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Sample records for biomechanical effects decline

  1. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are n

  2. Weightbath hydrotraction treatment: application, biomechanics, and clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márta Kurutz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Márta Kurutz1, Tamás Bender21Department of Structural Mechanics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary; 2Department of Physical Medicine, Polyclinic and Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, Budapest, Medical University of Szeged, HungaryBackground and purpose: Weightbath hydrotraction treatment (WHT is a simple noninvasive effective method of hydro- or balneotherapy to stretch the spine or lower limbs, applied successfully in hospitals and health resort sanitaria in Hungary for more than fifty years. This study aims to introduce WHT with its biomechanical and clinical effects. History, development, equipment, modes of application, biomechanics, spinal traction forces and elongations, indications and contraindications of WHT are precented.Subjects and methods: The calculation of traction forces acting along the spinal column during the treatment is described together with the mode of suspension and the position of extra weight loads applied. The biomechanics of the treatment are completed by in vivo measured elongations of lumbar segments using a special underwater ultrasound measuring method. The clinical effects, indications, and contraindications of the treatment are also presented.Results: In the underwater cervical suspension of a human body, approximately 25 N stretching load occurs in the cervical spine, and about 11 N occurs in the lumbar spine. By applying extra weights, the above tensile forces along the spinal column can be increased. Thus, the traction effect can be controlled by applying such loads during the treatment. Elongations of segments L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5–S1 were measured during the usual WHT of patients suspended cervically in water for 20 minutes, loaded by 20–20 N lead weights on the ankles. The mean initial elastic elongations of spinal segments were about 0.8 mm for patients aged under 40 years, 0.5 mm between 40–60 years, and 0.2 mm for patients over 60 years. The mean

  3. Declining ecosystem health and the dilution effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hussein; Ecke, Frauke; Evander, Magnus; Magnusson, Magnus; Hörnfeldt, Birger

    2016-01-01

    The "dilution effect" implies that where species vary in susceptibility to infection by a pathogen, higher diversity often leads to lower infection prevalence in hosts. For directly transmitted pathogens, non-host species may "dilute" infection directly (1) and indirectly (2). Competitors and predators may (1) alter host behavior to reduce pathogen transmission or (2) reduce host density. In a well-studied system, we tested the dilution of the zoonotic Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) in bank voles (Myodes glareolus) by two competitors and a predator. Our study was based on long-term PUUV infection data (2003-2013) in northern Sweden. The field vole (Microtus agrestis) and the common shrew (Sorex araneus) are bank vole competitors and Tengmalm's owl (Aegolius funereus) is a main predator of bank voles. Infection probability in bank voles decreased when common shrew density increased, suggesting that common shrews reduced PUUV transmission. Field voles suppressed bank vole density in meadows and clear-cuts and indirectly diluted PUUV infection. Further, Tengmalm's owl decline in 1980-2013 may have contributed to higher PUUV infection rates in bank voles in 2003-2013 compared to 1979-1986. Our study provides further evidence for dilution effect and suggests that owls may have an important role in reducing disease risk. PMID:27499001

  4. Biomechanical Effect of Chinese Immobilization Using Little Splint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mei; ZHAO Namula

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization using little splint is an original innovation of Chinese people for the fracture fixation, which is simple to use and clinically effective. It was found that Chinese immobilization using little splint can make the non-invasive, uncovering, and trouble free healing of bone fracture via harmonious unity of the structure stability and the force balance, of the motion stability and the stress adaptability, of the constant and discontinuous physiological stress. The biomechanical effect of Chinese immobilization using little splint, including entirety, dynamic, and functional fixity, is the root cause of its inheritance and the use up to now, and also is a direction of today's fracture fixation towards personalization, individuality and entirety.

  5. Organizational Decline and Effectiveness in Private Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C.

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine the relationship between organizational decline and three domains of effectiveness (academic, morale, and external adaptation) in private colleges and universities is discussed. The results demonstrate that the relationship between decline and effectiveness is not uniform across three types of institutions. (Author/MLW)

  6. Effects of resistance training fatigue on joint biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David R; Szivak, Tunde K; Distefano, Lindsay J; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Apicella, Jenna M; Kelly, Neil A; Creighton, Brent C; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2013-01-01

    Resistance training has been found to have a multitude of benefits. However, when performed with short rest, resistance training can result in substantial fatigue, which may have a negative impact on exercise technique. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of fatigue from resistance exercise on joint biomechanics to determine what residual movement effects may exist after the workout. Twelve men with at least 6 months of resistance training experience (age 24 ± 4.2 years, height 173.1 ± 3.6 cm, weight 76.9 ± 7.8 kg) performed 5 body weight squats before (pretest) and after (posttest) a highly fatiguing resistance training workout. Lower extremity biomechanics were assessed using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system during these squats. Peak angle, total displacement, and rate were assessed for knee flexion, trunk flexion, hip flexion, hip rotation, and hip adduction. Results showed a significant decrease in peak angle for knee flexion (Pre: 120.28 ± 11.93°, Post: 104.46 ± 9.85°), hip flexion (Pre: -109.42 ± 12.49°, Post: -95.8 ± 12.30°), and hip adduction (Pre: -23.32 ± 7.04°, Post: -17.30 ± 8.79°). There was a significant reduction in angular displacement for knee flexion (Pre: 115.56 ± 10.55°, Post: 103.35 ± 10.49°), hip flexion (Pre: 97.94 ± 10.69°, Post: 90.51 ± 13.22°), hip adduction (Pre: 17.79 ± 7.36°, Post: 11.89 ± 4.34°), and hip rotation (Pre: 30.72 ± 12.28, Post: 20.48 ± 10.12). There was also a significant reduction in displacement rate for knee flexion (Pre: 2.20 ± 0.20, Post: 1.98 ± 0.20), hip flexion (Pre: 1.92 ± 0.20, Post: 1.76 ± 0.27), hip adduction (Pre: -0.44 ± 0.17, Post: -0.31 ± 0.17), and hip rotation (Pre: 0.59 ± 0.23, Post: 0.38 ± 0.21). This study demonstrated that there are lasting residual effects on movement capabilities after a high-intensity short rest protocol. Thus, strength and conditioning coaches must be careful to monitor movements and exercise techniques after such workouts

  7. Effects of spaceflight on rat humerus geometry, biomechanics, and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailas, A. C.; Zernicke, R. F.; Grindeland, R. E.; Kaplansky, A.; Durnova, G. N.; Li, K. C.; Martinez, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 12.5-day spaceflight (Cosmos 1887 biosatellite) on the geometric, biomechanical, and biochemical characteristics of humeri of male specific pathogen-free rats were examined. Humeri of age-matched basal control, synchronous control, and vivarium control rats were contrasted with the flight bones to examine the influence of growth and space environment on bone development. Lack of humerus longitudinal growth occurred during the 12.5 days in spaceflight. In addition, the normal mid-diaphysial periosteal appositional growth was affected; compared with their controls, the spaceflight humeri had less cortical cross-sectional area, smaller periosteal circumferences, smaller anterior-posterior periosteal diameters, and smaller second moments of area with respect to the bending and nonbending axes. The flexural rigidity of the flight humeri was comparable to that of the younger basal control rats and significantly less than that of the synchronous and vivarium controls; the elastic moduli of all four groups, nonetheless, were not significantly different. Generally, the matrix biochemistry of the mid-diaphysial cross sections showed no differences among groups. Thus, the spaceflight differences in humeral mechanical strength and flexural rigidity were probably a result of the differences in humeral geometry rather than material properties.

  8. WHAT IS A MOMENT ARM? CALCULATING MUSCLE EFFECTIVENESS IN BIOMECHANICAL MODELS USING GENERALIZED COORDINATES

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Michael A.; Seth, Ajay; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanics researchers often use multibody models to represent biological systems. However, the mapping from biology to mechanics and back can be problematic. OpenSim is a popular open source tool used for this purpose, mapping between biological specifications and an underlying generalized coordinate multibody system called Simbody. One quantity of interest to biomechanical researchers and clinicians is “muscle moment arm,” a measure of the effectiveness of a muscle at contributing to a pa...

  9. Research and Teaching: Assessing the Effect of Problem-Based Learning on Undergraduate Student Learning in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, David; Stoner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of using the problem-based learning (PBL) teaching strategy on student academic achievement and secondary learning outcomes when compared with the traditional lecture (TL) for an undergraduate Biomechanics course. Successive undergraduate Biomechanics courses--a TL cohort and a PBL cohort--were…

  10. Effect of estrogen on tendon collagen synthesis, tendon structural characteristics, and biomechanical properties in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Kongsgaard, M; Holm, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge about the effect of estradiol on tendon connective tissue is limited. Therefore, we studied the influence of estradiol on tendon synthesis, structure, and biomechanical properties in postmenopausal women. Nonusers (control, n = 10) or habitual users of oral estradiol replacement the...

  11. The effect of head trauma on fracture healing: biomechanical testing and finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ozan, Firat; Hasan YILDIZ; Bora, Osman Arslan; Pekedis, Mahmut; Coskun, Gulnihal Ay; Gore, Oya

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the effect of head trauma on fracture healing with biomechanical testing, to compare the results obtained from a femur model created by finite element analysis with experimental data, and to develop a finite element model that can be employed in femoral fractures. Methods: Twenty-two Wistar albino rats were randomized into two groups. The control group was subjected to femoral fracture followed by intramedullary fixation, whereas the head trauma group was ...

  12. The effect of substrate compliance on the biomechanics of gibbon leaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Anthony J; Günther, Michael M; Crompton, Robin H; D'Août, Kristiaan; Preuschoft, Holger; Vereecke, Evie E

    2011-02-15

    The storage and recovery of elastic strain energy in the musculoskeletal systems of locomoting animals has been extensively studied, yet the external environment represents a second potentially useful energy store that has often been neglected. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of orangutans to usefully recover energy from swaying trees to minimise the cost of gap crossing. Although mechanically similar mechanisms have been hypothesised for wild leaping primates, to date no such energy recovery mechanisms have been demonstrated biomechanically in leapers. We used a setup consisting of a forceplate and two high-speed video cameras to conduct a biomechanical analysis of captive gibbons leaping from stiff and compliant poles. We found that the gibbons minimised pole deflection by using different leaping strategies. Two leap types were used: slower orthograde leaps and more rapid pronograde leaps. The slower leaps used a wider hip joint excursion to negate the downward movement of the pole, using more impulse to power the leap, but with no increase in work done on the centre of mass. Greater hip excursion also minimised the effective leap distance during orthograde leaps. The more rapid leaps conversely applied peak force earlier in stance where the pole was effectively stiffer, minimising deflection and potential energy loss. Neither leap type appeared to usefully recover energy from the pole to increase leap performance, but the gibbons demonstrated an ability to best adapt their leap biomechanics to counter the negative effects of the compliant pole. PMID:21270319

  13. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  14. Effects of refrigeration and freezing on the electromechanical and biomechanical properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changoor, Adele; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    In vitro electromechanical and biomechanical testing of articular cartilage provide critical information about the structure and function of this tissue. Difficulties obtaining fresh tissue and lengthy experimental testing procedures often necessitate a storage protocol, which may adversely affect the functional properties of cartilage. The effects of storage at either 4°C for periods of 6 days and 12 days, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at -20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive electromechanical measurements and unconfined compression testing on 3 mm diameter disks were used to assess cartilage properties, including the streaming potential integral (SPI), fibril modulus (Ef), matrix modulus (Em), and permeability (k). Cartilage disks were also examined histologically. Compared with controls, significant decreases in SPI (to 32.3±5.5% of control values, prefrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were detected at day 6. A trend toward detecting a decrease in SPI (to 94.2±6.2% of control values, p=0.083) was identified following a single freeze-thaw cycle, but no detectable changes were observed for any biomechanical parameters. All numbers are mean±95% confidence interval. These results indicate that fresh cartilage can be stored in a humid chamber at 4°C for a maximum of 6 days with no detrimental effects to cartilage electromechanical and biomechanical properties, while one freeze-thaw cycle produces minimal deterioration of biomechanical and electromechanical properties. A comparison to literature suggested that particular attention should be paid to the manner in which specimens are thawed after freezing, specifically by minimizing thawing time at higher temperatures. PMID:20887036

  15. Detecting Early Biomechanical Effects of Zoledronic Acid on Femurs of Osteoporotic Female Rats

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    Evandro Pereira Palacio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the biomechanical effects of zoledronic acid (ZA on femurs of female osteoporotic rats after follow-up periods of 9 and 12 months. Methods. Eighty female Wistar rats were prospectively assessed. At 60 days of age, the animals were randomly divided into two groups: bilateral oophorectomy (O (n=40 and sham surgery (S (n=40. At 90 days of age, groups O and S were randomly subdivided into four groups, according to whether 0.1 mg/kg of ZA or distilled water (DW was intraperitoneally administered: OZA (n=20, ODW (n=20, SZA (n=20, and SDW (n=20. The animals were sacrificed at 9 and 12 months after the administration of the substances, and then their right femurs were removed and analyzed biomechanically. Axial compression tests that focused on determining the maximum load (N, yield point (N, and stiffness coefficient (N/mm of the proximal femur were performed in the biomechanical study. Results. ZA significantly increased the maximum load and yield point, reducing the stiffness coefficient concerning the oophorectomy status and follow-up period. Conclusion. Zoledronic acid, at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, significantly increased the maximum loads and yield points and reduced the stiffness coefficients in the femurs of female rats with osteoporosis caused by bilateral oophorectomy.

  16. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Thomas W.; Dell, Paul C.; Conrad, Bryan P; Tanner, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR) in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and r...

  17. Effects of Ankle Arthrodesis on Biomechanical Performance of the Entire Foot.

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    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Ankle arthrodesis is one popular surgical treatment for ankle arthritis, chronic instability, and degenerative deformity. However, complications such as foot pain, joint arthritis, and bone fracture may cause patients to suffer other problems. Understanding the internal biomechanics of the foot is critical for assessing the effectiveness of ankle arthrodesis and provides a baseline for the surgical plan. This study aimed to understand the biomechanical effects of ankle arthrodesis on the entire foot and ankle using finite element analyses. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle, involving 28 bones, 103 ligaments, the plantar fascia, major muscle groups, and encapsulated soft tissue, was developed and validated. The biomechanical performances of a normal foot and a foot with ankle arthrodesis were compared at three gait instants, first-peak, mid-stance, and second-peak.Changes in plantar pressure distribution, joint contact pressure and forces, von Mises stress on bone and foot deformation were predicted. Compared with those in the normal foot, the peak plantar pressure was increased and the center of pressure moved anteriorly in the foot with ankle arthrodesis. The talonavicular joint and joints of the first to third rays in the hind- and mid-foot bore the majority of the loading and sustained substantially increased loading after ankle arthrodesis. An average contact pressure of 2.14 MPa was predicted at the talonavicular joint after surgery and the maximum variation was shown to be 80% in joints of the first ray. The contact force and pressure of the subtalar joint decreased after surgery, indicating that arthritis at this joint was not necessarily a consequence of ankle arthrodesis but rather a progression of pre-existing degenerative changes. Von Mises stress in the second and third metatarsal bones at the second-peak instant increased to 52 MPa and 34 MPa, respectively, after surgery. These variations can provide

  18. Biomechanical Effect of an Interlaminar Device on Ranges of Motion, Intradiscal Pressure, and Centers of Rotation

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    Giancarlo Guizzardi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The IntraSPINE is a new interlaminar device that has been proposed with the aim to decompress the spinal canal without reducing the extension motion. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of L4-L5 spinal units implanted with this interlaminar device, in terms of ranges of motion, intradiscal pressure, and centers of rotation. Material and Methods. Six human lumbar spines were harvested within 10 days after death. A specific spine testing device was used to apply moments up to 10 Nm in flexion-extension, lateral bending (left-right flexion and left-right axial rotation (torsion, with measurement of vertebral 3D motion and of intervertebral disc pressure. Protocol was repeated for each specimen in 5 configurations: intact specimen; after L4-L5 bilateral medial hemifacetectomy and both yellow ligament resection; after implantation of the interlaminar device at the L4-L5 level; after removal of the L4-L5 supraspinous ligament, resection of the posterior third of the disc and addition of an artificial ligament; after device and artificial ligament removal. Results. The implant reduced increases in segmental flexion seen following injury particularly when applied with the artificial ligament. Intradiscal pressure reduced following application of the implant without reducing extension range. A small posterior shift of the Mean Centers of Rotation (MCR was noticed after instrumentation. Torsion and lateral bending range was unaffected by the interlaminar device. Conclusion. This biomechanical study yields a better understanding of this interlaminar implant effect. A large clinical trial with follow-up would be required to evaluate and confirm in vivo the observed in vitro biomechanical behavior of the device.

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on the basic biomechanical properties of freeze-dried bovine pericardium (FDBP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of sterilization using gamma radiation on the basic biomechanical properties of freeze dried bovine pericardium (FDBP). Bovine pericardium was obtained from the Shah Alam Abattoir, Selangor. The pericardial sacs were cleaned, freeze-dried and irradiated with 25 kGy gamma rays at Malaysian Institute of Nuclear Technology (MINT), Bangi, Selangor. The biomechanical properties of one hundred strips (1 cm by 4 cm) each of the irradiated and non-irradiated of FDBP were measured respectively by instron tensometer (Instron 4301) using 5 m/min cross 'head speed. The strips thickness was measured by Mitutoyo thickness gauge. The mean values of the tensile strength (12.4±0.522 MPa/mm2), load at auto break (1 8.5±1.08 N/mm2), modulus of elasticity (stiffness) (62.69±2.48 MPa/mm2) and elongation rate (5 1 %) for non-irradiated FDBP were found to be significantly higher (P2, 9.3±4.2 N/mm2, 35.7±1.7 MPa/mm2 and 43% respectively. However, the thickness between the two groups was not significantly different (P>0.05). Although sterilization using gamma irradiation is effective against disease transmission by bioprosthesis, it can caused significant decreased in FDBP tensile strength, load at auto break, Yang modulus and elongation rate. (Author)

  20. Effect of Body-Weight-Support Running on Lower-Limb Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Michael; Fleming, Neil; Eberman, Lindsey; Games, Kenneth; Vaughan, Jeremiah

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Body-weight-support (BWS) running is increasing in popularity, despite limited evidence of its effects on running mechanics. Objectives To determine the effect of increasing BWS on lower-limb biomechanics during lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill running. Methods Fourteen male recreational runners completed 15 randomized trials on an LBPP treadmill at 5 levels of BWS and 3 velocities (1-minute trials with 3-minute recovery). Knee and ankle kinematic data were recorded continuously via electrogoniometry. Synchronous in-shoe plantar-pressure data identified stride onset and quantified foot-segment forces. Data were recorded during the final 30 seconds of each trial and averaged over 10 consecutive stride cycles. Results Higher levels of BWS resulted in significantly (Pdoi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6503. PMID:27581179

  1. The Effect of Lower Body Stabilization and Different Writing Tools on Writing Biomechanics in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Lien, Yueh-Ju; Yu, Yu-Chun; Ju, Yan-Ying; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Wu, David Bin-Chia

    2013-01-01

    A high percentage of children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty keeping up with the handwriting demands at school. Previous studies have addressed the effects of proper sitting and writing tool on writing performance, but less on body biomechanics. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of lower body stabilization and pencil…

  2. Neuropsychological Practice Effects in the Context of Cognitive Decline: Contributions from Learning and Task Novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgusen, Sommer R; Suchy, Yana; Chelune, Gordon J; Baucom, Brian R

    2016-04-01

    Although cognitive decline is typically associated with decreasing practice effects (PEs) (presumably due to declining memory), some studies show increased PEs with declines in cognition. One explanation for these inconsistencies is that PEs reflect not only memory, but also rebounds from adapting to task novelty (i.e., novelty effect), leading to increased PEs. We examined a theoretical model of relationships among novelty effects, memory, cognitive decline, and within-session PEs. Sixty-six older adults ranging from normal to severely impaired completed measures of memory, novelty effects, and two trials each of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, 4 th Edition Symbol Search and Coding. Interrelationships among variables were examined using regression analyses. PEs for Symbol Search and Coding (a) were related to different proposed PE components (i.e., memory and novelty effects), such that novelty effect predicted Symbol Search PE (R 2 =.239, pcognitive decline, such that the greatest cognitive decline was associated with smallest Coding PE (R 2 =.125, p=.004), whereas intermediate cognitive decline was associated with the greatest Symbol Search PE (R 2 =.097, p=.040). The relationship between cognitive decline and PE for Symbol Search was partially mediated by novelty effect among older adults with abnormal cognitive decline (model R 2 =.286, pprocesses of PE across different neuropsychological measures. (JINS, 2016, 22, 453-466). PMID:26790693

  3. Modeling the Effects of Harvest Alternatives on Mitigating Oak Decline in a Central Hardwood Forest Landscape.

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    Wen J Wang

    Full Text Available Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak

  4. The effects of a lateral in-flight perturbation on lower extremity biomechanics during drop landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom, Jae P; Simpson, Kathy J; Arnett, Scott W; Brown, Cathleen N

    2014-10-01

    One potential ACL injury situation is due to contact with another person or object during the flight phase, thereby causing the person to land improperly. Conversely, athletes often have flight-phase collisions but do land safely. Therefore, to better understand ACL injury causation and methods by which people typically land safely, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an in-flight perturbation on the lower extremity biomechanics displayed by females during typical drop landings. Seventeen collegiate female recreational athletes performed baseline landings, followed by either unexpected laterally-directed perturbation or sham (nonperturbation) drop landings. We compared baseline and perturbation trials using paired-samples t tests (P flight perturbation leads to abnormal GRF and angular motions and joint moments of the lower extremity. PMID:25010630

  5. Effect of the hydration on the biomechanical properties in a fibrin-agarose tissue-like model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scionti, Giuseppe; Moral, Monica; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Durán, Juan D G; Alaminos, Miguel; Campos, Antonio; López-López, Modesto T

    2014-08-01

    The effect of hydration on the biomechanical properties of fibrin and fibrin-agarose (FA) tissue-like hydrogels is reported. Native hydrogels with approximately 99.5% of water content and hydrogels with water content reduced until 90% and 80% by means of plastic compression (nanostructuration) were generated. The biomechanical properties of the hydrogels were investigated by tensile, compressive, and shear tests. Experimental results indicate that nanostructuration enhances the biomechanical properties of the hydrogels. This improvement is due to the partial draining of the water that fills the porous network of fibers that the plastic compression generates, which produces a denser material, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Results also indicate that the characteristic compressive and shear parameters increase with agarose concentration, very likely due to the high water holding capacity of agarose, which reduces the compressibility and gives consistency to the hydrogels. However, results of tensile tests indicate a weakening of the hydrogels as agarose concentration increases, which evidences the anisotropic nature of these biomaterials. Interestingly, we found that by adjusting the water and agarose contents it is possible to tune the biomechanical properties of FA hydrogels for a broad range, within which the properties of many native tissues fall. PMID:23963645

  6. Ocular biomechanics study: current state and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Petrov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the eye represents a challenge for biomechanical research due to its size, over the last two decades, much data on ocular biomechanics were accumulated. Scleral and lamina cribrosa biomechanics contribute to our understanding of myopia and open-angle glaucoma; iris and trabecular meshwork biomechanics to that of angle-closure glaucoma; vitreous biomechanics to that of retinal detachment and ocular drug delivery; corneal biomechanics to that of keratoconus; and lens capsule biomechanics to that of cataract. This paper offers a general overview of recent advances in corneal, scleral, crystalline lens, and lamina cribrosa biomechanics and summarizes the results of experimental and clinical studies. Ocular biomechanics abnormalities affect etiology of many eye diseases. Ocular biomechanics plays an important role in the development of novel diagnostic methods, therapeutic and surgical procedures. Corneal biomechanics impacts etiology and pathogenesis of keratoconus as well as tonometry accuracy and explains corneal refractive surgery effect. Scleral biomechanics is associated with IOP and progressive myopia. Accommodative apparatus (ciliary body and crystalline lens is an important anatomic physiological structure. Recent studies uncovered the causes of agerelated loss of accommodation as a result of lens involution. Optic nerve head abnormalities due to IOP fluctuations are the key factor of glaucomatous neuropathy. They are directly associated with ocular biomechanics as well.

