WorldWideScience

Sample records for biomechanical properties compared

  1. Comparative transcriptional analysis of three human ligaments with distinct biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I; Canga-Villegas, Ana; Cerezal, Luis; Plaza, Santiago; Hurlé, Juan M; García-Porrero, Juan A; Montero, Juan A

    2013-12-01

    One major aim of regenerative medicine targeting the musculoskeletal system is to provide complementary and/or alternative therapeutic approaches to current surgical therapies, often involving the removal and prosthetic substitution of damaged tissues such as ligaments. For these approaches to be successful, detailed information regarding the cellular and molecular composition of different musculoskeletal tissues is required. Ligaments have often been considered homogeneous tissues with common biomechanical properties. However, advances in tissue engineering research have highlighted the functional relevance of the organisational and compositional differences between ligament types, especially in those with higher risks of injury. The aim of this study was to provide information concerning the relative expression levels of a subset of key genes (including extracellular matrix components, transcription factors and growth factors) that confer functional identity to ligaments. We compared the transcriptomes of three representative human ligaments subjected to different biomechanical demands: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL); the ligamentum teres of the hip (LT); and the iliofemoral ligament (IL). We revealed significant differences in the expression of type I collagen, elastin, fibromodulin, biglycan, transforming growth factor β1, transforming growth interacting factor 1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and transforming growth factor β-induced gene between the IL and the other two ligaments. Thus, considerable molecular heterogeneity can exist between anatomically distinct ligaments with differing biomechanical demands. However, the LT and ACL were found to show remarkable molecular homology, suggesting common functional properties. This finding provides experimental support for the proposed role of the LT as a hip joint stabiliser in humans. © 2013 Anatomical Society.

  2. Comparing Biomechanical Properties, Repair Times, and Value of Common Core Flexor Tendon Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Aakash; Schimoler, Patrick; Miller, Mark C; Kharlamov, Alexander; Merrell, Gregory A; Palmer, Bradley A

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare biomechanical strength, repair times, and repair values for zone II core flexor tendon repairs. A total of 75 fresh-frozen human cadaveric flexor tendons were harvested from the index through small finger and randomized into one of 5 repair groups: 4-stranded cross-stitch cruciate (4-0 polyester and 4-0 braided suture), 4-stranded double Pennington (2-0 knotless barbed suture), 4-stranded Pennington (4-0 double-stranded braided suture), and 6-stranded modified Lim-Tsai (4-0 looped braided suture). Repairs were measured in situ and their repair times were measured. Tendons were linearly loaded to failure and multiple biomechanical values were measured. The repair value was calculated based on operating room costs, repair times, and suture costs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis were used to compare repair data. The braided cruciate was the strongest repair ( P > .05) but the slowest ( P > .05), and the 4-stranded Pennington using double-stranded suture was the fastest ( P > .05) to perform. The total repair value was the highest for braided cruciate ( P > .05) compared with all other repairs. Barbed suture did not outperform any repairs in any categories. The braided cruciate was the strongest of the tested flexor tendon repairs. The 2-mm gapping and maximum load to failure for this repair approached similar historical strength of other 6- and 8-stranded repairs. In this study, suture cost was negligible in the overall repair cost and should be not a determining factor in choosing a repair.

  3. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation

  4. Biomechanical Properties of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve in the Piglet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Megan J.; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVP) results from damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The most common causes of UVP are associated with compromised RLN tissue. The purpose of this research was to investigate the biomechanical properties of piglet RLN and identify differences in these properties along its length and in between the left and right side. Quasi-static uniaxial tensile testing and isotropic constitutive modeling was performed on seven piglet RLNs. Stiffness and other biomechanical parameters were derived from these tests and compared from conducting two different statistical analysis for the between and within nerve comparisons. Results showed higher stiffness values in the left RLN segment than for the right. Descriptive data demonstrated a higher stiffness in RLN segments surrounding the aortic arch, indicating a more protective role of the extracellular matrix in these nerves. This research offers insight regarding the protective function of the RLN connective tissues and structural compromise due to its environment. PMID:20369296

  5. Steven Vogel and His Theory of Comparative Biomechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    motivating examples of biological systems. Vogel's books are different. He truly talks about biomechanics or rather comparative bio- mechanics. The book is perfect for teaching biomechan- ics to biology students. It will surely sensitize them to mechanics. But what about engineer- ing students who presumably know mechan ...

  6. Comparative biomechanics: life's physical world (second edition)

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Why do you switch from walking to running at a specific speed? Why do tall trees rarely blow over in high winds? And why does a spore ejected into air at seventy miles per hour travel only a fraction of an inch? Comparative Biomechanics is the first and only textbook that takes a comprehensive look at the mechanical aspects of life--covering animals and plants, structure and movement, and solids and fluids. An ideal entry point into the ways living creatures interact with their immediate physical world, this revised and updated edition examines how the forms and activities of animals and plants reflect the materials available to nature, considers rules for fluid flow and structural design, and explores how organisms contend with environmental forces. Drawing on physics and mechanical engineering, Steven Vogel looks at how animals swim and fly, modes of terrestrial locomotion, organism responses to winds and water currents, circulatory and suspension-feeding systems, and the relationship between size and mech...

  7. Biomechanical properties of the keratoconic cornea: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellara, Hans R; Patel, Dipika V

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in assessing corneal biomechanical properties due to potential clinical applications, particularly in the early detection of keratoconus (KC). This review discusses the effects of keratoconus on the biomechanical properties of the cornea and the current techniques used to detect these changes both in the laboratory and clinical setting. Specific structural changes occurring in the corneal stroma as part of the disease process can be linked to alterations in the viscous and elastic properties of the cornea in keratoconus. Although there are extensive ex vivo studies using techniques such as extensometry and inflation testing to analyse the biomechanical properties of the normal cornea, few have investigated the keratoconic cornea using the same methods. There are a number of ex vivo studies that confirm the effectiveness of collagen cross-linking in increasing Young's modulus in healthy corneas. Recently, research has focussed on measuring corneal biomechanical parameters in vivo using two commercially available instruments: the Ocular Response Analyser (ORA) and the CorVis ST (CST). Both instruments analyse the dynamic behaviour of the cornea, when temporarily deformed by an air puff; however, the outputs of these instruments are not directly comparable due to differences in the characteristics of the air puff and output parameters. Studies using these instruments have reported significant differences between keratoconic and healthy corneas; however, neither instrument can currently be used in isolation to reliably diagnose keratoconus. Further research analysing the outputs of these instruments may enhance their diagnostic capabilities. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometry Australia.

  8. Steven Vogel and His Theory of Comparative Biomechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 5. Steven Vogel and His Theory of Comparative Biomechanics. Book Review Volume 21 Issue 5 May 2016 pp 467-471. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/05/0467-0471. Abstract ...

  9. Steven Vogel and His Theory of Comparative Biomechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 5. Steven Vogel and His Theory of Comparative Biomechanics. Book Review Volume 21 Issue 5 May 2016 pp 467-471. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/05/0467-0471. Abstract ...

  10. Evaluating Glucocorticoid Administration on Biomechanical Properties of Rats’ Tibial Diaphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidouni, Mohammadjavad; Nejati, Hossein; Salimi, Maryam; Bayat, Mohammad; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Asgharie, Mohammad Ali; Rezaian, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a disease, which causes bone loss and fractures. Although glucocorticoids effectively suppress inflammation, their chronic use is accompanied by bone loss with a tendency toward secondary osteoporosis. Objectives: This study took into consideration the importance of cortical bone in the entire bone's mechanical competence. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of different protocols of glucocorticoid administration on the biomechanical properties of tibial bone diaphysis in rats compared to control and low-level laser-treated rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. We used systematic random sampling to divide 40 adult male rats into 8 groups with 5 rats in each group. Groups were as follows: 1) control, 2) dexamethasone (7 mg/week), 3) dexamethasone (0.7 mg/week), 4) methylprednisolone (7 mg/kg/week), 5) methylprednisolone (5 mg/kg twice weekly), 6) dexamethasone (7 mg/kg three times per week), 7) dexamethasone (0.7 mg/kg thrice per week), and 8) low-level laser-treated rats. The study periods were 4-7 weeks. At the end of the treatment periods, we examined the mechanical properties of tibial bone diaphysis. Data were analyzed by statistical analyses. Results: Glucocorticoid-treated rats showed weight loss and considerable mortality (21%). The biomechanical properties (maximum force) of glucocorticoid-treated rats in groups 4 (62 ± 2.9), 6 (63 ± 5.1), and 7 (60 ± 5.3) were comparable with the control (46 ± 1.5) and low-level laser-treated (57 ± 3.2) rats. Conclusions: In contrast to the findings in humans and certain other species, glucocorticoid administration caused anabolic effect on the cortical bone of tibia diaphysis bone in rats. PMID:26019900

  11. A Novel Fixation System for Acetabular Quadrilateral Plate Fracture: A Comparative Biomechanical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Chun Zha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the biomechanical properties of a novel fixation system (named AFRIF and to compare it with other five different fixation techniques for quadrilateral plate fractures. This in vitro biomechanical experiment has shown that the multidirectional titanium fixation (MTF and pelvic brim long screws fixation (PBSF provided the strongest fixation for quadrilateral plate fracture; the better biomechanical performance of the AFRIF compared with the T-shaped plate fixation (TPF, L-shaped plate fixation (LPF, and H-shaped plate fixation (HPF; AFRIF gives reasonable stability of treatment for quadrilateral plate fracture and may offer a better solution for comminuted quadrilateral plate fractures or free floating medial wall fracture and be reliable in preventing protrusion of femoral head.

  12. Quantitative methods for reconstructing tissue biomechanical properties in optical coherence elastography: a comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Sudheendran, Narendran; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the accuracy of five different methods for extracting the biomechanical properties of soft samples using optical coherence elastography (OCE). OCE is an emerging noninvasive technique, which allows assessing biomechanical properties of tissues with a micrometer spatial resolution. However, in order to accurately extract biomechanical properties from OCE measurements, application of proper mechanical model is required. In this study, we utilize tissue-mimicking phantoms with controlled elastic properties and investigate the feasibilities of four available methods for reconstructing elasticity (Young’s modulus) based on OCE measurements of an air-pulse induced elastic wave. The approaches are based on the shear wave equation (SWE), the surface wave equation (SuWE), Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation (RLFE), and finite element method (FEM), Elasticity values were compared with uniaxial mechanical testing. The results show that the RLFE and the FEM are more robust in quantitatively assessing elasticity than the other simplified models. This study provides a foundation and reference for reconstructing the biomechanical properties of tissues from OCE data, which is important for the further development of noninvasive elastography methods. PMID:25860076

  13. Comparison of the biomechanical tensile and compressive properties of decellularised and natural porcine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgaied, A; Stanley, M; Galfe, M; Berry, H; Ingham, E; Fisher, J

    2015-06-01

    Meniscal repair is widely used as a treatment for meniscus injury. However, where meniscal damage has progressed such that repair is not possible, approaches for partial meniscus replacement are now being developed which have the potential to restore the functional role of the meniscus, in stabilising the knee joint, absorbing and distributing stress during loading, and prevent early degenerative joint disease. One attractive potential solution to the current lack of meniscal replacements is the use of decellularised natural biological scaffolds, derived from xenogeneic tissues, which are produced by treating the native tissue to remove the immunogenic cells. The current study investigated the effect of decellularisation on the biomechanical tensile and compressive (indentation and unconfined) properties of the porcine medial meniscus through an experimental-computational approach. The results showed that decellularised medial porcine meniscus maintained the tensile biomechanical properties of the native meniscus, but had lower tensile initial elastic modulus. In compression, decellularised medial porcine meniscus generally showed lower elastic modulus and higher permeability compared to that of the native meniscus. These changes in the biomechanical properties, which ranged from less than 1% to 40%, may be due to the reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) content during the decellularisation process. The predicted biomechanical properties for the decellularised medial porcine meniscus were within the reported range for the human meniscus, making it an appropriate biological scaffold for consideration as a partial meniscus replacement. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Optical spectroscopic characterization of human meniscus biomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Myllymäki, Juho; Danso, Elvis K.; Honkanen, Juuso T. J.; Korhonen, Rami K.; Töyräs, Juha; Afara, Isaac O.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the capacity of optical spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral ranges for estimating the biomechanical properties of human meniscus. Seventy-two samples obtained from the anterior, central, and posterior locations of the medial and lateral menisci of 12 human cadaver joints were used. The samples were subjected to mechanical indentation, then traditional biomechanical parameters (equilibrium and dynamic moduli) were calculated. In addition, strain-dependent fibril network modulus and permeability strain-dependency coefficient were determined via finite-element modeling. Subsequently, absorption spectra were acquired from each location in the VIS (400 to 750 nm) and NIR (750 to 1100 nm) spectral ranges. Partial least squares regression, combined with spectral preprocessing and transformation, was then used to investigate the relationship between the biomechanical properties and spectral response. The NIR spectral region was observed to be optimal for model development (83.0%≤R2≤90.8%). The percentage error of the models are: Eeq (7.1%), Edyn (9.6%), Eɛ (8.4%), and Mk (8.9%). Thus, we conclude that optical spectroscopy in the NIR range is a potential method for rapid and nondestructive evaluation of human meniscus functional integrity and health in real time during arthroscopic surgery.

  15. [Preliminary study of biomechanic property on human forethigh skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Chen, H

    1997-12-01

    HLC0-I biomechanical living-tissues testing mechanic was adopted for testing the biomechanical property of normal adult forethigh skin. The figures acquired were calculated using one dimension strain energy function and the constitutive equation of mono-way stress and strain was established. The results showed that the relationship between stress and strain could be expressed by the exponential function. The rise of stress was not evident when the strain was lower than 1.2, but the stress rose much sharply when the strain was higher than 1.2. The curves were nonlinear. This suggests that when we sew up a wound or perform skin transplantation, the strain should be lower than 1.2.

  16. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon [Mahidol University, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Rachathewi, Bangkok (Thailand); Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques. (orig.)

  17. [Effects of microwave acute irradiation on biomechanic properties of rabbit tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Li, X; Zhang, F; Yu, X; Liao, X

    1999-06-01

    The rabbit body was irradiated acutely by 2.45 GHz continuous microwave. After irradiation, the values of blood viscosity, blood viscoelasticity, platelet aggregation, erythrocyte fragility, erythrocyte deformation, erythrocyte aggregation, the compressive mechanic property and flexible property of bones were tested. The data of irradiated group and unirradiated group were compared. The results showed: after microwave irradiation, the rabbit blood viscosity and viscoelasticity decreased; the rabbit platelet aggregation rate decreased and the disaggregation rate increased; the erythrocyte fragility increased; the biomechanic properties of bones did not change considerably.

  18. Comparison of Corneal Topographical and Biomechanical Properties in Cases with Atopic Dermatitis and Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Yıldırım

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To compare the topographic, biomechanical, and thickness properties of corneas of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and of healthy individuals. Ma te ri al and Met hod: In this prospective, cross-sectional, and comparative study, 28 healthy individuals (control group and 28 patients with AD (study group were enrolled. Corneal topographical measurements using Scheimpflug camera with a Placido disc topographer (Sirius, corneal biomechanical properties using Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, and central corneal thickness (CCT using ultrasonic pachymeter were obtained for each participant. Re sults: Topographic parameters were not significantly different between both groups (p>0.05. Corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF were found same in both groups. CCT measured with ultrasonic pachymeter was significantly lower in patients with AD compared to health controls (p<0.05. Dis cus si on: No significant difference was found between patients with AD and age-matched healthy individuals regarding the corneal topographic findings and corneal biomechanical parameters. CCT was found to be lower in cases with AD than in healthy controls. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 140-4

  19. A comparative biomechanical analysis of term fetal membranes in human and domestic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to biomechanically characterize and compare human, porcine, equine, and ovine fetal membranes. Noncontact metrology was used for topographic analyses. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to resolve specific biomechanical values. Puncture force and radial stresses we...

  20. Effects of refrigeration and freezing on the electromechanical and biomechanical properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changoor, Adele; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    In vitro electromechanical and biomechanical testing of articular cartilage provide critical information about the structure and function of this tissue. Difficulties obtaining fresh tissue and lengthy experimental testing procedures often necessitate a storage protocol, which may adversely affect the functional properties of cartilage. The effects of storage at either 4°C for periods of 6 days and 12 days, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at -20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive electromechanical measurements and unconfined compression testing on 3 mm diameter disks were used to assess cartilage properties, including the streaming potential integral (SPI), fibril modulus (Ef), matrix modulus (Em), and permeability (k). Cartilage disks were also examined histologically. Compared with controls, significant decreases in SPI (to 32.3±5.5% of control values, prefrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were detected at day 6. A trend toward detecting a decrease in SPI (to 94.2±6.2% of control values, p=0.083) was identified following a single freeze-thaw cycle, but no detectable changes were observed for any biomechanical parameters. All numbers are mean±95% confidence interval. These results indicate that fresh cartilage can be stored in a humid chamber at 4°C for a maximum of 6 days with no detrimental effects to cartilage electromechanical and biomechanical properties, while one freeze-thaw cycle produces minimal deterioration of biomechanical and electromechanical properties. A comparison to literature suggested that particular attention should be paid to the manner in which specimens are thawed after freezing, specifically by minimizing thawing time at higher temperatures.

  1. Comparing dynamical systems concepts and techniques for biomechanical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E.A. van Emmerik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional biomechanical analyses of human movement are generally derived from linear mathematics. While these methods can be useful in many situations, they do not describe behaviors in human systems that are predominately nonlinear. For this reason, nonlinear analysis methods based on a dynamical systems approach have become more prevalent in recent literature. These analysis techniques have provided new insights into how systems (1 maintain pattern stability, (2 transition into new states, and (3 are governed by short- and long-term (fractal correlational processes at different spatio-temporal scales. These different aspects of system dynamics are typically investigated using concepts related to variability, stability, complexity, and adaptability. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast these different concepts and demonstrate that, although related, these terms represent fundamentally different aspects of system dynamics. In particular, we argue that variability should not uniformly be equated with stability or complexity of movement. In addition, current dynamic stability measures based on nonlinear analysis methods (such as the finite maximal Lyapunov exponent can reveal local instabilities in movement dynamics, but the degree to which these local instabilities relate to global postural and gait stability and the ability to resist external perturbations remains to be explored. Finally, systematic studies are needed to relate observed reductions in complexity with aging and disease to the adaptive capabilities of the movement system and how complexity changes as a function of different task constraints.

  2. The importance of assessing corneal biomechanical properties in glaucoma patients care – a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalescu, Dana; Corbu, Catalina; Vasile, Potop; Iancu, Raluca; Cristea, Miruna; Ionescu, Catalina; Radu Constantin, Ciuluvica; Voinea, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to familiarize the public with the role of corneal biomechanics in glaucoma patient management. Methods: Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) is the only device that measures in vivo corneal biomechanics. Recent studies regarding “corneal biomechanics and glaucoma” were reviewed and the obtained data were compared in order to present a better understanding of the corneal biomechanical properties involvement in glaucoma care. Results: According to the studies reviewed, in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) the mean corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) were approximately 2 mmHg lower than in normal eyes. In ocular hypertension (OH), the mean CH was about 1mmHg higher than in POAG patients and 1mmHg lower than in the control group, while the mean CRF was about 2mmHg higher than in POAG and 1mmHg higher than in the control group. Regarding the normal tension glaucoma (NTG), there were studies that showed that the mean CH and CRF were approximately 1mmHg lower than in POAG and studies that showed similar values between the POAG and NTG groups. The mean CH did not differ much between POAG and angle closure glaucoma (ACG), being lower than in normal individuals, while CRF appeared to be higher in the ACG than in normal individuals. Concerning congenital glaucoma (CG), both CH and CRF were about 2mmHg lower than in normal eyes. Conclusions: Corneal biomechanics influenced the IOP measurement and have been proven to be of a great significance in glaucoma patients regardless of the central corneal thickness (CCT). Lower values of CH and CRF could suggest an alteration in the corneal response associated to glaucoma. PMID:29450353

  3. The importance of assessing corneal biomechanical properties in glaucoma patients care - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalescu, Dana; Corbu, Catalina; Vasile, Potop; Iancu, Raluca; Cristea, Miruna; Ionescu, Catalina; Radu Constantin, Ciuluvica; Voinea, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to familiarize the public with the role of corneal biomechanics in glaucoma patient management. Methods: Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) is the only device that measures in vivo corneal biomechanics. Recent studies regarding "corneal biomechanics and glaucoma" were reviewed and the obtained data were compared in order to present a better understanding of the corneal biomechanical properties involvement in glaucoma care. Results: According to the studies reviewed, in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) the mean corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) were approximately 2 mmHg lower than in normal eyes. In ocular hypertension (OH), the mean CH was about 1mmHg higher than in POAG patients and 1mmHg lower than in the control group, while the mean CRF was about 2mmHg higher than in POAG and 1mmHg higher than in the control group. Regarding the normal tension glaucoma (NTG), there were studies that showed that the mean CH and CRF were approximately 1mmHg lower than in POAG and studies that showed similar values between the POAG and NTG groups. The mean CH did not differ much between POAG and angle closure glaucoma (ACG), being lower than in normal individuals, while CRF appeared to be higher in the ACG than in normal individuals. Concerning congenital glaucoma (CG), both CH and CRF were about 2mmHg lower than in normal eyes. Conclusions: Corneal biomechanics influenced the IOP measurement and have been proven to be of a great significance in glaucoma patients regardless of the central corneal thickness (CCT). Lower values of CH and CRF could suggest an alteration in the corneal response associated to glaucoma.

  4. Biomechanical and biochemical properties of the thoracic aorta in warmblood horses, Friesian horses, and Friesians with aortic rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saey, Veronique; Famaey, Nele; Smoljkic, Marija; Claeys, Erik; van Loon, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Ploeg, Margreet; Delesalle, Catherine; Gröne, Andrea; Duchateau, Luc; Chiers, Koen

    2015-11-18

    Thoracic aortic rupture and aortopulmonary fistulation are rare conditions in horses. It mainly affects Friesian horses. Intrinsic differences in biomechanical properties of the aortic wall might predispose this breed. The biomechanical and biochemical properties of the thoracic aorta were characterized in warmblood horses, unaffected Friesian horses and Friesians with aortic rupture in an attempt to unravel the underlying pathogenesis of aortic rupture in Friesian horses. Samples of the thoracic aorta at the ligamentum arteriosum (LA), mid thoracic aorta (T1) and distal thoracic aorta (T2) were obtained from Friesian horses with aortic rupture (A), nonaffected Friesian (NA) and warmblood horses (WB). The biomechanical properties of these samples were determined using uniaxial tensile and rupture assays. The percentages of collagen and elastin (mg/mg dry weight) were quantified. Data revealed no significant biomechanical nor biochemical differences among the different groups of horses. The distal thoracic aorta displayed an increased stiffness associated with a higher collagen percentage in this area and a higher load-bearing capacity compared to the more proximal segments. Our findings match reported findings in other animal species. Study results did not provide evidence that the predisposition of the Friesian horse breed for aortic rupture can be attributed to altered biomechanical properties of the aortic wall.

  5. Corneal Biomechanical Properties in High Myopia Measured by Dynamic Scheimpflug Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Miao; Wang, Wei; Ding, Hui; Zhong, Xingwu

    2017-12-01

    The cornea is a viscoelastic tissue with viscous and elastic properties. The information of corneal biomechanical changes in high myopia has implications for understanding the pathogenesis of high myopia and primary open angle glaucoma. However, the knowledge of corneal biomechanics in high myopia is limited. To compare the corneal biomechanical properties in high-myopia subjects and emmetropia subjects. Dynamic Scheimpflug imaging technology was used to measure intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, and corneal biomechanical parameters, including time at the first applanation, velocity at the first applanation, length at the first applanation, deformation amplitude at the first applanation, time at the second applanation, A2V (velocity at the second applanation), length at the second applanation (A2L), deformation amplitude at the second applanation, time at the highest concavity, radius curvature at the highest concavity (HCR), maximal deformation amplitude (MDA), and peak distance. This study included 40 subjects with high myopia and 61 emmetropia subjects. The high-myopia demonstrated greater MDA compared with the emmetropia (1.07 ± 0.01 vs. 1.02 ± 0.01 mm; P myopia exhibited a smaller HCR, greater MDA, faster A2V and shorter A2L, with a pooled mean difference of -0.21 mm (95% confidential interval [95% CI], -0.30 to -0.13; P myopia showed a significantly smaller HCR, greater MDA, faster A2V, and shorter A2L than did those with emmetropia, which indicated that the cornea in an eye with high myopia becomes weaker and more deformable.

  6. Steven Vogel and His Theory of Comparative Biomechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Bio-Cyber Physical Systems) or a suffix (e.g.,. Mathematical Biology). The traditional fields of biology and mechanics present a peculiar problem when they are combined together because biomechanics and mechanobiology are both used, the latter being much younger than the former. How is mechanobiology dif-.

  7. Biomechanical properties of a novel biodegradable magnesium-based interference screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ezechieli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57. Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05. Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesiumbased screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32. MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future.

  8. Biomechanical Properties of a Novel Biodegradable Magnesium-Based Interference Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezechieli, Marco; Meyer, Hanna; Lucas, Arne; Helmecke, Patrick; Becher, Christoph; Calliess, Tilman; Windhagen, Henning; Ettinger, Max

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA) were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57). Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05). Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesium-based screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32). MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future. PMID:27433303

  9. Influence of corneal biomechanical properties on surgically induced astigmatism in cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Alexandre; Ricaud, Xavier; Van Went, Charles; Labbé, Antoine; Baudouin, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    To perform an overall follow-up of the morphologic, optical, and biomechanical properties of the cornea to determine new parameters influencing the refractive outcomes of cataract surgery. Clinical study. Patients scheduled for cataract surgery were assessed for surgically induced corneal astigmatism (SIA) and higher-order aberrations, (HOAs) using a Scheimpflug rotating camera (Pentacam) together with corneal imaging by optical coherence tomography (Spectralis) and biomechanical analysis by the Ocular Response Analyzer preoperatively and 1, 7, and 30 days postoperatively. The central and peripheral corneal thicknesses; incision width, length, and architecture; corneal hysteresis (CH); and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were computed to identify new parameters influencing corneal optical changes that determine the final refractive result. The study enrolled 40 patients (40 eyes). The SIA and HOAs were significantly lower after microincision surgery (≤ 2.2 mm) than after small-incision surgery (2.75 mm) (both Pincision compared with a constructed incision (Pincision width (Pincision width (Pinfluence of incision size on SIA, CH also modulates optical changes. The biomechanical features of the cornea should be taken into account preoperatively to better predict the refractive outcomes of cataract surgery. Copyright © 2013 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparing dynamical systems concepts and techniques for biomechanical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    van Emmerik, Richard E.A.; Ducharme, Scott W.; Amado, Avelino C.; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Traditional biomechanical analyses of human movement are generally derived from linear mathematics. While these methods can be useful in many situations, they do not describe behaviors in human systems that are predominately nonlinear. For this reason, nonlinear analysis methods based on a dynamical systems approach have become more prevalent in recent literature. These analysis techniques have provided new insights into how systems (1) maintain pattern stability, (2) transition into new stat...

  11. Biomechanical properties of osteoporotic rat femurs after different hormonal treatments: genistein, estradiol, and estradiol/progesterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azboy İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of the study is to compare the effects of genistein, estradiol, estradiol/progesterone combination on the bone mineral density and biomechanical properties of ovariectomized rats’ bone. Methods: 50 female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Bilaterally ovaeriectomy were performed in all groups except the sham-operated group. Groups were a sham-operated group and a control group (water was given, estradiol treated group (17-β estradiol 0.015 mg/kg per day, genistein treated group (genistein 10 mg/kg per day, and an estradiol/progesterone combination group (17-β estradiol 0.015 mg/kg plus drosperinone 0.028 mg/kg per day. The water or hormones were implemented in relevant groups for eight weeks by orogasthric catheter. The bone mineral density and biomechanical properties of the femur were analyzed. Results: Genistein, estradiol, and estradiol/progesterone groups increased bone mineral density significantly compared to the control group. In diaphysis and metaphysis bending test, all groups had higher peak load values than the control group. There were statistically significant differences between the estrogen/progesterone group and control group in diaphysis bending with regard to peak load. There were statistically significant differences between the estradiol and control groups in metaphysis bending with regard to peak load. In axial rotation test, all groups had higher peak torque values than the control groups. Conclusions: Genistein, estradiol and estrogen/progesterone combination improved the biomechanical properties of the ovariectomized rat bone. Genistein which has less side effects may be considered as an alternative in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  12. Effect of estrogen on tendon collagen synthesis, tendon structural characteristics, and biomechanical properties in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kongsgaard, Mads; Holm, Lars

    2009-01-01

    and fibril characteristics were determined by MRI and transmission electron microscopy, whereas tendon biomechanical properties were measured during isometric maximal voluntary contraction by ultrasound recording. Tendon FSR was markedly higher in ERT users (P

  13. Comparing the Main Anthropometric and Biomechanical Indexes in Male Adult Wushu Athletes in Taolu and Sanda Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azam daneshvar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main aim of the study was comparing the main anthropometric and biomechanics indexes in elite male adult Wushu athletes in both Taolu and Sanda disciplines.  Methods: The sample of the present study included 20 elite male Wushu athletes who were checked for 33 anthropometric and 11 biomechanical indexes. The normality of the data was checked by Kolmogorov–Smirnov normality measure. Factor Analysis was run to determine the main indexes and independent samples .T-test was used at a significance level of p<0.05 to compare the means. Results: The results showed that in Taolu group, sitting height, waist to pelvic circumference ratio and body fat percentage were higher. Also, the weight, arm length, leg length, head circumference, arm circumference in contraction, shoulder width, the width of the wrist and body mass index were greater in the Sanda group. There was a meaningful difference between endurance indices, lower limb  muscular strength, semi dynamic balance in posterior-lateral direction, semi dynamic balance in right-anterior direction, semi dynamic balance in posterior-medial direction, semi dynamic balance in posterior-lateral direction (p<0.05.   Conclusion: There is a significant difference in the main anthropometric and biomechanical indicators of Wushu in both Taolu and Sanda disciplines. It appears that balance, endurance – strength of foot in the biomechanical properties are the most important Indicators in Taolu.

  14. Biomechanical properties of jaw periosteum-derived mineralized culture on different titanium topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Att, Wael; Kubo, Katsutoshi; Yamada, Masahiro; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the biomechanical properties of periosteum-derived mineralized culture on different surface topographies of titanium. Titanium surfaces modified by machining or by acid etching were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Rat mandibular periosteum-derived cells were cultured on either of the titanium surfaces. Cell proliferation was evaluated by cell counts, and gene expression was analyzed using a reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) stain assay was employed to evaluate osteoblastic activity. Matrix mineralization was examined via von Kossa stain assay, total calcium deposition, and SEM. The hardness and elastic modulus of mineralized cultures were measured using a nano-indenter. The machined surface demonstrated a flat topographic configuration, while the acid-etched surface revealed a uniform micron-scale roughness. Both cell density and ALP activity were significantly higher on the machined surface than on the acid-etched surface. The expression of bone-related genes was up-regulated or enhanced on the acid-etched surface compared to the machined surface. Von Kossa stain showed significantly greater positive areas for the machined surface compared to the acid-etched surface, while total calcium deposition was statistically similar. Mineralized culture on the acid-etched surface was characterized by denser calcium deposition, more mature collagen deposition on the superficial layer, and larger and denser globular matrices inside the matrix than the culture on the machined surface. The mineralized matrix on the acid-etched surface was two times harder than on the machined surface, whereas the elastic modulus was comparable between the two surfaces. The design of this study can be used as a model to evaluate the effect of implant surface topography on the biomechanical properties of periosteum-derived mineralized culture. The results suggest that mandibular periosteal cells respond to different

  15. Biomechanical Properties of the Cornea Measured With the Dynamic Scheimpflug Analyzer in Young Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hun; Kang, David Sung Yong; Ha, Byoung Jin; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Eung Kweon; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Kim, Ha Yan; Kim, Tae-Im

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the biomechanical properties of the cornea using the dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer in young healthy adults. This prospective cross-sectional population study included 944 eyes of 472 participants aged 20 to 40 years. Participants underwent ophthalmic investigations, including evaluation of biomechanical properties of the cornea using the dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer, manifest refraction, and measurements of keratometric values by autokeratometry, intraocular pressure (IOP) by noncontact tonometer, central corneal thickness (CCT) by ultrasound, and white-to-white distance by Scheimpflug tomography. Statistical analyses included determination of the reference interval with a bootstrapping method, linear quantile mixed-effects model, and Spearman correlation analysis between the corneal biomechanical parameters and other variables (age, manifest refraction spherical equivalent, CCT, IOP, white-to-white, and keratometric values). The 90% CIs of all corneal biomechanical parameters demonstrated that the ranges of the 90% CIs for the reference data were almost identical with and without bootstrapping. Quantile regression to determine the fifth, 50th, and 95th percentiles of each corneal biomechanical parameter supported the findings from the nonparametric method with the 90% CIs. Correlation analysis showed significant correlations between the parameters and variables, but there was a relatively high Spearman correlation coefficient in the case of the correlations with the CCT and IOP. Using data from a large population of young healthy adults, we developed a database of normal values for multiple corneal biomechanical parameters obtained from the dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer. We conclude that the biomechanical properties of the cornea are influenced by the CCT and IOP.

  16. Identification of biomechanical properties in vivo in human uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Donghua; Hee, Lene; Sandager, Puk; Uldbjerg, Niels; Gregersen, Hans

    2014-11-01

    The course and outcome of pregnancy is closely correlated to change of biomechanical properties of the uterine cervix. The aim of this study was to build a non-linear, fiber reinforced mechanical model of the cervix for estimation of mechanical characteristics of the cervix in early- and term-pregnant women based on recordings of in vivo pressure and diameter by means of the Functional Luminal Imaging Probe (FLIP) technology. Five early- and six term-pregnant women were examined with a FLIP probe. The bag on the probe was inserted into the cervical canal for concomitant measurement of diameters at 16 serial locations along the canal and the bag pressure. The bag was inflated to a maximum volume of 50 ml. A three-fiber-families model including isotropic elastin-dominated matrix and anisotropic collagen was introduced to describe the mechanical behavior of the cervical canal. The unknown geometric and mechanical parameters were calculated on the basis of the mid-cervical diameters and the intraluminal pressures during the inflation. The wall thickness in the unloaded state (zero pressure applied) and mechanical properties of the matrix material (c) and collagens (c1, c2) were estimated with good fits of the calculated intraluminal pressures to the FLIP recordings during the cervical canal distension. No significant difference in the wall thickness was found between the early- and term-pregnant women (10.3 ± 0.8mm vs. 11.7 ± 2.2mm, p=0.30). The cervical matrix material and the collagen in the early-pregnant women were much stiffer than that in the term-pregnant women (pcervix wall were remodeled during pregnancy. The mechanical model can be applied to other tubular visceral organs where concomitant measures of pressure and diameter can be obtained for better understanding diseases and their evolution or treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel flavonoid C-glucoside from Ulmus wallichiana preserves bone mineral density, microarchitecture and biomechanical properties in the presence of glucocorticoid by promoting osteoblast survival: a comparative study with human parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M P; Mishra, J S; Sharan, K; Yadav, M; Singh, A K; Srivastava, A; Kumar, S; Bhaduaria, S; Maurya, R; Sanyal, S; Chattopadhyay, N

    2013-11-15

    6-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S,3S)-(+)-5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxydihydroflavonol (GTDF) is a novel compound isolated from Ulmus wallichiana, reported to have bone anabolic action in ovariectomized rats. Here, we studied the effect of GTDF in glucocorticoid (GC)-induced bone loss and its mode of action. Osteoblasts were cultured from rat calvaria or bone marrow to study apoptosis and differentiation by dexamethasone (Dex), methylprednisolone (MP), GTDF, quercetin and rutin. Female Sprague Dawley rats were treated with Dex or MP with or without GTDF or PTH. Efficacy was evaluated by bone microarchitecture using microcomputed tomography, determination of new bone formation by fluorescent labeling of bone and osteoblast apoptosis by co-labeling bone sections with Runx-2 and TUNEL. Serum osteocalcin was determined by ELISA. GTDF preserved trabecular and cortical bones in the presence of Dex and MP and mitigated the MP-mediated suppression of serum osteocalcin. Co-administration of GTDF to MP rats increased mineral apposition, bone formation rates, bone biomechanical strength, reduced osteoblast apoptosis and increased osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells compared to MP group, suggesting in vivo osteogenic effect of GTDF. These effects of GTDF were to a great extent comparable to PTH. GTDF prevented GC-induced osteoblast apoptosis by inhibiting p53 expression and acetylation, and activation of AKT but did not influence transactivation of GC receptor (GR). GTDF protects against GC-induced bone loss by promoting osteoblast survival through p53 inhibition and activation of AKT pathways but not as a GR antagonist. GTDF has the potential in the management of GC-induced osteopenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    OpenAIRE

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength we...

  19. Influences of Desmin and Keratin 19 on Passive Biomechanical Properties of Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer B. Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In skeletal muscle fibers, forces must be transmitted between the plasma membrane and the intracellular contractile lattice, and within this lattice between adjacent myofibrils. Based on their prevalence, biomechanical properties and localization, desmin and keratin intermediate filaments (IFs are likely to participate in structural connectivity and force transmission. We examined the passive load-bearing response of single fibers from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles of young (3 months and aged (10 months wild-type, desmin-null, K19-null, and desmin/K19 double-null mice. Though fibers are more compliant in all mutant genotypes compared to wild-type, the structural response of each genotype is distinct, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which desmin and keratin influence the biomechanical properties of myofibers. This work provides additional insight into the influences of IFs on structure-function relationships in skeletal muscle. It may also have implications for understanding the progression of desminopathies and other IF-related myopathies.

  20. Static and dynamic biomechanical properties of the regenerating rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Koji; Noguchi, Masahiko; Ikoma, Kazuya; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2008-07-01

    Since tendons show viscoelastic behavior, dynamic viscoelastic properties should be assessed in addition to static biomechanical properties. We evaluated differences between static and dynamic biomechanical properties of the regenerating rabbit Achilles tendon following tenotomy. At 3, 6, or 12 weeks after right Achilles tenotomy, the right (regenerating) and left (control) tendons were collected with the calcaneus from 49 rabbits. A unidirectional failure test and a dynamic viscoelastic test were conducted. Tensile strength and Young's modulus (static biomechanical properties) in the regenerating group at Week 6 were significantly greater than at Week 3, while at Week 12, these were significantly greater than at Week 6. However, even at Week 12, both parameters were less than in the control group. The value of tan delta represents dynamic viscoelasticity, a smaller tan delta indicates greater elasticity. tan delta for the regenerating group was significantly greater than for the control group at Week 3, but regenerating and control groups did not significantly differ at Week 6. No marked change was seen from Weeks 6 to 12 in the regenerating group, and no significant difference in tan delta was evident between the regenerating and control groups at Week 12. Dynamic biomechanical properties of regenerating rabbit Achilles tendons may improve more rapidly than static biomechanical properties. Ability to tolerate dynamic movement in the healing Achilles tendon may improve more rapidly than ability to withstand static stresses.

  1. Spinal biomechanical properties are significantly altered with a novel embalming method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, Roderick M; Faraj, Sayf S A; Kingma, Idsart; van Royen, Barend J; de Kleuver, Marinus; van der Veen, Albert J

    2017-04-11

    In vitro tests on the biomechanical properties of human spines are often performed using fresh frozen specimens. However, this carries the risk of pathogen transfer from specimen to the worker and the specimens can only be used for a limited amount of time. Human spinal specimens embalmed with formaldehyde carry an almost absent risk of transfer of pathogens and can be stored and used for a long time, but the tissue properties are strongly affected making this method inapplicable for biomechanical testing. In this study, a new embalming technique called Fix for Life (F4L), which claims to preserve the tissue properties, was tested. The range of motion (ROM) and stiffness of six fresh human spinal specimens was measured using a spinal motion simulator before and after F4L embalming. After F4L embalming, spinal stiffness increased in flexion-extension by 230%, in lateral bending by 284% and in axial rotation by 271%. ROM decreased by 46% in flexion-extension, 56% in lateral bending and 54% in axial rotation. In conclusion, based on this study, F4L does not maintain physiological spinal biomechanical properties, and we propose that this method should not be used for biomechanical studies. Nevertheless, the method may be an alternative to formaldehyde fixation in situations such as training and education because the effect on spinal biomechanics is less detrimental than formaldehyde and tissue color is maintained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of corneal biomechanical properties following penetrating keratoplasty using ocular response analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanathi Murugesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate corneal biomechanical properties in eyes that has undergone penetrating keratoplasty (PK. Materials and Methods: Retrospective observational study in a tertiary care centre. Data recorded included ocular response analyzer (ORA values of normal and post-keratoplasty eyes [corneal hysteresis (CH, corneal resistance factor (CRF, Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg, and cornea-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc], corneal topography, and central corneal thickness (CCT. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to analyze the difference in ORA parameter between post-PK eyes and normal eyes. Correlation between parameters was evaluated with Spearman′s rho correlation. Results: The ORA study of 100 eyes of 50 normal subjects and 54 post-keratoplasty eyes of 51 patients showed CH of 8.340 ± 1.85 and 9.923 ± 1.558, CRF of 8.846 ± 2.39 and 9.577 ± 1.631 in post-PK eyes and normal eyes, respectively. CH and CRF did not correlate with post-keratoplasty astigmatism (P = 0.311 and 0.276, respectively while a significant correlation was observed with IOPg (P = 0.004 and IOPcc (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Biomechanical profiles were significantly decreased in post-keratoplasty eyes with significant correlation with higher IOP as compared with that in normal eyes.

  3. Corneal biomechanical properties after femtosecond laser assisted LASIK with the corneal visualization Scheimpflug technology and ocular response analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the changes of corneal biomechanical properties before and after femtosecond laser assisted LASIK(FS-LASIKusing Corneal Visualisation Scheimpflug Technology(Corvis STand Ocular Response Analyzer(ORA, and the correlation with other myopic parameters. METHODS:Sixty three patients(63 eyeswho had myopic femtosecond laser assisted LASIK(FS-LASIKwere enrolled in the study. The right eye of each patient was analyzed in this study. The corneal biomechanical parameters pre-operative and 1mo post-operative was measured with the Corvis ST(Oculus, Wetzlar, Germanyand ORA(Reichert, Buffalo, New York, USA. Comparison of the biomechanical property values before and after surgery was peformed using Paired t-test or Mann-Whitney U. Pearson or Spearman correlations were used to evaluate the relationship between parameters.RESULTS: The postoperative 1st A-time, Vin, 2nd A length, Vout, HC time and Radius demonstrate significant decreases comparing with preoperative values(P=0.00, P=0.00, P=0.00, P=0.00, P=0.00, P=0.00 respectively. The postoperative 2nd A-time, DA and PD significantly increases(P=0.00, P=0.00, P=0.00, however, the 1st A length had no significant difference after surgery. The CH and CRF were significantly lower after FS-LASIK(P=0.00, P=0.00. A statistically significant correlation coefficient was found between preoperative central corneal thickness(CCTwith postoperative-preoperative changes of 1st A-time, 2nd A-time, DA and Radius respectively(P=0.01, P=0.04, P=0.03, P=0.01. CONCLUSION:There were significantly changes of corneal biomechanical properties after FS-LASIK surgery. The changes of corneal biomechanical properties after FS-LASIK can be reflected by some parameters of Corvis ST and ORA. The mainly influence of corneal biomechanical alteration was possibly correlation with corneal thickness.

  4. Changes in biomechanical properties of the cornea after modified transepithelial crosslinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Medvedev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in biomechanical properties of the cornea after conducting transepithelial crosslinking with the prior application of a 40 % glucose solution.Materials and methods. Just studied the biomechanical properties of the corneas of six rabbits breed Chinchilla (12 eyes. 4 rabbit entered in the experimental group, in which in one eye glucose solution was applied on the cornea and allowed to stay for 10 minutes, followed by the instillation of 0.1 % Riboflavin solution for 30 minutes. On a couple of the rabbit eye was applied a solution of Riboflavin without prior instillation of glucose. Then carried out the procedure of irradiation according to the conventional technology with UV with a wavelength of 370 μm and a beam energy of 3.0 mW / cm2. Two rabbits (4 eyes were included in the control group, in which crosslinking was not performed. After 1 month the euthanasia of the animals was performed with subsequent enucleation for corneal research on a tensile testing machine. In the control and experimental group compared, the relaxation curves and the following parameters were analyzed: initial stress (MPa, equilibrium stress (MPa modulus of elasticity.Results and their discussion. After the crosslinking the rise of the initial stress (in the control group and 0.7+0.1 MPa, in the experimental and 1.5+0.2 1.3+0.3 MPa, respectively. The stress relaxation is fast (equilibrium stress value is reached after 250 sec. and after the administration of glucose for approximately 75 seconds, which means a greater rigidity of experimental group of samples. In the experimental groups significantly changed and the modulus of elasticity: its value has increased approximately in 2 times in comparison with control samples. The equilibrium stress values in the experimental groups were different from the zero value that also indicates a change in the chemical structure of the samples.Conclusions. Holding transepithelial of

  5. Spinal biomechanical properties are significantly altered with a novel embalming method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holewijn, Roderick M.; Faraj, Sayf S.A.; Kingma, Idsart; van Royen, Barend J.; de Kleuver, Marinus; van der Veen, Albert J.

    2017-01-01

    In vitro tests on the biomechanical properties of human spines are often performed using fresh frozen specimens. However, this carries the risk of pathogen transfer from specimen to the worker and the specimens can only be used for a limited amount of time. Human spinal specimens embalmed with

  6. Spinal biomechanical properties are significantly altered with a novel embalming method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holewijn, R.M.; Faraj, S.S.; Kingma, I.; Royen, B.J. van; Kleuver, M. de; Veen, A.J. van der

    2017-01-01

    In vitro tests on the biomechanical properties of human spines are often performed using fresh frozen specimens. However, this carries the risk of pathogen transfer from specimen to the worker and the specimens can only be used for a limited amount of time. Human spinal specimens embalmed with

  7. Impact of oral contraceptive use and menstrual phases on patellar tendon morphology, biochemical composition and biomechanical properties in female athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Couppe, Christian; Hansen, Christina S

    2013-01-01

    biomechanical properties, tendon fibril characteristics or collagen cross-linking was observed between the OC-users and non-users, or between the different phases of the menstrual cycle. In athletes, tendon CSA in the preferred jumping leg tended to be larger than the contra-lateral leg (p=0.09), and a greater...... absolute (p=0.01) and normalized tendon stiffness (p=0.02), as well as a lower strain (p=0.04) were observed in the jumping leg compared to the contra-lateral leg. Conclusion: The results indicate that long-term OC use or menstrual phases does not influence structure or mechanical properties...

  8. The effects of intratendinous and retrocalcaneal intrabursal injections of corticosteroid on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugate, Ronald; Pennypacker, Jason; Saunders, Marnie; Juliano, Paul

    2004-04-01

    The use of corticosteroid injections in the treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis is controversial. We assessed the effects of corticosteroid injections, both within the tendon substance and into the retrocalcaneal bursa, on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons. The systemic effects of bilateral corticosteroid injections were also studied. The rabbits were divided into three treatment groups. The rabbits in Group I received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of normal saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, those in Group II received injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the left side and injections of saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, and those in Group III received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the right. These injections were given weekly for three weeks. At four weeks after the final injection, the tendons were harvested and were tested biomechanically to determine failure load, midsubstance strain and total strain, modulus of elasticity, failure stress, and total energy absorbed. The site of failure was also documented. The groups were compared according to the location of the injections, the type of injection (steroid or saline solution), and the total systemic load of steroid. Specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of corticosteroid showed significantly decreased failure stress compared with those from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of saline solution (p = 0.008). Specimens from limbs that had received intrabursal injections of corticosteroid demonstrated significantly decreased failure stress (p = 0.05), significantly decreased total energy absorbed (p = 0.017), and significantly increased total strain (p = 0.049) compared with specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous

  9. Fully automated segmentation of callus by micro-CT compared to biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, Oliver; Götz, Carolin; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Prodinger, Peter Michael; Tischer, Thomas

    2017-07-11

    A high percentage of closed femur fractures have slight comminution. Using micro-CT (μCT), multiple fragment segmentation is much more difficult than segmentation of unfractured or osteotomied bone. Manual or semi-automated segmentation has been performed to date. However, such segmentation is extremely laborious, time-consuming and error-prone. Our aim was to therefore apply a fully automated segmentation algorithm to determine μCT parameters and examine their association with biomechanics. The femura of 64 rats taken after randomised inhibitory or neutral medication, in terms of the effect on fracture healing, and controls were closed fractured after a Kirschner wire was inserted. After 21 days, μCT and biomechanical parameters were determined by a fully automated method and correlated (Pearson's correlation). The fully automated segmentation algorithm automatically detected bone and simultaneously separated cortical bone from callus without requiring ROI selection for each single bony structure. We found an association of structural callus parameters obtained by μCT to the biomechanical properties. However, results were only explicable by additionally considering the callus location. A large number of slightly comminuted fractures in combination with therapies that influence the callus qualitatively and/or quantitatively considerably affects the association between μCT and biomechanics. In the future, contrast-enhanced μCT imaging of the callus cartilage might provide more information to improve the non-destructive and non-invasive prediction of callus mechanical properties. As studies evaluating such important drugs increase, fully automated segmentation appears to be clinically important.

  10. Static and fatigue biomechanical properties of anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems. A synthetic testing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Y; Cunningham, B W; Parker, L M; Kanayama, M; McAfee, P C

    1999-07-15

    A mechanical testing standard for anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems was introduced, using a synthetic model. Twelve recent instrumentation systems were tested in static and fatigue modes. To establish the testing standard for anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems using a synthetic model and to evaluate the static and fatigue biomechanical properties of 12 anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems. Although numerous studies have been performed to evaluate the biomechanics of anterior spinal instrumentation using a cadaveric or animal tissue, problems of specimen variation, lack of reproducibility, and inability to perform fatigue testing have been pointed out. In no studies has a precise synthetic testing standard for anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation systems been described. An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene cylinder was designed according to the anatomic dimensions of the vertebral body. Two cylinders spanned by spinal instrumentation simulated a total corpectomy defect, and a compressive lateral bending load was applied. The instrumentation assembly was precisely standardized. The static destructive and fatigue tests up to 2 million cycles at three load levels were conducted, followed by the failure mode analysis. Twelve anterior instrumentation systems, consisting of five plate and seven rod systems were compared in stiffness, bending strength, and cycles to failure. Static and fatigue test parameters both demonstrated highly significant differences between devices. The stiffness ranged from 280.5 kN/m in the Synthes plate (Synthes, Paoli, PA) to 67.9 kN/m in the Z-plate ATL (SofamorDanek, Memphis, TN). The Synthes plate and Kaneda SR titanium (AcroMed, Cleveland, OH) formed the highest subset in bending strength of 1516.1 N and 1209.9 N, respectively, whereas the Z-plate showed the lowest value of 407.3 N. There were no substantial differences between plate and rod devices. In fatigue, only three systems: Synthes plate

  11. Biomechanical Properties of the Internal Limiting Membrane after Intravitreal Ocriplasmin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielmuth, Franziska; Schumann, Ricarda G; Spindler, Volker; Wolf, Armin; Scheler, Renate; Mayer, Wolfgang J; Henrich, Paul B; Haritoglou, Christos

    2016-01-01

    To assess the stiffness of the human internal limiting membrane (ILM) and evaluate potential changes of mechanical properties following intravitreal ocriplasmin injection for vitreomacular traction. This is an interventional comparative case series of 12 surgically excised ILM specimens consecutively obtained from 9 eyes of 9 patients after unsuccessful pharmacologic vitreolysis with ocriplasmin. During the same time period, 16 specimens from 13 other eyes without ocriplasmin treatment were harvested during vitrectomy and served as controls. All patients presented with macular holes or vitreomacular traction and underwent vitrectomy with ILM peeling either with or without brilliant blue (BB) staining. All specimens were analyzed using atomic force microscopy with scan regions of 25 × 25 μm. In all specimens, both the retinal side and vitreal side of the ILM were analyzed. Atomic force microscopy revealed no significant differences in elasticity of ILM specimens removed from eyes with or without ocriplasmin treatment. Undulated areas of the retinal side presented stiffer than the vitreal side of the ILM. Topographical mapping of both the vitreal and retinal side of the ILM showed no apparent alteration of the morphology in ocriplasmin-treated eyes compared to untreated eyes. Staining with BB resulted in an increase of tissue stiffness. Intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin does not change biomechanical properties of the human ILM. There is no evidence of a potential enzymatic effect of ocriplasmin interfering with the stiffness of this basement membrane. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Beware the black box: investigating the sensitivity of FEA simulations to modelling factors in comparative biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. Walmsley

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA is a computational technique of growing popularity in the field of comparative biomechanics, and is an easily accessible platform for form-function analyses of biological structures. However, its rapid evolution in recent years from a novel approach to common practice demands some scrutiny in regards to the validity of results and the appropriateness of assumptions inherent in setting up simulations. Both validation and sensitivity analyses remain unexplored in many comparative analyses, and assumptions considered to be ‘reasonable’ are often assumed to have little influence on the results and their interpretation.Here we report an extensive sensitivity analysis where high resolution finite element (FE models of mandibles from seven species of crocodile were analysed under loads typical for comparative analysis: biting, shaking, and twisting. Simulations explored the effect on both the absolute response and the interspecies pattern of results to variations in commonly used input parameters. Our sensitivity analysis focuses on assumptions relating to the selection of material properties (heterogeneous or homogeneous, scaling (standardising volume, surface area, or length, tooth position (front, mid, or back tooth engagement, and linear load case (type of loading for each feeding type.Our findings show that in a comparative context, FE models are far less sensitive to the selection of material property values and scaling to either volume or surface area than they are to those assumptions relating to the functional aspects of the simulation, such as tooth position and linear load case. Results show a complex interaction between simulation assumptions, depending on the combination of assumptions and the overall shape of each specimen. Keeping assumptions consistent between models in an analysis does not ensure that results can be generalised beyond the specific set of assumptions used. Logically, different

  13. Alterations in Leg Extensor Muscle-Tendon Unit Biomechanical Properties With Ageing and Mechanical Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher McCrum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tendons transfer forces produced by muscle to the skeletal system and can therefore have a large influence on movement effectiveness and safety. Tendons are mechanosensitive, meaning that they adapt their material, morphological and hence their mechanical properties in response to mechanical loading. Therefore, unloading due to immobilization or inactivity could lead to changes in tendon mechanical properties. Additionally, ageing may influence tendon biomechanical properties directly, as a result of biological changes in the tendon, and indirectly, due to reduced muscle strength and physical activity. This review aimed to examine age-related differences in human leg extensor (triceps surae and quadriceps femoris muscle-tendon unit biomechanical properties. Additionally, this review aimed to assess if, and to what extent mechanical loading interventions could counteract these changes in older adults. There appear to be consistent reductions in human triceps surae and quadriceps femoris muscle strength, accompanied by similar reductions in tendon stiffness and elastic modulus with ageing, whereas the effect on tendon cross sectional area is unclear. Therefore, the observed age-related changes in tendon stiffness are predominantly due to changes in tendon material rather than size with age. However, human tendons appear to retain their mechanosensitivity with age, as intervention studies report alterations in tendon biomechanical properties in older adults of similar magnitudes to younger adults over 12–14 weeks of training. Interventions should implement tendon strains corresponding to high mechanical loads (i.e., 80–90% MVC with repetitive loading for up to 3–4 months to successfully counteract age-related changes in leg extensor muscle-tendon unit biomechanical properties.

  14. Biomechanical properties of human thoracic spine disc segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B D Stemper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The objective was to determine the age-dependent compressive and tensile properties of female and male thoracic spine segments using postmortem human subjects (PMHS. Materials and Methods : Forty-eight thoracic disc segments at T4-5, T6-7, T8-9, and T10-11 levels from 12 PMHS T3-T11 spinal columns were divided into groups A and B based on specimen age and loaded in compression and tension. Stiffness and elastic modulus were computed. Stiffness was defined as the slope in the linear region of the force-displacement response. Elastic modulus was defined as the slope of the stress strain curve. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was used to determine significant differences (P< 0.05 in the disc cross-sectional area, stiffness, and elastic modulus based on gender, spinal level, and group. Results : Specimen ages in group A (28 ± 8 years were significantly lower than in group B (70 ± 7 years. Male discs had significantly greater area (7.2 ± 2.0 sq cm than female discs (5.9 ± 1.8 sq cm. Tensile and compressive stiffness values were significantly different between the two age groups, but not between gender and level. Specimens in group A had greater tensile (486 ± 108 N/mm and compressive (3300 ± 642 N/mm stiffness values compared to group B specimens (tension: 397 ± 124 N/mm, compression: 2527 ± 734 N/mm. Tensile and compressive elastic modulus values depended upon age group and gender, but not on level. Group A specimens had significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.9 ± 0.8 MPa, 19.5 ± 4.1 MPa than group B specimens (1.7 ± 0.6 MPa, 10.6 ± 3.4 MPa. Female specimens showed significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.6 ± 1.0 MPa, 16.6 ± 6.4 MPa than male specimens (2.0 ± 0.7 MPa, 13.7 ± 5.0 MPa. Discussion: Using the two groups to represent "young" and "old" specimens, this study showed that the mechanical response decreases in older specimens, and the decrease is greater in compressive than distractive

  15. Effect of electromagnetic fields on some biomechanical and biochemical properties of rat’s blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaseb, M. A.; Shahin, F. A.; Ali, F. M.; Baieth, H. A.

    2017-06-01

    In order to study the effect of electromagnetic fields (0.3 mT, 50 Hz) on some biomechanical and biochemical properties of rats’ blood, healthy thirty male albino rats of 150 ± 10 g were divided into three equal groups namely A, B1, B2. Group A used as a control group, group B1 was continuously exposed to a magnetic field of (0.3 mT, 50 Hz) for a period of 21 days for direct effect studies. Group B2 was continuously exposed to the same magnetic field for the same period of time, then was housed away from the magnetic field for a period of 45 days for delayed effects studies. After examination, the results indicated that the apparent viscosity and the consistency index increased significantly and very high significantly for groub B1 and B2 compared to control at Pbone marrow functions. These results are supported by the blood film image, where irregularities and deformations in the RBCs membranes had been occurred. We conclude that the cell membrane properties are highly affected by the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields, which proved to be biologically toxic.

  16. Impaired physical function, loss of muscle mass and assessment of biomechanical properties in critical ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum

    2012-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment. A plaus......Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment....... A plausible contributor to the accentuated catabolic drive in ICU patients is a synergistic response to inflammation and inactivity leading to loss of muscle mass. As these entities are predominantly present in the early phase of ICU stay, interventions employed during this time frame may exhibit the greatest...

  17. Comminuted supracondylar femoral fractures: a biomechanical analysis comparing the stability of medial versus lateral plating in axial loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Briffa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of medial and lateral plating of a medially comminuted supracondylar femoral fracture. A supracondylar femoral fracture model comparing two fixation methods was tested cyclically in axial loading. One-centimetre supracondylar gap osteotomies were created in six synthetic femurs approximately 6 cm proximal to the knee joint. There were two constructs investigated: group 1 and group 2 were stabilized with an 8-hole LC-DCP, medially and laterally, respectively. Both construct groups were axially loaded. Global displacement (total length, wedge displacement, bending moment and strain were measured. Medial plating showed a significantly decreased displacement, bending moment and strain at the fracture site in axial loading. Medial plating of a comminuted supracondylar femur fracture is more stable than lateral plating.

  18. Biomechanical properties of native and tissue engineered heart valve constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Ragaert, Kim; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Selimović, Seila; Paul, Arghya; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-06-27

    Due to the increasing number of heart valve diseases, there is an urgent clinical need for off-the-shelf tissue engineered heart valves. While significant progress has been made toward improving the design and performance of both mechanical and tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs), a human implantable, functional, and viable TEHV has remained elusive. In animal studies so far, the implanted TEHVs have failed to survive more than a few months after transplantation due to insufficient mechanical properties. Therefore, the success of future heart valve tissue engineering approaches depends on the ability of the TEHV to mimic and maintain the functional and mechanical properties of the native heart valves. However, aside from some tensile quasistatic data and flexural or bending properties, detailed mechanical properties such as dynamic fatigue, creep behavior, and viscoelastic properties of heart valves are still poorly understood. The need for better understanding and more detailed characterization of mechanical properties of tissue engineered, as well as native heart valve constructs is thus evident. In the current review we aim to present an overview of the current understanding of the mechanical properties of human and common animal model heart valves. The relevant data on both native and tissue engineered heart valve constructs have been compiled and analyzed to help in defining the target ranges for mechanical properties of TEHV constructs, particularly for the aortic and the pulmonary valves. We conclude with a summary of perspectives on the future work on better understanding of the mechanical properties of TEHV constructs. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Altered Biomechanical Properties of Gastrocnemius Tendons of Turkeys Infected with Turkey Arthritis Reovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer A. Sharafeldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turkey arthritis reovirus (TARV causes lameness and tenosynovitis in commercial turkeys and is often associated with gastrocnemius tendon rupture by the marketing age. This study was undertaken to characterize the biomechanical properties of tendons from reovirus-infected turkeys. One-week-old turkey poults were orally inoculated with O’Neil strain of TARV and observed for up to 16 weeks of age. Lameness was first observed at 8 weeks of age, which continued at 12 and 16 weeks. At 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age, samples were collected from legs. Left intertarsal joint with adjacent gastrocnemius tendon was collected and processed for histological examination. The right gastrocnemius tendon’s tensile strength and elasticity modulus were analyzed by stressing each tendon to the point of rupture. At 16 weeks of age, gastrocnemius tendons of TARV-infected turkeys showed significantly reduced (P<0.05 tensile strength and modulus of elasticity as compared to those of noninfected control turkeys. Gastrocnemius tendons revealed lymphocytic tendinitis/tenosynovitis beginning at 4 weeks of age, continuing through 8 and 12 weeks, and progressing to fibrosis from 12 to 16 weeks of age. We propose that tendon fibrosis is one of the key features contributing to reduction in tensile strength and elasticity of gastrocnemius tendons in TARV-infected turkeys.

