who are designing study abroad (SA) experiences by outlining a three-week Maymester study abroad to Reggio Emilia, Italy, and a semester-long study abroad to Brussels, Belgium. The authors reflect on commonalities in planning, recruiting, preparing students, and conducting each trip, as well as some of the…

  14. Book Study Blogs: Creating Self-Sustaining Online Learning Communities for Graduate Students of Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonehouse, Pauline P.; Splichal, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative online learning has been adopted at all levels of education, in PK-12 public schools and universities, yet studies find student responses to the experience somewhat unpredictable. In this study, the authors draw on the practice of incorporating book study blogs at the University of North Dakota to engage doctoral students in a…

  15. Perspectives and Plans for Graduate Studies. 11, Engineering 1974-75; F. Civil Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Council on Graduate Studies, Toronto. Advisory Committee on Academic Planning.

    A series of studies carried out by the Advisory Committee on Academic Planning (ACAP) published by the Council of Ontario Universities (COU) dealt with a planning study of doctoral work in engineering that was conducted in several parts corresponding to the various disciplines within engineering. This document, which is one part of that study,…

  16. Cross-sectional study to examine evidence-based practice skills and behaviors of physical therapy graduates: is there a knowledge-to-practice gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Patricia J; Norton, Amy V; Darrah, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Curricula changes in physical therapist education programs in Canada emphasize evidence-based practice skills, including literature retrieval and evaluation. Do graduates use these skills in practice? The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of research information in the clinical decision making of therapists with different years of experience and evidence-based practice preparation. Perceptions about evidence-based practice were explored qualitatively. A cross-sectional study with 4 graduating cohorts was conducted. Eighty physical therapists representing 4 different graduating cohorts participated in interviews focused on 2 clinical scenarios. Participants had varying years of clinical experience (range=1-15 years) and academic knowledge of evidence-based practice skills. Therapists discussed the effectiveness of interventions related to the scenarios and identified the sources of information used to reach decisions. Participants also answered general questions related to evidence-based practice knowledge. Recent graduates demonstrated better knowledge of evidence-based practice skills compared with therapists with 6 to 15 years of clinical experience. However, all groups used clinical experience most frequently as their source of information for clinical decisions. Research evidence was infrequently included in decision making. This study used a convenience sample of therapists who agreed to volunteer for the study. The results suggest a knowledge-to-practice gap; graduates are not using the new skills to inform their practice. Tailoring academic evidence-based activities more to the time constraints of clinical practice may help students to be more successful in applying evidence in practice. Academic programs need to do more to create and nurture environments in both academic and clinical settings to ensure students practice using evidence-based practice skills across settings. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  17. Transition into the workplace: comparing health graduates' and organisational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Arlene; Costa, Beth M

    2017-02-01

    Health graduates face personal and work-related stressors during the graduate year. The extent to which employers and health graduates have a shared understanding of graduate stressors is unclear but may impact graduate support and transition into the health profession. Aim and design: The aim of this exploratory qualitative study was to identify factors that impact health graduates' transition and integration into the workplace, comparing the perspectives of health graduates and organisational representatives. Individual and small group semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 medical and 26 nursing graduates and five organisational representatives from a regional health organisation in Victoria, Australia. A thematic analysis was undertaken on the data. Five main categories were identified: dealing with change, dealing with conflict, workload, taking responsibility and factors that influence performance. Similarities and differences in the perspectives of health graduates and organisational representatives were identified. These findings have implications for current graduate support programs.

  18. Teaching Religion in Indonesia: A Report on Graduate Studies in Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bret

    2012-01-01

    Established in 2000-2001, the Center for Religious and Cross-cultural Studies (CRCS) is the only master's level religious studies program at a non-religiously affiliated university in Indonesia. In many respects, the program is experimental, operating within the dynamic political and religious environment of the Muslim world's youngest and largest…

  19. A Study of Post-Graduate Plans of Arizona High School Seniors. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; And Others

    A study undertaken in Arizona in 1975 was comprised of two parts, a pilot study and a comprehensive survey of high school students. It had as an overall objective to provide a data resource useful to all citizens and postsecondary institutions, to manpower and employment agencies, and to the state's high schools for program planning and…

  20. Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar citation rates: a case study of medical physics and biomedical engineering: what gets cited and what doesn't?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    There are often differences in a publication's citation count, depending on the database accessed. Here, aspects of citation counts for medical physics and biomedical engineering papers are studied using papers published in the journal Australasian physical and engineering sciences in medicine. Comparison is made between the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Papers are categorised into subject matter, and citation trends are examined. It is shown that review papers as a group tend to receive more citations on average; however the highest cited individual papers are more likely to be research papers.

  1. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP)

    OpenAIRE

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava; Manoj ansal; Neeraj Gour; Pooja Chaduary; Pankaj Kumar Jain; Mahendra Chouksey; Pawan pathak

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: The pr...

  2. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP)

    OpenAIRE

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava; Manoj ansal; Neeraj Gour; Pooja Chaduary; Pankaj Kumar Jain; Mahendra Chouksey; Pawan pathak

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: Th...

  3. Therapists' and patients' stress responses during graduated versus flooding in vivo exposure in the treatment of specific phobia: A preliminary observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Sarah; Miller, Robert; Fehm, Lydia; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Fydrich, Thomas; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-12-15

    Exposure therapy is considered an effective treatment strategy for phobic anxiety, however, it is rarely applied in clinical practice. The under-usage might be due to various factors of which heightened stress levels not only in patients but also in therapists are presumed to be of particular relevance. The present study aimed to investigate whether different forms of exposure might lead to varying physiological and psychological stress responses in therapists and phobic patients. 25 patients with specific phobia underwent individual cognitive behavioural therapy, performed by 25 psychotherapist trainees, applying exposure sessions in graduated form or the flooding technique. Patients and therapists provided subjective evaluations of stress and five saliva samples for analysis of salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase either during two graduated exposure sessions or during one flooding session, while a regular therapy session served as control condition. Therapists displayed heightened salivary alpha-amylase release during exposure of the flooding, but not the graduated, type. Patients showed elevated salivary cortisol during flooding exposure numerically, however, not on a statistically significant level. Therapists reported more pronounced subjective stress during flooding compared to graduated exposure. Elevated stress levels should be addressed in clinical training in order to improve application of exposure in routine practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Are graduated intensivists prepared for practice? : A case study from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ids S.; Brand, Paul L. P.; Pols, Jan; Delwig, Hans; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; Tulleken, Jaap E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: An evaluation of the alignment between intensive care medicine (ICM) training and practice provides valuable information for the development of ICM training. Therefore this study examines how well recently licensed intensivists feel prepared for practice and whether intensivists from

  5. An empirical study of economists and the new graduate and postgraduate economics’ degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Marín Hernández

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work gives the results from surveying a sample of Spanish economists who gave their opinions about the skills and abilities they had acquired during their university studies. The results showed that the more valued university studies included learning based on cases and concrete problems, direct acquisition of experience, learning from computer studies and understanding theories and concepts. The least valued undergraduate studies included aspects such as emphasis on research, the opportunity to participate in projects or giving academic advice. Those being surveyed stated that they regarded knowledge acquired in accountancy, finance, law, marketing, strategy, human resources, mathematics, microeconomics, operation management, Spanish or world economics and statistics as being extremely or very important for obtaining their degree and in their work after university.

  6. The future of the pharmaceutical sciences and graduate education: recommendations from the AACP Graduate Education Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Pong, Susanna; Gobburu, Jogarao; O'Barr, Stephen; Shah, Kumar; Huber, Jason; Weiner, Daniel

    2013-05-13

    Despite pharma's recent sea change in approach to drug discovery and development, U.S. pharmaceutical sciences graduate programs are currently maintaining traditional methods for master's and doctoral student education. The literature on graduate education in the biomedical sciences has long been advocating educating students to hone soft skills like communication and teamwork, in addition to maintaining excellent basic skills in research. However, recommendations to date have not taken into account the future trends in the pharmaceutical industry. The AACP Graduate Education Special Interest Group has completed a literature survey of the trends in the pharmaceutical industry and graduate education in order to determine whether our graduate programs are strategically positioned to prepare our graduates for successful careers in the next few decades. We recommend that our pharmaceutical sciences graduate programs take a proactive leadership role in meeting the needs of our future graduates and employers. Our graduate programs should bring to education the innovation and collaboration that our industry also requires to be successful and relevant in this century.

  7. Figure mining for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Iossifov, Ivan

    2009-08-15

    Figures from biomedical articles contain valuable information difficult to reach without specialized tools. Currently, there is no search engine that can retrieve specific figure types. This study describes a retrieval method that takes advantage of principles in image understanding, text mining and optical character recognition (OCR) to retrieve figure types defined conceptually. A search engine was developed to retrieve tables and figure types to aid computational and experimental research. http://iossifovlab.cshl.edu/figurome/.