  7. Investigation of chemical and physical properties of carbon nanotubes and their effects on cell biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo

    Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Effects of acid treatment on structure, properties and biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes, Applied Surface Science, 2013, 268, 261-268.) Chapter two shows how exposure to CNTs changes the biomechanical properties of fixed human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells). Specifically, by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation technology, we demonstrated that cellular exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 24h induces significant changes in cellular biomechanics leading to increased cellular stiffness. The MWCNTs incubation also seemed to alter the surface area of the cells. Consequently, measures of the mechanical properties of the exposed cell could be used as indicators of its biological state and could offer valuable insights into the mechanisms associated with CNTs-induced genetic instability. (Publication: Chenbo Dong, Linda Sargent, Michael L Kashon, David Lowry, Jonathan S. Dordick, Steven H. Reynolds, Yon Rojanasakul and Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Expose to carbon nanotubes leads to change in cellular biomechanics, Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2013, 7, 945-951.) Chapter three links together the MWCNTs exposure duration, internalization and induced biomechanical changes in fixed cells. Our findings indicated that changes in biomechanical properties of the fixed cells are a function of the uptake and internalization of the MWCNTs as well as their uptake time. Specifically, short exposure time did not seem to lead to considerable changes in the elastic properties in the cellular system. However, longer cellular exposure to CNTs leads to a higher uptake and internalization of the nanotubes and a larger effect on the cell mechanics. Such changes could be related to CNTs interactions with cellular elements and could bring information on the CNT intrinsic toxicity. Chapter four talks about the potential of purified forms of CNTs with increased hydrophilicity to affect live human lung epithelial cells when used at occupational

  8. Radiation combined injury models to study the effects of interventions and wound biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawaski, Janice A; Yates, Charles R; Miller, Duane D; Kaffes, Caterina C; Sabek, Omaima M; Afshar, Solmaz F; Young, Daniel A; Yang, Yunzhi; Gaber, M Waleed

    2014-12-01

    In the event of a nuclear detonation, a considerable number of projected casualties will suffer from combined radiation exposure and burn and/or wound injury. Countermeasure assessment in the setting of radiation exposure combined with dermal injury is hampered by a lack of animal models in which the effects of interventions have been characterized. To address this need, we used two separate models to characterize wound closure. The first was an open wound model in mice to study the effect of wound size in combination with whole-body 6 Gy irradiation on the rate of wound closure, animal weight and survival (morbidity). In this model the addition of interventions, wound closure, subcutaneous vehicle injection, topical antiseptic and topical antibiotics were studied to measure their effect on healing and survival. The second was a rat closed wound model to study the biomechanical properties of a healed wound at 10 days postirradiation (irradiated with 6 or 7.5 Gy). In addition, complete blood counts were performed and wound pathology by staining with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, CD68 and Ki67. In the mouse open wound model, we found that wound size and morbidity were positively correlated, while wound size and survival were negatively correlated. Regardless of the wound size, the addition of radiation exposure delayed the healing of the wound by approximately 5-6 days. The addition of interventions caused, at a minimum, a 30% increase in survival and improved mean survival by ∼9 days. In the rat closed wound model we found that radiation exposure significantly decreased all wound biomechanical measurements as well as white blood cell, platelet and red blood cell counts at 10 days post wounding. Also, pathological changes showed a loss of dermal structure, thickening of dermis, loss of collagen/epithelial hyperplasia and an increased density of macrophages. In conclusion, we have characterized the effect of a changing wound size in combination with radiation

  9. Effect of prosthetic gel liner thickness on gait biomechanics and pressure distribution within the transtibial socket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Boutwell, MS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic gel liners are often prescribed for persons with lower-limb amputations to make the prosthetic socket more comfortable. However, their effects on residual limb pressures and gait characteristics have not been thoroughly explored. This study investigated the effects of gel liner thickness on peak socket pressures and gait patterns of persons with unilateral transtibial amputations. Pressure and quantitative gait data were acquired while subjects walked on liners of two different uniform thicknesses. Fibular head peak pressures were reduced (p = 0.04 with the thicker liner by an average of 26 +/– 21%, while the vertical ground reaction force (GRF loading peak increased 3 +/– 3% (p = 0.02. Most subjects perceived increased comfort within the prosthetic socket with the thicker liner, which may be associated with the reduced fibular head peak pressures. Additionally, while the thicker liner presumably increased comfort by providing a more compliant limb-socket interface, the higher compliance may have reduced force and vibration feedback to the residual limb and contributed to the larger vertical GRF loading peaks. We conclude that determining optimal gel liner thickness for a particular individual will require further investigations to better identify and understand the compromises that occur between user perception, residual-limb pressure distribution, and gait biomechanics.

  10. Dietary xylitol in the prevention of experimental osteoporosis:beneficial effects on bone resorption, structure and biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, P.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract Dietary xylitol supplementation increases bone calcium and phosphorus concentrations in healthy rats, as well as protects against the decrease of bone minerals and bone density during experimental osteoporosis. This suggests that dietary xylitol might have a favorable effect on the prevention of osteoporosis. However, before any conclusions can be drawn about the usefulness of a compound, studies including structural evaluation and biomechanical testing of ...

  11. Learning from the Effect of Economic Decline on Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Leonard

    1976-01-01

    Organizations must constantly reexamine their operations to cope effectively with a changing economic picture. This process can help managers identify some decisions to be made about HRD programs during a time of declining economy. (Author)

  12. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kursat Dabak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p0.008. Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  13. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Tanner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and rotation of the trapezium, radius, and first metacarpal, before and after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, radius and trapezium, and first metacarpal and trapezium during loading was calculated using rigid body mechanics. Overall stiffness of each specimen was determined. Results. Total construct stiffness following CTR was reduced in all specimens but not significantly. No significant changes were found in adduction, pronation, or dorsiflexion of the trapezium with respect to radius after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, between radius and trapezium, or between first metacarpal and trapezium after open CTR was not decreased significantly. Conclusion. From this data, we cannot determine if releasing the transverse carpal ligament alters kinematics of the CMC joint.

  14. The Effect of an Open Carpal Tunnel Release on Thumb CMC Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Marc A; Conrad, Bryan P; Dell, Paul C; Wright, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We have observed worsening thumb pain following carpal tunnel release (CTR) in some patients. Our purpose was to determine the effect of open CTR on thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) biomechanics. Methods. Five fresh-frozen cadaver arms with intact soft tissues were used. Each specimen was secured to a jig which fixed the forearm at 45° supination, and the wrist at 20° dorsiflexion, with thumb pointing up. The thumb was axially loaded with a force of 130 N. We measured 3D translation and rotation of the trapezium, radius, and first metacarpal, before and after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, radius and trapezium, and first metacarpal and trapezium during loading was calculated using rigid body mechanics. Overall stiffness of each specimen was determined. Results. Total construct stiffness following CTR was reduced in all specimens but not significantly. No significant changes were found in adduction, pronation, or dorsiflexion of the trapezium with respect to radius after open CTR. Motion between radius and first metacarpal, between radius and trapezium, or between first metacarpal and trapezium after open CTR was not decreased significantly. Conclusion. From this data, we cannot determine if releasing the transverse carpal ligament alters kinematics of the CMC joint. PMID:23251808

  15. Effect of hydroxyapatite on the biodegradation and biomechanical stability of polyester nanocomposites for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, M; Shalumon, K T; Mitha, M K; Ganesan, K; Epple, M

    2010-03-01

    The effect of hydroxyapatite (HAP) on the performance of nanocomposites of an unsaturated polyester, i.e., hydroxy-terminated high molecular weight poly(proplyene fumarate) (HT-PPFhm), was investigated. A thermoset nanocomposite was prepared with nanoparticles of calcined HAP (<100 nm, rod-like shape, filler content 30 wt.%), HT-PPFhm and N-vinyl pyrrolidone, dibenzoyl peroxide and N,N-dimethyl aniline. Two more nanocomposites were prepared with precipitated HAP nanoparticles (<100 nm rod-like shape) and commercially available HAP nanoparticles (<200 nm spherical shape), respectively. Calcined HAP nanoparticles resulted in very good crosslinking in the resin matrix with high crosslinking density and interfacial bonding with the polymer, owing to the rod-like shape of the nanoparticles; this gave improved biomechanical strength and modulus and also controlled degradation of the nanocomposite for scaffold formation. The tissue compatibility and osteocompatibility of the nanocomposite containing calcined HAP nanoparticles was evaluated. The tissue compatibility was studied by intramuscular implantation in a rabbit animal model for 3 months as per ISO standard 10993/6. The in vivo femoral bone repair was also carried out in the rabbit animal model as per ISO standard 10993/6. The nanocomposite containing calcined HAP nanoparticles is both biocompatible and osteocompatible. PMID:19788944

  16. Effects of the fibers distribution in the human eardrum: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Fernanda; Parente, Marco; Martins, Pedro; Garbe, Carolina; Santos, Carla; Areias, Bruno; Branco, Carla; Paço, João; Jorge, Renato Natal

    2016-06-14

    The eardrum separates the external ear from the middle ear and it is responsible to convert the acoustical energy into mechanical energy. It is divided by pars tensa and pars flaccida. The aim of this work is to analyze the susceptibility of the four quadrants of the pars tensa under negative pressure, to different lamina propria fibers distribution. The development of associated ear pathology, in particular the formation of retraction pockets, is also evaluated. To analyze these effects, a computational biomechanical model of the tympano-ossicular chain was constructed using computerized tomography images and based on the finite element method. Three fibers distributions in the eardrum middle layer were compared: case 1 (eardrum with a circular band of fibers surrounding all quadrants equally), case 2 (eardrum with a circular band of fibers that decreases in thickness in posterior quadrants), case 3 (eardrum without circular fibers in the posterior/superior quadrant). A static analysis was performed by applying approximately 3000Pa in the eardrum. The pars tensa of the eardrum was divided in four quadrants and the displacement of a central point of each quadrant analyzed. The largest displacements of the eardrum were obtained for the eardrum without circular fibers in the posterior/superior quadrant. PMID:27036071

  17. The effect of biomechanical variables on force sensitive resistor error: Implications for calibration and improved accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Jonathon S; Evans, Katherine R; Hebert, Jacqueline S; Marasco, Paul D; Carey, Jason P

    2016-03-21

    Force Sensitive Resistors (FSRs) are commercially available thin film polymer sensors commonly employed in a multitude of biomechanical measurement environments. Reasons for such wide spread usage lie in the versatility, small profile, and low cost of these sensors. Yet FSRs have limitations. It is commonly accepted that temperature, curvature and biological tissue compliance may impact sensor conductance and resulting force readings. The effect of these variables and degree to which they interact has yet to be comprehensively investigated and quantified. This work systematically assesses varying levels of temperature, sensor curvature and surface compliance using a full factorial design-of-experiments approach. Three models of Interlink FSRs were evaluated. Calibration equations under 12 unique combinations of temperature, curvature and compliance were determined for each sensor. Root mean squared error, mean absolute error, and maximum error were quantified as measures of the impact these thermo/mechanical factors have on sensor performance. It was found that all three variables have the potential to affect FSR calibration curves. The FSR model and corresponding sensor geometry are sensitive to these three mechanical factors at varying levels. Experimental results suggest that reducing sensor error requires calibration of each sensor in an environment as close to its intended use as possible and if multiple FSRs are used in a system, they must be calibrated independently. PMID:26903413

  18. Radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical effects of recombinant canine somatotropin in an unstable ostectomy gap model of bone healing in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the effect of recombinant canine somatotropin (STH) on radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing using an unstable ostectomy gap model. Study Design: After an ostectomy of the midshaft radius, bone healing was evaluated over an 8-week period in control dogs (n = 4) and dogs receiving recombinant canine STH (n = 4). Animals Or Sample Population: Eight sexually intact female Beagle dogs, 4 to 5 years old. Methods: Bone healing was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative evaluation of serial radiographs every 2 weeks. Terminal dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending biomechanical testing were also performed. Results: Dogs receiving STH had more advanced radiographic healing of ostectomy sites. Bone area, bone mineral content, and bone density were two to five times greater at the ostectomy sites of treated dogs. Ultimate load at failure and stiffness were three and five times greater in dogs receiving STH. Conclusions: Using the ostectomy gap model, recombinant canine STH enhanced the radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing in dogs. Clinical Relevance: Dogs at risk for delayed healing of fractures may benefit from treatment with recombinant canine STH

  19. Quantitative evidence for the effects of multiple drivers on continental-scale amphibian declines

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, E H C; Miller, D A W; Schmidt, B R; Adams, M J; Amburgey, S M; Chamber, T; Cruickshank, S S; Fisher, R N; Green, D M; Hossack, B R; Johnson, P T J; Joseph, M B; Rittenhourse, T A G; Ryan, M E; Waddle, J H

    2016-01-01

    Since amphibian declines were first proposed as a global phenomenon over a quarter century ago, the conservation community has made little progress in halting or reversing these trends. The early search for a “smoking gun” was replaced with the expectation that declines are caused by multiple drivers. While field observations and experiments have identified factors leading to increased local extinction risk, evidence for effects of these drivers is lacking at large spatial scales. Here, we us...

  20. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  1. Effects of Bone Young’s Modulus on Finite Element Analysis in the Lateral Ankle Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. X. Niu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA is a powerful tool in biomechanics. The mechanical properties of biological tissue used in FEA modeling are mainly from experimental data, which vary greatly and are sometimes uncertain. The purpose of this study was to research how Young’s modulus affects the computations of a foot-ankle FEA model. A computer simulation and an in-vitro experiment were carried out to investigate the effects of incremental Young’s modulus of bone on the stress and strain outcomes in the computational simulation. A precise 3-dimensional finite element model was constructed based on an in-vitro specimen of human foot and ankle. Young’s moduli were assigned as four levels of 7.3, 14.6, 21.9 and 29.2 GPa respectively. The proximal tibia and fibula were completely limited to six degrees of freedom, and the ankle was loaded to inversion 10° and 20° through the calcaneus. Six cadaveric foot-ankle specimens were loaded as same as the finite element model, and strain was measured at two positions of the distal fibula. The bone stress was less affected by assignment of Young’s modulus. With increasing of Young’s modulus, the bone strain decreased linearly. Young’s modulus of 29.2 GPa was advisable to get the satisfactory surface strain results. In the future study, more ideal model should be constructed to represent the nonlinearity, anisotropy and inhomogeneity, as the same time to provide reasonable outputs of the interested parameters.

  2. Systems biomechanics of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Maly, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    Systems Biomechanics of the Cell attempts to outline systems biomechanics of the cell as an emergent and promising discipline. The new field owes conceptually to cell mechanics, organism-level systems biomechanics, and biology of biochemical systems. Its distinct methodology is to elucidate the structure and behavior of the cell by analyzing the unintuitive collective effects of elementary physical forces that interact within the heritable cellular framework. The problematics amenable to this approach includes the variety of cellular activities that involve the form and movement of the cell body and boundary (nucleus, centrosome, microtubules, cortex, and membrane). Among the elementary system effects in the biomechanics of the cell, instability of symmetry, emergent irreversibility, and multiperiodic dissipative motion can be noted. Research results from recent journal articles are placed in this unifying framework. It is suggested that the emergent discipline has the potential to expand the spectrum of ques...

  3. Interactive effect of APOE genotype and blood pressure on cognitive decline: the PATH through life study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Shea; Das, Debjani; Anstey, Kaarin J; Easteal, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) *ε4 allele and hypertension are two of the most prevalent risk factors for cognitive decline in later life. Here we investigate whether cognitive decline is affected by interaction between these two risk factors. Specifically, we examine whether APOE*ε4 moderates the association between high blood pressure and cognition in later life. Cognitive function was assessed at three time points over a period of 8 years in 1,474 cognitively normal, community-dwelling adults aged 60-64 years at baseline. Blood pressure and APOE genotype were assessed at baseline. Blood pressure was measured categorically as 'Hypertension' and continuously as 'Mean Arterial Pressure' (MAP). Multilevel models were used to investigate main and interactive effects of APOE genotype and both hypertension and MAP on the rate of change of episodic memory, working memory, verbal ability, perceptual speed, and global cognition. The APOE-hypertension interaction was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in the rate of decline of episodic memory, verbal ability, and global cognition. However, its inclusion in the model did not increase the amount of outcome variation explained beyond that already explained by the effect of time. In contrast, the APOE-MAP interaction had no effect on the rate of decline in any of these domains of cognitive performance. These results provide tentative evidence that APOE genotype moderates the association between high blood pressure and cognitive decline in later life. PMID:25672766

  4. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect. PMID:22920242

  5. A review of biomechanics of the shoulder and biomechanical concepts of rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the basic knowledge about shoulder biomechanics, which is thought to be useful for surgeons. Some clinical reports have described that the excellent outcome after cuff repair without acromioplasty and a limited acromioplasty might be enough for subacromial decompression. It was biomechanically demonstrated that a 10-mm medial shift of the tendon repair site has a minimum effect on biomechanics. Many biomechanical studies reported that the transosseous equivalent repair was superior to other techniques, although the tendon may lose its inherent elasticity. We herein introduce our recent experiment data and latest information on biomechanics.

  6. Trapped in the extinction vortex? Strong genetic effects in a declining vertebrate population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Mikael

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity are expected to increase the extinction risk of small populations, but detailed tests in natural populations are scarce. We combine long-term population and fitness data with those from two types of molecular markers to examine the role of genetic effects in a declining metapopulation of southern dunlins Calidris alpina schinzii, an endangered shorebird. Results The decline is associated with increased pairings between related individuals, including close inbreeding (as revealed by both field observations of parentage and molecular markers. Furthermore, reduced genetic diversity seems to affect individual fitness at several life stages. Higher genetic similarity between mates correlates negatively with the pair's hatching success. Moreover, offspring produced by related parents are more homozygous and suffer from increased mortality during embryonic development and possibly also after hatching. Conclusions Our results demonstrate strong genetic effects in a rapidly declining population, emphasizing the importance of genetic factors for the persistence of small populations.

  7. A neurofuzzy inference system based on biomechanical features for the evaluation of the effects of physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannozzi, G; Pecoraro, F; Caserotti, Paolo; Cappozzo, A

    2008-01-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate physical training effects. For this purpose, a classifier was implemented by taking into account biomechanical features selected from force-plate measurements and a neurofuzzy algorithm for data management and relevant decision-making. Measurements included two...... sets of sit-to-stand (STS) trials involving two homogeneous groups, experimental and control, of elders. They were carried out before and after a 12-week heavy resistance strength-training program undergone by the experimental group. Pre- and post-training differences were analysed, and percentages of...

  8. Effect of thigh muscle fatigue on the biomechanical factors of the lower limbs when walking in a squatted position

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Wan-Ki; Lee, Chul-Gab; Ko, Dae-Sik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare and analyze the effects of thigh muscle fatigue caused by walking in a squatted position on biomechanical factors, to evaluate the risk of a job performed sitting in a squatted position for a long period of time. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen right foot dominant women without any injuries in their joints and body in the last 6 months were selected. They walked in a squatted position, and then muscle fatigue was induced by using an isokineti...

  9. Projected effects of declining anthropogenic aerosols on the southern annular mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Declining emissions of anthropogenic aerosols have been shown to contribute to global warming in climate projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). This study considers the response of the southern annular mode (SAM) in austral summer to declining aerosols in simulations forced by Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) using CSIRO-Mk3.6, a CMIP5-generation model. A ten-member ensemble forced by RCP4.5 for the period 2006–2100 is compared with another experiment, which is identical except that emissions of anthropogenic aerosols are held fixed at their 2005 values. With fixed aerosol emissions, the model simulates a negative (but statistically insignificant) ensemble-mean SAM trend in austral summer, suggesting that the effects of recovering stratospheric ozone slightly outweigh the effects of increasing long-lived greenhouse gases (GHGs). In contrast, the standard RCP4.5 experiment (including additional warming due to declining aerosols) simulates a positive ensemble-mean SAM trend, and the difference between the two trends is significant at 5%. The response of Southern Hemisphere zonal-mean atmospheric circulation and temperature to declining aerosols resembles the response to increasing GHGs; this suggests that the positive SAM trend due to declining aerosols may be driven by mechanisms that are similar to those that cause the positive SAM trend in response to increasing GHGs. (letter)

  10. Effects of Mechanical Properties and Atherosclerotic Artery Size on Biomechanical Plaque Disruption - Mouse versus Human

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Laurent M.; Broisat, Alexis; Ghezzi, Catherine; Finet, Gérard; Rioufol, Gilles; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Ohayon, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of atherosclerosis are extensively being used to study the mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque development and the results are frequently extrapolated to humans. However, major differences have been described between murine and human atherosclerotic lesions and the determination of similarities and differences between these species has been largely addressed recently. This study takes over and extends previous studies performed by our group and related to the biomechanical chara...

  11. Explaining the decline in Mexico-U.S. Migration: the effect of the Great Recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    The rate of Mexico-U.S. migration has declined precipitously in recent years. From 25 migrants per thousand in 2005, the annual international migration rate for Mexican men dropped to 7 per thousand by 2012. If sustained, this low migration rate is likely to have a profound effect on the ethnic and national-origin composition of the U.S. population. This study examines the origins of the migration decline using a nationally representative panel survey of Mexican households. The results support an explanation that attributes a large part of the decline to lower labor demand for Mexican immigrants in the United States. Decreases in labor demand in industrial sectors that employ a large percentage of Mexican-born workers, such as construction, are found to be strongly associated with lower rates of migration for Mexican men. Second, changes in migrant selectivity are also consistent with an economic explanation for the decline in international migration. The largest declines in migration occurred precisely among the demographic groups most affected by the Great Recession: namely, economically active young men with low education. Results from the statistical analysis also show that the reduction in labor demand in key sectors of the U.S. economy resulted in a more positive educational selectivity of young migrants. PMID:25407844

  12. Combined effect of lung function level and decline increases morbidity and mortality risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baughman, Penelope; Marott, Jacob Louis; Lange, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lung function level and decline are each pre- dictive of morbidity and mortality. Evaluation of the combined effect of these measurements may help further identify high-risk groups. Using Copenhagen City Heart Study longitudinal spirometry data (n = 10,457), 16–21 year risks of chronic o...

  13. Declining efficacy in controlled trials of antidepressants: effects of placebo dropout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, S.J.; Undurraga, J.; Tondo, L.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-placebo differences (effect-sizes) in controlled trials of antidepressants for major depressive episodes have declined for several decades, in association with selectively increasing clinical improvement associated with placebo-treatment. As these trends require adequate explanation, we tested

  14. Biomechanical effect of vertebroplasty on the adjacent intervertebral levels using a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Sheng; XU Yong-qing; ZHANG Mei-chao; TANG Xun; WANG Yue-li; ZHONG Shi-zheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the biomechanical effect of different volume,distribution and leakage to adjacent disc of bone cement on the adjacent vertebral body by three-dimensional osteoporosis finite element model of lumbar.Methods: L4-L5 motion segment data of the cadaver of an old man who had no abnormal findings on roentgenograms were obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans. Three-dimensional model of L4-L5 was established with Mimics software, and finite element model of L4-L5 functional spinal unit (FSU) was established by Ansys 7.0 software. The effect of different loading conditions and distribution of bone cement after vertebroplasty on the adjacent vertebral body was investigated.Results: This study presented a validated finite element model of L4-L5 FSU with a simulated vertebroplasty augmentation to predict stresses and strains of adjacent untreated vertebral bodies. The findings from this FSU study suggested the endplate and disc stress of the adjacent vertebral body was not influenced by filling volume of bone cement but unipedicle injection and leakage to the disc of bone cement could concentrate the stress of adjacent endplate.Conclusions: Asymmetric distributions and leakage of cement into intervertebral disc can improve the stress of endplate in adjacent vertebral body. These results suggest that optimal biomechanical configuration should have symmetric placement and avoid leakage of cement in operation.

  15. On the ferrule effect and the biomechanical stability of teeth restored with cores, posts, and crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Mamoun, John S.

    2014-01-01

    An abutment for a fixed partial denture may not contain enough tooth structure, such that the abutment does not provide an adequate ‘ferrule effect’. A crown or bridge dental prosthesis that is cemented onto such an abutment/s may undergo biomechanical failure. Here, the tooth, core, and post complex, on which the crown is cemented, may fracture off from the abutment, causing the crown to separate from the abutment, while the cement that bonds the crown to the tooth, core, and post complex re...

  16. Effects of declining aerosols on projections of zonally averaged tropical precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All of the representative concentration pathways (RCPs) assume that future emissions of aerosols and aerosol precursors will decline sharply. There is considerable evidence that historically increasing aerosols have substantially affected tropical precipitation, but the effects of projected aerosol declines have received little attention. We compare projections forced by the medium-low RCP4.5 pathway in two subsets of models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5): one group (HiForc) includes treatments of indirect aerosol effects on cloud albedo and cloud lifetime as well as direct aerosol effects, while the other group (LoForc) only treats direct aerosol effects. In this scenario we find that models in the HiForc group consistently project larger increases in both the mean and inter-hemispheric (north minus south) asymmetry of tropical sea-surface temperature (SST) and precipitation than do models in the LoForc group. Earlier projections from CMIP3, in which future aerosol declines were assumed to be smaller, behave more like the CMIP5 LoForc group. These results show that projected tropical SST and precipitation changes are sensitive to assumptions about aerosol emissions and indirect aerosol effects. If the real world resembles the HiForc group, then future aerosol changes are likely to be an important (even dominant) driver of tropical precipitation changes under low to moderate forcing scenarios. (letter)

  17. Biomechanics in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  18. Decline in Child Marriage and Changes in Its Effect on Reproductive Outcomes in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal, S M Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the decline in child marriage and changes in its effect on reproductive outcomes of Bangladeshi women, using the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey data. Chi-square tests, negative binomial Poisson regression and binary logistic regression were performed in analyzing the data. Overall, 82% of women aged 20-49 years were married-off before 18 years of age, and 63% of the marriages took place before 16 years of age. The incidence of child marriage was significantl...