  20. Bone plate composed of a ternary nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fiber composite: biomechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bo; Li, Jidong; Zhu, Qingmao; Guo, Shuquan; Qi, Xiaotong; Li, Weichao; Wu, Jun; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Dianming

    2014-01-01

    An ideal bone plate for internal fixation of bone fractures should have good biomechanical properties and biocompatibility. In this study, we prepared a new nondegradable bone plate composed of a ternary nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fiber (n-HA/PA66/GF) composite. A breakage area on the n-HA/PA66/GF plate surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Its mechanical properties were investigated using bone-plate constructs and biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The results confirmed that adhesion between the n-HA/PA66 matrix and the glass fibers was strong, with only a few fibers pulled out at the site of breakage. Fractures fixed by the n-HA/PA66/GF plate showed lower stiffness and had satisfactory strength compared with rigid fixation using a titanium plate. Moreover, the results with regard to mesenchymal stem cell morphology, MTT assay, Alizarin Red S staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin showed that the n-HA/PA66/GF composite was suitable for attachment and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells, and did not have a negative influence on matrix mineralization or osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. These observations indicate that the n-HA/PA66/GF plate has good biomechanical properties and biocompatibility, and may be considered a new option for internal fixation in orthopedic surgery.

  1. Effects of repeated ankle stretching on calf muscle-tendon and ankle biomechanical properties in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fan; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J; Harvey, Richard; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate changes in active and passive biomechanical properties of the calf muscle-tendon unit induced by controlled ankle stretching in stroke survivors. Ten stroke survivors with ankle spasticity/contracture and ten healthy control subjects received intervention of 60-min ankle stretching. Joint biomechanical properties including resistance torque, stiffness and index of hysteresis were evaluated pre- and post-intervention. Achilles tendon length was measured using ultrasonography. The force output of the triceps surae muscles was characterized via the torque-angle relationship, by stimulating the calf muscles at a controlled intensity across different ankle positions. Compared to healthy controls, the ankle position corresponding to the peak torque of the stroke survivors was shifted towards plantar flexion (Pcalf muscles in stroke survivors under matched stimulations (Pmuscle-tendon level, repeated stretching improved calf muscle force output, which might be associated with decreased muscle fascicle stiffness, increased fascicle length and shortening of the Achilles tendon. The study provided evidence of improvement in muscle tendon properties through stretching intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimungu, Joseph G; Loades, Kenneth W; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength were evaluated in plant roots grown in the greenhouse and in the field. Root anatomical phenes were found to be better predictors of root penetrability than root diameter per se and associated with smaller distal cortical region cell size. Smaller outer cortical region cells play an important role in stabilizing the root against ovalization and reducing the risk of local buckling and collapse during penetration, thereby increasing root penetration of hard layers. The use of stele diameter was found to be a better predictor of root tensile strength than root diameter. Cortical thickness, cortical cell count, cortical cell wall area and distal cortical cell size were stronger predictors of root bend strength than root diameter. Our results indicate that root anatomical phenes are important predictors for root penetrability of high-strength layers and root biomechanical properties. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. In Vivo Corneal Biomechanical Properties with Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology in Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the repeatability of recalculated corneal visualization Scheimpflug technology (CorVis ST parameters and to study the variation of biomechanical properties and their association with demographic and ocular characteristics. Methods. A total of 783 healthy subjects were included in this study. Comprehensive ophthalmological examinations were conducted. The repeatability of the recalculated biomechanical parameters with 90 subjects was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models were used to identify demographic and ocular factors. Results. The repeatability of the central corneal thickness (CCT, deformation amplitude (DA, and first/second applanation time (A1/A2-time exhibited excellent repeatability (CV% ≤ 3.312% and ICC ≥ 0.929 for all measurements. The velocity in/out (Vin/out, highest concavity- (HC- radius, peak distance (PD, and DA showed a normal distribution. Univariate linear regression showed a statistically significant correlation between Vin, Vout, DA, PD, and HC-radius and IOP, CCT, and corneal volume, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that IOP and CCT were negatively correlated with Vin, DA, and PD, while there was a positive correlation between Vout and HC-radius. Conclusion. The ICCs of the recalculated parameters, CCT, DA, A1-time, and A2-time, exhibited excellent repeatability. IOP, CCT, and corneal volume significantly influenced the biomechanical properties of the eye.

  4. Biomechanic changes in passive properties of hemiplegic ankles with spastic hypertonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun G; Van Rey, Elton; Bai, Zhiqiang; Roth, Elliot J; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2004-10-01

    To investigate quantitatively biomechanic changes in the passive properties of hemiplegic spastic ankles. Evaluation of spastic hypertonia by moving the ankle joint slowly between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion extreme positions under controlled joint torque and position. Institutional research center. Twenty-four stroke patients with spastic ankles and 32 healthy controls. Not applicable. Passive resistance torque at controlled dorsiflexion and plantarflexion positions, dorsiflexion and plantarflexion range of motion (ROM) at controlled torques, and quasistatic stiffness and energy loss in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Spastic hypertonic ankles showed significant alterations of the passive properties in plantarflexion (P=.041) as well as in dorsiflexion (P=.016) directions. Compared with healthy controls, spastic ankles showed higher resistance torque (9.51+/-4.79Nm vs 6.21+/-3.64Nm, P=.016), higher quasistatic stiffness (.54+/-.19Nm/deg vs .35+/-.20Nm/deg, P=.001) at 10 degrees of dorsiflexion, larger normalized dorsiflexion energy loss (.068+/-.04J/deg vs .04+/-.02J/deg, P=.037), and decreased dorsiflexion ROM at 10Nm of resistance torque (10.77 degrees +/-8.69 degrees vs 20.02 degrees +/-11.67 degrees , P=.014). The resistance torque, ROM, and stiffness of spastic hypertonic ankles in plantarflexion showed similar changes (Pbiomechanic changes in both plantar- and dorsiflexors are associated with spastic hypertonia of chronic stroke patients, and they can be evaluated quantitatively under well-controlled conditions. With simplifications, the various measures in this study can potentially be used to obtain more comprehensive and quantitative evaluations of spastic hypertonia in a clinical setting.

  5. Biomechanical properties of bone treated by magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound - an in vivo porcine model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Amir; Avivi, Eran; Brosh, Tamar; Schwartz, Ignat; Liberman, Boaz

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system uses MR imaging for real-time aiming of thermal ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors. Past clinical studies showed no increase in fracture rate after MRgFUS treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of MRgFUS treatment on mechanical properties of bone and correlate the effect to histological findings of treated bone. Four fully grown mini-pigs were treated by MRgFUS. Six consecutive right normal ribs were treated in each animal, and the left corresponding ribs served as controls. The animals were sacrificed at pre-set intervals (0, 2, 6 and 12weeks after treatment), and the treated and control bones were extracted. Mechanical properties of each bone were examined using three points bending studies for comparing treated bones to the corresponding controls. Histologic properties using Masson and hematoxylin-eosin stains were also compared. The ratio between treated and control biomechanical properties showed reduction in bone biomechanical properties at 6weeks post-MRgFUS treatment. The mean±SD yield load ratio and maximum ratios were 0.69±0.11 and 0.71±0.13, respectively (both p=0.031). These findings showed some recovery trend at 12weeks after treatment. Histological analysis showed a reduction in mean osteon size at 2weeks after treatment (0.58×10(-3)±0.1×10(-3)mm and 0.16×10(-3)±0.017×10(-3)mm) in control vs. treated bones, respectively (p=0.005). Treatment with the MRgFUS system resulted in a ~30% reduction in mechanical strength at 6weeks post-treatment. The reduction showed a reversible trend, with a 25%-20% decrease in strength at 12weeks post-treatment. © 2013.

  6. Effects of heat treatment of wood on hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation and biomechanical properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekola, J; Lassila, L V J; Hirvonen, J; Lahdenperä, M; Grenman, R; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2010-08-01

    Wood is a natural fiber reinforced composite. It structurally resembles bone tissue to some extent. Specially heat-treated birch wood has been used as a model material for further development of synthetic fiber reinforced composites (FRC) for medical and dental use. In previous studies it has been shown, that heat treatment has a positive effect on the osteoconductivity of an implanted wood. In this study the effects of two different heat treatment temperatures (140 and 200 degrees C) on wood were studied in vitro. Untreated wood was used as a control material. Heat treatment induced biomechanical changes were studied with flexural and compressive tests on dry birch wood as well as on wood after 63 days of simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion. Dimensional changes, SBF sorption and hydroxylapatite type mineral formation were also assessed. The results showed that SBF immersion decreases the biomechanical performance of wood and that the heat treatment diminishes the effect of SBF immersion on biomechanical properties. With scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis it was shown that hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation formed on the 200 degrees C heat-treated wood. An increased weight gain of the same material during SBF immersion supported this finding. The results of this study give more detailed insight of the biologically relevant changes that heat treatment induces in wood material. Furthermore the findings in this study are in line with previous in vivo studies.

  7. Influence of reproductive status on tissue composition and biomechanical properties of ovine vagina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ulrich

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To undertake a comprehensive analysis of the biochemical tissue composition and passive biomechanical properties of ovine vagina and relate this to the histo-architecture at different reproductive stages as part of the establishment of a large preclinical animal model for evaluating regenerative medicine approaches for surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse. METHODS: Vaginal tissue was collected from virgin (n = 3, parous (n = 6 and pregnant sheep (n = 6; mean gestation; 132 d; term = 145 d. Tissue histology was analyzed using H+E and Masson's Trichrome staining. Biochemical analysis of the extracellular matrix proteins used a hydroxyproline assay to quantify total collagen, SDS PAGE to measure collagen III/I+III ratios, dimethylmethylene blue to quantify glycosaminoglycans and amino acid analysis to quantify elastin. Uniaxial tensiometry was used to determine the Young's modulus, maximum stress and strain, and permanent strain following cyclic loading. RESULTS: Vaginal tissue of virgin sheep had the lowest total collagen content and permanent strain. Parous tissue had the highest total collagen and lowest elastin content with concomitant high maximum stress. In contrast, pregnant sheep had the highest elastin and lowest collagen contents, and thickest smooth muscle layer, which was associated with low maximum stress and poor dimensional recovery following repetitive loading. CONCLUSION: Pregnant ovine vagina was the most extensible, but the weakest tissue, whereas parous and virgin tissues were strong and elastic. Pregnancy had the greatest impact on tissue composition and biomechanical properties, compatible with significant tissue remodeling as demonstrated in other species. Biochemical changes in tissue protein composition coincide with these altered biomechanical properties.

  8. Study of osteoporosis through the measurement of bone density, trace elements, biomechanical properties and immunocytochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aras, N.K.; Korkusuz, F.; Akkas, N.; Laleli, Y.; Kuscu, L.; Gunel, U.

    1996-01-01

    Osteoporosis is defined as an absolute decrease in the amount of bone to a level below required for mechanical support. It is an important bone disease in elderly people in many countries. Unfortunately, there is no reliable statistical data in Turkey for the incidence of osteoporosis. A decrease in bone mass is the important cause in fractures in osteoporosis. Therefore, we intend to study both bone density and other variables such as trace elements, biomechanical properties and other immunocytochemicals in bone, all combined might give an information about the cause and prevention of osteoporosis. (author)

  9. Estudo comparativo de propriedades biomecânicas da porção central do tendão calcâneo congelado e a fresco Comparative study on biomechanical properties of the central portion of frozen and fresh calcaneus tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bezerra de Menezes Reiff

    2007-01-01

    strength-deformation graphics. Strength at maximum resistance limit, stiffness, tension at maximum resistance limit, relative deformation, and elasticity module parameters were assessed. The results were compared and statistically analyzed by "Student’s t- method", with a significance level of 0.05, with no significant difference on values achieved between groups. We concluded that freezing at -85º C does not cause changes to tendons’ biomechanical properties, despite of storage time.

  10. Effect of immediate loading on the biomechanical properties of bone surrounding the miniscrew implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Nakagaki, Susumu; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Handa, Keisuke; Koike, Toshiyuki; Muguruma, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of immediate loading on the biomechanical properties of bone surrounding a miniscrew implant. Forty titanium alloy miniscrew implants were placed on the buccal side of the maxillae and mandibles in four beagle dogs. Twelve pairs of miniscrew implants were immediately loaded with approximately 150 g of continuous force using nickel-titanium coil springs and the remaining 16 implants were left unloaded for 8 weeks. Nanoindentation testing was performed (peak load 10 mN) and the hardness and elastic modulus were calculated. Two series of indentations (in cortical and trabecular bone) for both the compression and tension sides were made. For each site, five indentations were placed approximately 25 μm from the implant-bone interface and 250 μm from the screw thread. The mean hardness and elastic modulus were generally higher in mandibles than maxillae and were higher in cortical bone than in trabecular bone. The trabecular bone near the implant-bone interface on the compression side was significantly harder than that at other locations in trabecular bone. In conclusion, this is the first study that has investigated the biomechanical properties of bone surrounding a miniscrew implant under immediate loading using nanoindentation testing. The mechanical properties of bone surrounding a miniscrew implant may be influenced by immediate loading.

  11. Comparative evaluation of different anchoring techniques for synthetic cruciate ligaments. A biomechanical and animal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsch, R

    1994-01-01

    Under certain well-defined indications alloplastic material may be used in cruciate ligament surgery. The stability and survival of such a synthetic ligament is to a great extent dependent on the anchorage with which it is fastened to the bone. Most fixation methods have proved to be too weak or have revealed other essential drawbacks, resulting in clinical and experimental failure. A new ligament fixation device (LFD) was developed and tested biomechanically and in animal experiments. In the biomechanic investigation the new LFD was compared to single staples, double staples in the belt-buckle technique, and ligament guidance through additional bone tunnels (Z-technique). The tests were carried out on human cadaver knees, plastic bones, and dog stifle joints. The evaluated parameters were linear and maximum load, stiffness, and elongation. In addition, hysteresis tests were performed to assay the long-term resistance of the fixation. The tests showed a significant superiority of the LFD in all measured variables compared to the other anchorages. The pull-out strength, at 1866 +/- 43 N (cadaver knee), was about four times that for the single staple, and about twice as high as that for the double staple and Z-technique. The animal experiments were performed on German shepherd cross-breed dogs. In six animals the anterior cruciate ligaments were excised bilaterally and replaced by a 6-mm Trevira ligament, on one side anchored with staples in the Z-technique, on the other with the LFD. Postoperatively the dogs were allowed to move freely; no additional protection was employed. After 6 months the animals were sacrificed and the knees examined macroscopically, radiologically, microscopically, and by biomechanical testing. After half a year of implantation, the pull-out strength of the alloplastic ligament was 662 +/- 62 N for the LFD and 531 +/- 67 N for the staples. Three ligaments in the staple group and one in the LFD group had ruptured completely, and two ligaments

  12. Biomechanical and morphological properties of the multiparous ovine vagina and effect of subsequent pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynkevic, Rita; Martins, Pedro; Hympanova, Lucie; Almeida, Henrique; Fernandes, Antonio A; Deprest, Jan

    2017-05-24

    Pelvic floor soft tissues undergo changes during the pregnancy. However, the degree and nature of this process is not completely characterized. This study investigates the effect of subsequent pregnancy on biomechanical and structural properties of ovine vagina. Vaginal wall from virgin, pregnant (in their third pregnancy) and parous (one year after third vaginal delivery) Swifter sheep (n=5 each) was harvested. Samples for biomechanics and histology, were cut in longitudinal axis (proximal and distal regions). Outcome measurements describing Young's modulus, ultimate stress and elongation were obtained from stress-strain curves. For histology samples were stained with Miller's Elastica staining. Collagen, elastin and muscle cells and myofibroblasts contents were estimated, using image processing techniques. Statistical analyses were performed in order to determine significant differences among experimental groups. Significant regional differences were identified. The proximal vagina was stiffer than distal, irrespective the reproductive status. During the pregnancy proximal vagina become more compliant than in parous (+47.45%) or virgin sheep (+64.35%). This coincided with lower collagen (-15 to -21%), higher elastin (+30 to +60%), and more smooth muscle cells (+17 to +37%). Vaginal tissue from parous ewes was weaker than of virgins, coinciding with lower collagen (-10%), higher elastin (+50%), more smooth muscle cells (+20%). It could be proposed that after pregnancy biomechanical properties of vagina do not recover to those of virgins. Since elastin has a significant influence on the compliance of soft tissues and collagen is the main "actor" regarding strength, histological analysis performed in this study justifies the mechanical behavior observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interrelation of Hydration, Collagen Cross-Linking Treatment, and Biomechanical Properties of the Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Rahimi, Abdolrasol

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hydration and collagen cross-linking treatment on biomechanical properties of the cornea. The original corneal collagen cross-linking protocol was used to induce cross-links in bovine corneas. The thickness of samples was used as a measure of their hydration and five different thickness groups (n = 5 each) were considered. The cross-linked corneal strips were allowed to hydrate/dehydrate until their thickness reached 500, 700, 900, 1100, and 1500 μm. The tensile behavior of specimens in each thickness group was characterized by conducting uniaxial tensile experiments. The experiments were done in mineral oil in order to keep the thickness of samples constant and minimize hydration changes. It was observed that collagen cross-linking treatment significantly increased both the maximum tensile stress and the equilibrium (relaxed) stress of the bovine cornea (p  0.99), respectively. Hydration and collagen cross-linking treatment concomitantly affect biomechanical properties of the cornea. Therefore, an accurate estimate of stiffening effects of collagen cross-linking treatment option using uniaxial tensile experiments is only possible if the hydration of specimens is fully controlled.

  14. Individual typological variability of macro-microscopical and biomechanical properties of intracranial part of vertebral artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomkina О.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of the study is to reveal the features of individual typological variability of macro-microscopical and biomechanical properties of the wall of intracranial part of vertebral arteries (IPVA in adult people. Materials and methods: The research material of 228 samples of IPVA has been received by autopsy of 115 corpses of people aged 21-84 years. External diameter, thickness of the wall, diameter of lumen of artery have been measured. Biomechanical properties of IPVA have been studied by explosive carTira Test 28005 with a loading cell of 100 H. General strength (H, breaking point (H/mm2, Young»s modulus (H/mm2, absolute (mm and relative deformation (% of samples of arteries have been defined. Results: 3 groups of variants of arteries have been isolated: with average size of a sign (M±y, less than the average size (M+ y. The conclusion: The obtained data about functional anatomy of vascular bed of brain may be useful in blood flow modeling and optimization of extra — and intravascular interventions.

  15. Structural and Biomechanical Properties of the Exchange Tissue of the Avian Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, John N

    2015-10-01

    The blood capillaries (BC) and the air capillaries (ACs) are the terminal gas exchange units of the avian lung. The minuscule structures are astonishingly strong. It is only recently that the morphologies and the biomechanical properties of the BCs and the ACs were investigated. Regarding size and shape, the BCs and the ACs differ remarkably. While they were previously claimed to be tubular (cylindrical) in shape, the ACs are rather rotund structures which interconnect across short, narrow passageways. Atypical of those in other tissues, the BCs in the exchange tissue of the avian lung comprise of distinct segments which are about as long as they are wide and which are coupled in three-dimensions. The thin blood-gas barrier (BGB) which separates the ACs from the BCs is peculiarly strong. The causes of the strengths of the ACs and the BCs in general and the BGB in particular are varied and controversial. Here, the recent morphological and physiological findings on the structure, biomechanical properties, and the strengths of the respiratory units of the avian lung and the BGB have been critically examined. Also, in light of the new morphological findings of the ACs and the BCs, the functional model which is currently in use to assess the gas exchange efficiency of the avian lung should be revised and the inappropriateness of the terms 'blood capillary' and 'air capillary' for the gas exchange units of the avian lung is pointed out. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Biomechanical and physical properties of human amniotic membrane after gamma irradiation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimah Yusof; Salahbiah Abd Majid

    1999-01-01

    At MINT Tissue Bank, amniotic membranes are procured routinely from placenta of screened healthy mothers. They are processed, dried, packed and sterilised using gamma irradiation at minimum dose of 17 kGy. The sterilised membranes are delivered to several hospitals and clinics, locally and even abroad. The membranes are effectively used on patients with first and second degree bums, superficial wounds and scalds. At present the membrane is given 2 years expiry date if stored in dark and cool place. A study was carried to validate this expiry period under the quality system by determining any changes in biomechanical properties of amnion after irradiation and at various storage times. Random samples of amnion, stored at room temperature in dark were picked up for physical tests including tensile strength and elongation using Instron Universal Testing Instrument (Model 43 1 0) at MINT. After 4 months storage, irradiated freeze-dried amnion (79.79+20.27 kg/cm sup 2) had significantly lower tensile strength compared to air-dried amnion (304.97+66.92 kg/cm sup 2) at P<0.05. As for elongation, there was no significant different between air-dried and freeze dried. Further studies on the stability of air-dried amnion over storage time showed that there was no significant reduction in tensile strength (432.37 +208.1 1 kg/cm sup 2) and elongation (I 1.68+1.63%) for radiation sterilised amnion up to 12 months storage. Combination of radiation and storage at room temperature also did not alter the stability of the products stored up to 20 months when compared to newly processed amnion. We could not find any changes in physical appearance such as colour for amnion which have been kept for almost 5 years. Therefore the expiry date of 2 years (24 months) given to our amnion is acceptable. At present, MINT Tissue Bank only process air-dried amnion since the cost of processing of amniotic membranes can be reduced by 40% compared to freeze drying. Water content for both drying

  17. Evaluating biomechanical properties of murine embryos using Brillouin microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Raksha; Zhang, Jitao; Wu, Chen; Rippy, Justin; Singh, Manmohan; Larin, Kirill V.; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2017-08-01

    Embryogenesis is regulated by numerous changes in mechanical properties of the cellular microenvironment. Thus, studying embryonic mechanophysiology can provide a more thorough perspective of embryonic development, potentially improving early detection of congenital abnormalities as well as evaluating and developing therapeutic interventions. A number of methods and techniques have been used to study cellular biomechanical properties during embryogenesis. While some of these techniques are invasive or involve the use of external agents, others are compromised in terms of spatial and temporal resolutions. We propose the use of Brillouin microscopy in combination with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure stiffness as well as structural changes in a developing embryo. While Brillouin microscopy assesses the changes in stiffness among different organs of the embryo, OCT provides the necessary structural guidance.

  18. Biomechanical properties of composite compact-porous titanium produced by electric discharge sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minko, D.; Belyavin, K.; Sheleg, V.

    2017-07-01

    The main disadvantage of currently used endosteal implants is their unsatisfactory biostable performance. Under action of functional stress caused by flaws of the design or lower mechanical characteristics the areas of stresses extreme concentration exceeding strength limits of bone tissue appears in the bone surrounding the implant that leads to the tearing away the implant. The problem of specific pressure lowering on the bone and uniform distribution of stress is solved by two ways: the increase of the implant area and the search of implant materials with optimum biomechanical properties. Porous materials of spherical titanium powders have adjustable pore size and large unit surface area, as well as possess high biologic compatibility with living tissue. This allows reduction of the rejection reaction due to a more even stress distribution around the functioning implant. Clinical results show that such implants have more stable physical and chemical properties.

  19. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  20. Biomechanical and antibacterial properties of Tobramycin loaded hydroxyapatite coated fixation pins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Jan Henrik; Lilja, Mirjam; Sörensen, Torben Christian; Åstrand, Maria; Procter, Philip; Fuchs, Sabine; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigates the use of nanoporous, biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings deposited on TiO₂ coated fixation pins as functional implant surfaces for the local release of Tobramycin in order to prevent bacterial colonization. The impact of HA-coating thickness, coating morphology and biomechanical forces during insertion into synthetic bone on the drug loading and release properties are analyzed. The coatings are shown to exhibit bactericidal effects against Staphylococcus aureus in agar medium for a duration of 6 days after loading by adsorption with Tobramycin for only 5 min at elevated temperature and pressure. Furthermore, high performance liquid chromatography analysis shows a drug release in phosphate buffered saline for 8 days with antibiotic concentration remaining above the minimal inhibitory concentration for S. aureus during the entire release period. Biomechanical insertion tests into synthetic bone and conventional scratch testing demonstrate adhesive strength at the HA/TiO₂ interface. Biocompatibility is verified by cell viability tests. Outgrowth endothelial cells, as well as primary osteoblasts, are viable and firmly attached to both HA and TiO₂ surfaces. The results presented are encouraging and support the concept of functional HA coatings as local drug delivery vehicles for biomedical applications to treat as well as to prevent post-surgical infections. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dynamic ultra high speed Scheimpflug imaging for assessing corneal biomechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ambrósio Jr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe a novel technique for clinical characterization of corneal biomechanics using non-invasive dynamic imaging. METHODS: Corneal deformation response during non contact tonometry (NCT is monitored by ultra-high-speed (UHS photography. The Oculus Corvis ST (Scheimpflug Technology; Wetzlar, Germany has a UHS Scheimpflug camera, taking over 4,300 frames per second and of a single 8mm horizontal slit, for monitoring corneal deformation response to NCT. The metered collimated air pulse or puff has a symmetrical configuration and fixed maximal internal pump pressure of 25 kPa. The bidirectional movement of the cornea in response to the air puff is monitored. RESULTS: Measurement time is 30ms, with 140 frames acquired. Advanced algorithms for edge detection of the front and back corneal contours are applied for every frame. IOP is calculated based on the first applanation moment. Deformation amplitude (DA is determined as the highest displacement of the apex in the highest concavity (HC moment. Applanation length (AL and corneal velocity (CVel are recorded during ingoing and outgoing phases. CONCLUSION: Corneal deformation can be monitored during non contact tonometry. The parameters generated provide clinical in vivo characterization of corneal biomechanical properties in two dimensions, which is relevant for different applications in Ophthalmology.

  2. Comparative Biomechanical and Microstructural Analysis of Native versus Peracetic Acid-Ethanol Treated Cancellous Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Rauh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone transplantation is frequently used for the treatment of large osseous defects. The availability of autologous bone grafts as the current biological gold standard is limited and there is a risk of donor site morbidity. Allogenic bone grafts are an appealing alternative, but disinfection should be considered to reduce transmission of infection disorders. Peracetic acid-ethanol (PE treatment has been proven reliable and effective for disinfection of human bone allografts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of PE treatment on the biomechanical properties and microstructure of cancellous bone grafts (CBG. Forty-eight human CBG cylinders were either treated by PE or frozen at −20°C and subjected to compression testing and histological and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. The levels of compressive strength, stiffness (Young’s modulus, and fracture energy were significantly decreased upon PE treatment by 54%, 59%, and 36%, respectively. Furthermore, PE-treated CBG demonstrated a 42% increase in ultimate strain. SEM revealed a modified microstructure of CBG with an exposed collagen fiber network after PE treatment. We conclude that the observed reduced compressive strength and reduced stiffness may be beneficial during tissue remodeling thereby explaining the excellent clinical performance of PE-treated CBG.

  3. [Evaluation of bone architecture and biomechanic properties by peripheral quantitative computed tomography in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiao-ping; Xia, Wei-bo; Meng, Xun-wu; Zhou, Xue-ying; Hu, Ying-ying; Liu, Huai-cheng

    2003-05-10

    To evaluate the value of peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) in measuring bone architecture and biomechanic properties. 50 virgin female Wistar rats six months old were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1) 8 rats were killed as baseline group; (2) 8 rats underwent sham operation and then were killed 14 weeks after (sham operation group); (3) 16 rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) without further intervention. Six and 14 weeks after the operation each 8 rats were killed (OVX group); and (4) 18 rats underwent OVX too. After the OVX 9 of the 18 rats were treated with 17beta-estradiol 20 micro g/kg/d IH and 9 rats were treated with estradiol valerate 800 micro g/kg/d po for 8 weeks respectively. Then the 18 rats were killed (OVX plus estrogen group, O + E group). The right tibiae of the rats were taken for histomorphometric analysis, and the right femora were prepared for pQCT scanning and bone biomechanical measurement with indentation test and three-point bending test. Histomorphometric analysis showed that the trabecular volume of proximal tibia (Cn-BV/TV) in the OVX group was 8.1 +/- 1.4%, significantly lower than that in the sham operation group (19.5 +/- 1.5%, P biomechanic properties in measured by three point test after OVX and estrogen treatment. A significant positive correlation was shown between Trab BMD and Cn-TV/BV and between Trab BMD and Tb N (r = 0.88 and 0.73, both P < 0.01). Similarly, both Trab BMC and Trab BMD of the femur were significantly correlated with the Can load and Can Stiff determined by indentation test (r = 0.47 - 0.68, all P < 0.01). There was also a significant correlation of parameters measured by pQCT in cortical bone with the maximal load and stiffness for the femur midshaft, and the best correlation was found between the maximal load of femur midshaft and Crt BMC and Crt A (both r = 0.76 and P < 0.01). The geometric, densitometric and mechanical properties in cortical and trabecular bones of rat can be well

  4. Investigation of chemical and physical properties of carbon nanotubes and their effects on cell biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo

    Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Effects of acid treatment on structure, properties and biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes, Applied Surface Science, 2013, 268, 261-268.) Chapter two shows how exposure to CNTs changes the biomechanical properties of fixed human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells). Specifically, by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation technology, we demonstrated that cellular exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 24h induces significant changes in cellular biomechanics leading to increased cellular stiffness. The MWCNTs incubation also seemed to alter the surface area of the cells. Consequently, measures of the mechanical properties of the exposed cell could be used as indicators of its biological state and could offer valuable insights into the mechanisms associated with CNTs-induced genetic instability. (Publication: Chenbo Dong, Linda Sargent, Michael L Kashon, David Lowry, Jonathan S. Dordick, Steven H. Reynolds, Yon Rojanasakul and Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Expose to carbon nanotubes leads to change in cellular biomechanics, Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2013, 7, 945-951.) Chapter three links together the MWCNTs exposure duration, internalization and induced biomechanical changes in fixed cells. Our findings indicated that changes in biomechanical properties of the fixed cells are a function of the uptake and internalization of the MWCNTs as well as their uptake time. Specifically, short exposure time did not seem to lead to considerable changes in the elastic properties in the cellular system. However, longer cellular exposure to CNTs leads to a higher uptake and internalization of the nanotubes and a larger effect on the cell mechanics. Such changes could be related to CNTs interactions with cellular elements and could bring information on the CNT intrinsic toxicity. Chapter four talks about the potential of purified forms of CNTs with increased hydrophilicity to affect live human lung epithelial cells when used at occupational

  5. Mineral density and biomechanical properties of bone tissue from male Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) exposed to organochlorine contaminants and emaciation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Wolkers, Hans; Rigét, Frank F

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the impact from dietary OC (organochlorine) exposure and restricted feeding (emaciation) on bone mineral density (BMD; g hydroxy-apatite cm(-2)) in femoral, vertebrate, skull and baculum osteoid tissue from farmed Arctic blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus). For femur, also biomechanical......), energy absorption (J) and time (s) biomechanical properties than fat winter foxes (all pbones from fasting which is in agreement with previous studies. Further, it should be kept in mind when studying bone tissues in Arctic mammals also in order to avoid...

  6. Current considerations concerning endodontically treated teeth: alteration of hard dental tissues and biomechanical properties following endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriu, Bogdan; Vârlan, Constantin; Suciu, Ioana; Vârlan, Virginia; Bodnar, Dana

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this general article is to present an overview of the current knowledge about composition and structural changes and also about specific biomechanical alterations related to vitality loss or endodontic therapy. For a long time, these issues have been controversially approached from a clinical standpoint and are therefore still confusing for many practitioners. Vitality loss or endodontic procedures seem to induce only negligible changes in hard dental tissue moisture. Physico-chemical properties of dentin can be modified by some of the endodontic chemical products used for chemo-mechanical debridement. On the other hand, tooth biomechanical behavior is affected, since tooth strength is reduced proportionally to coronal tissue loss, due to either pre-existent carious/non-carious lesions or cavity acces preparation, besides restorative procedures. The related literature shows the lack of accepted clinical standards and consensus regarding the optimal way of approaching the specific tooth biomechanics following endodontic therapy.

  7. Effect of biometric characteristics on biomechanical properties of the cornea in cataract patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Fei Song

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the impact of biometric characteristics on the biomechanical properties of the human cornea using the ocular response analyzer (ORA and standard comprehensive ophthalmic examinations before and after standard phacoemulsification. METHODS: This study comprised 54 eyes with cataract with significant lens opacification in stages I or II that underwent phacoemulsification (2.8 mm incision. Corneal hysteresis (CH, corneal resistance factor (CRF, Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg, and corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc were measured by ORA preoperatively and at 1mo postoperatively. Biometric characteristics were derived from corneal topography [TMS-5, anterior equivalent (EQTMS and cylindric (CYLTMS power], corneal tomography [Casia, anterior and posterior equivalent (EQaCASIC, EQpCASIA and cylindric (CYLaCASIA, CYLpCASIA power], keratometry [IOLMaster, anterior equivalent (EQIOL and cylindric (CYLIOL power] and autorefractor [anterior equivalent (EQAR]. Results from ORA were analyzed and correlated with those from all other examinations taken at the same time point. RESULTS: Preoperatively, CH correlated with EQpCASIA and CYLpCASIA only (P=0.001, P=0.002. Postoperatively, IOPg and IOPcc correlated with all equivalent powers (EQTMS, EQIOL, EQAR, EQaCASIA and EQpCASIA (P=0.001, P=0.007, P=0.001, P=0.015, P=0.03 for IOPg and P<0.001, P=0.003, P<0.001, P=0.009, P=0.014 for IOPcc. CH correlated postoperatively with EQaCASIA and EQpCASIC only (P=0.021, P=0.022. CONCLUSION: Biometric characteristics may significantly affect biomechanical properties of the cornea in terms of CH, IOPcc and IOPg before, but even more after cataract surgery.

  8. A structural basis for sustained bacterial adhesion: biomechanical properties of CFA/I pili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Björnham, Oscar; Svantesson, Mats; Badahdah, Arwa; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Bullitt, Esther

    2012-02-03

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrheal disease worldwide. Adhesion pili (or fimbriae), such as the CFA/I (colonization factor antigen I) organelles that enable ETEC to attach efficiently to the host intestinal tract epithelium, are critical virulence factors for initiation of infection. We characterized the intrinsic biomechanical properties and kinetics of individual CFA/I pili at the single-organelle level, demonstrating that weak external forces (7.5 pN) are sufficient to unwind the intact helical filament of this prototypical ETEC pilus and that it quickly regains its original structure when the force is removed. While the general relationship between exertion of force and an increase in the filament length for CFA/I pili associated with diarrheal disease is analogous to that of P pili and type 1 pili, associated with urinary tract and other infections, the biomechanical properties of these different pili differ in key quantitative details. Unique features of CFA/I pili, including the significantly lower force required for unwinding, the higher extension speed at which the pili enter a dynamic range of unwinding, and the appearance of sudden force drops during unwinding, can be attributed to morphological features of CFA/I pili including weak layer-to-layer interactions between subunits on adjacent turns of the helix and the approximately horizontal orientation of pilin subunits with respect to the filament axis. Our results indicate that ETEC CFA/I pili are flexible organelles optimized to withstand harsh motion without breaking, resulting in continued attachment to the intestinal epithelium by the pathogenic bacteria that express these pili. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic hip screw (DHS is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC, superior-centre (SC, inferior-center (IC, centre-anterior (CA, and centre-posterior (CP. All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  10. Intraosseous fixation compared to plantar plate fixation for first metatarsocuneiform arthrodesis: a cadaveric biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Klaus Edgar; Peters, Jennifer; Schmidtmann, Irene; Maus, Uwe; Stephan, Daniel; Augat, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Metatarsocuneiform (MTC) fusion is a treatment option for management of hallux valgus. We compared the biomechanical characteristics of an internal fixation device with plantar plate fixation. Seven matched pairs of feet from human cadavers were used to compare the intramedullary (IM) device plus compression screw to plantar plate combined with a compression screw. Specimen constructs were loaded in a cyclic 4-point bending test. We obtained initial/final stiffness, maximum load, and number of cycles to failure. Bone mineral density was measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Performance was compared using time to event analysis with number of cycles as time variable, and a proportional hazard model including shared frailty model fitted with treatment and bone mineral density as covariates. On average the plates failed after 7517 cycles and a maximum load of 167 N, while the IM-implants failed on average after 2946 cycles and a maximum load of 69 N. In all pairs the 1 treated with IM-implant failed earlier than the 1 treated with a plate (hazard ratio for IM-implant versus plate was 79.9 (95% confidence interval [6.1, 1052.2], P = .0009). The initial stiffness was 131 N/mm for the plantar plate and 43.3 N/mm for the IM implant. Initial stiffness (r = .955) and final stiffness (r = .952) were strongly related to the number of cycles to failure. Bone mineral density had no effect on the number of cycles to failure. Plantar plate fixation created a stronger and stiffer construct than IM fixation. A stiffer construct can reduce the risk of nonunion and shorten the period of non-weight-bearing. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Assessment of Corneal Biomechanical Properties and Intraocular Pressure in Myopic Spanish Healthy Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. del Buey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine biomechanical parameters of the cornea in myopic eyes and their relationship with the degree of myopia in a western healthy population. Methods. Corneal hysteresis (CH, corneal resistance factor (CRF, Goldmann correlated intraocular pressure (IOP, and corneal compensated IOP (IOPcc were measured using the ocular response analyzer (ORA in 312 eyes of 177 Spanish subjects aged between 20 and 56 years. Refraction was expressed as spherical equivalent (SE, which ranged from 0 to −16.50 diopters (D (mean: −3.88±2.90 D. Subjects were divided into four groups according to their refractive status: group 1 or control group: emmetropia (-0.50≤SE0.05; nevertheless, IOPcc was significantly higher in the moderately myopic (15.47±2.47 mmHg and highly myopic (16.14±2.59 mmHg groups than in the emmetropia (15.15±2.06 mmHg and low myopia groups (14.53±2.37 mmHg. No correlation between age and the measured parameters was found. CH and IOPcc were weakly but significantly correlated with SE (r=0.171, P=0.002 and r=-0.131, P=0.021, resp.. Conclusions. Present study showed only a very weak, but significant, correlation between CH and refractive error, with CH being lower in both moderately and highly myopic eyes than that in the emmetropic and low myopic eyes. These changes in biomechanical properties of the cornea may have an impact on IOP measurement, increasing the risk of glaucoma.

  12. Rib biomechanical properties exhibit diagnostic potential for accurate ageing in forensic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonicelli, Andrea; Xhemali, Bledar; Kranioti, Elena F.

    2017-01-01

    Age estimation remains one of the most challenging tasks in forensic practice when establishing a biological profile of unknown skeletonised remains. Morphological methods based on developmental markers of bones can provide accurate age estimates at a young age, but become highly unreliable for ages over 35 when all developmental markers disappear. This study explores the changes in the biomechanical properties of bone tissue and matrix, which continue to change with age even after skeletal maturity, and their potential value for age estimation. As a proof of concept we investigated the relationship of 28 variables at the macroscopic and microscopic level in rib autopsy samples from 24 individuals. Stepwise regression analysis produced a number of equations one of which with seven variables showed an R2 = 0.949; a mean residual error of 2.13 yrs ±0.4 (SD) and a maximum residual error value of 2.88 yrs. For forensic purposes, by using only bench top machines in tests which can be carried out within 36 hrs, a set of just 3 variables produced an equation with an R2 = 0.902 a mean residual error of 3.38 yrs ±2.6 (SD) and a maximum observed residual error 9.26yrs. This method outstrips all existing age-at-death methods based on ribs, thus providing a novel lab based accurate tool in the forensic investigation of human remains. The present application is optimised for fresh (uncompromised by taphonomic conditions) remains, but the potential of the principle and method is vast once the trends of the biomechanical variables are established for other environmental conditions and circumstances. PMID:28520764

  13. Applied biomechanics to evaluate the properties of laser beam treated orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieretti, Eurico Felix

    2016-01-01

    Laser beam marking is used to ensure biomaterials’ identification and traceability. The texturing imparts greater adhesion to the surfaces of implantable medical devices. The aim of this work was to evaluate the surface behaviour of the austenitic stainless steel ABNT NBR ISO 5832-1 marked and textured by optical fiber laser beam using selected parameters, changing the pulse frequency; in face of its biomechanical behaviour, through tests of tensile strength, fatigue and wear; verify the localized corrosion susceptibility by electrochemical tests in a solution that simulates the body fluids; and analyze microstructural changes. The treatments performed altered the biomaterials roughness and their micro hardness as a function of the increase of the pulse frequency. The microstructure and chemical composition of the surfaces underwent changes that directly affected the passive layer of the stainless steels, triggering the corrosion process. This effect was evidenced by SVET, XPS and characterization of electronic properties of the passive film by the Mott-Schottky technique. These two types of laser treatments increased the surfaces' magnetic susceptibility. The parameters used for the marking and texturing did not induce a decrease in the cellular viability of the samples, as no cytotoxicity was showed even after prolonged incubation. This biomaterial was adequate on the biomechanical tests, since the laser treatments, under the conditions used, did not induce the formation of surface tensions of magnitude capable of leading the fatigue fracture, indicating infinite fatigue life; the region of fracture by tension could not be related to the laser marking. The wear volume decreased as a function of the increase in micro hardness produced by the increase of the pulse frequency in the texturing. The visual character of the markings and texturing was assured after the majority of the tests performed. (author)

  14. Biomechanical properties: effects of low-level laser therapy and Biosilicate® on tibial bone defects in osteopenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangel, Renan; Bossini, Paulo S; Renno, Ana Cláudia; Granito, Renata N; Wang, Charles C; Nonaka, Keico O; Driusso, Patricia; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Oishi, Jorge

    2014-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of laser therapy and Biosilicate® on the biomechanical properties of bone callus in osteopenic rats. Fifty female Wistar rats were equally divided into 5 groups (n=10/group): osteopenic rats with intact tibiae (SC); osteopenic rats with unfilled and untreated tibial bone defects (OC); osteopenic rats whose bone defects were treated with Biosilicate® (B); osteopenic rats whose bone defects were treated with 830-nm laser, at 120 J/cm2 (L120) and osteopenic rats whose bone defects were treated with Biosilicate® and 830-nm laser, at 120 J/cm2 (BL120). Ovariectomy (OVX) was used to induce osteopenia. A non-critical bone defect was created on the tibia of the osteopenic animals 8 weeks after OVX. In Biosilicate® groups, bone defects were completely filled with the biomaterial. For the laser therapy, an 830-nm laser, 120 J/cm2 was used. On day 14 postsurgery, rats were euthanized, and tibiae were removed for biomechanical analysis. Maximal load and energy absorption were higher in groups B and BL120, according to the indentation test. Animals submitted to low-level laser therapy (LLLT) did not show any significant biomechanical improvement, but the association between Biosilicate® and LLLT was shown to be efficient to enhance callus biomechanical properties. Conversely, no differences were found between study groups in the bending test. Biosilicate® alone or in association with low level laser therapy improves biomechanical properties of tibial bone callus in osteopenic rats.

  15. Applanation optical coherence elastography: noncontact measurement of intraocular pressure, corneal biomechanical properties, and corneal geometry with a single instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Han, Zhaolong; Nair, Achuth; Schill, Alexander; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Current clinical tools provide critical information about ocular health such as intraocular pressure (IOP). However, they lack the ability to quantify tissue material properties, which are potent markers for ocular tissue health and integrity. We describe a single instrument to measure the eye-globe IOP, quantify corneal biomechanical properties, and measure corneal geometry with a technique termed applanation optical coherence elastography (Appl-OCE). An ultrafast OCT system enabled visualization of corneal dynamics during noncontact applanation tonometry and direct measurement of micro air-pulse induced elastic wave propagation. Our preliminary results show that the proposed Appl-OCE system can be used to quantify IOP, corneal biomechanical properties, and corneal geometry, which builds a solid foundation for a unique device that can provide a more complete picture of ocular health.

  16. Changes in biomechanical properties of the coronary artery wall contribute to maintained contractile responses to endothelin-1 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chen Yen; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Davenport, Anthony P; Maguire, Janet J

    2014-11-24

    Our aim was to determine whether alterations in biomechanical properties of human diseased compared to normal coronary artery contribute to changes in artery responsiveness to endothelin-1 in atherosclerosis. Concentration-response curves were constructed to endothelin-1 in normal and diseased coronary artery. The passive mechanical properties of arteries were determined using tensile ring tests from which finite element models of passive mechanical properties of both groups were created. Finite element modelling of artery endothelin-1 responses was then performed. Maximum responses to endothelin-1 were significantly attenuated in diseased (27±3 mN, n=55) compared to normal (38±2 mN, n=68) artery, although this remained over 70% of control. There was no difference in potency (pD2 control=8.03±0.06; pD2 diseased=7.98±0.06). Finite element modelling of tensile ring tests resulted in hyperelastic shear modulus μ=2004±410 Pa and hardening exponent α=22.8±2.2 for normal wall and μ=2464±1075 Pa and α=38.3±6.7 for plaque tissue and distensibility of diseased vessels was decreased. Finite element modelling of active properties of both groups resulted in higher muscle contractile strain (represented by thermal reactivity) of the atherosclerotic artery model than the normal artery model. The models suggest that a change in muscle response to endothelin-1 occurs in atherosclerotic artery to increase its distensibility towards that seen in normal artery. Our data suggest that an adaptation occurs in medial smooth muscle of atherosclerotic coronary artery to maintain distensibility of the vessel wall in the presence of endothelin-1. This may contribute to the vasospastic effect of locally increased endothelin-1 production that is reported in this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of the early keratoconus based on corneal biomechanical properties in the refractive surgery candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Pniakowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Subclinical keratoconus is contraindication to refractive surgery. The currently used methods of preoperative screening do not always allow differentiating between healthy eyes and those with subclinical keratoconus. Aim: To evaluate biomechanical parameters of the cornea, waveform score (WS, and intraocular pressure (IOP as potentially useful adjuncts to the diagnostic algorithm for precise detection of the early keratoconus stages and selection of refractive surgery candidates. Settings and Design: Department of Ophthalmology and prospective cross-sectional study. Patients and Methods: Patients enrolled in the study were diagnosed with refractive disorders. We assessed parameters of corneal biomechanics such as corneal hysteresis (CH, corneal resistance factor (CRF, Goldman-correlated IOP (IOPg, corneal compensated IOP, WS, and keratoconus match index (KMI. They were classified into one of three groups based on the predefined KMI range: Group 1 (from 0.352 to 0.757 – 45 eyes, Group 2 (from −0.08 to 0.313 – 52 eyes, and Group 0 - control group (from 0.761 to 1.642 – 80 eyes. Results: In both study groups, IOPg, CRF, and CH were decreased when compared to control (P < 0.0001. In control group, there was positive correlation between CH and KMI (P < 0.05, with no correlations in any of the two study groups. CRF correlated positively with KMI in control (P < 0.0001 and in Group 2 (P < 0.05. Conclusions: CH and CRF, together with WS and IOPg, consist a clinically useful adjunct to detect subclinical keratoconus in patients referred for refractive surgery when based on KMI staging.

  18. Comparative adaptations of lower limb biomechanics during unilateral and bilateral landings after different neuromuscular-based ACL injury prevention protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tyler N; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M; McLean, Scott G

    2014-10-01

    Potentially valuable anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention strategies are lengthy, limiting training success. Shorter protocols that achieve beneficial biomechanical adaptations may improve training effectiveness. This study examined whether core stability/balance and plyometric training can modify female landing biomechanics compared with the standard neuromuscular and no training models. Forty-three females had lower limb biomechanics analyzed during unilateral and bilateral landings immediately before and after a 6-week neuromuscular or no training programs. Sagittal and frontal plane hip and knee kinematics and kinetics were submitted to 3-way repeated-measures analyses of variance to test for the main and interaction effects of training group, landing type, and testing time. Greater peak knee flexion was evident in the standard neuromuscular group following training, during both bilateral (p = 0.027) and unilateral landings (p = 0.076 and d = 0.633). The plyometric group demonstrated reduced hip adduction (p = 0.010) and greater knee flexion (p = 0.065 and d = 0.564) during bilateral landings following training. The control group had significant reduction in peak stance knee abduction moment (p = 0.003) posttraining as compared with pretraining. The current outcomes suggest that significant biomechanical changes are possible by an isolated plyometric training component. The benefits, however, may not be evident across all landing types, seemingly limited to simplistic, bilateral landings. Integrated training protocols may still be the most effective training model, currently improving knee flexion posture during both bilateral and unilateral landings following training. Future prevention efforts should implement integrated training protocols that include plyometric exercises to reduce ACL injury risk of female athletes.

  19. Regolith properties under trees and the biomechanical effects caused by tree root systems as recognized by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Łukasz; Kasprzak, Marek

    2018-01-01

    Following previous findings regarding the influence of vascular plants (mainly trees) on weathering, soil production and hillslope stability, in this study, we attempted to test a hypothesis regarding significant impacts of tree root systems on soil and regolith properties. Different types of impacts from tree root system (direct and indirect) are commonly gathered under the key term of "biomechanical effects". To add to the discussion of the biomechanical effects of trees, we used a non-invasive geophysical method, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), to investigate the profiles of four different configurations at three study sites within the Polish section of the Outer Western Carpathians. At each site, one long profile (up to 189 m) of a large section of a hillslope and three short profiles (up to 19.5 m), that is, microsites occupied by trees or their remnants, were made. Short profiles included the tree root zone of a healthy large tree, the tree stump of a decaying tree and the pit-and-mound topography formed after a tree uprooting. The resistivity of regolith and bedrock presented on the long profiles and in comparison with the short profiles through the microsites it can be seen how tree roots impact soil and regolith properties and add to the complexity of the whole soil/regolith profile. Trees change soil and regolith properties directly through root channels and moisture migration and indirectly through the uprooting of trees and the formation of pit-and-mound topography. Within tree stump microsites, the impact of tree root systems, evaluated by a resistivity model, was smaller compared to microsites with living trees or those with pit-and-mound topography but was still visible even several decades after the trees were windbroken or cut down. The ERT method is highly useful for quick evaluation of the impact of tree root systems on soils and regolith. This method, in contrast to traditional soil analyses, offers a continuous dataset for the entire

  20. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on the tensile biomechanical properties of diabetic wounds at different phases of healing

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Harry M. C.; Cheing, Alex K. K.; Ng, Gabriel Y. F.; Cheing, Gladys L. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on the tensile biomechanical properties of diabetic wounds at different phases of healing. Two intensities of PEMF were adopted for comparison. We randomly assigned 111 10-week-old male streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats to two PEMF groups and a sham control group. Six-millimetre biopsy punched full thickness wounds were made on the lateral side of their hindlimbs. The PEMF groups received activ...

  1. Effect of corneal biomechanical properties on surgically-induced astigmatism and higher-order aberrations after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Koç

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the relationship between biomechanical properties of the cornea and postoperative refractive changes in patients with low-level astigmatism after cataract surgery. Methods: This prospective study recruited patients undergoing cataract surgery involving 2.8-mm superior incisions. Biomechanical properties of the cornea were evaluated preoperatively using the Ocular Response Analyzer, and corneal profiles were evaluated using a Scheimpflug system (Pentacam HR. Topographic astigmatism, total corneal aberrations (TCA and higher-order corneal aberrations (HOCA analyses were performed preoperatively and during 1- and 3-month postoperative exams. The incidences of surgically-induced astigmatism (SIA and HOCAs were calculated using vector analyses. Associations of the preoperative biomechanical properties of the cornea with SIA and HOCAs were evaluated. Results: This study included 28 eyes of 28 patients. The preoperative corneal hysteresis (CH was 8.68 ± 1.86 mmHg, and the corneal resistance factor (CRF was 8.66 ± 1.61 mmHg. At the 1-month postoperative evaluation, significant changes were observed in HOCAs (p=0.023, TCAs (p=0.05, astigmatism (p=0.02, and trefoil (p=0.033; in contrast, differences in coma (p=0.386 and spherical aberration (SA were not significant (p=0.947. At the 3-month visit, significant changes were only observed in TCAs (p=0.02 and HOCAs (p=0.012. No relationships between the preoperative corneal hysteresis and corneal resistance factor and postoperative SIA and HOCA were identified, other than a positive correlation between the 3-month postoperative incidence of corneal hysteresis and spherical aberration. Conclusions: Despite the observed lack of relationships of preoperative biomechanical properties of the cornea with SIA and postoperative aberrations (except for SA, further studies involving larger patient groups are needed to explore the unexpected refractive deviations after cataract surgery.

  2. Biomechanical properties of single chondrocytes and chondrons determined by micromanipulation and finite-element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bac V.; Wang, Qi Guang; Kuiper, Nicola J.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Thomas, Colin R.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2010-01-01

    A chondrocyte and its surrounding pericellular matrix (PCM) are defined as a chondron. Single chondrocytes and chondrons isolated from bovine articular cartilage were compressed by micromanipulation between two parallel surfaces in order to investigate their biomechanical properties and to discover the mechanical significance of the PCM. The force imposed on the cells was measured directly during compression to various deformations and then holding. When the nominal strain at the end of compression was 50 per cent, force relaxation showed that the cells were viscoelastic, but this viscoelasticity was generally insignificant when the nominal strain was 30 per cent or lower. The viscoelastic behaviour might be due to the mechanical response of the cell cytoskeleton and/or nucleus at higher deformations. A finite-element analysis was applied to simulate the experimental force-displacement/time data and to obtain mechanical property parameters of the chondrocytes and chondrons. Because of the large strains in the cells, a nonlinear elastic model was used for simulations of compression to 30 per cent nominal strain and a nonlinear viscoelastic model for 50 per cent. The elastic model yielded a Young's modulus of 14 ± 1 kPa (mean ± s.e.) for chondrocytes and 19 ± 2 kPa for chondrons, respectively. The viscoelastic model generated an instantaneous elastic modulus of 21 ± 3 and 27 ± 4 kPa, a long-term modulus of 9.3 ± 0.8 and 12 ± 1 kPa and an apparent viscosity of 2.8 ± 0.5 and 3.4 ± 0.6 kPa s for chondrocytes and chondrons, respectively. It was concluded that chondrons were generally stiffer and showed less viscoelastic behaviour than chondrocytes, and that the PCM significantly influenced the mechanical properties of the cells. PMID:20519215

  3. Correlation between RUST assessments of fracture healing to structural and biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Margaret E; Hussein, Amira I; Lybrand, Kyle E; Wulff, Alexander; Simmons, Erin; Choi, Jeffrey H; Litrenta, Jody; Ricci, William M; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V; Morgan, Elise F; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Tornetta, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Radiographic Union Score for Tibia (RUST) and modified RUST (mRUST) are radiographic tools for quantitatively evaluating fracture healing using a cortical scoring system. This tool has high intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs); however, little evidence has evaluated the scores against the physical properties of bone healing. Closed, stabilized fractures were made in the femora of C3H/HeJ male mice (8-12 week-old) of two dietary groups: A control and a phosphate restricted diet group. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) and torsion testing were carried out at post-operative days (POD) 14, 21, 35, and 42 (n = 10-16) per group time-point. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographic views were constructed from the µCT scans and scored by five raters. The raters also indicated if the fracture were healed. ICCs were 0.71 (mRUST) and 0.63 (RUST). Both RUST scores were positively correlated with callus bone mineral density (BMD) (r = 0.85 and 0.80, p RUST scores positively correlated with callus strength (r = 0.35 and 0.26, p RUST ≥10 and had excellent relationship to structural and biomechanical metrics. Effect of delayed healing due to phosphate dietary restrictions was found at later time points with all mechanical properties (p RUST scores (p > 0.318). Clinical relevance of this study is both RUST scores showed high correlation to physical properties of healing and generally distinguished healed vs. non-healed fractures. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:945-953, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Visualization and quantification of breast cancer biomechanical properties with magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plewes, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    A quasistatic magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) method for the evaluation of breast cancer is proposed. Using a phase contrast, stimulated echo MRI approach, strain imaging in phantoms and volunteers is presented. First-order assessment of tissue biomechanical properties based on inverse strain mapping is outlined and demonstrated. The accuracy of inverse strain imaging is studied through simulations in a two-dimensional model and in an anthropomorphic, three-dimensional finite-element model of the breast. To improve the accuracy of modulus assessment by elastography, inverse methods are discussed as an extension to strain imaging, and simulations quantify MRE in terms of displacement signal/noise required for robust inversion. A direct inversion strategy providing information on tissue modulus and pressure distribution is described along with a novel iterative method utilizing a priori knowledge of tissue geometry. It is shown that through the judicious choice of information from previous contrast-enhanced MRI breast images, MRE data acquisition requirements can be significantly reduced while maintaining robust modulus reconstruction in the presence of strain noise. An experimental apparatus for clinical breast MRE and preliminary images of a normal volunteer are presented. (author)

  5. The effects of substance P on the biomechanic properties of ruptured rat Achilles' tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Adelheid E; Burssens, Peter J; Vercruysse, Chris W; Vanderstraeten, Guy G; Verbeeck, Ronald M

    2006-02-01

    To determine whether injection of substance P into the paratendinous region of a ruptured and subsequently sutured rat Achilles' tendon alters the biomechanic properties of the tendon. Interventional animal study. Animal laboratory at a university hospital. Ninety-six 2-month-old, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Injection of saline, substance P (10(-6)micromol/kg of body weight [BW] or 10(-8)micromol/kg BW) associated with neutral endopeptidase inhibitors, or neutral endopeptidase inhibitors alone into the paratendinous region of ruptured and subsequently sutured rat Achilles' tendons from the second until the sixth day postoperatively. Stress at maximal load and work to maximal load and stiffness. Stress at maximal load was higher in the groups injected with substance P than in the saline group in the first, second, and sixth weeks. Work to maximal load was higher from the second until the sixth weeks in the substance P-treated groups than in the saline group. Stiffness did not differ between the 4 groups in any of the weeks. Injection of substance P into the paratendinous region of ruptured and subsequently sutured rat Achilles' tendons improved tendon healing by enhancing stress at maximal load and work to maximal load. However, stiffness was not significantly affected.

  6. Dynamic observation of biomechanic properties of sciatic nerve at the suture site in rats following repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baoguo; Zhang, Peixun; Yan, Jiazhi; Zhang, Hongbo

    2008-01-01

    To observe the biomechanic properties of the sciatic nerve at the suture site following repairing in rats. The right sciatic nerves of 40 white Sprague-Dawley 300~350 gm rats were exposed, cut and then repaired with 10-0 nylon sutures with four stitches, laced in the epineurium 0, 1, 3, and 6 weeks after operation, the tensile strength of the sciatic nerves were measured, and the data analyzed statistically. The load elongation curves for both the normal unoperated and operated nerves had similar shape. There were significant differences between the tensile strength of the 0th and the 1st, 3rd, and 6th weeks (P < 0.01). No significant difference was found among the 1st, 3rd, and 6th weeks. The tensile strength of the injured nerves recovered 48% of the normal nerve in the 1st week and 54% in 6 weeks after repairing. It may be concluded that the injured nerves can acquire mostly tensile strength stability in 1 week quickly and can maintain this relative tensile strength stability in 6 weeks.

  7. Changes in corneal topography and biomechanical properties after collagen cross linking for keratoconus: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Mohammadreza; Bagheri, Mansooreh; Ghavami, Shahri; Bamdad, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate changes in corneal topography and biomechanical properties after collagen cross-linking (CXL) for progressive keratoconus. Collagen cross-linking was performed on 97 eyes. We assessed uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Corneal topography indices were evaluated using placido disc topography, scanning slit anterior topography (Orbscan II), and rotating Scheimpflug topography (Pentacam). Specular microscopy and corneal biomechanics were evaluated. A 1-year-follow-up results revealed that UCVA improved from 0.31 to 0.45 and BCVA changed from 0.78 to 0.84 (P < 0.001). The mean of average keratometry value decreased from 49.62 to 47.95 D (P < 0.001). Astigmatism decreased from 4.84 to 4.24 D (P < 0.001). Apex corneal thickness decreased from 458.11 to 444.46 μm. Corneal volume decreased from 56.66 to 55.97 mm(3) (P < 0.001). Posterior best fit sphere increased from 55.50 to 46.03 mm (P = 0.025). Posterior elevation increased from 99.2 to 112.22 μm (P < 0.001). Average progressive index increased from 2.26 to 2.56 (P < 0.001). A nonsignificant decrease was observed in mean endothelial count from 2996 to 2928 cell/mm(2) (P = 0.190). Endothelial coefficient of variation (CV) increased nonsignificantly from 18.26 to 20.29 (P = 0.112). Corneal hysteresis changed from 8.18 to 8.36 (P = 0.552) and corneal resistance factor increased from 6.98 to 7.21 (P = 0.202), so these changes were not significant. Visual acuity and K values improved after CXL. In spite of the nonsignificant increase in endothelial cell count and increase in the CV, CLX seems to be a safe treatment for keratoconus. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are recommended.

  8. Effect of Biometric Characteristics on the Change of Biomechanical Properties of the Human Cornea due to Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the impact of biometric characteristics on changes of biomechanical properties of the human cornea due to standard cataract surgery using biomechanical analysis. Patients and Methods. This prospective consecutive cross-sectional study comprised 54 eyes with cataract in stages I or II that underwent phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. CH, CRF, IOPg, and IOPcc intraocular pressure were measured by biomechanical analysis preoperatively and at 1 month postoperatively. Changes (Δ were calculated as preoperative value versus postoperative value. Biometrical data were extracted from TMS-5 (CSI and SAI, IOLMaster (AL, and EM-3000 (CCT and ECC preoperatively. Results. The average values of the changes were ΔCH=-0.45±1.27 mmHg, ΔCRF=-0.88±1.1 mmHg, ΔIOPg=-1.58±3.15 mmHg, and ΔIOPcc=-1.45±3.93 mmHg. The higher the CSI the smaller the decrease in CH (r=0.302, P=0.028. The higher the CCT the larger the decrease in CRF (r=-0.371, P=0.013. The higher the AL the smaller the decrease in IOPg (r=0.417, P=0.005. The higher the AL, SAI, and EEC the smaller the decrease in IOPcc (r=0.351, P=0.001; r=-0.478, P<0.001; r=0.339, P=0.013. Conclusions. Corneal biomechanical properties were affected by comprehensive factors after cataract surgery, including corneal endothelium properties, biometry, and geometrical characteristics.