  8. Patient safety and technology-driven medication - A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia; Lefevre, Rikke S; Møller, Tom

    2015-05-01

    The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the systematic horizontal phenomenological-hermeneutic template methodology. The interviews uncovered that understanding the technologies; professionalism and patient safety are three crucial elements in the medication process. The students expressed positivity and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. Having an unclear nursing role model for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient adherence to the medication process, still remains to be studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Specialization training in Malawi: a qualitative study on the perspectives of medical students graduating from the University of Malawi College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Parekh, Natasha; Muula, Adamson S; Bui, Thuy

    2014-01-06

    There is a critical shortage of healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa, and Malawi has one of the lowest physician densities in the region. One of the reasons for this shortage is inadequate retention of medical school graduates, partly due to the desire for specialization training. The University of Malawi College of Medicine has developed specialty training programs, but medical school graduates continue to report a desire to leave the country for specialization training. To understand this desire, we studied medical students' perspectives on specialization training in Malawi. We conducted semi-structured interviews of medical students in the final year of their degree program. We developed an interview guide through an iterative process, and recorded and transcribed all interviews for analysis. Two independent coders coded the manuscripts and assessed inter-coder reliability, and the authors used an "editing approach" to qualitative analysis to identify and categorize themes relating to the research aim. The University of Pittsburgh Institutional Review Board and the University of Malawi College of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee approved this study and authors obtained written informed consent from all participants. We interviewed 21 medical students. All students reported a desire for specialization training, with 12 (57%) students interested in specialties not currently offered in Malawi. Students discussed reasons for pursuing specialization training, impressions of specialization training in Malawi, reasons for staying or leaving Malawi to pursue specialization training and recommendations to improve training. Graduating medical students in Malawi have mixed views of specialization training in their own country and still desire to leave Malawi to pursue further training. Training institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to understand the needs of the country's healthcare workforce and the needs of their graduating medical students to be able to

  10. Perceptions of UK medical graduates' preparedness for practice: a multi-centre qualitative study reflecting the importance of learning on the job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illing, Jan C; Morrow, Gill M; Rothwell nee Kergon, Charlotte R; Burford, Bryan C; Baldauf, Beate K; Davies, Carol L; Peile, Ed B; Spencer, John A; Johnson, Neil; Allen, Maggie; Morrison, Jill

    2013-02-28

    There is evidence that graduates of different medical schools vary in their preparedness for their first post. In 2003 Goldacre et al. reported that over 40% of UK medical graduates did not feel prepared and found large differences between graduates of different schools. A follow-up survey showed that levels of preparedness had increased yet there was still wide variation. This study aimed to examine whether medical graduates from three diverse UK medical schools were prepared for practice. This was a qualitative study using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Prospective and cross-sectional data were collected from the three medical schools.A sample of 60 medical graduates (20 from each school) was targeted. They were interviewed three times: at the end of medical school (n = 65) and after four (n = 55) and 12 months (n = 46) as a Year 1 Foundation Programme doctor. Triangulated data were collected from clinicians via interviews across the three sites (n = 92). In addition three focus groups were conducted with senior clinicians who assess learning portfolios. The focus was on identifying areas of preparedness for practice and any areas of lack of preparedness. Although selected for being diverse, we did not find substantial differences between the schools. The same themes were identified at each site. Junior doctors felt prepared in terms of communication skills, clinical and practical skills and team working. They felt less prepared for areas of practice that are based on experiential learning in clinical practice: ward work, being on call, management of acute clinical situations, prescribing, clinical prioritisation and time management and dealing with paperwork. Our data highlighted the importance of students learning on the job, having a role in the team in supervised practice to enable them to learn about the duties and responsibilities of a new doctor in advance of starting work.

  11. Changes in Transferable Knowledge Resulting from Study in a Graduate Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareiss, Ray; Sedano, Todd; Katz, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a study of the evolution of students' knowledge of software engineering from the beginning to the end of a master's degree curriculum in software engineering. Students were presented with a problem involving the initiation of a complex new project at the beginning of the program and again at the end of…

  12. The Hazard of Graduation: Analysis of Three Multivariate Statistics Used to Study Multi-Institutional Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlberg, Jessica Marie

    2013-01-01

    Adelman (2006) observed that a large quantity of research on retention is "institution-specific or use institutional characteristics as independent variables" (p. 81). However, he observed that over 60% of the students he studied attended multiple institutions making the calculation of institutional effects highly problematic. He argued…

  13. Cumulative Advantage in the Skill Development of STEM Graduate Students: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldon, David F.; Maher, Michelle A.; Roksa, Josipa; Peugh, James

    2016-01-01

    Studies of skill development often describe a process of cumulative advantage, in which small differences in initial skill compound over time, leading to increasing skill gaps between those with an initial advantage and those without. We offer evidence of a similar phenomenon accounting for differential patterns of research skill development in…

  14. Designing Graduate-Level Plant Breeding Curriculum: A Delphi Study of Private Sector Stakeholder Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jane K.; Repinski, Shelby L.; Hayes, Kathryn N.; Bliss, Frederick A.; Trexler, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    A broad-based survey using the Delphi method was conducted to garner current information from private sector stakeholders and build consensus opinions supporting key ideas for enhancing plant breeder education and training. This study asked respondents to suggest and rate topics and content they deemed most important to plant breeding graduate…

  15. A Study of Teaching Methods in Entrepreneurship Education for Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasti, Zahra; Falavarjani, Mansoreh Kiani; Imanipour, Narges

    2012-01-01

    As stated in numerous studies, entrepreneurship education is becoming more and more important everywhere in the world and research in entrepreneurship are growing and getting legitimacy in the scientific communities, however a few scholars have focused on the subfield of entrepreneurship education. Although the key to a successful entrepreneurship…

  16. Barriers to publishing in biomedical journals perceived by a sample of French researchers: results of the DIAzePAM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Duracinsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As publishing is essential but competitive for researchers, difficulties in writing and submitting medical articles to biomedical journals are disabling. The DIAzePAM (Difficultés des Auteurs à la Publication d’Articles Médicaux survey aimed to assess the difficulties experienced by researchers in the AP-HP (Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, i.e., Paris Hospitals Board, France, the largest public health institution in Europe, when preparing articles for biomedical journals. The survey also aimed to assess researchers’ satisfaction and perceived needs. Methods A 39-item electronic questionnaire based on qualitative interviews was addressed by e-mail to all researchers registered in the AP-HP SIGAPS (Système d’Interrogation, de Gestion et d’Analyse des Publications Scientifiques bibliometric database. Results Between 28 May and 15 June 2015, 7766 researchers should have received and read the e-mail, and 1191 anonymously completed the questionnaire (<45 years of age: 63%; women: 55%; physician: 81%; with PhD or Habilitation à Diriger des recherches––accreditation to direct research––: 45%. 94% of respondents had published at least one article in the previous 2 years. 76% of respondents felt they were not publishing enough, mainly because of lack of time to write (79% or submit (27%, limited skills in English (40% or in writing (32%, and difficulty in starting writing (35%. 87% of respondents would accept technical support, especially in English reediting (79%, critical reediting (63%, formatting (52%, and/or writing (41%, to save time (92% and increase high-impact-factor journal submission and acceptance (75%. 79% of respondents would appreciate funding support for their future publications, for English reediting (56%, medical writing (21%, or publication (38% fees. They considered that this funding support could be covered by AP-HP (73% and/or by the added financial value obtained by their

  17. Outcomes assessment of science & engineering doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) programs: An exploratory study of prospective influencers in distinguished graduate placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Louise M.

    This exploratory study was an investigation of the mission and emphases of twenty-two science & engineering doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) programs in ten fields of study at nine public research universities in the United States and the corresponding influence those factors impose on placement of Ph.D. graduates of those programs into academic program settings. Ph.D. program chairs participated via protocol to provide descriptive, statistical, and experiential details of their Ph.D. programs and offered insight on current conditions for academic placement opportunities. The quantitative analysis served as the basis of examination of influencers in graduate placement for those Ph.D. programs that are informed about placement activity of their graduates. Among the nine tested hypotheses there were no statistically significant findings. The qualitative expressions of this study---those found in the confounding variables, the limitations of the study, those questions that elicited opinions and further discussion and follow-up queries with program chairs---added most meaningfully, however, to the study in that they served as a gauge of the implications of neglect for those Ph.D. programs that remain uninformed about their graduate placement activity. Central to the findings of this study was that one compelling fact remains the same. Denecke, Director of Best Practice at the Council of Graduate Schools, pointed out years ago that just as "we know very little about why those who finish and why those who leave do so, we also know surprisingly little about where students go after their degrees...we therefore have little information about how effective doctoral programs are in preparing doctorates for short- and long-term career success." The fact remains that the effectiveness of doctoral programs in the context of career success is just as uncertain today. A serious admonition is that one-half of those programs that participated in this study remain uninformed about the

  18. Building the biomedical data science workforce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C Dunn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH from 2013 to 2016 to train a national workforce in biomedical data science. We provide an analysis of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K training program strengths and weaknesses with an eye toward future directions aimed at any funder and potential funding recipient worldwide. The focus is on extramurally funded programs that have a national or international impact rather than the training of NIH staff, which was addressed by the NIH's internal Data Science Workforce Development Center. From its inception, the major goal of BD2K was to narrow the gap between needed and existing biomedical data science skills. As biomedical research increasingly relies on computational, mathematical, and statistical thinking, supporting the training and education of the workforce of tomorrow requires new emphases on analytical skills. From 2013 to 2016, BD2K jump-started training in this area for all levels, from graduate students to senior researchers.