  19. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  20. Effects of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK on corneal biomechanical measurements with the Corvis ST tonometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frings A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Frings,1,* Stephan J Linke,1,2,* Eva L Bauer,1 Vasyl Druchkiv,1 Toam Katz,1,2 Johannes Steinberg1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE, Hamburg, Germany; 2Care Vision Refractive Center, Hamburg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: This study was initiated to evaluate biomechanical changes using the Corvis ST tonometer (CST on the cornea after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK. Setting: University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, and Care Vision Refractive Centers, Germany. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Methods: This retrospective study included 37 eyes of 37 refractive patients. All CST measurements were performed 1 day before surgery and at the 1-month follow-up examination. The LASIK procedure included mechanical flap preparation using a Moria SBKmicrokeratome and an Allegretto excimer laser platform. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed for mean first applanation length, mean first and second deflection lengths, mean first and second deflection amplitudes, radius of curvature, and peak distance. Significant positive correlations were found between the change (∆ of radius of curvature and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE, ablation depth, and ∆intraocular pressure as well as between AD and ∆HC-time. Each diopter of myopic correction in MRSE resulted in an increase in ∆radius of curvature of 0.2 mm. Conclusion: Several CST parameters were statistically significantly altered by LASIK, thereby indicating that flap creation, ablation, or both, significantly change the ability of the cornea to absorb or dissipate energy. Keywords: LASIK, corneal biomechanics, refractive surgery, Corvis ST

  1. Biomechanical analysis of the effect of occlusal force on osteosynthesis following sagittal split ramus osteotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relapse is sometimes observed during the postoperative course following sagittal split ramus osteotomy which is widely used to correct jaw deformities. Relapse may be caused by biomechanical factors such as the postoperative occlusal force. We evaluated serial changes in the stress distribution associated with postoperative occlusal force and jaw-closing pressure on the mandible and osteosynthesis plate using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Based on CT data, we produced mandibular models 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after sagittal split ramus osteotomy, and subjected them to simulated occlusal force and jaw-closing pressure. Changes in equivalent stress in the proximal and distal segments, at the osteosynthesis site, and the fixation plate were evaluated by three-dimensional finite element analysis. The equivalent stresses in the proximal and distal segments slightly increased over time from 1 to 12 months after the operation. In particular, marked stress concentration was observed at the anterior border of the ramus at each measurement area. Stress at the osteosynthesis site increased from 1 to 6 months after the operation, but decreased after 12 months. As a result of postoperative occlusal forces and jaw-closing pressure, stress was concentrated at the anterior border of the ramus in the proximal segment. Between 3 and 6 months after the operation, tensile stress was concentrated at the upper and lower ends of the osteotomy line at the osteosynthesis site. These biomechanical findings indicate the application of clockwise stress on the distal segment up to 6 months after the operation. We concluded that sagittal split ramus osteotomy runs the risk of relapse between 3 and 6 months after the operation. (author)

  2. The Effect of Contact Lens Usage on Corneal Biomechanical Parameters in Keratoconus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bülent Çankaya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To determine and compare the corneal biomechanical properties in keratoconus patients using rigid gas permeable contact lenses and keratoconus patients who do not use contact lenses. Ma te ri al and Met hod: The study consisted of 70 healthy controls (Group A, 27 ketatoconus subjects who do not use contact lens (Group B and 36 rigid gas permeable contact lens using keratoconic patients (Group C. Corneal viscoelastic parameters were measured with an Ocular response analyzer (ORA. Central corneal thickness was measured with an ultrasonic pachymeter. The differences in ORA parameters between the groups were compared. Re sults: The mean corneal hysteresis (CH in Groups A, B, and C were 10.3±1.5 mm Hg, 7.8±1.4 mm Hg, and 7.4±1.2 mm Hg, respectively. The differences in mean CH between Group A and the other two groups were statistically significant (p<0.01 for both comparisons, but no statistically significant difference was found between groups B and C in terms of mean CH (p=0.61. The mean corneal resistance factor (CRF was 10.7±1.9 in Group A compared with 6.6±1.6 in Group B and 6.1±1.5 in Group C. The differences in mean CRF between Group A and the other two groups were statistically significant (p<0.01 for both comparisons. There was no significant difference in CRF between the keratoconus eyes with or without rigid gas permeable contact lens usage (p=0.57. Dis cus si on: Our results suggest that ORA-generated parameters may be different in subjects with keratoconus. Corneal biomechanical parameters did not demonstrate a clear trend of change with rigid gas permeable contact lens usage. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 197-201

  3. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte;

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  4. Predicting effects of cold shock: modeling the decline of a thermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Trent, D.S.; Schneider, M.J.

    1977-10-01

    Predicting direct impact of cold shock on aquatic organisms after termination of power plant thermal discharges requires thermal tests that provide quantitative data on the resistance of acclimated species to lower temperatures. Selected examples from the literature on cold shock resistance of freshwater and marine fishes are illustrated to show predictive use. Abrupt cold shock data may be applied to field situations involving either abrupt or gradual temperature declines but yield conservative estimates under the latter conditions. Gradual cold shock data may be applied where heated plumes gradually dissipate because poikilotherms partially compensate for lowering temperature regimes. A simplified analytical model is presented for estimating thermal declines in terminated plumes originating from offshore, submerged discharges where shear current and boundary effects are minimal. When applied to site-specific conditions, the method provides time-temperature distributions for correlation with cold resistance data and, therefore, aids in assessing cold shock impact on aquatic biota.

  5. Effects of environmental regulations on heavy metal pollution decline in core sediments from Manila Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the high-resolution heavy metal pollution history of Manila Bay using heavy metal concentrations and Pb isotope ratios together with 210Pb dating to find out the effects of environmental regulations after the 1990s. Our results suggested that the rate of decline in heavy metal pollution increased dramatically from the end of the 1990s due to stricter environmental regulations, Administrative Order No. 42, being enforced by the Philippines government. The presented data and methodology should form the basis for future monitoring, leading to pollution control, and to the generation of preventive measures at the pollution source for the maintenance of environmental quality in the coastal metropolitan city of Manila. Although this is the first report of a reduction in pollution in Asian developing country, our results suggest that we can expect to find similar signs of pollution decline in other parts of the world as well.

  6. Effects of evidence-based prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury in adolescent female athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K.; Andersen, Lars L.; Brandt, Mikkel;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescent female football and handball players are among the athletes with the highest risk of sustaining anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. AIM: This study evaluated the effects of evidence-based lower extremity injury prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical...... risk factors for non-contact ACL injury. METHODS: 40 adolescent female football and handball players (15-16 years) were randomly allocated to a control group (CON, n=20) or neuromuscular training group (NMT, n=20). The NMT group performed an injury prevention programme as a warm-up before their usual....... CONCLUSIONS: A 12-week injury prevention programme in addition to training and match play in adolescent females altered the pattern of agonist-antagonist muscle preactivity during side cutting. This may represent a more ACL-protective motor strategy....

  7. Do ankle braces provide similar effects on ankle biomechanical variables in subjects with and without chronic ankle instability during landing?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songning; Zhang; Michael; Wortley; Julia; Freedman; Silvernail; Daniel; Carson; Maxime; R.Paquette

    2012-01-01

    <正>Purpose:The purpose of this study was to examine effects of a sport version of a semi-rigid ankle brace(ElementTM) and a soft ankle brace (ASO) on ankle biomechanics and ground reaction forces(GRFs) during a drop landing activity in subjects with chronic ankle instability(CAD compared to healthy subjects with no history of CAI. Methods:Ten healthy subjects and 10 subjects who had multiple ankle sprains participated in the study as the control and unstable subjects, respectively.The CAI subjects were age,body mass index and gender matched with the control subjects.The arch index and ankle functions of the subjects were measured in a subject screening session.During the biomechanical test session,participants performed five trials of drop landing from 0.6 m,wearing no brace(NB).Element? brace and ASO brace.Simultaneous recording of three-dimensional kinematic(240 Hz) and GRF(1200 Hz) data were performed. Results:The CAI subjects had lower ankle functional survey scores.The arch index and deformity results showed greater arch deformity of ElementTM against a static load than in NB and ASO due to greater initial arch position held by the brace.CAI participants had greater eversion velocity than healthy controls.The ASO brace reduced the first peak vertical GRF whereas ElementTM increased 2nd peak vertical GRF. ElementTMbrace reduced eversion range of motion(ROM) and peak eversion velocity compared to NB and ASO.In addition,ElementTM reduced dorsiflexion ROM and increased peak plantarflexion moment compared to NB and ASO. Conclusion:Results of static arch measurements and dynamic ankle motion suggest that the restrictions offered by both braces are in part due to more dorsiflexed ankle positions at contact,and higher initial arch position and stiffer ankle for ElementTM.

  8. Biomechanical supporting effect of tantalum rods for the femoral head with various sized lesions:a finite-element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-guang; WANG Shao-jin; YIN Qing-feng; LIU Sheng-hou; GUAN Yan-jin

    2012-01-01

    Background Features of necrotic lesions and various interventions could affect the biomechanics of the femoral head.A three-dimensional finite-element analysis was designed to demonstrate necrotic femoral head stress changes with various sizes of necrotic lesions,and evaluate the effect of tantalum rods on preventing femoral head cracking.Methods Femoral computed tomography scans were used to build a normal three-dimensional finite-element femoral head model in a computer.Based on the normal model,necrotic models of different lesion diameters(15 mm,20 mm and 30 mm)were created,as were the repaired models with tantalum rods for each diameter.After a series of meshing and force loading,the von Mises stress distributions,simulating single-legged stance,and stresses on specific points under loaded conditions were determfned for each model.Results Deep exploration into the burdened area of the femoral head indicated that higher stresses to the femoral head were observed with a larger necrotic lesion;the largest stress concentration,91.3 MPa,was found on the femoral head with a lesion diameter of 30 mm.By contrast,topical stress on the surface of the necrotic regions was lowered following implantation of a tantalum rod,and the changesin stress were significant in models with lesions of 15 mm and 30 mm in diameter,with the best biomechanical benefit from the tantalum rod found with a lesion diameter of 15 mm.Conclusions Femoral heads with larger necrotic lesions usually have a higher stress concentration and a higher risk of collapse.Various sized lesions on the femoral head can benefit from the mechanical support offered by the implantation of a tantalum rod;however,femoral heads with smaller sized lesions may benefit more.A thorough evaluation of the lesion size should be conducted prior to the use of tantalum rod implants in the treatment of femoral head necrosis.

  9. The Contribution of Advanced Glycation End product (AGE) accumulation to the decline in motor function

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth, Hans; Zuidema, Sytse; Bunt, Steven; Bautmans, Ivan; Schans, Cees van der; Hobbelen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Diminishing motor function is commonly observed in the elderly population and is associated with a wide range of adverse health consequences. Advanced Glycation End products (AGE’s) may contribute to age-related decline in the function of cells and tissues in normal ageing. Although the negative effect of AGE’s on the biomechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissues and the central nervous system have been previously described, the evidence regarding the effect on motor function is fragmen...

  10. Laser Metrology In Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    1983-12-01

    Modern treatment of sceletal disharmonies and malocclusions utilizes application of external forces. In order to effectively use these therapeutic forces, knowledge of three-dimensional displacements of bones with correlation to biological changes is required. In the past, this problem has been studied in a number of ways using, for example, strain gauges, brittle coatings, photoelasticity, as well as clinical observations and mathematical modeling. Becouse of their inherent limitations, these techniques did not always provide all the information necessary for development of meaningful relationships between the applied force system and the resulting biological remodeling. However, recent advances in the field of la-ser metrology allowed to overcome some of the dificulties found in the earlier methods and permitted development of new techniques for non-invasive measurements of bone motions in three-dimensional space. These laser techniques are particularly useful in biomechanics because they provide for rapid and accurate determination of displacements over the entire surface of the investigate object. In this paper, application of laser techniques for quantitative in-vivo and in-vitro measurements in biomechanics will be discussed and illustrated with representative examples.

  11. Effects of mistletoe infestation on the decline and mortality of Abies cephalonica in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Raftoyannis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, stands of Greek fir (Abies cephalonica Loudon are declining and high tree mortality has been observed in some years. The exact causes of fir decline and mortality have not been established although many have been proposed (drought, climatic change, air pollution and attacks by pathogens or insects. This study has focused on the effects of mistletoe (Viscum album L. on fir crown condition by assessing the mistletoe infestation level and its effects on fir defoliation. In the fir forests of Central Greece, the tree crown condition and the extent of mistletoe infestation were assessed and their relationships with tree height, altitude and aspect were investigated. The role of mistletoe on overall fir mortality was investigated by assessing standing trees that had died recently. The leaf water potential and chlorophyll fluorescence of mistletoe and fir were also measured during one growth season. The results showed that mistletoe infestation is related to crown defoliation. Altitude and tree height were not related with mistletoe infestation while infestation levels were lower on northern exposures. Mistletoe showed significantly lower water potentials and higher photochemical efficiencies than fir branches.

  12. Boosting beauty in an economic decline: mating, spending, and the lipstick effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah E; Rodeheffer, Christopher D; Griskevicius, Vladas; Durante, Kristina; White, Andrew Edward

    2012-08-01

    Although consumer spending typically declines in economic recessions, some observers have noted that recessions appear to increase women's spending on beauty products--the so-called lipstick effect. Using both historical spending data and rigorous experiments, the authors examine how and why economic recessions influence women's consumer behavior. Findings revealed that recessionary cues--whether naturally occurring or experimentally primed--decreased desire for most products (e.g., electronics, household items). However, these cues consistently increased women's desire for products that increase attractiveness to mates--the first experimental demonstration of the lipstick effect. Additional studies show that this effect is driven by women's desire to attract mates with resources and depends on the perceived mate attraction function served by these products. In addition to showing how and why economic recessions influence women's desire for beauty products, this research provides novel insights into women's mating psychology, consumer behavior, and the relationship between the two. PMID:22642483

  13. Effect of Mulligan's and Kinesio knee taping on adolescent ballet dancers knee and hip biomechanics during landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, D; Campbell, A; Ng, L; Grisbrook, T L; Hopper, D M

    2015-12-01

    Taping is often used to manage the high rate of knee injuries in ballet dancers; however, little is known about the effect of taping on lower-limb biomechanics during ballet landings in the turnout position. This study investigated the effects of Kinesiotape (KT), Mulligan's tape (MT) and no tape (NT) on knee and hip kinetics during landing in three turnout positions. The effect of taping on the esthetic execution of ballet jumps was also assessed. Eighteen pain-free 12-15-year-old female ballet dancers performed ballet jumps in three turnout positions, under the three knee taping conditions. A Vicon Motion Analysis system (Vicon Oxford, Oxford, UK) and Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (Watertown, Massa chusetts, USA) force plate collected lower-limb mechanics. The results demonstrated that MT significantly reduced peak posterior knee shear forces (P = 0.025) and peak posterior (P = 0.005), medial (P = 0.022) and lateral (P = 0.014) hip shear forces compared with NT when landing in first position. KT had no effect on knee or hip forces. No significant differences existed between taping conditions in all landing positions for the esthetic measures. MT was able to reduce knee and the hip forces without affecting the esthetic performance of ballet jumps, which may have implications for preventing and managing knee injuries in ballet dancers. PMID:25091570

  14. The declining effect of sibling size on children's education in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Costa Rica experienced a dramatic fertility decline in the 1960s and 1970s. The same period saw substantial improvement in children's educational attainment in Costa Rica. This correlation is consistent with household-level quantity-quality tradeoffs, but prior research on quantity-quality tradeoff magnitudes is mixed, and little research has estimated quantity-quality tradeoff behaviors in Latin America. Objective: This study explores one dimension of the potential demographic dividend from the fertility decline: the extent to which it was accompanied by quantity-quality tradeoffs leading to higher educational attainment. Specifically, we provide the first estimate of quantity-quality tradeoffs in Costa Rica, analyzing the increase in secondary school attendance among Costa Rican children as the number of siblings decreases. Furthermore, we advance the literature by exploring how that tradeoff has changed over time. Methods: We use 1984 and 2000 Costa Rican census data as well as survey data from the Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (CRELES. To address endogenous family size, the analysis uses an instrumental variable strategy based on the gender of the first two children to identify the causal relationship between number of siblings and children's education. Results: We find that, among our earlier cohorts, having fewer siblings is associated with a significantly higher probability of having attended at least one year of secondary school, particularly among girls. The effect is stronger after we account for the endogeneity of number of children born by the mother. For birth cohorts after 1980 this relationship largely disappears. Conclusions: This study provides strong evidence for a declining quantity-quality (Q-Q tradeoff in Costa Rica. This result suggests one potential explanation for the heterogeneous findings in prior studies elsewhere, but more work will be required to understand why such tradeoffs might vary

  15. Biomechanics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    Presents Current Principles and ApplicationsBiomedical engineering is considered to be the most expansive of all the engineering sciences. Its function involves the direct combination of core engineering sciences as well as knowledge of nonengineering disciplines such as biology and medicine. Drawing on material from the biomechanics section of The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition and utilizing the expert knowledge of respected published scientists in the application and research of biomechanics, Biomechanics: Principles and Practices discusses the latest principles and applicat

  16. Gingival Recessions and Biomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Godtfredsen

    Gingival recessions and biomechanics “Tissue is the issue, but bone sets the tone.“ A tooth outside the cortical plate can result in loss of bone and development of a gingival recession. The presentation aims to show biomechanical considerations in relation to movement of teeth with gingival...... by moving the root back in the alveolus. The tooth movement is accompanied by bone gain and thus increase the success rate for soft tissue augmentation. The choice of biomechanical system influences the treatment outcome. If a standard straight wire appliance is used, a biomechanical dilemma can arise...

  17. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  18. Trematode infection causes malformations and population effects in a declining New Zealand fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, David W; Thomas, Harriet; Thieltges, David W; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2010-03-01

    1. Animal malformations engender wide public and scientific concern because of associated environmental health risks. This is highlighted by increased incidence of limb malformations in amphibians associated with trematode infections and disturbance. Malformations may signal new emerging disease threats, but whether the phenomenon is broadly applicable across taxa, or has population-scale impacts, is unknown. 2. Malformations are widely reported in fish and, until now, have been attributed mainly to contaminants. We tested whether the trematode Telogaster opisthorchis caused severe malformations, leading to population effects, in Galaxias anomalus, a threatened New Zealand freshwater fish. 3. Experimental infection of larval fish caused increasing spinal malformation and mortality with infection intensity that closely matched field patterns. Field malformation frequency peaked in January (65%), before declining sharply in February (25%) and remaining low thereafter. 4. The peak occurred during a 'critical window' of larval development, with the decline coincident with a population crash, indicating that malformation was causing mortality in the field. 5. The occurrence of such critical developmental windows may explain why this mechanism of population impact has been overlooked. With global environmental stressors predicted to enhance trematode infections, our results show that parasite-induced malformation, and its population-scale impacts, could be more widespread than previously considered. PMID:19886894

  19. Effect of Extension and Type of Composite-Restored Class II Cavities on Biomechanical Properties of Teeth: A Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Azam Valian; Elham Moravej-Salehi; Allahyar Geramy; Elham Faramarzi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Controversy exists regarding cavity preparation for restoration of interproximal caries in posterior teeth in terms of preserving the tooth structure and suitable stress distribution. This study aimed to assess the effect of extension and type of class II cavities and the remaining tooth structure in maxillary premolars restored with composite resin on the biomechanical properties of teeth using finite element method (FEM). Materials and Methods: Using FEM, eight three-dimensional...

  20. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics. PMID:25162173

  1. Effect of seat and table top slope on the biomechanical stress sustained by the musculo-skeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaoui, Alain; Hassaïne, Myriam; Watier, Bruno; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of table and seat slope on the biomechanical stress sustained by the musculo-skeletal system. Angular position of the head and trunk, and surface electromyography of eleven postural muscles were recorded while seated under different conditions of seat slope (0°, 15° forward) and table slope (0°, 20° backward). The specific stress sustained by C7-T1 joint was estimated with isometric torque calculation. The results showed that the backward sloping table was associated with a reduction of neck flexion and neck extensors EMG, contrasting with a concurrent overactivity of the deltoideus. The forward sloping chair induced an anterior pelvic tilt, but also a higher activity of the knee (vasti) and ankle (soleus) extensors. It was concluded that sloping chairs and tables favor a more erect posture of the spine, but entails an undesirable overactivity of upper and lower limbs muscles to prevent the body from sliding. PMID:26669951

  2. The pizzicato knee-joint energy harvester: characterization with biomechanical data and the effect of backpack load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Michele; Aung, Min S. H.; Zhu, Meiling; Jones, Richard K.; Goulermas, John Y.

    2012-07-01

    The reduced power requirements of miniaturized electronics offer the opportunity to create devices which rely on energy harvesters for their power supply. In the case of wearable devices, human-based piezoelectric energy harvesting is particularly difficult due to the mismatch between the low frequency of human activities and the high-frequency requirements of piezoelectric transducers. We propose a piezoelectric energy harvester, to be worn on the knee-joint, that relies on the plucking technique to achieve frequency up-conversion. During a plucking action, a piezoelectric bimorph is deflected by a plectrum; when released due to loss of contact, the bimorph is free to vibrate at its resonant frequency, generating electrical energy with the highest efficiency. A prototype, featuring four PZT-5H bimorphs, was built and is here studied in a knee simulator which reproduces the gait of a human subject. Biomechanical data were collected with a marker-based motion capture system while the subject was carrying a selection of backpack loads. The paper focuses on the energy generation of the harvester and how this is affected by the backpack load. By altering the gait, the backpack load has a measurable effect on performance: at the highest load of 24 kg, a minor reduction in energy generation (7%) was observed and the output power is reduced by 10%. Both are so moderate to be practically unimportant. The average power output of the prototype is 2.06 ± 0.3 mW, which can increase significantly with further optimization.

  3. Partitioning of habitat effects casts light on the decline of the fen orchid, Liparis loeselii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Minter, Martine Olesen;

    2015-01-01

    Liparis loeselii is a rare and declining orchid species restricted to rich fens in the northern hemisphere. Suggested reasons for the decline are habitat destruction, eutrophication, altered hydrology and scrub encroachment after termination of traditional management such as grazing and hay making...

  4. Effects of conventional and slanted ventral slot procedures on the biomechanical behavior of the C5-C6 vertebral motion unit in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haisheng; Lambrechts, Nicolaas E; Lehner, Michael; Adam, Gremah M; Packer, Rebecca A; Moore, Trevor W; Main, Russell P

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of conventional and slanted ventral slot procedures on the biomechanical behavior of the C5-C6 vertebral motion unit (VMU) in dogs. SAMPLE 14 vertebral columns (C4 through C7) from canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Specimens were assigned to a conventional or slanted ventral slot group (n = 7/group). For each specimen, the C5-C6 VMU was tested in ventral and dorsal bending and positive and negative axial torsion before and after surgery. Range of motion (ROM), stiffness, and energy absorption were compared between the 2 groups. RESULTS Both procedures significantly increased the ROM and stiffness and significantly decreased the energy absorption of the C5-C6 VMU in ventral and dorsal bending. Both procedures also increased the ROM in positive and negative axial torsion. In negative torsion, total stiffness and stiffness over the maximum ROM tested decreased less for the slanted slot procedure than for the conventional slot procedure. There were no significant differences between procedures for any of the other biomechanical outcomes examined. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the biomechanical response of the C5-C6 VMU to the conventional and slanted ventral slot procedures was not significantly different, especially when considering postsurgical instability induced by both procedures. This was most likely due to disruption of the nucleus pulposus and dorsal annulus fibrosus of the disk with both procedures. On the basis of these findings, neither procedure appeared biomechanically superior. Comparative clinical studies are warranted to further evaluate the 2 procedures. PMID:27463547

  5. Effect of partial and complete posterior cruciate ligament transection on medial meniscus: A biomechanical evaluation in a cadaveric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-guang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relationship between medial meniscus tear and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL injury has not been exactly explained. We studied to investigate the biomechanical effect of partial and complete PCL transection on different parts of medial meniscus at different flexion angles under static loading conditions. Materials and Methods: Twelve fresh human cadaveric knee specimens were divided into four groups: PCL intact (PCL-I, anterolateral bundle transection (ALB-T, posteromedial bundle transection (PMB-T and PCL complete transection (PCL-T group. Strain on the anterior horn, body part and posterior horn of medial meniscus were measured under different axial compressive tibial loads (200-800 N at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion in each groups respectively. Results: Compared with the PCL-I group, the PCL-T group had a higher strain on whole medial meniscus at 30°, 60° and 90° flexion in all loading conditions and at 0° flexion with 400, 600 and 800 N loads. In ALB-T group, strain on whole meniscus increased at 30°, 60° and 90° flexion under all loading conditions and at 0° flexion with 800 N only. PMB-T exihibited higher strain at 0° flexion with 400 N, 600 N and 800 N, while at 30° and 60° flexion with 800 N and at 90° flexion under all loading conditions. Conclusions: Partial PCL transection triggers strain concentration on medial meniscus and the effect is more pronounced with higher loading conditions at higher flexion angles.

  6. Effect of adipose-derived stromal cells and BMP12 on intrasynovial tendon repair: A biomechanical, biochemical, and proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberman, Richard H; Shen, Hua; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Yang, Guang; Tuan, Rocky S; Xia, Younan; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly; Silva, Matthew J; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2016-04-01

    The outcomes of flexor tendon repair are highly variable. As recent efforts to improve healing have demonstrated promise for growth factor- and cell-based therapies, the objective of the current study was to enhance repair via application of autologous adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) and the tenogenic growth factor bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 12. Controlled delivery of cells and growth factor was achieved in a clinically relevant canine model using a nanofiber/fibrin-based scaffold. Control groups consisted of repair-only (no scaffold) and acellular scaffold. Repairs were evaluated after 28 days of healing using biomechanical, biochemical, and proteomics analyses. Range of motion was reduced in the groups that received scaffolds compared to normal. There was no effect of ASC + BMP12 treatment for range of motion or tensile properties outcomes versus repair-only. Biochemical assays demonstrated increased DNA, glycosaminoglycans, and crosslink concentration in all repair groups compared to normal, but no effect of ASC + BMP12. Total collagen was significantly decreased in the acellular scaffold group compared to normal and significantly increased in the ASC + BMP12 group compared to the acellular scaffold group. Proteomics analysis comparing healing tendons to uninjured tendons revealed significant increases in proteins associated with inflammation, stress response, and matrix degradation. Treatment with ASC + BMP12 amplified these unfavorable changes. In summary, the treatment approach used in this study induced a negative inflammatory reaction at the repair site leading to poor healing. Future approaches should consider cell and growth factor delivery methods that do not incite negative local reactions. PMID:26445383

  7. Ultaviolet-induced frameshift mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium: absence of an effect of mutation frequency decline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced yields of UV-induced back mutants to prototrophy are observed when irradiated cells of the Salmonella typhimurium frameshift strain LT2 hisC3076(R46) are plated on defined medium containing broth (2.5%, v/v) rather than a trace (0.02 μg/ml) of the required nutrient (histidine). This broth effect is not abolished, and is in fact augmented, in an excision-deficient derivative of hisC3076(R46) carrying the uvr-302 mutation. Since similar broth effects on UV-induced base-pair substitution mutagenesis have usually been attributed to inhibition of mutation frequency decline (MFD), and since MFD is in turn thought to reflect the activity of an intact excision-repair system, we sought to determine whether or not UV-induced premutational lesions leading to the production of frameshifts are susceptible to MFD. Results with the doubly auxotrophic strain LT2 hisC3076 leuA150 (pKM101) showed that in a population of cells actually undergoing MFD (as judged by a rapid loss of UV-induced reversions of the base-pair substitution marker (leuA150)), no concomitant loss of UV-induced reversions of the frameshift hisC3076 marker could be detected. (orig.)