  9. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kursat Dabak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p0.008. Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  10. In vivo biomechanical properties of heavy versus light weight monofilament polypropylene meshes. Does the knitting pattern matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigozzi, Miguel Angel; Provenzano, Sergio; Maeda, Fernando; Palma, Paulo; Riccetto, Cassio

    2017-01-01

    This work evaluated the post-implant biomechanical properties of light-weight (LW) and heavy-weight (HW) monofilament polypropylene (PP) meshes with different knitting patterns in an animal model in vivo. Forty-five adult female Wistar rats were divided into three groups and randomly implanted with 32 × 32 mm HW-PP (62 gm -2 ) orLW-PP (16 gm -2 ) in the lower abdomen. LW-PPwas tested orthogonally (called LWL and LWT) to reproduce the longitudinal and transverse planes of the vaginal wall, respectively. Abdominal walls were removed at 7, 30, and 60 days, and then tested for tensile load (maximum load until avulsion from the tissue), deflection, and stiffness to maximum load. Explants were compared over time and between groups. LW-PP meshes implanted in the LWT fashion (vaginal transverse plane) showed comparable maximum load and stiffness to HW-PP meshes, and LW-PP meshes implanted in the LWL fashion (vaginal longitudinal plane) presented lower maximum load and stiffness than the HW-PP meshes. There were no significant differences in the values of deflection at maximum load between the studied meshes as a function of time. The final mechanical behavior of PP mesh can be changed by its weight and knitting pattern. These properties may be useful in making more biocompatible prostheses for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) with less foreign material to maintain longitudinal vaginal elasticity and minimize sexual symptoms while maintaining transverse resistance (i.e., between vaginal fornixes) to prevent POP recurrence. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:73-79, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Biomechanical Property of a Newly Designed Assembly Locking Compression Plate: Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Jun Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed and validated a refined three-dimensional finite element model of middle femoral comminuted fracture to compare the biomechanical stability after two kinds of plate fixation: a newly designed assembly locking compression plate (NALCP and a locking compression plate (LCP. CT data of a male volunteer was converted to middle femoral comminuted fracture finite element analysis model. The fracture was fixated by NALCP and LCP. Stress distributions were observed. Under slow walking load and torsion load, the stress distribution tendency of the two plates was roughly uniform. The anterolateral femur was the tension stress area, and the bone block shifted toward the anterolateral femur. Maximum stress was found on the lateral border of the number 5 countersink of the plate. Under a slow walking load, the NALCP maximum stress was 2.160e+03 MPa and the LCP was 8.561e+02 MPa. Under torsion load, the NALCP maximum stress was 2.260e+03 MPa and the LCP was 6.813e+02 MPa. Based on those results of finite element analysis, the NALCP can provide adequate mechanical stability for comminuted fractures, which would help fixate the bone block and promote bone healing.

  12. Mechanical Spectral Signatures of Malignant Disease? A Small-Sample, Comparative Study of Continuum vs. Nano-Biomechanical Data Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin sections from human breast biopsies were employed to perform a differential analysis of the ultrasound spectral responses from invasive ductal carcinoma and normal tissue. A non-destructive testing methodology was employed, yielding the reflection coefficients as function of frequency in the clinical ultrasound range. The spectral responses were simulated both in the context of continuum and nano-biomechanics, with the objective of quantifying the physical properties that determine the differences in the spectral signature of normal vs. malignant tissue. The properties that were employed for the theoretical reconstruction of the spectra were: the density, the continuum and the nanomechanical elastic constants, and the nanomechanical theory internodal distance. The latter is a measure of the depth-of-penetration of mechanical actions between contiguous tissue elements. Together with vectorial descriptors of the tissue spatial arrangement, the internodal distance variable affords the quantitative incorporation of tissue architectural data in the theoretical model.

  13. Interference screw versus Endoscrew fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A biomechanical comparative study in sawbones and porcine knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Chih Hung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference screw fixation is one of the most common methods for ligament reconstruction. Although the advantages and clinical outcomes of this procedure have been widely reported, post-surgical complications often arise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new femoral fixation device, the Endoscrew, for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. We performed a mechanical test in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards and an in vitro biomechanical study. An axial pullout test was conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new device and the interference screw when implanted in solid rigid polyurethane foam test blocks. The biomechanical test used porcine femora to evaluate the initial fixation strength between these two implants. The maximum pullout force of the interference screw group [722.05 ± 130.49 N (N] was significantly greater (p < 0.01 than the Endoscrew group (440.79 ± 26.54 N when implanted in polyurethane foam 320 kg/m3 density. With polyurethane foam 160 kg/m3 density, the maximum pullout forces were (242.61 ± 37.36 N (p < 0.001 and (99.33 ± 30.01 N for the interference screw group and Endoscrew group, respectively. In the in vitro mechanical study, the Endoscrew (646.39 ± 72.38 N required a significantly greater ultimate load prior to failure (p < 0.05 when compared with the interference screw (489.72 ± 138.64 N. With regard to pullout stiffness, there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.13 between the Endoscrew group (99.15 ± 12.16 N/mm and the interference screw group (87.96 ± 11.12 N/mm. The cyclic stiffness was also not significantly different (p < 0.44 between the Endoscrew group (93.09 ± 16.07 N/mm and the interference screw group (85.78 ± 14.76 N/mm. The axial pullout test showed that the strength of the Endoscrew was close to the fixation strength required for daily activities, but it is

  14. Effects of the freezing and thawing process on biomechanical properties of the human skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Nishida, Yoshifumi; Takano, Tachio; Koizumi, Yoshinori; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if biomechanical investigations of skull samples are reliable after skulls have been subjected to a freezing and thawing process. The skulls were obtained from 105 Japanese cadavers (66 males, 39 females) of known age that were autopsied in our department between October 2012 and June 2013. We obtained bone specimens from eight sites (four bilaterally symmetrical pairs) of each skull and measured the mass of each specimen. They were then classified into three groups (A, B, C) based on the duration of freezing of the experimental samples. The left-side samples were subjected to frozen storage (experimental group). The corresponding right-side samples were their controls. Bending tests were performed on the controls immediately after they were obtained. The experimental samples were preserved by refrigeration at -20 °C for 1 day (group A), 1 month (group B), or 3 months (group C). Following refrigeration, these samples were placed at 37 °C to thaw for 1 h and then were subjected to bending tests using a three-point-bending apparatus attached to a Handy force gauge. The device recorded the fracture load automatically when the specimen fractured. Statistical analyses revealed that there were no significant differences in sample fracture loads between the frozen preserved/thawed samples and the unfrozen controls for each of the cryopreservation intervals. We eliminated any possible sample mass bias by using controls from the same skull in each case. The results suggest that the freezing/thawing process has little effect on the mechanical properties of human skulls. Thus, frozen storage for up to 3 months is a good method for preserving human skulls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomechanical Properties of Murine Meniscus Surface via AFM-based Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip ≈ 5 μm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction observed on 12-week old menisci. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD, and the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1 ± 0.8 MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean ± SEM, n = 13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4 ± 0.1 MPa, n = 6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  16. Influence of test temperature on biomechanical properties of all-inside meniscal repair devices and inside-out meniscus sutures--evaluation of an isolated distraction loading, worst-case scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Peter U; Favre, Philippe; Puskas, Gabor J; von Campe, Arndt; Koch, Peter P; Meyer, Dominik C

    2011-08-01

    Studies on the biomechanical properties of meniscus repairs are usually performed at room instead of body temperature. However, various all-inside meniscal repair devices include bioabsorbable materials, which are mechanically sensitive to higher environmental temperatures. Therefore, we hypothesize that current test standards may systematically lead to a false overestimation of their performance. In 84 cadaveric bovine lateral menisci, an artificial vertical lesion was repaired with different all-inside meniscal repair devices (FasT-Fix, FasT-Fix AB, RapidLoc, Meniscus Arrow, Meniscus Screw) compared to a vertical inside-out Ethibond Excel 2.0 suture loop. Maximum load-to-failure, stiffness, and failure mode were tested in a uniaxial distraction loading at 20°C and 37°C. Most of the tested implants were not susceptible to the higher environmental test temperature with respect to maximum load-to-failure, stiffness, and failure mode. Only the RapidLoc showed a significantly decreased stiffness (-28.1%) and a statistical trend to lower maximum load-to-failure (-20.6%) at 37°C compared to 20°C. 20°C environmental temperature seems to be an acceptable test condition for the most meniscal repair devices. However, if the bioabsorbable part of the implant is the weakest link, body temperature may be considered for testing to prevent false overestimation of the biomechanical properties. For future biomechanical in vitro testing of meniscal repair devices, this study may provide novel insight into biomechanical test protocols for considering the environmental test temperature as an influencing factor of the biomechanical properties of especially bioabsorbable meniscal repair devices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Consistency and Comparability of International Property Valuations

    OpenAIRE

    Lynne Michael; Guowei Gu

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates whether international property investors can rely on comparability and consistency in international property valuations.A survey was conducted with further secondary data analysis to investigate the drivers, risks and confounding factors affecting global property valuations. Major risks identified were political instability, a comparative lack of transparency in property markets and inferior property rights including titles, rights to minerals, water and land use. The ...

  18. Primary fixation of mini slings: a comparative biomechanical study in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Palma

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The mini sling concept for stress urinary incontinence is an anatomical approach that involves placing a midurethral low-tension tape anchored to the obturator internus muscles bilaterally. They overcome the blind passage of long needles and all the related complications. There are many different devices available and because these are outpatient procedures, primary fixation plays an important role in the outcome. The objective is to evaluate the primary fixation of the various devices of attachment of the commercially available mini-slings through biomechanical tests. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 45 Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups of 15 rats each. They underwent 5 subcutaneous implantation of different mini slings and one polipropilene mesh (control, as follows: TVT-Secur® (Gynecare, USA, Type 1 polypropylene mesh (control; Ophira Mini Sling System® (Promedon, Argentina, Tissue Fixation System® (TFS PTY, Australia, Zipper Sling® and "T device" (Prosurg, USA. The abdominal wall was removed on bloc at different times after implant for biomechanical evaluation, which consisted in application of unidirectional force to the extremity of the fixation system or mesh, until it was completely removed from the tissue using a tension meter (Nexygen 3.0 Universal Testing Machine - LLOYD Instruments. The force was measured in Newtons (N. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the resistance to extraction among the different fixation systems. At 7 days the Ophira Mini Sling System® presented the best fixation and "T dispositive" the worst. CONCLUSION: Ophira mini sling System® presented the best primary fixation at 7º, 14º and 30º days. The impact of this feature in the clinical setting needs to be verified.

  19. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  20. Removable thermoplastic appliances modified by incisal cuts show altered biomechanical properties during tipping of a maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillipp Brockmeyer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed to evaluate the force delivery of removable thermoplastic appliances (RTAs, modified by different sized incisal cuts, during tipping of a maxillary central incisor in palatal and vestibular direction. Methods Forty-five RTAs from three different materials (Biolon®, Erkodur®, Ideal Clear® of the same thickness (1 mm were used. Analysis was performed on a separated maxillary central incisor which was part of a resin model with a complete dentition. In 15 RTAs, of different material, a cut was inserted at the incisal edge of tooth 11. In 15 other appliances, the cut was extended to teeth 12 and 21. Fifteen aligners remained uncut. The experimental tooth was tipped starting from the zero position in 0.05° steps to a maximal deflection of ± 0.42° of the incisal edge in vestibular and palatal direction, after positioning the RTA onto the model. Results The horizontal (Fx and the vertical (Fz force components were decreased by approximately half with increasing cut size. Fz values changed during palatal tipping from a weak intrusive force, for aligners without cut, to an extrusive force with increasing cut size. Compared to both other materials used (Erkodur® and Ideal Clear®, the Biolon® aligners showed significantly higher Fx and Fz values (p < 0.0001, respectively. Conclusions RTAs modified by different sized incisal cuts show altered biomechanical properties and an inversion of the vertical force component, during tipping of a maxillary central incisor.

  1. Removable thermoplastic appliances modified by incisal cuts show altered biomechanical properties during tipping of a maxillary central incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Kramer, Katharina; Böhrnsen, Florian; Gruber, Rudolf Matthias; Batschkus, Sarah; Rödig, Tina; Hahn, Wolfram

    2017-08-28

    The present study aimed to evaluate the force delivery of removable thermoplastic appliances (RTAs), modified by different sized incisal cuts, during tipping of a maxillary central incisor in palatal and vestibular direction. Forty-five RTAs from three different materials (Biolon®, Erkodur®, Ideal Clear®) of the same thickness (1 mm) were used. Analysis was performed on a separated maxillary central incisor which was part of a resin model with a complete dentition. In 15 RTAs, of different material, a cut was inserted at the incisal edge of tooth 11. In 15 other appliances, the cut was extended to teeth 12 and 21. Fifteen aligners remained uncut. The experimental tooth was tipped starting from the zero position in 0.05° steps to a maximal deflection of ± 0.42° of the incisal edge in vestibular and palatal direction, after positioning the RTA onto the model. The horizontal (Fx) and the vertical (Fz) force components were decreased by approximately half with increasing cut size. Fz values changed during palatal tipping from a weak intrusive force, for aligners without cut, to an extrusive force with increasing cut size. Compared to both other materials used (Erkodur® and Ideal Clear®), the Biolon® aligners showed significantly higher Fx and Fz values (p < 0.0001, respectively). RTAs modified by different sized incisal cuts show altered biomechanical properties and an inversion of the vertical force component, during tipping of a maxillary central incisor.

  2. Developing a new dental implant design and comparing its biomechanical features with four designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Rismanchian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As various implant geometries present different biomechanical behaviors, the purpose of this work was to study stress distribution around tapered and cylindrical threaded implant geometries using three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Methods : Seven implant models were constructed using Computer Assisted Designing system. After digitized models of mandibular section, the crowns were created. They were combined with implant models, which were previously imported into CATIA software. The combined solid model was transferred to ABAQOUS to create a finite element meshed model which was later analyzed regarding the highest maximum and minimum principal stresses of bone. Results: For all models, the highest stresses of cortical bone were located at the crestal cortical bone around the implant. Threaded implants, triangular thread form and taper body form showed a higher peak of tensile and compressive stress than non-threaded implants, square thread form and straight body form, respectively. A taper implant with triangular threads, which is doubled in the cervical portion of the body, had a significantly lower peak of tensile and compressive stress in the cortical bone than straight/taper triangular or square threaded implant forms. Conclusion: For the investigation of bone implant interfacial stress, the non-bonded state should be studied too. Confirmative clinical and biological studies are required in order to benefit from the results of this study.

  3. Biomechanics of corneal ectasia and biomechanical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Cynthia J; Dupps, William J

    2014-06-01

    Many algorithms exist for the topographic/tomographic detection of corneas at risk for post-refractive surgery ectasia. It is proposed that the reason for the difficulty in finding a universal screening tool based on corneal morphologic features is that curvature, elevation, and pachymetric changes are all secondary signs of keratoconus and post-refractive surgery ectasia and that the primary abnormality is in the biomechanical properties. It is further proposed that the biomechanical modification is focal in nature, rather than a uniform generalized weakening, and that the focal reduction in elastic modulus precipitates a cycle of biomechanical decompensation that is driven by asymmetry in the biomechanical properties. This initiates a repeating cycle of increased strain, stress redistribution, and subsequent focal steepening and thinning. Various interventions are described in terms of how this cycle of biomechanical decompensation is interrupted, such as intrastromal corneal ring segments, which redistribute the corneal stress, and collagen crosslinking, which modifies the basic structural properties. Proprietary or commercial disclosures are listed after the references. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Corneal Biomechanical Properties after FS-LASIK with Residual Bed Thickness Less Than 50% of the Original Corneal Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The changes in corneal biomechanical properties after LASIK remain an unknown but important topic for surgical design and prognostic evaluation. This study aims to observe the postoperative corneal biomechanical properties one month after LASIK with amount of corneal cutting (ACC greater than 50% of the central corneal thickness (CCT. Methods. FS-LASIK was performed in 10 left rabbit eyes with ACC being 60% (L60 and 65% (L65 of the CCT, while the right eyes (R were the control. After 4 weeks, rabbits were executed and corneal strip samples were prepared for uniaxial tensile tests. Results. At the same strain, the stresses of L65 and L60 were larger than those of R. The elastic moduli of L60 and L65 were larger than those of R when the stress was 0.02 MPa, while they began to be less than those of R when stress exceeds the low-stress region. After 10 s relaxation, the stress of specimens L65, L60, and R increased in turn. Conclusion. The elastic moduli of the cornea after FS-LASIK with ACC greater than 50% of the CCT do not become less under normal rabbit IOP. The limit stress grows with the rise of ACC when relaxation becomes stable.

  5. Associations of Biomechanical Properties of the Cornea With Environmental and Metabolic Factors in an Elderly Population: The ALIENOR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Cedric; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Boniol, Mathieu; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Le Goff, Melanie; Malet, Florence; Rougier, Marie-Benedicte; Delyfer, Marie-Noelle; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Delcourt, Cecile

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the associations of biomechanical properties of the cornea with metabolic and environmental factors in an elderly population. The ALIENOR (Antioxydants, Lipides Essentiels, Nutrition, and Maladies OculaiRes) study is a population-based study. In 2009-2010, 624 subjects, aged 74 years or more, underwent an eye examination, including intraocular pressure (IOP), central corneal thickness (CCT), and biomechanical properties of the cornea measurements using the Ocular Response Analyzer. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, and medical history data were collected using standardized questionnaires. Mean lifetime ambient ultraviolet (UV) exposure was estimated using residential history and statistics of UV radiation at each location using the Eurosun UV database. Mean age was 82.2 ± 4.3 years. Mean corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), and CCT were 9.4 ± 1.9, 9.8 ± 1.9 mm Hg, and 551.6 ± 36.8 μm, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, CH and CRF values were significantly lower in subjects older than 80 years (-0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.89; -0.24); P cornea are modified by metabolic and lifetime environmental factors, especially UV exposure. The manner these factors may influence onset and progression of ocular diseases or IOP measurements need further investigation.

  6. Cumulative loads increase at the knee joint with slow-speed running compared to faster running: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jesper; Sørensen, Henrik; Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard

    2015-04-01

    Biomechanical cross-sectional study. To investigate the hypothesis that the cumulative load at the knee during running increases as running speed decreases. The knee joint load per stride decreases as running speed decreases. However, by decreasing running speed, the number of strides per given distance is increased. Running a given distance at a slower speed may increase the cumulative load at the knee joint compared with running the same distance at a higher speed, hence increasing the risk of running-related injuries in the knee. Kinematic and ground reaction force data were collected from 16 recreational runners, during steady-state running with a rearfoot strike pattern at 3 different speeds (mean ± SD): 8.02 ± 0.17 km/h, 11.79 ± 0.21 km/h, and 15.78 ± 0.22 km/h. The cumulative load (cumulative impulse) over a 1000-m distance was calculated at the knee joint on the basis of a standard 3-D inverse-dynamics approach. Based on a 1000-m running distance, the cumulative load at the knee was significantly higher at a slow running speed than at a high running speed (relative difference, 80%). The mean load per stride at the knee increased significantly across all biomechanical parameters, except impulse, following an increase in running speed. Slow-speed running decreases knee joint loads per stride and increases the cumulative load at the knee joint for a given running distance compared to faster running. The primary reason for the increase in cumulative load at slower speeds is an increase in number of strides needed to cover the same distance.

  7. Comparative biomechanic study of flexor tendon repair using FiberWire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitayawinyu, Thanapong; Martineau, Paul A; Luria, Shai; Hanel, Douglas P; Trumble, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    FiberWire, an increasingly popular suture material, allows for strong flexor tendon repair that may allow early mobilization. This study was designed to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of FiberWire for flexor tendon repair and to identify the most effective repair technique using this material. Forty-nine human cadaver flexor tendons were randomized and tested biomechanically using one of the following techniques of flexor tendon repair performed with 3-0 FiberWire: (1) modified Kessler, (2) modified Pennington, (3) 2-strand multiple grasping, (4) 2-strand multiple locking, (5) 2-strand double cross-locks, (6) Massachusetts General Hospital, and (7) 4-strand locked cruciate. The ultimate tensile strength, 2-mm gap resistance, and failure mode of the repairs were evaluated. Knot unraveling was the most common failure mode of FiberWire repair in 4 of the 7 techniques. Four-strand repairs and locking repairs provided significantly more strength than 2-strand repairs and grasping repairs. Multiple grasping and multiple locking repairs with 2 knots were significantly weaker than single grasping and locking repairs with a single knot. Four-strand locked cruciate repairs were significantly stronger than the other techniques (mean ultimate tensile strength 107 N, 2-mm gap force 96 N). Two-strand double cross-locks repairs were stronger than the other 2-strand repairs (mean ultimate tensile strength 69 N, 2-mm gap force 53 N). The strength of the FiberWire repairs increased with locking repair and with increased number of strands but was not influenced by increased number of locking and grasping stitches. Four-strand locked cruciate and 2-strand double cross-locks provided the greatest strength and likely are appropriate for future clinical use in, respectively, 4-strand and 2-strand repairs. However, the poor knot-holding characteristics of FiberWire with the need of a greater number of knot throws may be of concern for surgeons using this product for flexor tendon

  8. Biomechanical pulping : a mill-scale evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood. Akhtar; Gary M. Scott; Ross E. Swaney; Mike J. Lentz; Eric G. Horn; Marguerite S. Sykes; Gary C. Myers

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical pulping process is electrical energy intensive and results in low paper strength. Biomechanical pulping, defined as the fungal treatment of lignocellulosic materials prior to mechanical pulping, has shown at least 30% savings in electrical energy consumption, and significant improvements in paper strength properties compared to the control at a laboratory...

  9. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance.

  10. [Development of static three dimensional screw-plate system and the biomechanic features thereof, a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie-Yu; Li, Kang-Hua; Liao, Qian-De; Zhu, Yong; Hu, Yi-He; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2009-01-06

    To develop a new internal fixation device and the matching tools for subtrochanteric fracture, investigate the biomechanical features thereof, and compare its effects with those of other instruments. A new internal fixation device, static three dimensional screw-plate system: (STDSP) was developed based on the anatomical parameters and the biomechanical characteristics of proximal femur and combined with the biomechanical advantages of the model of three-dimensional plate and multiple-screws plate fixation. Sixteen paired cadaveric adult femurs were randomly divided into 2 equal groups: fracture healing group undergoing insertion of implant and then taking out thereof with a nail left, and fracture group with a trapezoid defect to mimic subtrochanteric fracture 4 of which were fixed with dynamic hip screw (DHS) and STDSP or Gamma nail and STDSP. All the specimens underwent A-P position four point bending test, axial compression test, torsion test, and destroyable test. (1) In the fracture group, A-P position four point bending test showed that the stretch displacement of STDSP group was (0.221 +/- 0.089) mm, significantly smaller than that of the Gamma nails group [(0.506 +/- 0.086) mm, t = 38.278 P = 0.000]; Axial compression test showed that the inferior displacement of the STDSP group was (2.804 +/- 0.585) mm, significantly larger than that of the Gamma nail group [(1.874 +/- 0.549) mm, t = -5.454, P = 0.012]; Torsion test showed that the torque values at 50 and 100 of the STDSP group were (3.78 +/- 0.84) J and (2.3 +/- 1.08) J, both significantly larger than those of the Gamma nail groups [(2.3 +/- 1.08) J and (4.35 +/- 1.81) J, t = -4.729 P = 0.018, and t = -3.227 P = 0.048] and those of the DHS group [(7.3 +/- 1.273) J and (4.325 +/- 0.88) J respectively, t = -3.242 P = 0.048]; and torsion destroyable test showed that the torque values at 200 of the STDSP group was (21.88 +/- 2.51) J, significantly larger than those of the Gamma nail and DHS groups, [(14

  11. Raman spectroscopy detects deterioration in biomechanical properties of bone in a glucocorticoid-treated mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-08-01

    Although glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed for the symptomatic management of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, extended glucocorticoid exposure is the leading cause of physician-induced osteoporosis and leaves patients at a high risk of fracture. To study the biochemical effects of glucocorticoid exposure and how they might affect biomechanical properties of the bone, Raman spectra were acquired from ex vivo tibiae of glucocorticoid- and placebo-treated wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. Statistically significant spectral differences were observed due to both treatment regimen and mouse genotype. These differences are attributed to changes in the overall bone mineral composition, as well as the degree of phosphate mineralization in tibial cortical bone. In addition, partial least squares regression was used to generate a Raman-based prediction of each tibia's biomechanical strength as quantified by a torsion test. The Raman-based predictions were as accurate as those produced by microcomputed tomography derived parameters, and more accurate than the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for monitoring bone biochemistry in studies of bone diseases such as osteoporosis, including tests of drugs being developed to combat these diseases.

  12. Changes of calf muscle-tendon biomechanical properties induced by passive-stretching and active-movement training in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Hwang, Miriam; Ren, Yupeng; Gao, Fan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-08-01

    Biomechanical properties of calf muscles and Achilles tendon may be altered considerably in children with cerebral palsy (CP), contributing to childhood disability. It is unclear how muscle fascicles and tendon respond to rehabilitation and contribute to improvement of ankle-joint properties. Biomechanical properties of the calf muscle fascicles of both gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and soleus (SOL), including the fascicle length and pennation angle in seven children with CP, were evaluated using ultrasonography combined with biomechanical measurements before and after a 6-wk treatment of passive-stretching and active-movement training. The passive force contributions from the GM and SOL muscles were separated using flexed and extended knee positions, and fascicular stiffness was calculated based on the fascicular force-length relation. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including resting length, cross-sectional area, and stiffness, were also evaluated. The 6-wk training induced elongation of muscle fascicles (SOL: 8%, P = 0.018; GM: 3%, P = 0.018), reduced pennation angle (SOL: 10%, P = 0.028; GM: 5%, P = 0.028), reduced fascicular stiffness (SOL: 17%, P = 0.128; GM: 21%, P = 0.018), decreased tendon length (6%, P = 0.018), increased Achilles tendon stiffness (32%, P = 0.018), and increased Young's modulus (20%, P = 0.018). In vivo characterizations of calf muscles and Achilles tendon mechanical properties help us better understand treatment-induced changes of calf muscle-tendon and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  13. Changes of calf muscle-tendon biomechanical properties induced by passive-stretching and active-movement training in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Hwang, Miriam; Ren, Yupeng; Gao, Fan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of calf muscles and Achilles tendon may be altered considerably in children with cerebral palsy (CP), contributing to childhood disability. It is unclear how muscle fascicles and tendon respond to rehabilitation and contribute to improvement of ankle-joint properties. Biomechanical properties of the calf muscle fascicles of both gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and soleus (SOL), including the fascicle length and pennation angle in seven children with CP, were evaluated using ultrasonography combined with biomechanical measurements before and after a 6-wk treatment of passive-stretching and active-movement training. The passive force contributions from the GM and SOL muscles were separated using flexed and extended knee positions, and fascicular stiffness was calculated based on the fascicular force-length relation. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including resting length, cross-sectional area, and stiffness, were also evaluated. The 6-wk training induced elongation of muscle fascicles (SOL: 8%, P = 0.018; GM: 3%, P = 0.018), reduced pennation angle (SOL: 10%, P = 0.028; GM: 5%, P = 0.028), reduced fascicular stiffness (SOL: 17%, P = 0.128; GM: 21%, P = 0.018), decreased tendon length (6%, P = 0.018), increased Achilles tendon stiffness (32%, P = 0.018), and increased Young's modulus (20%, P = 0.018). In vivo characterizations of calf muscles and Achilles tendon mechanical properties help us better understand treatment-induced changes of calf muscle-tendon and facilitate development of more effective treatments. PMID:21596920

  14. [Dynamic observation of the biomechanic properties of sciatic nerve at the suture site in rats following repairing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-zhi; Jiang, Bao-guo; Zhao, Fu-qiang; Wei, Guang-ru; Shang, Yong-gang; Zhang, Pei-xun; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Hong-bo

    2005-06-15

    To observe the biomechanic properties of sciatic nerve at the suture site in rats following repairing. The right sciatic nerves of 40 white Sprague-Dawley 300-350 gm rats were exposed, cut and then repaired with 10-0 nylon sutures, laced in the epineurium. 0, 1, 3, 6 weeks after operation, the tensile strength of the sciatic nerves were measured, the data analyzed statistically. The load-elongation curves for both the normal unoperated and operated nerves had the similar shape. The tensile strength of the 0 week was significant difference to 1, 3 and 6 weeks (P < 0.01). No significant difference was found among 1, 3 and 6 weeks. The tensile strength of the injured nerves are recovered in the first week and resistant in 6 weeks after repairing.

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Biomechanical Behaviour of Two Cementless Short Stems for Hip Replacement: Linea Anatomic and Minihip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarre, Sergio; Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Gracia, Luis

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study between two stems (Linea Anatomic and Minihip) has been performed in order to analyse the differences in their biomechanical behaviour, concerning stem micromotions and load transmission between stem and bone. From the corresponding finite element models, a parametric study was carried out to quantify ranges of micromotions taking into account: friction coefficient in the stem-bone interface, press-fit and two types of gait cycle. Micromotions were evaluated for each stem at six different levels along repeated gait cycles. An initial and marked stem subsidence at the beginning of the simulation was observed, followed by an asymptotic decrease due to friction forces. Once migration occurs, a repeated reversible cyclic micromotion is developed and stabilized as gait cycle times are simulated. The general motion pattern exhibited higher amplitude of micromotion for Minihip compared to Linea stem. The load transmission mechanism was analyzed, identifying the main internal forces. The results show higher local forces for Minihip stem up to 80% greater than for Linea stem. The differences of design between Minihip and Linea conditioned different distributions of load, influencing the posterior stress-shielding. Consequently, short stems require high bone stock and quality should, being indicated for young patients with high bone quality. PMID:27391328

  16. Biomechanical pulping of kenaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz Ahmed; Masood Akhtar; Gary C. Myers; Gary M. Scott

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fungal pretreatment of whole kenaf prior to refining on refiner electrical energy consumption, paper strength, and optical properties. We also explored the suitability of whole kenaf biomechanical pulp for making newsprint in terms of ISO brightness and strength properties. Kenaf was sterilized by autoclaving...

  17. Biomechanics of footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, C J

    1987-07-01

    This article discusses biomechanical principles that indicate a number of basic design criteria for shoes and the properties of good footwear in terms of normal daily activities at home, at school, and at work. These properties also apply to normal occupational footwear and safety footwear.

  18. [Changes in the biomechanic property of the skin after hemodialysis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardesca, E; Brazzelli, V; Borroni, G; Cavagnino, A; Rabbiosi, G

    1989-06-01

    Skin extensibility in 21 subjects (belonging to two different age groups) undergoing hemodialysis has been investigated. Measurements have been performed on the forearm before and after two hours of dialytic treatment. A significant decrease of skin extensibility (P less than 0.02) has been recorded in the elderly prior to the dialytic procedure; the data is consistent with an increased dermal water content. Water removal during treatment led to normalization of extensometric levels (P less than 0.05). However, improvement of skin extensibility is not directly related to the amount of water withdrawn. The study support the importance of water in determining skin viscoelastic responses; hemodialysis is a useful model to monitor the effects of water on skin biomechanics.

  19. Evolution of bone biomechanical properties at the micrometer scale around titanium implant as a function of healing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayron, Romain; Matsukawa, Mami; Tsubota, Ryo; Mathieu, Vincent; Barthel, Etienne; Haiat, Guillaume

    2014-03-21

    The characterization of the biomechanical properties of newly formed bone tissue around implants is important to understand the osseointegration process. The objective of this study is to investigate the evolution of elastic properties of newly formed bone tissue as a function of healing time. To do so, nanoindentation and micro-Brillouin scattering techniques are coupled following a multimodality approach using histological analysis. Coin-shaped implants were placed in vivo at a distance of 200 µm from the cortical bone surface, leading to an initially empty cavity. Two rabbits were sacrificed after 7 and 13 weeks of healing time. The histological analyses allow us to distinguish mature and newly formed bone tissue. The bone mechanical properties were measured in mature and newly formed bone tissue. Analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer tests reveals a significant effect of healing time on the indentation modulus and ultrasonic velocities of bone tissue. The results show that bone mass density increases by 12.2% (2.2% respectively) between newly formed bone at 7 weeks (13 weeks respectively) and mature bone. The dependence of bone properties on healing time may be explained by the evolution of bone microstructure and mineralization.

  20. Evolution of bone biomechanical properties at the micrometer scale around titanium implant as a function of healing time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vayron, Romain; Mathieu, Vincent; Haiat, Guillaume; Matsukawa, Mami; Tsubota, Ryo; Barthel, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of the biomechanical properties of newly formed bone tissue around implants is important to understand the osseointegration process. The objective of this study is to investigate the evolution of elastic properties of newly formed bone tissue as a function of healing time. To do so, nanoindentation and micro-Brillouin scattering techniques are coupled following a multimodality approach using histological analysis. Coin-shaped implants were placed in vivo at a distance of 200 µm from the cortical bone surface, leading to an initially empty cavity. Two rabbits were sacrificed after 7 and 13 weeks of healing time. The histological analyses allow us to distinguish mature and newly formed bone tissue. The bone mechanical properties were measured in mature and newly formed bone tissue. Analysis of variance and Tukey–Kramer tests reveals a significant effect of healing time on the indentation modulus and ultrasonic velocities of bone tissue. The results show that bone mass density increases by 12.2% (2.2% respectively) between newly formed bone at 7 weeks (13 weeks respectively) and mature bone. The dependence of bone properties on healing time may be explained by the evolution of bone microstructure and mineralization. (paper)

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Two Types of Immediately Loaded Implants Using Biomechanical and Histomorphometric Tests: An Animal Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Movahedian, Bijan; Khalighinejad, Navid; Badrian, Hamid; Mohammad Razavi, Sayed; Nekouie, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In order to minimize the required time to regain esthetic and function, immediately loaded implants were suggested. The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the Nisastan and XIve implants using biomechanical and histomorphometric tests. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, 6 Nisastan one-piece immediately loaded screw type implant (OPILS) and 6 Xive implants with 3.4 mm diameter and 11 mm long were used. The implants were immediately loaded with temporary coating. After three months, the torque required to break bone-implant contact was measured and was recorded. All implants were extracted with surrounding bone and histologically were evaluated. The data were inputted into the SPSS 11.5 to run student T-test statistical analyses (α = 0.05). Results. The success rates of both types of implants was 100%, and none of them failed due to mobility or bone loss. The mean removal torque value (RTV) was 142.08 and 40 N/Cm for Xive and Nisastan implants, respectively, and their RTVs showed a significant difference between two mentioned implants (P = 0.004). None of the histomorphometric values showed significant differences between the two implants (P > 0.05). Discussion. both systems have the capability to induce osseointegration under immediate loads but that Xive implants showed higher capability for bone contact. PMID:22852091

  2. COMPARATIVE BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSES OF SQUAT JUMP WITHOUT AND WITH FLEXION IN KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Bubanj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In sports hall of Faculty of sports and physical education in Niš, student demon- strated technique of squat jump – without and with flexion in knee joint. Elements of technique were recorded by using one digital video camera in sagital plane. By using comparative kinematics analyses, there were establish differences in values of kinema- tics parametres of different body segments. Bigger elevation of body centre of gravity was ascertain at bounce without flexion in knee joint.

  3. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with integrated fixation and adjunctive posterior stabilization: A comparative biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Matthew S; Dupre, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Oh, Michael Y; Altman, Daniel T; Cheng, Boyle C

    2015-10-01

    Interbody fusion cages with integrated fixation components have become of interest due to their ability to provide enhanced post-operative stability and mitigate device migration. A recently approved anterior lumbar interbody fusion cage with integrated fixation anchors has yet to be compared in vitro to a standard polyetheretherketone cage when used in combination with an interspinous process clamp. Twelve human cadaveric lumbar segments were implanted at L4-L5 with a Solus interbody cage (n=6) or standard polyetheretherketone cage (n=6) following Intact testing and discectomy. Each cage was subsequently evaluated in all primary modes of loading after supplementation with the following posterior constructs: interspinous process clamp, bilateral transfacet screws, unilateral transfacet screw with contralateral pedicle screws, and bilateral pedicle screws. Range of motion results were normalized to Intact, and a two-way mixed analysis of variance was utilized to detect statistical differences. The Solus cage in combination with all posterior constructs provided significant fixation compared to Intact in all loading conditions. The polyetheretherketone cage also provided significant fixation when combined with all screw based treatments, however when used with the interspinous process clamp a significant reduction was not observed in lateral bending or axial torsion. Interbody cages with integrated fixation components enhance post-operative stability within the intervertebral space, thus affording clinicians the potential to utilize less invasive methods of posterior stabilization when seeking circumferential fusion. Interspinous process clamps, in particular, may reduce peri-operative and post-operative comorbidities compared to screw based constructs. Further study is necessary to corroborate their effectiveness in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of Physical Exercise and Food Restriction on the Biomechanical Properties of the Femur of Ageing Male Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Skalicky, Monika; Viidik, Andrus

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voluntary running in wheels as well as food reduction increase the life spans of rats. Disparate parameters such as the collagen biomarker of ageing and the development of kidney pathologies are decreased by voluntary exercise. There are few reports on the influence of physical exercise...... and food restriction on the skeleton of male rats. Most investigations initiated rather short-term interventions in 4- to 5-week-old animals and thus studied more the influence of growth than the influence of ageing on the skeleton. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of physical exercise and food...... to decreasing biomechanical strength than the diaphysis during ageing. Physical exercise, when started at the age of 5 months, when the skeleton has reached its adult size, is somewhat effective in counteracting these changes. There is also some retarding effect of food restriction....

  5. The extensor tibiae muscle of the stick insect: biomechanical properties of an insect walking leg muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guschlbauer, Christoph; Scharstein, Hans; Büschges, Ansgar

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the properties of the extensor tibiae muscle of the stick insect (Carausius morosus) middle leg. Muscle geometry of the middle leg was compared to that of the front and hind legs and to the flexor tibiae, respectively. The mean length of the extensor tibiae fibres is 1.41+/-0.23 mm and flexor fibres are 2.11+/-0.30 mm long. The change of fibre length with joint angle was measured and closely follows a cosine function. Its amplitude gives effective moment arm lengths of 0.28+/-0.02 mm for the extensor and 0.56+/-0.04 mm for the flexor. Resting extensor tibiae muscle passive tonic force increased from 2 to 5 mN in the maximum femur-tibia (FT)-joint working range when stretched by ramps. Active muscle properties were measured with simultaneous activation (up to 200 pulses s(-1)) of all three motoneurons innervating the extensor tibiae, because this reflects most closely physiological muscle activation during leg swing. The force-length relationship corresponds closely to the typical characteristic according to the sliding filament hypothesis: it has a plateau at medium fibre lengths, declines nearly linearly in force at both longer and shorter fibre lengths, and the muscle's working range lies in the short to medium fibre length range. Maximum contraction velocity showed a similar relationship. The force-velocity relationship was the traditional Hill curve hyperbola, but deviated from the hyperbolic shape in the region of maximum contraction force close to the isometric contraction. Step-like changes in muscle length induced by loaded release experiments characterised the non-linear series elasticity as a quadratic spring.

  6. Carbon fiber reinforced PEEK Optima--a composite material biomechanical properties and wear/debris characteristics of CF-PEEK composites for orthopedic trauma implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Ely L; Rath, Ehud; Shlaifer, Amir; Chechik, Ofir; Maman, Eran; Salai, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The advantageous properties of carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF-PEEK) composites for use as orthopedic implants include similar modulus to bone and ability to withstand prolonged fatigue strain. The CF-PEEK tibial nail, dynamic compression plate, proximal humeral plate and distal radius volar plate were compared biomechanically (by four-point bending, static torsion of the nail, and bending fatigue) and for wear/debris (by amount of the debris generated at the connection between the CF-PEEK plate and titanium alloy screws) to commercially available devices. Four-point bending stress of the tibial nail and dynamic and distal radius plates yielded characteristics similar to other commercially available devices. The distal volar plate bending structural stiffness of the CF-PEEK distal volar plate was 0.542 Nm2 versus 0.376 Nm2 for the DePuy's DVR anatomic volar plate. The PHILOS proximal humeral internal locking system stainless steel plate was much stronger (6.48 Nm2) than the CF-PEEK proximal humeral plate (1.1 Nm2). Tibial nail static torsion testing showed similar properties to other tested nails (Fixion, Zimmer and Synthes). All tested CF-PEEK devices underwent one million fatigue cycles without failure. Wear test showed a lower volume of generated particles in comparison to the common implants in use today. Thus, these tested implants were similar to commercially used devices and can be recommended for use as implants in orthopedic surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical and biomechanical properties of the pacemaking sinoatrial node extracellular matrix are distinct from contractile left ventricular matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Gluck

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix plays a role in differentiation and phenotype development of its resident cells. Although cardiac extracellular matrix from the contractile tissues has been studied and utilized in tissue engineering, extracellular matrix properties of the pacemaking sinoatrial node are largely unknown. In this study, the biomechanical properties and biochemical composition and distribution of extracellular matrix in the sinoatrial node were investigated relative to the left ventricle. Extracellular matrix of the sinoatrial node was found to be overall stiffer than that of the left ventricle and highly heterogeneous with interstitial regions composed of predominantly fibrillar collagens and rich in elastin. The extracellular matrix protein distribution suggests that resident pacemaking cardiomyocytes are enclosed in fibrillar collagens that can withstand greater tensile strength while the surrounding elastin-rich regions may undergo deformation to reduce the mechanical strain in these cells. Moreover, basement membrane-associated adhesion proteins that are ligands for integrins were of low abundance in the sinoatrial node, which may decrease force transduction in the pacemaking cardiomyocytes. In contrast to extracellular matrix of the left ventricle, extracellular matrix of the sinoatrial node may reduce mechanical strain and force transduction in pacemaking cardiomyocytes. These findings provide the criteria for a suitable matrix scaffold for engineering biopacemakers.

  8. Foraging on individual leaves by an intracellular feeding insect is not associated with leaf biomechanical properties or leaf orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Fiene

    Full Text Available Nearly all herbivorous arthropods make foraging-decisions on individual leaves, yet systematic investigations of the adaptive significance and ecological factors structuring these decisions are rare with most attention given to chewing herbivores. This study investigated why an intracellular feeding herbivore, Western flower thrips (WFT Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande, generally avoids feeding on the adaxial leaf surface of cotton cotyledons. WFT showed a significant aversion to adaxial-feeding even when excised-cotyledons were turned up-side (abaxial-side 'up', suggesting that negative-phototaxis was not a primary cause of thrips foraging patterns. No-choice bioassays in which individual WFT females were confined to either the abaxial or adaxial leaf surface showed that 35% fewer offspring were produced when only adaxial feeding was allowed, which coincided with 32% less plant feeding on that surface. To test the hypothesis that leaf biomechanical properties inhibited thrips feeding on the adaxial surface, we used a penetrometer to measure two variables related to the 'toughness' of each leaf surface. Neither variable negatively co-varied with feeding. Thus, while avoiding the upper leaf surface was an adaptive foraging strategy, the proximate cause remains to be elucidated, but is likely due, in part, to certain leaf properties that inhibit feeding.

  9. Comparative Studies on Some Physicochemical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Industrial and nutritional processes have increased the demands for oil and this in turn has led to the search for oils from different types of seeds. It is in this vein that baobab seed oil was extracted, analyzed and some of it physicochemical properties compared with those of vegetable, peanut and palm oils. The percentage ...

  10. Comparative Studies on Some Physicochemical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: Industrial and nutritional processes have increased the demands for oil and this in turn has led to the search for oils from different types of seeds. It is in this vein that baobab seed oil was extracted, analyzed and some of it physicochemical properties compared with those of vegetable, peanut and palm oils.

  11. Effects of diabetes mellitus on biomechanical properties of the rabbit cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, FangJun; Deng, ManLi; Zheng, XiaoBo; Li, LinNa; Zhao, YiPing; Cao, Si; Yu, AYong; Wang, QinMei; Huang, JinHai; Elsheikh, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effects of diabetes on the biomechanical behavior of cornea in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced in 20 rabbits using alloxan, while another 20 age- and weight-matched non-diabetic rabbits served as controls. Eyes were enucleated after 8 weeks of inducing diabetes and the whole cornea was removed with a 3 mm wide scleral ring and tested under inflation conditions with an internal pressure range of 2.0-30.0 mmHg to determine their stress-strain behavior using an inverse analysis process. The blood glucose level (BG), advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs), central corneal thickness (CCT) and intraocular pressure (IOP) increased significantly in the DM group. There were statistically significant correlations between BG and AGEs (r = 0.768, p = 0.00), and between AGEs and CCT variation upon induction of DM (r = 0.594, p = 0.00). The tangent modulus (Et) of the cornea at four stress levels (1-4 kPa, equivalent to approximately IOP of 7.5, 15, 22.5 and 30 mmHg, respectively) was significantly higher in diabetic rabbits than in the control group (p cornea of diabetic rabbits showed a significant increase in mechanical stiffness as evidenced by increases in corneal thickness and tangent modulus. The Et increase may be explained by a non-enzymatic cross-linking of collagen fibrils mediated by AGEs due to the high blood glucose levels in diabetes. The study also found significant IOP increases with higher blood glucose level even after controlling the effects of both corneal thickness and tangent modulus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulsed electromagnetic field treatment enhances healing callus biomechanical properties in an animal model of osteoporotic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androjna, Caroline; Fort, Brian; Zborowski, Maciej; Midura, Ronald J

    2014-09-01

    Delayed bone healing has been noted in osteoporosis patients and in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of estrogen-depletion osteopenia. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) devices are clinically approved as an adjunct to cervical fusion surgery in patients at high risk for non-fusion and for the treatment of fracture non-unions. These bone growth stimulating devices also accelerate the healing of fresh fracture repair in skeletally mature normal rats but have not been tested for efficacy to accelerate and/or enhance the delayed bone repair process in OVX rats. The current study tested the hypothesis that daily PEMF treatments would improve the fracture healing response in skeletally mature OVX rats. By 6 weeks of healing, PEMF treatments resulted in improved hard callus elastic modulus across fibula fractures normalizing the healing process in OVX rats with respect to this mechanical property. Radiographic evidence showed an improved hard callus bridging across fibula fractures in OVX rats treated with PEMF as compared to sham treatments. These findings provide a scientific rationale for investigating whether PEMF might improve bone-healing responses in at-risk osteoporotic patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF on the tensile biomechanical properties of diabetic wounds at different phases of healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry M C Choi

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF on the tensile biomechanical properties of diabetic wounds at different phases of healing. Two intensities of PEMF were adopted for comparison. We randomly assigned 111 10-week-old male streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats to two PEMF groups and a sham control group. Six-millimetre biopsy punched full thickness wounds were made on the lateral side of their hindlimbs. The PEMF groups received active PEMF delivered at 25 Hz with intensity of either 2 mT or 10 mT daily, while the sham group was handled in a similar way except they were not exposed to PEMF. Wound tissues were harvested for tensile testing on post-wounding days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14 and 21. Maximum load, maximum stress, energy absorption capacity, Young's modulus and thickness of wound tissue were measured. On post-wounding day 5, the PEMF group that received 10-mT intensity had significantly increased energy absorption capacity and showed an apparent increase in the maximum load. However, the 10-mT PEMF group demonstrated a decrease in Young's modulus on day 14. The 10-mT PEMF groups showed a significant increase in the overall thickness of wound tissue whereas the 2-mT group showed a significant decrease in the overall maximum stress of the wounds tissue. The present findings demonstrated that the PEMF delivered at 10 mT can improve energy absorption capacity of diabetic wounds in the early healing phase. However, PEMF (both 2-mT and 10-mT seemed to impair the material properties (maximum stress and Young's modulus in the remodelling phase. PEMF may be a useful treatment for promoting the recovery of structural properties (maximum load and energy absorption capacity, but it might not be applied at the remodelling phase to avoid impairing the recovery of material properties.

  14. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on the tensile biomechanical properties of diabetic wounds at different phases of healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Harry M C; Cheing, Alex K K; Ng, Gabriel Y F; Cheing, Gladys L Y

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on the tensile biomechanical properties of diabetic wounds at different phases of healing. Two intensities of PEMF were adopted for comparison. We randomly assigned 111 10-week-old male streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats to two PEMF groups and a sham control group. Six-millimetre biopsy punched full thickness wounds were made on the lateral side of their hindlimbs. The PEMF groups received active PEMF delivered at 25 Hz with intensity of either 2 mT or 10 mT daily, while the sham group was handled in a similar way except they were not exposed to PEMF. Wound tissues were harvested for tensile testing on post-wounding days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14 and 21. Maximum load, maximum stress, energy absorption capacity, Young's modulus and thickness of wound tissue were measured. On post-wounding day 5, the PEMF group that received 10-mT intensity had significantly increased energy absorption capacity and showed an apparent increase in the maximum load. However, the 10-mT PEMF group demonstrated a decrease in Young's modulus on day 14. The 10-mT PEMF groups showed a significant increase in the overall thickness of wound tissue whereas the 2-mT group showed a significant decrease in the overall maximum stress of the wounds tissue. The present findings demonstrated that the PEMF delivered at 10 mT can improve energy absorption capacity of diabetic wounds in the early healing phase. However, PEMF (both 2-mT and 10-mT) seemed to impair the material properties (maximum stress and Young's modulus) in the remodelling phase. PEMF may be a useful treatment for promoting the recovery of structural properties (maximum load and energy absorption capacity), but it might not be applied at the remodelling phase to avoid impairing the recovery of material properties.

  15. Organic trace minerals and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol affect performance characteristics, leg abnormalities, and biomechanical properties of leg bones of turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferket, P R; Oviedo-Rondón, E O; Mente, P L; Bohórquez, D V; Santos, A A; Grimes, J L; Richards, J D; Dibner, J J; Felts, V

    2009-01-01

    Leg problems and resulting mortality can exceed 1% per week in turkey toms starting at approximately 15 wk of age. Dietary supplementation of organic trace minerals (MIN) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (HyD) may improve performance, decrease incidence of leg abnormalities, and increase bone strength. Nicholas 85X700 toms were assigned to 4 treatments consisting of a factorial arrangement of 2 concentrations of MIN (0 and 0.1% of Mintrex P(Se), which adds 40, 40, 20, and 0.3 mg/kg of Zn, Mn, Cu, and Se, respectively) and 2 concentrations of HyD (0 and 92 microg/kg of HyD). Diets were formulated to be equal in nutrient content and fed ad libitum as 8 feed phases. Feed intake and BW were measured at 6, 12, 15, 17, and 20 wk of age. Valgus, varus, and shaky leg defects were determined at 12, 15, 17, and 20 wk of age. Tibia and femur biomechanical properties were evaluated by torsion and bending tests at 17 wk of age. There were no treatment effects on BW. Only MIN significantly improved feed conversion ratio through to 20 wk of age. Cumulative mortality at 3 wk of age was greater among the MIN birds, but it was lower by 20 wk (P = 0.085). The MIN decreased the incidence of varus defects at 17 wk of age; shaky leg at 12, 15, and 17 wk of age; and valgus defects at 15, 17, and 20 wk of age. There were no MIN x HyD interaction effects on individual gait problems. Maximum load and the bending stress required for tibias to break in a 4-point assay were increased with MIN supplementation, especially when HyD was also added. Maximum shear stress at failure of femoral bones in a torsion assay was increased by supplementation with both MIN and HyD together. Dietary supplementation of MIN and HyD may improve biomechanical properties of bones. Dietary MIN supplementation may improve feed conversion of turkeys, likely by decreasing leg problems.

  16. Aging is associated with changes to the biomechanical properties of the posterior cerebral artery and parenchymal arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Otero, Janice M; Garver, Hannah; Fink, Gregory D; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2016-02-01

    Artery remodeling, described as a change in artery structure, may be responsible for the increased risk of cardiovascular disease with aging. Although the risk for stroke is known to increase with age, relatively young animals have been used in most stroke studies. Therefore, more information is needed on how aging alters the biomechanical properties of cerebral arteries. Posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) and parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are important in controlling brain perfusion. We hypothesized that aged (22-24 mo old) C57bl/6 mice would have stiffer PCAs and PAs than young (3-5 mo old) mice. The biomechanical properties of the PCAs and PAs were assessed by pressure myography. Data are presented as means ± SE of young vs. old. In the PCA, older mice had increased outer (155.6 ± 3.2 vs. 169.9 ± 3.2 μm) and lumen (116.4 ± 3.6 vs. 137.1 ± 4.7 μm) diameters. Wall stress (375.6 ± 35.4 vs. 504.7 ± 60.0 dyn/cm(2)) and artery stiffness (β-coefficient: 5.2 ± 0.3 vs. 7.6 ± 0.9) were also increased. However, wall strain (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1) was reduced with age. In the PAs from old mice, wall thickness (3.9 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.2 μm) and area (591.1 ± 95.4 vs. 852.8 ± 100 μm(2)) were increased while stress (758.1 ± 100.0 vs. 587.2 ± 35.1 dyn/cm(2)) was reduced. Aging also increased mean arterial and pulse pressures. We conclude that age-associated remodeling occurs in large cerebral arteries and arterioles and may increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Flexor tendon tissue engineering: acellularization of human flexor tendons with preservation of biomechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgen, Brian C; Woon, Colin Y L; Kim, Maxwell; Thorfinn, Johan; Lindsey, Derek; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2011-08-01

    Acellular human tendons are a candidate scaffold for tissue engineering flexor tendons of the hand. This study compared acellularization methods and their compatibility with allogeneic human cells. Human flexor tendons were pretreated with 0.1% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) for 4  h followed by 24  h treatments of 1% Triton X-100, 1% tri(n-butyl)phosphate, or 0.1% or 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in 0.1% EDTA. Outcomes were assessed histologically by hematoxylin and eosin and SYTO green fluorescent nucleic acid stains and biochemically by a QIAGEN DNeasy kit, Sircol collagen assay, and 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue glycosaminoglycan assay. Mechanical data were collected using a Materials Testing System to pull to failure tendons acellularized with 0.1% SDS. Acellularized tendons were re-seeded in a suspension of human dermal fibroblasts. Attachment of viable cells to acellularized tendon was assessed biochemically by a cell viability assay and histologically by a live/dead stain. Data are reported as mean±standard deviation. Compared with the DNA content of fresh tendons (551±212  ng DNA/mg tendon), only SDS treatments significantly decreased DNA content (1% SDS [202.8±37.4  ng DNA/mg dry weight tendon]; 0.1% SDS [189±104  ng DNA/mg tendon]). These findings were confirmed by histology. There was no decrease in glycosaminoglycans or collagen following acellularization with SDS. There was no difference in the ultimate tensile stress (55.3±19.2 [fresh] vs. 51.5±6.9 [0.1% SDS] MPa). Re-seeded tendons demonstrated attachment of viable cells to the tendon surface using a viability assay and histology. Human flexor tendons were acellularized with 0.1% SDS in 0.1% EDTA for 24  h with preservation of mechanical properties. Preservation of collagen and glycoaminoglycans and re-seeding with human cells suggest that this scaffold is biocompatible. This will provide a promising scaffold for future human flexor tendon tissue engineering studies to

  18. Magnetic hyperthermia dosimetry by biomechanical properties revealed in magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in magnetic hyperthermia to treat solid tumors. Under an appropriate AC magnetic field, energy can be transferred to the MNPs to heat up the intended tissue target while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of MNP thermal therapy is desirable in order to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. Typical hyperthermia dosimetry often relies on changes in imaging properties or temperature measurements based on the thermal distribution. Alternative dosimetric indicators can include the biomechanical properties of the tissue, reflecting the changes due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration during hyperthermia treatments. Tissue stiffness can be probed by elastography modalities including MRI, ultrasound imaging, and optical coherence elastography (OCE), with OCE showing the highest displacement sensitivity (tens of nanometers). Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) is one type of OCE that utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the tissue stiffness. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of evaluating the hyperthermia dose based on the elasticity changes revealed by MM-OCE. Superparamagnetic MNPs were applied to ex vivo tissue specimens for both magnetic hyperthermia and MM-OCE experiments, where temperature and elastic modulus were obtained. A correlation between temperature rise and measured stiffness was observed. In addition, we found that with repetitive sequential treatments, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results potentially suggest that MM-OCE could indicate the irreversible changes the tissue undergoes during thermal therapy, which supports the idea for MM-OCE-based hyperthermia dosage control in future applications.

  19. Measuring the biomechanical properties of the actin in MCF-7 breast cancer cell with a combined system of AFM and SIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Minghai; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Biomechanics of cell plays an important role in the behavior and development of diseases, which has a profound influence on the health, structural integrity, and function of cells. In this study, we proposed a method to assess the biomechanical properties in single breast cancer cell line MCF-7 by combining structured illumination microscopy (SIM) with atomic force microscopy (AFM). High resolution optical image of actin in MCF-7 cell and its elastography were obtained. The result shows that the quantitative resolution was improved by SIM, with 490 nm of conventional fluorescence image and 285 nm of reconstructed SIM image, which could give a precise location for AFM measurement. The elasticity of actin is about in the range of 10 1000 kPa. The proposed methods will be helpful in the understanding and clinical diagnosis of diseases at single cell level.

  20. Multifactorial relationship between 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography signaling and biomechanical properties in unruptured aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchimi, Alain; Cheramy-Bien, Jean-Paul; Gasser, T Christian; Namur, Gauthier; Gomez, Pierre; Seidel, Laurence; Albert, Adelin; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Labropoulos, Nicos; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between biomechanical properties and biological activities in aortic aneurysms was investigated with finite element simulations and 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography. The study included 53 patients (45 men) with aortic aneurysms, 47 infrarenal (abdominal aortic) and 6 thoracic (thoracic aortic), who had ≥1 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography. During a 30-month period, more clinical events occurred in patients with increased 18F-FDG uptake on their last examination than in those without (5 of 18 [28%] versus 2 of 35 [6%]; P=0.03). Wall stress and stress/strength index computed by finite element simulations and 18F-FDG uptake were evaluated in a total of 68 examinations. Twenty-five (38%) examinations demonstrated ≥1 aneurysm wall area of increased 18F-FDG uptake. The mean number of these areas per examination was 1.6 (18 of 11) in thoracic aortic aneurysms versus 0.25 (14 of 57) in abdominal aortic aneurysms, whereas the mean number of increased uptake areas colocalizing with highest wall stress and stress/strength index areas was 0.55 (6 of 11) and 0.02 (1 of 57), respectively. Quantitatively, 18F-FDG positron emission tomographic uptake correlated positively with both wall stress and stress/strength index (P<0.05). 18F-FDG uptake was particularly high in subjects with personal history of angina pectoris and familial aneurysm. Increased 18F-FDG positron emission tomographic uptake in aortic aneurysms is strongly related to aneurysm location, wall stress as derived by finite element simulations, and patient risk factors such as acquired and inherited susceptibilities.

  1. Athletes Rated as Poor Single-Leg Squat Performers Display Measureable Differences in Single-Leg Squat Biomechanics Compared to Good Performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Lachlan E; Alexander, Bryce C; Schache, Anthony G; Pandy, Marcus G; Crossley, Kay M; Collins, Natalie J

    2017-11-15

    It is important to validate single-leg squat visual rating criteria used in clinical practice and research. Foot orthoses may improve single-leg squat performance in those who demonstrate biomechanics associated with increased risk of lower-limb injury. Validate visual rating criteria proposed by Crossley et al, by determining whether athletes rated as poor single-leg squat performers display different single-leg squat biomechanics than good performers; and evaluate immediate effects of foot orthoses on single-leg squat biomechanics in poor performers. Comparative cross-sectional study. University laboratory. 79 asymptomatic athletes underwent video classification of single-leg squat performance based on established visual rating criteria (overall impression, trunk posture, pelvis 'in space', hip movement, knee movement), and were rated as good (n=23), fair (n=41) or poor (n=15) performers. A subset of good (n=16) and poor (n=12) performers underwent biomechanical assessment, completing five continuous single-leg squats on their dominant limb while three-dimensional motion analysis and ground reaction force data were recorded. Poor performers repeated the task standing on prefabricated foot orthoses. Peak external knee adduction moment (KAM) and peak angles for the trunk, hip, knee and ankle. Compared to good performers, poor performers had a significantly lower peak KAM (mean difference 0.11 Nm/kg, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02 to 0.2 Nm/kg), higher peak hip adduction angle (-4.3°, -7.6° to -0.9°), and higher peak trunk axial rotation towards their stance limb (3.8°, 0.4° to 7.2°). Foot orthoses significantly increased the peak KAM in poor performers (-0.06 Nm/kg, -0.1 to -0.01 Nm/kg), with values approximating those observed in good performers. Findings validate Crossley et al's visual rating criteria for single-leg squat performance in asymptomatic athletes, and suggest that 'off-the-shelf' foot orthoses may be a simple intervention for poor performers

  2. Biomechanical properties of articular cartilage as a standard for biologically integrated interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierlbeck, J; Hammer, J; Englert, C; Reuben, R L

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage integration has been described in in-vitro models, which compare mechanical to biochemical behaviour and histological analysis, respectively. The emphasis of these findings is mainly on the biochemical and histological analysis, rather than on the mechanical performance. The complex in vitro loading conditions and high deviations in the mechanical results due to the biological variance, make interpretations difficult. The aim of this study is to analyse and define the mechanical stress and strain distribution in a single lap configuration by means of an optical strain measurement system. Supportive finite element computation is performed to indicate the heterogeneous stress strain distribution in the integration area. The optical failure analysis of the experiment reveals crack propagation through the integration area comparable to plane shear in fracture mode two. Using the optical strain measurement set up a direct estimation of the shear modulus is achievable by analysing the relative displacement within the bonded joint before the onset of delamination in the adhesive layer. This result lead to a better interpretation of the mechanical behaviour of articular cartilage integration in vitro.