  19. On the 40th anniversary of the Post graduate studies faculty of state establishment "Dnipropetrovsk Medical Academy of Health Ministry of Ukraine"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snysar V.I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 post graduate studies faculty of SE "Dnipropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Health Ministry of Ukraine" celebrates the 40th anniversary. By Decree of the Council of Ministers of USSR and Ministry of Health of USSR № 124 from March 24, 1973 (rector’s order № 38 from 30.03.1973. Doctors’ advanced training faculty was founded on the basis of Dnipropetrovsk Medical Institute of Order of the Red Banner of Labor. For the first time in the Soviet Union it was situated at a distance of 150 km from the main base in the city of Krivoy Rog. Four departments in the main branches: therapy, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology were opened and began successful work. Further, the departments of clinical laboratory diagnostics (1974, traumatology and orthopedics (1975, three departments of stomatology (1976 were organized. Starting from 1979 the departments of Doctors’ advanced training faculty have been organized on the basis of Dnipropetrovsk medical institutions of. The Department of gastroenterology was established in 1979, the department of obstetrics, gynecology and perinatology was founded in 1989, the department of psychiatry - in 1986. The department of medical and social expertise of the Post graduate studies faculty was opened in 1979 by the initiative of the Rector of Dnipropetrovsk Medical Institute Prof. I.I. Krizhanovskaya. Since 1997 one of the departments of therapy has moved to the Post graduate studies faculty and was named "department of therapy of interns and family medicine". In 2005 it was renamed to the department of family medicine. In 1983 the qualification upgrading courses of health care managers were reformed in the department of social hygiene and public health organization of the Post graduate studies faculty. The department of anesthesiology, intensive care and emergency states of the Post graduate studies Faculty separated from the department of anesthesiology and intensive Care in 1986. The department

  20. Study on pivot-point vibration of molecular bond-rupture events by quartz crystal microbalance for biomedical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yong J; Jia, Renjie

    2012-01-01

    Bond-rupture scanning for biomedical diagnostics is examined using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) experiments and microparticle mechanics modeling calculations. Specific and nonspecific interactions between a microparticle and its binding QCM surface can be distinguished by gradually increasing the amplitude of driving voltage applied to QCM and monitoring its frequency changes. This research proposes a mechanical model of interactions between biological molecules and a QCM substrate surface. The mechanical force required to break a biotin-streptavidin bond was calculated through a one-pivot-point bottom-up vibration model. The bond-rupture force increases with an increase of the microparticle radius, the QCM resonant frequency, and the amplitude of driving voltage applied to the QCM. The significance of the research on biological molecular bond rupture is extremely important in characterizing microbial (such as cells and virus) specificity, due to the force magnitude needed to break bonds using a transducer.

  1. Applications of isotopes. [Need and cost of stable iotopes for use as tracers in biomedical and environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby-Smith, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Current and potential applications of stable isotopes as tracers in a number of biomedical and environmental areas are discussed. It is pointed out that a wide variety of problems exist in these fields whose solutions in principle are amenable to the isotopic approach. The number and diversity of these problems as well as the unique role stable isotopes can play in their solution illustrate the importance of achieving and maintaining a broad inventory of isotopic species. Experience has demonstrated unequivocally an additional overriding requirement for widespread exploration of stable isotopes by the scientific and technical community, i.e., the need for low cost availability of the materials in quantity. Some representative applications of /sup 12/C, /sup 13/C, /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 16/O, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O are discussed.

  2. [Role transition and working adaption in new nursing graduates: a qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsueh-Hua; Liu, Pei-Fen; Hu, Hsiao-Chen; Huang, Su-Fei; Chen, Hsiao-Lien

    2010-12-01

    The role transition process is full of stresses and challenges for nurses. Between 35-61% nurses leave their job within the first year. Past cross-sectional quantitative studies have not provided deep descriptions of either the dynamic role transition or work adaption processes of new nurses. The purpose of this study was to understand the role transition experience of new nurses as they transitioned into clinical practice during their first three months on the job. A qualitative approach was used. Data were collected through a semi-structured interview from 50 new nurses. Data were analyzed using category-content analysis. Three stages were identified in the new nurse work adaption process over the first three-month period. These included (1) Understanding: New nurse knowledge and skills are insufficient to handle routine work, adapting to the role transition is difficult, feelings of anxiety emerge related to fears of incompetence, communication difficulties must be faced in the handover process, new nurses adopt feelings of attachment to their preceptors, they must work to adopt appropriate attitudes and approaches to nursing practice, and support is sought from family, teachers and friends; (2) Acclimation: Learning to care for patients independently, seeking role models, learning to adapt to night shifts, trying to identify with co-workers, and seeking support from colleagues, preceptors and head nurses; (3) Acceptance: Managing nursing work better in terms of time and organization, feeling gradual acceptance from co-workers, restoring personal enthusiasm for work, starting to consider other, non-work related matters, experiencing and appreciating the support of co-workers and head nurses. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATION: New nurses face a critical role transition process through their first three months on the job. Guidance and leadership from experienced nurses and multiple support systems can assist new nurses to acclimate to their role. Research results provide

  3. The Study of Philosophy in Innovative Power Engineering Post-graduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, J. V.

    2017-11-01

    Training of highly qualified personnel for the innovative high-tech fields of power engineering is one of the most important tasks of modern education. A number of special features of modern power engineering necessitate not only a highly specialized training but a wider approach in teaching postgraduate students of this field. These special features include a high degree of integration of science, industry, economic and social spheres, and the breadth of interdisciplinary connections in high-tech industries. The postgraduate philosophical training plays an important role in the educational process. The breadth of the problem field and the universality of philosophical knowledge reveal the methods and mechanisms of integration of such sub-disciplines that have significant methodological and structural differences: science, logical-mathematical, socio-economic, technological and human knowledge. Appeal to the philosophy at the stage of postgraduate training has a number of reasons. First of all, it is aimed at integrating of the specific content of different areas of knowledge into a holistic worldview. Secondly, it contributes in developing a critical attitude towards reality and science. What is more, the study of philosophy helps young researches to acquire the definition of their ideological position.

  4. Timely Post-Graduate Degree Completion: A Case Study of Jamshoro Education City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagul Huma Lashari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies the status of postgraduate students at the master degree level regarding their degree completion in the three public sector universities at Jamshoro Education City. The status is identified by analyzing enrolment of the postgraduate and comparing it with rate of their degree completion. In addition, the paper also discusses their characteristics which lead them towards the degree completion. For this paper, enrolment of the postgraduate students at the master level is compared with the degree completion rate of 2008 academic session only. The result shows the obvious difference between enrolment and rate of the degree completion. In total 417 postgraduate students were enrolled in 2008 session, however, only 60 (14% of students have completed their postgraduate degrees. Those who have completed their degrees, with respect to universities 6% students belong to US (University of Sindh, 22% belong to MUET (Mehran University of Engineering & Technology and 8% students belong to LUMHS (Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences. The demographical data of the postgraduate students has also shown some variations like gender, age, employment, and financial resources. In addition, the research requirements also vary for different postgraduate students. The research requirements include lab based, field based and library based resources. The characteristics of the postgraduate students of three public sector universities including financial resources, employment status, and working organization also show differences with each-other in terms of the degree completion.

  5. Handbook of photonics for biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Donghyun; Somekh, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Nanophotonics has emerged rapidly into technological mainstream with the advent and maturity of nanotechnology available in photonics and enabled many new exciting applications in the area of biomedical science and engineering that were unimagined even a few years ago with conventional photonic engineering techniques. Handbook of Nanophotonics in Biomedical Engineering is intended to be a reliable resource to a wealth of information on nanophotonics that can inspire readers by detailing emerging and established possibilities of nanophotonics in biomedical science and engineering applications. This comprehensive reference presents not only the basics of nanophotonics but also explores recent experimental and clinical methods used in biomedical and bioengineering research. Each peer-reviewed chapter of this book discusses fundamental aspects and materials/fabrication issues of nanophotonics, as well as applications in interfaces, cell, tissue, animal studies, and clinical engineering. The organization provides ...