  8. A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavness, Ian; Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Demolin, Didier; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in…

  9. Decline in effectiveness of antenatal corticosteroids with time to birth: real or artefact?

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Simon; Brocklehurst, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The widely accepted notion that the benefits of antenatal corticosteroids decline with time to birth may not be correct, argue Simon Gates and Peter Brocklehurst, as the evidence is based on unsound subgroup analyses

  10. The pizzicato knee-joint energy harvester: characterization with biomechanical data and the effect of backpack load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduced power requirements of miniaturized electronics offer the opportunity to create devices which rely on energy harvesters for their power supply. In the case of wearable devices, human-based piezoelectric energy harvesting is particularly difficult due to the mismatch between the low frequency of human activities and the high-frequency requirements of piezoelectric transducers. We propose a piezoelectric energy harvester, to be worn on the knee-joint, that relies on the plucking technique to achieve frequency up-conversion. During a plucking action, a piezoelectric bimorph is deflected by a plectrum; when released due to loss of contact, the bimorph is free to vibrate at its resonant frequency, generating electrical energy with the highest efficiency. A prototype, featuring four PZT-5H bimorphs, was built and is here studied in a knee simulator which reproduces the gait of a human subject. Biomechanical data were collected with a marker-based motion capture system while the subject was carrying a selection of backpack loads. The paper focuses on the energy generation of the harvester and how this is affected by the backpack load. By altering the gait, the backpack load has a measurable effect on performance: at the highest load of 24 kg, a minor reduction in energy generation (7%) was observed and the output power is reduced by 10%. Both are so moderate to be practically unimportant. The average power output of the prototype is 2.06 ± 0.3 mW, which can increase significantly with further optimization. (paper)

  11. The employment effects of mergers in a declining industry: the case of South African gold mining.

    OpenAIRE

    Behar, Alberto; Hodge, James

    2007-01-01

    An industry in decline provides an appropriate setting for the theory that mergers and acquisitions destroy implicit contracts and allow for the shedding of excess labour. We test this theory using provincial data from the South African gold mining industry, which has been in decline over the last two decades. Our data clearly portray rises in real wages and falling employment after the end of apartheid and our econometric results are remarkably consistent with standard labour demand theory. ...

  12. Video Games as a Means to Reduce Age-Related Cognitive Decline: Attitudes, Compliance, and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Walter R.; Champion, Michael; Blakely, Daniel P.; Wright, Timothy; Souders, Dustin J.; Charness, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a “brain fitness” game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game) induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants’ ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why. PMID:23378841

  13. Video games as a means to reduce age-related cognitive decline: attitudes, compliance, and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Walter R; Champion, Michael; Blakely, Daniel P; Wright, Timothy; Souders, Dustin J; Charness, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a "brain fitness" game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game) induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants' ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why. PMID:23378841

  14. Video Games as a Means to Reduce Age-related Cognitive Decline: Attitudes, Compliance, and Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Boot

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a brain fitness game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants’ ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why.

  15. Computational modeling in biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mofrad, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a glimpse of the diverse and important roles that modern computational technology is playing in various areas of biomechanics. It includes unique chapters on ab initio quantum mechanical, molecular dynamic and scale coupling methods..

  16. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  17. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  18. The Biomechanical Effect of Loading Speed on Metal-on-UHMWPE Contact Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Zdero, Radovan; Bagheri, Zahra S; Rezaey, Mojtaba; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bougherara, Habiba

    2014-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a material commonly used in total hip and knee joint replacements. Numerous studies have assessed the effect of its viscoelastic properties on phenomena such as creep, stress relaxation, and tensile stress. However, these investigations either use the complex 3D geometries of total hip and knee replacements or UHMWPE test objects on their own. No studies have directly measured the effect of vertical load application speed on the contact mec...

  19. Effect of Nutrition on Biomechanical Properties of Bone in Laying Hens and Broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Olgun

    2014-01-01

    Leg problems have caused significant economic losses in poultry sector. Bone quality and strong is related to nutrition. In this review, effects of nutrition on bone strength are given to laying hens and broilers. For this, effects of some minerals and feed additives on bone quality were reviewed. Calcium, phosphorus, boron and some feed additives in feeding of hens and broilers are important to strong bone. In addition, the form of calcium resources must be considered in laying hens.

  20. Relationships between job organisational factors, biomechanical and psychosocial exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Stephen S; Kapellusch, Jay M; Merryweather, Andrew S; Thiese, Matthew S; Garg, Arun; Hegmann, Kurt T; Silverstein, Barbara A

    2016-02-01

    The relationships between work organisational, biomechanical and psychosocial factors were studied using cross-sectional data from a pooled dataset of 1834 participants. The work organisational factors included: job rotation, overtime work, having second jobs and work pace. Task and job level biomechanical variables were obtained through sub-task data collected in the field or analysed in the laboratory. Psychosocial variables were collected based on responses to 10 questions. The results showed that job rotations had significant effects on all biomechanical and most psychosocial measures. Those with job rotations generally had higher job biomechanical stressors, and lower job satisfaction. Overtime work was associated with higher job biomechanical stressors, and possibly self-reported physical exhaustion. Those having second jobs reported getting along with co-workers well. Work pace had significant influences on all biomechanical stressors, but its impact on job biomechanical stressors and psychosocial effects are complicated. Practitioner Summary: The findings are based on a large number of subjects collected by three research teams in diverse US workplaces. Job rotation practices used in many workplaces may not be effective in reducing job biomechanical stressors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Overtime work is also associated with higher biomechanical stressors. PMID:26102483

  1. Declining Petroleum Production and the Effect Upon Communities in New Mexico's Permian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Ryan D.

    The petroleum industry, a vital component of New Mexico's economy, is in a gradual decline. As petroleum production is primarily focused in the southeastern corner of the state, this decline phenomenon is particularly relevant to area residents. The problem addressed in this study was that little information is available regarding the lived experiences of business and community leaders concerning this phenomenon, particularly in terms of future economic sustainability. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to interview a purposive sample of business and community leaders regarding their lived experiences and perceptions relating to the economic sustainability of the region. Research questions asked about the general awareness of the decline of oil production---data collected from federal and state databases---and potential options for alternative economic development. Coded data were analyzed and themes and patterns were identified. Findings included a general lack of awareness of area residents regarding a decline of production, assumed economic stability, and resistance to change based on a lack of incentive. Included in the findings were potential options for strategic economic diversification. Recommendations included a campaign to promote awareness of the decline of oil, provide incentives for change, and economic diversification as method of moving the local economy away from dependence upon the petroleum industry. Implications for positive social change were that the affected region can use the findings to identify sustainable alternative industries to support the communities into the future.

  2. The effects of gastrocnemius-soleus muscle forces on ankle biomechanics during triple arthrodesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejazi, Shima; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Rasmussen, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element model of the ankle, taking into account the effects of muscle forces, determined by a musculoskeletal analysis, to investigate the contact stress distribution in the tibio-talar joint in patients with triple arthrodesis and in normal subjects. Forces of major a...

  3. An Evaluation of the Instructional Effectiveness of a Computer Lesson in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, John P.; Francis, Peter R.

    1982-01-01

    One group of undergraduate students were taught a one-hour computerized lesson on free body diagram analysis, developed at Iowa State University for use with the PLATO system. Other students studied the same material using worksheets. Both methods appeared to be equally effective although the computer system offered some instructional advantages.…

  4. Effect of medial arch-heel support in inserts on reducing ankle eversion: a biomechanics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Patrick SH

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive pronation (or eversion at ankle joint in heel-toe running correlated with lower extremity overuse injuries. Orthotics and inserts are often prescribed to limit the pronation range to tackle the problem. Previous studies revealed that the effect is product-specific. This study investigated the effect of medial arch-heel support in inserts on reducing ankle eversion in standing, walking and running. Methods Thirteen pronators and 13 normal subjects participated in standing, walking and running trials in each of the following conditions: (1 barefoot, and shod condition with insert with (2 no, (3 low, (4 medium, and (5 high medial arch-heel support. Motions were captured and processed by an eight-camera motion capture system. Maximum ankle eversion was calculated by incorporating the raw coordinates of 15 anatomical positions to a self-compiled Matlab program with kinematics equations. Analysis of variance with repeated measures with post-hoc Tukey pairwise comparisons was performed on the data among the five walking conditions and the five running conditions separately. Results Results showed that the inserts with medial arch-heel support were effective in dynamics trials but not static trials. In walking, they successfully reduced the maximum eversion by 2.1 degrees in normal subjects and by 2.5–3.0 degrees in pronators. In running, the insert with low medial arch support significantly reduced maximum eversion angle by 3.6 and 3.1 degrees in normal subjects and pronators respectively. Conclusion Medial arch-heel support in inserts is effective in reducing ankle eversion in walking and running, but not in standing. In walking, there is a trend to bring the over-pronated feet of the pronators back to the normal eversion range. In running, it shows an effect to restore normal eversion range in 84% of the pronators.

  5. Elastodynamic analysis of the human aorta and the effect of biomechanical parameters on its behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Siamak; Dargahi, Javad; Farmanzad, Farhad

    2007-01-01

    In this work, a finite element formulation for the analysis of the elastodynamic behavior of the human aorta is presented. In this formulation, a one-dimensional approach was adopted and a comprehensive computer program was written and employed in the mathematical analysis. All the necessary material and geometrical parameters were appropriately incorporated in the simulation. A comparison was made between the simplified elasticity theory and the one proposed in this study using the poroelasticity theory. The effects of certain parameters including the fluid density and the material permeability of the matrix on the behavior of the aortic tissue were investigated. According to these findings, the higher the density of the liquid in the tissue, the more delay will be observed in the resonance frequencies. It was also concluded that in the poroelasticity theory, the resonance frequencies occur at a later stage compared with the elasticity theory. The permeability of liquid into the pores and its damping effect are the two factors that contributed to the delay in the resonance. It was observed that at a frequency of 10 Hz, up to a permeability of about 10(-8) m(4)/N.s, the effect on the magnitude of the amplitude is negligible. However, from this threshold value up to a point at which the permeability is equal to 10(-5) m(4)/N.s, there is a corresponding increase in the amplitude. PMID:17611299

  6. A biomechanical modeling study of the effects of the orbicularis oris muscle and jaw posture on lip shape

    CERN Document Server

    Stavness, Ian; Perrier, Pascal; Demolin, Didier; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in lip gestures and (b) the constraints of coupled lip/jaw biomechanics on jaw posture in labial sounds. Method: The authors used a model coupling the jaw, tongue, and face. First, the influence of the orbicularis oris (OO) anatomical implementation was analyzed by assessing how changes in depth (from epidermis to the skull) and peripheralness (proximity to the lip horn center) affected lip shaping. Second, the capability of the lip/jaw system to generate protrusion and rounding, or labial closure, was evaluated for different jaw heights. Results: Results showed that a peripheral and moderately deep OO implementation is most appropriate for protrusion and rounding; a superf...

  7. The effects of exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, J.G.Z. van; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Mechelen, W. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the effect of physical exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline. Data sources: Randomized controlled trials were identified by literature searches in PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and AgeLine. Study selection: Papers were inclu

  8. Decline of brown trout () in Switzerland - How to assess potential causes in a multi-factorial cause-effect relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Decline of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in Switzerland - How to assess potential causes in a multi-factorial cause-effect relationship correspondence: Corresponding author. (Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia) (Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia) Institute Man-Society-Environment, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Basel - Vesalgasse 1--> , CH-4051 Basel--> , Tel. +41 ? 61 ? 267 04 02--> - SWITZERL...

  9. Effects of type and mode of propulsion on hand-cycling biomechanics in nondisabled subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Faupin, PhD

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the range of motion (ROM (in degrees of the upper limb and trunk, forces (Newtons, two-dimensional fraction effective force (FEF2D (in percent, and torque (Newton meters during hand cycling. Seven nondisabled participants performed a 1 min exercise test at 70 rpm on a hand cycle (HC fixed to an ergometer in synchronous (SC mode versus asynchronous (AC mode and in arm-power (AP versus arm-trunk-power (ATP type of propulsion. Higher (p < 0.001 flexion/extension of the trunk was found during ATP versus AP type and higher (p < 0.001 lateral flexion and rotation of the trunk in AC versus SC mode. The trunk ROM should explain the different force generation patterns observed in this investigation between AC and SC modes and AP and ATP types. However, kinetic results do not allow the most effective type or mode of propulsion (FEF2D: from 72.9% to 89.3% to be established. We conclude that trunk movement is an important parameter to consider in ergonomically optimizing hand cycling. Nevertheless, future studies in experienced HC users, especially with limited trunk function, should be performed.

  10. Biomechanical Performances of Networked Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate: Effect of Photoinitiator Concentration, Temperature, and Incubation Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Morshed; Orock, Albert; Tarantini, Stefano; White, Jeremiah; Yasar, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient conduit networks can be introduced within the Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate (PEGDA) tissue construct to enable cells to survive in the scaffold. Nutrient conduit networks can be created on PEGDA by macrochannel to nanochannel fabrication techniques. Such networks can influence the mechanical and cell activities of PEGDA scaffold. There is no study conducted to evaluate the effect of nutrient conduit networks on the maximum tensile stress and cell activities of the tissue scaffold. The study aimed to explore the influence of the network architecture on the maximum tensile stress of PEGDA scaffold and compared with the nonnetworked PEGDA scaffold. Our study found that there are 1.78 and 2.23 times decrease of maximum tensile stress due to the introduction of nutrient conduit networks to the PEGDA scaffold at 23°C and 37°C temperature conditions, respectively. This study also found statistically significant effect of network architecture, PI concentration, temperature, and wait time on the maximum failure stress of PEGDA samples (P value < 0.05). Cell viability results demonstrated that networked PEGDA hydrogels possessed increased viability compared to nonnetworked and decreased viability with increased photoinitiator concentrations. The results of this study can be used for the design of PEGDA scaffold with macrosize nutrient conduit network channels. PMID:26925104

  11. EFFECT OF AGE ON THE BIOMECHANICAL AND MICROCIRCULATORY PROPERTIES OF THE SKIN IN HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS AND DURING VENOUS ULCERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mattar, Essam H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: With aging there is alteration of elastic properties of the skin and skin-blood flow. Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare age-related changes in selected biomechanical parameters of the skin (skin hardness, skin extensibility, relaxation time constant, τ) and subcutaneous microcirculatory quality (SMQ) in individuals with and without venous diseases. Materials and Methods: Two groups were studied: the first group was of asymptomatic healthy individuals and the second gro...

  12. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1 large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2 polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3 polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment

  13. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark. The...... longitudinal study on the high-tech cluster reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to decline. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on the cluster’s adaptive capabilities, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing in new resources to the cluster...

  14. The effect of a cadence retraining protocol on running biomechanics and efficiency: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafer, Jocelyn F; Brown, Allison M; deMille, Polly; Hillstrom, Howard J; Garber, Carol Ewing

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the association between mechanical deviations from normal and the presence or risk of injury. Some runners attempt to change mechanics by increasing running cadence. Previous work documented that increasing running cadence reduces deviations in mechanics tied to injury. The long-term effect of a cadence retraining intervention on running mechanics and energy expenditure is unknown. This study aimed to determine if increasing running cadence by 10% decreases running efficiency and changes kinematics and kinetics to make them less similar to those associated with injury. Additionally, this study aimed to determine if, after 6 weeks of cadence retraining, there would be carryover in kinematic and kinetic changes from an increased cadence state to a runner's preferred running cadence without decreased running efficiency. We measured oxygen uptake, kinematic and kinetic data on six uninjured participants before and after a 6-week intervention. Increasing cadence did not result in decreased running efficiency but did result in decreases in stride length, hip adduction angle and hip abductor moment. Carryover was observed in runners' post-intervention preferred running form as decreased hip adduction angle and vertical loading rate. PMID:25369525

  15. Effect of passive acoustic sampling methodology on detecting bats after declines from white nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant with the emergence and spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS) and precipitous decline of many bat species in North America, natural resource managers need modified and/or new techniques for bat inventory and monitoring that provide robust occupancy estimates. We used Anabat acoustic detectors to determine the most efficient passive acoustic sampling design for optimizing detection probabilities of multiple bat species in a WNS-impacted environment in New York, USA. Our sampling protocol included: six acoustic stations deployed for the entire duration of monitoring as well as a 4 x 4 grid and five transects of 5-10 acoustic units that were deployed for 6-8 night sample durations surveyed during the summers of 2011-2012. We used Program PRESENCE to determine detection probability and site occupancy estimates. Overall, the grid produced the highest detection probabilities for most species because it contained the most detectors and intercepted the greatest spatial area. However, big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and species not impacted by WNS were detected easily regardless of sampling array. Endangered Indiana (Myotis sodalis) and little brown (Myotis lucifugus) and tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) showed declines in detection probabilities over our study, potentially indicative of continued WNS-associated declines. Identification of species presence through efficient methodologies is vital for future conservation efforts as bat populations decline further due to WNS and other factors.   

  16. The effect of starting point placement technique on thoracic transverse process strength: an ex vivo biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Douglas C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of thoracic pedicle screws in spinal deformity, trauma, and tumor reconstruction is becoming more common. Unsuccessful screw placement may require salvage techniques utilizing transverse process hooks. The effect of different starting point placement techniques on the strength of the transverse process has not previously been reported. The purpose of this paper is to determine the biomechanical properties of the thoracic transverse process following various pedicle screw starting point placement techniques. Methods Forty-seven fresh-frozen human cadaveric thoracic vertebrae from T2 to T9 were disarticulated and matched by bone mineral density (BMD and transverse process (TP cross-sectional area. Specimens were randomized to one of four groups: A, control, and three others based on thoracic pedicle screw placement technique; B, straightforward; C, funnel; and D, in-out-in. Initial cortical bone removal for pedicle screw placement was made using a burr at the location on the transverse process or transverse process-laminar junction as published in the original description of each technique. The transverse process was tested measuring load-to-failure simulating a hook in compression mode. Analysis of covariance and Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the data. Results Technique was a significant predictor of load-to-failure (P = 0.0007. The least squares mean (LS mean load-to-failure of group A (control was 377 N, group B (straightforward 355 N, group C (funnel 229 N, and group D (in-out-in 301 N. Significant differences were noted between groups A and C, A and D, B and C, and C and D. BMD (0.925 g/cm2 [range, 0.624-1.301 g/cm2] was also a significant predictor of load-to-failure, for all specimens grouped together (P P 0.05. Level and side tested were not found to significantly correlate with load-to-failure. Conclusions The residual coronal plane compressive strength of the thoracic transverse process

  17. Video Games as a Means to Reduce Age-Related Cognitive Decline: Attitudes, Compliance, and Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Boot, Walter R.; Michael eChampion; Daniel Patrick Blakely; Timothy eWright; Dustin eSouders; Neil eCharness

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We exp...

  18. Female-Specific Effects on Age-Related Spatial Learning Decline in Songbirds

    OpenAIRE

    Kosarussavadi, Saritha

    2015-01-01

    Spatial cognitive decline is a known hallmark for age-related deterioration in learning and memory, as neurobiological changes occur in the hippocampus with advancing age. Sexually dimorphic spatial abilities have also been consistently demonstrated in humans and other mammalian studies. Despite their extended lifespan and adaptations to aging, little is known about avian age-related cognition and physiology. In this experiment, we used zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to investigate the e...

  19. Remedial effects of motivational incentive on declining cognitive control in healthy aging and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga A Harsay

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The prospect of reward may provide a motivational incentive for optimizing goal-directed behavior. Animal work demonstrates that reward-processing networks and oculomotor-control networks in the brain are connected through the dorsal striatum, and that reward anticipation can improve oculomotor control via this nexus. Due perhaps to deterioration in dopaminergic striatal circuitry, goal-directed oculomotor control is subject to decline in healthy seniors, and even more in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD. Here we examine whether healthy seniors and PD patients are able to utilize reward prospects to improve their impaired antisaccade performance. Results confirmed that oculomotor control declined in PD patients compared to healthy seniors, and in healthy seniors compared to young adults. However, the motivational incentive of reward expectation resulted in benefits in antisaccade performance in all groups alike. These findings speak against structural and nonmodifiable decline in cognitive control functions, and emphasize the remedial potential of motivational incentive mechanisms in healthy as well as pathological aging.

  20. A preliminary case study of the effect of shoe-wearing on the biomechanics of a horse’s foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jeffery W.; Gatesy, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Horse racing is a multi-billion-dollar industry that has raised welfare concerns due to injured and euthanized animals. Whilst the cause of musculoskeletal injuries that lead to horse morbidity and mortality is multifactorial, pre-existing pathologies, increased speeds and substrate of the racecourse are likely contributors to foot disease. Horse hooves have the ability to naturally deform during locomotion and dissipate locomotor stresses, yet farriery approaches are utilised to increase performance and protect hooves from wear. Previous studies have assessed the effect of different shoe designs on locomotor performance; however, no biomechanical study has hitherto measured the effect of horseshoes on the stresses of the foot skeleton in vivo. This preliminary study introduces a novel methodology combining three-dimensional data from biplanar radiography with inverse dynamics methods and finite element analysis (FEA) to evaluate the effect of a stainless steel shoe on the function of a Thoroughbred horse’s forefoot during walking. Our preliminary results suggest that the stainless steel shoe shifts craniocaudal, mediolateral and vertical GRFs at mid-stance. We document a similar pattern of flexion-extension in the PIP (pastern) and DIP (coffin) joints between the unshod and shod conditions, with slight variation in rotation angles throughout the stance phase. For both conditions, the PIP and DIP joints begin in a flexed posture and extend over the entire stance phase. At mid-stance, small differences in joint angle are observed in the PIP joint, with the shod condition being more extended than the unshod horse, whereas the DIP joint is extended more in the unshod than the shod condition. We also document that the DIP joint extends more than the PIP after mid-stance and until the end of the stance in both conditions. Our FEA analysis, conducted solely on the bones, shows increased von Mises and Maximum principal stresses on the forefoot phalanges in the shod

  1. Effect of age on the biomechanical and microcirculatory properties of the skin in healthy individuals and during venous ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam H Mattar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With aging there is alteration of elastic properties of the skin and skin-blood flow. Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare age-related changes in selected biomechanical parameters of the skin (skin hardness, skin extensibility, relaxation time constant, τ and subcutaneous microcirculatory quality (SMQ in individuals with and without venous diseases. Materials and Methods: Two groups were studied: the first group was of asymptomatic healthy individuals and the second group included patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI and venous ulceration, without edema. Both groups were subdivided to three age categories (21-40, 41-60 and 61-90 years old. Skin hardness was measured by durometer, extensibility and τ were measured using extensometer and SQM was assessed via postural vasoconstrictive response (LDF. Results: Results showed that skin hardness, extensibility, and τ-values were increased, whereas LDF was decreased in the older groups as compared with younger groups. These changes are attributed to alterations in the skin structure and reduced capillaries density networks. Similar behavior was found in the biomechanical and microcirculatory changes in patients with venous ulceration and CVI, but these changes were more increased further in older patients with venous ulceration as compared with older patients with CVI and that can be attribute to more intense response against tissue injury. Conclusions: Since aging elevated skin hardness and extensibility, but lowered vasoconstrictive response in individuals, with and without, venous diseases, we conclude that aging process is likely to cause an accumulation of damaged skin tissues and that could induce an apparent antigen-driven response that altered skin structure and the subsequent biomechanical properties obtained in this study.

  2. Biomechanics of the Sensor–Tissue Interface—Effects of Motion, Pressure, and Design on Sensor Performance and the Foreign Body Response—Part I: Theoretical Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Helton, Kristen L; Ratner, Buddy D.; Wisniewski, Natalie A

    2011-01-01

    The importance of biomechanics in glucose sensor function has been largely overlooked. This article is the first part of a two-part review in which we look beyond commonly recognized chemical biocompatibility to explore the biomechanics of the sensor–tissue interface as an important aspect of continuous glucose sensor biocompatibility. Part I provides a theoretical framework to describe how biomechanical factors such as motion and pressure (typically micromotion and micropressure) give rise t...

  3. Declining global warming effects on the phenology of spring leaf unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongshuo H.; Zhao, Hongfang; Piao, Shilong; Peaucelle, Marc; Peng, Shushi; Zhou, Guiyun; Ciais, Philippe; Huang, Mengtian; Menzel, Annette; Peñuelas, Josep; Song, Yang; Vitasse, Yann; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2015-10-01

    Earlier spring leaf unfolding is a frequently observed response of plants to climate warming. Many deciduous tree species require chilling for dormancy release, and warming-related reductions in chilling may counteract the advance of leaf unfolding in response to warming. Empirical evidence for this, however, is limited to saplings or twigs in climate-controlled chambers. Using long-term in situ observations of leaf unfolding for seven dominant European tree species at 1,245 sites, here we show that the apparent response of leaf unfolding to climate warming (ST, expressed in days advance of leaf unfolding per °C warming) has significantly decreased from 1980 to 2013 in all monitored tree species. Averaged across all species and sites, ST decreased by 40% from 4.0 +/- 1.8 days °C-1 during 1980-1994 to 2.3 +/- 1.6 days °C-1 during 1999-2013. The declining ST was also simulated by chilling-based phenology models, albeit with a weaker decline (24-30%) than observed in situ. The reduction in ST is likely to be partly attributable to reduced chilling. Nonetheless, other mechanisms may also have a role, such as `photoperiod limitation' mechanisms that may become ultimately limiting when leaf unfolding dates occur too early in the season. Our results provide empirical evidence for a declining ST, but also suggest that the predicted strong winter warming in the future may further reduce ST and therefore result in a slowdown in the advance of tree spring phenology.

  4. Effects of fish farming on seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) in a Mediterranean bay: seagrass decline after organic loading cessation

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado, O.; Ruiz, J; M. Perez; J. Romero; Ballesteros, E.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of fish farming on a seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) meadow at Fornells Bay, Minorca (Balearic Islands) were studied. Changes in plant and meadow features (e.g. shoot morphology, shoot density, biomass, rhizome growth, nutrient and soluble sugars concentrations...) in three stations along a transect from a disturbed (organic pollution due to fish cultures) to an undisturbed site were assessed. The fish culture had ceased in 1991; however, seagrass decline, already reported in a prev...