  3. Biomechanical Factors in Planning of Periacetabular Osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin eNiknafs

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the effects of cartilage thickness distribution and compressive properties in the context of optimal alignment planning for periacetabular osteotomy (PAO. The Biomechanical Guidance System (BGS is a computer-assisted surgical suite assisting surgeon’s in determining the most beneficial new alignment of a patient’s acetabulum. The BGS uses biomechanical analysis of the hip to find this optimal alignment. Articular cartilage is an essential component of this analysis and its physical properties can affect contact pressure outcomes. Patient-specific hip joint models created from CT scans of a cohort of 29 dysplastic subjects were tested with four different cartilage thickness profiles (one uniform and threenonuniform and two sets of compressive characteristics. For each combination of thickness distribution and compressive properties, the optimal alignment of the acetabulum was found; the resultant geometric and biomechanical characterization of the hip were compared among the optimal alignments. There was an average decrease of 49.2 +/- 22.27% in peak contact pressure from the preoperative to the optimal alignment over all patients. We observed an average increase of 19 +/- 7.7 degrees in center-edge angle and an average decrease of 19.5 +/- 8.4 degrees in acetabular index angle from the preoperative case to the optimized plan. The optimal alignment increased the lateral coverage of the femoral head and decreased the obliqueness of the acetabular roof in all patients. These anatomical observations were independent of the choice for either cartilage thickness profile, or compressive properties. While patient-specific acetabular morphology is essential for surgeons in planning PAO, the predicted optimal alignment of the acetabulum was not significantly sensitive to the choice of cartilage thickness distribution over the acetabulum. However, in all groups the biomechanically predicted optimal alignment resulted in decreased

  4. Morphology and biomechanics of human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Polienko, Asel V.; Ivanov, Dmitry V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: A study of the biomechanical characteristics of the human heart ventricles was performed. 80 hearts were extracted during autopsy of 80 corpses of adults (40 women and 40 men) aged 31-70 years. The samples were investigated in compliance with the recommendations of the ethics committee. Methods: Tension and compression tests were performed with help of the uniaxial testing machine Instron 5944. Cardiometry was also performed. Results: In this work, techniques for human heart ventricle wall biomechanical properties estimation were developed. Regularities of age and gender variability in deformative and strength properties of the right and left ventricle walls were found. These properties were characterized by a smooth growth of myocardial tissue stiffness and resistivity at a relatively low strain against reduction in their strength and elasticity from 31-40 to 61-70 years. It was found that tissue of the left ventricle at 61-70 years had a lower stretchability and strength compared with tissues of the right ventricle and septum. These data expands understanding of the morphological organization of the heart ventricles, which is very important for the development of personalized medicine. Taking into account individual, age and gender differences of the heart ventricle tissue biomechanical characteristics allows to rationally choosing the type of patching materials during reconstructive operations on heart.

  5. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P, E-mail: b-lee@nerites.com [Nerites Corporation, 505 S. Rosa Road, Suite 123, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

  6. Mineral density and biomechanical properties of bone tissue from male Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) exposed to organochlorine contaminants and emaciation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Wolkers, Hans; Rigét, Frank F

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the impact from dietary OC (organochlorine) exposure and restricted feeding (emaciation) on bone mineral density (BMD; g hydroxy-apatite cm(-2)) in femoral, vertebrate, skull and baculum osteoid tissue from farmed Arctic blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus). For femur, also biomechanical...

  7. Waves and high nutrient loads jointly decrease survival and separately affect morphological and biomechanical properties in the seagrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Nafie, Y.A.; de los Santos, C.B.; Brun, F.G.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Bouma, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    In an 8-week aquarium experiment, we investigated the interactive effects of waves (present vs. absent) and water-column nutrient level (high vs. low) on the survival, growth, morphology, and biomechanics of the seagrass, Zostera noltii. Survival was reduced when plants were exposed to both waves

  8. Changes of biomechanical properties of the shoulder bone of white rate on the background of the deffects of the greater bone and the possibility of their pharmacological correction

    OpenAIRE

    Lukyantseva, Galina

    2017-01-01

    Lukyantseva Galina. Changes of biomechanical properties of the shoulder bone of white rate on the background of the deffects of the greater bone and the possibility of their pharmacological correction. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(6):767-777. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1000949 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4946 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric eva...

  9. Inertial measures of motion for clinical biomechanics: comparative assessment of accuracy under controlled conditions - changes in accuracy over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lebel

    Full Text Available Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven't been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1 to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2 to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time.This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP. Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials.Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase.The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame.Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their full potential in capturing clinical outcomes.

  10. Comparative biomechanic performances of locked cruciate four-strand flexor tendon repairs in an ex vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croog, Alexander; Goldstein, Rachel; Nasser, Philip; Lee, Steve K

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the effects of 3 different locking configurations on repair strength when used in a cruciate four-strand repair. Sixty fresh porcine flexor tendons were transected and repaired with cruciate four-strand core suture repairs with 3 different locking configurations: simple locks (a modification of the Pennigton method), circle locks, and cross locks. Half of the repairs in each locking group were reinforced with a peripheral suture. The tendon repairs were subjected to linear load-to-failure testing. Outcome measures were 2-mm gap force and ultimate tensile strength. The cross lock repair had significantly greater 2-mm gap force and ultimate tensile strength than the simple lock repair, both with and without a peripheral suture. The cross lock repair showed significantly greater 2-mm gap force without a peripheral suture and significantly greater ultimate tensile strength with a peripheral suture than the circle lock repair. With peripheral reinforcement, the cross lock cruciate repair had a mean 2-mm gap force of 92 N and ultimate tensile strength of 119 N. The cross lock cruciate repair consistently produced the strongest biomechanic performance in all outcome measures. Locking configuration influences the biomechanic performance of cruciate four-strand flexor tendon repairs. Our results suggest that the cruciate repair with cross locks is stronger than repairs with simple locks or circle locks. Whether the results of this ex vivo porcine linear model can be translated to the clinical arena is unknown, because the factors of tendon/sheath friction, tendon healing, and compromised tendon viability from the lock were not addressed.

  11. Poly(ethylmethacrylate-co-diethylaminoethyl acrylate) coating improves endothelial re-population, bio-mechanical and anti-thrombogenic properties of decellularized carotid arteries for blood vessel replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, Elena; Venkateswaran, Seshasailam; Perán, Macarena; Jiménez, Gema; Pernagallo, Salvatore; Díaz-Mochón, Juan J; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Arrebola, Francisco; Melchor, Juan; Soto, Juan; Rus, Guillermo; Real, Pedro J; Diaz-Ricart, María; Conde-González, Antonio; Bradley, Mark; Marchal, Juan A

    2017-03-24

    Decellularized vascular scaffolds are promising materials for vessel replacements. However, despite the natural origin of decellularized vessels, issues such as biomechanical incompatibility, immunogenicity risks and the hazards of thrombus formation, still need to be addressed. In this study, we coated decellularized vessels obtained from porcine carotid arteries with poly (ethylmethacrylate-co-diethylaminoethylacrylate) (8g7) with the purpose of improving endothelial coverage and minimizing platelet attachment while enhancing the mechanical properties of the decellularized vascular scaffolds. The polymer facilitated binding of endothelial cells (ECs) with high affinity and also induced endothelial cell capillary tube formation. In addition, platelets showed reduced adhesion on the polymer under flow conditions. Moreover, the coating of the decellularized arteries improved biomechanical properties by increasing its tensile strength and load. In addition, after 5 days in culture, ECs seeded on the luminal surface of 8g7-coated decellularized arteries showed good regeneration of the endothelium. Overall, this study shows that polymer coating of decellularized vessels provides a new strategy to improve re-endothelialization of vascular grafts, maintaining or enhancing mechanical properties while reducing the risk of thrombogenesis. These results could have potential applications in improving tissue-engineered vascular grafts for cardiovascular therapies with small caliber vessels.

  12. Biomechanical advantages of robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation in posterior lumbar interbody fusion compared with freehand technique in a prospective randomized controlled trial-perspective for patient-specific finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Park, Sung-Cheol; Kwon, Oh-Hyo; Son, Juhyun; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    There have been conflicting results on the surgical outcome of lumbar fusion surgery using two different techniques: robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation and conventional freehand technique. In addition, there have been no studies about the biomechanical issues between both techniques. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanical properties in terms of stress at adjacent segments using robot-assisted pedicle screw insertion technique (robot-assisted, minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion, Rom-PLIF) and freehand technique (conventional, freehand, open approach, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, Cop-PLIF) for instrumented lumbar fusion surgery. This is an additional post-hoc analysis for patient-specific finite element (FE) model. The sample is composed of patients with degenerative lumbar disease. Intradiscal pressure and facet contact force are the outcome measures. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo an instrumented PLIF procedure using a Rom-PLIF (37 patients) or a Cop-PLIF (41), respectively. Five patients in each group were selected using a simple random sampling method after operation, and 10 preoperative and postoperative lumbar spines were modeled from preoperative high-resolution computed tomography of 10 patients using the same method for a validated lumbar spine model. Under four pure moments of 7.5 Nm, the changes in intradiscal pressure and facet joint contact force at the proximal adjacent segment following fusion surgery were analyzed and compared with preoperative states. The representativeness of random samples was verified. Both groups showed significant increases in postoperative intradiscal pressure at the proximal adjacent segment under four moments, compared with the preoperative state. The Cop-PLIF models demonstrated significantly higher percent increments of intradiscal pressure at proximal adjacent segments under extension, lateral bending, and torsion moments than the Rom-PLIF models (p=.032, p=.008, and p

  13. DOES AEROBIC EXERCISE TRAINING PROMOTE CHANGES IN STRUCTURAL AND BIOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE TENDONS IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Márcio A. Bezerra; Kamilla D.S. Lira; Patrícia V. C. Silveira; Marcos P.G. Coutinho; Andrea Lemos; Silvia R. A. Moraes

    2012-01-01

    To develop a systematic review to evaluate, through the best scientific evidence available, the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in improving the biomechanical characteristics of tendons in experimental animals. Two independent assessors conducted a systematic search in the databases Medline/PUBMED and Lilacs/BIREME, using the following descriptors of Mesh in animal models. The ultimate load of traction and the elastic modulus tendon were used as primary outcomes and transverse section area,...

  14. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  15. Dinosaur biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, R. McNeill

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imp...

  16. An Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Bankart Repair Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Christopher H; Voss, Andreas; Obopilwe, Elifho; Dyrna, Felix; Arciero, Robert A; Shea, Kevin P

    2017-11-01

    Suture anchor repair for anterior shoulder instability can be performed using a number of different repair techniques, but none has been proven superior in terms of anatomic and biomechanical properties. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the anatomic footprint coverage and biomechanical characteristics of 4 different Bankart repair techniques: (1) single row with simple sutures, (2) single row with horizontal mattress sutures, (3) double row with sutures, and (4) double row with labral tape. The hypotheses were as follows: (1) double-row techniques would improve the footprint coverage and biomechanical properties compared with single-row techniques, (2) horizontal mattress sutures would increase the footprint coverage compared with simple sutures, and (3) repair techniques with labral tape and sutures would not show different biomechanical properties. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-four fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were dissected. The native labrum was removed and the footprint marked and measured. Repair for each of the 4 groups was performed, and the uncovered footprint was measured using a 3-dimensional digitizer. The strength of the repair sites was assessed using a servohydraulic testing machine and a digital video system to record load to failure, cyclic displacement, and stiffness. The double-row repair techniques with sutures and labral tape covered 73.4% and 77.0% of the footprint, respectively. These percentages were significantly higher than the footprint coverage achieved by single-row repair techniques using simple sutures (38.1%) and horizontal mattress sutures (32.8%) ( P footprint coverage of the simple suture and horizontal mattress suture groups was not significantly different ( P = .44). There were no significant differences in load to failure, cyclic displacement, or stiffness between the single-row and double-row groups or between the simple suture and horizontal mattress suture techniques. Likewise, there was no

  17. Changes in the biomechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeongwon; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyung Sook

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical properties of a single cell are closely related to the fate and functions of the cell. Changes in mechanical properties may cause diseases or cell apoptosis. Selective cytotoxic effects of nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma have been demonstrated on cancer cells. In this work, changes in the mechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-DBD plasma were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and SiHa) and normal human fibroblast cells (HFBs) were exposed to micro-DBD plasma for various exposure times. The elasticity of a single cell was determined by force-distance curve measurement using AFM. Young's modulus was decreased by plasma treatment for all cells. The Young's modulus of plasma-treated HeLa cells was decreased by 75% compared to nontreated HeLa cells. In SiHa cells and HFBs, elasticity was decreased slightly. Chemical changes induced by the plasma treatment, which were observed by Raman spectroscopy, were also significant in HeLa cells compared to SiHa cells and HFBs. These results suggested that the molecular changes induced by micro-DBD plasma were related to cell mechanical changes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. PEEK versus titanium locking plates for proximal humerus fracture fixation: a comparative biomechanical study in two- and three-part fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Seifert, Robert; Theisen, Christina; Gehweiler, Dominic; Wähnert, Dirk; Schulze, Martin; Raschke, Michael J; Weimann, Andre

    2017-01-01

    The high rigidity of metal implants may be a cause of failure after fixation of proximal humerus fractures. Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) plates with a modulus similar to human cortical bone may help to overcome this problem. The present study assesses the biomechanical behavior of a PEEK plate compared with a titanium locking plate. Unstable two- and three-part fractures were simulated in 12 pairs of cadaveric humeri and were fixed with either a PEEK or a titanium locking plate using a pairwise comparison. With an optical motion capture system, the stiffness, failure load, plate bending, and the relative motion at the bone-implant interface and at the fracture site were evaluated. The mean load to failure for two- and three-part fracture fixations was, respectively, 191 N (range 102-356 N) and 142 N (range 102-169 N) in the PEEK plate group compared with 286 N (range 191-395 N) and 258 N (range 155-366 N) in the titanium locking plate group. The PEEK plate showed significantly more bending in both the two- and three-part fractures (p PEEK plate showed lower fixation strength and increased motion at the bone-implant interface compared with a titanium locking plate.

  19. Tendon Mineralization Is Progressive and Associated with Deterioration of Tendon Biomechanical Properties, and Requires BMP-Smad Signaling in the Mouse Achilles Tendon Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Hast, Michael W.; Liu, Min; Usami, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic tendon mineralization can develop following tendon rupture or trauma surgery. The pathogenesis of ectopic tendon mineralization and its clinical impact have not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we utilized a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to determine whether ectopic tendon mineralization alters the biomechanical properties of the tendon and whether BMP signaling is involved in this condition. A complete transverse incision was made at the midpoint of the right Achilles tendon in 8-week-old CD1 mice and the gap was left open. Ectopic cartilaginous mass formation was found in the injured tendon by 4 weeks post-surgery and ectopic mineralization was detected at 8–10 weeks post-surgery. Ectopic mineralization grew over time and volume of the mineralized materials of 25-weeks samples was about 2.5 fold bigger than that of 10-weeks samples, indicating that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive. In vitro mechanical testing showed that max force, max stress and mid-substance modulus in the 25-weeks samples were significantly lower than the 10-weeks samples. We observed substantial increases in expression of bone morphogenetic protein family genes in injured tendons 1 week post-surgery. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that phosphorylation of both Smad1 and Smad3 were highly increased in injured tendons as early as 1 week post-injury and remained high in ectopic chondrogenic lesions 4 weeks post-injury. Treatment with the BMP receptor kinase inhibitor (LDN193189) significantly inhibited injury-induced tendon mineralization. These findings indicate that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive, involves BMP signaling and associated with deterioration of tendon biomechanical properties. PMID:26825318

  20. Histologic pattern of biomechanic properties of the carbon fiber-augmented ligament tendon. A laboratory and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, D G; Iusim, M; Angel, D; Rotem, A; Roffman, M; Grishkan, A; Mordohohovich, D; Boss, J

    1985-06-01

    Implantation of carbon fiber tow (CFT) for ligament and tendon augmentation was investigated in ten dogs and 45 patients. CFT produced a new structure with a remarkably consistent structural pattern. The basic pattern of the CFT-augmented unit consisted of a core of carbon fiber surround by concentric layers of fibroblasts and collagen fibers. This unit structure was developed from continuous irritation of physical structure of the carbon fiber. In dogs, ultimate tensile strength of the augmented tendon one year after surgery averaged 88% of natural tendon. Digestion of the connective tissue component of the CFT unit exposed the original carbon fiber tow. The connective tissue-free CFT maintained its original tensile strength. The continuous production of collagenous tissue surrounding carbon fibers produced a ligamentous structure that was physiologically compatible and biomechanically sufficient.

  1. Dinosaur biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R McNeill

    2006-08-07

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result.

  2. First Metatarsophalangeal Contact Properties Following Proximal Opening Wedge and Scarf Osteotomies for Hallux Valgus Correction: A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Cameron; Yoshida, Ryu; Cote, Mark; DiVenere, Jessica; Geaney, Lauren E

    2017-04-01

    Proximal opening wedge osteotomy (POWO) is an established procedure for moderate to severe hallux valgus. A common concern of this procedure is that it results in lengthening of the first metatarsal, which could cause increased intra-articular pressure of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) and may ultimately lead to arthritis because of these altered mechanics. The purpose of this study was to use a cadaveric model to compare intra-articular pressures and articulating contact properties of the MTP joint following either scarf osteotomy or POWO. Fresh-frozen cadaveric below-knee specimens with pre-existing hallux valgus (n = 12) and specimens without hallux valgus (n = 6, control group) were used. The hallux valgus specimens were stratified into 2 groups (n = 6 each): POWO or scarf osteotomy. The groups were matched based on the degree of deformity. Peak intra-articular pressure, force, and area were measured in all normal, preoperative, and postoperative specimens with a simulated weightbearing model. These measurements were made with a pressure transducer placed within the first MTP joint. Postoperatively POWO group had slightly higher contact forces and pressures compared to the scarf group and lower contact forces and pressures than those of the normal group but were not statistically significant ( P > .05). Normal specimens had higher intra-articular force, pressure, and area than postoperative specimens but the difference was not found to be significant. First metatarsal lengthening was found in both the scarf and POWO specimens; however, neither increase was found to be significant ( P > .05). The results from this study show that after operative correction, contact properties of the fist MTP joint among normal, POWO, and scarf osteotomy groups revealed no significant differences. First MTP joints in those with hallux valgus had significantly lower contact force and pressure compared to those without hallux valgus. With little long-term outcomes of

  3. A comparative study of the physicochemical properties of starches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some properties of starches from cassava, potato and sweet potato were compared with cereal starches from maize, wheat, millet and sorghum. The aim was to determine the properties of tuber and root crop starches and compare them with cereal starches in addition to unravelling the potential of commonly grown ...

  4. A comparative property investigation of lithium phosphate glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... A comparative property investigation of lithium phosphate glass melted in microwave and ... comparative analysis of the properties is presented with glasses melted in conventional resistance heating adopting standard methods of ... been investigated in the laboratory scale by the authors' group. [14–17].

  5. Biomechanics in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  6. Externalised locking compression plate as an alternative to the unilateral external fixator: a biomechanical comparative study of axial and torsional stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, B F H; Chen, J Y; Yew, A K S; Chua, S K; Chou, S M; Chia, S L; Koh, J S B; Howe, T S

    2017-04-01

    unilateral external fixator: a biomechanical comparative study of axial and torsional stiffness. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:216-223. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.64.2000470. © 2017 Ang et al.

  7. An evaluation of the effect of pulsed wave low-level laser therapy on the biomechanical properties of the vertebral body in two experimental osteoporosis rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Mohammad; Fridoni, Mohammadjavad; Nejati, Hossein; Mostafavinia, Atarodalsadat; Salimi, Maryam; Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-Amin; Najar, Azam; Bayat, Saba; Rezaei, Fatemesadat

    2016-02-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) increases vertebral fragility as a result of the biomechanical effects of diminished bone structure and composition. This study has aimed to assess the effects of pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PW LLLT) on cancellous bone strength of an ovariectomized (OVX-d) experimental rat model and a glucocorticoid-induced OP (GIOP) experimental rat model. There were four OVX-d groups and four dexamethasone-treated groups. A group of healthy rats was used for baseline evaluations. The OVX-d rats were further subdivided into the following groups: control rats with OP, OVX-d rats that received alendronate, OVX-d rats treated with PW LLLT, and OVX-d rats treated with alendronate and PW LLLT. The remaining rats received dexamethasone and were divided into four groups: control, alendronate-treated rats, laser-treated rats, and laser-treated rats with concomitant administration of alendronate. PW LLLT (890 nm, 80 Hz, 0.972 J/cm(2)) was performed on the spinal processes of the T12, L1, L2, and L3 vertebras. We extracted the L1 vertebrae and submitted them to a mechanical compression test. Biomechanical test findings showed positive effects of the PW LLLT and alendronate administration on increasing bending stiffness and maximum force of the osteoporotic bones compared to the healthy group. However, laser treatment of OVA-d rats significantly increased stress high load compared to OVA-d control rats. PW LLLT preserved the cancellous (trabecular) bone of vertebra against the detrimental effects of OV-induced OP on bone strength in rats compared to control OV rats.

  8. Characterization of site-specific biomechanical properties of human meniscus-Importance of collagen and fluid on mechanical nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso, E K; Mäkelä, J T A; Tanska, P; Mononen, M E; Honkanen, J T J; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J; Julkunen, P; Korhonen, R K

    2015-06-01

    Meniscus adapts to joint loads by depth- and site-specific variations in its composition and structure. However, site-specific mechanical characteristics of intact meniscus under compression are poorly known. In particular, mechanical nonlinearities caused by different meniscal constituents (collagen and fluid) are not known. In the current study, in situ indentation testing was conducted to determine site-specific elastic, viscoelastic and poroelastic properties of intact human menisci. Lateral and medial menisci (n=26) were harvested from the left knee joint of 13 human cadavers. Indentation tests, using stress-relaxation and dynamic (sinusoidal) loading protocols, were conducted for menisci at different sites (anterior, middle, posterior, n=78). Sample- and site-specific axisymmetric finite element models with fibril-reinforced poroelastic properties were fitted to the corresponding stress-relaxation curves to determine the mechanical parameters. Elastic moduli, especially the instantaneous and dynamic moduli, showed site-specific variation only in the medial meniscus (pmeniscus. The phase angle showed no statistically significant variation between the sites (p>0.05). The values for the strain-dependent fibril network modulus (nonlinear behaviour of collagen) were significantly different (pmeniscus only between the middle and posterior sites. For the strain-dependent permeability coefficient, only anterior and middle sites showed a significant difference (pmeniscus. This parameter demonstrated a significant difference (pmeniscus shows more site-dependent variation in the mechanical properties as compared to lateral meniscus. In particular, anterior horn of medial meniscus was the stiffest and showed the most nonlinear mechanical behaviour. The nonlinearity was related to both collagen fibrils and fluid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in biomechanical properties of glenohumeral joint capsules with adhesive capsulitis by repeated capsule-preserving hydraulic distensions with saline solution and corticosteroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun S; Chung, Sun G; Kim, Tae Uk; Kim, Hee Chan

    2012-12-01

    To investigate whether capsule-preserving hydraulic distension with saline solution and corticosteroid for adhesive capsulitis induces biomechanical alterations in glenohumeral joint capsules along with clinical improvements. A case series. University outpatient clinic of physical medicine and rehabilitation. Eighteen patients with unilateral adhesive capsulitis. INTERVENTION AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Three hydraulic distensions with saline solution and corticosteroid were performed with 1-month intervals. To avoid rupturing capsules, all distensions were monitored by using real-time pressure-volume curves. Stiffness, maximal volume capacity, and pressure at the maximal volume capacity of the capsule were measured at each intervention. Clinical parameters, such as pain and range of motion, were recorded before, 3 days after, and 1 month after each distension. Stiffness decreased (47.6 ± 27.1 mm Hg/mL to 31.7 ± 18.4 mm Hg/mL to 24.2 ± 14.0 mm Hg/mL, mean SD) and maximal volume capacity increased (18.8 ± 7.3 mL to 20.5 ± 7.5 mL to 24.2 ± 7.0 mL, mean SD) significantly (P = .001 for both) at each repeated hydraulic distension. Pressure at the maximal volume capacity tended to decrease, but the decrements were not statistically significant (P = .662). The clinical parameters were significantly improved throughout and 1 month after the 3 repeat procedures (P Capsule-preserving hydraulic distension changed the biomechanical properties of the glenohumeral joint capsule, lessening the stiffness and enlarging the volume capacity. These alterations were accompanied by improved range of motion and relief of pain. Repeated capsule-preserving hydraulic distension with saline solution and corticosteroid would be useful to treat adhesive capsulitis and to evaluate the treatment results. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. FEBio: finite elements for biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Ateshian, Gerard A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, investigators have primarily used commercial software that is neither geared toward biological applications nor sufficiently flexible to follow the latest developments in the field. This lack of a tailored software environment has hampered research progress, as well as dissemination of models and results. To address these issues, we developed the FEBio software suite (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software/febio), a nonlinear implicit finite element (FE) framework, designed specifically for analysis in computational solid biomechanics. This paper provides an overview of the theoretical basis of FEBio and its main features. FEBio offers modeling scenarios, constitutive models, and boundary conditions, which are relevant to numerous applications in biomechanics. The open-source FEBio software is written in C++, with particular attention to scalar and parallel performance on modern computer architectures. Software verification is a large part of the development and maintenance of FEBio, and to demonstrate the general approach, the description and results of several problems from the FEBio Verification Suite are presented and compared to analytical solutions or results from other established and verified FE codes. An additional simulation is described that illustrates the application of FEBio to a research problem in biomechanics. Together with the pre- and postprocessing software PREVIEW and POSTVIEW, FEBio provides a tailored solution for research and development in computational biomechanics.

  11. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  12. Does aerobic exercise training promote changes in structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons in experimental animals? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, M A; Lemos, A; Lira, K D S; Silveira, P V C; Coutinho, M P G; E Moraes, S R A

    2012-12-01

    To develop a systematic review to evaluate, through the best scientific evidence available, the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in improving the biomechanical characteristics of tendons in experimental animals. Two independent assessors conducted a systematic search in the databases Medline/PUBMED and Lilacs/BIREME, using the following descriptors of Mesh in animal models. The ultimate load of traction and the elastic modulus tendon were used as primary outcomes and transverse section area, ultimate stress and tendon strain as secondary outcomes. The assessment of risk of bias in the studies was carried out using the following methodological components: light/dark cycle, temperature, nutrition, housing, research undertaken in conjunction with an ethics committee, randomization, adaptation of the animals to the training and preparation for the mechanical test. Eight studies, comprising 384 animals, were selected; it was not possible to combine them into one meta-analysis due to the heterogeneity of the samples. There was a trend to increasing ultimate load without changes in the other outcomes studied. Only one study met more than 80% of the quality criteria. Physical training performed in a structured way with imposition of overloads seems to be able to promote changes in tendon structure of experimental models by increasing the ultimate load supported. However, the results of the influence of exercise on the elastic modulus parameters, strain, transverse section area and ultimate stress, remain controversial and inconclusive. Such a conclusion must be evaluated with reservation as there was low methodological control in the studies included in this review.

  13. Selection of the implant transgingival height for optimal biomechanical properties: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yingying; Kong, Liang; Hu, Kaijin; Xie, Cheng; Zhou, Hongzhi; Liu, Yanpu; Liu, Baolin

    2009-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of the transgingival height of an implant on the maximum equivalent stress in jaw bones and the maximum displacement in implant-abutment complex by a finite element method. The transgingival height ranged from 1.0-4.0 mm. Under axial load, the maximum equivalent stress in the cortical bone could be reduced by up to 4.7%, and under a buccolingual load, the maximum equivalent stresses in the cortical and the cancellous bones could be reduced by 17.3% and 18.5%, respectively. The maximum displacement of the implant-abutment complex could be reduced by 4.1% and 48.9% under axial and buccolingual loads, respectively. When the transgingival height was in the range of 1.7-2.8 mm, there was minimum stress in the jaw bones and minimum displacement in the implant-abutment complex. Data indicated that transgingival height played a more important part in protecting a dental implant under a buccolingual load than under an axial load; and transgingival heights ranging from 1.7-2.8 mm were biomechanically optimal for a screwed implant.

  14. Effects of methionine restriction and endurance exercise on bones of ovariectomized rats: a study of histomorphometry, densitometry, and biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsang-Hai; Su, I-Hsiu; Lewis, Jack L; Chang, Ming-Shi; Hsu, Ar-Tyan; Perrone, Carmen E; Ables, Gene P

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary methionine restriction (MetR) and endurance exercise on bone quality under a condition of estrogen deficiency, female Sprague-Dawley rats (36-wk-old) were assigned to a sham surgery group or one of five ovariectomized groups subjected to interventions of no treatment (Ovx), endurance exercise (Exe), methionine restriction (MetR), methionine restriction plus endurance exercise (MetR + Exe), and estrogen treatment (Est). Rats in the exercise groups were subjected to a treadmill running regimen. MetR and control diets contained 0.172 and 0.86% methionine, respectively. After the 12-wk intervention, all animals were killed, and serum and bone tissues were collected for analyses. Compared with estrogen treatment, MetR diet and endurance exercise showed better or equivalent efficiency in reducing body weight gain caused by ovariectomy (P bone turnover compared with the Ovx group, MetR diet and/or endurance exercise demonstrated efficiencies in downregulating serum insulin, leptin, triglyceride, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (P bone mineral density (vBMD), but only the Exe and Est groups preserved cancellous bone volume and/or vBMD of distal femora (P exercise improved cortical bone properties, but only endurance exercise preserved cancellous bone under estrogen deficiency. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Biomechanical Skin Property Evaluation for Wounds Treated With Synthetic and Biosynthetic Wound Dressings and a Newly Developed Collagen Matrix During Healing of Superficial Skin Defects in a Rat Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Manuel; Engelke, Anne-Sophie; Tolzmann, Dascha Sophie; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Rothenberger, Jens

    2016-09-01

    There is a high prevalence of superficial wounds such as partial-thickness burns. Treatment of these wounds frequently includes temporary application of wound dressings. The aim of this study was to compare a newly developed collagen matrix with commonly used temporary skin dressings for treatment of partial-thickness skin defects. Through a skin dermatome, 42 standardized superficial skin defects were generated on the back of 28 adult male Lewis rats. The wounds were treated with a synthetic wound dressing (Suprathel, Polymedics Innovations Inc, Woodstock, GA) (n = 14), a biosynthetic skin dressing (Biobrane, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) (n = 14), or a newly developed bovine collagen matrix, Collagen Cell Carrier (Viscofan BioEngineering, Weinheim, Germany) (n = 14). Biomechanical properties of the skin were determined and compared every 10 days over a 3-month period of using the Cutometer MPA 580 (Courage + Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Cologne, Germany). As opposed to healthy skin, statistically significant differences were detected between days 10 and 30, and between days 60 and 80, for calculated elasticity (Ue), firmness of skin (R0), and overall elasticity (R8). After 3 months, no statistically significant differences in skin elasticity were detected between the different wound dressings. The presented results give an opportunity to compare the wound dressings used for treatment with respect to skin elasticity and reveal the potential of the bovine collagen matrix in the treatment of superficial skin defects; therefore the results facilitate further evaluation of collagen matrix in surgical applications and regenerative medicine.

  16. DOES AEROBIC EXERCISE TRAINING PROMOTE CHANGES IN STRUCTURAL AND BIOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE TENDONS IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio A. Bezerra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To develop a systematic review to evaluate, through the best scientific evidence available, the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in improving the biomechanical characteristics of tendons in experimental animals. Two independent assessors conducted a systematic search in the databases Medline/PUBMED and Lilacs/BIREME, using the following descriptors of Mesh in animal models. The ultimate load of traction and the elastic modulus tendon were used as primary outcomes and transverse section area, ultimate stress and tendon strain as secondary outcomes. The assessment of risk of bias in the studies was carried out using the following methodological components: light/dark cycle, temperature, nutrition, housing, research undertaken in conjunction with an ethics committee, randomization, adaptation of the animals to the training and preparation for the mechanical test. Eight studies, comprising 384 animals, were selected; it was not possible to combine them into one meta-analysis due to the heterogeneity of the samples. There was a trend to increasing ultimate load without changes in the other outcomes studied. Only one study met more than 80% of the quality criteria. Physical training performed in a structured way with imposition of overloads seems to be able to promote changes in tendon structure of experimental models by increasing the ultimate load supported. However, the results of the influence of exercise on the elastic modulus parameters, strain, transverse section area and ultimate stress, remain controversial and inconclusive. Such a conclusion must be evaluated with reservation as there was low methodological control in the studies included in this review.

  17. How Heart Valves Evolve to Adapt to an Extreme-Pressure System: Morphologic and Biomechanical Properties of Giraffe Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup Funder, Jonas; Christian Danielsen, Carl; Baandrup, Ulrik; Martin Bibby, Bo; Carl Andelius, Ted; Toft Brøndum, Emil; Wang, Tobias; Michael Hasenkam, J

    2017-01-01

    Heart valves which exist naturally in an extreme-pressure system must have evolved in a way to resist the stresses of high pressure. Giraffes are interesting as they naturally have a blood pressure twice that of humans. Thus, knowledge regarding giraffe heart valves may aid in developing techniques to design improved pressure-resistant biological heart valves. Heart valves from 12 giraffes and 10 calves were explanted and subjected to either biomechanical or morphological examinations. Strips from the heart valves were subjected to cyclic loading tests, followed by failure tests. Thickness measurements and analyses of elastin and collagen content were also made. Valve specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, elastic van Gieson stain, Masson's trichrome and Fraser-Lendrum stain, as well as immunohistochemical reactions for morphological examinations. The aortic valve was shown to be 70% (95% CI 42-103%) stronger in the giraffe than in its bovine counterpart (p giraffe aortic valve was found to be significantly stiffer than the bovine aortic valve (p giraffes contained significantly more collagen than those of calves. The elastin contents of the pulmonary valves (2.5%) and aortic valves (1.5%) were also higher in giraffes. The greater strength of the giraffe aortic valve is most likely due to a compact collagen construction. Both, collagen and elastin contents were higher in giraffes than in calves, which would make giraffe valves more resistant to the high-pressure forces. However, collagen also stiffens and thickens the valves. The mitral leaflets showed similar (but mostly insignificant) trends in strength, stiffness, and collagen content.

  18. The effect of locked screw angulation on the biomechanical properties of the S.P.S. Free-Block plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, M K A; Rahal, S C; Ribeiro, C R; Padovani, C R

    2013-01-01

    Among the locked internal fixators is one denominated S.P.S. (Synthesis Pengo System) Free-Block, which was designed with a locking ring that allows the screw to be locked and positioned obliquely. Due to the paucity of biomechanical studies on this system, the present work aimed to evaluate the influence of locked screw angulation on the resistance of the S.P.S. Free-Block plate. Forty synthetic bone cylinders with 10 mm fracture gap were used. Forty seven-hole 3.5 mm stainless steel plates (two AO-like dynamic compression holes and five locked holes) were assembled according to the orientation of the locked screws: monocortical screws were positioned at 90º to the long axis of the cylinder (Group 1), and monocortical screws were positioned at 70º to its cylinder long axis (Group 2). In both groups, AO-like dynamic compression hole screws were positioned bicortically and neutrally. For each group, six specimens were tested until failure, three in bending and three in compression, to determine the loads for fatigue testing. Subsequently, for each group, 14 specimens were tested for failure - seven by bending and seven in compression. No significant failure differences were observed between Groups 1 and 2 under static-loading or fatigue test. In a fracture gap model the orientation of the locked monocortical screws did not show any influence on the mechanical performance of the S.P.S. Free-Block to tests of axial compression and four-point bending.

  19. A comparative study on physicochemical properties of Chinese-type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-10-04

    Oct 4, 2010 ... A comparative study on physicochemical properties of. Chinese-type soy sauces prepared using .... chemical properties between soy sauces prepared using. A. oryzae koji (SSAO) and mixed kojis .... by gel permeation chromatography on a. Superdex peptide 10/300 GL column (Amersham Biosciences ...

  20. Comparative Properties of Bamboo and Rice Straw Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianmiao Liu; Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Zehui Jiang; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a potential major bio-energy resource. Tests were carried out to compare and evaluate the property of bamboo and rice straw pellets, rice straw being the other main source of biomass solid fuel in China. All physical properties of untreated bamboo pellets (UBP), untreated rice straw pellets (URP), carbonized bamboo pellets (CBP), and carbonized rice straw...

  1. Using step width to compare locomotor biomechanics between extinct, non-avian theropod dinosaurs and modern obligate bipeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, P J; Clemente, C J; Weems, R E; Graham, D F; Lamas, L P; Hutchinson, J R; Rubenson, J; Wilson, R S; Hocknull, S A; Barrett, R S; Lloyd, D G

    2017-07-01

    How extinct, non-avian theropod dinosaurs locomoted is a subject of considerable interest, as is the manner in which it evolved on the line leading to birds. Fossil footprints provide the most direct evidence for answering these questions. In this study, step width-the mediolateral (transverse) distance between successive footfalls-was investigated with respect to speed (stride length) in non-avian theropod trackways of Late Triassic age. Comparable kinematic data were also collected for humans and 11 species of ground-dwelling birds. Permutation tests of the slope on a plot of step width against stride length showed that step width decreased continuously with increasing speed in the extinct theropods ( p < 0.001), as well as the five tallest bird species studied ( p < 0.01). Humans, by contrast, showed an abrupt decrease in step width at the walk-run transition. In the modern bipeds, these patterns reflect the use of either a discontinuous locomotor repertoire, characterized by distinct gaits (humans), or a continuous locomotor repertoire, where walking smoothly transitions into running (birds). The non-avian theropods are consequently inferred to have had a continuous locomotor repertoire, possibly including grounded running. Thus, features that characterize avian terrestrial locomotion had begun to evolve early in theropod history. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Biomechanical Consequences of the Elastic Properties of Dental Implant Alloys on the Supporting Bone: Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Pérez-Pevida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to evaluate how the elastic properties of the fabrication material of dental implants influence peri-implant bone load transfer in terms of the magnitude and distribution of stress and deformation. A three-dimensional (3D finite element analysis was performed; the model used was a section of mandibular bone with a single implant containing a cemented ceramic-metal crown on a titanium abutment. The following three alloys were compared: rigid (Y-TZP, conventional (Ti-6Al-4V, and hyperelastic (Ti-Nb-Zr. A 150-N static load was tested on the central fossa at 6° relative to the axial axis of the implant. The results showed no differences in the distribution of stress and deformation of the bone for any of the three types of alloys studied, mainly being concentrated at the peri-implant cortical layer. However, there were differences found in the magnitude of the stress transferred to the supporting bone, with the most rigid alloy (Y-TZP transferring the least stress and deformation to cortical bone. We conclude that there is an effect of the fabrication material of dental implants on the magnitude of the stress and deformation transferred to peri-implant bone.

  3. Comparative Biomechanical Study on Contact Alterations After Lateral Meniscus Posterior Root Avulsion, Transosseous Reinsertion, and Total Meniscectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Blanca, Ana; Espejo-Baena, Alejandro; Amat Trujillo, Daniel; Prado Nóvoa, María; Espejo-Reina, Alejandro; Quintero López, Clara; Ezquerro Juanco, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    To compare the effects of lateral meniscus posterior root avulsion left in situ, its repair, and meniscectomy on contact pressure distribution in both tibiofemoral compartments at different flexion angles. Eight cadaveric knees were tested under compressive 1000 N load for 4 lateral meniscus conditions (intact, posterior root avulsion, transosseous root repair, and total meniscectomy) at flexion angles 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°. Contact area and pressure distribution were registered using K-scan pressure sensors inserted between menisci and tibial plateau. In the lateral compartment, root detachment decreased contact area (P = .017, 0° and 30°; P = .012, 60° and 90°) and increased mean (P = .012, all angles) and maximum (P = .025, 0° and 30°; P = .017, 60°; P = .012, 90°) pressures relative to intact condition. Repair restored all measured parameters close to intact at 0°, but effectiveness decreased with flexion angle, yielding no significant effect at 90°. Meniscectomy produced higher decreases than root avulsion in contact area (P = .012, 0° and 90°; P = .05, 30° and 60°) and increases in mean (P = .017, 0° and 30°; P = .018, 90°) and maximum pressure (P = .012, 0°; P = .036, 30°). In the medial compartment, lesion changed the contact area at high flexion angles only, while meniscectomy induced greater changes at all angles. Lateral meniscus posterior root avulsion generates significant alterations in contact area and pressures at lateral knee compartment for flexion angles between full extension and 90°. Meniscectomy causes greater disorders than the avulsion left in situ. Transosseous repair with a single suture restores these alterations to conditions close to intact at 0° and 30° but not at 60° and 90°. Altered contact mechanics after lateral meniscus posterior root avulsion might have degenerative consequences. Transosseous repair with one suture should be revised to effectively restore contact mechanics at high flexion angles

  4. Is pelvic fixation the only option to provide additional stability to the sacral anchorage in long lumbar instrumentation? A comparative biomechanical study of new techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkheimer, David; Reichel, Heiko; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Lattig, Friederike

    2017-03-01

    Supplementary iliac screws have the highest potential to protect S1-pedicle-screws from loosening in long fusion constructs. However, this technique bridges the iliosacral joint with potential disadvantages for the patient. This study aimed to evaluate if two different established fixation techniques can be used in addition to pedicle screws as alternative to iliac screws, and if these two techniques can provide similar stability when S1-pedicle-screws are loosened. Flexibility testing with pure moments of 7.5Nm was performed with six human osteopenic/osteoporotic L4-pelvis specimens. The following conditions were investigated: 1. Intact; 2. Destabilization L5/S1; 3. Fixation with rigid L4-S1 pedicle-screw-system; 4. Condition 3- loosening of S1-screws; 5. Condition 4- L5-S2-lamina-hooks; 6. Condition 4- L5/S1-translaminar-screws; 7. Condition 4- S2-ala-ilium screws. Application of compressive L5-S2-lamina-hooks or L5/S1-translaminar-screws next to pedicle screws in L5 and S1 was feasible in all specimens. L4-S1-pedicle-screw-instrumentation reduced the Range of Motion significantly compared to the destabilized condition. After simulation of S1 screw loosening, lamina hooks only reduced the Range of Motion in flexion/extension significantly. L5/S1-translaminar-screws had a higher stabilizing effect in lateral bending and axial rotation, but the effect of both systems was smaller than with an instrumentation extension to the os ilium. In long lumbar pedicle screw instrumentations including L5/S1, additional ilium screws have the highest potential to protect the S1-anchorage. Additional L5/S1-translaminar-screws can increase stability of the lumbosacral junction without bridging the iliosacral joint, whereas lamina hooks showed no significant biomechanical benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Minimum cement volume required in vertebral body augmentation--A biomechanical study comparing the permanent SpineJack device and balloon kyphoplasty in traumatic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Robert; Schmitt, Lena; Gierer, Philip; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Noriega, David; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Meeder, Peter-J; Martin, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    Minimally invasive treatment of vertebral fractures is basically characterized by cement augmentation. Using the combination of a permanent implant plus cement, it is now conceivable that the amount of cement can be reduced and so this augmentation could be an attractive opportunity for use in traumatic fractures in young and middle-aged patients. The objective of this study was to determine the smallest volume of cement necessary to stabilize fractured vertebrae comparing the SpineJack system to the gold standard, balloon kyphoplasty. 36 fresh frozen human cadaveric vertebral bodies (T11-L3) were utilized. After creating typical compression wedge fractures (AO A1.2.1), the vertebral bodies were reduced by SpineJack (n=18) or kyphoplasty (n=18) under preload (100N). Subsequently, different amounts of bone cement (10%, 16% or 30% of the vertebral body volume) were inserted. Finally, static and dynamic biomechanical tests were performed. Following augmentation and fatigue tests, vertebrae treated with SpineJack did not show any significant loss of intraoperative height gain, in contrast to kyphoplasty. In the 10% and 16%-group the height restoration expressed as a percentage of the initial height was significantly increased with the SpineJack (>300%). Intraoperative SpineJack could preserve the maximum height gain (mean 1% height loss) better than kyphoplasty (mean 16% height loss). In traumatic wedge fractures it is possible to reduce the amount of cement to 10% of the vertebral body volume when SpineJack is used without compromising the reposition height after reduction, in contrast to kyphoplasty that needs a 30% cement volume. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOMECHANICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Knudson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This book provides a broad and in-depth theoretical and practical description of the fundamental concepts in understanding biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of human movement. PURPOSE The aim is to bring together up-to-date biomechanical knowledge with expert application knowledge. Extensive referencing for students is also provided. FEATURES This textbook is divided into 12 chapters within four parts, including a lab activities section at the end. The division is as follows: Part 1 Introduction: 1.Introduction to biomechanics of human movement; 2.Fundamentals of biomechanics and qualitative analysis; Part 2 Biological/Structural Bases: 3.Anatomical description and its limitations; 4.Mechanics of the musculoskeletal system; Part 3 Mechanical Bases: 5.Linear and angular kinematics; 6.Linear kinetics; 7.Angular kinetics; 8.Fluid mechanics; Part 4 Application of Biomechanics in Qualitative Analysis :9.Applying biomechanics in physical education; 10.Applying biomechanics in coaching; 11.Applying biomechanics in strength and conditioning; 12.Applying biomechanics in sports medicine and rehabilitation. AUDIENCE This is an important reading for both student and educators in the medicine, sport and exercise-related fields. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a helpful guide to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in exercise and sport biomechanics. ASSESSMENT The text provides a constructive fundamental resource for biomechanics, exercise and sport-related students, teachers and researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion. It is also very useful since being clearly written and presenting several ways of examples of the application of biomechanics to help teach and apply biomechanical variables and concepts, including sport-related ones

  7. Biomechanics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    Presents Current Principles and ApplicationsBiomedical engineering is considered to be the most expansive of all the engineering sciences. Its function involves the direct combination of core engineering sciences as well as knowledge of nonengineering disciplines such as biology and medicine. Drawing on material from the biomechanics section of The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition and utilizing the expert knowledge of respected published scientists in the application and research of biomechanics, Biomechanics: Principles and Practices discusses the latest principles and applicat

  8. Modelling biomechanics of bark patterning in grasstrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Holly; Runions, Adam; Hobill, David; Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    2014-09-01

    Bark patterns are a visually important characteristic of trees, typically attributed to fractures occurring during secondary growth of the trunk and branches. An understanding of bark pattern formation has been hampered by insufficient information regarding the biomechanical properties of bark and the corresponding difficulties in faithfully modelling bark fractures using continuum mechanics. This study focuses on the genus Xanthorrhoea (grasstrees), which have an unusual bark-like structure composed of distinct leaf bases connected by sticky resin. Due to its discrete character, this structure is well suited for computational studies. A dynamic computational model of grasstree development was created. The model captures both the phyllotactic pattern of leaf bases during primary growth and the changes in the trunk's width during secondary growth. A biomechanical representation based on a system of masses connected by springs is used for the surface of the trunk, permitting the emergence of fractures during secondary growth to be simulated. The resulting fracture patterns were analysed statistically and compared with images of real trees. The model reproduces key features of grasstree bark patterns, including their variability, spanning elongated and reticulate forms. The patterns produced by the model have the same statistical character as those seen in real trees. The model was able to support the general hypothesis that the patterns observed in the grasstree bark-like layer may be explained in terms of mechanical fractures driven by secondary growth. Although the generality of the results is limited by the unusual structure of grasstree bark, it supports the hypothesis that bark pattern formation is primarily a biomechanical phenomenon.

  9. Comparative study of hygrothermal properties of five thermal insulation materials

    OpenAIRE

    Laure Ducoulombier; Zoubeir Lafhaj

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this article is to carry out a comparative study of the main hygrothermal properties of five thermal insulation materials for buildings. These properties are necessary for a correct prediction of heat and moisture transfers through the walls and the selection of the most appropriate materials according to the specific buildings. The studied materials were glass wool, rock wool, expanded polystyrene, wood fiberboard and polyester fiberfill. The article is divided into three pa...

  10. Nanomechanical properties of mineralised collagen microfibrils based on finite elements method: biomechanical role of cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical structures in bio-composites such as bone tissue have many scales or levels and synergic interactions between the different levels. They also have a highly complex architecture in order to fulfil their biological and mechanical functions. In this study, a new three-dimensional (3D) model based on the finite elements (FEs) method was used to model the relationship between the hierarchical structure and the properties of the constituents at the sub-structure scale (mineralised collagen microfibrils) and to investigate their apparent nanomechanical properties. The results of the proposed FE simulations show that the elastic properties of microfibrils depend on different factors such as the number of cross-links, the mechanical properties and the volume fraction of phases. The results obtained under compression loading at a small deformation < 2% show that the microfibrils have a Young's modulus (Ef) ranging from 0.4 to 1.16 GPa and a Poisson's ratio ranging from 0.26 to 0.3. These results are in excellent agreement with experimental data (X-ray, AFM and MEMS) and molecular simulations.

  11. Histologic and biomechanical evaluation of a novel macroporous polytetrafluoroethylene knit mesh compared to lightweight and heavyweight polypropylene mesh in a porcine model of ventral incisional hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melman, L.; Jenkins, E. D.; Hamilton, N. A.; Bender, L. C.; Brodt, M. D.; Deeken, C. R.; Greco, S. C.; Frisella, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the biocompatibility of heavyweight polypropylene (HWPP), lightweight polypropylene (LWPP), and monofilament knit polytetrafluoroethylene (mkPTFE) mesh by comparing biomechanics and histologic response at 1, 3, and 5 months in a porcine model of incisional hernia repair. Methods Bilateral full-thickness abdominal wall defects measuring 4 cm in length were created in 27 Yucatan minipigs. Twenty-one days after hernia creation, animals underwent bilateral preperitoneal ventral hernia repair with 8 × 10 cm pieces of mesh. Repairs were randomized to Bard®Mesh (HWPP, Bard/Davol, http://www.davol.com), ULTRAPRO® (LWPP, Ethicon, http://www.ethicon.com), and GORE®INFINIT Mesh (mkPTFE, Gore & Associates, http://www.gore.com). Nine animals were sacrificed at each timepoint (1, 3, and 5 months). At harvest, a 3 × 4 cm sample of mesh and incorporated tissue was taken from the center of the implant site and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing at a rate of 0.42 mm/s. The maximum force (N) and tensile strength (N/cm) were measured with a tensiometer, and stiffness (N/mm) was calculated from the slope of the force-versus-displacement curve. Adjacent sections of tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and analyzed for inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue ingrowth. Data are reported as mean ± SEM. Statistical significance (P 0.05 for all comparisons). However, for each mesh type, the maximum strength at 5 months was significantly lower than that at 1 month (P 0.05 for all comparisons). No significant differences with regard to inflammation, fibrosis, or tissue ingrowth were detected between mesh types at any time point (P > 0.09 for all comparisons). However, over time, inflammation decreased significantly for all mesh types (P 0.09). Conclusions The maximum tensile strength of mesh in the abdominal wall decreased over time for HWPP, LWPP, and mkPTFE mesh materials alike. This trend may actually reflect inability to adequately grip specimens at

  12. Aeronautical Inspirations in Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroński Ryszard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The goal of the paper is to show that some problems formulated in the dynamics of atmospheric flight are very similar to the problems formulated in the biomechanics of motion and medicine. Three problems were compared: minimumheat transfer from the boundary layer to the ballistic missile skin, minimum-time ski descent, and the minimisation of the negative cumulated effect of the drug in cancer chemotherapy. Material and methods. All these problems are solved using the same method originally developed for aerospace systems - the method of Miele (the extremisation method of linear integrals via Green’s theorem. Results. It is shown that the problems arising in different branches of knowledge are very similar in problem formulations, mathematical models, and solution methods used. Conclusions. There are no barriers between different disciplines.

  13. Biomechanical properties of orthogonal plate configuration versus parallel plate configuration using the same locking plate system for intra-articular distal humeral fractures under radial or ulnar column axial load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Toshiya; Hara, Akira; Iwase, Hideaki; Ichihara, Satoshi; Nagao, Masashi; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Previous reports have questioned whether an orthogonal or parallel configuration is superior for distal humeral articular fractures. In previous clinical and biomechanical studies, implant failure of the posterolateral plate has been reported with orthogonal configurations; however, the reason for screw loosening in the posterolateral plate is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical properties and to clarify the causes of posterolateral plate loosening using a humeral fracture model under axial compression on the radial or ulnar column separately. And we changed only the plate set up: parallel or orthogonal. We used artificial bone to create an Association for the Study of Internal Fixation type 13-C2.3 intra-articular fracture model with a 1-cm supracondylar gap. We used an anatomically-preshaped distal humerus locking compression plate system (Synthes GmbH, Solothurn, Switzerland). Although this is originally an orthogonal plate system, we designed a mediolateral parallel configuration to use the contralateral medial plate instead of the posterolateral plate in the system. We calculated the stiffness of the radial and ulnar columns and anterior movement of the condylar fragment in the lateral view. The parallel configuration was superior to the orthogonal configuration regarding the stiffness of the radial column axial compression. There were significant differences between the two configurations regarding anterior movement of the capitellum during axial loading of the radial column. The posterolateral plate tended to bend anteriorly under axial compression compared with the medial or lateral plate. We believe that in the orthogonal configuration axial compression induced more anterior displacement of the capitellum than the trochlea, which eventually induced secondary fragment or screw dislocation on the posterolateral plate, or nonunion at the supracondylar level. In the parallel configuration, anterior movement of the capitellum or

  14. A Comparative Study of the Compaction Properties of Binary and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To comparatively evaluate the tableting properties of binary mixtures and bilayer tablets containing plastic deformation and brittle fracture excipients. Methods: Binary mixture and bilayer tablets of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), ethyl cellulose, anhydrous lactose and dextrate were prepared by direct compression ...

  15. A comparative study of the flow enhancing properties of bentonite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of granule flow enhancing property of bentonite, magnesium stearate, talc and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was undertaken. Bentonite was processed into fine powder. A 10 %w/w of starch granules was prepared and separated into different sizes (˂180, 180-500, 500-710 and 710-850 μm).

  16. Comparative study of spectroscopic properties of the low-lying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    985–994. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Comparative study of spectroscopic properties of the low-lying electronic states of 2,4-pentadien-1-iminium cation and its N-substituted analogues. ANJAN CHATTOPADHYAY. Department of Chemistry, Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani –KK Birla Goa Campus,.

  17. A comparative study of the antimicrobial properties of the ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... enema for intestinal worms in parts of Ivory Coast. The latex is also used as a natural preservative (Anthony,. 1995). This work was undertaken to compare the phytoche- mical and antimicrobial properties of the leaf and root extracts of L. owariensis on three clinical bacterial isolates so as to validate or ...

  18. Comparative study of the physiochemical and structural properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of some physiochemical and structural parameters of brown (mature) and green (immature) coconut fibre as adsorbents was studied. The physiochemical and structural properties evaluated were surface area, moisture content, pH, bulk density, pore volume, porosity, ash content, tortuocity and metal ...

  19. Comparative study of the properties of ordinary portland cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explored metakaolin as alternative material to cement. It compares the properties of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete and binary concrete containing metakaolin as partial replacement of OPC. Two set of concrete samples; one with 10% Metakaolin (MK) replacing OPC by weight, and the other without ...

  20. A comparative property investigation of lithium phosphate glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... comparative analysis of the properties is presented with glasses melted in conventional resistance heating adopting standard methods of .... length and the standard deviation has been reported as error limit (±0.0001). ... to less evaporation of more volatile ingredient in MW heating. Figure 3 depicts X-ray ...

  1. Comparative study of some mechanical and release properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanical and release properties of paracetamol tablets formulated with cashew gum (CAG), povidone (PVP) and gelatin (GEL) as binders were studied and compared. The parameters studied were tensile strength (TS), brittle fracture index (BFI), friability (F), disintegration time (DT) and percentage drug released ...

  2. A comparative study of proton transport properties of zirconium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    A comparative study of proton transport properties of zirconium phosphate and its metal exchanged phases. RAKESH THAKKAR, HEEMANSHU PATEL and UMA CHUDASAMA*. Applied Chemistry Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda,. Vadodara 390 001, India. MS received 26 ...

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Some Properties of Native and Oxidized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to produce native starches from cassava, yam and rice, and to modify a portion of the native starches by oxidation and compare their properties. The modification process was carried out by treating the native starches with food grade sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The proximate, swelling index and ...

  4. A comparative property investigation of lithium phosphate glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 5. A comparative property investigation of lithium phosphate glass melted in microwave and conventional heating. AVIK HALDER BISWAJIT MANDAL SOURINDRA MAHANTY RANJAN SEN ASHIS KUMAR MANDAL. Volume 40 Issue 5 September 2017 pp ...

  5. Biomechanical comparison of rotational activities between anterior cruciate ligament- and posterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bee Oh; Shin, Han Sol; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the early functional recovery using biomechanical properties between anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)- and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-reconstructed patients and to determine the biomechanical deficit of PCL-reconstructed patients compared to ACL-reconstructed patients. A motion analysis system was used to measure and calculate kinematic and kinetic data for 10 patients who underwent PCL-reconstructed patients [experimental group (group 1)], 10 ACL-reconstructed patients (group 2), and 10 healthy subjects (group 3) during 45°, 90°, 135°, and 180° cutting and turn running tasks. Groups 1 and 2 were assessed at 3 (return to daily activity) and 6 months (return to light sports) postoperatively. At 3 months postoperatively, compared to groups 2 and 3, group 1 showed a decrease in knee flexion angle, extension moment, valgus moment, external rotational moment, ground reaction force, and increased hamstring-quadriceps ratio. At 6 months postoperatively, results from group 1 resembled those of groups 2 and 3 over time. Patients who underwent PCL reconstruction showed some biomechanical deficits in performance of activities requiring rotation, compared to those who underwent ACL reconstruction. Therefore, the modification of a rehabilitation programme for patients who underwent PCL reconstruction would be necessary for improvement of the biomechanical properties during performance of dynamic activities. Case-control study, Level III.

  6. Surgical fixation of midshaft clavicle fractures: A systematic review of biomechanical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsmans, Martijn H; van Heijl, Mark; Houwert, Roderick M; Burger, Bart J; Verleisdonk, Egbert Jan M; Veeger, Dirk Jan; van der Meijden, Olivier A

    2018-02-21

    Surgical treatment of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures requires a decision between plate fixation and intramedullary (IM) fixation. Numerous studies report on the biomechanical properties of various repair constructs. The goal of this systematic review was to provide an overview of studies describing the biomechanical properties of the most commonly used surgical fixations of midshaft clavicle fractures. Additionally, we aimed to translate these biomechanical results into clinically relevant conclusions. A computer-aided search of the EMBASE and PudMed/MEDLINE databases was conducted. Studies included for review compared biomechanical properties of plate fixation with IM fixation and superiorly positioned plates with anteroinferiorly positioned plates for midshaft clavicle fractures. Fifteen studies were eligible for inclusion. Plate fixation seemed to form a more robust construct than IM fixation in terms of stiffness and failure loading. The remaining clavicle was stronger after removal of the IM device than after removal of the plate. Superior plating of transverse fractures generally seemed to provide greater stiffness and strength during bending loads than anteroinferior plating did. The absence of cortical alignment in wedge and comminuted fractures directly influenced the fixation stability for both IM fixation and plate fixation, regardless of location. Each type of fracture fixation has biomechanical advantages and disadvantages. However, exact thresholds of stiffness for inducing healing and failure strength to withstand refractures are unknown. The clinical relevance of the biomechanical studies may be arguable. Since none of the studies investigate the effect of tissue adaptation over time they should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C; Liu, Perng-Ru

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm 3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  8. Comparative Study on Mechanical Properties between Pure and Recycled Polypropylenes

    OpenAIRE

    Ariadne L. Juwono; Bernadeth Jong Hiong Jun

    2010-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is one type of thermoplastics that is widely used in our daily activities. A combination of the high demand and the easiness of recycling process, the recycled PP has been generally applied. In this study, the structure and the mechanical properties of the as-received PPs, recycled PPs, and commercial recycled PPs were compared, especially for cloth hanger application. DSC test results showed that recycling process did not cause a significant change to the material's meltin...

  9. Biomechanical properties of the femoral neck relative to osteosynthesis methods and bone mineral content assessed by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husby, T.

    1990-01-01

    Bone mineral content as determined by computerized tomography (CT) and mechanical strength on axial loading were compared in 36 cadaveric femur specimens. Based on the CT measurements of density and area, the mass of a transverse slice of the femur was estimated. Highly significant correlations were demonstrated between strength and cancellous bone density. Even higher correlations were revealed when the bone masses of the proximal and distal femoral areas were calculated. Based on these findings, an equal distribution of the effective mass of the femur was postulated. This hypothesis was confirmed in an experimental rotational model. The CT attenuation values were also correlated to direct measurements of bone mineral content, i.e. calcium. Moreover, the strength of different metal implants, commonly used in femoral neck fractures, were assessed in cadaver specimens. 134 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs

  10. In vitro biomechanical properties of 2 compression fixation methods for midbody proximal sesamoid bone fractures in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodie, J B; Ruggles, A J; Litsky, A S

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate 2 methods of midbody proximal sesamoid bone repair--fixation by a screw placed in lag fashion and circumferential wire fixation--by comparing yield load and the adjacent soft-tissue strain during monotonic loading. Experimental study. 10 paired equine cadaver forelimbs from race-trained horses. A transverse midbody osteotomy of the medial proximal sesamoid bone (PSB) was created. The osteotomy was repaired with a 4.5-mm cortex bone screw placed in lag fashion or a 1.25-mm circumferential wire. The limbs were instrumented with differential variable reluctance transducers placed in the suspensory apparatus and distal sesamoidean ligaments. The limbs were tested in axial compression in a single cycle until failure. The cortex bone screw repairs had a mean yield load of 2,908.2 N; 1 limb did not fail when tested to 5,000 N. All circumferential wire repairs failed with a mean yield load of 3,406.3 N. There was no statistical difference in mean yield load between the 2 repair methods. The maximum strain generated in the soft tissues attached to the proximal sesamoid bones was not significantly different between repair groups. All repaired limbs were able to withstand loads equal to those reportedly applied to the suspensory apparatus in vivo during walking. Each repair technique should have adequate yield strength for repair of midbody fractures of the PSB immediately after surgery.

  11. Comparative study of hygrothermal properties of five thermal insulation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Ducoulombier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to carry out a comparative study of the main hygrothermal properties of five thermal insulation materials for buildings. These properties are necessary for a correct prediction of heat and moisture transfers through the walls and the selection of the most appropriate materials according to the specific buildings. The studied materials were glass wool, rock wool, expanded polystyrene, wood fiberboard and polyester fiberfill. The article is divided into three parts. The first part presents the phenomena of hygrothermal transfers in walls in order to understand the need for determining specific properties of the insulating materials. The second part describes in details the five studied insulating materials and the methods used for the characterization and identification of their main properties. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results and makes comparisons between materials. The differences between the insulating materials are brought out, such as the strong dependence of the thermal conductivity of polystyrene on temperature, or the good permeability of fibrous insulating materials to water vapor. A detailed analysis of the obtained results is presented.