  6. Pilot Study of iPad Incorporation Into Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Mark J; Crandley, Edwin F; Rumph, Jake S; Kirk, Susan E; Dunlap, Neal E; Rahimi, Asal S; Turner, A Benton; Larner, James M; Read, Paul W

    2013-03-01

    Increased documentation and charting requirements are challenging for residents, given duty hour limits. Use of mobile electronic devices may help residents complete these tasks efficiently. To collect initial data on usage rates, information technology (IT) support requirements, and resident use of iPads during training. In this pilot study, we provided 12 residents/fellows from various specialties at the University of Virginia with an iPad with IT support. The system used a virtual private network with access to the institution's electronic health record. Participants were allowed to develop their own methods and systems for personalized iPad use, and after 9 months they provided data on the utility of the iPad. Feedback from the IT team also was obtained. Average iPad use was 2.1 h/d (range, 0.5-6 h/d). The average self-reported reduction in administrative work due to the iPad was 2.7 h/wk (range, 0-9 h/wk). A total of 75% (9 of 12) of the users would recommend universal adoption among residents and fellows. More than 90% (11 of 12) of users reported the iPad would improve communication for coordination of care. A total of 68% (8 of 12) of users reported that an iPad facilitated their activities as educators of medical students and junior residents. Residents cited slow data entry into the electronic health record and hospital areas lacking Wi-Fi connectivity as potential drawbacks to iPad use. The IT team reported minimal support time for device setup, maintenance, and upgrades, and limited security risks. The iPad may contribute to increased clinical efficiency, reduced hours spent on administrative tasks, and enhanced educational opportunities for residents, with minimal IT support.

  7. The relationship of high school graduation exams to graduation rates and SAT scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Marchant

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the effect of high school graduation exams on states' graduation rates, states' aggregated SAT scores, and individual students' SAT scores. Three data sources were used: One source identified states requiring a standardized test for graduation; the NCES provided state aggregated data on graduation rates for the class of 2002; and the College Board provided its 2001 SAT database for all test-takers. After controlling for students' demographic characteristics (e.g., race, family education and income, GPA and class rank, regression analyses revealed that states requiring graduation exams had lower graduation rates and lower SAT scores. Individually, students from states requiring a graduation exam performed more poorly on the SAT than did students from states not requiring an exam. The impact of high stakes tests' on students' motivation to stay in school and on the teaching of critical thinking skills (tested by the SAT are discussed.

  8. INTRODUCTION: GRADUATE STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laverne Jacobs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice is proud to publish issue 32 (1. This issue features a special section highlighting the scholarship of graduate students. While it is always a pleasure to read promising work by newer scholars in the fields of law and social justice, we are certain that this collection of articles represents some of the finest and thought-provoking scholarship stemming from current graduate students in law. The articles stem from a graduate student essay contest that WYAJ held in 2013 and for which we received many submissions. The collection of selected papers offers a view of legal and interdisciplinary research examining issues that are topically diverse but which are all of deep, long-term importance to the world of access to justice. A reader of the special section on Graduate Student Scholarship will find explorations of access to justice from the perspectives of equality rights, discretion, adjudication and methods of legal service delivery, to name a few. A prize was offered to two papers judged to be of exceptional quality. I am very pleased to announce that the winners of those two prizes are Andrew Pilliar, for his article “Exploring a Law Firm Business Model to Improve Access to Justice” and Blair A. Major, for his contribution, “Religion and Law in R v NS: Finding Space to Re-think the Balancing Analysis”. The Editorial Board thanks all those who submitted papers to the contest and to this final special issue of the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice. Another notable feature of this issue is the introduction of a section called Research Notes. The Yearbook will periodically publish peer-reviewed research notes that present the findings of empirical (quantitative, qualitative or mixed method research studies. This section aims to contribute to the growing and important body of empirical scholarship within the realm of access to justice socio-legal research. We hope that you enjoy

  9. Superhydrophobic Materials for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are actively studied across a wide range of applications and industries, and are now finding increased use in the biomedical arena as substrates to control protein adsorption, cellular interaction, and bacterial growth, as well as platforms for drug delivery devices and for diagnostic tools. The commonality in the design of these materials is to create a stable or metastable air state at the material surface, which lends itself to a number of unique properties. These activities are catalyzing the development of new materials, applications, and fabrication techniques, as well as collaborations across material science, chemistry, engineering, and medicine given the interdisciplinary nature of this work. The review begins with a discussion of superhydrophobicity, and then explores biomedical applications that are utilizing superhydrophobicity in depth including material selection characteristics, in vitro performance, and in vivo performance. General trends are offered for each application in addition to discussion of conflicting data in the literature, and the review concludes with the authors’ future perspectives on the utility of superhydrophobic surfaces for biomedical applications. PMID:27449946

  10. Permission to park: A statewide study of high school parking permits to determine compliance with graduated driver licensing law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apanovitch, Audrey; Champany, Victoria; Wilson, Meghan; Emam, Hadeer; Ruiz, Kelly; Borrup, Kevin; Lapidus, Garry

    2015-09-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of fatality among teens in the United States. Beginning in the 1990s, many states enacted graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems to delay full licensure while allowing beginners to obtain experience under lower-risk conditions. Many high schools require parent and guardians of newly licensed teen drivers to complete a student parking pass application (PPA) for their son/daughter to drive, park, and transport themselves to and from school activities. The objective of this study was to describe the content of these PPAs for compliance with Connecticut's GDL law. PPAs were requested via e-mail, fax, or telephone from all Connecticut's high schools (n = 233). PPA variables included school demographics, parking rules, prohibitions and sanctions for violations, as well as reference to GDL law. Seventy-four schools were excluded because students were not allowed to park and schools did not require PPAs or declined to send us a copy of their PPAs. Of the remaining 159 schools, 122 (76.7%) sent us their PPAs. Responding schools were more likely to be suburban or rural. Most PPAs included a section on prohibitions and sanctions for driving misbehavior. Forty-three percent prohibited students from going to car during school hours, and 34% prohibited driving off campus/parking lot. Seventy percent warned of consequences for dangerous driving in parking lot, and 88% included the possibility of revocation for infractions. Only 14% had any reference to Connecticut's GDL law on their PPAs. A small percentage of Connecticut high schools include information about GDL laws on their PPAs. All states should examine their PPA content and adopt a uniform high school PPA that includes key provisions of their state's GDL laws in an effort to promote teen driving safety. Therapeutic study, level V.

  11. Are recent graduates enough prepared to perform obstetric skills in their rural and compulsory year? A study from Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez del Hierro, Galo; Remmen, Roy; Verhoeven, Veronique; Van Royen, Paul; Hendrickx, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the possible mismatch of obstetrical skills between the training offered in Ecuadorian medical schools and the tasks required for compulsory rural service. Setting Primary care, rural health centres in Southern Ecuador. Participants A total of 92 recent graduated medical doctors during their compulsory rural year. Primary and secondary outcomes measures A web-based survey was developed with 21 obstetrical skills. The questionnaire was sent to all rural doctors who work in Loja province, Southern Ecuador, at the Ministry of Health (n=92). We measured two categories ‘importance of skills in rural practice’ with a five-point Likert-type scale (1= strongly disagree; 5= strongly agree); and ‘clerkship experience’ using a nominal scale divided in five levels: level 1 (not seen, not performed) to level 5 (performed 10 times or more). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) was used to observe associations. Results A negative correlation was found in the skills: ‘episiotomy and repair’, ‘umbilical vein catheterisation’, ‘speculum examination’, ‘evaluation of cervical dilation during active labour’, ‘neonatal resuscitation’ and ‘vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery’. For instance ‘Episiotomy and repair’ is important (strongly agree and agree) to 100% of respondents, but in practice, only 38.9% of rural doctors performed the task three times and 8.3% only once during the internship, similar pattern is seen in the others. Conclusions In this study we have noted the gap between the medical needs of populations in rural areas and training provided during the clerkship experiences of physicians during their rural service year. It is imperative to ensure that rural doctors are appropriately trained and skilled in the performance of routine obstetrical duties. This will help to decrease perinatal morbidity and mortality in rural Ecuador. PMID:25082424

  12. Are recent graduates enough prepared to perform obstetric skills in their rural and compulsory year? A study from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Del Hierro, Galo; Remmen, Roy; Verhoeven, Veronique; Van Royen, Paul; Hendrickx, Kristin

    2014-07-31

    The aim of this study was to assess the possible mismatch of obstetrical skills between the training offered in Ecuadorian medical schools and the tasks required for compulsory rural service. Primary care, rural health centres in Southern Ecuador. A total of 92 recent graduated medical doctors during their compulsory rural year. A web-based survey was developed with 21 obstetrical skills. The questionnaire was sent to all rural doctors who work in Loja province, Southern Ecuador, at the Ministry of Health (n=92). 'importance of skills in rural practice' with a five-point Likert-type scale (1= strongly disagree; 5= strongly agree); and 'clerkship experience' using a nominal scale divided in five levels: level 1 (not seen, not performed) to level 5 (performed 10 times or more). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) was used to observe associations. A negative correlation was found in the skills: 'episiotomy and repair', 'umbilical vein catheterisation', 'speculum examination', 'evaluation of cervical dilation during active labour', 'neonatal resuscitation' and 'vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery'. For instance 'Episiotomy and repair' is important (strongly agree and agree) to 100% of respondents, but in practice, only 38.9% of rural doctors performed the task three times and 8.3% only once during the internship, similar pattern is seen in the others. In this study we have noted the gap between the medical needs of populations in rural areas and training provided during the clerkship experiences of physicians during their rural service year. It is imperative to ensure that rural doctors are appropriately trained and skilled in the performance of routine obstetrical duties. This will help to decrease perinatal morbidity and mortality in rural Ecuador. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 6, is a collection of papers that discusses the role of integrated electronics in medical systems and the usage of biological mathematical models in biological systems. Other papers deal with the health care systems, the problems and methods of approach toward rehabilitation, as well as the future of biomedical engineering. One paper discusses the use of system identification as it applies to biological systems to estimate the values of a number of parameters (for example, resistance, diffusion coefficients) by indirect means. More particularly, the i