  5. The effect of Chinese Jinzhida recipe on the hippocampus in a rat model of diabetes-associated cognitive decline

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Xiao-Hui; Liang, Li-Na; Zhan, Li-bin; Lu, Xiao-Guang; Shi, Xiang; Qi, Xin; Feng, Zhao-Lan; Wu, Mei-Juan; Sui, Hua; Zheng, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Fu-Liang; Sun, Jie; Bai, Chang-Chuan; Li, Nan; Han, Guo-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of treatment with Multi component Chinese Medicine Jinzhida (JZD) on behavioral deficits in diabetes-associated cognitive decline (DACD) rats and verify our hypothesis that JZD treatment improves cognitive function by suppressing the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and improving insulin signaling transduction in the rats’ hippocampus. Methods A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was established using high fat diet and streptozotocin (30 mg/kg...

  6. Nutritional decline in cystic fibrosis related diabetes: the effect of intensive nutritional intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, H

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Reports indicate that nutritional and respiratory decline occur up to four years prior to diagnosis of cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD). Our aim was to establish whether intensive nutritional intervention prevents pre-diabetic nutritional decline in an adult population with CFRD. METHODS: 48 adult patients with CFRD were matched to 48 controls with CF, for age, gender and lung pathogen status. Nutritional and other clinical indices were recorded at annual intervals from six years before until two years after diagnosis. Data were also analysed to examine the impact of early and late acquisition of CFRD. RESULTS: No important differences in weight, height, body mass index (BMI), lung function or intravenous treatment were found between groups in the six years prior to diagnosis, nor any significant deviation over time. In those who developed diabetes, use of overnight enteral tube feeding (ETF) was four times as likely at the time of diagnosis, compared to controls [ETF 43.8% (CFRD) v 18.8% (CF Controls), OR 4.0, CI 1.3 to 16.4, p=0.01]. Age at onset of CFRD played a significant role in determining the pre-diabetic clinical course. Younger diabetics with continued growth at study onset (n=17) had a lower BMI from 2 years prior to diagnosis compared to controls [BMI 18.9 kg\\/m(2) (CFRD) v 20.8 kg\\/m(2) (CF Controls), diff=1.9, CI -0.1 to 3.7 p=0.04]. The BMI of older diabetics (completed growth at study onset) was equal to that of controls throughout. CONCLUSION: Pre-diabetic nutritional decline is not inevitable in adults with CFRD, but is influenced by age of onset. In the group overall, those with CFRD are more likely to require ETF from 2 years prior to diagnosis. Despite intensive nutritional intervention, patients who continue to grow throughout the pre-diabetic years, show a level of nutritional decline absent in older adults.

  7. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra. PMID:21303323

  8. ROBUST DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutawanir Darwis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Empirical decline curve analysis of oil production data gives reasonable answer in hyperbolic type curves situations; however the methodology has limitations in fitting real historical production data in present of unusual observations due to the effect of the treatment to the well in order to increase production capacity. The development ofrobust least squares offers new possibilities in better fitting production data using declinecurve analysis by down weighting the unusual observations. This paper proposes a robustleast squares fitting lmRobMM approach to estimate the decline rate of daily production data and compares the results with reservoir simulation results. For case study, we usethe oil production data at TBA Field West Java. The results demonstrated that theapproach is suitable for decline curve fitting and offers a new insight in decline curve analysis in the present of unusual observations.

  9. Common SIRT1 variants modify the effect of abdominal adipose tissue on aging-related lung function decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curjuric, Ivan; Imboden, Medea; Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier; Gerbase, Margaret W; Haun, Margot; Keidel, Dirk; Kumar, Ashish; Pons, Marco; Rochat, Thierry; Schikowski, Tamara; Schindler, Christian; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kronenberg, Florian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M

    2016-06-01

    Lung function is an independent predictor of mortality and serves as an aging marker in never smokers. The protein sirtuin-1 of gene SIRT1 has profound anti-inflammatory effects and regulates metabolic pathways. Its suggested longevity effects on lower organisms remain poorly studied in humans. In 1132 never smokers of the population-based SAPALDIA cohort, we investigated associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs730821, rs10997868, rs10823116) of SIRT1 and aging-related lung function decline over 11 years in terms of change in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75 % of FVC (FEF25-75) using multiple linear regression models. Interactions between the SIRT1 SNPs and adiposity parameters (body mass index (BMI), its change and weight gain) were tested by including multiplicative interaction terms into the models. SIRT1 polymorphisms exhibited no main effects, but modified the association between obesity measures and FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75 decline (p = 0.009-0.046). Per risk allele, FEV1/FVC decline was accelerated up to -0.5 % (95 % CI -1.0 to 0 %) and -0.7 % (-1.3 to -0.2 %) over interquartile range increases in BMI (2.4 kg/m(2)) or weight (6.5 kg), respectively. For FEF25-75 decline, corresponding estimates were -57 mL/s (-117 to 4 mL/s) and -76 mL/s (-1429 to -9 mL/s). Interactions were not present in participants with genetically lowered C-reactive protein concentrations. Genetic variation in SIRT1 might therefore affect lung function and human longevity by modifying subclinical inflammation arising from abdominal adipose tissue. PMID:27125385

  10. The Decline of University Patenting and the End of the Bayh-Dole Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    University patenting has been heralded as a symbol of changing relations between universities and their social environments. The Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 in the USA was eagerly promoted by the OECD as a recipe for the commercialization of university research, and the law was imitated by a number of national governments. However, since the 2000s university patenting in the most advanced economies has been on the decline both as a percentage and in absolute terms. We suggest that the institutional incentives for university patenting have disappeared with the new regime of university ranking. Patents and spin-offs are not counted in university rankings. In the new arrangements of university-industry-government relations, universities have become very responsive to changes in their relevant environments.

  11. [Three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Biomechanical Effect of Rigid Fixation and Elastic Fixation on Lumbar Interbody Fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiangbo; Song, Yueming; Liu, Limin; Zhou, Chunguan; Yang, Xi

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to compare the mechanical characteristics under different physiological load conditions with three-dimensional finite element model of rigid fixation and elastic fixation in the lumbar. We observed the stress distribution characteristics of a sample of healthy male volunteer modeling under vertical, flexion and extension torque situation. The outcomes showed that there existed 4-6 times pressure on the connecting rod of rigid fixation compared with the elastic fixations under different loads, and the stress peak and area of force on elastic fixation were much higher than that of the rigid fixations. The elastic fixation has more biomechanical advantages than rigid fixation in promoting interbody lumbar fusion after surgery. PMID:26211247

  12. Biomechanics of Rowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  13. Does Anticoagulant Medication Alter Fracture-Healing? A Morphological and Biomechanical Evaluation of the Possible Effects of Rivaroxaban and Enoxaparin Using a Rat Closed Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodinger, Peter Michael; Burgkart, Rainer; Kreutzer, Kilian; Liska, Franz; Pilge, Hakan; Schmitt, Andreas; Knödler, Martina; Holzapfel, Boris Michael; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Tischer, Thomas; Bissinger, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to prevent thromboembolism in orthopaedic surgery, especially in the treatment of fractures or after joint-replacement. Impairment of fracture-healing due to increased bone-desorption, delayed remodelling and lower calcification caused by direct osteoclast stimulation is a well-known side effect of unfractioned heparin. However, the effect of LMWH is unclear and controversial. Recent studies strongly suggest impairment of bone-healing in-vitro and in animal models, characterized by a significant decrease in volume and quality of new-formed callus. Since October 2008, Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) is available for prophylactic use in elective knee- and hip-arthroplasty. Recently, some evidence has been found indicating an in vitro dose independent reduction of osteoblast function after Rivaroxaban treatment. In this study, the possible influence of Rivaroxaban and Enoxaparin on bone-healing in vivo was studied using a standardized, closed rodent fracture-model. 70 male Wistar-rats were randomized to Rivaroxaban, Enoxaparin or control groups. After pinning the right femur, a closed, transverse fracture was produced. 21 days later, the animals were sacrificed and both femora harvested. Analysis was done by biomechanical testing (three-point bending) and micro CT. Both investigated substances showed histomorphometric alterations of the newly formed callus assessed by micro CT analysis. In detail the bone (callus) volume was enhanced (sign. for Rivaroxaban) and the density reduced. The bone mineral content was enhanced accordingly (sign. for Rivaroxaban). Trabecular thickness was reduced (sign. for Rivaroxaban). Furthermore, both drugs showed significant enlarged bone (callus) surface and degree of anisotropy. In contrast, the biomechanical properties of the treated bones were equal to controls. To summarize, the morphological alterations of the fracture-callus did not result in functionally relevant deficits. PMID:27455072

  14. Age-Dependent Decline of Endogenous Pain Control: Exploring the Effect of Expectation and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grashorn, Wiebke; Sprenger, Christian; Forkmann, Katarina; Wrobel, Nathalie; Bingel, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Although chronic pain affects all age ranges, it is particularly common in the elderly. One potential explanation for the high prevalence of chronic pain in the older population is impaired functioning of the descending pain inhibitory system which can be studied in humans using conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigms. In this study we investigated (i) the influence of age on CPM and (ii) the role of expectations, depression and gender as potential modulating variables of an age-related change in CPM. 64 healthy volunteers of three different age groups (young = 20–40 years, middle-aged = 41–60 years, old = 61–80 years) were studied using a classical CPM paradigm that combined moderate heat pain stimuli to the right forearm as test stimuli (TS) and immersion of the contralateral foot into ice water as the conditioning stimulus (CS). The CPM response showed an age-dependent decline with strong CPM responses in young adults but no significant CPM responses in middle-aged and older adults. These age-related changes in CPM responses could not be explained by expectations of pain relief or depression. Furthermore, changes in CPM responses did not differ between men and women. Our results strongly support the notion of a genuine deterioration of descending pain inhibitory mechanisms with age. PMID:24086595

  15. Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Yaritza

    2016-01-01

    The Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) is equipped with anthropometric and biomechanical instrumentation and regularly performs population analysis based on analytical and modeling capabilities to test and verify if all eligible crew/passengers can be accommodated, and fitted with a protective suit that enables performance of reach and access tasks. The ABF's unique expertise can aid in identifying potential ergonomic and occupational biomechanical problems with recommended solutions to improve a suited passenger's safety, comfort, and injury protection. My involvement was in the following projects: The ABF is currently trying to define human performance capabilities in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit. Subjects are tested in an effort to further understand shoulder and elbow strength performance deficits when suited compared to unsuited. Another ongoing project is to develop a protocol to reliably characterize human health and performance metrics for individuals working inside various extravehicular activity (EVA) suits under realistic spaceflight conditions. This project will provide benchmarking data and protocols to be used in the making of future EVA suit configurations.

  16. Dynamic Observation on the Effects of Different Suture Techniques on the Biomechanical Properties in the Healing of Tendons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To identify the best suture techniques for the tendon repair, the biomechanical properties of tendons sutured by different methods were dynamically examined. 140 chickens were divided into 2 groups equally: group A and group B. The tendon of the right side was subjected to injury-repair process, and the tendons of the left sides served as controls in both groups. In group A, "figure-of8" suture, modified Kessler suture and Bunnell suture were used for the 2nd to 4th paws respectively, while in group B, Kleinert suture, Tsuge suture and Ikuta suture were used. On the day 0, 3,7, 14, 21, 28, 42 after operation, 10 animals were sacrificed and the flexor tendons of both sides were harvested for strength test. The results showed that the initial strength of the repaired tendons and the strength after 6 weeks following tendon cut were far below those of intact tendons, irrespective of suture techniques used. With the 6 techniques, the Pmax of tendons repaired by Tsuge suture was increased continually, reaching the highest value on the 42nd day. The Pmax of tendons sutured by the modified Kessler suture was slightly lower than that by Tsuge suture, but it was increased steadily in healing. The tendons repaired by figure-of-8 suture yielded the lowest Pmax. It was concluded that Tsuge suture and modified Kessler suture were the best techniques for tendon repair.

  17. Carpal tunnel release: do we understand the biomechanical consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Harris, Andrew; Skjong, Christian; Akelman, Edward

    2014-11-01

    Carpal tunnel release is a very common procedure performed in the United States. While the procedure is often curative, some patients experience postoperative scar sensitivity, pillar pain, grip weakness, or recurrent median nerve symptoms. Release of the carpal tunnel has an effect on carpal anatomy and biomechanics, including increases in carpal arch width and carpal tunnel volume and changes in muscle and tendon mechanics. Our understanding of how these biomechanical changes contribute to postoperative symptoms is still evolving. We review the relevant morphometric and biomechanical changes that occur following release of the transverse carpal ligament. PMID:25364635

  18. Advances of air pollution science: from forest decline to multiple-stress effects on forest ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, E; Schaub, M; Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Augustaitis, A; Bastrup-Birk, A M; Bytnerowicz, A; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Müller-Starck, G; Serengil, Y

    2010-06-01

    Over the past 20 years, the focus of forest science on air pollution has moved from forest decline to a holistic framework of forest health, and from the effects on forest production to the ecosystem services provided by forest ecosystems. Hence, future research should focus on the interacting factorial impacts and resulting antagonistic and synergistic responses of forest trees and ecosystems. The synergistic effects of air pollution and climatic changes, in particular elevated ozone, altered nitrogen, carbon and water availability, must be key issues for research. Present evidence suggests air pollution will become increasingly harmful to forests under climate change, which requires integration amongst various stressors (abiotic and biotic factors, including competition, parasites and fire), effects on forest services (production, biodiversity protection, soil protection, sustained water balance, socio-economical relevance) and assessment approaches (research, monitoring, modeling) to be fostered. PMID:20036449

  19. "Industrialization and the Fertility Decline"

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael Franck; Oded Galor

    2015-01-01

    The research provides the first empirical examination of the hypothesized effect of industrialization on the fertility decline. Exploiting exogenous source of regional variations in the adoption of steam engines across France, the study establishes that industrialization was a major catalyst in the fertility decline in the course of the demographic transition. Moreover, the analysis further suggests that the contribution of industrialization to the decline in fertility plausibly operated thro...

  20. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-01

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (pmechanics exhibited significant relationships with age. Nonlinear flexibility curves described the functional response of the cervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects. PMID:23415075

  1. Age-related decline in brain resources modulates genetic effects on cognitive functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bäckman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging.Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008, who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed.

  2. Effect of biomechanical disturbance of the temporomandibular joint on the prevalence of internal derangement in mandibular asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranastidporn, B; Hisano, M; Soma, K

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the relationship between biomechanical changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and internal derangement (ID) symptoms in mandibular asymmetry. Posteroanterior cephalograms (PA) of 140 patients with TMJ ID associated with mandibular asymmetry were used to investigate the inclination of the frontal occlusal plane (FOP), and were analysed in conjunction with the results of a report providing information on ID symptoms. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) of the entire mandible was created to investigate the distribution of TMJ forces during clenching. The inclination of the FOP was modified to simulate various degrees of vertical asymmetry. The stresses on the TMJ on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides were analysed and their values were compared with those of the standard model. The results showed that the symptomatic sides were significantly related to the degree of inclination of the FOP. Increasing its angulation resulted in a decrease of the symptoms on the ipsilateral side and an increase of those on the contralateral side. The analysis showed that stress-distribution patterns and overall stresses of the articular disc were influenced by the angulation of inclination of the FOP. These mechanical changes exhibited a distinct relationship with the prevalence of ID in the patients. These results suggest that disturbances in the stresses either in amount or direction due to occlusal inclination can be responsible for ID. Therefore, an attempt to establish a flat occlusal plane is an important orthodontic treatment objective in maintaining the normal health and structure of the TMJ. PMID:16230327

  3. Protective effect of myostatin gene deletion on aging-related muscle metabolic decline

    OpenAIRE

    Chabi, Beatrice; Pauly, Marion; Carillon, Julie; Carnac, Gilles; Favier, François; Fouret, Gilles; Bonafos, Béatrice; Vanterpool, Frankie; Vernus, Barbara,; Coudray, Charles; Feillet Coudray, Christine; Bonnieu, Anne; Lacan, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    While myostatin gene deletion is a promising therapy to fight muscle loss during aging, this approach induces also skeletal muscle metabolic changes such as mitochondrial deficits, redox alteration and increased fatigability. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of aging on these features in aged wild-type (WT) and mstn knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, to determine whether an enriched-antioxidant diet may be useful to prevent agerelated disorders, we orally administered to the...

  4. Protective effect of myostatin gene deletion on aging-related muscle metabolic decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabi, B; Pauly, M; Carillon, J; Carnac, G; Favier, F B; Fouret, G; Bonafos, B; Vanterpool, F; Vernus, B; Coudray, C; Feillet-Coudray, C; Bonnieu, A; Lacan, D; Koechlin-Ramonatxo, C

    2016-06-01

    While myostatin gene deletion is a promising therapy to fight muscle loss during aging, this approach induces also skeletal muscle metabolic changes such as mitochondrial deficits, redox alteration and increased fatigability. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of aging on these features in aged wild-type (WT) and mstn knockout (KO) mice. Moreover, to determine whether an enriched-antioxidant diet may be useful to prevent age-related disorders, we orally administered to the two genotypes a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase for 12 weeks. We reported that mitochondrial functional abnormalities persisted (decreased state 3 and 4 of respiration; p<0.05) in skeletal muscle from aged KO mice; however, differences with WT mice were attenuated at old age in line with reduced difference on running endurance between the two genotypes. Interestingly, we showed an increase in glutathione levels, associated with lower lipid peroxidation levels in KO muscle. Enriched antioxidant diet reduced the aging-related negative effects on maximal aerobic velocity and running limit time (p<0.05) in both groups, with systemic adaptations on body weight. The redox status and the hypertrophic phenotype appeared to be beneficial to KO mice, mitigating the effect of aging on the skeletal muscle metabolic remodeling. PMID:26944368

  5. Effects of nonlinearity in the materials used for the semi-rigid pedicle screw systems on biomechanical behaviors of the lumbar spine after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, various types of semi-rigid pedicle screw fixation systems have been developed for the surgical treatment of the lumbar spine. They were introduced to address the adverse issues commonly found in traditional rigid spinal fusion--abnormally large motion at the adjacent level and subsequent degeneration. The semi-rigid system uses more compliant materials (nitinol or polymers) and/or changes in rod design (coiled or twisted rods) as compared to the conventional rigid straight rods made of Ti alloys (E = 114 GPa, υ = 0.32). However, biomechanical studies on the semi-rigid pedicle screw systems were usually limited to linear modeling of the implant and anatomic elements, which may not be capable of reflecting realistic post-operative motions of the spine. In this study, we evaluated the effects of nonlinearity in materials used for semi-rigid pedicle screw fixation systems to evaluate the changes in biomechanical behaviors using finite element analysis. Changes in range of motion (ROM) and center of rotation (COR) were assessed at the operated and adjacent levels. Actual load-displacement results of the semi-rigid rod from mechanical test were carried out to reflect the nonlinearity of the implant. In addition, nonlinear material properties of various spinal ligaments studies were used for the finite element modeling. The post-operative models were constructed by modifying the previously validated intact model of the L1-S1 spine. Eight different post-operative models were made to address the effects of nonlinearity-with a traditional stiffness modulus rod (with linear ligaments, case 1; with nonlinear ligaments, case 5), with a rigid rod (with linear ligaments, case 2; with nonlinear ligaments, case 6), with a soft rod (with linear ligaments, case 3; with nonlinear ligaments, case 7), and with a nonlinear rod (with linear ligaments, case 4; with nonlinear ligaments, case 8). To simulate the load on the lumbar spine in a neutral posture, follower load (400 N

  6. Effects of nonlinearity in the materials used for the semi-rigid pedicle screw systems on biomechanical behaviors of the lumbar spine after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sung-Jae [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae 621749 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Hyung [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan 331825 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Hyun-Ju [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul 363951 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwon-Yong, E-mail: sjl@bme.inje.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Recently, various types of semi-rigid pedicle screw fixation systems have been developed for the surgical treatment of the lumbar spine. They were introduced to address the adverse issues commonly found in traditional rigid spinal fusion--abnormally large motion at the adjacent level and subsequent degeneration. The semi-rigid system uses more compliant materials (nitinol or polymers) and/or changes in rod design (coiled or twisted rods) as compared to the conventional rigid straight rods made of Ti alloys (E = 114 GPa, {upsilon} = 0.32). However, biomechanical studies on the semi-rigid pedicle screw systems were usually limited to linear modeling of the implant and anatomic elements, which may not be capable of reflecting realistic post-operative motions of the spine. In this study, we evaluated the effects of nonlinearity in materials used for semi-rigid pedicle screw fixation systems to evaluate the changes in biomechanical behaviors using finite element analysis. Changes in range of motion (ROM) and center of rotation (COR) were assessed at the operated and adjacent levels. Actual load-displacement results of the semi-rigid rod from mechanical test were carried out to reflect the nonlinearity of the implant. In addition, nonlinear material properties of various spinal ligaments studies were used for the finite element modeling. The post-operative models were constructed by modifying the previously validated intact model of the L1-S1 spine. Eight different post-operative models were made to address the effects of nonlinearity-with a traditional stiffness modulus rod (with linear ligaments, case 1; with nonlinear ligaments, case 5), with a rigid rod (with linear ligaments, case 2; with nonlinear ligaments, case 6), with a soft rod (with linear ligaments, case 3; with nonlinear ligaments, case 7), and with a nonlinear rod (with linear ligaments, case 4; with nonlinear ligaments, case 8). To simulate the load on the lumbar spine in a neutral posture, follower load

  7. Carpal Tunnel Release: Do We Understand the Biomechanical Consequences?

    OpenAIRE

    Morrell, Nathan T.; Harris, Andrew; Skjong, Christian; Akelman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel release is a very common procedure performed in the United States. While the procedure is often curative, some patients experience postoperative scar sensitivity, pillar pain, grip weakness, or recurrent median nerve symptoms. Release of the carpal tunnel has an effect on carpal anatomy and biomechanics, including increases in carpal arch width and carpal tunnel volume and changes in muscle and tendon mechanics. Our understanding of how these biomechanical changes contribute to ...

  8. Single Cell Biomechanical Phenotyping using Microfluidics and Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Babahosseini, Hesam

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied with alterations in the cell biomechanical phenotype, including changes in cell structure, morphology, and responses to microenvironmental stress. These alterations result in an increased deformability of transformed cells and reduced resistance to mechanical stimuli, enabling motility and invasion. Therefore, single cell biomechanical properties could be served as a powerful label-free biomarker for effective characterization and early detection of single ca...

  9. Effects of local delivery of BMP2, zoledronate and their combination on bone microarchitecture, biomechanics and bone turnover in osteoporotic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Da; Hao, Xuguang; Xu, Fang; Liu, Jian; Xu, Fei; Luo, Erping; Meng, Guolin

    2016-01-01

    The hip fracture is one major clinical challenge associated with osteoporosis, resulting in heavy socioeconomic burdens and high mortality. Systemic therapies of anti-osteoporosis drugs are expensive, time-consuming and also evoke substantial side effects, which fails to provide early protection from fractures. Accumulating evidence demonstrates the high bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of local drug delivery in accelerating facture healing and bone defect repair. This study aims at investigating the effects of local delivery of BMP2 and zoledronate (two promising anabolic/anti-catobolic reagents) encapsulated by fibrin sealants into femoral necks on regulating bone quality and remodeling in osteoporotic rabbits subjected to combined ovariectomy and glucocorticoid injection. We show that 6-week BMP2 delivery exhibited more prominent effect on mitigating trabecular bone microarchitecture deterioration and mechanical strength reduction of femoral necks than local zoledronate treatment. BMP2 plus zoledronate showed more significant improvement of bone microstructure, mechanical strength and bone formation rate at 12 weeks post injection than single BMP2 or zoledronate delivery via μCT, biomechanical, histomorphometric and serum biochemical analyses. This study enriches our knowledge for understanding the availability of local drug delivery for improving bone quantity and quality, which may lead to earlier, safer and more efficient protection from osteoporosis-induced fractures in clinics. PMID:27329730

  10. Declining Dioxin concentrations in the Rhone River, France, attest to the effectiveness of emissions controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Babut, Marc; Mourier, Brice; Mahler, Barbara J.; Roux, Gwenaelle; Desmet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Emission-control policies have been implemented in Europe and North America since the 1990s for polychlorodibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and furans (PCDFs). To assess the effect of these policies on temporal trends and spatial patterns for these compounds in a large European river system, sediment cores were collected in seven depositional areas along the Rhone River in France, dated, and analyzed for PCDDs and PCDFs. Results show concentrations increase in the downstream direction and have decreased temporally at all sites during the last two decades, with an average decrease of 83% from 1992 to 2010. The time for a 50% decrease in concentrations (t1/2) averaged 6.9 ± 2.6 and 9.1 ± 2.9 years for the sum of measured PCDDs and PCDFs, respectively. Congener patterns are similar among cores and indicate dominance of regional atmospheric deposition and possibly weathered local sources. Local sources are clearly indicated at the most downstream site, where concentrations of the most toxic dioxin, TCDD, are about 2 orders of magnitude higher than at the other six sites. The relatively steep downward trends attest to the effects of the dioxin emissions reduction policy in Europe and suggest that risks posed to aquatic life in the Rhone River basin from dioxins and furans have been greatly reduced.

  11. Reversing introduced species effects: Experimental removal of introduced fish leads to rapid recovery of a declining frog

    OpenAIRE

    Vredenburg, Vance T.

    2004-01-01

    Amphibian population declines and extinctions are occurring even in the world's least impacted areas. The introduction and spread of nonnative predators is one of many proposed causes of amphibian declines. Correlational studies have shown a negative relationship between introduced fishes and declining amphibians, but little direct experimental evidence is available. This study experimentally manipulated the presence and absence of widely introduced salmonids rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykis...

  12. Brain injury biomechanics in closed-head impact : Studies on injury epidemiology, tolerance criteria, biomechanics and traffic injury prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Viano, David

    1997-01-01

    Permanent disability from traumatic brain injury is a devastating consequence of traffic crashes. Injury prevention is a fruitful approach to reduce the incidence and severity of disabling brain injury. However, the development of effective prevention techniques requires better knowledge on the mechanisms and biomechanics of brain injury in closed-head impact. The overall aim of this study is focused on brain injury mechanisms, biomechanics, and tolerances in closed-head ...