  12. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  13. Computational modeling in biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mofrad, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a glimpse of the diverse and important roles that modern computational technology is playing in various areas of biomechanics. It includes unique chapters on ab initio quantum mechanical, molecular dynamic and scale coupling methods..

  14. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  15. Biomechanics and tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, B

    2006-05-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause.

  16. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p<1.1×10-5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  17. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3.5 Locking Compression Plate Fixation to 3.5 Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate Fixation in a Canine Cadaveric Distal Humeral Metaphyseal Gap Model

    OpenAIRE

    Filipowicz, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Objective- To compare the biomechanical properties of 3.5 locking compression plate (LCP) fixation to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation in a canine cadaveric, distal humeral metaphyseal gap model in static axial compression and cyclic axial compression and torsion. Study Design- Biomechanical in vitro study. Sample Population- 30 paired humeri from adult, medium to large breed dogs. Methods- Testing was performed monotonically to failure in axial compres...

  18. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of “functional tissue engineering” has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements. PMID:24818797

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Dental Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Peskersoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the properties of nanobased dental restorative materials with nanoindentation method in a precise, repeatable, and comparable way. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composites, conventional glass ionomer materials, and light cured nanoionomer materials were utilised for the study. Specimen discs (r=10 mm, h= 2 mm were prepared to test the hardness, modulus of elasticity, yield strength, and fracture toughness values for each sample in a nanoindentation device with an atomic force microscopy add-on (n=25. Comparative analyses were performed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. The hardness and modulus of elasticity values of nanocomposite were higher (2.58 GPa and 32.86 GPa, resp. than those of other dental materials. Although glass ionomer exhibited a hardness that was similar to a nanoionomer (0.81 versus 0.87 GPa, glass ionomer had the lowest fracture toughness value (Kc=0.83 MPa/mm0.5. The mechanical properties of resin composites improve with additional nanoscale fillers, unlike the glass ionomer material.

  20. Are Cranial Biomechanical Simulation Data Linked to Known Diets in Extant Taxa? A Method for Applying Diet-Biomechanics Linkage Models to Infer Feeding Capability of Extinct Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Flynn, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Performance of the masticatory system directly influences feeding and survival, so adaptive hypotheses often are proposed to explain craniodental evolution via functional morphology changes. However, the prevalence of “many-to-one” association of cranial forms and functions in vertebrates suggests a complex interplay of ecological and evolutionary histories, resulting in redundant morphology-diet linkages. Here we examine the link between cranial biomechanical properties for taxa with different dietary preferences in crown clade Carnivora, the most diverse clade of carnivorous mammals. We test whether hypercarnivores and generalists can be distinguished based on cranial mechanical simulation models, and how such diet-biomechanics linkages relate to morphology. Comparative finite element and geometric morphometrics analyses document that predicted bite force is positively allometric relative to skull strain energy; this is achieved in part by increased stiffness in larger skull models and shape changes that resist deformation and displacement. Size-standardized strain energy levels do not reflect feeding preferences; instead, caniform models have higher strain energy than feliform models. This caniform-feliform split is reinforced by a sensitivity analysis using published models for six additional taxa. Nevertheless, combined bite force-strain energy curves distinguish hypercarnivorous versus generalist feeders. These findings indicate that the link between cranial biomechanical properties and carnivoran feeding preference can be clearly defined and characterized, despite phylogenetic and allometric effects. Application of this diet-biomechanics linkage model to an analysis of an extinct stem carnivoramorphan and an outgroup creodont species provides biomechanical evidence for the evolution of taxa into distinct hypercarnivorous and generalist feeding styles prior to the appearance of crown carnivoran clades with similar feeding preferences. PMID:25923776

  1. Biomechanical studies: science (f)or common sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, Jos J.; Doornberg, Job N.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; van der Zwan, A. L.; Spoor, A. B.; van Vugt, A. B.; Armstrong, A. D.; Shrivastava, A.; Wahegaonkar, A. L.; Shafritz, A. B.; Adams, J.; Ilyas, A.; Vochteloo, A. J. H.; Castillo, A. P.; Basak, A.; Andreas, P.; Barquet, A.; Kristan, A.; Berner, A.; Ranade, A. B.; Ashish, S.; Terrono, A. L.; Jubel, A.; Frieman, B.; Bamberger, H. B.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Belangero, W. D.; Hearon, B. F.; Boler, J. M.; Walter, F. L.; Boyer, M.; Wills, B. P. D.; Broekhuyse, H.; Buckley, R.; Watkins, B.; Sears, B. W.; Calfee, R. P.; Ekholm, C.; Fernandes, C. H.; Swigart, C.; Cassidy, C.; Wilson, C. J.; Bainbridge, L. C.; Wilson, C.; Jones, C. M.; Cornell, C.; Crist, B. D.; van Deurzen, D. F. P.; Beingessner, D.; Rowland, D. J.; Della Rocca, G. J.; Eygendaal, D.; McKee, D. M.; Verbeek, D. O. F.; Kalainov, D. M.; Polatsch, D.; Barreto, C. J. R.; Merchant, M.; Brilej, D.; Bijlani, N.; Silva, D. M.; Maman, E.; Ibrahim, I. M.; Nyszkiewicz, R.; Henry, P. D. G.; Ruchelsman, D.; Vishwanath, I. M.; Scott, D. F.; Harvey, E.; Grosso, E.; Stojkovska, E.; Pemovska, N. N.; Tolo, E. T.; Schumer, E. D.; Suarez, F.; Frihagen, F.; Lopez-Gonzalez, F.; Rodríguez, F. M.; Caro, G. C. Zambrano; Garnavos, C.; Athwal, G. S.; DeSilva, G.; Dyer, G. S. M.; Babis, G. C.; Gradl, G.; Frykman, G. K.; Gaston, R. G.; Garrigues, G.; Bayne, G. J.; Merrell, G.; Hernandez, G. R.; Gadbled, G.; Campinhos, L. A. B.; Balfour, G. W.; van der Heide, H.; Nancollas, M.; Young, C.; Pess, G. M.; Goost, H.; Alonso, H.; Villamizar, N. N.; Awan, H.; Routman, H. D.; Kimball, H. L.; Hofmeister, E.; McGraw, I.; Erol, K.; Biert, J.; Goslings, J. C.; Di Giovanni, J. F.; Bishop, J.; Abzug, J. M.; Greenberg, J. A.; Ahn, J.; McAuliffe, J.; Fanuele, J. C.; Boretto, J. G.; Choueka, J.; Murachovsky, J.; Ribeiro Filho, J. E. G.; Isaacs, J.; Izzi, J. A.; Kellam, J.; Giuffre, J. L.; Conflitti, J. M.; Wolf, J. M.; Scheer, J. H.; Capo, J. T.; Rubio, J.; Taras, J.; Wint, J.; Wolkenfelt, J.; Kakar, S.; Chivers, K.; Zyto, K.; Keener, J. D.; Eng, K.; Jeray, K.; Lee, K.; Malone, K. J.; Kabir, K.; Kraan, G. A.; Radcliff, K.; Dickson, K.; Poelhekke, L. M. S. J.; Mica, L.; Weiss, L.; Adolfsson, L. E.; Borris, L. C.; Lasanianos, N. G.; Schulte, L. M.; Paz, L.; Felipe, N. E. L.; Verhofstad, N. N.; van de Sande, M. A. J.; Mormino, M.; Richard, M. J.; Bonczar, M.; Hammerberg, E. M.; Menon, M.; Mazzocca, A. D.; Bronkhorst, M. W. G. A.; McKee, M.; Soong, M.; Costanzo, R. M.; Wood, M. M.; Abdel-Ghany, M. I.; Baskies, M.; Behrman, M.; Quell, M.; Kessler, M. W.; Palmer, M. J.; Prayson, M.; Pirpiris, M.; Ragsdell, M. M.; Krijnen, M. R.; Tyllianakis, M.; Grafe, M. W.; Schep, N.; Nelson, E.; Akabudike, N. M.; Shortt, N. L.; Horangic, N. J.; Leung, N. L.; Gummerson, N. W.; Kanakaris, N. K.; Wilson, N.; Calandruccio, J.; Semenkin, O. M.; Omid, R.; Veillette, C. J. H.; Richardson, M.; Ortiz, J. A.; Forigua, J. E.; Brink, P. R. G.; Kloen, P.; van Eerten, P. V.; Prashanth, I.; Althausen, P.; Lygdas, P.; Parnes, N.; Martineau, P. A.; Benhaim, P.; Blazar, P.; Schandelmaier, N. N.; Petrisor, B.; Jebson, P.; Levin, P.; Batson, W. A.; García, F.; Owens, P. W.; Guenter, L.; Haverlag, R.; Peters, R. W.; de Bedout, R.; Shatford, R.; Rowinski, S.; Verhagen, R. A. W.; Babst, R. H.; Hauck, R.; Papandrea, R.; Gilbert, R. S.; Rizzo, M.; Jenkinson, R.; Hutchison, R. L.; Liem, R.; Smith, R. M.; Tashijan, R.; Zura, R. D.; Page, R. S.; Pesantez, R.; Wagenmakers, R.; Abrams, J.; Spruijt, S.; Kennedy, S. A.; Mehta, S.; Beldner, S.; Schmidt, A.; Mitchell, S.; Fischer, S. T.; Checchia, S. L.; Dodds, S.; Nolan, B. M.; Kaplan, S.; Kaar, S. G.; Kronlage, S.; Meylaerts, S. A.; Steinmann, S.; McCabe, S. J.; Streubel, P. N.; Omara, T.; Swiontkowski, M.; Gosens, T.; DeCoster, T.; Taitsman, L.; Baxamusa, T.; Dienstknecht, T.; Kaplan, F. T. D.; Siff, T.; Begue, T.; Higgins, T.; Mittlmeier, T.; Apard, T.; Hughes, T.; Havliček, T.; Wyrick, T.; Rozental, N. N.; Stackhouse, T. G.; Giordano, V.; Varecka, T. F.; Nikolaou, V. S.; Jokhi, V.; Philippe, V.; Wall, C. J.; Walsh, C. J.; Hammert, W. C.; Weil, Y.; Satora, W.; Wright, T.; Zalavras, C.

    2014-01-01

    It is our impression that many biomechanical studies invest substantial resources studying the obvious: that more and larger metal is stronger. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if a subset of biomechanical studies comparing fixation constructs just document common sense. Using a web-based

  2. A comparative study of proton transport properties of zirconium (IV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Proton conductors; proton transport properties; solid electrolytes; ionic conductors; proton conduction in zirconium (IV) phosphonates; proton transport properties in Zr(IV) amino phosphonates.

  3. Dr Dapertutto's biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojmenović Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of the research is the basic models of Meyerhold's biomechanics, which were used to define its theoretical principles. Professor Meyerhold, the theatrical leader of an eccentric stream, with which he changed the modern understanding of the theatre, established the technique of biomechanics by analysing the calculated type of movement. The analysis determines the answers to the questions: What kind of influence does Taylor's 'scientific management of work' have on defining the principles of Meyerhold's techniques of biomechanics? Which aesthetic models of stage movement were some of the basic subjects of Meyerhold's research? Meyerhold's theatrical work has been researched by a number of theatre theorists. However, how much does his work influence the film medium?.

  4. Application of acoustic microscopy to assessment of cardiovascular biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Hidehiko; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Tanaka, Motonao; Joergensen, Claus S.; Falk, Erling

    2002-11-01

    Acoustic microscopy provides information on physical and mechanical properties of biological tissues, while optical microscopy with various staining techniques provides chemical properties. The biomechanics of tissues is especially important in cardiovascular system because its pathophysiology is closely related with mechanical stresses such as blood pressure or blood flow. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) system with tone-burst ultrasound in the frequency range of 100-200 MHz has been developed, and attenuation and sound speed of tissues have been measured. In human coronary arteries, attenuation and sound speed were high in calcification and collagen, while both values were low in smooth muscle and lipid. Another SAM system with 800-MHz-1.3-GHz ultrasound was applied for aortas of Apo-E deficient mouse, which is known to develop atherosclerosis. Attenuation of ultrasound was significantly higher in type 1 collagen compared to type 3 collagen. Recently, a new type FFT-SAM using a single-pulse, broadband frequency range ultrasound (20-150 MHz) has been developed. Cardiac allograft was observed by FFT-SAM and the acoustic properties were able to grade allograft rejection. SAM provides very useful information for assessing cardiovascular biomechanics and for understanding normal and abnormal images of clinical ultrasound.

  5. Statin-induced calcific Achilles tendinopathy in rats: comparison of biomechanical and histopathological effects of simvastatin, atorvastatin and rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleağasıoğlu, Ferda; Olcay, Ercan; Olgaç, Vakur

    2017-06-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence indicates the risk of tendinopathy and spontaneous and/or simultaneous tendon ruptures associated with statin use. This experimental study was designed to evaluate and compare the biomechanical and histopathological effects of the three most commonly prescribed statins (simvastatin, atorvastatin and rosuvastatin) on the Achilles tendon in rats. Statins were administered by gavage to rats at daily doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg for 3 weeks. One week later, the Achilles tendons were dissected and their biomechanical properties, including ultimate tensile force, yield force and elastic modulus, were determined. The samples were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and examined under a light microscope. The biomechanical properties of the tibia were tested by three-point bending test. Bone mineral density (BMD) and the lengths of tibias were measured by computed tomography. All the statins caused deterioration of the biomechanical parameters of the Achilles tendon. Histopathological analysis demonstrated foci of dystrophic calcification only in the statin-treated groups. However, the number and the total area of calcific deposits were similar between the statin groups. The biomechanical parameters of tibias were improved in all the statin groups. BMD in the statin-treated groups was not significantly different from the control group. All the statins tested are associated with calcific tendinopathy risk of which full awareness is required during everyday medical practice. However, statin-associated improvement of bone biomechanical properties is a favourable feature which may add to their beneficial effects in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, especially in the elderly.

  6. Gingival Recessions and Biomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Godtfredsen

    by moving the root back in the alveolus. The tooth movement is accompanied by bone gain and thus increase the success rate for soft tissue augmentation. The choice of biomechanical system influences the treatment outcome. If a standard straight wire appliance is used, a biomechanical dilemma can arise....... The forces applied to bring the tooth back into the alveolar process generate opposite reactive forces, which can direct the adjacent teeth out towards the boundary of the bony envelope. A different force system can be achieved with a segmented appliance: The reaction forces from the root movement...

  7. Simulations of Biomechanical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose Cruz

    Recent studies have published breakthroughs in the application of finite element (FEA) studies in the design and analysis of advanced orthodontics. However, FEA has not captured bone remodeling responses to advanced orthodontics. The results of these simulations report unrealistic displacement around the nasal bridge, which impeded correlation with clinical data. Bone remodeling has been previously documented in FEA and has shown bone response to mechanical stimulus in femur bone models. However, the relationship between mechanical stimulus and bone remodeling has not been reported in orthodontic studies due to the complexity of the skull. In the current study, strain energy is used as the mechanical stimulus to control remodeling, from which density and modulus evolve. Due to the localization of forces in orthodontics, current remodeling algorithms have limited application. In turn, we developed an algorithm that dynamically collects, sorts, and bins stresses in all elements for regional remodeling based on the proximity of the element to the load. The results demonstrate that bone response to orthodontic appliances is different than that of an FEA without bone remodeling, due to load path changes based upon evolution of the bone properties. It was also found that density and moduli proximal to the load application site exhibit faster remodeling than those located remotely. Modeling another biomechanical phenomena, a 3D simulation was created to simulate recent experimental results that discovered a difference in impact mitigation properties of dense-polymer/foam bilayer structure based on the orientation of the dense-polymer with respect to the impact site. The impact energy transmitted varied in time of arrival and amplitude depending on the orientation of the structure (thin layer up or down). By creating a 3D explicit dynamic FEA simulation, it is expected to reduce costly experiments and time consumed in set up, and offer opportunities for optimization for

  8. Comparing contribution of flexural and planar modes to thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja; Jindal, V. K.

    2017-05-01

    Graphene, the most studied and explored 2D structure has unusual thermal properties such as negative thermal expansion, high thermal conductivity etc. We have already studied the thermal expansion behavior and various thermodynamic properties of pure graphene like heat capacity, entropy and free energy. The results of thermal expansion and various thermodynamic properties match well with available theoretical studies. For a deeper understanding of these properties, we analyzed the contribution of each phonon branch towards the total value of the individual property. To compute these properties, the dynamical matrix was calculated using VASP code where the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) is employed under quasi-harmonic approximation in interface with phonopy code. It is noticed that transverse mode has major contribution to negative thermal expansion and all branches have almost same contribution towards the various thermodynamic properties with the contribution of ZA mode being the highest.

  9. Polarity effect of microcurrent electrical stimulation on tendon healing: Biomechanical and histopathological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F. Ahmed

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of microcurrent electrical stimulation (MES applied with different polarity on the biomechanical properties of injured tendons and to correlate results with histopathological studies. Ninety six male white New Zealand rabbits were used in the study. Six rabbits were kept as normal group with intact tendons and the remaining 90 rabbits with their right Achilles tendons tenotomized, sutured and immobilized. After that rabbits were allocated into equal three groups; cathodal, anodal and control. Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups according to the study period; 3, 5 and 8 weeks. There were significant increases of all biomechanical measurements for cathodal and anodal groups than those of control group at all study periods. Furthermore there were significant increases of all biomechanical measurements in the cathodal group more than the anodal group at the 3 week period, while there was significant increase of the anodal group more than the cathodal at 5 and 8 week periods. The histopathological findings supported the biomechanical results. Tendons in cathode group showed better healing picture compared to those of anodal group at third week. While tendons in the anodal group showed better improvement at the 5 and 8 week. MES improved the healing process of tendon and the polarity of MES could be an important factor to be considered in treating tendon injuries.

  10. Biomechanical characterization of an osteoporotic artificial bone model for the distal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wähnert, Dirk; Hoffmeier, Konrad L; Klos, Kajetan; Stolarczyk, Yves; Fröber, Rosemarie; Hofmann, Gunther O; Mückley, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic distal femur fractures is still an unsolved problem of trauma surgery. The poor bone stock often leads to secondary loss of reduction and implant failure. Therefore, the development of new implants and their biomechanical testing is essential. In a previous study, we developed and initially characterized an artificial osteoporotic bone model of the distal femur. This follow-up study was performed to characterize this model in a biomechanical comparison. We investigated two different artificial bones: five foam cortical shell (Sawbones) and 10 custom-made artificial femoral condyles. Additionally, eight human femora were used for comparison. For biomechanical testing, two intramedullary nails (distal femur nail (DFN) and supracondylar nail (SCN)) were cyclically axial loaded in an AO 33 C2 unstable distal femoral fracture model. In our testing, the artificial bone showed a decrease in the axial stiffness of 27% for the SCN and 28% for the DFN compared to the human results. Also the number of cycles for a deformation of 2.5 mm was reduced by 55% (SCN) and 62% (DFN). This decrease was homogenous and caused by the relative high bone mineral density of the human specimen used. The modes of failure showed no difference between the artificial and human bones. Our customized artificial bone provides suitable results. In relation to the human bones classified as mildly osteoporotic, we assume that the biomechanical properties match to serve as an osteoporotic bone. Yet, we suggest to check transferability of the results with human material.

  11. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra.

  12. Biomechanical analysis of drop and countermovement jumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M. F.; Mackay, M.T.; Schinkelshoek, D.; Huijing, P. A.; van Ingen Schenau, G. J.

    For 13 subjects the performance of drop jumps from a height of 40 cm (DJ) and of countermovement jumps (CMJ) was analysed and compared. From force plate and cine data biomechanical variables including forces, moments, power output and amount of work done were calculated for hip, knee and ankle

  13. Biomechanical comparison of transoral and transbuccal lateral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this experimental study was to compare the biomechanical behaviors of two different types of osteosynthesis that are used in the treatment of mandibular angle fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty synthetic polyurethane human mandible replicas, with medullar and cortical portions, were ...

  14. Mechanical Characterisation and Biomechanical and Biological Behaviours of Ti-Zr Binary-Alloy Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritza Brizuela-Velasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to characterise the mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr binary alloy dental implants and to describe their biomechanical behaviour as well as their osseointegration capacity compared with the conventional Ti-6Al-4V (TAV alloy implants. The mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr binary alloy were characterised using Roxolid© implants (Straumann, Basel, Switzerland via ultrasound. Their biomechanical behaviour was described via finite element analysis. Their osseointegration capacity was compared via an in vivo study performed on 12 adult rabbits. Young’s modulus of the Roxolid© implant was around 103 GPa, and the Poisson coefficient was around 0.33. There were no significant differences in terms of Von Mises stress values at the implant and bone level between both alloys. Regarding deformation, the highest value was observed for Ti-15Zr implant, and the lowest value was observed for the cortical bone surrounding TAV implant, with no deformation differences at the bone level between both alloys. Histological analysis of the implants inserted in rabbits demonstrated higher BIC percentage for Ti-15Zr implants at 3 and 6 weeks. Ti-15Zr alloy showed elastic properties and biomechanical behaviours similar to TAV alloy, although Ti-15Zr implant had a greater BIC percentage after 3 and 6 weeks of osseointegration.

  15. An overview on plant cuticle biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Eva; Cuartero, Jesús; Heredia, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    Plant biomechanics combines the principles of physics, chemistry and engineering to answer questions about plant growth, development and interaction with the environment. The epidermal-growth-control theory, postulated in 1867 and verified in 2007, states that epidermal cells determine the rate of organ elongation since they are under tension, while inner tissues are under compression. The lipid cuticle layer is deposited on the surface of outer epidermal cell walls and modifies the chemical and mechanical nature of these cell walls. Thus, the plant cuticle plays a key role in plant interaction with the environment and in controlling organ expansion. Rheological analyses indicate that the cuticle is a mostly viscoelastic and strain-hardening material that stiffens the comparatively more elastic epidermal cell walls. Cuticle stiffness can be attributed to polysaccharides and flavonoids present in the cuticle whereas a cutin matrix is mainly responsible for its extensibility. Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity have a plasticizing effect on the mechanical properties of cuticle since they lower cuticle stiffness and strength. The external appearance of agricultural commodities, especially fruits, is of great economic value. Mechanical properties of the cuticle can have a positive or negative effect on disorders like fruit cracking, fungal pathogen penetration and pest infestation. Cuticle rheology has significant variability within a species and thus can be subjected to selection in order to breed cultivars resistant to pests, infestation and disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of hormone replacement and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) on the biomechanics and biochemistry of pelvic support ligaments in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahryarinejad, Azin; Gardner, Thomas R; Cline, J Mark; Levine, William N; Bunting, Haley A; Brodman, Michael D; Ascher-Walsh, Charles J; Scotti, Richard J; Vardy, Michael D

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of selective estrogen receptor modulators and ethinyl estradiol on the biomechanical and biochemical properties of the uterosacral and round ligaments in the monkey model of menopause. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 female macaque monkeys. Ovariectomized monkeys received 12 weeks of placebo, raloxifene, tamoxifen, or ethinyl estradiol. Biomechanical step-strain testing and real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed on the uterosacral and round ligaments. Tamoxifen and raloxifene uterosacrals expressed differing collagen I/III receptor density ratios, but both selective estrogen receptor modulators showed decreased tensile stiffness compared to ethinyl estradiol and controls. These findings support a possible effect of selective estrogen receptor modulators on biomechanical and biochemical properties of uterosacrals. This may play a role in pelvic organ prolapse. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Comparative Evaluation of the Physical and Chemical Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physical and chemical properties of tamarind seeds (Tamarindus indica L.) in Nigeria were investigated. Tamarind fruits were randomly collected from 18 towns in the savannah region of Nigeria. The seeds were manually separated from the pulp and membranes, sun-dried and the physical properties determined.

  18. Comparative study of physicochemical and thermal properties of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three indigenous cucurbit seeds from Ivory Coast namely Cucumeropsis mannii Naudin, Citrullus lanatus var. Citroides (Thrumb.) Matsum & Nakai and Cucumis melo var. Agrestis were investigated for the physicochemical properties. Thermal properties of their crude oils extracted by a cold solvent method were also tested.

  19. Comparative evaluation of in vitro mechanical properties of different designs of epoxy-pin external skeletal fixation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Surbhi Kuldeep; Aithal, Hari Prasad; Kinjavdekar, Prakash; Amarpal; Pawde, Abhijit Motiram; Srivastava, Tuhin; Tyagi, Kanti Prakash; Monsang, Shongsir Warson

    2014-03-01

    To compare in vitro biomechanical properties of different designs of epoxy-pin external skeletal fixator (ESF) constructs. Mechanical testing study. Four epoxy-pin ESF design constructs (uniplanar [EU], multiplanar-I [EM-I], multiplanar-II [EM-II], and circular [EC]) were mechanically tested in compression, bending, and torsion. Four different designs of free-form epoxy-pin external fixator constructs were developed using 1.5 mm K-wires and epoxy resin mounted in an ultra-high density polyethylene rod (20 mm diameter). Three-point fixation was done in each fragment, and the distance between fixation wires, and between the rod and the side bars was kept constant in all the designs. A 5 mm gap was maintained at the center of the fixation rod to simulate an unstable fracture condition. The fixator constructs (n = 12 of each design) were subjected to mechanical testing in axial compression, bending, or torsion. Load-deformation curves were generated and mechanical properties were compared between construct types. EU was the weakest design. Under compression, constructs EM-I, EM-II, and EC were similar. Under bending, EM-I and EM-II had similar strength, whereas EC was strongest. Under torsion, EC was strongest, followed by EM-II, EM-I, and EU; EM-II provided double the rotational stability of EM-I. Overall, EC followed by EM-II epoxy-pin fixator designs had better mechanical strength. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. Biomechanics of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Health and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease. The biome......The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease....... The biomechanical properties are crucial for GI motor function because peristaltic motion that propels the food through the GI tract is a result of interaction of the passive and active tissue forces and the hydrodynamic forces in the food bolus and remodeling of the mechanical properties reflects the changes...... in the tissue structure that determine a specific motor dysfunction. Therefore, biomechanical data on the GI wall are important to understand the pathogenesis to the GI motor-sensory function and dysfunction. Moreover, biomechanical studies of the GI tract pave the way for further mathematical and computational...

  1. ES-2 Dummy Biomechanical Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Katie; Abramczyk, Joseph; Berliner, Jeff; Irwin, Annette; Jensen, Jack; Kowsika, Murthy; Mertz, Harold J; Rouhana, Stephen W; Scherer, Risa; Shi, Yibing; Sutterfield, Aleta; Xu, Lan; Tylko, Suzanne; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2002-11-01

    This technical paper presents the results of biomechanical testing conducted on the ES-2 dummy by the Occupant Safety Research Partnership and Transport Canada. The ES-2 is a production dummy, based on the EuroSID-1 dummy, that was modified to further improve testing capabilities as recommended by users of the EuroSID-1 dummy. Biomechanical response data were obtained by completing a series of drop, pendulum, and sled tests that are outlined in the International Organization of Standardization Technical Report 9790 that describes biofidelity requirements for the midsize adult male side impact dummy. A few of the biofidelity tests were conducted on both sides of the dummy to evaluate the symmetry of its responses. Full vehicle crash tests were conducted to verify if the changes in the EuroSID-1, resulting in the ES-2 design, did improve the dummy's testing capability. In addition to the biofidelity testing, the ES-2 dummy repeatability, reproducibility and durability are discussed. Finally, this technical paper will compare the biofidelity ratings of the current adult side impact dummies with the ES-2 dummy, which received an overall dummy biofidelity rating of 4.6.

  2. Biomechanical comparative study of the stability of injectable pedicle screws with different lateral holes augmented with different volumes of polymethylmethacrylate in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Yang; Huang, Chen; Wu, Hong-Hua; Zhou, Jiang-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Wei

    2018-03-19

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is widely used for pedicle screw augmentation in osteoporosis. Until now, there had been no studies of the relationship between screw stability and the distribution and volume of PMMA. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between screw stability and the distribution pattern and injected volume of PMMA. This is a biomechanical comparison of injectable pedicle screws with different lateral holes augmented with different volumes of PMMA in cadaveric osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae. Forty-eight osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae were randomly divided into Groups A, B, and C with different pedicle screws (16 vertebrae in each group), and then each group was randomly divided into Subgroups 0, 1, 2, and 3 with different volumes of PMMA (four vertebra with eight pedicles in each subgroup). A pilot hole was prepared in advance using the same method in all samples. Type A and type B pedicle screws were directly inserted into vertebrae in Groups A and B, respectively, and then different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mL) were injected through the screws and into vertebrae in Subgroups 0, 1, 2, and 3. The pilot holes were filled with different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mL), and then the screws were inserted in Groups C0, C1, C2, and C3. Screw position and distribution of PMMA were evaluated radiographically, and axial pullout tests were performed to measure maximum axial pullout strength (F max ). Polymethylmethacrylate surrounded the anterior one-third of screws in the vertebral body in Groups A1, A2, and A3; the middle one-third of screws in the junction area of the vertebral body and the pedicle in Groups B1, B2, and B3; and the full length of screws evenly in both the vertebral body and the pedicle in Groups C1, C2, and C3. There was no malpositioning of screws or leakage of PMMA in any sample. Two-way analysis of variance revealed that two factors-distribution and volume of PMMA-significantly influenced

  3. A biomechanical assessment to evaluate breed differences in normal porcine medial collateral ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germscheid, Niccole M; Thornton, Gail M; Hart, David A; Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2011-02-24

    Little information is available on the role of genetic factors and heredity in normal ligament behaviour and their ability to heal. Assessing these factors is challenging because of the lack of suitable animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a porcine model in order to evaluate and compare the biomechanical differences of normal medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) between Yorkshire (YK) and red Duroc (RD) breeds. It was hypothesized that biomechanical differences would not exist between normal YK and RD MCLs. Comparisons between porcine and human MCL were also made. A biomechanical testing apparatus and protocol specific to pig MCL were developed. Ligaments were subjected to cyclic and static creep tests and then elongated to failure. Pig MCL morphology, geometry, and low- and high-load mechanical behaviour were assessed. The custom-designed apparatus and protocol were sufficiently sensitive to detect mechanical property differences between breeds as well as inter-leg differences. The results reveal that porcine MCL is comparable in both shape and size to human MCL and exhibits similar structural and material failure properties, thus making it a feasible model. Comparisons between RD and YK breeds revealed that age-matched RD pigs weigh more, have larger MCL cross-sectional area, and have lower MCL failure stress than YK pigs. The effect of weight may have influenced MCL geometrical and biomechanical properties, and consequently, the differences observed may be due to breed type and/or animal weight. In conclusion, the pig serves as a suitable large animal model for genetic-related connective tissue studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. DYNAMIC MAGNIFICATION OF BIOMECHANICAL SYSTEM MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Pokatilov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods for estimation of dynamic magnification pertaining to motion in biomechanics have been developed and approbаted in the paper. It has been ascertained that widely-used characteristics for evaluation of motion influence on mechanisms and machinery such as a dynamic coefficient and acceleration capacity factor become irrelevant while investigating human locomotion under elastic support conditions. The reason is an impossibility to compare human motion in case when there is a contact with elastic and rigid supports because while changing rigidity of the support exercise performing technique is also changing. In this case the technique still depends on a current state of a specific sportsman. Such situation is observed in sports gymnastics. Structure of kinematic and dynamic models for human motion has been investigated in the paper. It has been established that properties of an elastic support are reflected in models within two aspects: in an explicit form, when models have parameters of dynamic deformation for a gymnastic apparatus, and in an implicit form, when we have numerically changed parameters of human motion. The first part can be evaluated quantitatively while making comparison with calculations made in accordance with complete models. For this reason notions of selected and complete models have been introduced in the paper. It has been proposed to specify models for support and models of biomechanical system that represent models pertaining only to human locomotor system. It has been revealed that the selected models of support in kinematics and dynamics have structural difference. Kinematics specifies only parameters of elastic support deformation and dynamics specifies support parameters in an explicit form and additionally in models of human motion in an explicit form as well. Quantitative estimation of a dynamic motion magnification in kinematics and dynamics models has been given while using computing experiment for grand

  5. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L; Goldstein, Steven A; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2014-06-27

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of "functional tissue engineering" has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors influencing corneal biomechanical changes after microincision cataract surgery and standard coaxial phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Agdeppa, Ma Cecilia C; Rodríguez-Prats, Jose Luis; Amparo, Francisco; Piñero, David P

    2010-06-01

    To determine the factors affecting corneal biomechanics using biomechanical waveform analysis after microincision cataract surgery (MICS) and standard coaxial phacoemulsification with different incision sizes. Vissum-Instituto Oftalmologico de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. This prospective nonrandomized study comprised eyes with significant cataract that had MICS (sub-1.8 mm incision) or coaxial phacoemulsification (2.75 mm incision). Corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) were measured by biomechanical waveform analysis (Ocular Response Analyzer) preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at 1 month. Results were analyzed and compared between groups. In the MICS group (n = 30), there was a significant increase in Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOP) and corneal-compensated IOP, although CH decreased in the immediate postoperative period (P<.05). At 1 month, all parameters in the MICS group returned to normal. The coaxial group (n = 30) had an increase in Goldmann-correlated IOP and corneal-compensated IOP, both of which were higher than normal at 1 month. Backward multiple regression analysis showed significant correlations between CH and preoperative Goldmann-correlated IOP and preoperative CRF (r(2) = 0.631, P<.05); between age, axial length (AL), and preoperative CRF (r(2) = 0.418, P<.05); and between the change in CH and AL, total incision length, and preoperative CH (r(2) = 0.429, P<.05). Cataract surgery with MICS and coaxial phacoemulsification significantly altered corneal biomechanics. Corneal hysteresis was inversely correlated with Goldmann-correlated IOP; CRF was inversely correlated with age and AL. The MICS technique provided more stable corneal biomechanical properties than standard coaxial phacoemulsification 1 month postoperatively. (c) 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion using a barbell-shaped cage: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Boden, S D; Hutton, W C

    2001-10-01

    There are drawbacks to using threaded cylindrical cages (e.g., limited area for bone ingrowth and metal precluding radiographic visualization of bone healing). To somewhat offset these drawbacks, a barbell-shaped cage has been designed. The central core of the barbell can be wrapped with collagen sheets infiltrated with bone morphogenetic protein. The obvious theoretical advantages of a barbell cage have to be weighed against potential biomechanical disadvantages. Our purpose was to compare the biomechanical properties of an anterior lumbar interbody reconstruction using 18-mm-diameter threaded cylindrical cages, with a reconstruction using barbell cages (18-mm diameter and 6 mm wide at both cylindrical ends, with a round 4-mm-diameter bar joining the two ends). Twelve cadaveric lumbar motion segments were tested. Three L5-S1 segments received two threaded cylindrical cages, and three L5-S1 segments received two barbell cages. Three L3-L4 segments received one threaded cylindrical cage, and three L3-L4 segments received one barbell cage. A series of biomechanical loading sequences were carried out on each motion segment, and stiffness curves were obtained. After the biomechanical testing, an axial compressive load was applied to the motion segments until failure. They were then radiographed and bisected through the disc, and the subsidence (or penetration) of the cage(s) in the cancellous bone of the vertebral bodies was measured. There was no difference in terms of stiffness between the motion segments with the threaded cylindrical cage(s) inserted and those with the barbell cage(s) inserted (p > 0.15). The average values of subsidence was 0.96 mm for the threaded cylindrical cage group and 0.80 mm for the barbell cage group (difference not significant: p = 0.38). The results suggest that a reconstruction using barbell cages is a biomechanically acceptable alternative to one using threaded cylindrical cages.

  8. A comparative study of the physical and mechanical properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the compliance of the physical and mechanical properties of granites produced in some parts of Ogun State to relevant codes and standards. The desire to carry out the study was borne by personal on – site experience that single size aggregates produced in some parts of Ogun State do not conform ...

  9. A comparative property investigation of lithium phosphate glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study addresses the application of microwave (MW) energy for melting lithium phosphate glass. Acomparative analysis of the properties is presented with glasses melted in conventional resistance heating adopting standardmethods of characterization. The density of the glass was found less in MW heating.

  10. A comparative study of the starch pasting properties of unprocessed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pasting properties (gelatinization temperature gelatinization time, viscosity, ease of cooking and starch stability) of cassava, plantain and banana flours have been found to be affected by processing. Roasting and boiling, reduced peak viscosities drastically. Boiling reduced the peak viscosity of cassava from 1575 to 65Bu, ...

  11. Comparative Studies of Physico-chemical Properties of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some physico-chemical properties of four major general purpose cement (As, Br, De and Sk) sold in Nigerian market using standard methods; due to the persistent collapse of buildings. The results showed that Br cement recorded the least CaO content (56.17%) while De cement had ...

  12. Comparative properties of pure and sulphonated dyes extracted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In continuation of our research on the extraction and application of plants, we report the results of the dyeing and fastness properties of dyes extracted from the leaves of Henna and Kolanut plants in chrome-tanned (Wet- Blue) leather. Dyes were extracted from Henna (Lawsonia inermis) and Kolanut (Cola nitida) plants ...

  13. Comparative study of pasting properties of improved plantain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New plantain, banana and cassava varieties may find application in the baking and confectionery industry based on their pasting properties. However, a need exists for the establishment of standards for plantain and banana flour by relevant agencies to harness their industrial application. Key words: Musa, Manihot, pasting ...

  14. Comparative study of the chemical properties of palm oil extracted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical properties of palm oil processed using medium-scale mill and traditional method were investigated. Fresh fruit bunches of Tenera and Dura cultivars of 20, 30 and 50 years of age were processed. Six samples of oil palm fruitlets of both cultivars were investigated using medium-scale mill and another six oil ...

  15. Applied biomechanics to evaluate the properties of laser beam treated orthopedic implants; Biomêcanica aplicada na avaliação de propriedades de implantes ortopédicos metálicos tratados por feixe laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieretti, Eurico Felix

    2016-07-01

    Laser beam marking is used to ensure biomaterials’ identification and traceability. The texturing imparts greater adhesion to the surfaces of implantable medical devices. The aim of this work was to evaluate the surface behaviour of the austenitic stainless steel ABNT NBR ISO 5832-1 marked and textured by optical fiber laser beam using selected parameters, changing the pulse frequency; in face of its biomechanical behaviour, through tests of tensile strength, fatigue and wear; verify the localized corrosion susceptibility by electrochemical tests in a solution that simulates the body fluids; and analyze microstructural changes. The treatments performed altered the biomaterials roughness and their micro hardness as a function of the increase of the pulse frequency. The microstructure and chemical composition of the surfaces underwent changes that directly affected the passive layer of the stainless steels, triggering the corrosion process. This effect was evidenced by SVET, XPS and characterization of electronic properties of the passive film by the Mott-Schottky technique. These two types of laser treatments increased the surfaces' magnetic susceptibility. The parameters used for the marking and texturing did not induce a decrease in the cellular viability of the samples, as no cytotoxicity was showed even after prolonged incubation. This biomaterial was adequate on the biomechanical tests, since the laser treatments, under the conditions used, did not induce the formation of surface tensions of magnitude capable of leading the fatigue fracture, indicating infinite fatigue life; the region of fracture by tension could not be related to the laser marking. The wear volume decreased as a function of the increase in micro hardness produced by the increase of the pulse frequency in the texturing. The visual character of the markings and texturing was assured after the majority of the tests performed. (author)

  16. Artificial intelligence in sports biomechanics: new dawn or false hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Roger

    2006-12-15

    This article reviews developments in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in sports biomechanics over the last decade. It outlines possible uses of Expert Systems as diagnostic tools for evaluating faults in sports movements ('techniques') and presents some example knowledge rules for such an expert system. It then compares the analysis of sports techniques, in which Expert Systems have found little place to date, with gait analysis, in which they are routinely used. Consideration is then given to the use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) in sports biomechanics, focusing on Kohonen self-organizing maps, which have been the most widely used in technique analysis, and multi-layer networks, which have been far more widely used in biomechanics in general. Examples of the use of ANNs in sports biomechanics are presented for javelin and discus throwing, shot putting and football kicking. I also present an example of the use of Evolutionary Computation in movement optimization in the soccer throw in, which predicted an optimal technique close to that in the coaching literature. After briefly overviewing the use of AI in both sports science and biomechanics in general, the article concludes with some speculations about future uses of AI in sports biomechanics. Key PointsExpert Systems remain almost unused in sports biomechanics, unlike in the similar discipline of gait analysis.Artificial Neural Networks, particularly Kohonen Maps, have been used, although their full value remains unclear.Other AI applications, including Evolutionary Computation, have received little attention.

  17. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho-Joong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to

  18. Decreased trabecular bone biomechanical competence, apparent density, IGF-II and IGFBP-5 content in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, Thor; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier studies on the effect of excess growth hormone (GH) on trabecular bone have been conflicting. Since insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBPs) in part mediate the effects of GH, the present study aimed to investigate trabecular bone composition...... of these growth factors in relation to biomechanical properties in acromegaly. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Trabecular bone biomechanical competence (compression test), apparent density (peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pQCT), and bone matrix contents of calcium (HCl hydrolysis) and IGFs (guanidinium......-HCl extraction) were measured in iliac crest biopsies from 13 patients with active acromegaly (two women and 11 men, aged 21-61 years) and 21 age- and sex-matched controls (four women and 17 men, aged 23-64 years). RESULTS: Trabecular bone pQCT was reduced in acromegalic patients compared with controls (P = 0...

  19. Correlative Analysis of Vertebral Trabecular Bone Microarchitecture and Mechanical Properties: A Combined Ultra-high Field (7 Tesla) MRI and Biomechanical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenoun, Daphne; Fouré, Alexandre; Pithioux, Martine; Guis, Sandrine; Le Corroller, Thomas; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Pauly, Vanessa; Guye, Maxime; Bernard, Monique; Chabrand, Patrick; Champsaur, Pierre; Bendahan, David

    2017-10-15

    High-resolution imaging and biomechanical investigation of ex-vivo vertebrae. The aim of this study was to assess bone microarchitecture of cadaveric vertebrae using ultra-high field (UHF) 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine whether the corresponding microarchitecture parameters were related to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone strength assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and mechanical compression tests. Limitations of DXA for the assessment of bone fragility and osteoporosis have been recognized and criteria of microarchitecture alteration have been included in the definition of osteoporosis. Although vertebral fracture is the most common osteoporotic fracture, no study has assessed directly vertebral trabecular bone microarchitecture. BMD of 24 vertebrae (L2, L3, L4) from eight cadavers was investigated using DXA. The bone volume fraction (BVF), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp) of each vertebra were quantified using UHF MRI. Measurements were performed by two operators to characterize the inter-rater reliability. The whole set of specimens underwent mechanical compression tests to failure and the corresponding failure stress was calculated. The inter-rater reliability for bone microarchitecture parameters was good with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82 to 0.94. Failure load and stress were significantly correlated with BVF, Tb.Sp, and BMD (P < 0.05). Tb.Th was only correlated with the failure stress (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the combination of BVF and BMD improved the prediction of the failure stress from an adjusted R = 0.384 for BMD alone to an adjusted R = 0.414. We demonstrated for the first time that the vertebral bone microarchitecture assessed with UHF MRI was significantly correlated with biomechanical parameters. Our data suggest that the multimodal assessment of BMD and trabecular bone microarchitecture with UHF MRI

  20. Comparing optical properties of different species of diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibohm, Christian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Su, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are single cellular algae encapsulate d in an external wall of micro-structured porous silica called the frustule. Diatoms are present in all water environments and contribute with 20-25 % of the global primary production of oxygen by photosynthesis. The appearance of the frustule is very...... species dependent with huge variety in size, shape, and micro- structure. We have experimentally investigated optical properties of frustules of several species of diatoms to further understand light harvesting properties together with commo n traits, effects and differences between the different...... frustules. We have observed, when incident light interacts w ith the micro-structured frustule it is multiple diffracted giving rise to wavelength dependent multiple focal points and other optical effects. Experimental results have been simulated and well confirmed by free space FFT propagation routine...

  1. Biomedical Imaging and Computational Modeling in Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Iacoviello, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This book collects the state-of-art and new trends in image analysis and biomechanics. It covers a wide field of scientific and cultural topics, ranging from remodeling of bone tissue under the mechanical stimulus up to optimizing the performance of sports equipment, through the patient-specific modeling in orthopedics, microtomography and its application in oral and implant research, computational modeling in the field of hip prostheses, image based model development and analysis of the human knee joint, kinematics of the hip joint, micro-scale analysis of compositional and mechanical properties of dentin, automated techniques for cervical cell image analysis, and iomedical imaging and computational modeling in cardiovascular disease.   The book will be of interest to researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to image analysis and understanding, medical imaging, biomechanics, simulation and modeling, experimental analysis.

  2. Biomechanics of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Health and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease. The biome...

  3. Biomechanics of the upper limb

    OpenAIRE

    Łukasz Jaworski; Robert Karpiński; Angelika Dobrowolska

    2016-01-01

    The article presents basics of the human upper limb’s anatomy, including skeletal system, joints and basic division of muscles in the limb. The biomechanics of the upper limb is introduced. The range of performed motions is depicted. The possible applications of anatomy and biomechanics of the upper limb are shown.

  4. Biomechanics in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusinger, R H

    1984-12-01

    Evidence from dynamic biomechanical analyses of physical activities has greatly expanded our knowledge about the mechanical bases for human movement function with potential implications for further understanding movement dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to relate these findings to present knowledge about the effect on human joints during movement, the role of muscle action on human skeletal levers during movement, and the application of this information to functional tasks by physical therapy clinicians. Also presented are some thoughts regarding what must be accomplished so that this material can be generalized to clinical practice.

  5. Biomechanical comparison of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and PTFE interpositional patches and direct tendon-to-bone repair for massive rotator cuff tears in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Andrew Dj; Beattie, Rebekah F; Murrell, George Ac; Lam, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears are a difficult problem. Modalities such as irrigation and debridement, partial repair, tendon transfer and grafts have been utilized with high failure rates and mixed results. Synthetic interpositional patch repairs are a novel and increasingly used approach. The present study aimed to examine the biomechanical properties of common synthetic materials for interpositional repairs in contrast to native tendon. Six ovine tendons, six polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt sections and six expanded PTFE (ePTFE) patch sections were pulled-to-failure to analyze their biomechanical and material properties. Six direct tendon-to-bone surgical method repairs, six interpositional PTFE felt patch repairs and six interpositional ePTFE patch repairs were also constructed in ovine shoulders and pulled-to-failure to examine the biomechanical properties of each repair construct. Ovine tendon had higher load-to-failure (591 N) and had greater stiffness (108 N/mm) than either PTFE felt (296 N, 28 N/mm) or ePTFE patch sections (323 N, 34 N/mm). Both PTFE felt and ePTFE repair techniques required greater load-to-failure (225 N and 177 N, respectively) than direct tendon-to-bone surgical repairs (147 N) in ovine models. Synthetic materials lacked several biomechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, compared to ovine tendon. Interpositional surgical repair models with these materials were significantly stronger than direct tendon-to-bone model repairs.

  6. Bladder biomechanics and the use of scaffolds for regenerative medicine in the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Lemon, Greg; Hilborn, Jöns

    2018-01-01

    in vitro and in vivo, including in the treatment of clinical conditions. The biomechanical properties of the native bladder can be investigated using a range of mechanical tests for standardized assessments, as well as mathematical and computational bladder biomechanics. Despite a large body of research...

  7. Comparative in vitro antioxidant properties of water juice from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is based on a comprehensive comparison among different African fruits relative to one another and to identify the ones with high antioxidant capacity as compared to the standard ascorbic acid. The antioxidant capacity was analyzed using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 1 ...

  8. Comparative properties of ceramic-based roofing sheets from local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ceramic roofing sheets were fabricated in the laboratory by using ideal raw materials. The fabricating materials are coiled coconut fibre, palm fruit fibre, fresh water, river sand, polymeric dust, saw dust and cement. The resulting product was compared with factory -produced ceramic-based roofing sheets that are easily ...

  9. comparative analysis of the properties of concrete produced with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    Cements may be defined as adhesive substances capable of uniting fragments or masses of solid .... demoulding and curing. The concrete cube specimens were cured by complete immersion in water in a curing tank. .... higher strength gain experience with PLC grade. 42. 5 R when compared with PLC grade 32.5 N.

  10. [Biomechanic and histomorphometric studies of HIP titanium glass ceramic, a new implant material, compared with glass ceramics, titanium and titanium alloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H J; Fritz, T R; Fuhrmann, G; Gross, U; Strunz, V

    1990-01-01

    Interfacial tensile strength and quantitative histomorphological properties of alloplastic implant materials for hard tissue application were studied in animal models. Physico-chemical bonding in the order of 1 N/mm2 of bone to glass-ceramic (Ceravital) was demonstrated independent of magnitude of surface roughness with mineralized bone in excess of 80% at the implant interface. No bone-bonding, but contact of mineralized bone at the metal surface was observed in pure titanium and titanium alloys (Ti6Al4V, Ti5Al2, 5Fe) with smooth surfaces. Rough or porous surfaced specimens, however, exhibited mechanical interlocking and interdigitation, thus yielding interfacial tensile strength of up to 4 N/mm2 in geometrically porous or madreporic surfaces. The new composite material HIP-Titanium-glass-ceramic (Ceravital) displayed physico-chemical bonding to bone as well as mechanical interdigitation within the secondary porous structure, thus giving support to expectations that HIP-Titanium-glass-ceramic coated implants should perform superior than bulk materials.

  11. Comparative study of viscoelastic properties using virgin yogurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimonte, G.; Nelson, D.; Weaver, S.; Schneider, M.; Flower-Maudlin, E.; Gore, R.; Baumgardner, J.R.; Sahota, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    We describe six different tests used to obtain a consistent set of viscoelastic properties for yogurt. Prior to yield, the shear modulus μ and viscosity η are measured nondestructively using the speed and damping of elastic waves. Although new to foodstuffs, this technique has been applied to diverse materials from metals to the earth's crust. The resultant shear modulus agrees with μ∼E/3 for incompressible materials, where the Young's modulus E is obtained from a stress - strain curve in compression. The tensile yield stress τ o is measured in compression and tension, with good agreement. The conventional vane and cone/plate rheometers measured a shear stress yield τ os ∼τ o /√ (3) , as expected theoretically, but the inferred 'apparent' viscosity from the cone/plate rheometer is much larger than the wave measurement due to the finite yield (τ os ≠0). Finally, we inverted an open container of yogurt for 10 6 s>η/μ and observed no motion. This demonstrates unequivocally that yogurt possesses a finite yield stress rather than a large viscosity. We present a constitutive model with a pre-yield viscosity to describe the damping of the elastic waves and use a simulation code to describe yielding in complex geometry. copyright 1998 Society of Rheology

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of two types of short-stemmed hip prostheses compared to the trust plate prosthesis by three-dimensional measurement of micromotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fottner, Andreas; Schmid, Markus; Birkenmaier, Christof; Mazoochian, Farhad; Plitz, Wolfgang; Volkmar, Jansson

    2009-06-01

    Stemless and short-stemmed hip prostheses have been developed to preserve femoral bone stock. While all these prostheses claim a more or less physiological load transfer, clinical long-term results are only available for the stemless thrust plate prosthesis. In this study, the in vitro primary stability of the thrust plate prosthesis was compared to two types of short-stemmed prostheses. In addition to the well-established Mayo prosthesis, the modular Metha prosthesis was tested using cone adapters with 130 degrees and 140 degrees neck-shaft-angles. The prostheses were implanted in composite femurs and loaded dynamically (300-1700 N). Three-dimensional micromotions at the bone-prosthesis interface were measured. In addition, the three-dimensional deformations at the surface of the composite femur were measured to gain data on the strain distribution. For all tested prostheses, the micromotions did not exceed 150 microm, the critical value for osteointegration. The thrust plate prosthesis revealed similar motions as the short-stemmed prostheses. The short-stemmed prosthesis with the 130 degrees cone tended to have the highest micromotions of all tested short-stemmed prostheses. The thrust plate prosthesis revealed the lowest alteration of bone surface deformation after implantation. The comparably low micromotions of the thrust plate prosthesis and the short-stemmed prostheses should be conducive to osseous integration. The higher alteration of load transmission after implantation reveals a higher risk of stress shielding for the short-stemmed prostheses.

  13. Analysis of the impact of biomechanical traits of European black Poplar on riverbank flow resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista Chirico, Giovanni; Saulino, Luigi; Pasquino, Vittorio; Villani, Paolo; Rita, Angelo; Todaro, Luigi; Saracino, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the effects of riparian plants on river flow dynamics is fundamental for an appropriate river management. Riparian woody vegetation enhances bank cohesion and provides ecosystem services by mitigating nutrient and sediment loads to the river flow and enhancing biodiversity. However riparian trees also contribute to river flow resistance and thus can have a significant impact on flow dynamics during flood events. The flow-plant interaction mainly depends on plant morphological characters (e.g. diameter, height, canopy size, foliage density) and biomechanical properties, such as its flexural rigidity. This study aims at testing the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic behaviour of the European black Poplar (∖textit{Populus nigra} L.), a common woody riparian plant, is influenced by specific biomechanical traits developed as result of its adaptation to different river ecosystems. We examine the morphological and biomechanical properties of living stems of black Poplar sampled in two different riverine environments in Southern Italy located only a few kilometres apart. The two sample sets of living stems exhibit similar morphological traits but significantly different Young module of elasticity. We compared the drag forces that the flow would exert on these two different sets of plants for a wide range of flow velocities, by employing a numerical model that accounts for the bending behaviour of the woody plant due to the hydrodynamic load, under the hypothesis of complete submergence. A Monte Carlo approach was applied in order to account for the stochastic variability of the morphological and mechanical parameters affecting plant biomechanical behaviour. We identified a threshold value of the plant diameter, above which the two sets of European black Poplars are subjected to drag forces that differ by more than 25{∖%} on average, for flow velocities larger than 1 m/s.

  14. Pull out Strength of Dual Outer Diameter Pedicle Screws Compared to Uncemented and Cemented Standard Pedicle Screws: A Biomechanical in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Andrea; Leichtle, Carmen I; Frantz, Sandra; Bumann, Marte; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Shiozawa, Thomas; Leichtle, Ulf G

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the potential of the dual outer diameter screw and systematically evaluate the pull-out force of the dual outer diameter screw compared to the uncemented and cemented standard pedicle screws with special regard to the pedicle diameter and the vertebra level. Sixty vertebrae of five human spines (T 6 -L 5 ) were sorted into three study groups for pairwise comparison of the uncemented dual outer diameter screw, the uncemented standard screw, and the cemented standard screw, and randomized with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebra level. The vertebrae were instrumented, insertion torque was determined, and pull-out testing was performed using a material testing machine. Failure load was evaluated in pairwise comparison within each study group. The screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio was determined and the uncemented dual outer diameter and standard screws were compared for different ratios as well as vertebra levels. Significantly increased pull-out forces were measured for the cemented standard screw compared to the uncemented standard screw (+689 N, P dual outer diameter screw (+403 N, P dual outer diameter screw to the uncemented standard screw in the total study group, a distinct but not significant increase was measured (+149 N, P = 0.114). Further analysis of these two screws, however, revealed a significant increase of pull-out force for the dual outer diameter screw in the lumbar region (+247 N, P = 0.040), as well as for a screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio between 0.6 and 1 (+ 488 N, P = 0.028). For clinical application, cement augmentation remains the gold standard for increasing screw stability. According to our results, the use of a dual outer diameter screw is an interesting option to increase screw stability in the lumbar region without cement augmentation. For the thoracic region, however, the screw-to-pedicle diameter should be checked and attention should be paid to screw cut out, if the dual outer diameter screw is considered.

  15. Properties of the circumgalactic medium in simulations compared to observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, R. E. G.; Tissera, P. B.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Sodré, L.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Galaxies are surrounded by extended gaseous halos that store significant fractions of chemical elements. These are syntethized by the stellar populations and later ejected into the circumgalactic medium (CGM) by different mechanism, of which supernova feedback is considered one of the most relevant. Aims: We aim to explore the properties of this metal reservoir surrounding star-forming galaxies in a cosmological context aiming to investigate the chemical loop between galaxies and their CGM, and the ability of the subgrid models to reproduce observational results. Methods: Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we have analysed the gas-phase chemical contents of galaxies with stellar masses in the range 109-1011 M⊙. We estimated the fractions of metals stored in the different CGM phases, and the predicted O VI and Si III column densities within the virial radius. Results: We find roughly 107 M⊙ of oxygen in the CGM of simulated galaxies having M⋆ 1010 M⊙, in fair agreement with the lower limits imposed by observations. The Moxy is found to correlate with M⋆, at odds with current observational trends but in agreement with other numerical results. The estimated profiles of O VI column density reveal a substantial shortage of that ion, whereas Si III, which probes the cool phase, is overpredicted. Nevertheless, the radial dependences of both ions follow the respective observed profiles. The analysis of the relative contributions of both ions from the hot, warm and cool phases suggests that the warm gas (105 K stored in this gas-phase. These discrepancies provide important information to improve the subgrid physics models. Our findings show clearly the importance of tracking more than one chemical element and the difficulty of simultaneously satisfying the observables that trace the circumgalactic gas at different physical conditions. Additionally, we find that the X-ray coronae around the simulated galaxies have luminosities and temperatures

  16. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shiels, Alan [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); FitzGerald, Paul G. [Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Menon, Anil G. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mathias, Richard T. [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  17. Hand biomechanics in skilled pianists playing a scale in thirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hie

    2010-12-01

    Pianists, who attend to the integral relationship of their particular musculoskeletal characteristics to the piano technique at hand, discover an efficient path to technical advancement and, consequently, to injury prevention. Thus, a study of pianist's hand biomechanics in relation to different piano techniques is highly relevant, as hand features may influence various techniques in different ways. This study addressed relationships between pianists' hand biomechanics and the performance of a scale in thirds, as a part of an ongoing series of studies examining relationships between hand biomechanics and performance data of primary techniques. The biomechanics of hand length and width, finger length, hand span, hand and arm weights, and ulnar deviation at the wrist were compared with tempo, articulation, and dynamic voicing (tone balance between two notes of the thirds). Pearson correlation analysis showed a positive association between ulnar deviation and tempo; the other biomechanical features showed no relationships with any of the performance criteria. Qualitative cross-sectional observation of individual profiles showed that experienced pianists perform with a higher degree of synchrony in two-note descent while pianists with organ training background play with a lesser degree of synchrony. All biomechanical features were closely related among one another with one exception: wrist ulnar deviation was not associated with any other biomechanical features; rather, data suggest possible negative associations. This study underscores the importance of wrist mobility in piano skills development. Further research using a complete set of prototype piano techniques and multiple-level pianist-subjects could provide substantive biomechanical information that may be used to develop efficient pedagogy and prevention strategies for playing-related injuries as well as rehabilitation.

  18. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPORTS BIOMECHANICS: NEW DAWN OR FALSE HOPE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bartlett

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews developments in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI in sports biomechanics over the last decade. It outlines possible uses of Expert Systems as diagnostic tools for evaluating faults in sports movements ('techniques' and presents some example knowledge rules for such an expert system. It then compares the analysis of sports techniques, in which Expert Systems have found little place to date, with gait analysis, in which they are routinely used. Consideration is then given to the use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs in sports biomechanics, focusing on Kohonen self-organizing maps, which have been the most widely used in technique analysis, and multi-layer networks, which have been far more widely used in biomechanics in general. Examples of the use of ANNs in sports biomechanics are presented for javelin and discus throwing, shot putting and football kicking. I also present an example of the use of Evolutionary Computation in movement optimization in the soccer throw in, which predicted an optimal technique close to that in the coaching literature. After briefly overviewing the use of AI in both sports science and biomechanics in general, the article concludes with some speculations about future uses of AI in sports biomechanics.

  19. Contrast-enhanced CT using a cationic contrast agent enables non-destructive assessment of the biochemical and biomechanical properties of mouse tibial plateau cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Benjamin A; Patel, Harsh; Holland, Conor; Freedman, Jonathan D; Shelofsky, Joshua S; Snyder, Brian D; Stok, Kathryn S; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-07-01

    Mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA) are commonly used to study the disease's pathogenesis and efficacy of potential treatments. However, measuring the biochemical and mechanical properties of articular cartilage in these models currently requires destructive and time-consuming histology and mechanical testing. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of using contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) to rapidly and non-destructively image and assess the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Using three ex vivo C57BL/6 mouse tibial plateaus, we determined the time required for the cationic contrast agent CA4+ to equilibrate in the cartilage. The whole-joint coefficient of friction (μ) of 10 mouse knees (some digested with Chondroitenase ABC to introduce variation in GAG) was evaluated using a modified Stanton pendulum. For both the medial and lateral tibial plateau cartilage of these knees, linear regression was used to compare the equilibrium CECT attenuations to μ, as well as each side's indentation equilibrium modulus (E) and Safranin-O determined GAG content. CA4+ equilibrated in the cartilage in 30.9 ± 0.95 min (mean ± SD, tau value of 6.17 ± 0.19 min). The mean medial and lateral CECT attenuation was correlated with μ (R(2)  = 0.69, p < 0.05), and the individual medial and lateral CECT attenuations correlated with their respective GAG contents (R(2)  ≥ 0.63, p < 0.05) and E (R(2)  ≥ 0.63, p < 0.05). In conclusion, CECT using CA4+ is a simple, non-destructive technique for three-dimensional imaging of ex vivo mouse cartilage, and significant correlations between CECT attenuation and GAG, E, and μ are observed. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1130-1138, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Scale-Independent Biomechanical Optimization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schutte, J. F; Koh, B; Reinbolt, J. A; Haftka, R. T; George, A; Fregly, B. J

    2003-01-01

    ...: the Particle Swarm Optimizer (PSO). They apply this method to the biomechanical system identification problem of finding positions and orientations of joint axes in body segments through the processing of experimental movement data...

  1. Systems biomechanics of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Maly, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    Systems Biomechanics of the Cell attempts to outline systems biomechanics of the cell as an emergent and promising discipline. The new field owes conceptually to cell mechanics, organism-level systems biomechanics, and biology of biochemical systems. Its distinct methodology is to elucidate the structure and behavior of the cell by analyzing the unintuitive collective effects of elementary physical forces that interact within the heritable cellular framework. The problematics amenable to this approach includes the variety of cellular activities that involve the form and movement of the cell body and boundary (nucleus, centrosome, microtubules, cortex, and membrane). Among the elementary system effects in the biomechanics of the cell, instability of symmetry, emergent irreversibility, and multiperiodic dissipative motion can be noted. Research results from recent journal articles are placed in this unifying framework. It is suggested that the emergent discipline has the potential to expand the spectrum of ques...