  14. Biomedical enhancements as justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeesoo

    2015-02-01

    Biomedical enhancements, the applications of medical technology to make better those who are neither ill nor deficient, have made great strides in the past few decades. Using Amartya Sen's capability approach as my framework, I argue in this article that far from being simply permissible, we have a prima facie moral obligation to use these new developments for the end goal of promoting social justice. In terms of both range and magnitude, the use of biomedical enhancements will mark a radical advance in how we compensate the most disadvantaged members of society. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 5, is a collection of papers that deals with application of the principles and practices of engineering to basic and applied biomedical research, development, and the delivery of health care. The papers also describe breakthroughs in health improvements, as well as basic research that have been accomplished through clinical applications. One paper examines engineering principles and practices that can be applied in developing therapeutic systems by a controlled delivery system in drug dosage. Another paper examines the physiological and materials vari

  16. Graduate Study for the Twenty-First Century: How to Build an Academic Career in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Gregory Colon

    2005-01-01

    Many graduate students continue to be regarded as "apprentices" despite the fact that they are expected to design and teach their own classes, serve on university committees, and conference and publish regularly. "The Chronicle of Higher Education" reports that the attrition rate for American Ph.D. programs is at an all-time high, between 40% and…

  17. What Are the Capabilities of Graduates Who Study Outdoor Education in Australian Universities? The Case for a Threshold Concepts Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, Scott; Thomas, Glyn J.

    2017-01-01

    Research has indicated that some stakeholders in the Australian outdoor education profession are uncertain about the capabilities of students graduating from university outdoor education programmes. Unfortunately, there is currently no formal or informal agreement amongst university programmes regarding the knowledge, skills, and experience that…

  18. Open and Distance Education Systems: Do They Enhance Graduates' Soft Skills? The Results from 2009 Universitas Terbuka Tracer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnaningsih, Dewi Juliah

    2013-01-01

    The vision and mission of Universitas Terbuka (UT) is to become a highly qualified open and distance education institution and to provide higher education access to all communities. Graduates of UT are expected to acquire adequate knowledge, hard skills and soft skills. Soft skills play important roles in the world of work. The aim of this article…

  19. Strengthening the Relationship between Undergraduate Professional Preparation Programs in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism and Graduate Leisure Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Daniel; Browne, Laurie; Bricker, Kelly; Schwab, Keri

    2011-01-01

    This article stems from a conversation among academic leaders of graduate-oriented departments of parks, recreation, and tourism across North America who participated in an administrator summit at Zion Ponderosa Resort in southern Utah September 23-26, 2010. The University of Utah's Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism hosted the summit,…

  20. Report on the AATF National Survey of Graduate Studies in French/Francophone Culture and Civilization (FFCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Alain-Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Presents the results of a survey of the teaching of French/Francophone Culture and Civilization (FFCC) in French graduate programs in the United States. The survey was commissioned by the American Association of Teachers of French Commission on Cultural Competence. (Author/VWL)

  1. Explaining the Relationship between the Identification of Academics with Self-Leadership: A Study of MBA Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Matthew Jack

    2016-01-01

    How master of business administration (MBA) graduates influence themselves to achieve their objectives in their careers can be linked to how well they identified with academics throughout their education. It is important that scholars understand this relationship between academic and career performance. The ability to self-regulate, self-motivate,…

  2. Study of author’s applied physical training program for military officers-graduates of reserve officers’ departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Yavorskyy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to test effectiveness of applied physical training program for military officers, called up to military service after graduation from reserve officers’ departments. Material: the research was conducted on the base of Educational center 184 from June 2014 to December 2015. In the research 80 military officers participated (n=30 - graduates of military higher educational establishments; n=26, n=24 - graduates of reserve officers’ departments of 22-27 years’ age. Results: we fulfilled analysis of military officers’ physical fitness by exercises, which characterize general physical fitness and military applied skills (100 meters’ run, chin ups, 3000 meters’ run, passing obstacles course, grenade throws for distance and for accuracy, 5 km march-rush. We worked out the program, the essence of which implies ensuring of physical fitness and acceleration of reserve officers-graduates’ adaptation to professional (combat functioning. Conclusions: it was proved that implementation of the author’s program influenced positively on perfection of general physical qualities and military applied skills of military officers-graduated of reserve officers’ departments (р-0.05-0.001.

  3. Observational retrospective study on the effectiveness of sequential graduated intermittent pneumatic compression therapy of lower limbs edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Toma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of sequential graduated intermittent pneumatic compression (SGIPC therapy of lower limbs edema, regardless of its etiology. A retrospective observational study is conducted to determine the effectiveness of a regimen of sequential gradient SGIPC in treating edema of lower limbs. The study is carried out on 90 patients affected by different stages of edema and evaluated at a Wound Care Clinic for one month. Medical records data have been collected after the first, the third, and the fifth hour-long treatment session. The inclusion criteria are: (1 presence of edema to one limb, at least, regardless of etiology, (2 presence of both pain and feeling of heaviness (or tiredness of the limb, (3 non-use of bandages or elastic stocking/knee socks, and (4 availability of complete data about the edema size monitoring. The exclusion criteria are: (1 presence of infected wounds, (2 severe arteriosclerosis or other ischemic vascular diseases, (3 severe congestive cardiac failure, (4 known or suspected acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT, (5 thrombophlebitis or Pulmonary Embolism (PE, and (6 hypertension (Systolic Pressure greater than 170mmHg. The following parameters are considered as grade of improvement: the decrease of the limb circumference in at least two measurement points between the foot, ankle, and calf; the disappearance of at least one of the symptoms of pain and feeling of heaviness of the limb; improved mobility. A Flowtron ACS 900 system is used, for the treatment, consisting of a pump, connected to two (calf and thigh brace with individual tubes, applying a pneumatic compression, graduated in the air chamber, with sequential cycle in three compartments (one at the calf level and two at the thigh level, at a pressure of 45mmHg, with inflation cycles intermittent alternating. Inflation time 12s, time of deflation 48s. In addition, braces corresponding to limb size have been used

  4. High School Graduation Rates:Alternative Methods and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Miao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The No Child Left Behind Act has brought great attention to the high school graduation rate as one of the mandatory accountability measures for public school systems. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate the high school graduation rate given the lack of longitudinal databases that track individual students. This study reviews literature on and practices in reporting high school graduation rates, compares graduation rate estimates yielded from alternative methods, and estimates discrepancies between alternative results at national, state, and state ethnic group levels. Despite the graduation rate method used, results indicate that high school graduation rates in the U.S. have been declining in recent years and that graduation rates for black and Hispanic students lag substantially behind those of white students. As to graduation rate method preferred, this study found no evidence that the conceptually more complex methods yield more accurate or valid graduation rate estimates than the simpler methods.

  5. Biomedical engineering education in developing countries: research synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Tania S

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical engineering (BME) contributes to development through improving human health. This paper examines BME education to address the needs of developing countries. Components of different BME programs described in the literature are synthesized to represent what has been proposed or implemented for the production of graduates able to address health problems in a manner suited to the local environment in which they occur. Published research on BME education is reviewed with reference to problem context, interventions and their mechanisms, and intended outcomes.

  6. Honey/PVA hybrid wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Structural, physico-mechanical and in-vitro biomedical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Javad; Tang, Youhong

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogel/honey hybrids manifest an attractive design with an exclusive therapeutic property that promotes wound healing process. The greater the concentration of honey within the formulation, the better the biomedical properties that will be achieved. However, an increase in the percentage of honey can negatively affect the physico-chemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels. The need exists, therefore, to prepare wound dressings that contain high honey density with optimal biomedical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. In this study, a simple method for the preparation of a highly concentrated honey/PVA hybrid hydrogel with borax as the crosslinking agent is reported. Comprehensive evaluations of the morphology, swelling kinetics, permeability, bio-adhesion, mechanical characteristics, cytotoxicity, antibacterial property, cell proliferation ability and their controlling release properties were conducted as a function of crosslinking density. All the borax-induced hydrogels showed acceptable biocompatibility, and the incorporation of 1% borax in the hydrogel formulation produced optimal behaviours for wound addressing applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Business Graduate Skill Sets - Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise; Chapman, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the competencies required by industry in business graduates and the relative importance and current graduate proficiency levels in each skill area. A secondary purpose was to examine and compare the perceived role of contemporary business schools across different samples. The study was conducted during…

  8. RPCs in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, G.; De Vecchi, C.; Giroletti, E.; Guida, R.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Necchi, M. M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Sani, G.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.