  13. Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) ≤6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≤10, and ≤ T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = 20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially

  14. Synergistic effects of disturbance and control in the decline of Eichhornia crassipes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S.; Santos, M. J.; Ustin, S.

    2009-12-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is an aquatic invasive that has spread from Brazil to many regions in the world. In California, water hyacinth has reached a treat level and has been actively managed in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. To better understand the change in water hyacinth and other co-occurring aquatic vegetation we collected hyperspectral HyMap data from 2004 to 2008 over the entire Delta. We analyzed change in the classified data looking at the impact of natural variability, disturbance events, and chemical control on water hyacinth distribution in the Delta. Our results show that seasonal variability in salinity levels allows water hyacinth to occur throughout the Delta, in spite of being a freshwater plant that is extremely sensitive to salinity. Decline in submersed vegetation leads to decline in water hyacinth cover in the following year; this is likely due to the potential role of submersed species as an anchor/substrate for water hyacinth. Chemical control also decreases water hyacinth cover but the change is not sustainable if conditions continue to be favorable to its growth and spread. The synergistic effect of disturbance along with control measures in the last three years has led to a steep reduction in water hyacinth cover. In 2005 December and the beginning of 2006, two major floods flushed the species downstream. In winter of 2007, a week of continuous frost days further depleted already vulnerable populations. Regional climate models predict an increase in salinity levels in the Delta and increased risk of flooding and salt water intrusions due to sea-level rise and levee failure. While this might control and reduce water hyacinth in the Delta, it is likely that there will be regions in the Delta that will serve as nurseries and help the plant resurge during low-salinity seasons. This is likely aggravated as global warming reduces the persistence of continuous frost days that are capable of killing large populations of water

  15. Effect of SqVYV-resistant pollenizers on development and spread of watermelon vine decline in seedless watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon vine decline (WVD) caused by the whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) has been a major limiting factor in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) production in south Florida for the past several years. The disease causes sudden decline of the vines and affects the internal fru...

  16. Biomechanical conditions of walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y F; Luo, L P; Li, Z Y; Han, S Y; Lv, C S; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The development of rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury does not usually include gait pattern design. This paper introduced a gait pattern design by using equations (conditions of walking). Following the requirements of reducing force to the injured side to avoid further injury, we developed a lower limb gait pattern to shorten the stride length so as to reduce walking speed, to delay the stance phase of the uninjured side and to reduce step length of the uninjured side. This gait pattern was then verified by the practice of a rehabilitation training of an Achilles tendon rupture patient, whose two-year rehabilitation training (with 24 tests) has proven that this pattern worked as intended. This indicates that rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury can rest on biomechanical conditions of walking based on experimental evidence.

  17. Effect of Extension and Type of Composite-Restored Class II Cavities on Biomechanical Properties of Teeth: A Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Valian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversy exists regarding cavity preparation for restoration of interproximal caries in posterior teeth in terms of preserving the tooth structure and suitable stress distribution. This study aimed to assess the effect of extension and type of class II cavities and the remaining tooth structure in maxillary premolars restored with composite resin on the biomechanical properties of teeth using finite element method (FEM.Using FEM, eight three-dimensional (3D models of class II cavities in maxillary premolars with variable mesiodistal (MD dimensions, variable thickness of the residual wall in-between the mesial and distal cavities and different locations of the wall were designed. Other dimensions were the same in all models. Cavities were restored with composite resin. A load equal to the masticatory force (200N was applied to the teeth. Finite element analysis (FEA was used to calculate the von Mises stress.Stress in the enamel margin increased by increasing the MD dimensions of the cavities. Deviation of the residual wall between the mesial and distal cavities from the tooth center was found to be an important factor in increasing stress concentration in the enamel. Increasing the MD dimensions of the cavity did not cause any increase in stress concentration in dentin.Increasing the MD dimensions of the cavities, decreasing the thickness of the residual wall between the mesial and distal cavities and its deviation from the tooth center can increase stress concentration in the enamel but not in dentin.

  18. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  19. Biomechanics: basic and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume presents the state of the art in biomechanics. The most recent achievements of biomechanical research in the fields of orthopaedics, dynamics of the musculoskeletal system, hard and soft tissues, rehabilitation, sports, cardiovascular problems and research methodology have been selected and edited by a distinguished panel of reviewers. The material is such that the volume will serve as a reference for many years for bioengineers, sports scientists, clinicians and clinical researchers in rehabilitation, orthopaedics and cardiovascular surgery

  20. Atraumatic extractions: a biomechanical rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Carl E; Perez, Helena M

    2008-08-01

    Biomechanical aspects of force have been applied to tooth extraction for centuries. However, the mechanical advantages available to extract the teeth were primarily applied to hold the crown of the tooth, rather than help extract it. An extraction device (Physics Forceps) has been developed to apply a biomechanical rationale to the extraction process of a tooth using a class 1 lever, creep, and shear components of force. PMID:18717405

  1. Biomechanics aspects of technique of high jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adashevskiy V.M.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of work consists in the theoretical ground of optimum biomechanics descriptions in high jumps. A mathematical model is developed for determination of influence on the height of jump: speed and corner of flight of centre-of-mass during pushing away, positions of centre-of-mass body of sportsman in the phases of pushing away and transition through a slat, forces of resistance of air environment, influences of moment of inertia of body. The basic technical run-time errors of sportsman are selected exercises. To biomechanics descriptions, to the step-up effectiveness of high jumps belong: speed of flight of centre-of-mass sportsman (4.2-5.8 meters in a second, corner of flight of centre-of-mass body (50-58 degrees, height of flight of centre-of-mass body (0.85-1.15 meter. Directions of choice of necessary biomechanics descriptions which a sportsman can realize are shown. Offered recommendation on the increase of effectiveness of high jumps.

  2. 肌球蛋白在生物力学效应中的调控作用%The Accommodative Function of Myosin on Cell Biomechanics Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡鸣(综述); 洪莉(审校)

    2015-01-01

    细胞骨架是细胞内机械力传递链的一个组分,肌球蛋白作为细胞骨架的主要组成蛋白,对细胞受到外界力作用时产生的效应具有一定的调控作用,当细胞内的肌球蛋白的表达、结构以及活性发生改变时,细胞的力学效能也会发生相应的改变,从而影响细胞的功能以及组织结构的改变。肌球蛋白轻链的磷酸化、重链各亚型间的转化以及Rho GTP酶信号通路在对细胞生物力学效应的调控中起着一定的作用。%Cytoskeleton is a component of mechanical force transmission chain .As the main protein in forming cytoskeleton in cells, myosin plays a role in regulating the effect produced by cells when they are forced by the external force.When the expression, structure and activity of myosin changes, mechanical effi-ciency of cells will have a corresponding change, thus affecting the cell function and organizational structure. Phosphorylated myosin light chain, transformation of subtypes in myosin heavy chain , and Rho GTPases sig-naling pathway play an important role in the regulation of cellular biological effects .In this article, we try to express the advanced research in myosin′s impact on cell biomechanics effect.In addition, we also discuss the generation mechanism of such effects.

  3. Energetics, Biomechanics, and Performance in Masters' Swimmers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria I; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Neiva, Henrique P; Marinho, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Ferreira, MI, Barbosa, TM, Costa, MJ, Neiva, HP, and Marinho, DA. Energetics, biomechanics, and performance in masters' swimmers: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2069-2081, 2016-This study aimed to summarize evidence on masters' swimmers energetics, biomechanics, and performance gathered in selected studies. An expanded search was conducted on 6 databases, conference proceedings, and department files. Fifteen studies were selected for further analysis. A qualitative evaluation of the studies based on the Quality Index (QI) was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The studies were thereafter classified into 3 domains according to the reported data: performance (10 studies), energetics (4 studies), and biomechanics (6 studies). The selected 15 articles included in this review presented low QI scores (mean score, 10.47 points). The biomechanics domain obtained higher QI (11.5 points), followed by energetics and performance (10.6 and 9.9 points, respectively). Stroke frequency (SF) and stroke length (SL) were both influenced by aging, although SF is more affected than SL. Propelling efficiency (ηp) decreased with age. Swimming performance declined with age. The performance declines with age having male swimmers deliver better performances than female counterparts, although this difference tends to be narrow in long-distance events. One single longitudinal study is found in the literature reporting the changes in performance over time. The remaining studies are cross-sectional designs focusing on the energetics and biomechanics. Overall, biomechanics parameters, such as SF, SL, and ηp, tend to decrease with age. This review shows the lack of a solid body of knowledge (reflected in the amount and quality of the articles published) on the changes in biomechanics, energetics, and performance of master swimmers over time. The training programs for this age-group should aim to preserve the energetics as much as possible and, concurrently, improve the

  4. Differential effects of IGF-1 deficiency during the life span on structural and biomechanical properties in the tibia of aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Herron, Jacquelyn C; Estep, Patrick N; Logan, Sreemathi; Hodges, Erik L; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Sonntag, William E

    2016-04-01

    Advanced aging is associated with the loss of structural and biomechanical properties in bones, which increases the risk for bone fracture. Aging is also associated with reductions in circulating levels of the anabolic signaling hormone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1. While the role of IGF-1 in bone development has been well characterized, the impact of the age-related loss of IGF-1 on bone aging remains controversial. Here, we describe the effects of reducing IGF-1 at multiple time points in the mouse life span--early in postnatal development, early adulthood, or late adulthood on tibia bone aging in both male and female igf (f/f) mice. Bone structure was analyzed at 27 months of age using microCT. We find that age-related reductions in cortical bone fraction, cortical thickness, and tissue mineral density were more pronounced when IGF-1 was reduced early in life and not in late adulthood. Three-point bone bending assays revealed that IGF-1 deficiency early in life resulted in reduced maximum force, maximum bending moment, and bone stiffness in aged males and females. The effects of IGF-1 on bone aging are microenvironment specific, as early-life loss of IGF-1 resulted in decreased cortical bone structure and strength along the diaphysis while significantly increasing trabecular bone fraction and trabecular number at the proximal metaphysis. The increases in trabecular bone were limited to males, as early-life loss of IGF-1 did not alter bone fraction or number in females. Together, our data suggest that the age-related loss of IGF-1 influences tibia bone aging in a sex-specific, microenvironment-specific, and time-dependent manner. PMID:26968399

  5. A biomechanical characterisation of acellular porcine super flexor tendons for use in anterior cruciate ligament replacement: investigation into the effects of fat reduction and bioburden reduction bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Anthony; Jones, Gemma L; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    The decellularisation of xenogenic and allogeneic biological grafts offers a promising solution to replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The purpose of this investigation was to determine the biomechanical effects of additional fat reduction and bioburden reduction steps in the decellularisation of porcine super flexor tendon (pSFT). Study 1 investigated the use of acetone or chloroform-methanol as a fat reduction agent. The most effective of these was then carried forward into Study 2, which investigated the use of antibiotics or peracetic acid (PAA) as a bioburden reduction agent. Stress relaxation data was analysed using a Maxwell-Wiechert viscoelastic model and, in addition to classical material properties, the tangent modulus of the toe-region was determined from strength testing data. In both studies, the majority of decellularised groups demonstrated no statistical differences for material properties such as tensile strength and Young's modulus compared to native controls. Different trends were observed for many of the viscoelastic parameters, but also for the tangent modulus in the toe-region indicating a change in performance at low strains. The most severe deviations from the profile of the native tangent modulus were found to occur in Study 2 when PAA was used for bioburden reduction. Classic material properties (E, UTS etc.) are often used to compare the characteristics of native and decellularised tissues, however they may not highlight changes occurring in the tissues at low strains. In this study, this represented the physiological strains encountered by substitute acellular ACL grafts. Acetone was chosen as the fat reduction step whereas, antibiotics was preferable over PAA as a bioburden reduction step. PMID:25443884

  6. Judo Biomechanical Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Sacripanti, Attilio

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time, there is comprehensively tackling the problem of biomechanical optimization of a sport of situation such as judo. Starting from the optimization of more simple sports, optimization of this kind of complex sports is grounded on a general physics tool such as the analysis of variation. The objective function is divided for static and dynamic situation of Athletes couple, and it is proposed also a sort of dynamic programming problem Strategic Optimization. A dynamic programming problem is an optimization problem in which decisions have to be taken sequentially over several time periods linked in some fashion. A strategy for a dynamic programming problem is just a contingency plan, a plan that specifies what is to be done at each stage as a function of all that has transpired up to that point. It is possible to demonstrate, under some conditions, that a Markovian optimal strategy is an optimal strategy for the dynamic programming problem under examination. At last we try to appr...

  7. [Hoarseness: biomechanisms and quantitative laryngoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysholdt, U

    2014-07-01

    Every phonosurgical procedure alters endolaryngeal anatomy; be it by removing tissue, or injection or implantation of autologous or foreign material. However, the effect that an altered airflow cross section and changed soft tissue elasticity will have on the voice cannot be predicted. With the aim of promoting rational indications for phonosurgery, the current article explains the biomechanisms of the normal and the disordered voice, including the complex interdependence of tissue viscoelasticity, glottal airstream and sound production. According to European Laryngological Society (ELS) recommendations, five - not entirely mutually independent - evaluation criteria form the basis of indication assessments: self-rating (by the patient), proxy rating (by the physician), technical signal analysis (computerized), aerodynamics (spirometry) and vibration analysis (stroboscopy). The ELS evaluation standards agreed upon in 2001 enable indications and - by virtue of pre- and postoperative comparisons - therapeutic successes to be assessed. The 10-year-old ELS protocol has been updated by a real-time method for visualizing vocal fold vibrations: the phonovibrogram (PVG) has replaced stroboscopy. Independently of the morphological anatomic details of the larynx, PVG visualizes the symmetry and regularity of vocal fold motion, thus allowing preoperative estimation of tissue elasticity. PMID:25056650

  8. Effect of pharmacotherapy on rate of decline of lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results from the TORCH study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celli, Bartolomé R; Thomas, Nicola E; Anderson, Julie A;

    2008-01-01

    of combined salmeterol 50 microg plus fluticasone propionate 500 microg, either component alone or placebo, on the rate of post-bronchodilator FEV(1) decline in patients with moderate or severe COPD. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted from September 2000 to November...... 2005 in 42 countries. Of 6,112 patients from the efficacy population, 5,343 were included in this analysis. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Spirometry was measured every 24 weeks for 3 years. There were 26,539 on-treatment observations. The adjusted rate of decline in FEV(1) was 55 ml/year for placebo......, 42 ml/year for salmeterol, 42 ml/year for fluticasone propionate, and 39 ml/year for salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate. Salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate reduced the rate of FEV(1) decline by 16 ml/year compared with placebo (95% confidence interval [CI], 7-25; P

  9. Kinesiology/Biomechanics: Perspectives and Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Anne E.

    1980-01-01

    Past and recent developments and future directions in kinesiology and biomechanics are reviewed. Similarities and differences between these two areas are clarified. The areas of kinesiology and biomechanics have distinct unique qualities and should be treated as separate disciplines. (CJ)

  10. Biomechanics of bird flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W

    2007-09-01

    Power output is a unifying theme for bird flight and considerable progress has been accomplished recently in measuring muscular, metabolic and aerodynamic power in birds. The primary flight muscles of birds, the pectoralis and supracoracoideus, are designed for work and power output, with large stress (force per unit cross-sectional area) and strain (relative length change) per contraction. U-shaped curves describe how mechanical power output varies with flight speed, but the specific shapes and characteristic speeds of these curves differ according to morphology and flight style. New measures of induced, profile and parasite power should help to update existing mathematical models of flight. In turn, these improved models may serve to test behavioral and ecological processes. Unlike terrestrial locomotion that is generally characterized by discrete gaits, changes in wing kinematics and aerodynamics across flight speeds are gradual. Take-off flight performance scales with body size, but fully revealing the mechanisms responsible for this pattern awaits new study. Intermittent flight appears to reduce the power cost for flight, as some species flap-glide at slow speeds and flap-bound at fast speeds. It is vital to test the metabolic costs of intermittent flight to understand why some birds use intermittent bounds during slow flight. Maneuvering and stability are critical for flying birds, and design for maneuvering may impinge upon other aspects of flight performance. The tail contributes to lift and drag; it is also integral to maneuvering and stability. Recent studies have revealed that maneuvers are typically initiated during downstroke and involve bilateral asymmetry of force production in the pectoralis. Future study of maneuvering and stability should measure inertial and aerodynamic forces. It is critical for continued progress into the biomechanics of bird flight that experimental designs are developed in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:17766290

  11. Problems of Sport Biomechanics and Robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Erdmann, Wlodzimierz S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents many common areas of interest of different specialists. There are problems described from sport, biomechanics, sport biomechanics, sport engineering, robotics, biomechanics and robotics, sport biomechanics and robotics. There are many approaches to sport from different sciences and engineering. Robotics is a relatively new area and has had moderate attention from sport specialists. The aim of this paper is to present several areas necessary to develop sport robots based on...

  12. Interactive effects of nutrition, environment, and rat-strain on cortical and vertebral bone geometry and biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernicke, R. F.; Li, K.-C.; Salem, G. J.; Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to generate comparative data on the sensitivity of cortical- and vertebral-bone adaptations in two different rat strains maintained at conditions typical for spaceborne experiments conducted by U.S.A. and USSR. The effects of cage environment, diet, and rat-strain on the cortical (humerus) and vertebral (T7) bones of male Taconic-Sprague-Dawley and Czechoslovakian-Wistar rats were investigated using different flight-simulation cages (one rat/cage for U.S.A.; ten rats/cage for USSR conditions) and fed either U.S.A. or USSR diet. The results showed significant effects of these factors on the humeral and vertebral geometry and mechanical properties, as well as significant interactive effects on the mechanical properties of the humerus.

  13. Individual differences in the biomechanical effect of loudness and tempo on upper-limb movements during repetitive piano keystrokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Shinichi; Aoki, Tomoko; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    The present study addressed the effect of loudness and tempo on kinematics and muscular activities of the upper extremity during repetitive piano keystrokes. Eighteen pianists with professional music education struck two keys simultaneously and repetitively with a combination of four loudness levels and four tempi. The results demonstrated a significant interaction effect of loudness and tempo on peak angular velocity for the shoulder, elbow, wrist and finger joints, mean muscular activity for the corresponding flexors and extensors, and their co-activation level. The interaction effect indicated greater increases with tempo when eliciting louder tones for all joints and muscles except for the elbow velocity showing a greater decrease with tempo. Multiple-regression analysis and K-means clustering further revealed that 18 pianists were categorized into three clusters with different interaction effects on joint kinematics. These clusters were characterized by either an elbow-velocity decrease and a finger-velocity increase, a finger-velocity decrease with increases in shoulder and wrist velocities, or a large elbow-velocity decrease with a shoulder-velocity increase when increasing both loudness and tempo. Furthermore, the muscular load considerably differed across the clusters. These findings provide information to determine muscles with the greatest potential risk of playing-related disorders based on movement characteristics of individual pianists. PMID:21816497

  14. Pulse Pressure Is Associated With Early Brain Atrophy and Cognitive Decline: Modifying Effects of APOE-ε4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, Daniel A; Preis, Sarah R; Beiser, Alexa; Bangen, Katherine J; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Lamar, Melissa; Libon, David J; Seshadri, Sudha; Wolf, Philip A; Au, Rhoda

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether midlife pulse pressure is associated with brain atrophy and cognitive decline, and whether the association was modified by apolipoprotein-E ε4 (APOE-ε4) and hypertension. Participants (549 stroke-free and dementia-free Framingham Offspring Cohort Study participants, age range=55.0 to 64.9 y) underwent baseline neuropsychological and magnetic resonance imaging (subset, n=454) evaluations with 5- to 7-year follow-up. Regression analyses investigated associations between baseline pulse pressure (systolic-diastolic pressure) and cognition, total cerebral volume and temporal horn ventricular volume (as an index of smaller hippocampal volume) at follow-up, and longitudinal change in these measures. Interactions with APOE-ε4 and hypertension were assessed. Covariates included age, sex, education, assessment interval, and interim stroke. In the total sample, baseline pulse pressure was associated with worse executive ability, lower total cerebral volume, and greater temporal horn ventricular volume 5 to 7 years later, and longitudinal decline in executive ability and increase in temporal horn ventricular volume. Among APOE-ε4 carriers only, baseline pulse pressure was associated with longitudinal decline in visuospatial organization. Findings indicate arterial stiffening, indexed by pulse pressure, may play a role in early cognitive decline and brain atrophy in mid to late life, particularly among APOE-ε4 carriers. PMID:27556935

  15. Addressing the Declining Productivity of Higher Education Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education productivity, as measured by academic degrees granted by American colleges and universities, is declining. Since the early 1990s, real expenditures on higher education have grown by more than 25 percent, now amounting to 2.9 percent of US gross domestic product (GDP)--greater than the percentage of GDP spent on higher education in…

  16. Declining caries trends: are we satisfied?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. Lagerweij; C. van Loveren

    2015-01-01

    WHO data suggest that all over the world the prevalence of caries has declined at the end of the previous and in the first decade of the present century. This decline started wherever the use of effective fluoride toothpaste became commonplace. Even though the decline is considerable with a 90 % red

  17. Foraging Habitat Quality Constrains Effectiveness of Artificial Nest-Site Provisioning in Reversing Population Declines in a Colonial Cavity Nester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catry, Inês; Franco, Aldina M. A.; Rocha, Pedro; Alcazar, Rita; Reis, Susana; Cordeiro, Ana; Ventim, Rita; Teodósio, Joaquim; Moreira, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Among birds, breeding numbers are mainly limited by two resources of major importance: food supply and nest-site availability. Here, we investigated how differences in land-use and nest-site availability affected the foraging behaviour, breeding success and population trends of the colonial cavity-dependent lesser kestrel Falco naumanni inhabiting two protected areas. Both areas were provided with artificial nests to increase nest-site availability. The first area is a pseudo-steppe characterized by traditional extensive cereal cultivation, whereas the second area is a previous agricultural zone now abandoned or replaced by forested areas. In both areas, lesser kestrels selected extensive agricultural habitats, such as fallows and cereal fields, and avoided scrubland and forests. In the second area, tracked birds from one colony travelled significantly farther distances (6.2 km ±1.7 vs. 1.8 km ±0.4 and 1.9 km ±0.6) and had significant larger foraging-ranges (144 km2 vs. 18.8 and 14.8 km2) when compared to the birds of two colonies in the extensive agricultural area. Longer foraging trips were reflected in lower chick feeding rates, lower fledging success and reduced chick fitness. Availability and occupation of artificial nests was high in both areas but population followed opposite trends, with a positive increment recorded exclusively in the first area with a large proportion of agricultural areas. Progressive habitat loss around the studied colony in the second area (suitable habitat decreased from 32% in 1990 to only 7% in 2002) is likely the main driver of the recorded population decline and suggests that the effectiveness of bird species conservation based on nest-site provisioning is highly constrained by habitat quality in the surrounding areas. Therefore, the conservation of cavity-dependent species may be enhanced firstly by finding the best areas of remaining habitat and secondly by increasing the carrying capacity of high-quality habitat areas

  18. Effects of illegal harvest of eggs on the population decline of leatherback turtles in Las Baulas Marine National Park, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomillo, Pilar Santidrián; Saba, Vincent S; Piedra, Rotney; Paladino, Frank V; Spotila, James R

    2008-10-01

    Within 19 years the nesting population of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) at Parque Nacional Marino Las Baulas declined from 1500 turtles nesting per year to about 100. We analyzed the effects of fishery bycatch and illegal harvesting (poaching) of eggs on this population. We modeled the population response to different levels of egg harvest (90, 75, 50, and 25%) and the effect of eradicating poaching at different times during the population decline. We compared effects of 90% poaching with those of 20% adult mortality because both of these processes were present in the population at Las Baulas. There was a stepwise decline in number of nesting turtles at all levels of egg harvest. Extirpation times for different levels of poaching ranged from 45 to 282 years. The nesting population declined more slowly and survived longer with 20% adult mortality (146 years) than it did with 90% poaching (45 years). Time that elapsed until poaching stopped determined the average population size at which the population stabilized, ranging from 90 to 420 nesting turtles. Our model predicted that saving clutches lost naturally would restore the population when adult mortality rates were low and would contribute more to population recovery when there were short remigration intervals between nesting seasons and a large proportion of natural loss of clutches. Because the model indicated that poaching was the most important cause of the leatherback decline at Las Baulas, protecting nests on the beach and protecting the beach from development are critical for survival of this population. Nevertheless, the model predicted that current high mortality rates of adults will prevent population recovery. Therefore, protection of the beach habitat and nests must be continued and fishery bycatch must be reduced to save this population. PMID:18637915

  19. Who fears and who welcomes population decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P. Van Dalen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available European countries are experiencing population decline and the tacit assumption in most analyses is that the decline may have detrimental welfare effects. In this paper we use a survey among the population in the Netherlands to discover whether population decline is always met with fear. A number of results stand out: population size preferences differ by geographic proximity: at a global level the majority of respondents favors a (global population decline, but closer to home one supports a stationary population. Population decline is clearly not always met with fear: 31 percent would like the population to decline at the national level and they generally perceive decline to be accompanied by immaterial welfare gains (improvement environment as well as material welfare losses (tax increases, economic stagnation. In addition to these driving forces it appears that the attitude towards immigrants is a very strong determinant at all geographical levels: immigrants seem to be a stronger fear factor than population decline.

  20. Distributed Data Acquisition For Biomechanics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, J.; Geisler, M.; Prieto, T.; Weiss, R.

    1987-01-01

    Biomechanics research at the Medical College of Wisconsin is directed to the determination of the mechanisms of head and spine injury and the evaluation of surgical treatments for these injuries. This work involves mechanical testing of components of the spine (disks, vertebral bodies, and ligaments) as well as testing of composite spines and in situ evaluation of intact human cadavers (1,3). Other studies utilize experimental animals to measure neurologic and physiologic effects due to injury producing loads and accelerations (2). An integrated system has been developed to facilitate the acquisition and analysis of the diverse types of data from these experiments.