  2. Topographic and biomechanical evaluation of cornea in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkaynak, Hasan; Duru, Necati; Ersoy, Reyhan; Kalkan Akcay, Emine; Ugurlu, Nagihan; Cagil, Nurullah; Cakir, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare topographic and biomechanical properties of corneas in patients with acromegaly with those of healthy individuals. Thirty-five patients with acromegaly (study group) and 35 healthy individuals (control group) were enrolled in this prospective study. Topographic measurements, including central corneal thickness (CCT), mean keratometry (K) value, K1, K2, surface asymmetry index, corneal volume (CV), and anterior chamber depth in the right eye of each participant were obtained using a Scheimpflug camera with a Placido disc topographer (Sirius; Costruzione Strumenti Oftalmici). Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOP), and Goldmann-corelated intraocular pressure (IOPg) were measured using Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (Reichert Ophthalmic Instruments). Mean CCT, CV, CH, CRF, and IOPg values were higher in acromegalic eyes (549.3 ± 30.2 μm, 59.1 ± 3.1 μm, 11.3 ± 1.2 mm Hg, 11.3 ± 1.2 mm Hg, and 17.5 ± 2.9 mm Hg, respectively) than in healthy eyes (531.4 ± 33.6 μm, 57.4 ± 2.7 μm, 10.4 ± 1.2 mm Hg, 10.2 ± 1.6 mm Hg, and 14.8 ± 3.1 mm Hg, respectively; CCT, P = 0.042; CV, P = 0.032; CH, P = 0.044; CRF, P = 0.035; IOPg, P < 0.001). CCT, CV, CH, CRF, IOPg, and IOP with Goldmann applanation tonometry were significantly higher in acromegalic eyes. These corneal topographic and biomechanical properties, disease duration, and disease status should be considered when planning corneal refractive surgery and determining accurate intraocular pressure in patients with acromegaly.

  3. Biomechanical and biochemical outcomes of porcine temporomandibular joint disc deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuska, Andrea M; Muller, Stephen; Dolwick, M Franklin; McFetridge, Peter S

    2016-04-01

    The structure-function relationship in the healthy temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc has been well established, however the changes in dysfunctional joints has yet to be systematically evaluated. Due to the poor understanding of the etiology of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) this study evaluated naturally occurring degenerative remodeling in aged female porcine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs in order to gain insight into the progression and effects on possible treatment strategies of TMDs. Surface and regional biomechanical and biochemical properties of discal tissues were determined in grossly deformed (≥Wilkes Stage 3) and morphologically normal (≤Wilkes Stage 2) TMJ discs. Compared to normal disc structure the deformed discs lacked a smooth biconcave shape and characteristic ECM organization. Reduction in tensile biomechanical integrity and increased compressive stiffness and cellularity was found in deformed discs. Regionally, the posterior and intermediate zones of the disc were most frequently affected along with the inferior surface. The frequency of degeneration observed on the inferior surface of the disc (predominantly posterior), suggests that a disruption in the disc-condyle relationship likely contributes to the progression of joint dysfunction more than the temporodiscal relationship. As such, the inferior joint space may be an important consideration in early clinical diagnosis and treatment of TMDs, as it is overlooked in techniques performed in the upper joint space, including arthroscopy and arthrocentesis. Furthermore, permanent damage to the disc mechanical properties would limit the ability to successfully reposition deformed discs, highlighting the importance of emerging therapies such as tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparing Data Sets: Implicit Summaries of the Statistical Properties of Number Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bradley J.; Masnick, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    Comparing datasets, that is, sets of numbers in context, is a critical skill in higher order cognition. Although much is known about how people compare single numbers, little is known about how number sets are represented and compared. We investigated how subjects compared datasets that varied in their statistical properties, including ratio of…

  5. Stability of the human spine: a biomechanical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, P.J.M.; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Grootenboer, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The influences of curvatures and of physical properties on the mechanical stability of the spine were analysed by means of a three-dimensional, geometrical, nonlinear biomechanical model. According to the model, the initial buckling load decreases with increasing lordotic and kyphotic curvatures.

  6. Effects of axial length and corneal curvature on corneal biomechanics in elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha-Sha Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To explore the corneal biomechanical properties of the elderly with different axial length(ALand corneal curvature by corneal visualization Scheimpflug Technology(Corvis ST. METHODS: Cross-sectional study. A total of 161 patients(297 eyesundergoing phacoemulsification were collected in this study. They were divided into 22-24mm, 24-26mm, more than 26mm groups according to axial length(190 eyes, 54 eyes and 53 eyes, respectively. Those of whom axial length was 22-24mm and the corneal curvature was 42-44D were divided into male and female groups(44 eyes and 49 eyes, respectively. Those of whom axial length was 22-24mm were divided into 42-44D group, more than 44D group according to corneal curvature(88 eyes, 102 eyes, respectively. Corvis ST was used to measure the biomechanical parameters of the cornea. The differences in the parameters between different groups were analyzed using the independent-samples t test or one-way analysis of variance and correlation analyses were performed using Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS: When comparing the corneal biomechanical parameters, no statistically significant differences were found between male and female groups(P>0.05. The first applanation length and second applanation length among different corneal curvatures were statistically significant(PPr=0.429, 0.278; Pr=-0.291, -0.415; PCONCLUSION: The corneal curvature and ocular axial length may be the factors affecting the corneal biomechanical characteristics. The longer axial length, the thinner corneal thickness, the more easily the corneal is deformed, and with the increase of the axial length, intraocular pressure also increases.

  7. Biomechanics and functionality of hepatocytes in liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shan; Song, Zhenyuan; Cotler, Scott J; Cho, Michael

    2014-06-27

    Cirrhosis is a life-threatening condition that is generally attributed to overproduction of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix that mechanically stiffens the liver. Chronic liver injury due to causes including viral hepatitis, inherited and metabolic liver diseases and external factors such as alcohol abuse can result in the development of cirrhosis. Progression of cirrhosis leads to hepatocellular dysfunction. While extensive studies to understand the complexity underlying liver fibrosis have led to potential application of anti-fibrotic drugs, no such FDA-approved drugs are currently available. Additional studies of hepatic fibrogenesis and cirrhosis primarily have focused on the extracellular matrix, while hepatocyte biomechanics has received limited attention. The role of hepatocyte biomechanics in liver cirrhosis remains elusive, and how the cell stiffness is correlated with biological functions of hepatocytes is also unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the biomechanical properties of hepatocytes are correlated with their functions (e.g., glucose metabolism), and that hepatic dysfunction can be restored through modulation of the cellular biomechanics. Furthermore, our results indicate the hepatocyte functionality appears to be regulated through a crosstalk between the Rho and Akt signaling. These novel findings may lead to biomechanical intervention of hepatocytes and the development of innovative tissue engineering for clinical treatment to target liver cells rather than exclusively focusing on the extracellular matrix alone in liver cirrhosis. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  9. Contrast-Enhanced CT using a Cationic Contrast Agent Enables Non-Destructive Assessment of the Biochemical and Biomechanical Properties of Mouse Tibial Plateau Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Lakin, Benjamin A.; Patel, Harsh; Holland, Conor; Freedman, Jonathan D.; Shelofsky, Joshua S.; Snyder, Brian D.; Stok, Kathryn S.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA) are commonly used to study the disease’s pathogenesis and efficacy of potential treatments. However, measuring the biochemical and mechanical properties of articular cartilage in these models currently requires destructive and time-consuming histology and mechanical testing. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of using contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) to rapidly and non-destructively image and assess the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Using three ex vivo C5...

  10. Biomechanical evaluation of the locking titanium cable in the fixture of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-zhi YAO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  The article aims at evaluating the biological properties of tibiofibular titanium cable fixation device in terms of both anti-separation and stress shielding by comparison to the interior fixation with lag screw based on experimental observation. Methods  Six corpse ankle specimens were first tested of pressure-separation and stress measurement, the data from which were compared to the normal group, and then a syndesmosis injury model was established. All the samples are randomly divided into 2 groups of 3 specimens each, which were treated with tibiofibula locked titanium cable and lag screw fixation respectively for syndesmosis injury. Then, the samples were tested for pressure-separation and stress measurement. The biomechanical properties as anti-separation ability and stress shielding were analyzed and compared between the two fixation method. Results  Both tibiofibula locked titanium cables and lag screws were able to provide enough strong lateral anti-separation ability, but strong fixation screws were inferior to tibiofibular titanium cable fixation device in fibular longitudinal stress transduction. Conclusion  Tibiofibular titanium cable fixation device not only provide sufficient lateral anti-separation, but also reduces the tibial and fibular longitudinal stress shielding, thus being superior to the traditional lag screw in biomechanical properties. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.09

  11. The corneoscleral shell of the eye: potentials of assessing biomechanical parameters in normal and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Iomdina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews modern methods of evaluating the biomechanical properties of the corneoscleral shell of the eye that can be used both in the studies of the pathogenesis of various ophthalmic pathologies and in clinical practice. The biomechanical parameters of the cornea and the sclera have been shown to be diagnostically significant in assessing the risk of complications and the effectiveness of keratorefractive interventions, in the diagnosis and the prognosis of keratoconus, progressive myopia, or glaucoma. In clinical practice, a special device, Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, has been used on a large scale. The analyzer is used to assess two parameters that characterize viscoelastic properties of the cornea — corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF. Reduced levels of CH and CRF have been noted after eximer laser surgery, especially that administered to patients who demonstrate a regression in the refraction effect or suffer from keratoconus. This fact justifies the use of these biomechanical parameters as additional diagnostic criteria in the evaluation of the state of the cornea. At the same time, ORA data are shown to reflect the biomechanical response to the impact of the air pulse not only from the cornea alone but also from the whole corneoscleral capsule. This is probably the cause of reduced CH in children with progressive myopia and a weakened supportive function of the sclera, as well as such reduction in glaucomatous adult patients. It is hypothesized that a low CH value is a result of remodeling of the connective tissue matrix of the corneoscleral shell of the eye and can be an independent factor testifying to a risk of glaucoma progression. Reduced CH in primary open-angle glaucoma occurs in parallel with the development of pathological structural changes of the optic disc, and deterioration of visual fields, which is an evidence of a specific character and sensitivity of this parameter. The

  12. Scleral ultrastructure and biomechanical changes in rabbits after negative lens application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Lin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To address the microstructure and biomechanical changes of the sclera of rabbits after negative lens application by spectacle frame apparatus. METHODS: Five New Zealand rabbits of seven weeks post-natal were treated with -8 D lens monocularly over the course of two weeks. Refractive errors and axial length (AXL were measured at the 1st, 7th and 14th days of the induction period. Ultrastructure of sclera was determined with electron microscopy. Biomechanical properties were tested by an Instron 5565 universal testing machine. RESULTS: Lens-induced (LI eyes elongated more rapidly compared with fellow eyes with AXL values of 15.56±0.14 and 15.21±0.14 mm (P<0.01. Fibril diameter was significantly smaller in the LI eyes compared with control ones in the inner, middle, and outer layers (inner layer, 63.533 vs 76.467 nm; middle layer, 92.647 vs 123.984 nm; outer layer, 86.999 vs 134.257 nm, P<0.01, respectively. In comparison with control eyes, macrophage-like cells that engulfed fibroblasts, dilated endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuoles in fibroblasts were observed in the inner and middle stroma in the LI eyes. Ultimate stress and Young’s modulus were lower in the LI eyes compared with those in the control eyes. CONCLUSION: Negative lens application alters eye growth, and results in axial elongation with changes in scleral ultrastructural and mechanical properties.

  13. Anatomical and biomechanical traits of broiler chickens across ontogeny. Part II. Body segment inertial properties and muscle architecture of the pelvic limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Paxton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In broiler chickens, genetic success for desired production traits is often shadowed by welfare concerns related to musculoskeletal health. Whilst these concerns are clear, a viable solution is still elusive. Part of the solution lies in knowing how anatomical changes in afflicted body systems that occur across ontogeny influence standing and moving. Here, to demonstrate these changes we quantify the segment inertial properties of the whole body, trunk (legs removed and the right pelvic limb segments of five broilers at three different age groups across development. We also consider how muscle architecture (mass, fascicle length and other properties related to mechanics changes for selected muscles of the pelvic limb. All broilers used had no observed lameness, but we document the limb pathologies identified post mortem, since these two factors do not always correlate, as shown here. The most common leg disorders, including bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis and rotational and angular deformities of the lower limb, were observed in chickens at all developmental stages. Whole limb morphology is not uniform relative to body size, with broilers obtaining large thighs and feet between four and six weeks of age. This implies that the energetic cost of swinging the limbs is markedly increased across this growth period, perhaps contributing to reduced activity levels. Hindlimb bone length does not change during this period, which may be advantageous for increased stability despite the increased energetic costs. Increased pectoral muscle growth appears to move the centre of mass cranio-dorsally in the last two weeks of growth. This has direct consequences for locomotion (potentially greater limb muscle stresses during standing and moving. Our study is the first to measure these changes in the musculoskeletal system across growth in chickens, and reveals how artificially selected changes of the morphology of the pectoral apparatus may cause

  14. Biomechanics of bird flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W

    2007-09-01

    Power output is a unifying theme for bird flight and considerable progress has been accomplished recently in measuring muscular, metabolic and aerodynamic power in birds. The primary flight muscles of birds, the pectoralis and supracoracoideus, are designed for work and power output, with large stress (force per unit cross-sectional area) and strain (relative length change) per contraction. U-shaped curves describe how mechanical power output varies with flight speed, but the specific shapes and characteristic speeds of these curves differ according to morphology and flight style. New measures of induced, profile and parasite power should help to update existing mathematical models of flight. In turn, these improved models may serve to test behavioral and ecological processes. Unlike terrestrial locomotion that is generally characterized by discrete gaits, changes in wing kinematics and aerodynamics across flight speeds are gradual. Take-off flight performance scales with body size, but fully revealing the mechanisms responsible for this pattern awaits new study. Intermittent flight appears to reduce the power cost for flight, as some species flap-glide at slow speeds and flap-bound at fast speeds. It is vital to test the metabolic costs of intermittent flight to understand why some birds use intermittent bounds during slow flight. Maneuvering and stability are critical for flying birds, and design for maneuvering may impinge upon other aspects of flight performance. The tail contributes to lift and drag; it is also integral to maneuvering and stability. Recent studies have revealed that maneuvers are typically initiated during downstroke and involve bilateral asymmetry of force production in the pectoralis. Future study of maneuvering and stability should measure inertial and aerodynamic forces. It is critical for continued progress into the biomechanics of bird flight that experimental designs are developed in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  15. Biomechanics and the wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaurin, C A; Brubaker, C E

    1991-04-01

    Wheelchair biomechanics involves the study of how a wheelchair user imparts power to the wheels to achieve mobility. Because a wheelchair can coast, power input need not be continuous, but each power strike can be followed by a period of recovery, with the stroking frequency depending on user preferences and the coasting characteristics of the wheelchair. The latter is described in terms of rolling resistance, wind resistance and the slope of the surface. From these three factors the power required to propel the wheelchair is determined, and must be matched by the power output of the user. The efficiency of propulsion is the ratio of this power output to the metabolic cost and is typically in the order of 5% in normal use. The features required in a wheelchair depend upon user characteristics and intended activities. The ideal wheelchair for an individual will have the features that closely match these characteristics and activities. Thus prescription is not just choosing a wheelchair, but choosing the components of the wheelchair that best serve the intended purpose. In this paper, each component is examined for available options and how these options effect the performance of the wheelchair for the individual. The components include wheels, tyres, castors, frames, bearings, materials, construction details, seats, backrests, armrests, foot and legrests, headrests, wheel locks, running brakes, handrims, levers, accessories, adjustments and detachable parts. Each component is considered in relation to performance characteristics including rolling resistance, versatility, weight, comfort, stability, maneouvrability, transfer, stowage, durability and maintenance. Where they exist, wheelchair standards are referred to as a source of information regarding these characteristics.

  16. Evaluation of the relationship between corneal biomechanic and HbA1C levels in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazgan, Serpil; Celik, Ugur; Kaldırım, Havva; Ayar, Orhan; Elbay, Ahmet; Aykut, Veysel; Celik, Burcu; Taş, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the corneal biomechanical properties due to the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels using the ocular response analyzer (ORA) in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). ORA values were obtained from 156 eyes of subjects with type 2 DM and 74 eyes of healthy control subjects with similar age and sex. Subjects were divided into three groups: Group 1, healthy control subjects; Group 2, diabetes patients with HbA1C biomechanical parameters: corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), Goldmann-correlated pressure (IOPg), and corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc) measurements were obtained using ORA. Ultrasound pachymetry was used for measurement of central corneal thickness (CCT). CH and CRF were significantly different in each of the three groups (P-values for CH respectively; Groups 1 and 2=0.008, Groups 1 and 3, and Groups 2 and 3, biomechanical properties when compared to healthy subjects, there was also a positive correlation between HbA1C level and intraocular pressure.

  17. Biomechanical Perspectives on Concussion in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, Steven; Bland, Megan L.; Campolettano, Eamon T.; Press, Jaclyn N.; Rowson, Bethany; Smith, Jake A.; Sproule, David W.; Tyson, Abigail M.; Duma, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    Concussions can occur in any sport. Often, clinical and biomechanical research efforts are disconnected. This review paper analyzes current concussion issues in sports from a biomechanical perspective and is geared towards Sports Med professionals. Overarching themes of this review include: the biomechanics of the brain during head impact, role of protective equipment, potential population-based differences in concussion tolerance, potential intervention strategies to reduce the incidence of injury, and common biomechanical misconceptions. PMID:27482775

  18. Biomechanical analysis of the posterior bony column of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiukun; Huang, Shuai; Tang, Yubo; Wang, Xi; Pan, Tao

    2017-09-15

    Each part of the rear bone structure can become an anchor point for an attachment device. The objective of this study was to evaluate the stiffness and strength of different parts of the rear lumbar bone structure by axial compression damage experiments. Five adult male lumbar bone structures from L2 to L5 were exposed. The superior and inferior articular processes, upper and lower edges of the lamina, and upper and lower edges of the spinous process were observed and isolated and then divided into six groups (n = 10). The specimens were placed between the compaction disc and the load platform in a universal testing machine, which was first preloaded to 5.0 N tension to eliminate water on the surface and then loaded to the specimen curve decline at a constant tension loading rate of 0.01 mm/s, until the specimens had been destroyed. Significant differences in mechanical properties were found among different parts of the rear lumbar bone structure. Compared with other parts, the lower edge of the lamina has good mechanical properties, which have a high modulus of elasticity; the superior and inferior articular processes have greater ultimate strength, which can withstand greater compressive loads; and the mechanical properties of the spinous process are poor, and it is significantly stiffer and weaker than the lamina and articular processes. These data can be useful in future spinal biomechanics research leading to better biomechanical compatibility and provide theoretical references for spinal implant materials.

  19. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  20. Evaluation and Comparison of Biomechanical Properties of Snail Loop with that of Opus Loop and Teardrop Loop for en masse Retraction of Anterior Teeth: FEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Rajkumar Rao

    2013-01-01

    Results: Inherently the M/F ratio produced was higher and F/D rate produced was least for opus loop compared to snail loop and teardrop loop. Conclusion: With incorporation of 20°gable bends snail loop prepared in 0.017 × 0.025 inch and 0.019 × 0.025 inch TMA wire is very efficient to deliver M/F ratio required for translatory tooth movement with acceptable F/D rate. Snail loop is easy to fabricate and finer shape morphology prevents tissue impingement.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  2. Comparison of the corneal biomechanical properties with the Ocular Response Analyzer® (ORA) in African and Caucasian normal subjects and patients with glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detry-Morel, Michèle; Jamart, Jacques; Hautenauven, Frédéric; Pourjavan, Sayeh

    2012-03-01

    To compare corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) measured with the Ocular Response Analyzer(®) tonometer (ORA) between (i) African normals and treated primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and (ii) between normals and treated POAG Caucasians. To analyse the correlation of CH and CRF with visual field (VF) defects in the two groups. This comparative study included 59 African (29 (POAG), 30 normals) and 55 Caucasians (30 POAG and 25 normals) subjects. Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and ORA measurements were performed in a randomized sequence. Visual field was tested with the Swedish interactive threshold algorithms standard strategy of the Humphrey perimeter. Hoddap classification was used to estimate the severity of VF defects. Primary open-angle glaucoma Africans were younger than POAG Caucasians (p < 0.001). Goldmann applanation tonometry and central corneal thickness (CCT) did not differ significantly between the four subgroups. African normals had lower CH than Caucasian controls (p < 0.001). CH was 9.2 ± 1.1 and 8.3 ± 1.7 mmHg respectively in POAG Caucasians and Africans (p < 0.001). African controls had higher ORA corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc) than Caucasian controls (p < 0.001). Primary open-angle glaucoma Africans had higher IOPcc values than Caucasian POAGs (p < 0.001). CH and IOPcc were associated with race (p < 0.001) but not with CCT. Based on mean deviation values (MD), POAG Africans had more severe VF defects. CH was correlated with MD (r = 0.442; p = 0.031) and severity of VF defects only in POAG Africans (r = -0.464; p = 0.013). African normal subjects and POAG patients had an altered CH, which is associated with a significant underestimation of GAT IOP. This may potentially contribute to the earlier development and greater severity of glaucoma damage in Africans compared with Caucasians at diagnosis. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Physical and Structural Properties of Water Retted and Non-retted Flax Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Raghavan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Flax stems of Modran variety were subjected to water retting under laboratory conditions and its physical properties were compared with non-retted fibers. Physical properties including percentage of impurities, weighted average length, linear density, tenacity and elongation were analyzed and the results were compared. The analysis of retted and non-retted flax fibers showed that retting is the most important step in the processing of flax fibers and it directly affects quality attributes like strength, fineness, and homogeneity. Scanning Electron microscope images of fibers were also analyzed and the retted fibers showed much cleaner surface when compared to decorticated non-retted fibers.

  4. Comparing data sets: implicit summaries of the statistical properties of number sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bradley J; Masnick, Amy M

    2015-01-01

    Comparing datasets, that is, sets of numbers in context, is a critical skill in higher order cognition. Although much is known about how people compare single numbers, little is known about how number sets are represented and compared. We investigated how subjects compared datasets that varied in their statistical properties, including ratio of means, coefficient of variation, and number of observations, by measuring eye fixations, accuracy, and confidence when assessing differences between number sets. Results indicated that participants implicitly create and compare approximate summary values that include information about mean and variance, with no evidence of explicit calculation. Accuracy and confidence increased, while the number of fixations decreased as sets became more distinct (i.e., as mean ratios increase and variance decreases), demonstrating that the statistical properties of datasets were highly related to comparisons. The discussion includes a model proposing how reasoners summarize and compare datasets within the architecture for approximate number representation. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  5. Clinical applications of biomechanics cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, A S

    1986-10-01

    Biomechanics cinematography is the analysis of movement of living organisms through the use of cameras, image projection systems, electronic digitizers, and computers. This article is a comparison of cinematographic systems and details practical uses of the modality in research and education.

  6. Comparative evaluation of physicochemical properties of jatropha curcas seed oil for coolant-lubricant application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Muhamad Nasir; Sharif, Safian; Rahim, Erween Abd.; Abdullah, Rozaini

    2017-09-01

    Increased attention to environmental issues due to industrial activities has forced the authorities raise awareness and implement regulations to reduce the use of mineral oil. Some vegetable oils unexplored or less explored, particularly the non-edible oils such as Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) and others. Physicochemical properties of JCO is compared with others edible oils, synthetic ester and fatty alcohol to obtain a viable alternative in metal cutting fluids. The oil was found to show the suitability of properties for coolant-lubricant applications in term of its physicochemical properties and better in flash point and viscosity value.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadiki, Josna Vinutha; Jampanapalli, Sharada Reddy; Konda, Suhasini; Inguva, Hema Chandrika; Chimata, Vamsi Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Chlorhexidine gluconate is a widely used antimicrobial agent. Adding chlorhexidine and quaternary ammonium compounds to filling materials, such as composite resins, acrylic resins, and glass ionomer cements increases the antibacterial property of restorative materials. This study includes antibacterial property of glass ionomer restorative cements with chlorhexidine gluconate. The primary objective of our study was to compare the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available glass ionomer cements with and without chlorhexidine gluconate on strains of mutans streptococci. Two glass ionomers (Fuji II Conventional and Fuji IX) were used. Chlorhexidine gluconate was mixed with glass ionomer cements, and antimicrobial properties against mutans streptococci were assessed by agar diffusion. The tested bacterial strain was inhibited and the antimicrobial properties decreased with time. The highest amount of antimicrobial activity with mean inhibitory zone was found in Fuji II with chlorhexidine gluconate followed by Fuji IX with chlorhexidine gluconate, Fuji II without chlorhexidine gluconate, and Fuji IX without chlorhexidine gluconate. The results of the study confirmed that the addition of 5% chlorhexidine gluconate to Fuji II and Fuji IX glass ionomer cements resulted in a restorative material that had increased antimicrobial properties over the conventional glass ionomer cements alone for Streptococcus mutans. How to cite this article: Yadiki JV, Jampanapalli SR , Konda S, Inguva HC, Chimata VK. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):99-103.

  8. Biomechanical comparison of osteosynthesis with poly‑L‑lactic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of poly‑L‑lactic acid and titanium screws in the fixation of intracapsular condylar fractures, in 10 polyurethane hemimandibles. Materials and Methods: Artificial intracapsular fractures were created with a steel disk and electronic ...

  9. Head Impact Biomechanics in Women's College Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynall, Robert C; Clark, Michael D; Grand, Erin E; Stucker, Jaclyn C; Littleton, Ashley C; Aguilar, Alain J; Petschauer, Meredith A; Teel, Elizabeth F; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    There are limited nonlaboratory soccer head impact biomechanics data. This is surprising given soccer's global popularity. Epidemiological data suggest that female college soccer players are at a greater concussion injury risk than their male counterparts. Therefore, the purposes of our study were to quantify head impact frequency and magnitude during women's soccer practices and games in the National Collegiate Athletic Association and to characterize these data across event type, playing position, year on the team, and segment of game (first and second halves). Head impact biomechanics were collected from female college soccer players (n = 22; mean ± SD age = 19.1 ± 0.1 yr, height = 168.0 ± 3.5 cm, mass = 63.7 ± 6.0 kg). We employed a helmetless head impact measurement device (X2 Biosystems xPatch) before each competition and practice across a single season. Peak linear and rotational accelerations were categorized based on impact magnitude and subsequently analyzed using appropriate nonparametric analyses. Overall, women's college soccer players experience approximately seven impacts per 90 min of game play. The overwhelming majority (~90%) of all head impacts were categorized into our mildest linear acceleration impact classification (10g-20g). Interestingly, a higher percentage of practice impacts in the 20g-40g range compared with games (11% vs 7%) was observed. Head impact biomechanics studies have provided valuable insights into understanding collision sports and for informing evidence-based rule and policy changes. These have included changing the football kickoff, ice hockey body checking ages, and head-to-head hits in both sports. Given soccer's global popularity, and the growing public concern for the potential long-term neurological implications of collision and contact sports, studying soccer has the potential to impact many athletes and the sports medicine professionals caring for them.

  10. Biomechanical metrics of aesthetic perception in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Shippen, James

    2015-12-01

    The brain may be tuned to evaluate aesthetic perception through perceptual chunking when we observe the grace of the dancer. We modelled biomechanical metrics to explain biological determinants of aesthetic perception in dance. Eighteen expert (EXP) and intermediate (INT) dancers performed développé arabesque in three conditions: (1) slow tempo, (2) slow tempo with relevé, and (3) fast tempo. To compare biomechanical metrics of kinematic data, we calculated intra-excursion variability, principal component analysis (PCA), and dimensionless jerk for the gesture limb. Observers, all trained dancers, viewed motion capture stick figures of the trials and ranked each for aesthetic (1) proficiency and (2) movement smoothness. Statistical analyses included group by condition repeated-measures ANOVA for metric data; Mann-Whitney U rank and Friedman's rank tests for nonparametric rank data; Spearman's rho correlations to compare aesthetic rankings and metrics; and linear regression to examine which metric best quantified observers' aesthetic rankings, p dance movements revealed differences between groups and condition, p brain combines sensory motor elements into integrated units of behaviour. In this representation, the chunk of information which is remembered, and to which the observer reacts, is the elemental mode shape of the motion rather than physical displacements. This suggests that reduction in redundant information to a simplistic dimensionality is related to the experienced observer's aesthetic perception.

  11. How few? Bayesian statistics in injury biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutcliffe, Hattie C; Schmidt, Allison L; Lucas, Joseph E; Bass, Cameron R

    2012-10-01

    In injury biomechanics, there are currently no general a priori estimates of how few specimens are necessary to obtain sufficiently accurate injury risk curves for a given underlying distribution. Further, several methods are available for constructing these curves, and recent methods include Bayesian survival analysis. This study used statistical simulations to evaluate the fidelity of different injury risk methods using limited sample sizes across four different underlying distributions. Five risk curve techniques were evaluated, including Bayesian techniques. For the Bayesian analyses, various prior distributions were assessed, each incorporating more accurate information. Simulated subject injury and biomechanical input values were randomly sampled from each underlying distribution, and injury status was determined by comparing these values. Injury risk curves were developed for this data using each technique for various small sample sizes; for each, analyses on 2000 simulated data sets were performed. Resulting median predicted risk values and confidence intervals were compared with the underlying distributions. Across conditions, the standard and Bayesian survival analyses better represented the underlying distributions included in this study, especially for extreme (1, 10, and 90%) risk. This study demonstrates that the value of the Bayesian analysis is the use of informed priors. As the mean of the prior approaches the actual value, the sample size necessary for good reproduction of the underlying distribution with small confidence intervals can be as small as 2. This study provides estimates of confidence intervals and number of samples to allow the selection of the most appropriate sample sizes given known information.

  12. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of two plating configurations for critical-sized defects of the mandible in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, Boaz; Stover, Susan M; Garcia, Tanya C; Leale, Dustin M; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the biomechanical behavior of mandibular critical-sized defects stabilized with 2 plating configurations under in vitro conditions resembling clinical situations. SAMPLE 24 mandibles harvested from 12 adult canine cadavers. PROCEDURES 8 mandibles were kept intact as control samples. A critical-sized defect was created in 16 mandibles; these mandibles were stabilized by use of a single locking plate (LP [n = 8]) or an LP combined with an alveolar miniplate (LMP [8]). Mandibles were loaded in cantilever bending in a single-load-to-failure test with simultaneous recording of load and actuator displacement. Stiffness, yield, and failure properties were compared among groups. Mode of failure was recorded. Radiographic evidence of tooth root and mandibular canal damage was quantified and compared between groups. RESULTS Stiffness and yield loads of single LP and LMP constructs were < 30% of values for intact mandibles, and failure loads were < 45% of values for intact mandibles. There were no consistent biomechanical differences at failure between single LP and LMP constructs, but the LMP construct had greater stiffness and strength prior to yield. Frequency of screw penetration of teeth and the mandibular canal was significantly greater for LMP than for single LP constructs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Both fixation methods were mechanically inferior to an intact mandible. The LMP construct was mechanically stronger than the LP construct but may not be clinically justifiable. Addition of an alveolar miniplate provided additional strength to the construct but resulted in more frequent penetration of tooth roots and the mandibular canal.

  14. Cell biomechanics and its applications in human disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-04-01

    Certain diseases are known to cause changes in the physical and biomechanical properties of cells. These include cancer, malaria, and sickle cell anemia among others. Typically, such physical property changes can result in several fold increases or decreases in cell stiffness, which are significant and can result in severe pathology and eventual catastrophic breakdown of the bodily functions. While there are developed biochemical and biological assays to detect the onset or presence of diseases, there is always a need to develop more rapid, precise, and sensitive methods to detect and diagnose diseases. Biomechanical property changes can play a significant role in this regard. As such, research into disease biomechanics can not only give us an in-depth knowledge of the mechanisms underlying disease progression, but can also serve as a powerful tool for detection and diagnosis. This article provides some insights into opportunities for how significant changes in cellular mechanical properties during onset or progression of a disease can be utilized as useful means for detection and diagnosis. We will also showcase several technologies that have already been developed to perform such detection and diagnosis.

  15. The influence of slope on Spartium junceum root system: morphological, anatomical and biomechanical adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Fabio; Scippa, G S; Lasserre, B; Montagnoli, A; Tognetti, R; Marchetti, M; Chiatante, D

    2017-05-01

    Root systems have a pivotal role in plant anchorage and their mechanical interactions with the soil may contribute to soil reinforcement and stabilization of slide-prone slopes. In order to understand the responses of root system to mechanical stress induced by slope, samples of Spartium junceum L., growing in slope and in plane natural conditions, were compared in their morphology, biomechanical properties and anatomical features. Soils sampled in slope and plane revealed similar characteristics, with the exception of organic matter content and penetrometer resistance, both higher in slope. Slope significantly influenced root morphology and in particular the distribution of lateral roots along the soil depth. Indeed, first-order lateral roots of plants growing on slope condition showed an asymmetric distribution between up- and down-slope. Contrarily, this asymmetric distribution was not observed in plants growing in plane. The tensile strength was higher in lateral roots growing up-slope and in plane conditions than in those growing down-slope. Anatomical investigations revealed that, while roots grown up-slope had higher area covered by xylem fibers, the ratio of xylem and phloem fibers to root diameter did not differ among the three conditions, as also, no differences were found for xylem fiber cell wall thickness. Roots growing up-slope were the main contributors to anchorage properties, which included higher strength and higher number of fibers in the xylematic tissues. Results suggested that a combination of root-specific morphological, anatomical and biomechanical traits, determines anchorage functions in slope conditions.

  16. Biomechanical design considerations for transradial prosthetic interface: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yuanjun; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Traditional function and comfort assessment of transradial prostheses pay scant attention to prosthetic interface. With better understanding of the biomechanics of prosthetic interface comes better efficiency and safety for interface design; in this way, amputees are more likely to accept prosthetic usage. This review attempts to provide design and selection criteria of transradial interface for prosthetists and clinicians. Various transradial socket types in the literature were chronologically reviewed. Biomechanical discussion of transradial prosthetic interface design from an engineering point of view was also done. Suspension control, range of motion, stability, as well as comfort and safety of socket designs have been considered in varying degrees in the literature. The human-machine interface design should change from traditional "socket design" to new "interface design." From anatomy and physiology to biomechanics of the transradial residual limb, the force and motion transfer, together with comfort and safety, are the two main aspects in prosthetic interface design. Load distribution and transmission should mainly rely on achieving additional skeletal control through targeted soft tissue relief. Biomechanics of the residual limb soft tissues should be studied to find the relationship between mechanical properties and the comfort and safety of soft tissues. © IMechE 2016.

  17. Biomechanical Properties of Infantry Combat Boot Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Karen

    1997-01-01

    .... A survey addressing comfort parameters was administered to each subject. Boot impact tests revealed that all of the commercially available boots tested superior to the standard-issue jungle and leather combat boots...

  18. Fatigue behavior of Ilizarov frame versus tibial interlocking nail in a comminuted tibial fracture model: a biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahel Philip F

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for comminuted tibial shaft fractures include plating, intramedullary nailing, and external fixation. No biomechanical comparison between an interlocking tibia nail with external fixation by an Ilizarov frame has been reported to date. In the present study, we compared the fatigue behaviour of Ilizarov frames to interlocking intramedullary nails in a comminuted tibial fracture model under a combined loading of axial compression, bending and torsion. Our goal was to determine the biomechanical characteristics, stability and durability for each device over a clinically relevant three month testing period. The study hypothesis was that differences in the mechanical properties may account for differing clinical results and provide information applicable to clinical decision making for comminuted tibia shaft fractures. Methods In this biomechanical study, 12 composite tibial bone models with a comminuted fracture and a 25 mm diaphyseal gap were investigated. Of these, six models were stabilized with a 180-mm four-ring Ilizarov frame, and six models were minimally reamed and stabilized with a 10 mm statically locked Russell-Taylor Delta™ tibial nail. After measuring the pre-fatigue axial compression bending and torsion stiffness, each model was loaded under a sinusoidal cyclic combined loading of axial compression (2.8/28 lbf; 12.46/124.6 N and torque (1.7/17 lbf-in; 0.19/1.92 Nm at a frequency of 3 Hz. The test was performed until failure (implant breakage or ≥ 5° angulations and/or 2 cm shortening occurred or until 252,000 cycles were completed, which corresponds to approximately three months testing period. Results In all 12 models, both the Ilizarov frame and the interlocking tibia nail were able to maintain fracture stability of the tibial defect and to complete the full 252,000 cycles during the entire study period of three months. A significantly higher stiffness to axial compression and torsion was

  19. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Functional Properties of Some Commonly Used Cereal and Legume Flours and Their Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Nawaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional properties such as protein solubility, swelling capacity, water holding capacity, gelling ability, bulk density and foaming capacity of flours of some commonly used cereals and legume (wheat, refined wheat, maize and chickpea and their blends were studied. Blends of flours were prepared by mixing equal proportions of selected floors. Statistically significant difference  in studied functional properties except bulk density was observed among cereal flours and their blends. Chickpea flour was found to possess comparatively high water holding capacity, protein solubility index and swelling capacity. The functional properties of maize and wheat flours were found to be improved when blended with chickpea. Chickpea flour and its blends with cereal flours were found to possess good functional score and suggested as favorable candidates for use in the preparation of viscous foods and bakery products. The data provide guidelines regarding the improvement in functional properties of economically favorable cereal flours.

  1. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF IMMUNOMODULATING PROPERTIES OF C HITOSAN AND ITS DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Ivanushko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Comparative study was carried out, aiming to assess immunostimulatory properties of high-molecular chitosan (Ch-HM and its derivatives, i.e., low molecular weight chitosan (Ch-LM, N-3-hydroxymyristoyl (Ch-LM at a low acylation ratio, N-3-hydroxymyristoylchitooligosaccharides (N-acylchito-biose, -triose, -tetraose, N-, O-carboxyalkylchitosans (carboxymethyl, -ethyl, -propyl derivates. It was established, that the chemical modifications of chitosan influenced its biological activity. The derivatives of chitosan were found to have improved physical properties (good solubility in neutral and alkaline solutions, low viscosity in acidic solutions, good absorption from a gastrointestinal compartment, as compared with initial (high molecular weight chitosan formula. They possess immunomodulatory properties and may be regarded as promising substances for preparation of medical drugs and biologically active food additives (BAFA.

  2. A detailed comparative study between chemical and bioactive properties of Ganoderma lucidum from different origins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojkovic, D.S.; Barros, L.; Calhelha, R.C.; Glamoclija, J.; Ciric, A.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.; Sokovic, M.; Ferreira, I.C.F.R.

    2014-01-01

    A detailed comparative study on chemical and bioactive properties of wild and cultivated Ganoderma lucidum from Serbia (GS) and China (GCN) was performed. This species was chosen because of its worldwide use as medicinal mushroom. Higher amounts of sugars were found in GS, while higher amounts of

  3. Comparative study on properties of edible films based on pinhao (Araucaria angustifolia) starch and flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to develop and compare the properties of edible films based on pinhao starch and pinhao flour. Seven formulations were developed by casting methodology: 5% pinhao starch with 0, 1, 1.5, and 2% glycerol, and 5% pinhao flour with 1, 1.5, and 2% glycerol. The films were evalua...

  4. Biomechanical analysis of the fixation systems for anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyin Lei

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggested that all fixation systems enhance biomechanical stability significantly. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws has quite comparable results to double column plates, they were superior to anterior column plate combined with posterior screws.

  5. [Retention and biomechanics of retentive complexes. 3. The Kratochvil school and current retentive complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique Fernández, M; Jacques Grimonster, L

    1989-04-01

    The authors analyse the biomechanical bases of the Kratochvil "retentive complex" and show how they have induced the nowadays north-american propositions (RPI & RPA). They compare them to the european ones (Nally-Martinet).

  6. Some Comparative Properties of Reconstituted Poplar Veneer Replicating Wenge With Classic Veneer of the Same Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia GURAU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Eco-friendly alternative options to traditional wood veneer have become available around the world in reconstituted veneers. This paper is exploring some properties of reconstituted poplar veneer replicating wenge in indirect testing, which meant to evaluate the bending properties of veneered particleboards and in direct testing that envisaged the veneer density and water absorption. The properties of reconstituted poplar replicating wenge were compared with those of poplar and wenge veneer tested in the same conditions. The results show a slightly lower MOE and MOR for the particleboard veneered with reconstituted veneer compared to the classic veneer, in spite of a higher veneered panel density. The reason may be a discontinuous structure of the engineered veneer compared to the traditional veneer. However, the addition of veneer to particleboards has increased their MOE app. 1.4-1.7 times and doubled their MOR. Smaller standard deviation values of the MOE, MOR and density were recorded for the particleboard veneered with reconstituted poplar replicating wenge compared with the ones veneered with poplar or natural wenge, which may indicate a more homogenous structure for the reconstituted veneer compared with the natural veneers. The reconstituted poplar veneer replicating wenge had higher density than the poplar veneer and it absorbed less water. However, compared with natural wenge, the replica made of poplar had lower performances. Further tests could examine the finishing behaviour of reconstituted veneer and its resistance to scratches and spots.

  7. A biomechanical model of mammographic compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J H; Rajagopal, V; Nielsen, P M F; Nash, M P

    2008-02-01

    A number of biomechanical models have been proposed to improve nonrigid registration techniques for multimodal breast image alignment. A deformable breast model may also be useful for overcoming difficulties in interpreting 2D X-ray projections (mammograms) of 3D volumes (breast tissues). If a deformable model could accurately predict the shape changes that breasts undergo during mammography, then the model could serve to localize suspicious masses (visible in mammograms) in the unloaded state, or in any other deformed state required for further investigations (such as biopsy or other medical imaging modalities). In this paper, we present a validation study that was conducted in order to develop a biomechanical model based on the well-established theory of continuum mechanics (finite elasticity theory with contact mechanics) and demonstrate its use for this application. Experimental studies using gel phantoms were conducted to test the accuracy in predicting mammographic-like deformations. The material properties of the gel phantom were estimated using a nonlinear optimization process, which minimized the errors between the experimental and the model-predicted surface data by adjusting the parameter associated with the neo-Hookean constitutive relation. Two compressions (the equivalent of cranio-caudal and medio-lateral mammograms) were performed on the phantom, and the corresponding deformations were recorded using a MRI scanner. Finite element simulations were performed to mimic the experiments using the estimated material properties with appropriate boundary conditions. The simulation results matched the experimental recordings of the deformed phantom, with a sub-millimeter root-mean-square error for each compression state. Having now validated our finite element model of breast compression, the next stage is to apply the model to clinical images.

  8. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  9. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  10. Corneal Biomechanical Changes and Tissue Remodeling After SMILE and LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rohit; Francis, Mathew; Shroff, Rushad; Pahuja, Natasha; Khamar, Pooja; Girrish, Molleti; Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Sinha Roy, Abhijit

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate transient corneal tissue healing and biomechanical changes between laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) eyes. In each patient, one eye underwent LASIK and the other underwent SMILE. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and dynamic Scheimpflug imaging (Corvis-ST) was used to assess tissue healing and biomechanics, respectively. Analyses of OCT scans yielded corneal speckle distribution (CSD) and Bowman's roughness index (BRI). Waveform analyses of deformation amplitude yielded corneal stiffness. Further, corneal force versus corneal deformation data helped compare the two procedures. BRI increased and then decreased transiently after both treatments (P < 0.05). However, SMILE eyes had BRI similar to that of their preoperative state compared to LASIK eyes at 6-month follow-up. CSD indicated a marked increase in the number of bright pixels and a decrease in the number of dark pixels after SMILE (1-month follow-up) and LASIK eyes (3-month follow-up), respectively. CSD returned to near preoperative state thereafter, respectively. Corneal stiffness change from preoperative state was similar between LASIK and SMILE eyes. However, deformation at discrete values of corneal force indicated some recovery of biomechanical strength after SMILE, but not in LASIK eyes. BRI and CSD indicated earlier tissue healing in SMILE eyes than in LASIK. CSD results may indicate delayed cell death in LASIK eyes and increased light scatter due to interface fluid in SMILE eyes. Corneal biomechanical strength remodeled better in SMILE. This may indicate some hydration-related recovery.

  11. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression.

  12. Wearable Biomechanical Energy Harvesting Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Man Choi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvesting has been attracting attention as a technology that is capable of replacing or supplementing a battery with the development of various mobile electronics. In environments where stable electrical supply is not possible, energy harvesting technology can guarantee an increased leisure and safety for human beings. Harvesting with several watts of power is essential for directly driving or efficiently charging mobile electronic devices such as laptops or cell phones. In this study, we reviewed energy harvesting technologies that harvest biomechanical energy from human motion such as foot strike, joint motion, and upper limb motion. They are classified based on the typical principle of kinetic energy harvesting: piezoelectric, triboelectric, and electromagnetic energy harvesting. We focused on the wearing position of high-power wearable biomechanical energy harvesters (WBEHs generating watt-level power. In addition, the features and future trends of the watt-level WBEHs are discussed.

  13. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  14. Biomechanical analysis of the fixation systems for anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianyin; Dong, Pengfei; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Zhihua; Cai, Xianhua

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of common fixation systems for complex acetabular fractures. A finite element (FE) pelvic model with anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures was created. Three common fixation systems were used to fix the posterior wall acetabular fractures: 1. Anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (group I), 2. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (group II) and 3. Double-column plates (group III). And 600 N, representing the body weight, was loaded on the upper surface of the sacrum to simulate the double-limb stance. The amounts of total and relative displacements were compared between the groups. The total amount of displacement was 2.76 mm in group II, 2.81 mm in group III, and 2.83 mm in group I. The amount of relative displacement was 0.0078 mm in group II, 0.0093 mm in group III and 0.014 mm in group I. Our results suggested that all fixation systems enhance biomechanical stability significantly. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws has quite comparable results to double column plates, they were superior to anterior column plate combined with posterior screws. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of three fixations for tibial plateau fractures by biomechanical study and radiographic observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-wei; Liu, Guo-dong; Ou, Shan; Jiang, Xie-yuan; Fei, Jun; Wu, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fixation effects of three fixation devices for tibial plateau fracture (AO/OTA classification 41 A1). Sixteen human cadaver tibial specimens were randomly divided into four groups. An A1 fracture model was established. The fractures were subsequently fixed by axial controlled intramedullary nail, external fixation and steel plate fixation. Each specimen was subjected to axial compression, torsion test and three-point bending test. Then a rat model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of these three fixations by evaluation of callus formation time and healing time. It was found that the axial controlled intramedullary nail group obtained superior biomechanical properties of resistance ability of bending, torsional and axial compressive, compared with external fixation and steel plate group. In animal experiments, the axial controlled intramedullary nail group had a significant shorter callus occurrence and healing time than steel plate and external fixator group. The axial controlled intramedullary nail fixation has a superior biomechanical characteristic and fixation effect for tibial plateau fractures than steel plate and external fixator. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. BIOMECHANICAL REMODELING OF BIODEGRADABLE SMALL-DIAMETER VASCULAR GRAFTS IN SITU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Glushkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the biomechanical remodeling of polymer grafts modified with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF after implantation into rat abdominal aorta.Materials and methods. Vascular grafts of2 mmdiameter were fabricated by electrospinning from polycaprolactone (PCL and a mixture of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate and PCL. The grafts were modified with VEGF by biphasic electrospinning. Morphology of the grafts was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Physico-mechanical properties of PCL and PHBV/PCL grafts were estimated using uniaxial tensile test and physiological circulating system equipped with state-of-theart ultrasound vascular wall tracking system. Physico-mechanical testing of PCL/VEGF and PHBV/PCL/VEGF was performed before and after implantation into rat abdominal aorta for 6 months. The modeling of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG was performed by finite element analysis for modified grafts.Results. Durability of PCL and PHBV/PCL grafts did not differ from that of human internal mammary artery; however, elasticity and stiffness of these grafts were higher compared to internal mammary artery. Viscoelastic properties of the grafts were comparable to those of native blood vessels. Modification of the grafts with VEGF reduced material stiffness. Six months postimplantation, PCL/VEGF and PHBV/PCL/VEGF were integrated with aortic tissue that induced changes in the physico-mechanical properties of the grafts similar to the native vessel. Biomechanical modeling confirmed the functioning of modified grafts in bypass position for CABG.Conclusion. PCL/VEGF and PHBV/PCL/VEGF grafts have satisfactory physico-mechanical properties and can be potentially used in the reconstruction of blood vessels. 

  17. Risk and protective factors associated with being bullied on school property compared with cyberbullied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray M. Merrill

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We identified bullying victimization (bullied on school property versus cyberbullied by selected demographic, personal characteristic, and behavior variables. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on adolescents (n = 13,583 completing the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS in grades 9 through 12. Results Being bullied on school property in the past 12 months was significantly more common in females than males, in earlier school grades, and in Whites and other racial groups compared with Blacks and Hispanics. Being bullied on school property generally decreased with later school grades, but cyberbullying in the past 12 months remained constant. Being bullied on school property or cyberbullied was significantly positively associated with mental health problems, substance use, being overweight, playing video games for 3 or more hours per day, and having asthma. The association was greatest with having mental health problems. Cyberbullying was generally more strongly associated with these conditions and behaviors. Protective behaviors against bullying victimization included eating breakfast every day, being physically active, and playing on sports teams. Those experiencing victimization on school property and cyberbullying were significantly more likely to experience mental health problems compared with just one of these types of bullying or neither. Conclusions Cyberbullying victimization is generally more strongly associated with mental health problems, substance use, being overweight, playing video games for 3 or more hours per day, and having asthma than bullying victimization on school property. However, because bullying on school property is more common in grades 9–11, this form of bullying has a greater burden on these conditions and behaviors in these school grades.

  18. Risk and protective factors associated with being bullied on school property compared with cyberbullied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M; Hanson, Carl L

    2016-02-12

    We identified bullying victimization (bullied on school property versus cyberbullied) by selected demographic, personal characteristic, and behavior variables. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on adolescents (n = 13,583) completing the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) in grades 9 through 12. Being bullied on school property in the past 12 months was significantly more common in females than males, in earlier school grades, and in Whites and other racial groups compared with Blacks and Hispanics. Being bullied on school property generally decreased with later school grades, but cyberbullying in the past 12 months remained constant. Being bullied on school property or cyberbullied was significantly positively associated with mental health problems, substance use, being overweight, playing video games for 3 or more hours per day, and having asthma. The association was greatest with having mental health problems. Cyberbullying was generally more strongly associated with these conditions and behaviors. Protective behaviors against bullying victimization included eating breakfast every day, being physically active, and playing on sports teams. Those experiencing victimization on school property and cyberbullying were significantly more likely to experience mental health problems compared with just one of these types of bullying or neither. Cyberbullying victimization is generally more strongly associated with mental health problems, substance use, being overweight, playing video games for 3 or more hours per day, and having asthma than bullying victimization on school property. However, because bullying on school property is more common in grades 9-11, this form of bullying has a greater burden on these conditions and behaviors in these school grades.

  19. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  20. Confidence crisis of results in biomechanics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2017-11-01

    Many biomechanics studies have small sample sizes and incorrect statistical analyses, so reporting of inaccurate inferences and inflated magnitude of effects are common in the field. This review examines these issues in biomechanics research and summarises potential solutions from research in other fields to increase the confidence in the experimental effects reported in biomechanics. Authors, reviewers and editors of biomechanics research reports are encouraged to improve sample sizes and the resulting statistical power, improve reporting transparency, improve the rigour of statistical analyses used, and increase the acceptance of replication studies to improve the validity of inferences from data in biomechanics research. The application of sports biomechanics research results would also improve if a larger percentage of unbiased effects and their uncertainty were reported in the literature.

  1. Compensation for Real Properties Acquired for Roads in Different Procedures - Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barańska Anna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Real properties acquired for the so-called public purpose, such as road investments, generate a one-off financial indemnity in the form of compensation paid to the expropriated owner. Due to the different possible modes of expropriation (pursuant to the Real Estate Management Act or the Special Road Act, the amount of the compensation due may be determined in different ways, which entails a variety of results. The article compares the compensation levels determined in two possible procedures: basing on the predominant use of the adjacent areas or on data from the transactions of real properties intended for public roads.

  2. Qualitative biomechanical principles for application in coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human movements in sport can be readily understood by Newtonian rigid-body mechanics. Many of these laws and biomechanical principles, however, are counterintuitive to a lot of people. There are also several problems in the application of biomechanics to sports, so the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport skills by many coaches has been limited. Biomechanics scholars have long been interested in developing principles that facilitate the qualitative application of biomechanics to improve movement performance and reduce the risk of injury. This paper summarizes the major North American efforts to establish a set of general biomechanical principles of movement, and illustrates how principles can be used to improve the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport technique. A coach helping a player with a tennis serve is presented as an example. The standardization of terminology for biomechanical principles is proposed as an important first step in improving the application ofbiomechanics in sport. There is also a need for international cooperation and research on the effectiveness of applying biomechanical principles in the coaching of sport techniques.

  3. Research and Teaching: Assessing the Effect of Problem-Based Learning on Undergraduate Student Learning in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, David; Stoner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of using the problem-based learning (PBL) teaching strategy on student academic achievement and secondary learning outcomes when compared with the traditional lecture (TL) for an undergraduate Biomechanics course. Successive undergraduate Biomechanics courses--a TL cohort and a PBL cohort--were…

  4. Screening sunscreens: protecting the biomechanical barrier function of skin from solar ultraviolet radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkey, C; Biniek, K; Dauskardt, R H

    2017-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is ubiquitous in human life and well known to cause skin damage that can lead to harmful conditions such as erythema. Although sunscreen is a popular form of protection for some of these conditions, it is unclear whether sunscreen can maintain the mechanical barrier properties of skin. The objective of this study was to determine whether in vitro thin-film mechanical analysis techniques adapted for biological tissue are able to characterize the efficacy of commonly used UV inhibitors and commercial sunscreens to protect the biomechanical barrier properties of stratum corneum (SC) from UV exposure. The biomechanical properties of SC samples were assayed through measurements of the SC's drying stress profile and delamination energy. The drying stresses within SC were characterized from the curvature of a borosilicate glass substrate onto which SC had been adhered. Delamination energies were characterized using a double-cantilever beam (DCB) cohesion testing method. Successive DCB specimens were prepared from previously separated specimens by adhering new substrates onto each side of the already tested specimen to probe delamination energies deeper into the SC. These properties of the SC were measured before and after UV exposure, both with and without sunscreens applied, to determine the role of sunscreen in preserving the barrier function of SC. The drying stress in SC starts increasing sooner and rises to a higher plateau stress value after UVA exposure as compared to non-UV-exposed control specimens. For specimens that had sunscreen applied, the UVA-exposed and non-UV-exposed SC had similar drying stress profiles. Additionally, specimens exposed to UVB without protection from sunscreen exhibited significantly lower delamination energies than non-UV-exposed controls. With commercial sunscreen applied, the delamination energy for UV-exposed and non-UV-exposed tissue was consistent, even up to large doses of UVB. In vitro thin

  5. Toward quantitative estimation of material properties with dynamic mode atomic force microscopy: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sayan; Gannepalli, Anil; Salapaka, Murti

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we explore methods that enable estimation of material properties with the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy suitable for soft matter investigation. The article presents the viewpoint of casting the system, comprising of a flexure probe interacting with the sample, as an equivalent cantilever system and compares a steady-state analysis based method with a recursive estimation technique for determining the parameters of the equivalent cantilever system in real time. The steady-state analysis of the equivalent cantilever model, which has been implicitly assumed in studies on material property determination, is validated analytically and experimentally. We show that the steady-state based technique yields results that quantitatively agree with the recursive method in the domain of its validity. The steady-state technique is considerably simpler to implement, however, slower compared to the recursive technique. The parameters of the equivalent system are utilized to interpret storage and dissipative properties of the sample. Finally, the article identifies key pitfalls that need to be avoided toward the quantitative estimation of material properties.

  6. Comparative Evaluations and Microstructure: Mechanical Property Relations of Sintered Silicon Carbide Consolidated by Various Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barick, Prasenjit; Chatterjee, Arya; Majumdar, Bhaskar; Saha, Bhaskar Prasad; Mitra, Rahul

    2018-04-01

    A comparative evaluation between pressureless or self-sintered silicon carbide (SSiC), hot-pressed silicon carbide (HP-SiC), and spark plasma-sintered silicon carbide (SPS-SiC) has been carried out with emphasis on examination of their microstructures and mechanical properties. The effect of sample dimensions on density and properties of SPS-SiC has been also examined. Elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness measured by indentation or testing of single-edge notched beam specimens have been found to follow the following trend, HP-SiC > SSiC > SPS-SiC. The SPS-SiC samples have shown size-dependent densification and mechanical properties, with the smaller sample exhibiting superior properties. The mechanical properties of sintered SiC samples appear to be influenced by relative density, grain size, and morphology, as well as the existence of intergranular glassy phase. Studies of fracture surface morphologies have revealed the mechanism of failure to be transgranular in SSiC or HP-SiC, and intergranular in case of SPS-SiC, indicating the dominating influence of grain size and α-SiC formation with high aspect ratio.

  7. The effect of organoclay type on morphology and mechanical properties of polypropylene films: comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gama, D.B.; Calado, J.F.; Duarte, I.S.; Silva, S.M.L.; Andrade, D.L.A.C.S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to compare the effect of the type of organoclay on morphological and mechanical properties of polypropylene films. Thus, were employed two organobentonite synthesized by NanoPol/UFCG (APOC and APOCF) and a organo montmorillonite Cloisite 20A (C20A) from Southern Clay Products (Texas/USA). The PP films and the PP/organoclay hybrids were prepared in a ChillRoll extruder - 16 AX Plastics and characterized by X-ray diffraction and mechanical properties. The results indicate that the incorporation of organobentonite (APOC and APOCF) and organo montmorillonite (C20A) resulted in the formation of PP nanocomposites with predominantly intercalated morphologies. Also indicate that the mechanical behavior of the films obtained with the three clays (APOC APOCF and C20A) was similar suggesting that the organobentonite, modified with national technology, raw material of low cost when compared to commercial organo montmorillonite, can be a viable alternative in the preparation of PP films. (author)

  8. Model Reduction in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan

    The mechanical characteristic of the cell is primarily performed by the cytoskeleton. Microtubules, actin, and intermediate filaments are the three main cytoskeletal polymers. Of these, microtubules are the stiffest and have multiple functions within a cell that include: providing tracks for intracellular transport, transmitting the mechanical force necessary for cell division during mitosis, and providing sufficient stiffness for propulsion in flagella and cilia. Microtubule mechanics has been studied by a variety of methods: detailed molecular dynamics (MD), coarse-grained models, engineering type models, and elastic continuum models. In principle, atomistic MD simulations should be able to predict all desired mechanical properties of a single molecule, however, in practice the large computational resources are required to carry out a simulation of larger biomolecular system. Due to the limited accessibility using even the most ambitious all-atom models and the demand for the multiscale molecular modeling and simulation, the emergence of the reduced models is critically important to provide the capability for investigating the biomolecular dynamics that are critical to many biological processes. Then the coarse-grained models, such as elastic network models and anisotropic network models, have been shown to bequite accurate in predicting microtubule mechanical response, but still requires significant computational resources. On the other hand, the microtubule is treated as comprising materials with certain continuum material properties. Such continuum models, especially Euler-Bernoulli beam models, are often used to extract mechanical parameters from experimental results. The microtubule is treated as comprising materials with certain continuum material properties. Such continuum models, especially Euler-Bernoulli beam models in which the biomolecular system is assumed as homogeneous isotropic materials with solid cross-sections, are often used to extract

  9. A Comparative Study of Some Properties of Cassava and Tree Cassava Starch Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belibi, P. C.; Daou, T. J.; Ndjaka, J. M. B.; Nsom, B.; Michelin, L.; Durand, B.

    Cassava and tree cassava starch films plasticized with glycerol were produced by casting method. Different glycerol contents (30, 35, 40 and 45 wt. % on starch dry basis) were used and the resulting films were fully characterized. Their water barrier and mechanical properties were compared. While increasing glycerol concentration, moisture content, water solubility, water vapour permeability, tensile strength, percent elongation at break and Young's modulus decreased for both cassava and tree cassava films. Tree cassava films presented better values of water vapour permeability, water solubility and percent elongation at break compared to those of cassava films, regardless of the glycerol content.

  10. Esophageal morphometric and biomechanical changes during aging in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    Background The function of the esophagus have obvious changes during the aging, this functional change is important in relation to the concept of “the form follows function”. It is therefore of great interest to study the aging changes of the esophageal biomechanical properties. Aim The aim of th....... The observed changes likely reflect the changes of the physiological function of the esophagus during aging since for other tissues the function dictates the form of the tissue, and remodeling depend on the mechanical loading.......Background The function of the esophagus have obvious changes during the aging, this functional change is important in relation to the concept of “the form follows function”. It is therefore of great interest to study the aging changes of the esophageal biomechanical properties. Aim The aim...... of the present study is to investigate the esophageal geometry and biomechanical changes during aging in rats. Materials and methods Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of esophageal segment were measured at the termination...

  11. A review of biomechanics of the shoulder and biomechanical concepts of rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the basic knowledge about shoulder biomechanics, which is thought to be useful for surgeons. Some clinical reports have described that the excellent outcome after cuff repair without acromioplasty and a limited acromioplasty might be enough for subacromial decompression. It was biomechanically demonstrated that a 10-mm medial shift of the tendon repair site has a minimum effect on biomechanics. Many biomechanical studies reported that the transosseous equivalent repair was superior to other techniques, although the tendon may lose its inherent elasticity. We herein introduce our recent experiment data and latest information on biomechanics.

  12. Hierarchical multiscale model for biomechanics analysis of microfilament networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Gu, Y. T.; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yarlagadda, Prasad K. D. V.; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2013-05-01

    The mechanisms of force generation and transference via microfilament networks are crucial to the understandings of mechanobiology of cellular processes in living cells. However, there exists an enormous challenge for all-atom physics simulation of real size microfilament networks due to scale limitation of molecular simulation techniques. Following biophysical investigations of constitutive relations between adjacent globular actin monomers on filamentous actin, a hierarchical multiscale model was developed to investigate the biomechanical properties of microfilament networks. This model was validated by previous experimental studies of axial tension and transverse vibration of single F-actin. The biomechanics of microfilament networks can be investigated at the scale of real eukaryotic cell size (10 μm). This multiscale approach provides a powerful modeling tool which can contribute to the understandings of actin-related cellular processes in living cells.