    2006-08-01

    We are studying possible applications of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in the biomedical domain such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The use of RPCs in PET can provide several improvements on the usual scintillation-based detectors. The most striking features are the extremely good spatial and time resolutions. They can be as low as 50 μm and 25 ps respectively, to be compared to the much higher intrinsic limits in bulk detectors. Much efforts have been made to investigate suitable materials to make RPCs sensitive to 511 keV photons. For this reason, we are studying different types of coating employing high Z materials with proper electrical resistivity. Later investigations explored the possibility of coating glass electrodes by mean of serigraphy techniques, employing oxide based mixtures with a high density of high Z materials; the efficiency is strongly dependent on its thickness and it reaches a maximum for a characteristic value that is a function of the compound (usually a few hundred microns). The most promising mixtures seem to be PbO, Bi 2O 3 and Tl 2O. Preliminary gamma efficiency measurements for a Multigap RPC prototype (MRPC) are presented as well as simulations using GEANT4-based framework. The MRPC has 5 gas gaps; their spacings are kept by 0.3 mm diameter nylon fishing line, electrodes are made of thin glasses (1 mm for the outer electrodes, 0.15-0.4 mm for the inner ones). The detector is enclosed in a metallic gas-tight box, filled with a C 2H 2F 4 92.5%, SF 6 2.5%, C 4H 10 5% mixture. Different gas mixtures are being studied increasing the SF6 percentage and results of efficiency as a function of the new mixtures will be presented.

  9. Effectiveness of a Low-Cost, Graduate Student-Led Intervention on Study Habits and Performance in Introductory Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Tyler D; Gantz, J D; Chaffee, Blake R; Arlinghaus, Kel; Wiebler, James; Hughes, Michael; Fernandes, Joyce J

    2017-01-01

    Institutions have developed diverse approaches that vary in effectiveness and cost to improve student performance in introductory science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. We developed a low-cost, graduate student-led, metacognition-based study skills course taught in conjunction with the introductory biology series at Miami University. Our approach aimed to improve performance for underachieving students by combining an existing framework for the process of learning (the study cycle) with concrete tools (outlines and concept maps) that have been shown to encourage deep understanding. To assess the effectiveness of our efforts, we asked 1) how effective our voluntary recruitment model was at enrolling the target cohort, 2) how the course impacted performance on lecture exams, 3) how the course impacted study habits and techniques, and 4) whether there are particular study habits or techniques that are associated with large improvements on exam scores. Voluntary recruitment attracted only 11-17% of our target cohort. While focal students improved on lecture exams relative to their peers who did not enroll, gains were relatively modest, and not all students improved. Further, although students across both semesters of our study reported improved study habits (based on pre and post surveys) and on outlines and concept maps (based on retrospectively scored assignments), gains were more dramatic in the Fall semester. Multivariate models revealed that, while changes in study habits and in the quality of outlines and concept maps were weakly associated with change in performance on lecture exams, relationships were only significant in the Fall semester and were sometimes counterintuitive. Although benefits of the course were offset somewhat by the inefficiency of voluntary recruitment, we demonstrate the effectiveness our course, which is inexpensive to implement and has advantage of providing pedagogical experience to future educators. © 2017 T. D

  10. Exploring subdomain variation in biomedical language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séaghdha Diarmuid Ó

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Applications of Natural Language Processing (NLP technology to biomedical texts have generated significant interest in recent years. In this paper we identify and investigate the phenomenon of linguistic subdomain variation within the biomedical domain, i.e., the extent to which different subject areas of biomedicine are characterised by different linguistic behaviour. While variation at a coarser domain level such as between newswire and biomedical text is well-studied and known to affect the portability of NLP systems, we are the first to conduct an extensive investigation into more fine-grained levels of variation. Results Using the large OpenPMC text corpus, which spans the many subdomains of biomedicine, we investigate variation across a number of lexical, syntactic, semantic and discourse-related dimensions. These dimensions are chosen for their relevance to the performance of NLP systems. We use clustering techniques to analyse commonalities and distinctions among the subdomains. Conclusions We find that while patterns of inter-subdomain variation differ somewhat from one feature set to another, robust clusters can be identified that correspond to intuitive distinctions such as that between clinical and laboratory subjects. In particular, subdomains relating to genetics and molecular biology, which are the most common sources of material for training and evaluating biomedical NLP tools, are not representative of all biomedical subdomains. We conclude that an awareness of subdomain variation is important when considering the practical use of language processing applications by biomedical researchers.

  11. Biomedical Engineering in Modern Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attinger, E. O.

    1971-01-01

    Considers definition of biomedical engineering (BME) and how biomedical engineers should be trained. State of the art descriptions of BME and BME education are followed by a brief look at the future of BME. (TS)

  12. Biomedical Image Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Biomedical Image Registration, WBIR 2018, held in Leiden, The Netherlands, in June 2018. The 11 full and poster papers included in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 17 submitted papers. The pap...

  13. Biomedical Data Mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, N.; Combi, C.; Tucker, A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the special topic of Methods of Information in Medicine on data mining in biomedicine, with selected papers from two workshops on Intelligent Data Analysis in bioMedicine (IDAMAP) held in Verona (2006) and Amsterdam (2007). Methods: Defining the field of biomedical data

  14. Careers in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, R E; Rotger, V I; Herrera, M C

    2010-01-01

    Although biomedical engineering was started in Argentina about 35 years ago, it has had a sustained growth for the last 25 years in human resources, with the emergence of new undergraduate and postgraduate careers, as well as in research, knowledge, technological development, and health care.

  15. Biomedical research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The biomedical research Panel believes that the Calutron facility at Oak Ridge is a national and international resource of immense scientific value and of fundamental importance to continued biomedical research. This resource is essential to the development of new isotope uses in biology and medicine. It should therefore be nurtured by adequate support and operated in a way that optimizes its services to the scientific and technological community. The Panel sees a continuing need for a reliable supply of a wide variety of enriched stable isotopes. The past and present utilization of stable isotopes in biomedical research is documented in Appendix 7. Future requirements for stable isotopes are impossible to document, however, because of the unpredictability of research itself. Nonetheless we expect the demand for isotopes to increase in parallel with the continuing expansion of biomedical research as a whole. There are a number of promising research projects at the present time, and these are expected to lead to an increase in production requirements. The Panel also believes that a high degree of priority should be given to replacing the supplies of the 65 isotopes (out of the 224 previously available enriched isotopes) no longer available from ORNL

  16. Rural retention of new medical graduates from the Collaborative Project to Increase Production of Rural Doctors (CPIRD): a 12-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techakehakij, Win; Arora, Rajin

    2017-07-01

    Physician scarcity in rural areas is a major obstacle to healthcare access, leading to health inequity worldwide. In Thailand, a special recruitment program of medical education [Collaborative Project to Increase Production of Rural Doctors (CPIRD)] was initiated with four different medical training tracks. No previous research has examined the rural retention of new medical graduates across the CPIRD tracks, compared with those receiving conventional medical education (Normal track). This study examines the public retention of rural physicians from different tracks of entry. A retrospective study was conducted in new medical graduates who entered Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) hospitals from January 2003 to October 2014, and followed up until June 2015, using administrative data from the Personnel Administration Division, MoPH. The CPIRD registry database was used to identify physicians' tracks of entry. Survival analyses and multiple logistic regression analyses were applied to compare the annual retention and the probability of 3-year retention of rural physicians. Results clearly demonstrated a high rural retention of CPIRD medical graduates, compared with their Normal track peers, regarding both lower annual resignation (HR 0.456, P rural retention were revealed across the different CPIRD tracks. Evidence from this study can be used as part of the information to reshape the physician production policy to reduce health inequity in rural areas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Information Seeking Behavior & Information Resources Management:Mental Process Selecting Subjects & Identifying Information Needs Case study: Graduate Students in Women seminaries of Shiraz of Academic year 1393- 1394(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Eftekhar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is Information Resources Management: Mental Process Selecting Subjects &  Identifying Information Needs. The research method used in this study is a Quantitative method. Sampling is purposeful. This means that it includes graduate Students in Women seminaries of Shiraz who have information-seeking experience and are able to express their views and information needs. The sample was selected according to the random sampling method with Cochran formula from 710 students. According to this sampling method there is 241 Graduate Students included in 1392-1393 seminaries year of  Women seminaries of Shiraz. This is a survey research Which has been carried out by employing a questionnaire and SPSS for windows to analyze data. The results showed that students for selecting subjects,  identifying information needs used methods and media such as Prying Mind, reviewing of information resources, Consulting with subject specialists.