  1. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  2. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lung Tai

    Full Text Available Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p 0.05. Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength.

  3. Effect of posterior decompression extent on biomechanical parameters of the spinal cord in cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of the cervical myelopathy due to compression of the spinal cord. Patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament usually require the decompression surgery, and there is a need to better understand the optimal surgical extent with which sufficient decompression without excessive posterior shifting can be achieved. However, few quantitative studies have clarified this optimal extent for decompression of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. We used finite element modeling of the cervical spine and spinal cord to investigate the effect of posterior decompression extent for continuous-type cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament on changes in stress, strain, and posterior shifting that occur with three different surgical methods (laminectomy, laminoplasty, and hemilaminectomy). As posterior decompression extended, stress and strain in the spinal cord decreased and posterior shifting of the cord increased. The location of the decompression extent also influenced shifting. Laminectomy and laminoplasty were very similar in terms of decompression results, and both were superior to hemilaminectomy in all parameters tested. Decompression to the extents of C3-C6 and C3-C7 of laminectomy and laminoplasty could be considered sufficient with respect to decompression itself. Our findings provide fundamental information regarding the treatment of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and can be applied to patient-specific surgical planning. PMID:26951839

  4. Morphological and biomechanical disparity of crocodile-line archosaurs following the end-Triassic extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Thomas L; Pierce, Stephanie E; Rayfield, Emily J; Anderson, Philip S L

    2013-11-01

    Mesozoic crurotarsans exhibited diverse morphologies and feeding modes, representing considerable ecological diversity, yet macroevolutionary patterns remain unexplored. Here, we use a unique combination of morphological and biomechanical disparity metrics to quantify the ecological diversity and trophic radiations of Mesozoic crurotarsans, using the mandible as a morpho-functional proxy. We recover three major trends. First, the diverse assemblage of Late Triassic crurotarsans was morphologically and biomechanically disparate, implying high levels of ecological variation; but, following the end-Triassic extinction, disparity declined. Second, the Jurassic radiation of marine thalattosuchians resulted in very low morphological disparity but moderate variation in jaw biomechanics, highlighting a hydrodynamic constraint on mandibular form. Third, during the Cretaceous terrestrial radiations of neosuchians and notosuchians, mandibular morphological variation increased considerably. By the Late Cretaceous, crocodylomorphs evolved a range of morphologies equalling Late Triassic crurotarsans. By contrast, biomechanical disparity in the Cretaceous did not increase, essentially decoupling from morphology. This enigmatic result could be attributed to biomechanical evolution in other anatomical regions (e.g. cranium, dentition or postcranium), possibly releasing the mandible from selective pressures. Overall, our analyses reveal a complex relationship between morphological and biomechanical disparity in Mesozoic crurotarsans that culminated in specialized feeding ecologies and associated lifestyles. PMID:24026826

  5. Biomechanical risk factors of non-contact ACL injuries:A stochastic biomechanical modeling study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Feng; Lin; Hui; Liu; Michael; T.Gros; Paul; Weinhold; William; E.Garrett; Bing; Yu

    2012-01-01

    <正>Background:Significant efforts have been made to identify modifiable risk factors of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) injuries in male and female athletes.However,current literature on the risk factors for ACL injury are purely descriptive.An understanding of biomechanical relationship between risk and risk factors of the non-contact ACL injury is necessary to develop effective prevention programs. Purpose:To compare lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between trials with and without non-contact ACL injuries and to determine if any difference exists between male and female trials with non-contact ACL injuries regarding the lower extremity motion patterns. Methods:In this computer simulation study,a stochastic biomechanical model was used to estimate the ACL loading at the time of peak posterior ground reaction force(GRF) during landing of the stop-jump task.Monte Carlo simulations were performed to simulate the ACL injuries with repeated random samples of independent variables.The distributions of independent variables were determined from in vivo laboratory data of 40 male and 40 female recreational athletes. Results:In the simulated injured trials,both male and female athletes had significantly smaller knee flexion angles,greater normalized peak posterior and vertical GRF.greater knee valgus moment,greater patella tendon force,greater quadriceps force,greater knee extension moment. and greater proximal tibia anterior shear force in comparison to the simulated uninjured trials.No significant difference was found between genders in any of the selected biomechanical variables in the trials with simulated non-contact ACL injuries. Conclusion:Small knee flexion angle,large posterior GRF.and large knee valgus moment are risk factors of non-contact ACL injury determined by a stochastic biomechanical model with a cause-and-effect relationship.

  6. Effect of dominant ground vegetation on soil organic matter quality in a declining mountain spruce forest of central Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonifacio, E.; Santoni, S.; Zanini, E. (Universita degli Studi di Torino (Italy)); Cudlin, P. (Inst. of Systems Biology and Ecology, Czech Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic))

    2008-07-01

    Grasses and shrubs constitute a high proportion of the total biomass in declining forest stands and may deeply affect soil organic matter. We fractionated the organic matter of 45 Oa horizons from the Krkonose Mts. into humic and fulvic acids (HA and FA) and related the differences to the dominant ground vegetation Vaccinium myrtillus, Deschampsia flexuosa and Molinia caerulea. Organic C was higher under M. caerulea than under Vaccinium myrtillus, but the humification rate was similar at all sites. A higher proportion of HA was found under M. caerulea, indicating that differences in species lead to variations in the quality of humic substances, but not in the quantitative aspects of the humification process. Regarding the importance of HA and FA in soil development, the findings suggest that, upon forest decline, major changes may be expected not only in the O horizons, but also in the whole soil profile. (orig.)

  7. Effect of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on biomechanical features of knee in level walking: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Dong-liang; WANG Yu-bin; AI Zi-sheng

    2010-01-01

    Background The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most commonly injured knee ligaments. Even following ACL reconstruction, significant articular cartilage degeneration can be observed and most patients suffer from premature osteoarthritis. Articular cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis development after ACL injury are regarded as progressive process that are affected by cyclic loading during frequently performed low-intensity daily activities. The purpose of this study was to perform a meta analysis on studies assessing the effects of ACL reconstruction on kinematics, kinetics and proprioception of knee during level walking.Methods This meta analysis was conducted according to the methodological guidelines outlined by the Cochrane Collaboration. An electronic search of the literature was performed and all trials published between January 1966 and July 2010 comparing gait and proprioception of a reconstructed-ACL group with an intact-ACL group were pooled for this review. Thirteen studies were included in the final meta analysis.Results There was no significant difference in step length, walking speed, maximum knee flexion angle during loading response, joint position sense and threshold to detect passive motion between the reconstructed-ACL group and the intact-ACL group (P >0.05). However, there was a significant difference in peak knee flexion angle, maximum angular knee flexion excursion during stance, peak knee flexion moment during walking and maximum external tibial rotation angle throughout the gait cycle between the reconstructed-ACL group and the intact-ACL group (P <0.05).Conclusions Step length, walking speed, maximum knee flexion angle during loading response, joint position sense and threshold to detect passive motion usually observed with ACL deficiency were restored after the ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation, but no significant improvements were observed for peak knee flexion angle, maximum angular knee flexion excursion

  8. Gender bias in China, the Republic of Korea, and India 1920-90 - effects of war, famine, and fertility decline

    OpenAIRE

    Das Gupta, Monica; Li Shuzhuo

    1999-01-01

    Kinship systems in China, the Republic of Korea, and North India have similar features that generate discrimination against girls, and these countries have some of the highest proportions of girls"missing"in the world. The authors document how the excess mortality of girls was increased by war, famine, and fertility decline - all of which constrained household resources - between 1920 and 1990. Of the three countries, China experienced the most crises during this period (with civil war, invas...

  9. Clinical applications of biomechanics cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, A S

    1986-10-01

    Biomechanics cinematography is the analysis of movement of living organisms through the use of cameras, image projection systems, electronic digitizers, and computers. This article is a comparison of cinematographic systems and details practical uses of the modality in research and education. PMID:2946390

  10. Biomechanics of Kuzushi-Tsukuri and Interaction in Competition

    CERN Document Server

    Sacripanti, Attilio

    2010-01-01

    In this paper it is performed the comparative biomechanical analysis of the Kuzushi (Unbalance) -Tsukuri (the entry and proper fitting of Tori's body into the position taken just before throwing) phases of Judo Throwing techniques. The whole effective movement is without separation, as already stated by old Japanese biomechanical studies (1972 -1978), only one skilled connected action, but the biomechanical analysis is able to separate the whole in didactic steps called Action Invariants. The first important finding singled out is the existence of two classes of Action Invariants the first the General one' connected to the whole body motion is specific of shortening distance in the Kuzushi Tsukuri Phase. The second one, the Specific Action Invariants is connected to the superior and inferior kinetic chains motion and right positioning connected both to Kuzushi and Tsukuri phases. Some interesting findings derive from this analysis: among throwing techniques, couple techniques could be independent from Kuzushi...

  11. Biomechanical analysis technique choreographic movements (for example, "grand battman jete"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batieieva N.P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : biomechanical analysis of the execution of choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Material : the study involved students (n = 7 of the department of classical choreography faculty of choreography. Results : biomechanical analysis of choreographic movement "grand battman jete" (classic exercise, obtained kinematic characteristics (path, velocity, acceleration, force of the center of mass (CM bio parts of the body artist (foot, shin, thigh. Built bio kinematic model (phase. The energy characteristics - mechanical work and kinetic energy units legs when performing choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Conclusions : It was found that the ability of an athlete and coach-choreographer analyze the biomechanics of movement has a positive effect on the improvement of choreographic training of qualified athletes in gymnastics (sport, art, figure skating and dance sports.

  12. Biomechanical ToolKit: Open-source framework to visualize and process biomechanical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Arnaud; Armand, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    C3D file format is widely used in the biomechanical field by companies and laboratories to store motion capture systems data. However, few software packages can visualize and modify the integrality of the data in the C3D file. Our objective was to develop an open-source and multi-platform framework to read, write, modify and visualize data from any motion analysis systems using standard (C3D) and proprietary file formats (used by many companies producing motion capture systems). The Biomechanical ToolKit (BTK) was developed to provide cost-effective and efficient tools for the biomechanical community to easily deal with motion analysis data. A large panel of operations is available to read, modify and process data through C++ API, bindings for high-level languages (Matlab, Octave, and Python), and standalone application (Mokka). All these tools are open-source and cross-platform and run on all major operating systems (Windows, Linux, MacOS X). PMID:24548899

  13. Reversing insect pollinator decline

    OpenAIRE

    Potts, Simon; Wentworth, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Pollination by insects enables the reproduction of flowering plants and is critical to UK agriculture.1 Insect pollinators have declined globally, with implications for food security and wild habitats. This POSTnote summarises the causes for the recent trends, gaps in knowledge and possible strategies for reversing pollinator decline.

  14. Watermelon Vine Declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of diseases have been identified that cause the wilt, collapse and general decline of watermelon plants. These diseases occur in watermelon growing areas around the world and are generically referred to as vine declines. In the 1990’s, Monosporascus root rot was identified as a disease of...

  15. Changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics with a heat-mouldable semi-custom foot orthotic device

    OpenAIRE

    Ferber Reed; Benson Brittany

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Semi-custom foot orthoses (SCO) are thought to be a cost-effective alternative to custom-made devices. However, previous biomechanical research involving either custom or SCO has only focused on rearfoot biomechanics. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics during shod walking with and without an SCO. We chose to investigate an SCO device that incorporates a heat-moulding process, to further understand if the moulding...

  16. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  17. Effects of strontium malonate (NB S101) on the compositional, structural and biomechanical properties of calcified tissues in rats and dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Anders Christer

    were examined for treatment-related changes in concentrations of Sr, Ca, Mg and P using inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), and the biomechanical properties of the bones were assessed using bending and...... of Ca and P was caused by the increased weight of HAp following adsorption and incorporation of Sr. It was found that respectively 70 – 72% of femur, 78% of rat incisor and 85% of dog molar was made up by HAp. The maximum strength of the dog femurs (three-point bending) was significantly reduced (19...

  18. Non-linear viscoelastic finite element analysis of the effect of the length of glass fiber posts on the biomechanical behaviour of directly restored incisors and surrounding alveolar bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Marco; Sorrentino, Roberto; Zarone, Fernando; Apicella, Davide; Aversa, Raffaella; Apicella, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    The study aimed at estimating the effect of insertion length of posts with composite restorations on stress and strain distributions in central incisors and surrounding bone. The typical, average geometries were generated in a FEA environment. Dentin was considered as an elastic orthotropic material, and periodontal ligament was coupled with nonlinear viscoelastic mechanical properties. The model was then validated with experimental data on displacement of incisors from published literature. Three post lengths were investigated in this study: root insertion of 5, 7, and 9 mm. For control, a sound incisor model was generated. Then, a tearing load of 50 N was applied to both sound tooth and simulation models. Post restorations did not seem to affect the strain distribution in bone when compared to the control. All simulated post restorations affected incisor biomechanics and reduced the root's deforming capability, while the composite crowns underwent a higher degree of deformation than the sound crown. No differences could be noticed in incisor stress and strain. As for the influence of post length, it was not shown to affect the biomechanics of restored teeth. PMID:18833761

  19. With Prudhoe Bay in decline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost every day, it seems, someone is mentioning Prudhoe Bay---its development activities, the direction of its oil production, and more recently its decline rate. Almost as frequently, someone is mentioning the number of companies abandoning exploration in Alaska. The state faces a double-edged dilemma: decline of its most important oil field and a diminished effort to find a replacement for the lost production. ARCO has seen the Prudhoe Bay decline coming for some time and has been planning for it. We have reduced staff, and ARCO and BP Exploration are finding cost-effective ways to work more closely together through such vehicles as shared services. At the same time, ARCO is continuing its high level of Alaskan exploration. This article will assess the future of Prudhoe Bay from a technical perspective, review ARCO's exploration plans for Alaska, and suggest what the state can do to encourage other companies to invest in this crucial producing region and exploratory frontier

  20. Mobility decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, C.J.; Siersma, V.; Mänty, Minna Regina;

    2014-01-01

    combined exposure to both factors additionally increased the risk, but there was no synergy effect between the two. Notably, fatigue predicted mobility decline at 3-year follow-up among those aged 80 years at baseline with a mean difference in number of mobility limitations from the joint reference...

  1. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef A.; Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias; Nnetu, David K.; Pawlizak, Steve; Wetzel, Franziska; Zink, Mareike

    2011-03-01

    With an increasing knowledge in tumor biology an overwhelming complexity becomes obvious which roots in the diversity of tumors and their heterogeneous molecular composition. Nevertheless in all solid tumors malignant neoplasia, i.e. uncontrolled growth, invasion of adjacent tissues, and metastasis, occurs. Physics sheds some new light on cancer by approaching this problem from a functional, materials perspective. Recent results indicate that all three pathomechanisms require changes in the active and passive cellular biomechanics. Malignant transformation causes cell softening for small deformations which correlates with an increased rate of proliferation and faster cell migration. The tumor cell's ability to strain harden permits tumor growth against a rigid tissue environment. A highly mechanosensitive, enhanced cell contractility is a prerequisite that tumor cells can cross its tumor boundaries and that this cells can migrate through the extracellular matrix. Insights into the biomechanical changes during tumor progression may lead to selective treatments by altering cell mechanics. Such drugs would not cure by killing cancer cells, but slow down tumor progression with only mild side effects and thus may be an option for older and frail patients.

  2. Biomechanical properties of acellular sciatic nerves treated with a modified chemical method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinlong Ma; Zhao Yang; Xiaolei Sun; Jianxiong Ma; Xiulan Li; Zhenzhen Yuan; Yang Zhang; Honggang Guo

    2011-01-01

    Nerve grafts are able to adapt to surrounding biomechanical environments if the nerve graft itself exhibits appropriate biomechanical properties (load, elastic modulus, etc.). The present study was designed to determine the differences in biomechanical properties between fresh and chemically acellularized sciatic nerve grafts. Two different chemical methods were used to establish acellular nerve grafts. The nerve was chemically extracted in the Sondell method with a combination of Triton X-100 (nonionic detergent) and sodium deoxycholate (anionic detergent), and in the modified method with a combination of Triton X-200 (anionic detergent), sulfobetaine-10 (SB-10, amphoteric detergents), and sulfobetaine-16 (SB-16, amphoteric detergents). Following acellularization, hematoxylin-eosin staining and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the effect of acellularization via the modified method was similar to the traditional Sondell method. However, effects of demyelination and nerve fiber tube integrity were superior to the traditional Sondell method. Biomechanical testing showed that peripheral nerve graft treated using the chemical method resulted in decreased biomechanical properties (ultimate load, ultimate stress, ultimate strain, and mechanical work to fracture) compared with fresh nerves, but the differences had no statistical significance (P > 0.05). These results demonstrated no significant effect on biomechanical properties of nerves treated using the chemical method. In conclusion, nerve grafts treated via the modified method removed Schwann cells, preserved neural structures, and ensured biomechanical properties of the nerve graft, which could be more appropriate for implantation studies.

  3. Sport and Exercise Biomechanics (Bios Instant Notes)

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Grimshaw; Adrian Lees; Neil Fowler; Adrian Burden

    2007-01-01

    DESCRIPTION Instant Notes on Sport and Exercise Biomechanics provides a broad overview of the fundamental concepts in exercise and sport biomechanics. PURPOSE The book aims to provide instant notes on essential information about biomechanics, and is designed to help undergraduate students to grasp the corresponding subjects in physical effort rapidly and easily. AUDIENCE The book provides a useful resource for undergraduate and graduate students as a fundamental reference book. For the resear...

  4. Unified Approach to the Biomechanics of Dental Implantology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenoble, D. E.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    The human need for safe and effective dental implants is well-recognized. Although many implant designs have been tested and are in use today, a large number have resulted in clinical failure. These failures appear to be due to biomechanical effects, as well as biocompatibility and surgical factors. A unified approach is proposed using multidisciplinary systems technology, for the study of the biomechanical interactions between dental implants and host tissues. The approach progresses from biomechanical modeling and analysis, supported by experimental investigations, through implant design development, clinical verification, and education of the dental practitioner. The result of the biomechanical modeling, analysis, and experimental phases would be the development of scientific design criteria for implants. Implant designs meeting these criteria would be generated, fabricated, and tested in animals. After design acceptance, these implants would be tested in humans, using efficient and safe surgical and restorative procedures. Finally, educational media and instructional courses would be developed for training dental practitioners in the use of the resulting implants.

  5. Effect of knee physiological anatomy environment on knee biomechanical properties%膝关节生理解剖环境对膝关节生物力学特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张美娟

    2012-01-01

    the biomechanics of the knee joint were selected, and for the articles in the same field, those published recently or in the authorized journals were selected. There were 163 articles after the initial survey. Then 25 articles related to biomechanics of the knee joint were selected to review.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The stability of the knee joint relies on the articular bone, and also depends on the constraints of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament, the balance of internal and external collateral ligament and extensor mechanism, as well as the power balance of quadriceps and hamstrings, especially depends on the balancing and stabilizing effect of the internal and external collateral ligament. It indicates that the anatomical environment of the knee joint determines the complexity of the knee joint in the biomechanical properties of loading, action and stability. Therefore, understanding the physiological structure and anatomical characteristics of the knee joint is of benefits to study the biomechanical characteristics of the knee joint, and that is important to study the pain, injury and tissue engineering of the knee joint.

  6. Effect of tiotropium on lung function decline in early-stage of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: propensity score-matched analysis of real-world data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ha Youn Lee,1,2 Sun Mi Choi,1,2 Jinwoo Lee,1,2 Young Sik Park,1,2 Chang-Hoon Lee,1,2 Deog Kyeom Kim,2,3 Sang-Min Lee,1,2 Ho Il Yoon,2,4 Jae-Joon Yim,1,2 Young Whan Kim,1,2 Sung Koo Han,1,2 Chul-Gyu Yoo1,2 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea Background: Tiotropium failed to slow the annual rate of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients with <70% predicted FEV1. However, the rate of FEV1 decline is known to be faster at early stages, which suggests that the effects of tiotropium may be more prominent in early-stage of COPD patients. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that tiotropium modifies the rate of FEV1 decline in COPD patients with an FEV1≥70%.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of COPD patients diagnosed between January 1, 2004, and July 31, 2012, at Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, and Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center. The inclusion criteria were as follows: age ≥40 years, postbronchodilator (BD FEV1≥70% of predicted and FEV1/FVC (forced vital capacity <0.70, and spirometry more than two times at certain times of the year. Conversely, the exclusion criteria were as follows: asthma, lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary resection, or long-term use of a short-acting muscarinic antagonist. The annual lung function decline in patients using tiotropium was compared with that in patients not

  7. Pathobiology of obesity and osteoarthritis: integrating biomechanics and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita I. Issa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing joints. Although the pathogenesis of obesity-associated osteoarthritis is not completely understood, recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory metabolic factors contribute to an increase in osteoarthritis risk. Adipose tissue, and in particular infrapatellar fat, is a local source of pro-inflammatory mediators that are increased with obesity and have been shown to increase cartilage degradation in cell and tissue culture models. One adipokine in particular, leptin, may be a critical mediator of obesity-associated osteoarthritis via synergistic actions with other inflammatory cytokines. Biomechanical factors may also increase the risk of osteoarthritis by activating cellular inflammation and promoting oxidative stress. However, some types of biomechanical stimulation, such as physiologic cyclic loading, inhibit inflammation and protect against cartilage degradation. A high percentage of obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis are sedentary, suggesting that a lack of physical activity may increase the susceptibility to inflammation. A more comprehensive approach to understanding how obesity alters daily biomechanical exposures within joint tissues may provide new insight into the protective and damaging effects of biomechanical factors on inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  8. LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS. A REVIEW OF BIOMECHANICAL STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴力扬; 徐印坎

    1998-01-01

    ObjectS. To investigate the biomechanical aspects of etiology, pathology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and surgical treatment of the lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods. A series of biomechanical methods, such as three-dimensional finite element models, threedimensional kinematic measurement, cadeveric evaluation, and imaging assessment was applied to correlate lumbar biomechanics and lumber spinal stenosls. Surgery of lumber spinal stenosis has been improved. Results.The stresses significantly concentrate on the posterolateral part of the annulus fibrcsms of disc, the posterior surface of vertebral body, the pedlcle, the interarticularis and the beet joints. This trend is intensified by disc degeneration and lumber backward extension. Posterior elcxnent resection has a definite effect upon the biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebrae. The improved operations proved satisfactory. Conclusion. Stress concentration in the lumber vertebrae is of importance to the etiology of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosls, and disc degeneratkm is the initial key of this process. Than these will be aggravatnd by backward extension. Functloval radiography and myelography are of assistance to the diagnosis of the lumhar spinal stenosls. For the surgcal treatment of the lumber spinal stenosis, destruction of the posterior element should be avoid as far as possible based upon the thorough decmnpression. Maintaining the lumbar spine in flexion by fusion after decorapression has been proved a useftd method. When developmental spinal stenoals is combined with disc herniation, discectoray through laminotomy is recommend for decompression.

  9. Decline in tropospheric NO2 and the effects of the 2008-09 economic crisis observed by OMI over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, F. F.

    2011-12-01

    We present a trend analysis of tropospheric NO2 for the time period of 2004-2010. Necessary for monitoring pollution abatement strategies, NO2 trends analyses are often based on surface networks, which suffer from high NO2 biases and spatial representativity issues inherent to the standard monitoring method (thermal reduction of NO2 followed by reaction with ozone and chemiluminescence). Space based NO2 trends are unbiased and self-consistent, but over Europe they have not been as obvious as those observed over North America and East Asia. In this work we exploit the daily NO2 column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in order to isolate long-term (timescales greater than one year) variability in NO2 over Europe without imposing a parametric fit to the data. In general, we find between 2005 and 2008, 1-5% per year declines in NO2 concentration in many polluted regions (e.g. Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Spain), but also 1-5% per year increases over the English Channel and the southern North Sea (a major shipping channel), as well as the United Kingdom, northern France and Eastern Europe. In 2009, NO2 almost exclusively decreased over Europe at a rate of 5-10% per year, coinciding with the abrupt decrease in industrial production and construction prompted by the global economic crisis. By 2010, in many areas the NO2 rate of change returned to pre-2009 levels suggesting economic recovery. We employ a simple fitting model to separate the forcing by meteorological variability, which can influence apparent NO2 trends, from that of NOx emissions. We calculate 1-3% per year NOx emissions reduction rates over most of Europe and an additional 15-30% per year decrease in NOx emissions during the economic crisis time period.

  10. Spatial and temporal variation in population dynamics of Andean frogs: Effects of forest disturbance and evidence for declines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M. Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity loss is a global phenomenon that can result in the collapse of food webs and critical ecosystem services. Amphibian population decline over the last century is a notable case of species loss because amphibians survived the last four major extinction events in global history, their current rate of extinction is unprecedented, and their rate of extinction is greater than that for most other taxonomic groups. Despite the severity of this conservation problem and its relevance to the study of global biodiversity loss, major knowledge gaps remain for many of the most threatened species and regions in the world. Rigorous estimates of population parameters are lacking for many amphibian species in the Neotropics. The goal of our study was to determine how the demography of seven species of the genus Pristimantis varied over time and space in two cloud forests in the Ecuadorian Andes. We completed a long term capture–mark–recapture study to estimate abundance, survival, and population growth rates in two cloud forests in the Ecuadorian Andes; from 2002 to 2009 at Yanayacu in the Eastern Cordillera and from 2002 to 2003 at Cashca Totoras in the Western Cordillera. Our results showed seasonal and annual variation in population parameters by species and sex. P. bicantus experienced significant reductions in abundance over the course of our study. Abundance, apparent survival, and population growth rates were lower in disturbed than in primary or mature secondary forest. The results of our study raise concerns for the population status of understudied amphibian groups and provide insights into the population dynamics of Neotropical amphibians.