  13. System-level biomechanical approach for the evaluation of term and preterm pregnancy maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Hussam; Wagoner Johnson, Amy; Chien, Edward K; Poellmann, Michael J; McFarlin, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    Preterm birth is the primary contributor to perinatal morbidity and mortality, with those born prior to 32 weeks disproportionately contributing compared to those born at 32-37 weeks. Outcomes for babies born prematurely can be devastating. Parturition is recognized as a mechanical process that involves the two processes that are required to initiate labor: rhythmic myometrial contractions and cervical remodeling with subsequent dilation. Studies of parturition tend to separate these two processes rather than evaluate them as a unified system. The mechanical property characterization of the cervix has been primarily performed on isolated cervical tissue, with an implied understanding of the contribution from the uterine corpus. Few studies have evaluated the function of the uterine corpus in the absence of myometrial contractions or in relationship to retaining the fetus. Therefore, the cervical-uterine interaction has largely been neglected in the literature. We suggest that a system-level biomechanical approach is needed to understand pregnancy maintenance. To that end, this paper has two main goals. One goal is to highlight the gaps in current knowledge that need to be addressed in order to develop any comprehensive and clinically relevant models of the system. The second goal is to illustrate the utility of finite element models in understanding pregnancy maintenance of the cervical-uterine system. The paper targets an audience that includes the reproductive biologist/clinician and the engineer/physical scientist interested in biomechanics and the system level behavior of tissues.

  14. Biomechanical testing of a hybrid locking plate fixation of equine sesamoid osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida da Silveira, E; Levasseur, A; Lacourt, M; Elce, Y; Petit, Y

    2014-01-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of a hybrid locking compression plate (LCP) construct with the compression screw technique as a treatment for transverse mid-body proximal sesamoid bone fractures. Ten paired forelimbs from abattoir horses were used. The medial proximal sesamoid bone of each limb was osteotomized transversely and randomly assigned, to either repair with a two-hole 3.5 mm LCP or a 4.5 mm cortical screw placed in lag fashion. Each limb was tested biomechanically by axial loading in single cycle until failure. The point of failure was evaluated from the load-displacement curves. Then a gross evaluation and radiographs were performed to identify the mode of failure. The loads to failure of limbs repaired with the hybrid LCP construct (4968 N ± 2167) and the limbs repaired with the screw technique (3009 N ± 1091) were significantly different (p fracture of the apical fragment of the proximal sesamoid bone. The LCP technique has potential to achieve a better fracture stability and healing when applied to mid-body fractures of the proximal sesamoid bone. Further testing, particularly fatigue resistance is required to corroborate its potential as a treatment option for mid-body fractures of the proximal sesamoid bone.

  15. [Function of prosthesis components in lower limb amputees with bone-anchored percutaneous implants : Biomechanical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumentritt, S

    2017-05-01

    Bone anchorage of an artificial limb has been proven to be an alternative intervention for amputees when prosthesis use is seriously reduced because of stump problems. Little is known about how prosthesis components interact with bone and joints and which potential the optimum use provides with respect to quality of treatment of leg amputees. Does osseointegration influence the motor activity of residual limbs differently compared with socket prostheses? How should prosthesis components be aligned? What type of prosthetic knee joints should be preferred in transfemoral amputees? Transfer of biomechanical knowledge of socket prosthetics to bone-anchored prostheses. Pilot studies with a limited number of amputees. Force transmission at the interface between the prosthesis and residual limb stump is completely different for osseointegrated fixation and socket design; however, the number of muscles available for control remains unchanged. Because the iliotibial tract is missing, bending moments of the femur are expected to be greater. Prosthetic alignment is very critical for gait pattern and the basic rules seem to be the same as for socket design. The foot position determines the knee function for below-knee amputees. The position of the femur influences the gait pattern of above-knee amputees. The lowest risk of falls and best functional properties are shown by microprocessor controlled knee joints. Osseointegrated leg prostheses have some biomechanical advantages over the socket design. Since rehabilitation quality is clearly affected the prosthetic alignment has to be done carefully and precisely. As a rule microprocessor controlled knee joints are indicated.

  16. Evaluation of a Particle Swarm Algorithm For Biomechanical Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Jaco F.; Koh, Byung; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Haftka, Raphael T.; George, Alan D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Optimization is frequently employed in biomechanics research to solve system identification problems, predict human movement, or estimate muscle or other internal forces that cannot be measured directly. Unfortunately, biomechanical optimization problems often possess multiple local minima, making it difficult to find the best solution. Furthermore, convergence in gradient-based algorithms can be affected by scaling to account for design variables with different length scales or units. In this study we evaluate a recently-developed version of the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to address these problems. The algorithm’s global search capabilities were investigated using a suite of difficult analytical test problems, while its scale-independent nature was proven mathematically and verified using a biomechanical test problem. For comparison, all test problems were also solved with three off-the-shelf optimization algorithms—a global genetic algorithm (GA) and multistart gradient-based sequential quadratic programming (SQP) and quasi-Newton (BFGS) algorithms. For the analytical test problems, only the PSO algorithm was successful on the majority of the problems. When compared to previously published results for the same problems, PSO was more robust than a global simulated annealing algorithm but less robust than a different, more complex genetic algorithm. For the biomechanical test problem, only the PSO algorithm was insensitive to design variable scaling, with the GA algorithm being mildly sensitive and the SQP and BFGS algorithms being highly sensitive. The proposed PSO algorithm provides a new off-the-shelf global optimization option for difficult biomechanical problems, especially those utilizing design variables with different length scales or units. PMID:16060353

  17. Biomechanics of the human uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kristin M; Elad, David

    2017-09-01

    The appropriate biomechanical function of the uterus is required for the execution of human reproduction. These functions range from aiding the transport of the embryo to the implantation site, to remodeling its tissue walls to host the placenta, to protecting the fetus during gestation, to contracting forcefully for a safe parturition and postpartum, to remodeling back to its nonpregnant condition to renew the cycle of menstruation. To serve these remarkably diverse functions, the uterus is optimally geared with evolving and contractile muscle and tissue layers that are cued by chemical, hormonal, electrical, and mechanical signals. The relationship between these highly active biological signaling mechanisms and uterine biomechanical function is not completely understood for normal reproductive processes and pathological conditions such as adenomyosis, endometriosis, infertility and preterm labor. Animal studies have illuminated the rich structural function of the uterus, particularly in pregnancy. In humans, medical imaging techniques in ultrasound and magnetic resonance have been combined with computational engineering techniques to characterize the uterus in vivo, and advanced experimental techniques have explored uterine function using ex vivo tissue samples. The collective evidence presented in this review gives an overall perspective on uterine biomechanics related to both its nonpregnant and pregnant function, highlighting open research topics in the field. Additionally, uterine disease and infertility are discussed in the context of tissue injury and repair processes and the role of computational modeling in uncovering etiologies of disease. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1388. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1388 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A comparative study of the thermoluminescence properties of several varieties of Brazilian natural quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito Farias, Thiago Michel de; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2012-01-01

    The following varieties of natural quartz, as the blue, the green, the red, the pink, the black, the sulphurous and the milky quartz, have been investigated concerning their thermoluminescence properties. For comparison sake natural colorless alpha quartz has been include. Since X-rays diffraction analysis has shown that all of them have the same crystal structure as the alpha quartz, it is expected that no great change in the TL property should be found, however, that was not the case. The TL peaks at 110, 175, 220, 325 and 375 °C observed in the alpha quartz are not found in all the varieties of quartz, for instance, the sulphurous quartz presented only 110° and 245° peaks, the pink one presented just 110, 220 and 375 °C peaks and so on. In respect to TL response as function of gamma ray dose a quite varied behavior has been observed and discussed. - Highlights: ► We evaluated seven varieties of natural quartz. ► Thermoluminescence properties were compared. ► Their properties are different. ► The models proposed for the TL emission cannot be applied.

  19. Comparative study of Bifidobacterium animalis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus casei and Saccharomyces boulardii probiotic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Flaviano S; Silva, Aparecida A; Vieira, Angélica T; Barbosa, Flávio H F; Arantes, Rosa M E; Teixeira, Mauro M; Nicoli, Jacques Robert

    2009-08-01

    The present work investigates some probiotic properties of four different microorganisms (Bifidobacterium animalis var. lactis BB-12, Escherichia coli EMO, Lactobacillus casei and Saccharomyces boulardii). In vitro and in vivo tests were carried out to compare cell wall hydrophobicity, production of antagonistic substances, survival capacity in the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free mice without pathological consequence, and immune modulation by stimulation of Küpffer cells, intestinal sIgA and IL-10 levels. In vitro antagonism against pathogenic bacteria and yeast was only observed for the probiotic bacteria B. animalis and L. casei. The hydrophobic property of the cell wall was higher for B. animalis and E. coli EMO, and this property could be responsible for a better ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free mice. Higher levels of sIgA were observed mainly for S. boulardii, followed by E. coli EMO and B. animalis, and only S. boulardii induced a significant higher level of IL-10. In conclusion, for a probiotic use, S. boulardii presented better characteristics in terms of immunomodulation, and B. animalis and L. casei for antagonistic substance production. The knowledge of the different probiotic properties could be used to choice the better microorganism depending on the therapeutic or prophylactic application.

  20. Aged garlic has more potent antiglycation and antioxidant properties compared to fresh garlic extract in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosta, Abdulhakim; Slevin, Mark; Rahman, Khalid; Ahmed, Nessar

    2017-01-01

    Protein glycation involves formation of early (Amadori) and late advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) together with free radicals via autoxidation of glucose and Amadori products. Glycation and increased free radical activity underlie the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. This study investigated whether aged garlic has more potent antiglycation and antioxidant properties compared to fresh garlic extract in vitro in a cell-free system. Proteins were glycated by incubation with sugars (glucose, methylglyoxal or ribose) ±5–15 mg/mL of aged and fresh garlic extracts. Advanced glycation endproducts were measured using SDS-PAGE gels and by ELISA whereas Amadori products were assessed by the fructosamine method. Colorimetric methods were used to assess antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging capacity, protein-bound carbonyl groups, thiol groups and metal chelation activities in addition to phenolic, total flavonoid and flavonol content of aged and fresh garlic extracts. Aged garlic inhibited AGEs by 56.4% compared to 33.5% for an equivalent concentration of fresh garlic extract. Similarly, aged garlic had a higher total phenolic content (129 ± 1.8 mg/g) compared to fresh garlic extract (56 ± 1.2 mg/g). Aged garlic has more potent antiglycation and antioxidant properties compared to fresh garlic extract and is more suitable for use in future in vivo studies. PMID:28051097

  1. Relationships between physical and biomechanical parameters and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A proficient golf swing is composed of a sequence of highly complex biomechanical movements and requires precisely timed and coordinated body movements to achieve great distance and accuracy. The aim of the current study was to identify the key physiological and biomechanical variables that relate to golf drive ...

  2. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    1996. Worthen, L., Hamill, J. Biomechanical issues in ballet : ankle alignment in pointe shoes. 15d, Annual Symposium on Medical Problems of Musicians... Mexico Race Walkers Association, Albuquerque, New Mexico , June, 1987. Biomechanics of fitness walking. American Diabetes Association, St. Louis, Missouri

  3. Biomechanical benefits of symmetrical strengthening of hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is abundant literature encouraging athletes to engage in concurrent strength training. However, little emphasis is placed on the value of biomechanics with regard to symmetrical strengthening of force-couple relationships. A review of literature reveals 565 biomechanical papers versus 2085 physiological papers ...

  4. Applied Biomechanics in an Instructional Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics is the science of how people move better, meaning more skillfully and more safely. This article places more emphasis on skill rather than safety, though there are many parallels between them. It shares a few features of the author's paradigm of applied biomechanics and discusses an integrated approach toward a middle school football…

  5. Biomechanical Comparison of Cadaveric and Commercially Available Synthetic Osteoporotic Bone Analogues in a Locked Plate Fracture Model Under Torsional Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Edward H; Kim, Hyunchul; Shorofsky, Michael; Hsieh, Adam H; Watson, Jeffrey D; OʼToole, Robert V

    2017-05-01

    Biomechanical studies of osteoporotic bone have used synthetic models rather than cadaveric samples because of decreased variability, increased availability, and overall ease of the use of synthetic models. We compared the torsional mechanical properties of cadaveric osteoporotic bone with those of currently available synthetic osteoporotic bone analogues. We tested 12 osteoporotic cadaveric humeri and 6 specimens each of 6 types of synthetic analogues. A 5-mm fracture gap model and posterior plating technique with 4.5-mm narrow 10-hole locking compression plate were used. Torque was applied to a peak of ±10 N·m for 1000 cycles at 0.3 Hz. Data were continuously collected during cyclical and ramped loading with a servohydraulic materials testing system. Cadaveric bone had a 17% failure rate before completing 1000 cycles. Three osteoporotic bone models had 100% failure (P Osteoporotic bone analogues had torsional mechanical properties different from those of osteoporotic cadaveric specimens. The differences between osteoporotic cadaveric humeri and synthetic osteoporotic bone analogues ranged from profound with complete catastrophic failure after a few cycles to subtler differences in stiffness and strain hardening. These findings suggest that different bone analogue models vary substantially in their torsional mechanical properties and might not be appropriate substitutes for cadaveric bone in biomechanical studies of osteoporotic bone.

  6. Influence of Orthotropy on Biomechanics of Peri-Implant Bone in Complete Mandible Model with Full Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The study was to investigate the impact of orthotropic material on the biomechanics of dental implant, based on a detailed mandible with high geometric and mechanical similarity. Materials and Methods. Multiple data sources were used to elaborate detailed biological structures and implant CAD models. In addition, an extended orthotropic material assignment methodology based on harmonic fields was used to handle the alveolar ridge region to generate compatible orthotropic fields. The influence of orthotropic material was compared with the commonly used isotropic model and simplified orthotropic model. Results. The simulation results showed that the values of stress and strain on the implant-bone interface almost increased in the orthotropic model compared to the isotropic case, especially for the cancellous bone. However, the local stress concentration was more obvious in the isotropic case compared to that in orthotropic case. The simple orthotropic model revealed irregular stress and strain distribution, compared to the isotropic model and the real orthotropic model. The influence of orthotropy was little on the implant, periodontal ligament, tooth enamel, and dentin. Conclusion. The orthotropic material has significant effect on stress and strain of implant-bone interface in the mandible, compared with the isotropic simulation. Real orthotropic mechanical properties of mandible should be emphasized in biomechanical studies of dental implants.

  7. Problems of Sport Biomechanics and Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlodzimierz S. Erdmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents many common areas of interest of different specialists. There are problems described from sport, biomechanics, sport biomechanics, sport engineering, robotics, biomechanics and robotics, sport biomechanics and robotics. There are many approaches to sport from different sciences and engineering. Robotics is a relatively new area and has had moderate attention from sport specialists. The aim of this paper is to present several areas necessary to develop sport robots based on biomechanics and also to present different types of sport robots: serving balls, helping to provide sports training, substituting humans during training, physically participating in competitions, physically participating in competitions against humans, serving as models of real sport performance, helping organizers of sport events and robot toys. Examples of the application of robots in sports communities are also given.

  8. Molecular modeling studies of structural properties of polyvinyl alcohol: a comparative study using INTERFACE force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosinski, Lukasz; Labus, Karolina

    2017-10-05

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a material with a variety of applications in separation, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Using combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, we present an extensive comparative study of second- and third-generation force fields Universal, COMPASS, COMPASS II, PCFF, and the newly developed INTERFACE, as applied to this system. In particular, we show that an INTERFACE force field provides a possibility of composing a reliable atomistic model to reproduce density change of PVA matrix in a narrow temperature range (298-348 K) and calculate a thermal expansion coefficient with reasonable accuracy. Thus, the INTERFACE force field may be used to predict mechanical properties of the PVA system, being a scaffold for hydrogels, with much greater accuracy than latter approaches. Graphical abstract Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo studies indicate that it is possible to predict properties of the PVA in narrow temperature range by using the INTERFACE force field.

  9. Property Rights, Inheritance by Wives and Gender Equality: Brazil and Hispanic America in Comparative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Diana Derre

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable gains were made in Latin America over the course of the twentieth century in strengthening the property rights of married women. Insufficient attention, nonetheless, has been given to the inheritance rights of wives. Reviewing the legal norms for twelve countries, it is argued that widows are often in a disadvantaged position compared to the children of a couple. Inheritance norms were not designed to give widows the possibility for economic autonomy, such as through control of the family farm or business. Moreover, given the gender gap favoring women in the lengthening of life spans and the low coverage of social security (particularly in rural areas in most countries, they are particularly vulnerable when they are widowed. The women’s movement is urged to take on the issue of inheritance rights since strengthening these are necessary to achieve a redistribution of property and real gender equality.

  10. Biomechanics of brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Thibault P; Balakrishnan, Asha; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of porcine brain tissue, obtained from a series of in vitro observations and experiments, is analyzed and described here with the aid of a large strain, nonlinear, viscoelastic constitutive model. Mixed gray and white matter samples excised from the superior cortex were tested in unconfined uniaxial compression within 15h post mortem. The test sequence consisted of three successive load-unload segments at strain rates of 1, 0.1 and 0.01 s⁻¹, followed by stress relaxation (n=25). The volumetric compliance of the tissue was assessed for a subset of specimens (n=7) using video extensometry techniques. The tissue response exhibited moderate compressibility, substantial nonlinearity, hysteresis, conditioning and rate dependence. A large strain kinematics nonlinear viscoelastic model was developed to account for the essential features of the tissue response over the entire deformation history. The corresponding material parameters were obtained by fitting the model to the measured conditioned response (axial and volumetric) via a numerical optimization scheme. The model successfully captures the observed complexities of the material response in loading, unloading and relaxation over the entire range of strain rates. The accuracy of the model was further verified by comparing model predictions with the tissue response in unconfined compression at higher strain rate (10 s⁻¹) and with literature data in uniaxial tension. The proposed constitutive framework was also found to be adequate to model the loading response of brain tissue in uniaxial compression over a wider range of strain rates (0.01-3000 s⁻¹), thereby providing a valuable tool for simulations of dynamic transients (impact, blast/shock wave propagation) leading to traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hand Posture Prediction Using Neural Networks within a Biomechanical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta C. Mora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs in the framework of a biomechanical hand model for grasping. ANNs enhance the model capabilities as they substitute estimated data for the experimental inputs required by the grasping algorithm used. These inputs are the tentative grasping posture and the most open posture during grasping. As a consequence, more realistic grasping postures are predicted by the grasping algorithm, along with the contact information required by the dynamic biomechanical model (contact points and normals. Several neural network architectures are tested and compared in terms of prediction errors, leading to encouraging results. The performance of the overall proposal is also shown through simulation, where a grasping experiment is replicated and compared to the real grasping data collected by a data glove device.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Antimicrobial Property of Wine and Ozone with Calcium Hydroxide and Chlorhexidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Shenbaga Kuttalam; Ebenezar, A V Rajesh; Anand, Nirupa; Mary, A Vinita; Mony, Bejoy

    2015-06-01

    The antibacterial properties of wine and ozone have been established but their antibacterial efficacies against endodontic pathogens are yet to be ascertained. The purpose of this study is to comparatively evaluate the antibacterial property of ozonated water, white wine (14%) and de-alcoholised white wine. S.mutans and E.faecalis were subcultured and inoculated in a nutrient broth for 24 hours. The following groups were formulated: Group 1A:2% Chlorhexidine (Control group); Group 1B:White wine; Group 1C:Dealcoholised white wine; Group 1D:Ozonated water; Group 2A: Ca(OH)2 + Chlorhexidine (Control group); Group 2B: White wine + Ca(OH)2; Group 2C:De-alcoholised White wine + Ca(OH)2 + chlorhexidine; Group 2D:White wine + Ca(OH)2 + chlorhexidine and group 2E: Dealcoholised white wine + Ca(OH)2 + chlorhexidine. The samples were allowed to diffuse into the culture medium for two hours, later the S. mutans were streaked on to the blood agar medium and the E. faecalis were streaked on to the Muller Hilton agar medium and incubated for 48 hours at 370C the zone of inhibition was measured after 48 hours. There was no growth of microorganisms seen with ozonated water. Chlorhexidine showed large zone of inhibition compared to the other groups. White wine has better antimicrobial property than de-alcoholised white wine, but when mixed with calcium hydroxide the dealcoholised white wine has better action against the microorganisms. Ozonated water has the best antibacterial property and the antibacterial action of Calcium hydroxide is enhanced when it is mixed with de-alcoholised white wine.

  13. [A biomechanic study on the relapse after sagittal split and oblique osteotomy of Ramus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Song, Yufeng; Wang, Dazhang

    2004-02-01

    The relapse after orthognathic surgery was frequently reported in recent years. But up to now researches concerning bio-mechanic mechanism of relapse are rare. The purpose of this study, by imitating the operation on monkeys, was to examine the biomechanical properties and histological characteristics after operation in order to investigate the mechanism of the relapse after orthognathic surgery. 20 rhesus monkeys divided into two groups were subjected to bilateral sagittal split and oblique osteotomy, respectively. The broken strength, stress and strain of the operated sites were examined with the use of biomechanical methods, and the healing scab was observed using histological method and SEM at 3, 6, 12, 24 weeks after operation. The results obtained demonstrated that bone healing and biomechanical properties reached certain level after 6 to 12 weeks' recovery in both operation groups; the biomechanical properties and histological characteristics recovered faster in sagittal split group than in oblique osteotomy group. Histological examination also demonstrated similar results. From the data above it is suggested that the higher relapse rate in sagittal split may more closely related to the mechanical effect different from the scab healing, although 8 weeks' fixation may meet the requirement of clinical treatment, accessory fixation method should be adopted after the removal of inter-maxilla fixation.

  14. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  15. Laryngeal biomechanics of the singing voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufman, J A; Radomski, T A; Joharji, G M; Russell, G B; Pillsbury, D C

    1996-12-01

    By transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy, patients with functional voice often demonstrate abnormal laryngeal biomechanics, commonly supraglottic contraction. Appropriately, such conditions are sometimes termed muscle tension dysphonias. Singers working at the limits of their voice may also transiently demonstrate comparable tension patterns. However, the biomechanics of normal singing, particularly for different singing styles, have not been previously well characterized. We used transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy to study 100 healthy singers to assess patterns of laryngeal tension during normal singing and to determine whether factors such as sex, occupation, and style of singing influence laryngeal muscle tension. Thirty-nine male and 61 female singers were studied; 48 were professional singers, and 52 were amateurs. Examinations of study subjects performing standardized and nonstandardized singing tasks were recorded on a laser disk and subsequently analyzed in a frame-by-frame fashion by a blinded otolaryngologist. Each vocal task was graded for muscle tension by previously established criteria, and objective muscle tension scores were computed. The muscle tension score was expressed as a percentage of frames for each task with one of the laryngeal muscle tension patterns shown. The lowest muscle tension scores were seen in female professional singers, and the highest muscle tension scores were seen in amateur female singers. Male singers (professional and amateur) had intermediate muscle tension scores. Classical singers had lower muscle tension scores than nonclassical singers, with the lowest muscle tension scores being seen in those singing choral music (41%), art song (47%), and opera (57%), and the highest being seen in those singing jazz/pop (65%), musical theater (74%), bluegrass/country and western (86%), and rock/gospel (94%). Analyzed also were the influences of vocal nodules, prior vocal training, number of performance and practice hours per week

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of the Jump Shot in Basketball

    OpenAIRE

    Struzik Artur; Pietraszewski Bogdan; Zawadzki Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Basketball players usually score points during the game using the jump shot. For this reason, the jump shot is considered to be the most important element of technique in basketball and requires a high level of performance. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of the lower limbs during a jump shot without the ball and a countermovement jump without an arm swing. The differences between variables provide information about the potential that an athlete can util...

  17. Artificial Intelligence in Sports Biomechanics: New Dawn or False Hope?

    OpenAIRE

    Bartlett, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews developments in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in sports biomechanics over the last decade. It outlines possible uses of Expert Systems as diagnostic tools for evaluating faults in sports movements ('techniques') and presents some example knowledge rules for such an expert system. It then compares the analysis of sports techniques, in which Expert Systems have found little place to date, with gait analysis, in which they are routinely used. Consideration is then ...

  18. Quantification of Subjective Scaling of Friction Using a Fingertip Biomechanical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdolvahab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjective scaling of friction is important in many applications in haptic technology. A nonhomogeneous biomechanical finite element model of fingertip is proposed in order to predict neural response of sensitive mechanoreceptors to frictional stimuli (Slowly Adapting SAII receptors under the glabrous skin. In a guided psychophysical experiment, ten human subjects were asked to scale several standard surfaces based on the perception of their frictional properties. Contact forces deployed during the exploratory time of one of the participants were captured in order to estimate required parameters for the model of contact in the simulation procedure. Consequently, the strain energy density at the location of a selective mechanoreceptor in the finite element model as a measure of discharge rate of the neural unit was compared to the subject’s perceptual evaluation of the relevant stimuli. It was observed that the subject’s scores correlate with the discharge rate of the given receptor.

  19. Modeling Analysis of Biomechanical Changes of Middle Ear and Cochlea in Otitis Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Rong Z.; Zhang, Xiangming; Guan, Xiying

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive finite element (FE) model of the human ear including the ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea was developed using histological sections of human temporal bone. The cochlea was modeled with three chambers separated by the basilar membrane and Reissner's membrane and filled with perilymphatic fluid. The viscoelastic material behavior was applied to middle ear soft tissues based on dynamic measurements of tissues in our lab. The model was validated using the experimental data obtained in human temporal bones and then used to simulate various stages of otitis media (OM) including the changes of morphology, mechanical properties, pressure, and fluid level in the middle ear. Function alterations of the middle ear and cochlea in OM were derived from the model and compared with the measurements from temporal bones. This study indicates that OM can be simulated in the FE model to predict the hearing loss induced by biomechanical changes of the middle ear and cochlea.

  20. Reinforced fixation of distal fibula fractures in elderly patients; A meta-analysis of biomechanical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Siem A; Lodeizen, Olivia A P; Goslings, J Carel; Schepers, Tim

    2016-07-01

    There is an increasing incidence of fragility fractures of the ankle in the elderly population. The open reduction and internal fixation of these fractures is challenging, due to reduced bone stock quality as a result of osteoporosis. Biomechanical studies have shown contradicting results using reinforced constructions in the fixation of fibular fractures. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of biomechanical studies on reinforced fixation of distal fibular fractures. A literature search was conducted utilizing three online databases considering biomechanical testing of different fixation techniques of distal fibular fractures. A meta-analysis was performed on two biomechanical outcome measures; torsional stiffness and torque to failure. In a total number of 13 studies 8 different reinforcement techniques were identified. Of these studies, six compared locked lateral plating with conventional lateral plating. There were no statistically significant differences between the locking and non-locking lateral plate for torque to failure or torsional stiffness. Locked plating strength was independent from bone mineral density in four studies. An antiglide plate proved to be biomechanically superior compared to a lateral plate in one study and to a locked plate in another. Locked lateral plates are not biomechanically superior to conventional lateral plates. However the strength of locked plating may be independent of bone mineral density and could make this technique more suitable in the fixation of severe osteoporotic fractures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A biomechanical, micro-computertomographic and histological analysis of the influence of diclofenac and prednisolone on fracture healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, Oliver; Kreutzer, Kilian; Götz, Carolin; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Pautke, Christoph; Vogt, Stephan; Wexel, Gabriele; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Tischer, Thomas; Prodinger, Peter Michael

    2016-09-05

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have long been suspected of negatively affecting fracture healing, although numerous disputes still exist and little data are available regarding diclofenac. Glucocorticoids interfere in this process over a similar and even broader mechanism of action. As many previously conducted studies evaluated either morphological changes or biomechanical properties of treated bones, the conjunction of both structural measures is completely missing. Therefore, it was our aim to evaluate the effects of diclofenac and prednisolone on the fracture callus biomechanically, morphologically and by 3-dimensional (3D) microstructural analysis. Femura of diclofenac-, prednisolone- or placebo-treated rats were pinned and a closed transverse fracture was generated. After 21 days, biomechanics, micro-CT (μCT) and histology were examined. The diclofenac group showed significantly impaired fracture healing compared with the control group by biomechanics and μCT (e.g. stiffness: 57.31 ± 31.11 N/mm vs. 122.44 ± 81.16 N/mm, p = 0.030; callus volume: 47.05 ± 15.67 mm3 vs. 67.19 ± 14.90 mm3, p = 0.037, trabecular thickness: 0.0937 mm ± 0.003 vs. 0.0983 mm ± 0.003, p = 0.023), as confirmed by histology. Biomechanics of the prednisolone group showed obviously lower absolute values than the control group. These alterations were confirmed in conjunction with μCT and histology. The inhibiting effects of both substances were not only mediated by absolute parameters (e.g. breaking load, BV), but we have shown, for the first time, that additional changes occurred in the microstructural bony network. Especially in patients at risk for delayed bone healing (arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, smoking), the administration of these drugs should be weighed carefully.

  2. The early effects of sustained platelet-derived growth factor administration on the functional and structural properties of repaired intrasynovial flexor tendons: an in vivo biomechanic study at 3 weeks in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberman, Richard H; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E; Das, Rosalina; Silva, Matthew J

    2007-03-01

    A bioactive fibrin-based delivery system was used to provide sustained administration of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) in a clinically relevant model of intrasynovial flexor tendon repair. We hypothesized that PDGF-BB administered in this manner would improve the sutured tendon's functional and structural properties 3 weeks after repair. A delivery system consisting of 30 microL of fibrin matrix, peptide, heparin, and 100 ng of PDGF-BB was incorporated into the repair sites of randomly selected medial or lateral forepaw flexor digitorum profundus tendons of 8 adult mongrel dogs. The remaining forepaw flexor digitorum profundus tendons were repaired without the growth-factor and fibrin-based delivery system and served as controls. The surgically treated forelimbs were treated with controlled passive motion rehabilitation. The animals were killed at 3 weeks, at which time the tendons were tested for range of motion with a motion analysis system and for tensile properties with a materials testing machine. Proximal interphalangeal joint and distal interphalangeal joint rotation values were significantly higher for the PDGF-BB-treated tendons compared with the repair-alone tendons. Excursion values were also significantly higher in the PDGF-BB-treated tendons. There were no significant differences in tensile properties when comparing PDGF-BB-treated with repair-alone tendons. The functional properties of repaired intrasynovial flexor tendons were significantly improved with the sustained administration of PDGF-BB. The failure to achieve improvements in ultimate load, stiffness, and strain in the experimental group may have been due to suboptimal PDGF-BB dosage or suboptimal release kinetics.

  3. Comparative study of mechanical properties of direct core build-up materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The strength greatly influences the selection of core material because core must withstand forces due to mastication and para-function for many years. This study was conducted to evaluate certain mechanical properties of commonly used materials for direct core build-up, including visible light cured composite, polyacid modified composite, resin modified glass ionomer, high copper amalgam, and silver cermet cement. Materials and Methods: All the materials were manipulated according to the manufacturer′s recommendations and standard test specimens were prepared. A universal testing machine at different cross-head speed was used to determine all the four mechanical properties. Mean compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, flexural strength, and elastic modulus with standard deviations were calculated. Multiple comparisons of the materials were also done. Results: Considerable differences in compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength were observed. Visible light cured composite showed relatively high compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength compared with the other tested materials. Amalgam showed the highest value for elastic modulus. Silver cermet showed less value for all the properties except for elastic modulus. Conclusions: Strength is one of the most important criteria for selection of a core material. Stronger materials better resist deformation and fracture provide more equitable stress distribution, greater stability, and greater probability of clinical success.

  4. Physicochemical properties of starches isolated from pumpkin compared with potato and corn starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przetaczek-Rożnowska, Izabela

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the selected physicochemical, thermal and rheological properties of pumpkin starches and compared with the properties of potato and corn starches used as control samples. Pumpkin starches could be used in the food industry as a free gluten starch. Better thermal and rheological properties could contribute to reduce the costs of food production. The syneresis of pumpkin starches was similar to that of potato starch but much lower than that for corn starch. Pasting temperatures of pumpkin starches were lower by 17-21.7°C and their final viscosities were over 1000cP higher than corn paste, but were close to the values obtained for potato starch. The thermodynamic characteristic showed that the transformation temperatures of pumpkin starches were lower than those measured for control starches. A level of retrogradation was much lower in pumpkin starch pastes (32-48%) than was in the case of corn (59%) or potato (77%) starches. The pumpkin starches gels were characterized by a much greater hardness, cohesiveness and chewiness, than potato or corn starches gels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative studies on structural properties and antimicrobial potential of spinel ferrite nanoparticles synthesized using various methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraliya, Jagdish D.; Rakhashiya, Purvi M.; Patel, Pooja P.; Thaker, Vrinda S.; Joshi, Hiren H.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, novel multifunctional magnetic iron-based nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) coated with silica, silica-DEG (diethylene glycol), PEG (polyethylene glycol) were synthesized using Auto Combustion Method (ACM), Co-precipitation Method (COPM), Citrate Precursor Method (CPM), Flash Combustion Method (FCM). These spinel ferrite nanoparticles also contain very high antibacterial properties to fulfill the requirements of a drug delivery system so that the antibiotic concentration could be minimized. A potential delivery system could be based on a ferromagnetic fluid. The effects of various preparation methods on the physical properties of the nanoparticles were examined. The nanoparticles were also tested against four human pathogenic bacteria (Gram negative E.coli, P. aeruginosa, Gram positive S. aureus, S. pyogenus) and two fungi (C. albicans, A.niger). It was revealed that a nanoparticle has strong antibacterial activity as compared to antifungal. Further, Gram positive bacteria are more affected than Gram negative bacteria. It was also clear that different methods of coating have great influence on the antimicrobial properties. It was observed that these nanoparticles have significantly different but potentially very high antimicrobial activities against the tested organisms than found elsewhere by other nanoparticles on the same organisms.

  6. Determining the biomechanics of touch sensation in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, Muna; Pawar, Vijay M; Shaw, Michael; Wong, David; Zhan, Haoyun; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2017-09-26

    The sense of touch is a fundamental mechanism that nearly all organisms use to interact with their surroundings. However, the process of mechanotransduction whereby a mechanical stimulus gives rise to a neuronal response is not well understood. In this paper we present an investigation of the biomechanics of touch using the model organism C. elegans. By developing a custom micromanipulation and force sensing system around a high resolution optical microscope, we measured the spatial deformation of the organism's cuticle and force response to controlled uniaxial indentations. We combined these experimental results with anatomical data to create a multilayer computational biomechanical model of the organism and accurately derive its material properties such as the elastic modulus and poisson's ratio. We demonstrate the utility of this model by combining it with previously published electrophysiological data to provide quantitative insights into different biomechanical states for mechanotransduction, including the first estimate of the sensitivity of an individual mechanoreceptor to an applied stimulus (parameterised as strain energy density). We also interpret empirical behavioural data to estimate the minimum number of mechanoreceptors which must be activated to elicit a behavioural response.

  7. The effects of tibiofibularis anterior ligaments on ankle joint biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Erduran, Mehmet; Baktıroğlu, Lütfü; Büdeyri, Aydın; Yıldız, Didem Venüs; Havıtçıoğlu, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of anterior inferior tibiofibularis ligament (AITFL) deficient human ankle under axial loading of ankle at stance phase of gait. In order to investigate the contribution of AITFL to ankle stability, an in vitro sequential experimental setup was simulated. The measurement of posterior displacement of distal tibia and anterior displacement of the foot, in neutral position, secondary to axial compression, was performed by two non-contact video extensometers. Eight freshly frozen, anatomically intact, cadaveric human ankle specimens were included and tested. An axial compression test machine was utilized from 0 to 800 Newtonswith a loading speed of 5 mm/min in order to simulate the axial weight-bearing sequence of the ankle at stance phase of human gait. There was a statistically significant difference between anteroposterior displacement values for AITFL-Intact and AITFL-Dissected specimens (p≤0.05). Mean AITFL-Intact and mean AITFL-Dissected ankle anteroposterior displacement was 1.28±0.47 mm and 2.06±0.7 mm, respectively. This study determined some numerical and quantitative data about the biomechanical properties of AITFL in neutral foot position. In the emergency department, diagnosis and treatment of AITFL injury, due to ankle distortion, is important. In AITFL injuries, ankle biomechanics is affected, and ankle instability occurs.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of the Flow Properties between Two Alumina-Based Dry Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Minniti de Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured and compared the flow properties of two alumina-based powders. The alumina powder (AP is irregularly shaped and has a smooth surface and moisture content of 0.16% (d.b., and the ceramic powder (CP, obtained after atomization in a spray dryer, is spherical and has a rough surface and moisture content of 1.07%. We measured the Hausner ratio (HR, the static angle of repose (AoR, the flow index (FI, the angle of internal friction, and the wall's friction angle. The properties measured using aerated techniques (AoR and HR demonstrated that AP presents true cohesiveness (and therefore a difficult flow, while CP presents some cohesiveness and its flow might be classified as half way between difficult and easy flow. Their FI values, which were obtained using a nonaerated technique, enable us to classify the alumina as cohesive and the ceramic powder as an easy-flow powder. The large mean diameter and morphological characteristics of CP reduce interparticle forces and improve flowability, in spite of the higher moisture content of their granules. The angles of internal friction and of wall friction were not significantly different when comparing the two powders.

  9. Biomechanics in Paralympics: Implications for Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriën, Floor; Taylor, Matthew J D; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2017-05-01

    To provide an overview of biomechanical studies in Paralympic research and their relevance for performance in Paralympic sports. The search terms paralympic biomechanics, paralympic sport performance, paralympic athlete performance, and paralympic athlete were entered into the electronic database PubMed. Thirty-four studies were found. Biomechanical studies in Paralympics mainly contributed to performance enhancement by technical optimization (n = 32) and/or injury prevention (n = 6). In addition, biomechanics was found to be important in understanding activity limitation caused by various impairments, which is relevant for evidence-based classification in Paralympic sports (n = 6). Distinctions were made between biomechanical studies in sitting (41%), standing (38%), and swimming athletes (21%). In sitting athletes, mostly kinematics and kinetics in wheelchair propulsion were studied, mainly in athletes with spinal-cord injuries. In addition, kinetics and/or kinematics in wheelchair basketball, seated discus throwing, stationary shot-putting, hand-cycling, sit-skiing, and ice sledge hockey received attention. In standing sports, primarily kinematics of athletes with amputations performing jump sports and running and the optimization of prosthetic devices were investigated. No studies were reported on other standing sports. In swimming, mainly kick rate and resistance training were studied. Biomechanical research is important for performance by gaining insight into technical optimization, injury prevention, and evidence-based classification in Paralympic sports. In future studies it is advised to also include physiological and biomechanical measures, allowing the assessment of the capability of the human body, as well as the resulting movement.

  10. An in vitro study of different material properties of Biodentine compared to ProRoot MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Markus; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-05-02

    The aim of this study was to compare solubility, microhardness, radiopacity, and setting time of Biodentine with ProRoot MTA. Solubility in distilled water, radioopacity, and setting time were evaluated in accordance with International Standard ISO 6876:2001. In addition, the solubility in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) buffer was determined. For microhardness-testing, ten samples of each cement were produced. All samples were loaded with a diamond indenter point with a weight of 100 g for 30s. All data were analysed using the Student-t-test. Both materials fulfilled the requirements of the International Standard ISO 6876:2001 and showed a solubility of Biodentine was significantly more soluble than ProRoot MTA (p Biodentine was significantly higher (62.35 ± 11.55HV) compared with ProRoot MTA (26.93 ± 4.66HV) (p Biodentine (1.50 ± 0.10 mm Al) (p Biodentine (85.66 ± 6.03 min) was significantly lower than for ProRoot MTA (228.33 ± 2.88 min) (p Biodentine and ProRoot MTA displayed different material properties. The solubility of both cements was in accordance with the International Standard ISO 6876:2001, whereas ProRoot MTA showed a significantly lower solubility. With regard to microhardness, Biodentine may be used to replace dentine. The radioopacity of Biodentine did not fulfil the requirements laid down in the International Standard ISO 6876:2001. The setting time for ProRoot MTA is significantly higher. Both materials can be used in different indications where specific material properties may be favourable. Hence, the here tested material properties are of clinical relevance.

  11. Relationship between osseointegration and superelastic biomechanics in porous NiTi scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangmei; Wu, Shuilin; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Chan, Y L; Hu, Tao; Xu, Zushun; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, Jonathan C Y; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Chu, Paul K

    2011-01-01

    The superelastic nature of bones requires matching biomechanical properties from the ideal artificial biomedical implants in order to provide smooth load transfer and foster the growth of new bone tissues. In this work, we determine the biomechanical characteristics of porous NiTi implants and investigate bone ingrowth under actual load-bearing conditions in vivo. In this systematic and comparative study, porous NiTi, porous Ti, dense NiTi, and dense Ti are implanted into 5 mm diameter holes in the distal part of the femur/tibia of rabbits for 15 weeks. The bone ingrowth and interfacial bonding strength are evaluated by histological analysis and push-out test. The porous NiTi materials bond very well to newly formed bone tissues and the highest average strength of 357 N and best ductility are achieved from the porous NiTi materials. The bonding curve obtained from the NiTi scaffold shows similar superelasticity as natural bones with a deflection of 0.30-0.85 mm thus shielding new bone tissues from large load stress. This is believed to be the reason why new bone tissues can penetrate deeply into the porous NiTi scaffold compared to the one made of porous Ti. Histological analysis reveals that new bone tissues adhere and grow well on the external surfaces as well as exposed areas on the inner pores of the NiTi scaffold. The in vitro study indicates that the surface chemical composition and topography of the porous structure leads to good cytocompatibility. Consequently, osteoblasts proliferate smoothly on the entire implant including the flat surface, embossed region, exposed area of the pores, and interconnected channels. In conjunction with the good cytocompatibility, the superelastic biomechanical properties of the porous NiTi scaffold bodes well for fast formation and ingrowth of new bones, and porous NiTi scaffolds are thus suitable for clinical applications under load-bearing conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanics-Hot Topics Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkemeier, Christopher; Adams, John D; Bernstein, Mitchell; Lee, Mark A; Harvey, Ed; Crist, Brett D

    2018-03-01

    Orthopaedic surgery and biomechanics are intimately partnered topics in medicine. Biomechanical principles are used to design implants and fashion treatment protocols. Although it would seem that biomechanical principles in the design of fixation devices and fracture repair constructs have been already finalized, there are several points of controversy remaining. New technology has raised new questions, while at the same time, we still do not fully understand simple clinical principles such as time of fracture healing depending on the construct used. This review looks at several of these current controversies to better understand what work is needed in fracture care going forward.

  13. Antibacterial properties of tualang honey and its effect in burn wound management: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Nur-Azida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of honey as a natural product of Apis spp. for burn treatment has been widely applied for centuries. Tualang honey has been reported to have antibacterial properties against various microorganisms, including those from burn-related diagnoses, and is cheaper and easier to be absorbed by Aquacel dressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential antibacterial properties of tualang honey dressing and to determine its effectiveness as a partial thickness burn wound dressing. Methods In order to quantitate the bioburden of the swabs, pour plates were performed to obtain the colony count (CFU/ml. Swabs obtained from burn wounds were streaked on blood agar and MacConkey agar for bacterial isolation and identification. Later, antibacterial activity of Aquacel-tualang honey, Aquacel-Manuka honey, Aquacel-Ag and Aquacel- plain dressings against bacteria isolated from patients were tested (in-vitro to see the effectiveness of those dressings by zone of inhibition assays. Results Seven organisms were isolated. Four types of Gram-negative bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., and three Gram-positive bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (CONS and Streptococcus spp., were isolated. Total bacterial count decreased on day 6 and onwards. In the in-vitro antibacterial study, Aquacel-Ag and Aquacel-Manuka honey dressings gave better zone of inhibition for Gram positive bacteria compared to Aquacel-Tualang honey dressing. However, comparable results were obtained against Gram negative bacteria tested with Aquacel-Manuka honey and Aquacel-Tualang honey dressing. Conclusions Tualang honey has a bactericidal as well as bacteriostatic effect. It is useful as a dressing, as it is easier to apply and is less sticky compared to Manuka honey. However, for Gram positive bacteria, tualang honey is not as effective as usual care

  14. Changes in Drop-Jump Landing Biomechanics During Prolonged Intermittent Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Randy J.; Cone, John C.; Tritsch, Amanda J.; Pye, Michele L.; Montgomery, Melissa M.; Henson, Robert A.; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As injury rates rise in the later stages of sporting activities, a better understanding of lower extremity biomechanics in the later phases of gamelike situations may improve training and injury prevention programs. Hypothesis: Lower extremity biomechanics of a drop-jump task (extracted from a principal components analysis) would reveal factors associated with risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury during a 90-minute individualized intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) and for 1 hour following the IEP. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Fifty-nine athletes (29 women, 30 men) completed 3 sessions. The first session assessed fitness for an IEP designed to simulate the demands of a soccer match. An experimental session assessed drop-jump biomechanics, after a dynamic warm-up, every 15 minutes during the 90-minute IEP, and for 1 hour following the IEP. A control session with no exercise assessed drop-jump performance at the same intervals. Results: Two biomechanical factors early in the first half (hip flexion at initial contact and hip loading; ankle loading and knee shear force) decreased at the end of the IEP and into the 60-minute recovery period, while a third factor (knee loading) decreased only during the recovery period (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The individualized sport-specific IEP may have more subtle effects on landing biomechanics when compared with short-term, exhaustive fatigue protocols. Clinical Relevance: Potentially injurious landing biomechanics may not occur until the later stages of soccer activity. PMID:24587862

  15. Biomechanical aspects of playing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, B M; Yeadon, M R

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss some biomechanical aspects of playing surfaces with special focus on (a) surface induced injuries, (b) methodologies used to assess surfaces and (c) findings from various sports. The paper concentrates primarily on questions related to load on the athlete's body. Data from epidemiological studies suggest strongly that the surface is an important factor in the aetiology of injuries. Injury frequencies are reported to be significantly different for different surfaces in several sports. The methodologies used to assess surfaces with respect to load or performance include material tests and tests using experimental subjects. There is only little correlation between the results of these two approaches. Material tests used in many standardized test procedures are not validated which suggests that one should exercise restraint in the interpretation of these results. Point elastic surfaces are widely studied while area elastic surfaces have received little attention to date. Questions of energy losses on sport surfaces have rarely been studied scientifically.

  16. Biomechanical analysis of the camelid cervical intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean K. Stolworthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (LBP is a prevalent global problem, which is often correlated with degenerative disc disease. The development and use of good, relevant animal models of the spine may improve treatment options for this condition. While no animal model is capable of reproducing the exact biology, anatomy, and biomechanics of the human spine, the quality of a particular animal model increases with the number of shared characteristics that are relevant to the human condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the camelid (specifically, alpaca and llama cervical spine as a model of the human lumbar spine. Cervical spines were obtained from four alpacas and four llamas and individual segments were used for segmental flexibility/biomechanics and/or morphology/anatomy studies. Qualitative and quantitative data were compared for the alpaca and llama cervical spines, and human lumbar specimens in addition to other published large animal data. Results indicate that a camelid cervical intervertebral disc (IVD closely approximates the human lumbar disc with regard to size, spinal posture, and biomechanical flexibility. Specifically, compared with the human lumbar disc, the alpaca and llama cervical disc size are approximately 62%, 83%, and 75% with regard to area, depth, and width, respectively, and the disc flexibility is approximately 133%, 173%, and 254%, with regard to range of motion (ROM in axial-rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral-bending, respectively. These results, combined with the clinical report of disc degeneration in the llama lower cervical spine, suggest that the camelid cervical spine is potentially well suited for use as an animal model in biomechanical studies of the human lumbar spine.

  17. Manufacturing of hydrogel biomaterials with controlled mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedadghavami, Armin; Minooei, Farnaz; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khetani, Sultan; Rezaei Kolahchi, Ahmad; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2017-10-15

    Hydrogels have been recognized as crucial biomaterials in the field of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications due to their specific characteristics. These biomaterials benefit from retaining a large amount of water, effective mass transfer, similarity to natural tissues and the ability to form different shapes. However, having relatively poor mechanical properties is a limiting factor associated with hydrogel biomaterials. Controlling the biomechanical properties of hydrogels is of paramount importance. In this work, firstly, mechanical characteristics of hydrogels and methods employed for characterizing these properties are explored. Subsequently, the most common approaches used for tuning mechanical properties of hydrogels including but are not limited to, interpenetrating polymer networks, nanocomposites, self-assembly techniques, and co-polymerization are discussed. The performance of different techniques used for tuning biomechanical properties of hydrogels is further compared. Such techniques involve lithography techniques for replication of tissues with complex mechanical profiles; microfluidic techniques applicable for generating gradients of mechanical properties in hydrogel biomaterials for engineering complex human tissues like intervertebral discs, osteochondral tissues, blood vessels and skin layers; and electrospinning techniques for synthesis of hybrid hydrogels and highly ordered fibers with tunable mechanical and biological properties. We finally discuss future perspectives and challenges for controlling biomimetic hydrogel materials possessing proper biomechanical properties. Hydrogels biomaterials are essential constituting components of engineered tissues with the applications in regenerative medicine and drug delivery. The mechanical properties of hydrogels play crucial roles in regulating the interactions between cells and extracellular matrix and directing the cells phenotype and genotype. Despite

  18. Structural and electronic properties of hydrogen adsorptions on BC3 sheet and graphene: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Lin, Wen-Huan; Albao, Marvin A; Su, Wan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the effect of hydrogen adsorption on a single BC 3 sheet as well as graphene using first-principles calculations. Specifically, a comparative study of the energetically favorable atomic configurations for both H-adsorbed BC 3 sheets and graphene at different hydrogen concentrations ranging from 1/32 to 4/32 ML and 1/8 to 1 ML was undertaken. The preferred hydrogen arrangement on the single BC 3 sheet and graphene was found to have the same property as that of the adsorbed H atoms on the neighboring C atoms on the opposite sides of the sheet. Moreover, at low coverage of H, the pattern of hydrogen adsorption on the BC 3 shows a proclivity toward formation on the same ring, contrasting their behavior on graphene where they tend to form the elongated zigzag chains instead. Lastly, both the hydrogenated BC 3 sheet and graphene exhibit alternation of semiconducting and metallic properties as the H concentration is increased. These results suggest the possibility of manipulating the bandgaps in a single BC 3 sheet and graphene by controlling the H concentrations on the BC 3 sheet and graphene.

  19. COMPARATIVE MAGNETIC AND PHOTOCATALYTIC PROPERTIES OF COPRECIPITATED ZINC FERRITE NANOPARTICLES BEFORE AND AFTER CALCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ebrahimi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of co-precipitation temperature and post calcination on the magnetic properties and photocatalytic activities of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were investigated. The structure, magnetic and optical properties of zinc ferrite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, vibrating sample magnetometry and UV–Vis spectrophotometry techniques.  The XRD results showed that the coprecipitated as well as calcined nanoparticles are single phase with partially inverse spinel structures. The magnetization and band gap decreased with the increasing of co-precipitation temperature through the increasing of the crystallite size. However, the post calcination at 500 °C was more effective on the decreasing of magnetization and band gap. Furthermore, photocatalytic activity of zinc ferrite nanoparticles was studied by the degradation of methyl orange under UV-light irradiation. Compare with the coprecipitated ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles with 5% degradation of methyl orange after 5 h UV-light light radiation, the calcined ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles exhibited a better photocatalytic activity with 20% degradation.

  20. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  1. Structures, properties, and functions of the stings of honey bees and paper wasps: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Long Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Through natural selection, many animal organs with similar functions have evolved different macroscopic morphologies and microscopic structures. Here, we comparatively investigate the structures, properties and functions of honey bee stings and paper wasp stings. Their elegant structures were systematically observed. To examine their behaviors of penetrating into different materials, we performed penetration–extraction tests and slow motion analyses of their insertion process. In comparison, the barbed stings of honey bees are relatively difficult to be withdrawn from fibrous tissues (e.g. skin, while the removal of paper wasp stings is easier due to their different structures and insertion skills. The similarities and differences of the two kinds of stings are summarized on the basis of the experiments and observations.

  2. Comparative study between structural and electrical properties of geopolymers applied to a green concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, A. M.; González, C. P.; Pérez, J.; Royero, C.; Sandoval, D.; Gutiérrez, J.

    2013-11-01

    This work shows a comparative analysis of geopolymers obtained by alkaline activation of two aluminosilicates: bentonite and metakaolin. With the goal of to replace some cement percentage, both aluminosilicates were added in several proportions (10, 20 and 30%) to concrete mixes. Portland Type I cement was used to prepare the reference concrete (without geopolymer). X-ray diffraction of geopolymers allowed to find new crystallographic phases that was not present in precursor's minerals. To evaluate mechanical properties of concrete prepared with geopolymers, test tubes with 7, 14, 28 and 90 days as setting time were used. Chemical resistance and Electrical impedance of concrete mixes were also measured. Results shows that cementitious material obtained from metakaolin exhibit the best compressive strength. On the other hand, those materials derived from bentonite, have a high electrical resistance so that, they protected reinforced concrete better that Portland does.

  3. Superplastic Grade Titanium Alloy: Comparative Evaluation of Mechanical Properties, Microstructure, and Fracture Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, static fracture, microstructure, and the mechanical behavior of SP-700 alloy (a superplastic grade were evaluated and compared with two other titanium alloys. The comparisons were made in terms of suitably designed heat treatment cycles. The heat treatment cycles included annealing and a combination of solutionizing and aging treatments for all three alloys. Tensile properties were determined using MTS Landmark Servohydraulic Test System. Tensile tested samples’ fracture surfaces were investigated with LEO-VP SEM instrument. Ti-15-3-3-3 alloy exhibited relatively a higher combination of strength and ductility in comparison to the other two alloys. All three types of titanium alloys demonstrated a very good level of tensile strength and ductility suitable for applications in military and biomedical fields.

  4. THE CENTER FOR MILITARY BIOMECHANICS RESEARCH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Military Biomechanics Research is a 7,500 ft2 dedicated laboratory outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment for 3-D analysis of movement, measurement...

  5. Biomechanical Weakening of Different Re-treatment Options After Small Incision Lenticule Extraction (SMILE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Sabine; Spiru, Bogdan; Hafezi, Farhad; Sekundo, Walter

    2017-03-01

    To determine the corneal weakening induced by different re-treatment options after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and investigate the potential of corneal cross-linking (CXL) to reestablish the original corneal stress resistance. A total of 96 freshly enucleated porcine corneas were used. The initial refractive correction was defined to be -11.00 diopters (D) and the required enhancement to be -3.00 D. Three different re-treatment options were analyzed: -3D Re-SMILE, -3D photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on top of the SMILE cap, and cap-to-flap conversion and -3D excimer ablation on the stromal bed (LASIK). The control condition did not receive any treatment. Subsequently, accelerated CXL (9 mW/cm 2 , 10 min) was performed in two groups with currently common enhancement techniques: following cap-to-flap conversion (-3D LASIK enhancement) and in controls. Biomechanical properties were measured with stress-strain extensometry ranging from 1.27 to 12.5 N. The Re-SMILE and PRK enhancement did not significantly reduce the overall elastic modulus of the cornea compared to controls (24.7 ± 2.23 and 22.7 ± 2.61 versus 23.8 ± 3.35 MPa, P ≥ .176), whereas LASIK enhancement did (22.2 ± 3.37 MPa, P = .048). CXL treatment significantly increased the elastic modulus compared to all non-cross-linked conditions (P ≤.001). Refractive surgery decreased the overall elastic modulus by 7%, whereas CXL increased it by 20%. In enhancement, the corneal biomechanical integrity is less affected with both Re-SMILE and PRK enhancement. Corneal weakening through laser refractive surgery is small compared to the stiffening effect after CXL. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(3):193-198.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Age–Related Perspectives on the Biomechanics of Traumatic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzutti, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Finite element models have the potential to accurately represent the pediatric body, both from the anatomical and topological point of view. They can describe changes in size and shape as well as changes in the biomechanical properties. Starting from the PIPER human body model, whose baseline represents the anatomy of a 6 years old child, a family of five models between the age of 2 and 6 was created with the purpose of investigating how the body reacts to a traumatic impact. To create these ...

  7. FUNDAMENTA LS OF BIOMECHANIC BIOMEDICAL ENGINERING

    OpenAIRE

    Sriwijaya, Rachmat

    2017-01-01

    Studi tentang biomechanics telah berkembang pesat dari awalnya hanya aplikasi studi mekanika teknik yang sederhana kemudian meluas dengan pelibatan berbagai bidang studi. Dalam bidang biomechanics buku ini sangat membantu mahasiswa ataupun peneliti untuk memahami dasar-dasar mekanika dan dinamika tubuh manusia, yang menjadi bidang kajian penting dalam studi rekayasa biomedik. Buku ini memberikan pengetahuan yang memadai tentang konsep statika, gerak, dinamika, pemodelan, dan aplikasinya dikai...

  8. Lingual biomechanics, case selection and success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Labh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deeper understanding of lingual biomechanics is prerequisite for success with lingual appliance. The difference between labial and lingual force system must be understood and kept in mind during treatment planning, especially anchorage planning, and extraction decision-making. As point of application of force changes, it completely changes the force system in all planes. This article describes lingual biomechanics, anchorage planning, diagnostic considerations, treatment planning, and case selection criteria in lingual orthodontics.

  9. Cirrus Cloud Properties from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cloud Radar Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Krueger, Steven K.; Mace, Gerald G.; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2003-02-01

    Cloud radar data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains site were used to evaluate the properties of cirrus clouds that occurred in a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation of the 29-day summer 1997 intensive observation period (IOP). The simulation was `forced' by the large-scale advective temperature and water vapor tendencies, horizontal wind velocity, and turbulent surface fluxes observed at the Southern Great Plains site. The large-scale advective condensate tendency was not observed. The correlation of CRM cirrus amount with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) high cloud amount was 0.70 for the subperiods during which cirrus formation and decay occurred primarily locally, but only 0.30 for the entire IOP. This suggests that neglecting condensate advection has a detrimental impact on the ability of a model (CRM or single-column model) to properly simulate cirrus cloud occurrence.The occurrence, vertical location, and thickness of cirrus cloud layers, as well as the bulk microphysical properties of thin cirrus cloud layers, were determined from the cloud radar measurements for June, July, and August 1997. The composite characteristics of cirrus clouds derived from this dataset are well suited for evaluating CRMs because of the close correspondence between the timescales and space scales resolved by the cloud radar measurements and by CRMs. The CRM results were sampled at eight grid columns spaced 64 km apart using the same definitions of cirrus and thin cirrus as the cloud radar dataset. The composite characteristics of cirrus clouds obtained from the CRM were then compared to those obtained from the cloud radar.Compared with the cloud radar observations, the CRM cirrus clouds occur at lower heights and with larger physical thicknesses. The ice water paths in the CRM's thin cirrus clouds are similar to those observed. However, the corresponding cloud-layer-mean ice water contents are

  10. Biomechanical Characteristics of Osteoporotic Fracture Healing in Ovariectomized Rats: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Long; Yao, Min; Cui, Xue-Jun; Xue, Chun-Chun; Wang, Yong-Jun; Shu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical tests are widely used in animal studies on osteoporotic fracture healing. However, the biomechanical recovery process is still unknown, leading to difficulty in choosing time points for biomechanical tests and in correctly assessing osteoporotic fracture healing. To determine the biomechanical recovery process during osteoporotic fracture healing, studies on osteoporotic femur fracture healing with biomechanical tests in ovariectomized rat (OVX) models were collected from PUBMED, EMBASE, and Chinese databases. Quadratic curves of fracture healing time and maximum load were fitted with data from the analyzed studies. In the fitted curve for normal fractures, the predicted maximum load was 145.56 N, and the fracture healing time was 88.0 d. In the fitted curve for osteoporotic fractures, the predicted maximum load was 122.30 N, and the fracture healing time was 95.2 d. The maximum load of fractured femurs in OVX rats was also lower than that in sham rats at day 84 post-fracture (D84 PF). The fracture healing time was prolonged and maximum load at D84 PF decreased in OVX rats with closed fractures. The maximum load of Wister rats was higher than that of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, but the fracture healing time of SD and Wister rats was similar. Osteoporotic fracture healing was delayed in rats that were 12 weeks old at ovariectomy. There was no significant difference in maximum load at D84 PF between rats with an osteoporosis modeling time = 12 weeks. In conclusion, fracture healing was delayed and biomechanical property decreased by osteoporosis. Time points around D95.2 PF should be considered for biomechanical tests of osteoporotic femur fracture healing in OVX rat models. Osteoporotic fracture healing in OVX rats was affected by the fracture type but not by the strain of the rat.

  11. Musculoskeletal, biomechanical, and physiological gender differences in the US military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Katelyn F; Keenan, Karen A; Sell, Timothy C; Abt, John P; Nagai, Takashi; Deluzio, Jennifer; McGrail, Mark; Lephart, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    The repeal of the Direct Ground Combat Assignment Rule has renewed focus on examining performance capabilities of female military personnel and their ability to occupy previously restricted military occupational specialties. Previous research has revealed female Soldiers suffer a greater proportion of musculoskeletal injuries compared to males, including a significantly higher proportion of lower extremity, knee, and overuse injuries. Potential differences may also exist in musculoskeletal, biomechanical, and physiological characteristics between male and female Soldiers requiring implementation of gender-specific training in order to mitigate injury risk and enhance performance. To examine differences in musculoskeletal, biomechanical, and physiological characteristics in male and female Soldiers. A total of 406 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Soldiers (348 male; 58 female) participated. Subjects underwent testing for flexibility, isokinetic and isometric strength (percent body weight), single-leg balance, lower body biomechanics during a stop jump and drop landing, body composition, anaerobic power/capacity, and aerobic capacity. Independent t tests assessed between-group comparisons. Women demonstrated significantly greater flexibility (Pphysiological characteristics. Sex-specific interventions may aid in improving such characteristics to optimize physical readiness and decrease the injury risk during gender-neutral training, and decreasing between-sex variability in performance characteristics may result in enhanced overall unit readiness. Identification of sex-specific differences in injury patterns and characteristics should facilitate adjustments in training in order for both sexes to meet the gender-neutral occupational demands for physically demanding military occupational specialties.