  18. Between biomedical and psychological experiments: The unexpected connections between the Pasteur Institutes and the study of animal mind in the second quarter of twentieth-century France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marion

    2016-02-01

    This article explores the unexpected connections between the Pasteur Institute in French Guinea and the study of animal mind in early twentieth century France. At a time when the study of animal intelligence was thriving in France and elsewhere, apes were appealing research subjects both in psychological and biomedical studies. Drawing on two case studies (Guillaume/Meyerson and Urbain), and then, on someone responding negatively to those connections, Thétard, this article shows how the long reach of biomedicine (linked to the prestige of Bernard and Pasteur) impinged on French biology and played a role in the tortuous, if not unsuccessful fate of animal psychology in France in the second quarter of the twentieth century. It shows how attempts to use apes (and other zoo animals) to yield new insights on animal psychology faced heavy restrictions or experienced false starts, and examines the reasons why animal psychology could not properly thrive at that time in France. Beyond the supremacy of biomedical interests over psychological ones, this article additionally explains that some individuals used animal behaviour studies as steppingstones in careers in which they proceeded on to other topics. Finally, it illustrates the tension between non-academic and academic people at a time when animal psychology was trying to acquire scientific legitimacy, and also highlights the difficulties attached to the scientific study of animals in a multipurpose and hybrid environment such as the early twentieth century Parisian zoo and also the Pasteur Institute of French Guinea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on pivot-point vibration of molecular bond-rupture events by quartz crystal microbalance for biomedical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan YJ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yong J Yuan, Renjie JiaLaboratory of Biosensing and MicroMechatronics, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Bond-rupture scanning for biomedical diagnostics is examined using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM experiments and microparticle mechanics modeling calculations. Specific and nonspecific interactions between a microparticle and its binding QCM surface can be distinguished by gradually increasing the amplitude of driving voltage applied to QCM and monitoring its frequency changes. This research proposes a mechanical model of interactions between biological molecules and a QCM substrate surface. The mechanical force required to break a biotin–streptavidin bond was calculated through a one-pivot-point bottom-up vibration model. The bond-rupture force increases with an increase of the microparticle radius, the QCM resonant frequency, and the amplitude of driving voltage applied to the QCM. The significance of the research on biological molecular bond rupture is extremely important in characterizing microbial (such as cells and virus specificity, due to the force magnitude needed to break bonds using a transducer.Keywords: bond rupture, mechanical force, biomolecular binding energy spectra, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM

  20. Novel magnetic multicore nanoparticles designed for MPI and other biomedical applications: From synthesis to first in vivo studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Kratz

    Full Text Available Synthesis of novel magnetic multicore particles (MCP in the nano range, involves alkaline precipitation of iron(II chloride in the presence of atmospheric oxygen. This step yields green rust, which is oxidized to obtain magnetic nanoparticles, which probably consist of a magnetite/maghemite mixed-phase. Final growth and annealing at 90°C in the presence of a large excess of carboxymethyl dextran gives MCP very promising magnetic properties for magnetic particle imaging (MPI, an emerging medical imaging modality, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The magnetic nanoparticles are biocompatible and thus potential candidates for future biomedical applications such as cardiovascular imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping in cancer patients, and stem cell tracking. The new MCP that we introduce here have three times higher magnetic particle spectroscopy performance at lower and middle harmonics and five times higher MPS signal strength at higher harmonics compared with Resovist®. In addition, the new MCP have also an improved in vivo MPI performance compared to Resovist®, and we here report the first in vivo MPI investigation of this new generation of magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. The impact of undergraduate clinical teaching models on the perceptions of work-readiness among new graduate nurses: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Emma E B; Boyd, Leanne; Mnatzaganian, George

    2017-08-01

    Clinical Placements are an essential component of bridging the gap between academic theory and nursing practice. There are multiple clinical models designed to ease the transition from student to professional, yet there has been little exploration of such models and their impact on graduates' perceptions of work-readiness. This cross sectional study examined perceptions of work-readiness of new graduate nurses who attended one of the following clinical teaching models: the University Fellowship Program (UFP), the Traditional Multi-facility Clinical Model (TMCPM), and the Mixed Program (MP). Three groups of first year graduate nurses (UFP, TMCPM, and MP) were compared using the Work-readiness Scale, a validated and reliable tool, which assessed nurses' perceptions of work-readiness in four domains: organizational acumen, personal work characteristics, social intelligence, and work competence. A multivariable Generalized Estimating Equations regression investigated socio-demographic and teaching-modelrelated factors associated with work-readiness. Of 43 nurses approached, 28 completed the survey (65% response rate) of whom 6 were UFP attendants, 8 attended the TMCPM and 14 the MP. Those who had attended the UFP scored higher than the other two in all four domains; however, the crude between-group comparisons did not yield statistically significant results. Only after accounting for age, gender, teaching setting and prior work experience, the multivariable model showed that undertaking the UFP was likely to increase perceptions of work-readiness by 1.4 points (95% CI 0.11-2.69), P=0.03). The UFP was superior to the other two placement models. The study suggests that the UFP may enhance graduate nurses' perceptions of work readiness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Graduates\\' Perception of University Programmes and Their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graduates\\' Perception of University Programmes and Their Relevance to Employment: A study of University of Nairobi Graduates (1991-1998). Gerald N Kimani. Abstract. No Abstract Available Africa Development Vol. XXX (1&2) 2005: 68-85. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ad.v30i1.22213 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  3. Why AD Graduates Choose Their First Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokvina, Gloria J.; Bratt, Ellen M.

    Reasons for the job selections of 64 associate degree nursing graduates were examined in a pilot study at Purdue University. The basic research question was whether nursing graduates initially view "maintenance" or motivational factors as more important. Based on Herzberg's theory of motivation, information is provided on maintenance or hygiene…

  4. Graduate Students' Perceptions of Contrapower Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohipp, Charmaine; Senn, Charlene Y.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the perceptions of 172 graduate students to traditional versus contrapower sexual harassment. Graduate students are a unique sample due to their dual role as a student and a teacher. After controlling for attitudes toward feminism and sexual harassment, participants viewed contrapower sexual harassment as less indicative of…

  5. The Zoology Department at Washington University (1944-1954): from undergraduate to graduate studies with Viktor Hamburger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnebacke, T H

    2001-04-01

    Beginning from an undergraduate's perspective and continuing through graduate school, this student's experiences in the Department of Zoology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri was a time of many rewarding experiences. Now, on this occasion of his 100th birthday, I wish to express my appreciation to the Chairman, Dr. Viktor Hamburger, for his teachings, his encouragement, and his friendship that has lasted over the past 56 years.

  6. Thermoresponsive Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoni K. Georgiou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive polymers are a class of “smart” materials that have the ability to respond to a change in temperature; a property that makes them useful materials in a wide range of applications and consequently attracts much scientific interest. This review focuses mainly on the studies published over the last 10 years on the synthesis and use of thermoresponsive polymers for biomedical applications including drug delivery, tissue engineering and gene delivery. A summary of the main applications is given following the different studies on thermoresponsive polymers which are categorized based on their 3-dimensional structure; hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, micelles, crosslinked micelles, polymersomes, films and particles.

  7. A study on knowledge and practice regarding biomedical waste management among staff nurses and nursing students of Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Haider

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are the centre of cure and also the important centres of infectious waste generation. Effective management of Biomedical Waste (BMW is not only a legal necessity but also a social responsibility. Aims and Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practice in managing the biomedical wastes among nursing staff and student nurses in RIMS, Ranchi. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at RIMS, Ranchi from Oct 2013 to March 2014 (6 months. It was a descriptive, hospital based, cross-sectional study. A total of 240 nurses participated in the present study, randomly chosen from various departments A pre-designed, pre-tested, structured proforma was used for data collection after getting their informed consent. Self-made scoring system was used to categorize the participants as having good, average and poor scores. Data was tabulated and analyzed using percentages and chi-square test. Results: The knowledge regarding general information about BMW management was assessed(with scores 0-8,it was found  that level of knowledge was better in student nurses than staff nurses as student nurses scored good(6-8correct answers in more than half of the questions (65%.Whereas staff nurses scored good in only 33.33% questions. When the practical information regarding the BMW management is assessed (with scores 0-8, it was found that staff nurses had relatively better practice regarding BMW management than students as they scored good(6-8correct answers in 40% and 30% respectively. Conclusion: Though overall knowledge of study participants was good but still they need good quality training to improve their current knowledge about BMW. 

  8. A "CASE" Study on Developing Science Communication and Outreach Skills of University Graduate Student Researchers in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesche, M. E.; Conner, L.

    2015-12-01

    Well rounded scientific researchers are not only experts in their field, but can also communicate their work to a multitude of various audiences, including the general public and undergraduate university students. Training in these areas should ideally start during graduate school, but many programs are not preparing students to effectively communicate their work. Here, we present results from the NSF-funded CASE (Changing Alaska Science Education) program, which was funded by NSF under the auspices of the GK-12 program. CASE placed science graduate students (fellows) in K-12 classrooms to teach alongside of K-12 teachers with the goal of enhancing communication and teaching skills among graduate students. CASE trained fellows in inquiry-based and experiential techniques and emphasized the integration of art, writing, and traditional Alaska Native knowledge in the classroom. Such techniques are especially effective in engaging students from underrepresented groups. As a result of participation, many CASE fellows have reported increased skills in communication and teaching, as well as in time management. These skills may prove directly applicable to higher education when teaching undergraduate students.

  9. Flexner 2.0—Longitudinal Study of Student Participation in a Campus-Wide General Pathology Course for Graduate Students at The University of Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M. Briehl PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty members from the Department of Pathology at The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson have offered a 4-credit course on enhanced general pathology for graduate students since 1996. The course is titled, “Mechanisms of Human Disease.” Between 1997 and 2016, 270 graduate students completed Mechanisms of Human Disease. The students came from 21 programs of study. Analysis of Variance, using course grade as the dependent and degree, program, gender, and year (1997-2016 as independent variables, indicated that there was no significant difference in final grade (F = 0.112; P = .8856 as a function of degree (doctorate: mean = 89.60, standard deviation = 5.75; master’s: mean = 89.34, standard deviation = 6.00; certificate program: mean = 88.64, standard deviation = 8.25, specific type of degree program (F = 2.066, P = .1316; life sciences: mean = 89.95, standard deviation = 6.40; pharmaceutical sciences: mean = 90.71, standard deviation = 4.57; physical sciences: mean = 87.79, standard deviation = 5.17, or as a function of gender (F = 2.96, P = .0865; males: mean = 88.09, standard deviation = 8.36; females: mean = 89.58, standard deviation = 5.82. Students in the physical and life sciences performed equally well. Mechanisms of Human Disease is a popular course that provides students enrolled in a variety of graduate programs with a medical school-based course on mechanisms of diseases. The addition of 2 new medically oriented Master of Science degree programs has nearly tripled enrollment. This graduate level course also potentially expands the interdisciplinary diversity of participants in our interprofessional education and collaborative practice exercises.

  10. The migration of university graduates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Holm, Jacob Rubæk; Nielsen, Kristian

    Several studies have documented that highly educated citizens contribute to regional economic performance (Moretti, 2013; Faggian and McCann,2009b; Sterlacchini 2008). Moreover, Åstebro et al. (2012) emphasize the importance of promoting start-up by recent university graduates. Thus, the retentio...

  11. Adolescent cannabis use, change in neurocognitive function, and high-school graduation: A longitudinal study from early adolescence to young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Parent, Sophie; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E; Séguin, Jean R

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this prospective longitudinal study was to investigate bidirectional associations between adolescent cannabis use (CU) and neurocognitive performance in a community sample of 294 young men from ages 13 to 20 years. The results showed that in early adolescence, and prior to initiation to CU, poor short-term and working memory, but high verbal IQ, were associated with earlier age of onset of CU. In turn, age of CU onset and CU frequency across adolescence were associated with (a) specific neurocognitive decline in verbal IQ and executive function tasks tapping trial and error learning and reward processing by early adulthood and (b) lower rates of high-school graduation. The association between CU onset and change in neurocognitive function, however, was found to be accounted for by CU frequency. Whereas the link between CU frequency across adolescence and change in verbal IQ was explained (mediated) by high school graduation, the link between CU frequency and tasks tapping trial and error learning were independent from high school graduation, concurrent cannabis and other substance use, adolescent alcohol use, and externalizing behaviors. Findings support prevention efforts aimed at delaying onset and reducing frequency of CU.

  12. Biomedical signals, imaging, and informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Signals, Imaging, and Informatics, the third volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in biosignal processing, medical imaging, infrared imaging, and medical informatics.More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including biomedical s

  13. Building integrated pathways to independence for diverse biomedical researchers: Project Pathways, the BUILD program at Xavier University of Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozesh, Maryam; Giguette, Marguerite; Morgan, Kathleen; Johanson, Kelly; D'Amour, Gene; Coston, Tiera; Wilkins-Green, Clair

    2017-01-01

    focuses on mentor training and providing faculty members with opportunities to improve their teaching skills as well as their research competitiveness. In addition to the wide range of activities supported by BUILD within the institution, Xavier University is partnering with a number of major research universities across the nation to achieve Project Pathways' goals. The strategies developed by Project Pathways are designed to address the challenges and barriers Xavier students face as they work towards graduate studies and entering the biomedical workforce. Xavier University of Louisiana has a long history of providing high quality, rigorous education to African American students in a very supportive environment with highly dedicated faculty and staff. The program highlighted here could be used by other institutions as a model program for assisting students in STEM and other biomedical fields of study to successfully matriculate through college and graduate school and develop their research careers.

  14. Differences between US Women’s and Men’s Careers in Astronomy: Results from the Longitudinal Study of Astronomy Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Rachel; White, Susan; Chu, Raymond Y.

    2015-08-01

    The Longitudinal Study of Astronomy Graduate Students (LSAGS), a joint project of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP), emerged from the Women in Astronomy II conference held in Pasadena, CA, USA in 2003. At the conference, concern about possible differential attrition for women arose from the relatively high percentage of female junior (student) AAS members compared to the lower representation of women among astronomy faculty members.The Committee for the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) and the AAS Council concluded that a longitudinal study was needed to collect data about which variables affect career choices in astronomy and to determine whether any of these variables exert a disproportionate force on either sex. In 2007-08, the project team, under the direction of Rachel Ivie, Associate Director of AIP’s Statistical Research Center (SRC), asked all graduate students in astronomy and astrophysics in the US (~1500) to complete the first survey. The LSAGS follows this same group of students as they leave graduate school and enter their careers. In 2012-13, more than 800 responded to the second survey, and most had completed PhDs. We plan a third round of data collection in 2015.Results from the study show that there are statistically significant differences between women and men in dissertation research methods, PhD subfield, and ratings of graduate school advisors. We found that after graduate school, women were more likely than men to take a break from work of six months or longer and to have made accommodations for a partner’s career opportunities (the “two-body problem”). In turn, women were more likely to work outside the field of astronomy because they were more likely to have experienced the “two-body problem.” In addition, we found women were more likely than men to have experienced harassment or discrimination at school or work. Finally, even while controlling for employment sector and years

  15. Modelling Graduate Skill Transfer from University to the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2016-01-01

    This study explores skill transfer in graduates as they transition from university to the workplace. Graduate employability continues to dominate higher education agendas yet the transfer of acquired skills is often assumed. The study is prompted by documented concern with graduate performance in certain employability skills, and prevalent skill…

  16. Graduate Student Needs in Relation to Library Research Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shawna; Jacobs, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, graduate study includes a research component, requiring library skills to locate relevant literature. Upon matriculation into graduate programs, many students are underprepared in library research skills, making library instruction a priority for the success of graduate students. This qualitative study, utilizing emergent design,…

  17. Tritium AMS for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.L.; Velsko, C.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-08-01

    We are developing 3 H-AMS to measure 3 H activity of mg-sized biological samples. LLNL has already successfully applied 14 C AMS to a variety of problems in the area of biomedical research. Development of 3 H AMS would greatly complement these studies. The ability to perform 3 H AMS measurements at sensitivities equivalent to those obtained for 14 C will allow us to perform experiments using compounds that are not readily available in 14 C-tagged form. A 3 H capability would also allow us to perform unique double-labeling experiments in which we learn the fate, distribution, and metabolism of separate fractions of biological compounds

  18. An introduction to biomedical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Dewhurst, D J

    1976-01-01

    An Introduction to Biomedical Instrumentation presents a course of study and applications covering the basic principles of medical and biological instrumentation, as well as the typical features of its design and construction. The book aims to aid not only the cognitive domain of the readers, but also their psychomotor domain as well. Aside from the seminar topics provided, which are divided into 27 chapters, the book complements these topics with practical applications of the discussions. Figures and mathematical formulas are also given. Major topics discussed include the construction, handli

  19. An Alternative Model to Determine the Financing Structure of PPP-Based Young Graduate Apartments in China: A Case Study of Hangzhou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelin Xu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnerships (PPP can be employed to provide public rental housing for young graduates, which has been urgent to achieve social sustainability in China. However, few studies have been conducted to investigate the financing structure of PPPs, particularly the ratio of private investment, which is important in initiating a PPP project. This study develops a robust model to determine the financing structure through considering the uncertainties in operation. A case study in Hangzhou demonstrates the process of the model. The relevant findings provide private investors and the local government with effective references for negotiating the financing structure of a PPP project.

  20. Graduates Performance in the Workplace: Employers‟ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel M. Plantilla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an assessment of the employers feedback on the performance of business graduates of University of Rizal System Pililla from batch 2010 – 2014 in the workplace with respect to knowledge and understanding, skills and personal qualities. The researcher used descriptive method of research utilizing the employers and managers of employed graduates as key informants of the study. The findings revealed that employers were very much satisfied on the performance of graduates in terms of knowledge and understanding of the job, general skills, specialized skills and personal qualities demonstrated in the workplace. There was significant difference on the performance of graduates in terms of positions and length of service as revealed by the variations on the level of satisfaction of the employers on graduates’ performance in work. Relationship exists between the degree of importance of the four aspects of job performance and the level of satisfaction on the performance of business graduates. Employers placed a strong preference to the business graduates of the campus. There is no mismatch of knowledge and skills of graduates and what the employers are expecting among the business graduates.