  12. Physiological and biomechanical aspects of orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, U; Reilly, T

    1997-12-01

    Orienteering is an endurance running event which differs from other running sports both in its cognitive element and in the type of terrain encountered. The demands of overcoming this terrain are not manifest in significant differences between orienteers and road runners in somatotype, though elite female orienteers have consistently been shown to have higher levels of adiposity (> 19%) than elite road runners. High aerobic power in orienteers (up to 63 and 76 ml/kg/min in women and men, respectively) is coupled with lower anaerobic performance. While leg strength is generally not high when compared with other athletic specialties, female orienteers have relatively good leg flexion strength. The energy cost of running is greatly increased in rough terrain. Oxygen cost was 26% higher while running in a forest when compared with road running. Biomechanical differences in stride pattern contribute towards this increased demand. Despite the high energy demands during competition, orienteers pace themselves such that their mean heart rate remains within the range of 167 to 172 beats/min, despite large fluctuations. The rough terrain encountered in orienteering results not only in a high energy cost but also in a higher incidence of sport-specific injuries, particularly to the ankle. Minor injuries such as cuts and bruises are common during competition.

  13. Calcium requirements of growing rats based on bone mass, structure, or biomechanical strength are similar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although calcium (Ca) supplementation increases bone density, the increase is small and the impact on bone strength and fracture risk is uncertain. To investigate if bone mass, morphology, and biomechanical properties are affected by deficient to copious dietary Ca concentrations, the long bones (ti...

  14. Biomechanical and nonfunctional assessment of physical capacity in male ICU survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Rose, Martin Høyer; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2013-01-01

    : ICU admission is associated with decreased physical function for years after discharge. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this muscle function impairment are undescribed. The aim of this study was to describe the biomechanical properties of the quadriceps muscle in ICU survivors 12 mont...

  15. Tensile strength comparison between peroneus longus and hamstring tendons: A biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The tensile strength of the peroneus longus tendon, which is similar to that of hamstring, gives information that both have the same biomechanic properties. Peroneus longus should not be used as a first option in ACL reconstruction, but may be used as an alternative donor in cases involving multiple instability that require more tendon donors in the reconstruction.

  16. Heterogeneous meshing and biomechanical modeling of human spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, J C M; Chui, C K; Wang, Z L; Ong, S H; Yan, C H; Wang, S C; Wong, H K; Teoh, S H

    2007-03-01

    We aim to develop a patient-specific biomechanical model of human spine for the purpose of surgical training and planning. In this paper, we describe the development of a finite-element model of the spine from the VHD Male Data. The finite-element spine model comprises volumetric elements suitable for deformation and other finite-element analysis using ABAQUS. The mesh generation solution accepts segmented radiological slices as input, and outputs three-dimensional (3D) volumetric finite element meshes that are ABAQUS compliant. The proposed mesh generation method first uses a grid plane to divide the contours of the anatomical boundaries and its inclusions into discrete meshes. A grid frame is then built to connect the grid planes between any two adjacent planes using a novel scheme. The meshes produced consist of brick elements in the interior of the contours and with tetrahedral and wedge elements at the boundaries. The nodal points are classified according to their materials and hence, elements can be assigned different properties. The resultant spine model comprises a detailed model of the 7 cervical vertebrae, 12 thoracic vertebrae, 5 lumbar vertebrae, and S1. Each of the vertebrae and intervertebral disc has between 1200 and 6000 elements, and approximately 1200 elements, respectively. The accuracy of the resultant VHD finite element spine model was good based on visual comparison of volume-rendered images of the original CT data, and has been used in a computational analysis involving needle insertion and static deformation. We also compared the mesh generated using our method against two automatically generated models; one consists of purely tetrahedral elements and the other hexahedral elements.

  17. MRI-determined lumbar muscle morphometry in man and sheep: potential biomechanical implications for ovine model to human spine translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F; Elliott, James

    2015-01-01

    The sheep is a commonly used animal model for human lumbar spine surgery, but only in vitro investigations comparing the human and ovine spine exist. Spinal musculature has previously not been compared between man and sheep. This additional knowledge could further indicate to what extent these species are biomechanically similar. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to investigate spinal muscle morphometric properties using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in different age groups of healthy human participants and sheep in vivo. Healthy human participants (n = 24) and sheep (n = 17) of different age groups underwent T1-weighted MRI of the lumbar spine. Regions of interest of the muscles erector spinae (ES), multifidus (M) and psoas (PS) were identified. The ratio of flexor to extensor volume, ratio of M to ES volume, and muscle fat relative to an area of intermuscular fat were calculated. Sheep M to ES ratio was significantly smaller than in the human participants (sheep 0.16 ± 0.02; human 0.37 ± 0.05; P biomechanical and functional demands, which is an important consideration when translating to human surgical models. PMID:26200090

  18. Evaluation of the relationship between corneal biomechanic and HbA1C levels in type 2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazgan S

    2014-08-01

    between each of the three groups (respectively; Groups 1 and 2, P=0.015, Groups 1 and 3, and Groups 2 and 3, P<0.001. Conclusion: Both diabetes groups were affected in terms of corneal biomechanical properties when compared to healthy subjects, there was also a positive correlation between HbA1C level and intraocular pressure. Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, HbA1C, ocular response analyzer, intraocular pressure, corneal biomechanical parameters

  19. Comparative properties of caveolar and noncaveolar preparations of kidney Na+/K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Ivanov, Alexander V; Gable, Marjorie E; Jolivel, Florent; Morrill, Gene A; Askari, Amir

    2011-10-11

    To evaluate previously proposed functions of renal caveolar Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, we modified the standard procedures for the preparation of the purified membrane-bound kidney enzyme, separated the caveolar and noncaveolar pools, and compared their properties. While the subunits of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (α,β,γ) constituted most of the protein content of the noncaveolar pool, the caveolar pool also contained caveolins and major caveolar proteins annexin-2 tetramer and E-cadherin. Ouabain-sensitive Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities of the two pools had similar properties and equal molar activities, indicating that the caveolar enzyme retains its ion transport function and does not contain nonpumping enzyme. As minor constituents, both caveolar and noncaveolar pools also contained Src, EGFR, PI3K, and several other proteins known to be involved in stimulous-induced signaling by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, indicating that signaling function is not limited to the caveolar pool. Endogenous Src was active in both pools but was not further activated by ouabain, calling into question direct interaction of Src with native Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Chemical cross-linking, co-immunoprecipitation, and immunodetection studies showed that in the caveolar pool, caveolin-1 oligomers, annexin-2 tetramers, and oligomers of the α,β,γ-protomers of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase form a large multiprotein complex. In conjunction with known roles of E-cadherin and the β-subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in cell adhesion and noted intercellular β,β-contacts within the structure of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, our findings suggest that interacting caveolar Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases located at renal adherens junctions maintain contact of two adjacent cells, conduct essential ion pumping, and are capable of locus-specific signaling in junctional cells.

  20. Gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength in patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Michael B; Patel, Chirag; Wiley, J Preston; Ferber, Reed

    2013-03-01

    A significant number of patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) have described a history of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). This leads to speculation that the underpinning mechanical causes of PFPS and PFOA may be similar. Although alterations in gait biomechanics and hip strength have been reported in PFPS, this relationship has not yet been explored in PFOA. Therefore the purpose of this study was compare gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength between PFOA patients and a healthy control group. Fifteen patients with symptomatic, radiographic PFOA and 15 controls participated. All patients underwent a walking gait analysis and maximal hip strength testing. Biomechanical variables of interest included the peak angular values of contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation during the stance phase. Hip abduction and external rotation strength were assessed using maximal voluntary isometric contractions. The PFOA group demonstrated significantly lower hip abduction strength compared to controls but no difference in hip external rotation strength. There were no statistical differences between the PFOA and control groups for contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation angles during walking. Despite patients with PFOA exhibiting weaker hip abductor muscle strength compared to their healthy counterparts they did not demonstrate alterations in pelvis or hip biomechanics during gait. These preliminary data suggests that weaker hip abductor strength does not result in biomechanical alterations during gait in this population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The biomechanical analysis of three-dimensional distal radius fracture model with different fixed splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zhen; Wang, Jian-Wei; Lu, Zhen-Fei; Ma, Jian-Wei; Yin, Heng

    2018-01-30

    The distal radius fracture is one of the common clinical fractures. At present, there are no reports regarding application of the finite element method in studying the mechanism of Colles fracture and the biomechanical behavior when using splint fixation. To explore the mechanism of Colles fracture and the biomechanical behavior when using different fixed splints. Based on the CT scanning images of forearm for a young female volunteer, by using model construction technology combined with RPOE and ANSYS software, a 3-D distal radius fracture forearm finite element model with a real shape and bioactive materials is built. The material tests are performed to obtain the mechanical properties of the paper-based splint, the willow splint and the anatomical splint. The numerical results are compared with the experimental results to verify the correctness of the presented model. Based on the verified model, the stress distribution of different tissues are analyzed. Finally, the clinical tests are performed to observe and verify that the anatomical splint is the best fit for human body. Using the three kinds of splints, the transferred bone stress focus on the distal radius and ulna, which is helpful to maintain the stability of fracture. Also the stress is accumulated in the distal radius which may be attributed to flexion position. Such stress distribution may be helpful to maintain the ulnar declination. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental observations, the anatomical splint has the best fitting to the limb, which can effectively avoid the local compression. The anatomical splint is the most effective for fixing and curing the fracture. The presented model can provide theoretical basis and technical guide for further investigating mechanism of distal radius fracture and clinical application of anatomical splint.

  2. Biomechanical comparison of the stable efficacy of two anterior plating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Saiwei; Wang, Lee-Wei

    2003-07-01

    To compare the immediate stable efficacy and load sharing effect of two types of anterior cervical screw-plating instrumentations: the Morscher Synthes titanium locking screw-plate system and the Caspar trapezoidal screw-plate system. Fresh porcine cervical spines with intact, two surgery unstable models, and then reconstructed with or without screw-plating instruments were compared in three physiological loading conditions. Two markedly instrumentation systems--Morscher Synthes titanium cervical locking screw-plate and Caspar trapezoidal screw-plate systems are commonly used in management of complex cervical spine disorders. Although the biomechanical study showed that the lower cost Caspar system performed superior in extension before and after plate fatigue, the clinic evaluations of two systems were contradictory. So (1) does the titanium cervical locking plate system pay for its higher cost? and (2) what is the load sharing character of strut graft in one level corpectomy? Eight fresh ligamentous porcine cervical spines from C3 to C7 were undergone axial compression, rotation and sagittal flexion tests. The biomechanical experiment was sequentially repeated for the intact, C5-6 discectomy, C5 corpectomy, and then stabilized by either type of plate fixation devices with or without polymethylmethacrylate bone cement grafting. Strains measured by an extensometer across the operated motion segment were used as the index of stability. Analysis of the strain data showed both types of anterior fixation plate systems provided adequate-restored stability for the spinal column only aided with polymethylmethacrylate construction. Statistically, there was no significant difference in biomechanical evaluation for the stability effect between much cost Morscher Synthes plate and Caspar plate system (pfailure. Statistically both systems showed similar stable efficacy, however, the Morscher Synthes cervical locking plate system might provide better stable effect in higher

  3. Microstructure and compressive mechanical properties of cortical bone in children with osteogenesis imperfecta treated with bisphosphonates compared with healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Laurianne; Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Pernelle, Kélig; Hoc, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by a change in bone tissue quality, but little data are available to describe the factors involved at the macroscopic scale. To better understand the effect of microstructure alterations on the mechanical properties at the sample scale, we studied the structural and mechanical properties of six cortical bone samples from children with OI treated with bisphosphonates and compared them to the properties of three controls. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution computed tomography and compression testing were used to assess these properties. More resorption cavities and a higher osteocyte lacunar density were observed in OI bone compared with controls. Moreover, a higher porosity was measured for OI bones along with lower macroscopic Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate stress. The microstructure was impaired in OI bones; the higher porosity and osteocyte lacunar density negatively impacted the mechanical properties and made the bone more prone to fracture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomechanics of single cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernick, Kristin B; Prevost, Thibault P; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-03-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude, 10, 1, and 0.1 μm s(-1). Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper)elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented in a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomechanic Factors Associated With Orbital Floor Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar; Andrecovich, Christopher; Silverman, Michael; Zhang, Liying; Shkoukani, Mahdii

    2017-07-01

    Orbital floor fractures are commonly seen in clinical practice, yet the etiology underlying the mechanism of fracture is not well understood. Current research focuses on the buckling theory and hydraulic theory, which implicate trauma to the orbital rim and the globe, respectively. To elucidate and define the biomechanical factors involved in an orbital floor fracture. A total of 10 orbits from 5 heads (3 male and 2 female) were used for this study. These came from fresh, unfixed human postmortem cadavers that were each selected so that the cause of death did not interfere with the integrity of orbital walls. Using a drop tower with an accelerometer, we measured impact force on the globe and rim of cadaver heads affixed with strain gauges. The mean impacts for rim and globe trauma were 3.9 J (95% CI, 3.4-4.3 J) and 3.9 J (95% CI, 3.5-4.3 J), respectively. Despite similar impact forces to the globe and rim, strain-gauge data displayed greater mean strain for globe impact (6563 μS) compared with rim impact (3530 μS); however, these data were not statistically significant (95% CI, 3598-8953 μS; P = .94). Our results suggest that trauma directly to the globe predisposes a patient to a more posterior fracture while trauma to the rim demonstrates an anterior predilection. Both the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms of fracture exist and demonstrate similar fracture thresholds. NA.

  6. Biomechanics of Nested Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; de Tranaltes, Kaylee; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Reyes, Phillip M; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Tumialán, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Arthrodesis is optimized when the structural graft occupies most of the surface area within a disc space. The transforaminal corridor inherently limits interbody size. To evaluate the biomechanical implications of nested interbody spacers (ie, a second curved cage placed behind a first) to increase disc space coverage in transforaminal approaches. Seven lumbar human cadaveric specimens (L3-S1) underwent nondestructive flexibility and axial compression testing intact and after transforaminal instrumentation at L4-L5. Specimens were tested in 5 conditions: (1) intact, (2) interbody, (3) interbody plus bilateral pedicle screws and rods (PSR), (4) 2 nested interbodies, and (5) 2 nested interbodies plus PSR. Mean range of motion (ROM) with 1 interbody vs 2 nested interbodies, respectively, was: flexion, 101% vs 85%; extension, 97% vs 92%; lateral bending, 127% vs 132%; and axial rotation, 145% vs 154%. One interbody and 2 nested interbodies did not differ significantly by loading mode (P > .10). With PSR, ROM decreased significantly compared with intact, but not between interbody and interbody plus PSR or 2 interbodies plus PSR (P > .80). Mean vertical height during compressive loading (ie, axial compressive stiffness) was significantly different with 2 nested interbodies vs 1 interbody alone (P < .001) (compressive stiffness, 89% of intact vs 67% of intact, respectively). Inserting a second interbody using a transforaminal approach is anatomically feasible and nearly doubles the disc space covered without affecting ROM. Compressive stiffness significantly increased with 2 nested interbodies, and foraminal height increased. Evaluation of the clinical safety and efficacy of nested interbodies is underway.

  7. Soft-tissue material properties under large deformation: strain rate effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tie; Desai, Jaydev P

    2004-01-01

    Biomechanical model of soft tissue derived from experimental measurements is critical for developing a reality-based model for minimally invasive surgical training and simulation. In our research, we have focused on developing a biomechanical model of the liver with the ultimate goal of using this model for local tool-tissue interaction tasks and providing feedback to the surgeon through a haptic display. We are interested in finding the local effective elastic modulus (LEM) of the liver tissue under different strain rates. We have developed a tissue indentation equipment for characterizing the biomechanical properties of the liver and compared the local effective elastic modulus (LEM) derived from experimental data with plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric element types in ABAQUS under varying strain rates. Our results show that the experimentally derived local effective modulus matches closely with the plane stress analysis in ABAQUS.

  8. Properties of the vacuum in models for QCD. Holography vs. resummed field theory. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayakin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-17

    This Thesis is dedicated to a comparison of the two means of studying the electromagnetic properties of the QCD vacuum - holography and resummed field theory. I compare two classes of distinct models for the dynamics of the condensates. The first class consists of the so-called holographic models of QCD. Based upon the Maldacena conjecture, it tries to establish the properties of QCD correlation functions from the behavior of classical solutions of field equations in a higher-dimensional theory. Yet in many aspects the holographic approach has been found to be in an excellent agreement with data. These successes are the prediction of the very small viscosity-to-entropy ratio and the predictions of meson spectra up to 5% accuracy in several models. On the other hand, the resummation methods in field theory have not been discarded so far. Both classes of methods have access to condensates. Thus a comprehensive study of condensates becomes possible, in which I compare my calculations in holography and resummed field theory with each other, as well as with lattice results, field theory and experiment. I prove that the low-energy theorems of QCD keep their validity in holographic models with a gluon condensate in a non-trivial way. I also show that the so-called decoupling relation holds in holography models with chiral and gluon condensates, whereas this relation fails in the Dyson-Schwinger approach. On the contrary, my results on the chiral magnetic effect in holography disagree with the weak-field prediction; the chiral magnetic effect (that is, the electric current generation in a magnetic field) is three times less than the current in the weakly-coupled QCD. The chiral condensate behavior is found to be quadratic in external field both in the Dyson-Schwinger approach and in holography, yet we know that in the exact limit the condensate must be linear, thus both classes of models are concluded to be deficient for establishing the correct condensate behaviour in the

  9. Properties of the vacuum in models for QCD. Holography vs. resummed field theory. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayakin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    This Thesis is dedicated to a comparison of the two means of studying the electromagnetic properties of the QCD vacuum - holography and resummed field theory. I compare two classes of distinct models for the dynamics of the condensates. The first class consists of the so-called holographic models of QCD. Based upon the Maldacena conjecture, it tries to establish the properties of QCD correlation functions from the behavior of classical solutions of field equations in a higher-dimensional theory. Yet in many aspects the holographic approach has been found to be in an excellent agreement with data. These successes are the prediction of the very small viscosity-to-entropy ratio and the predictions of meson spectra up to 5% accuracy in several models. On the other hand, the resummation methods in field theory have not been discarded so far. Both classes of methods have access to condensates. Thus a comprehensive study of condensates becomes possible, in which I compare my calculations in holography and resummed field theory with each other, as well as with lattice results, field theory and experiment. I prove that the low-energy theorems of QCD keep their validity in holographic models with a gluon condensate in a non-trivial way. I also show that the so-called decoupling relation holds in holography models with chiral and gluon condensates, whereas this relation fails in the Dyson-Schwinger approach. On the contrary, my results on the chiral magnetic effect in holography disagree with the weak-field prediction; the chiral magnetic effect (that is, the electric current generation in a magnetic field) is three times less than the current in the weakly-coupled QCD. The chiral condensate behavior is found to be quadratic in external field both in the Dyson-Schwinger approach and in holography, yet we know that in the exact limit the condensate must be linear, thus both classes of models are concluded to be deficient for establishing the correct condensate behaviour in the

  10. Age-related differences in the functional properties of lips compared with skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, E; Ishikawa, J; Sugata, K; Tsukahara, K; Yasumori, H; Yamamoto, T

    2018-02-06

    Lips can easily become dry and rough and their biggest problems are drying and chapping. The cause of those problems is considered to be that the stratum corneum (SC) moisture is small and its barrier function is low. However, those problems decrease in subjects as they approach 40 years of age, after which problems due to their shape and color increase. The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between SC properties of the lips during aging and to clarify the cause(s) of lip problems. One hundred and 38 Japanese female subjects with normal skin ranging in age from 16 to 78 years were enrolled in the study. The capacitance and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) values, viscoelasticity, and color of their lips were measured and compared with their cheeks. The capacitance values for the lip and the cheek increased and TEWL values for both areas decreased with age. TEWL values for the lip decreased until ~30 years of age and this is considered to be related to the problem of drying. Although the maximum amplitude U f of the lip increased with age, the U r /U f had no correlation with age. As for color, the L* and a* values decreased with age. Age-related changes with regard to SC functions, viscoelasticity and color of the lips have been clarified for the first time, and it is clear that these changes are related to problems of the lips. Compared with the cheeks, differences with the lips are more apparent. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mechanical properties and three-body wear of dental restoratives and their comparative flowable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Sabine; Rosentritt, Martin; Behr, Michael; Handel, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    To compare wear performance and resistance to crack propagation (K1C) of commercial restorative materials and their flowable variations. A potential correlation between three-body wear and fracture toughness, modulus of elasticity, fracture work, Vickers hardness, and filler content was investigated. Seven restoratives (five composites, one ormocer, and one compomer) and their corresponding flowable materials were used to determine and compare the three-body wear with a bolus of millet-seed shells and rice food (Willytec). The wear characteristics were measured by profilometry after 50,000, 100,000, 150,000, and 200,000 loading cycles. The fracture toughness value, K1C (MPam1/2), for each single-edged notched specimen was measured in a three-point bending test (universal testing machine 1446, Zwick). Fracture work and modulus of elasticity were calculated from the load curves. Vickers hardness was measured (HV hardness tester, Zwick) according to DIN 50133. The veneering composite Sinfony (3M ESPE) was used as a reference material. Heavily filled composites experienced less wear than their flowable variations. The nanofiller composites revealed better wear results than hybrid composites, compomers, and ormocers. After 200,000 load cycles, the lowest wear rates were detected for Grandio (14 microm; Voco), and the highest mean values were found for Dyract AP (104 microm; Dentsply DeTrey). The values for fracture toughness (K1C) ranged from 0.82 to 3.64 MPam1/2. Highest K1C data was exhibited by the nanocomposite Nanopaq (Schutz Dental). All tested restorative materials exhibited higher fracture toughness than their low-viscosity variations. The wear resistance of the newer generation composites with incorporated nanofiller or microfiller particles increased to a high extent. Flowables show less resistance against wear and crack propagation because of their lower filler content. The reduced mechanical properties limit their use as a restorative to small noncontact

  12. Wear properties of dental ceramics and porcelains compared with human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Rondoni, Giuseppe D; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Contemporary pressable and computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramics exhibit good mechanical and esthetic properties. Their wear resistance compared with human enamel and traditional gold based alloys needs to be better investigated. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the 2-body wear resistance of human enamel, gold alloy, and 5 different dental ceramics, including a recently introduced zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (Celtra Duo). Cylindrical specimens were fabricated from a Type III gold alloy (Aurocast8), 2 hot pressed ceramics (Imagine PressX, IPS e.max Press), 2 CAD/CAM ceramics (IPS e.max CAD, Celtra Duo), and a CAD/CAM feldspathic porcelain (Vitablocs Mark II) (n=10). Celtra Duo was tested both soon after grinding and after a subsequent glaze firing cycle. Ten flat human enamel specimens were used as the control group. All specimens were subjected to a 2-body wear test in a dual axis mastication simulator for 120000 loading cycles against yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal cusps. The wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (mm) and the volume loss (mm(3)). Antagonist wear (mm) was also recorded. Data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA tests (α=.05). The wear depth (0.223 mm) of gold alloy was the closest to that of human enamel (0.217 mm), with no significant difference (P>.05). The greatest wear was recorded on the milled Celtra Duo (wear depth=0.320 mm), which appeared significantly less wear resistant than gold alloy or human enamel (Pceramics did not statistically differ in comparison with the human enamel. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence comparing of activated biochar and conventional biochar on the soil biological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořáčková, Helena; Mykajlo, Irina; Záhora, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    In our experiment we have used biochar. This material is the product of the pyrolysis that has shown a positive effect on numerous physical and chemical soil properties. However, its influence on the biological component of the soil is very variable. A number of toxic substances that inhibit the soil productivity may be produced during pyrolysis process. The experiment dealt with the hypothesis concerning biochar toxicity reduction by simulating natural processes in the soil. Biochar has been exposed to aeration in the aquatic environment, enriched with nutrients and a source of native soil microflora. It has been created 6 variants in total, each with four replications. The soils samples have been placed in a phytotron for 90 days. Variants consisted of the soil with fertilizers adding (compost, biochar, activated biochar) and have been prepared as well as variants containing compost and biochar and activated biochar optionally. The highest aboveground biomass production has been estimated in variants containing compost, while the lowest production - in the variants containing conventional biochar. During production comparing of the variants with the conventional biochar, activated biochar and control samples it has been evident that activated biochar promotes plant growth, and in contradiction conventional biochar inhibits it. We will approach to the same conclusions when comparing variants with a combination of conventional biochar + compost and activated biochar + compost. Mineral nitrogen leaching has been another investigated parameter. The highest leaching has occurred in the control variant, while the lowest - in the variant with activated biochar (the leaching of nitrate nitrogen has been negligeable). Our results suggest that activated biochar has the potential; however, it is necessary to carry out similar experiments in the field conditions.

  14. A comparative density functional study on electrical properties of layered penta-graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhi Gen; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the influence of the number of layers, the biaxial strain in the range of −3% to 3%, and the stacking misalignments on the electronic properties of a new 2D carbon allotrope, penta-graphene (PG), based on hybrid-functional method within the density functional theory (DFT). In comparison with local exchange-correlation approximation in the DFT, the hybrid-functional provides an accurate description on the degree of p z orbitals localization and bandgap. Importantly, the predicted bandgap of few-layer PG has a weak layer dependence. The bandgap of monolayer PG is 3.27 eV, approximately equal to those of GaN and ZnO; and the bandgap of few-layer PG decreases slowly with the number of layers (N) and converge to 2.57 eV when N ≥ 4. Our calculations using HSE06 functional on few-layer PG reveal that bandgap engineering by stacking misalignment can further tune the bandgap down to 1.37 eV. Importantly, there is no direct-to-indirect bandgap transition in PG by varying strain, layer number, and stacking misalignment. Owing to its tunable, robustly direct, and wide bandgap characteristics, few-layer PG is promising for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications

  15. In vitro comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of temporary restorative materials used in fixed partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Saisadan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Materials used to fabricate provisional restorations can be classified as acrylics or resin composites. Provisional crows can be either prefabricated or custom made. Acrylics: These materials have been used to fabricate provisional restorations since the 1930s and usually available as powder and liquid. They are the most commonly used materials today for both single-unit and multiple-unit restorations. In general, their popularity is due to their low cost, acceptable esthetics, and versatility. Composites: Composite provisional materials use bis-acryl resin, a hydrophobic material that is similar to bis-GMA. Composites are available as auto-polymerized, dualpolymerized and visible light polymerized. Preformed Crowns: Preformed provisional crowns or matrices usually consist of tooth-shaped shells of plastic, cellulose acetate or metal. They are commercially available in various tooth sizes and are usually selected for a particular tooth anatomy. They are commonly relined with acrylic resin to provide a more custom fit before cementation, but the plastic and metal crown shells can also be cemented directly onto prepared teeth. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to choose a material to serve as a better interim prosthesis and to compare three different properties – flexural strength, compressive strength, and color stability. Materials and Methods: The samples were made with three different provisional materials (Revotek LC, Protemp 4, TemSpan. Result: It was inferred from the study that no one material was superior in all three tested parameters.

  16. The Eccentric Satellites Problem: Comparing Milky Way Satellite Orbital Properties to Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Umran; Pryor, Carlton; Applebaum, Elaad; Brooks, Alyson

    2018-01-01

    We compare the orbital properties of the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way to those of satellites found in simulated Milky Way-like systems as a means of testing cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. The particular problem that we are investigating is a discrepancy in the distribution of orbital eccentricities. Previous studies of Milky Way-mass systems analyzed in a semi-analytic ΛCDM cosmological model have found that the satellites tend to have significantly larger fractions of their kinetic energy invested in radial motion with respect to their central galaxy than do the real-world Milky Way satellites. We analyze several high-resolution ("zoom-in") hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-mass galaxies and their associated satellite systems to investigate why previous works found Milky Way-like systems to be rare. We find a possible relationship between a quiescent galactic assembly history and a distribution of satellite kinematics resembling that of the Milky Way. This project has been supported by funding from National Science Foundation grant PHY-1560077.

  17. Innovativeness as an emergent property: a new alignment of comparative and experimental research on animal innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Andrea S.

    2016-01-01

    Innovation and creativity are key defining features of human societies. As we face the global challenges of the twenty-first century, they are also facets upon which we must become increasingly reliant. But what makes Homo sapiens so innovative and where does our high innovation propensity come from? Comparative research on innovativeness in non-human animals allows us to peer back through evolutionary time and investigate the ecological factors that drove the evolution of innovativeness, whereas experimental research identifies and manipulates underpinning creative processes. In commenting on the present theme issue, I highlight the controversies that have typified this research field and show how a paradigmatic shift in our thinking about innovativeness will contribute to resolving these tensions. In the past decade, innovativeness has been considered by many as a trait, a direct product of cognition, and a direct target of selection. The evidence I review here suggests that innovativeness will be hereon viewed as one component, or even an emergent property of a larger array of traits, which have evolved to deal with environmental variation. I illustrate how research should capitalize on taxonomic diversity to unravel the full range of psychological processes that underpin innovativeness in non-human animals. PMID:26926287

  18. Comparative analysis of weld properties of titanium-niobium, titanium molybdenum and stainless steel archwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Pattabiraman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ability to achieve sound weld joints is a desirable characteristic for orthodontic archwires. Titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA has been the only truly weldable orthodontic archwire alloy until now. Titanium-niobium (Ti-Nb alloy archwires exhibit similar mechanical properties as TMA. Whether sound weld joints can be produced in these wires has not been evaluated thus far. In this study Ti-Nb alloy archwires were compared with TMA and stainless steel (SS for weld quality, with SS wires serving as the control group. Materials and Methods: Weld joint strength was assessed by subjecting welded samples of TMA, Ti-Nb and SS wires (0.017 Χ 0.025-inch to a tensile load. The weld joints were also qualitatively assessed by studying the surface characteristics under a scanning electron microscope and the metallographic features under an optical microscope. Results: The weld joint of TMA wire was found to be superior in terms of the strength, surface and metallographic characteristics of the weld joint. Weld joints in Ti-Nb wires had higher strength than those of SS though statistically insignificant. Conclusion: The study concluded that TMA wires are superior to Ti-Nb and SS wires in situations where weldability is a desirable characteristic.

  19. Amination of Nitroazoles — A Comparative Study of Structural and Energetic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuxiu Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, 3-nitro-1H-1,2,4-triazole (1 and 3,5-dinitro-1H-pyrazole (2 were C-aminated and N-aminated using different amination agents, yielding their respective C-amino and N-amino products. All compounds were fully characterized by NMR (1H, 13C, 15N, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. X-ray crystallographic measurements were performed and delivered insight into structural characteristics as well as inter- and intramolecular interactions of the products. Their impact sensitivities were measured by using standard BAM fallhammer techniques and their explosive performances were computed using the EXPLO 5.05 program. A comparative study on the influence of those different amino substituents on the structural and energetic properties (such as density, stability, heat of formation, detonation performance is presented. The results showed that the incorporation of an N-amino group into a nitroazole ring can improve nitrogen content, heat of formation and impact sensitivity, while the introduction of a C-amino group can enhance density, detonation velocity and pressure. The potential of N-amino and C-amino moieties for the design of next generation energetic materials is explored.

  20. Plant Glyoxylate/Succinic Semialdehyde Reductases: Comparative Biochemical Properties, Function during Chilling Stress, and Subcellular Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Zarei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant NADPH-dependent glyoxylate/succinic semialdehyde reductases 1 and 2 (cytosolic GLYR1 and plastidial/mitochondrial GLYR2 are considered to be of particular importance under abiotic stress conditions. Here, the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh. and rice (Oryza sativa L. GLYR1s and GLYR2s were characterized and their kinetic properties were compared to those of previously characterized GLYRs from Arabidopsis thaliana [L.] Heynh. The purified recombinant GLYRs had an affinity for glyoxylate and succinic semialdehyde, respectively, in the low micromolar and millimolar ranges, and were inhibited by NADP+. Comparison of the GLYR activity in cell-free extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis and a glyr1 knockout mutant revealed that approximately 85 and 15% of the cellular GLYR activity is cytosolic and plastidial/mitochondrial, respectively. Recovery of GLYR activity in purified mitochondria from the Arabidopsis glyr1 mutant, free from cytosolic GLYR1 or plastidial GLYR2 contamination, provided additional support for the targeting of GLYR2 to mitochondria, as well as plastids. The growth of plantlets or roots of various Arabidopsis lines with altered GLYR activity responded differentially to succinic semialdehyde or glyoxylate under chilling conditions. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential regulation of highly conserved plant GLYRs by NADPH/NADP+ ratios in planta, and their roles in the reduction of toxic aldehydes in plants subjected to chilling stress.

  1. Innovativeness as an emergent property: a new alignment of comparative and experimental research on animal innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Andrea S

    2016-03-19

    Innovation and creativity are key defining features of human societies. As we face the global challenges of the twenty-first century, they are also facets upon which we must become increasingly reliant. But what makes Homo sapiens so innovative and where does our high innovation propensity come from? Comparative research on innovativeness in non-human animals allows us to peer back through evolutionary time and investigate the ecological factors that drove the evolution of innovativeness, whereas experimental research identifies and manipulates underpinning creative processes. In commenting on the present theme issue, I highlight the controversies that have typified this research field and show how a paradigmatic shift in our thinking about innovativeness will contribute to resolving these tensions. In the past decade, innovativeness has been considered by many as a trait, a direct product of cognition, and a direct target of selection. The evidence I review here suggests that innovativeness will be hereon viewed as one component, or even an emergent property of a larger array of traits, which have evolved to deal with environmental variation. I illustrate how research should capitalize on taxonomic diversity to unravel the full range of psychological processes that underpin innovativeness in non-human animals. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Comparative study of the mechanical and tribological properties of a Hadfield and a Fermanal steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astudillo A., P. C.; Soriano G., A. F.; Barona Osorio, G. M.; Sánchez Sthepa, H.; Ramos, J.; Durán, J. F.; Pérez Alcázar, G. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, Fe-12.50Mn-1.10C-1.70Cr-0.40Mo-0.40Si-0.50(max)P-0.50(max)S (Hadfield alloy) and Fe-28.4Mn-0.86C-1.63Al-0.42Cu-1.80Mo-1.59Si-0.60W (Fermanal alloy) (Wt. %) in the aged condition were compared in terms of its tribological and microstructural properties. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were refined with the lines of the austenitic γ-phase, Chromium Iron Carbide (Cr2Fe14C), Iron Carbide (Fe2C), and Iron Oxide (Fe0.974O (II)) for the Hadfield alloy, and the lines of the austenitic γ-phase, martensite (M), Mn1.1Al0.9 phase and iron carbide (Fe7C3) for the Fermanal alloy. Mössbauer spectra were fit with two sites for the Hadfield alloy, which displayed as a broad singlet because of the austenitic disordered phase, and had a magnetic hyperfine field distribution, which corresponds to the Cr2Fe14C ferromagnetic carbides found by XRD. There were two paramagnetic sites, a singlet, which corresponds to the austenite disordered phase, and a doublet, which can be attributed to the Fe7C3 carbide. The obtained Rockwell C hardness for aged Hadfield and Fermanal alloys were 43.786 and 50.018 HRc, respectively.

  3. Effects of Taping and Orthoses on Foot Biomechanics in Adults with Flat-Arched Feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christopher; Arnold, John B; May, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    There is a paucity of evidence on the biomechanical effects of foot taping and foot orthoses in realistic conditions. This study aimed to determine the immediate effect and relationships between changes in multisegment foot biomechanics with foot taping and customized foot orthoses in adults with flat-arched feet. Multisegment foot biomechanics were measured in 18 adults with flat-arched feet (age 25.1 ± 2.8 yr; height 1.73 ± .13 m, body mass 70.3 ± 15.7 kg) during walking in four conditions in random order: neutral athletic shoe, neutral shoe with tape (low-Dye method and modified method) and neutral shoe with customized foot orthoses. In-shoe foot biomechanics were compared between conditions using a purpose developed foot model with three-dimensional kinematic analysis and inverse dynamics. Foot orthoses significantly delayed peak eversion compared to the neutral shoe (44% stance vs 39%, P = 0.002). Deformation across the midfoot and medial longitudinal arch was reduced with both the low-Dye taping (2.4°, P foot orthoses (R2 = 0.08-0.52, P = 0.006 to Foot orthoses more effectively altered timing of hindfoot motion whereas taping was superior in supporting the midfoot and medial longitudinal arch. The biomechanical response to taping was significantly related to the subsequent change observed with the use of foot orthoses.

  4. SPORT AND EXERCISE BIOMECHANICS (BIOS INSTANT NOTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grimshaw

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION Instant Notes on Sport and Exercise Biomechanics provides a broad overview of the fundamental concepts in exercise and sport biomechanics. PURPOSE The book aims to provide instant notes on essential information about biomechanics, and is designed to help undergraduate students to grasp the corresponding subjects in physical effort rapidly and easily. AUDIENCE The book provides a useful resource for undergraduate and graduate students as a fundamental reference book. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a starting point to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in the field of exercise and sport biomechanics. It would also be interest to anyone who wonders the concepts like momentum possessed, whole body angular momentum, opposite parallel forces, superman position, parabolic flight path, joint/normal reaction force, etc. FEATURES This textbook is divided into following sections from A to F: kinematics of motion, kinetics of linear motion, kinetics of angular motion, special topics, applications and measurement techniques, respectively. In sub-sections the kinematics of motion are reviewed in detail, outlining the physics of motion. Furthermore, the discussions of mechanical characteristics of motion, the mechanisms of injury, and the analysis of the sport technique provide a source of valuable information for both students and lecturers in appropriate fields. ASSESSMENT This book is an important reading for biomechanics students, teachers and even researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion.

  5. [Effects of 1.8 mT sinusoidal alternating electromagnetic fields of different frequencies on bone biomechanics of young rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanfeng; Gao, Yuhai; Zhen, Ping; Chen, Keming

    2016-11-25

    Objective: To study the effects of 1.8 mT sinusoidal electromagnetic fields of different frequencies on bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanical properties in young rats. Methods: A total of 32 female SD rats (6-week-old) were randomly divided into 4 groups (8 in each):control group, 10 Hz group, 25 Hz group and 40 Hz group. The experimental groups were given 1.8 mT sinusoidal electromagnetic field intervention 90 min per day. The whole body BMD of rats was detected with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention. After 8 weeks of intervention, all rats were sacrificed, and the BMD of femur and lumbar vertebra, the length and diameter of femur, the width between medial and lateral malleolus were measured. Electronic universal material testing machine was used to obtain biomechanical properties of femur and lumbar vertebra, and micro CT scan was performed to observe micro structures of tibial cancellous bone. Results: Compared with the control group, rats in 10 Hz and 40 Hz groups had higher whole body BMD, BMD of femur, maximum load and yield strength of femur, as well as maximum load and elastic modulus of lumbar vertebra (all P 0.05). Micro CT scan showed that the trabecular number and separation degree, bone volume percentage were significantly increased in 10 Hz and 40 Hz groups (all P 0.05). Conclusion: 10 and 40 Hz of 1.8 mT sinusoidal electromagnetic field can significantly improve the bone density, microstructure and biomechanical properties in young rats.

  6. Distal femoral fixation: a biomechanical comparison of retrograde nail, retrograde intramedullary nail, and prototype locking retrograde nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiney, Jake P; Battula, Suneel; O'Connor, Jill A; Ebraheim, Nabil; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Vrabec, Gregory

    2012-08-01

    Distal femur fractures continue to be a complex surgical problem for which the incidence is increasing. Presently, there is a need for different constructs to address these complex fractures. This study attempts to define the biomechanical properties of several implants. A novel, prototype locking retrograde intramedullary nail and the Russell-Taylor femoral retrograde nail were tested at non-destructive, physiological, axial mode load strength using a young, synthetic bone model for a medial segmental shaft defect in the supracondylar region of the distal femur (medial gap of 10mm, 65mm proximal to the distal joint and parallel to the knee axis). Each specimen was compressively loaded and unloaded to the peak load for 80,000cycles at a 0.5Hz frequency. These were compared to the results from the same lab of the retrograde Trigen intramedullary nail. Motion and peak displacement were measured across the fracture site as a reflection of construct stability. Previous testing demonstrated that Trigen intramedullary nail had significantly less motion across the gap and increased overall stiffness of the construct (Pnails. Locking technology used in a nail biomechanically appears to lead to more micro-motion across the fracture gap and to less stiffness in this construct. Further research needs to be invested into intramedullary, locking technology before introducing it into clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A biomechanical comparison of one-third tubular plates versus periarticular plates for fixation of osteoporotic distal fibula fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adrian T; Israel, Heidi; Cannada, Lisa K; Bledsoe, J Gary

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the biomechanical properties of locking and nonlocking plates using one-third tubular and periarticular plate designs in an osteoporotic distal fibula fracture model. Twenty-four cadaveric specimens, whose bone mineral densities were obtained using dual x-ray absorptiometry scans, were tested. The fracture model simulated an OTA 44-B2.1 fracture. The constructs included (1) nonlocking one-third tubular plate, (2) locking one-third tubular plate, (3) nonlocking periarticular plate, and (4) locking periarticular plate. The specimens underwent axial loading followed by torsional loading to failure. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis testing and further analysis with Mann-Whitney testing. The periarticular plates had greater rotational stiffness compared with the one-third tubular plates (P = 0.04). The nonlocking plates had greater torque to failure than the locking plates (P = 0.01). The nonlocking one-third tubular plate had greater torque to failure than the locking one-third tubular plate (P = 0.03). No significant differences were found in any of the comparisons regarding axial stiffness. In biomechanical testing using an osteoporotic model of OTA 44-B2.1 fractures, periarticular plates were superior to one-third tubular plates in rotational stiffness only. Locking plates did not outperform their nonlocking counterparts. Periarticular plates should be considered when treating osteoporotic distal fibula fractures, but one-third tubular plates and nonlocking plates provide adequate fixation for these injuries.

  8. Spatiotemporal variations in gene expression, histology and biomechanics in an ovine model of tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Sara; Dart, Andrew; Smith, Margaret; Blaker, Carina; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jeffcott, Leo; Little, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Flexor tendinopathy is a common problem affecting humans and animals. Tendon healing is poorly understood and the outcomes of conservative and surgical management are often suboptimal. While often considered a localized injury, recent evidence indicates that in the short term, tendinopathic changes are distributed widely throughout the tendon, remote from the lesion itself. Whether these changes persist throughout healing is unknown. The aim of this study was to document gene expression, histopathological and biomechanical changes that occur throughout the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) up to 16 weeks post-injury, using an ovine surgical model of tendinopathy. Partial tendon transection was associated with decreased gene expression for aggrecan, decorin, fibromodulin, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPS 1, 2 and 3), collagen I and collagen II. Gene expression for collagen III, lumican and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) increased locally around the lesion site. Expression of collagen III and MMP13 decreased with time, but compared to controls, collagen III, MMP13 and lumican expression remained regionally high throughout the study. An increase in TIMP3 was observed over time. Histologically, operated tendons had higher pathology scores than controls, especially around the injured region. A chondroid phenotype was observed with increased cellular rounding and marked proteoglycan accumulation which only partially improved with time. Biomechanically, partial tendon transection resulted in a localized decrease in elastic modulus (in compression) but only at 8 weeks postoperatively. This study improves our understanding of tendon healing, demonstrating an early 'peak' in pathology characterized by altered gene expression and notable histopathological changes. Many of these pathological changes become more localized to the region of injury during healing. Collagen III and MMP13 expression levels remained high close to the lesion throughout the

  9. Spatiotemporal variations in gene expression, histology and biomechanics in an ovine model of tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Biasutti

    Full Text Available Flexor tendinopathy is a common problem affecting humans and animals. Tendon healing is poorly understood and the outcomes of conservative and surgical management are often suboptimal. While often considered a localized injury, recent evidence indicates that in the short term, tendinopathic changes are distributed widely throughout the tendon, remote from the lesion itself. Whether these changes persist throughout healing is unknown. The aim of this study was to document gene expression, histopathological and biomechanical changes that occur throughout the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT up to 16 weeks post-injury, using an ovine surgical model of tendinopathy. Partial tendon transection was associated with decreased gene expression for aggrecan, decorin, fibromodulin, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPS 1, 2 and 3, collagen I and collagen II. Gene expression for collagen III, lumican and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13 increased locally around the lesion site. Expression of collagen III and MMP13 decreased with time, but compared to controls, collagen III, MMP13 and lumican expression remained regionally high throughout the study. An increase in TIMP3 was observed over time. Histologically, operated tendons had higher pathology scores than controls, especially around the injured region. A chondroid phenotype was observed with increased cellular rounding and marked proteoglycan accumulation which only partially improved with time. Biomechanically, partial tendon transection resulted in a localized decrease in elastic modulus (in compression but only at 8 weeks postoperatively. This study improves our understanding of tendon healing, demonstrating an early 'peak' in pathology characterized by altered gene expression and notable histopathological changes. Many of these pathological changes become more localized to the region of injury during healing. Collagen III and MMP13 expression levels remained high close to the lesion

  10. Tensile and shear loading stability of all-inside meniscal repairs: an in vitro biomechanical evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Brucker, P U; Favre, P; Puskas, G J; von Campe, A; Meyer, D C; Koch, P P

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most biomechanical studies for evaluation of the structural properties of meniscal repairs have been performed in tensile loading scenarios perpendicular to the circumferential meniscal fibers. However, meniscal repair constructs are also exposed to shear forces parallel to the circumferential meniscal fibers during healing, particularly in the midportion of the meniscus. HYPOTHESIS: Material properties of meniscal repair devices cannot be extrapolated from tensile to shear loa...

  11. Evaluation of Nitinol staples for the Lapidus arthrodesis in a reproducible biomechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Alexander Russell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While the Lapidus procedure is a widely accepted technique for treatment of hallux valgus, the optimal fixation method to maintain joint stability remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of new Shape Memory Alloy staples arranged in different configurations in a repeatable 1st Tarsometatarsal arthrodesis model. Ten sawbones models of the whole foot (n=5 per group were reconstructed using a single dorsal staple or two staples in a delta configuration. Each construct was mechanically tested in dorsal four-point bending, medial four-point bending, dorsal three-point bending and plantar cantilever bending with the staples activated at 37°C. The peak load, stiffness and plantar gapping were determined for each test. Pressure sensors were used to measure the contact force and area of the joint footprint in each group. There was a significant (p < 0.05 increase in peak load in the two staple constructs compared to the single staple constructs for all testing modalities. Stiffness also increased significantly in all tests except dorsal four-point bending. Pressure sensor readings showed a significantly higher contact force at time zero and contact area following loading in the two staple constructs (p < 0.05. Both groups completely recovered any plantar gapping following unloading and restored their initial contact footprint. The biomechanical integrity and repeatability of the models was demonstrated with no construct failures due to hardware or model breakdown. Shape memory alloy staples provide fixation with the ability to dynamically apply and maintain compression across a simulated arthrodesis following a range of loading conditions.

  12. Football practice and urinary incontinence: Relation between morphology, function and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Thuane Da; Brandão, Sofia; Oliveira, Dulce; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Parente, Marco; Duarte, José Alberto; Jorge, Renato Natal

    2015-06-25

    Current evidence points to a high prevalence of urinary incontinence among female athletes. In this context, this study aims to assess if structural and biomechanical characteristics of the pubovisceral muscles may lead to urine leakage. Clinical and demographic data were collected, as well as pelvic Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Furthermore, computational models were built to verify if they were able to reproduce similar biomechanical muscle response as the one measured by dynamic imaging during active contraction by means of the percent error. Compared to the continent ones (n=7), incontinent athletes (n=5) evidenced thicker pubovisceral muscles at the level of the midvagina (p=0.019 and p=0.028 for the right and left sides, respectively). However, there were no differences neither in the strength of contraction in the Oxford Scale or in the displacement of the pelvic floor muscles during simulation of voluntary contraction, which suggests that urine leakage may be related with alterations in the intrafusal fibers than just the result of thicker muscles. Additionally, we found similar values of displacement retrieved from dynamic images and numerical models (6.42 ± 0.36 mm vs. 6.10 ± 0.47 mm; p=0.130), with a percent error ranging from 1.47% to 17.20%. However, further refinements in the mechanical properties of the striated skeletal fibers of the pelvic floor muscles and the inclusion of pelvic organs, fascia and ligaments would reproduce more realistically the pelvic cavity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical evaluation of a biomechanical guidance system for periacetabular osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan J; Armiger, Robert S; Lepistö, Jyri; Armand, Mehran

    2016-03-30

    Populations suffering from developmental dysplasia of the hip typically have reduced femoral coverage and experience joint pain while walking. Periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is one surgical solution that realigns the acetabular fragment. This challenging surgery has a steep learning curve. Existing navigation systems for computer-assisted PAO neither track the released fragment nor offer the means to assess fragment location. An intraoperative workstation--the biomechanical guidance system (BGS)--developed for PAO incorporates intraoperative fragment tracking and acetabular characterization through radiographic angles and joint biomechanics. In this paper, we investigate the accuracy and effectiveness of the BGS for bone fragment tracking and acetabular characterization in clinical settings as compared to conventional techniques and postoperative assessments. We also report the issues encountered and our remedies when using the BGS in the clinical setting. Eleven consecutive patients (aged 22-48, mean 34, years) underwent 12 PAO surgeries (one bilateral surgery) where the BGS collected information on acetabular positioning. These measurements were compared with postoperative CT data and manual measurements made intraoperatively. No complications were reported during surgery, with surgical time-95-210 (mean 175) minutes-comparable to reported data for the conventional approach. The BGS-measured acetabular positioning showed strong agreement with postoperative CT measurements (-0.3-9.2, mean 3.7, degrees), whereas larger differences occurred between the surgeon's intraoperative manual measurements and postoperative CT measurements (-2.8-21.3, mean 10.5, degrees). The BGS successfully tracked the acetabular fragment in a clinical environment without introducing complications to the surgical workflow. Accurate 3D positioning of the acetabulum may provide more information intraoperatively (e.g., anatomical angles and biomechanics) without adversely impacting the surgery

  14. Biomechanical Analysis of a Filiform Mechanosensory Hair Socket of Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kanishka; Mian, Ahsan; Miller, John

    2016-08-01

    Filiform mechanosensory hairs of crickets are of great interest to engineers because of the hairs' highly sensitive response to low-velocity air-currents. In this study, we analyze the biomechanical properties of filiform hairs of the cercal sensory system of a common house cricket. The cercal sensory system consists of two antennalike appendages called cerci that are situated at the rear of the cricket's abdomen. Each cercus is covered with 500-750 flow sensitive filiform mechanosensory hairs. Each hair is embedded in a complex viscoelastic socket that acts as a spring and dashpot system and guides the movement of the hair. When a hair deflects due to the drag force induced on its length by a moving air-current, the spiking activity of the neuron that innervates the hair changes and the combined spiking activity of all hairs is extracted by the cercal sensory system. Filiform hairs have been experimentally studied by researchers, though the basis for the hairs' biomechanical characteristics is not fully understood. The socket structure has not been analyzed experimentally or theoretically from a mechanical standpoint, and the characterization that exists is mathematical in nature and only provides a very rudimentary approximation of the socket's spring nature. This study aims to understand and physically characterize the socket's behavior and interaction with the filiform hair by examining hypotheses about the hair and socket biomechanics. A three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) model was first created using confocal microscopy images of the hair and socket structure of the cricket, and then finite-element analyses (FEAs) based on the physical conditions that the insect experiences were simulated. The results show that the socket can act like a spring; however, it has two-tier rotational spring constants during pre- and postcontacts of iris and hair bulge due to its constitutive nonstandard geometric shapes.

  15. Biomechanical analysis of reduction malarplasty with L-shaped osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shuang; Gui, Lai; Wang, Meng; Chen, Ying; Niu, Feng; Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yankun

    2012-05-01

    Reduction malarplasty with L-shaped osteotomy is widely used for surgical correction of prominent zygoma and bilateral zygomatic asymmetry. One of the keys to this surgery is the formation of the greenstick fracture on the root of the zygomatic arch. However, the greenstick fracture cannot be seen directly both in the postoperative x-ray films and three-dimensional computed tomography images, and it is unknown how the greenstick fracture forms biomechanically. So it is of great concern to both the doctors and patients whether the greenstick fracture can really take place on the root of the zygomatic arch. This study focused on the biomechanism and deformation effects of the surgery by using the method of finite element (FE) analysis. Computed tomography data of 2 patients with prominent malar complex were obtained for three-dimensional reconstruction. The FE models of the zygomatic complex with L-shaped osteotomy were established by using Mimics via thresholding, segmentation techniques, and material properties assignment with gray value conversion. Then simulations including the boundary conditions and the forces of the surgery were performed in ABAQUS. The FE models have fine quality; the first one contains 63,053 units and 100,995 nodes, and the other one contains 70,238 units and 136,219 nodes. Under the loading of pressures, the zygoma and the zygomatic arch inward have deformation displacement. Maximum stress concentration was found just at the root of the zygomatic arch. A appropriate zygomatic pressure will generate a stress concentration to form the greenstick on the root of the zygomatic arch. This study can help surgeons understand and conduct the reduction malarplasty with L-shaped osteotomy from a biomechanical insight.

  16. A modification to the experimental gingivitis protocol to compare the antiplaque properties of two toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, R J; Shearer, B H; Morgan, R; Addy, M

    2003-02-01

    Randomised, blind, controlled experimental gingivitis and home-use study protocols are used to evaluate the efficacy of oral hygiene products. The present methodological study combined the two clinical trial designs to compare the preventive and therapeutic potentials of two toothpastes. The study was a parallel group, randomised, double-blind design, initially involving 73 healthy dentate subjects. A 21-day experimental gingivitis protocol was combined with a 6-week (42 days) home-use protocol. At baseline, modified gingival index (MGI), gingival index (GI) and gingival bleeding (GB) were recorded. A dental prophylaxis was then performed. Subjects were allocated to either control fluoride or stannous fluoride toothpaste based on gender and GI. During the first 21-day period, subjects applied the allocated toothpaste, for 1 min twice a day, to a group of teeth in a plastic shield and brushed the remaining teeth with the same paste. From day 21 the shield was not placed, and subjects brushed all teeth with the toothpaste for 1 min twice per day up to day 42. MGI, GB and a plaque index (PI) were recorded on days 21 and 42. Sixty-nine and 67 subjects completed to days 21 and 42, respectively. For shielded teeth, PI, MGI and GB increased to day 21 and then after ceasing the use of the shield decreased to day 42. At day 21, PI favoured the stannous fluoride toothpaste, but differences did not achieve statistical significance for any parameter at days 21 or 42. For unshielded teeth, there were no significant differences between the toothpastes for any parameter at either time point. : The feasibility of combining two gingivitis clinical trial methodologies appears proven, and data on both the preventive and therapeutic chemical and mechanical efficacy of toothpastes can be obtained through such protocols. Specifically from the present study and consistent with some other reports, the plaque inhibitory properties of the stannous fluoride product are limited and do not

  17. The EUROHIS-QOL 8-item index: comparative psychometric properties to its parent WHOQOL-BREF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Neusa Sica; Power, Mick J; Bushnell, Donald M; Fleck, Marcelo P

    2012-05-01

    To test the psychometric properties of the EUROHIS-QOL 8-item index, a shortened version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-Abbreviated Version (WHOQOL-BREF). The sample consisted of 2359 subjects identified from primary care settings, with 1193 having a confirmed diagnosis of depression. Data came from six countries (Australia, Brazil, Israel, Russia, Spain, and the United States) involved in a large international study, the Longitudinal Investigation of Depression Outcomes. The structure of the EUROHIS-QOL 8-item index follows that of the WHOQOL-BREF assessment. Internal consistency was measured by using Cronbach's alpha. Convergent validity was assessed by using correlations with different measures for mental health (Symptom Checklist 90), physical health (self-evaluation), and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF and short form 36 health survey). Discriminant group validity was assessed between diagnosed depressed and nondepressed patients. Differential item functioning and unidimensionality were analyzed by using Rasch analysis. Factor structure was assessed with structural equation modeling analyses. Internal consistency was acceptable (ranged between 0.72 and 0.81 across countries), and the index discriminated well between depression (t = 6.31-20.33; P relationships, and home items for age. A common one-factor structure with acceptable fit was identified in three out of six countries (comparative fit index = 0.85, root mean square error of approximation = 0.11). The EUROHIS-QOL 8-item index showed acceptable cross-cultural performance and a satisfactory discriminant validity and would be a useful measure to include in studies to assess treatment effectiveness. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparing the androgenic and estrogenic properties of progestins used in contraception and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw-du Toit, Renate; Perkins, Meghan S.; Hapgood, Janet P.; Africander, Donita

    2017-01-01

    Progestins used in endocrine therapies bind to multiple steroid receptors and are associated with several side-effects. It is thus important to understand the relationship between steroid receptor cross-reactivity and the side-effect profile of progestins. In cell lines that express negligible levels of steroid receptors, we report for the first time the binding affinities, potencies and efficacies of selected progestins from different generations determined in parallel. We show that the progestins bind to the androgen receptor (AR) with similar affinities to each other and progesterone, while none bind estrogen receptor (ER)-β, and only norethisterone acetate, levonorgestrel and gestodene bind ERα. Comparative dose-response analysis revealed that progestins from the first three generations display similar androgenic activity to the natural androgen dihydrotestosterone for transactivation, while norethisterone acetate, levonorgestrel and gestodene are ERα agonists. We show for the first time that the anti-androgenic properties of progesterone and drospirenone are similar to the well-known AR antagonist hydroxyflutamide, while nomegestrol acetate is more potent and nestorone less potent than both hydroxyflutamide and progesterone. Moreover, we are the first to report that the older progestins, unlike progesterone and the fourth generation progestins, are efficacious ERα agonists for transrepression, while the selected progestins from the second and third generation are efficacious AR agonists for transrepression. Considering the progestin potencies and their reported free serum concentrations relative to dihydrotestosterone and estradiol, our results suggest that the progestins are likely to exert AR-, but not ERα- or ERβ-mediated effects in vivo. PMID:28711501

  19. 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank W. Telewski; Lothar H. Koehler; Frank W. Ewers

    2003-07-20

    The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.

  20. Computational biomechanics for medicine from algorithms to models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Joldes, Grand; Nielsen, Poul; Doyle, Barry; Miller, Karol

    2017-01-01

    This volume comprises the latest developments in both fundamental science and patient-specific applications, discussing topics such as: cellular mechanics; injury biomechanics; biomechanics of heart and vascular system; medical image analysis; and both patient-specific fluid dynamics and solid mechanics simulations. With contributions from researchers world-wide, the Computational Biomechanics for Medicine series of titles provides an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements.

  1. Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Poul MF; Miller, Karol; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Deformation and Flow

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Deformation and Flow collects the papers from the Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Toronto in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  2. Multiscale modeling in biomechanics and mechanobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Presenting a state-of-the-art overview of theoretical and computational models that link characteristic biomechanical phenomena, this book provides guidelines and examples for creating multiscale models in representative systems and organisms. It develops the reader's understanding of and intuition for multiscale phenomena in biomechanics and mechanobiology, and introduces a mathematical framework and computational techniques paramount to creating predictive multiscale models.   Biomechanics involves the study of the interactions of physical forces with biological systems at all scales – including molecular, cellular, tissue and organ scales. The emerging field of mechanobiology focuses on the way that cells produce and respond to mechanical forces – bridging the science of mechanics with the disciplines of genetics and molecular biology. Linking disparate spatial and temporal scales using computational techniques is emerging as a key concept in investigating some of the complex problems underlying these...

  3. Medial malleolar fractures: a biomechanical study of fixation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, T Ty; Pugh, Kevin J; Litsky, Alan S; Taylor, Benjamin C; French, Bruce G

    2011-08-08

    Fracture fixation of the medial malleolus in rotationally unstable ankle fractures typically results in healing with current fixation methods. However, when failure occurs, pullout of the screws from tension, compression, and rotational forces is predictable. We sought to biomechanically test a relatively new technique of bicortical screw fixation for medial malleoli fractures. Also, the AO group recommends tension-band fixation of small avulsion type fractures of the medial malleolus that are unacceptable for screw fixation. A well-documented complication of this technique is prominent symptomatic implants and secondary surgery for implant removal. Replacing stainless steel 18-gauge wire with FiberWire suture could theoretically decrease symptomatic implants. Therefore, a second goal was to biomechanically compare these 2 tension-band constructs. Using a tibial Sawbones model, 2 bicortical screws were compared with 2 unicortical cancellous screws on a servohydraulic test frame in offset axial, transverse, and tension loading. Second, tension-band fixation using stainless steel wire was compared with FiberWire under tensile loads. Bicortical screw fixation was statistically the stiffest construct under tension loading conditions compared to unicortical screw fixation and tension-band techniques with FiberWire or stainless steel wire. In fact, unicortical screw fixation had only 10% of the stiffness as demonstrated in the bicortical technique. In a direct comparison, tension-band fixation using stainless steel wire was statistically stiffer than the FiberWire construct. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Influence of Different Tibial Fixation Techniques on Initial Stability in Single-Stage Anterior Cruciate Ligament Revision With Confluent Tibial Tunnels: A Biomechanical Laboratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Treder, Maximilian; Schulze, Martin; Müller, Viktoria; Vasta, Sebastiano; Zampogna, Biaggio; Herbort, Mirco; Kösters, Clemens; Raschke, Michael J; Lenschow, Simon

    2016-01-01

    To kinematically and biomechanically compare 4 different types of tibial tunnel management in single-stage anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision reconstruction with the control: primary ACL reconstruction using a robotic-based knee testing setup. Porcine knees and flexor tendons were used. One hundred specimens were randomly assigned to 5 testing groups: (1) open tibial tunnel, (2) bone plug technique, (3) biodegradable interference screw, (4) dilatation technique, and (5) primary ACL reconstruction. A robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system was used to simulate the KT-1000 (MEDmetric, San Diego, CA) and pivot-shift tests. Cyclic loading and load-to-failure testing were performed. Anterior tibial translation increased significantly with all of the techniques compared with the intact ACL (P .05). The open tunnel and dilated tunnel techniques showed significantly greater anterior tibial translation (P < .05). The results of the simulated pivot-shift test were in accordance with those of the KT-1000 test. No significant differences could be observed regarding stiffness or maximum load to failure. However, elongation was significantly lower in the primary ACL reconstruction group compared with groups 1 and 3 (P = .02 and P = .03, respectively). Filling an inco