  11. Biomechanical properties of four dermal substitutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-an; NING Fang-gang; ZHAO Nan-ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Many kinds of cell-free dermal substitutes have been developed during the past several years, however,their biomechanical properties, including hysteresis,stress relaxation, creep, and non-linear stress-strain, are still unknown. In this study, we tested these biomechanical characteristics of four dermal substitutes,and compared them with those of fresh human skin (FHS).

  12. Applied Biomechanics in an Instructional Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics is the science of how people move better, meaning more skillfully and more safely. This article places more emphasis on skill rather than safety, though there are many parallels between them. It shares a few features of the author's paradigm of applied biomechanics and discusses an integrated approach toward a middle school football…

  13. Biomechanics finds practical applications in aerospace research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanghe, X.

    1984-10-01

    Biomechanics is a branch of science which studies the mechanical properties of biological parts using the basic principles of mechanics and engineering. Formulas and quantitative calculations are used to analyze and understand physiological phenomena. Problems caused by weightlessness, coronary heart disease, blood circulation, use of medication, and application of biomechanics in aviation rescue are discussed.

  14. Mechatronic support of present robotics and biomechanics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ehrenberger, Zdeněk; Kratochvíl, Ctirad; Janíček, P.

    Brno: VUT, 2003 - (Ehrenberger, Z.; Houfek, L.; Kratochvíl, C.), s. 1-2 ISBN 80-21423-12-9. [Mechanotronic, Robotics and biomechanics 2003. Hrotovice (CZ), 24.03.2003-27.03.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : mechatronics * robotics * biomechanics Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics

  15. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  16. Age-related wayfinding differences in real large-scale environments: detrimental motor control effects during spatial learning are mediated by executive decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Taillade

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate motor control activity (active vs. passive condition with regards to wayfinding and spatial learning difficulties in large-scale spaces for older adults. We compared virtual reality (VR-based wayfinding and spatial memory (survey and route knowledge performances between 30 younger and 30 older adults. A significant effect of age was obtained on the wayfinding performances but not on the spatial memory performances. Specifically, the active condition deteriorated the survey measure in all of the participants and increased the age-related differences in the wayfinding performances. Importantly, the age-related differences in the wayfinding performances, after an active condition, were further mediated by the executive measures. All of the results relative to a detrimental effect of motor activity are discussed in terms of a dual task effect as well as executive decline associated with aging.

  17. Is America in Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Rather than decline, the issues are increased equality among industrialized nations, increased U.S. social inequality, and social implications of the new economy. The best way to tackle growing social inequality is by reshaping education to give workers the skills needed for this new economy. (JOW)

  18. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donelan J Maxwell

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomechanical energy harvesting–generating electricity from people during daily activities–is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Methods Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. Results The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm, and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%. Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 ± 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 ± 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Conclusion Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices.

  19. A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) Reveals Evidence for a Rapid Decline in Effective Population Size Beginning in the Late Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Yvette A.; Dowd, Scot E.; Decker, Jared E.; Seabury, Paul M.; Bhattarai, Eric; Johnson, Charles D.; Rollins, Dale; Tizard, Ian R.; Brightsmith, Donald J.; Peterson, Markus J.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Seabury, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Wild populations of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhite) have declined across nearly all of their U.S. range, and despite their importance as an experimental wildlife model for ecotoxicology studies, no bobwhite draft genome assembly currently exists. Herein, we present a bobwhite draft de novo genome assembly with annotation, comparative analyses including genome-wide analyses of divergence with the chicken (Gallus gallus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genomes, and coalescent modeling to reconstruct the demographic history of the bobwhite for comparison to other birds currently in decline (i.e., scarlet macaw; Ara macao). More than 90% of the assembled bobwhite genome was captured within 14,000 unique genes and proteins. Bobwhite analyses of divergence with the chicken and zebra finch genomes revealed many extremely conserved gene sequences, and evidence for lineage-specific divergence of noncoding regions. Coalescent models for reconstructing the demographic history of the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw provided evidence for population bottlenecks which were temporally coincident with human colonization of the New World, the late Pleistocene collapse of the megafauna, and the last glacial maximum. Demographic trends predicted for the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw also were concordant with how opposing natural selection strategies (i.e., skewness in the r-/K-selection continuum) would be expected to shape genome diversity and the effective population sizes in these species, which is directly relevant to future conservation efforts. PMID:24621616

  20. Decline in sediment contamination by persistent toxic substances from the outfall of wastewater treatment plant: Effectiveness of legislative actions in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangzi; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Badejo, Abimbola C; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Shen, Aihua; Lee, Sunggyu; Jeong, Yunsun; Choi, Minkyu; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2016-06-01

    Legacy and new persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in sediments near a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) outfall in a semi-enclosed bay, to investigate the current contamination and temporal changes in these contaminants associated with regulation activities in Korea. The concentrations of most of the POPs showed clear decreasing trends with an increase in the distance from the WWTP outfall, indicating that the WWTP discharges greatly contributed to the sediment contamination by POPs. Highly significant correlations were found for most of the POPs, indicating a common source for sediment contamination. Significant declines were found in the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and PAHs in the sediments collected between 2005 and 2013. This result suggested that legislative actions (regulation of the PCDD/Fs in flue gas, total pollution load management, and whole effluent toxicity for WWTP discharges) and change of fuels, were likely to be effective at reducing the POP and PAH levels in sediments during the past several years. The different compositional profiles of the PCDD/Fs and PAHs between 2005 and 2013 implied changes in and/or additional sources of these contaminants. Despite a decline in the PCDD/Fs over time, the present levels of PCDD/Fs in the sediment exceeded some of the sediment quality guidelines suggested by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. PMID:27031806

  1. Effect of ruboxistaurin (RBX) On visual acuity decline over a 6-year period with cessation and reinstitution of therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheetz, Matthew J; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Shahri, Nazila; Davis, Matthew D; Kles, Keri A; Danis, Ronald P

    2011-01-01

    The PKC-DRS2 was a Phase 3, randomized, double-masked, placebo (PBO)-controlled, 3-year study of the effect of 32 mg/day of ruboxistaurin (RBX), an orally administered protein kinase C inhibitor, on vision loss in patients with moderate to severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Ruboxistaurin...

  2. Biomechanical Remodeling of the Diabetic Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian;

    2010-01-01

    several years, several studies demonstrated that experimental diabetes induces GI morphological and biomechanical remodeling. Following the development of diabetes, the GI wall becomes thicker and the stiffness of the GI wall increases in a time-dependent manner. It is well known that mechanosensitive...... the biomechanical environment of the mechanosensitive nerve endings, therefore, the structure as well as the tension, stress and strain distribution in the GI wall is important for the sensory and motor function. Biomechanical remodeling of diabetic GI tract including alterations of residual strain and increase...

  3. Biomechanical performance of new cardiovascular needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, J G; Ferguson, R E; Rodeheaver, G T; Edlich, R F

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular needles are now being manufactured from new stainless steel alloys containing high concentrations of nickel, Surgalloy and Ethalloy. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical performance of a cardiovascular needle made of Surgalloy with a comparably sized needle made of Ethalloy. The parameters of biomechanical performance included sharpness, maintenance of sharpness, resistance to bending, and ductility. Because the biomechanical performance of these needles was remarkably similar, cardiovascular needles made of either the Surgalloy or Ethalloy alloys are recommended for cardiovascular surgery. PMID:11495105

  4. Speckle photography in biomechanical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Henryk T.; Podbielska, Halina

    1994-02-01

    The application of speckle photography in biomechanical testing of bones and surgical fixing devices is presented. Double-exposure speckle photography is used for measuring the in-plane deformation of broken lower leg bones supported with different fixing devices under axial loading. An osteosynthesis plate, an external fixator, and an intramedullar nail mounted on the tibia shaft are tested. The results for different loading conditions are analyzed and compared with those obtained by holographic interferometry. Further, the human hyoid bone is investigated by this method. The load is applied to the anterior surface of the body of the bone. All tested specimen show an asymmetric displacement, the greatest in a plane vertical to the load. An evaluation of fracture behavior can be done from the displacement pattern.

  5. Impact of climate change effecting Decline on Migration Birds of Bhadalwadi Lake Indapur Taluka M.S India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.S .Gantaloo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental changes are now a day’s happening regularly day to day increase in temperature ,Scarcity of rainfall ,Drying of lakes have strong implication on Biodiversity . .Global warming has set in motion and is affecting the timing of migration of birds .Birds are reliable indicator of environment change for centuries and their arrival indicate start of winter and departure summer in study area .There are many example of the effect of climate change on birds from all around the world which taken together provide compelling evidence that climate change is already affecting birds in diverse ways. The study was carried out for two years considering the changes occurring in climate parameters like Air Temperature, Rainfall were taken into facts .Keen observation with the help camera photography were taken to study. The effect on migrating Birds which measure international status on wet lands and lakes. Hence in the present study the data on biodiversity ,migratory birds have been collected to understand How climate change supported the dwelling of avian fauna in this area . This paper opens a review on migration of birds on the eve of 14th&15th May of world Bird migratory day.

  6. Building a better hormone therapy?: How understanding the rapid effects of sex steroid hormones could lead to new therapeutics for age-related memory decline

    OpenAIRE

    Frick, Karyn M.

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of data collected in recent decades has demonstrated that ovarian sex-steroid hormones, particularly 17β-estradiol (E2), are important trophic factors that regulate the function of cognitive regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. The loss of hormone cycling at menopause is associated with cognitive decline and dementia in women, and the onset of memory decline in animal models. However, hormone therapy is not currently recommended to prevent or treat cognitive decline, in part...

  7. Musculoskeletal demands on flamenco dancers: a clinical and biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejjani, F J; Halpern, N; Pio, A; Dominguez, R; Voloshin, A; Frankel, V H

    1988-04-01

    The flamenco dancer acts on the floor like a drummer. The percussive footwork and vibration patterns created during dancing impose unusual demands on the musculoskeletal system. This study investigated the clinical and biomechanical aspects of this task. Using the electrodynogram and skin-mounted accelerometers, foot pressures as well as hip and knee vibrations were recorded in 10 female dancers after a thorough clinical evaluation. A health questionnaire was also distributed to 29 dancers. Foot pressures and acceleration data reveal the percussive nature of the dance. Some clinical findings, like calluses, are related to pressure distribution. Urogenital disorders, as well as back and neck pain, may be related to the vibrations generated by the flamenco dance form. The hip joint seems to absorb most of the impacts. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as a useful tool for evaluating a dancer's biomechanical behavior, as well as the effect of floors and footwear on this behavior. PMID:3366430

  8. Beneficial effects of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on age-related cognitive decline in long-term-care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Thaís Cristina Galdino; Soares, Fernanda Cabral; De Macedo, Liliane Dias E Dias; Diniz, Domingos Luiz Wanderley Picanço; Bento-Torres, Natáli Valim Oliver; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on improving cognition in elderly persons living in long-term-care institutions (institutionalized [I]) or in communities with their families (noninstitutionalized [NI]). We compared neuropsychological performance using language and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test scores before and after 24 and 48 stimulation sessions. The two groups were matched by age and years of schooling. Small groups of ten or fewer volunteers underwent the stimulation program, twice a week, over 6 months (48 sessions in total). Sessions were based on language and memory exercises, as well as visual, olfactory, auditory, and ludic stimulation, including music, singing, and dance. Both groups were assessed at the beginning (before stimulation), in the middle (after 24 sessions), and at the end (after 48 sessions) of the stimulation program. Although the NI group showed higher performance in all tasks in all time windows compared with I subjects, both groups improved their performance after stimulation. In addition, the improvement was significantly higher in the I group than the NI group. Language tests seem to be more efficient than the MMSE to detect early changes in cognitive status. The results suggest the impoverished environment of long-term-care institutions may contribute to lower cognitive scores before stimulation and the higher improvement rate of this group after stimulation. In conclusion, language tests should be routinely adopted in the neuropsychological assessment of elderly subjects, and long-term-care institutions need to include regular sensorimotor, social, and cognitive stimulation as a public health policy for elderly persons. PMID:24600211

  9. Musculoskeletal Biomechanics in Cross-country Skiing

    OpenAIRE

    Holmberg, L. Joakim

    2012-01-01

    Why copy the best athletes? When you finally learn their technique, they may have already moved on. Using muscluloskeletal biomechanics you might be able to add the "know-why" so that you can lead, instead of being left in the swells. This dissertation presents the theoretical framework of musculoskeletal modeling using inverse dynamics with static optimization. It explores some of the possibilities and limitations of musculoskeletal biomechanics in cross-country skiing, especially double-pol...

  10. Beneficial effects of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on age-related cognitive decline in long-term-care institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira TCG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Thaís Cristina Galdino De Oliveira,1 Fernanda Cabral Soares,1 Liliane Dias E Dias De Macedo,1 Domingos Luiz Wanderley Picanço Diniz,1 Natáli Valim Oliver Bento-Torres,1,2 Cristovam Wanderley Picanço-Diniz1 1Laboratory of Investigations in Neurodgeneration and Infection, Biological Sciences Institute, University Hospital João de Barros Barreto, 2College of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Federal University of Pará, Belém, Brazil Abstract: The aim of the present report was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on improving cognition in elderly persons living in long-term-care institutions (institutionalized [I] or in communities with their families (noninstitutionalized [NI]. We compared neuropsychological performance using language and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE test scores before and after 24 and 48 stimulation sessions. The two groups were matched by age and years of schooling. Small groups of ten or fewer volunteers underwent the stimulation program, twice a week, over 6 months (48 sessions in total. Sessions were based on language and memory exercises, as well as visual, olfactory, auditory, and ludic stimulation, including music, singing, and dance. Both groups were assessed at the beginning (before stimulation, in the middle (after 24 sessions, and at the end (after 48 sessions of the stimulation program. Although the NI group showed higher performance in all tasks in all time windows compared with I subjects, both groups improved their performance after stimulation. In addition, the improvement was significantly higher in the I group than the NI group. Language tests seem to be more efficient than the MMSE to detect early changes in cognitive status. The results suggest the impoverished environment of long-term-care institutions may contribute to lower cognitive scores before stimulation and the higher improvement rate of this group after stimulation. In conclusion

  11. Effect of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures on Achilles tendon healing in a rat model: A histological and biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H Cummings

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Repairing tendon injuries with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB has potential for improving surgical outcomes. Augmentation of sutures, a critical component of surgical tendon repair, by coating with growth factors may provide a clinically useful therapeutic device for improving tendon repair. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to (a coat Vicryl sutures with a defined dose of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB without additional coating excipients (e.g. gelatin, (b quantify the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB released from the suture, and (c use the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures to enhance tendon repair in a rat Achilles tendon transection model. Methods: Vicryl sutures were coated with 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 10.0 mg/mL concentrations of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB using a dip-coating process. In vitro release was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acutely transected rat Achilles tendons were repaired using one of the four suture groups (n = 12 per group. Four weeks following repair, the tensile biomechanical and histological (i.e. collagen organization and angiogenesis properties were determined. Results: A dose-dependent bolus release of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB occurred within the first hour in vitro, followed by a gradual release over 48 h. There was a significant increase in ultimate tensile strength (p < 0.01 in the two highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose groups (1.9 ± 0.5 and 2.1 ± 0.5 MPa relative to controls (1.0 ± 0.2 MPa. The modulus significantly increased (p = 0.031 with the highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose group (7.2 ± 3.8 MPa relative to all other groups (control: 3.5 ± 0.9 MPa. No significant differences were identified for the maximum load or stiffness. The histological collagen and angiogenesis

  12. Biomechanical properties of peripheral nerve after acellular treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xin-long; SUN Xiao-lei; YANG Zhao; LI Xiu-lan; MA Jian-xiong; ZHANG Yang; YUAN Zhen-zhen

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injury causes a high rate of disability and a huge economic burden,and is currently one of the serious health problems in the world.The use of nerve grafts plays a vital role in repairing nerve defects.Acellular nerve grafts have been widely used in many experimental models as a peripheral nerve substitute.The purpose of this study was to test the biomechanical properties of acellular nerve grafts.Methods Thirty-four fresh sciatic nerves were obtained from 17 adult male Wistar rats (age of 3 months) and randomly assigned to 3 groups:normal control group,nerve segments underwent no treatment and were put in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) and stored at 4℃ until further use; physical method group,nerve segments were frozen at -196℃ and then thawed at 37℃; and chemical method group,nerve segments were chemically extracted with the detergents Triton X-200,sulfobetaine-10 (SB-10) and sulfobetaine-16 (SB-16).After the acellularization process was completed,the structural changes of in the sciatic nerves in each group were observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and field emission scanning electron microscopy,then biomechanical properties were tested using a mechanical apparatus (Endura TEC ELF 3200,Bose,Boston,USA).Results Hematoxylin-eosin staining and field emission scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the effects of acellularization,demyelination,and integrity of nerve fiber tube of the chemical method were better than that of the physical method.Biomechanical testing showed that peripheral nerve grafts treated with the chemical method resulted in some decreased biomechanical properties (ultimate load,ultimate stress,ultimate strain,and mechanical work to fracture) compared with normal control nerves,but the differences were not statistically significant (P >0.05).Conclusion Nerve treated with the chemical method may be more appropriate for use in implantation than nerve treated with the physical method.

  13. Mobility decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna Regina; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to pro...... promote mobility in old age.......Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to...

  14. Biomechanical Properties of Bone and Biomechanics of Age - Related Fractures - Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezzan Günaydın

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available From a biomechanical viewpoint, fractures are due to a structural failure of the bone. This failure occurs when the forces applied to the bone exceed its load – bearing capacity. The load – bearing capacity of a bone depends on the geometry (its size, shape and distribution of bone mass, and the material properties of a bone as well as the direction and magnitude of applied load. Bone fragility can be defined by biomechanical parameters such as strength, brittleness and work to failure. Strategies to reduce fracture risk must be based on a sound understanding of the cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms that underlie the increased risk of fractures while aging. In this review biomechanics of bone and the etiology of age – related fractures from a biomechanical viewpoint have been discussed in the view of current literature. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2007;13:44-8

  15. Decline in breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Schwartz, Walter; Blichert-Toft, Mogens;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: When estimating the decline in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening, the challenge is to provide valid comparison groups and to distinguish the screening effect from other effects. In Funen, Denmark, multidisciplinary breast cancer management teams started before screening...... was introduced; both activities came later in the rest of Denmark. Because Denmark had national protocols for breast cancer treatment, but hardly any opportunistic screening, Funen formed a "natural experiment", providing valid comparison groups and enabling the separation of the effect of screening...... from other factors. METHODS: Using Poisson regression we compared the observed breast cancer mortality rate in Funen after implementation of screening with the expected rate without screening. The latter was estimated from breast cancer mortality in the rest of Denmark controlled for historical...

  16. Understanding a migratory species in a changing world: climatic effects and demographic declines in the western monarch revealed by four decades of intensive monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeset, Anne E; Harrison, Joshua G; Shapiro, Arthur M; Nice, Chris C; Thorne, James H; Waetjen, David P; Fordyce, James A; Forister, Matthew L

    2016-07-01

    Migratory animals pose unique challenges for conservation biologists, and we have much to learn about how migratory species respond to drivers of global change. Research has cast doubt on the stability of the eastern monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) population in North America, but the western monarchs have not been as intensively examined. Using a Bayesian hierarchical model, sightings of western monarchs over approximately 40 years were investigated using summer flight records from ten sites along an elevational transect in Northern California. Multiple weather variables were examined, including local and regional temperature and precipitation. Population trends from the ten focal sites and a subset of western overwintering sites were compared to summer and overwintering data from the eastern migration. Records showed western overwintering grounds and western breeding grounds had negative trends over time, with declines concentrated early in the breeding season, which were potentially more severe than in the eastern population. Temporal variation in the western monarch also appears to be largely independent of (uncorrelated with) the dynamics in the east. For our focal sites, warmer temperatures had positive effects during winter and spring, and precipitation had a positive effect during spring. These climatic associations add to our understanding of biotic-abiotic interactions in a migratory butterfly, but shifting climatic conditions do not explain the overall, long-term, negative population trajectory observed in our data. PMID:27000943

  17. Drivers and moderators of business decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Pretorius

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Reports of business failure elicit various reactions, while research in this domain often appears to be limited by a lack of access to information about failure and by the negativity that surrounds it. Those who have experienced failure do not readily talk about it, or they disappear from the radar screen of researchers. Yet failure is preceded by decline which, when focused on strategically, can reduce eventual failures if early action is taken. The main purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual framework or typology of the drivers and moderators of business decline. Design/methodology/approach: After applying the "grounded theory" approach to the academic literature on decline and failure, a conceptual framework for the variables that drive and moderate business decline is proposed. Findings: The study proposes that decline has three core drivers, three peripheral drivers and four moderators. The core drivers identified are: resource munificence; leadership as origin; and causality (strategic versus operational origin of decline. The three peripheral drivers are: unique preconditions; continuous decisions impact; and extremes dichotomy. The study describes four moderators of the drivers: life cycle stage; stakeholder perspective; quantitative versus qualitative nature of signs and causes; and finally the age and size effects. Research limitations/implications: The proposed conceptual framework is based on literature only, although it has found support during discussions with practitioners. It is proposed to readers of this journal for scrutiny and validation. Practical implications: Strategists need to understand what drives decline in order to act timeously; practitioners who have an insight into the moderators with their impacts could make better decisions in response to decline in organisations and possibly avoid business failure. Originality/Value: Understanding business decline is still a huge theoretical challenge, which

  18. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5−/−), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0+/−; homozygous KO: AQP0−/−; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0+/− lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and together they help to confer

  19. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital adm...

  20. SPORT AND EXERCISE BIOMECHANICS (BIOS INSTANT NOTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grimshaw

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION Instant Notes on Sport and Exercise Biomechanics provides a broad overview of the fundamental concepts in exercise and sport biomechanics. PURPOSE The book aims to provide instant notes on essential information about biomechanics, and is designed to help undergraduate students to grasp the corresponding subjects in physical effort rapidly and easily. AUDIENCE The book provides a useful resource for undergraduate and graduate students as a fundamental reference book. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a starting point to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in the field of exercise and sport biomechanics. It would also be interest to anyone who wonders the concepts like momentum possessed, whole body angular momentum, opposite parallel forces, superman position, parabolic flight path, joint/normal reaction force, etc. FEATURES This textbook is divided into following sections from A to F: kinematics of motion, kinetics of linear motion, kinetics of angular motion, special topics, applications and measurement techniques, respectively. In sub-sections the kinematics of motion are reviewed in detail, outlining the physics of motion. Furthermore, the discussions of mechanical characteristics of motion, the mechanisms of injury, and the analysis of the sport technique provide a source of valuable information for both students and lecturers in appropriate fields. ASSESSMENT This book is an important reading for biomechanics students, teachers and even researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of lumbosacral fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, D H; Cunningham, B W; Shono, Y; Myers, J J; McAfee, P C

    1992-08-01

    Flexion testing was performed until failure on 66 lumbosacral bovine spinal segments comparing ten different lumbosacral instrumentation techniques. Maximum flexion moment at failure, flexural stiffness, and maximum angulation of the lumbosacral joint at failure were determined as well as strain measurements across the anterior aspect of the lumbosacral intervertebral disc using an extensometer. The maximum moment at failure was significantly greater for the only two devices that extended fixation into the ilium anterior to the projected image of the middle osteoligamentous column: ISOLA Galveston and ISOLA iliac screws (F = 12.2, P less than 0.001). The maximum stiffness at failure reinforced these findings (F = 23.7, P less than 0.001). A second subset of stability showed the advantages of S2 pedicle fixation by increasing the flexural lever arm (Cotrel-Dubousset butterfly plate, and Cotrel-Dubousset Chopin block, P less than 0.05). This exhaustive in vitro biomechanical study introduces the concept of a pivot point at the lumbosacral joint at the intersection of the middle osteoligamentous column (sagittal plane) and the lumbosacral intervertebral disc (transverse plane). A spinal surgeon can increase the stability of lumbosacral instrumentation by extending fixation through the anterior sacral cortex (Steffee plate group with pedicle screws that medially converge in a triangular fashion). A means of enhancing this fixation was to achieve more inferior purchase by extending the fixation down to the S2 pedicle (Cotrel-Dubousset Chopin and Cotrel-Dubousset butterfly groups). However, the best fixation was achieved by obtaining purchase between the iliac cortices down into the superior acetabular bone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1523506

  2. Biomechanics of Degenerative Spinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Justin A.; Jakoi, Andre M.

    2016-01-01

    The spine has several important functions including load transmission, permission of limited motion, and protection of the spinal cord. The vertebrae form functional spinal units, which represent the smallest segment that has characteristics of the entire spinal column. Discs and paired facet joints within each functional unit form a three-joint complex between which loads are transmitted. Surrounding the spinal motion segment are ligaments, composed of elastin and collagen, and joint capsules which restrict motion to within normal limits. Ligaments have variable strengths and act via different lever arm lengths to contribute to spinal stability. As a consequence of the longer moment arm from the spinous process to the instantaneous axis of rotation, inherently weaker ligaments (interspinous and supraspinous) are able to provide resistance to excessive flexion. Degenerative processes of the spine are a normal result of aging and occur on a spectrum. During the second decade of life, the intervertebral disc demonstrates histologic evidence of nucleus pulposus degradation caused by reduced end plate blood supply. As disc height decreases, the functional unit is capable of an increased range of axial rotation which subjects the posterior facet capsules to greater mechanical loads. A concurrent change in load transmission across the end plates and translation of the instantaneous axis of rotation further increase the degenerative processes at adjacent structures. The behavior of the functional unit is impacted by these processes and is reflected by changes in the stress-strain relationship. Back pain and other clinical symptoms may occur as a result of the biomechanical alterations of degeneration. PMID:27114783

  3. 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank W. Telewski; Lothar H. Koehler; Frank W. Ewers

    2003-07-20

    The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of the Swim-Start: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Julien Vantorre, Didier Chollet, Ludovic Seifert

    2014-01-01

    This review updates the swim-start state of the art from a biomechanical standpoint. We review the contribution of the swim-start to overall swimming performance, the effects of various swim-start strategies, and skill effects across the range of swim-start strategies identified in the literature. The main objective is to determine the techniques to focus on in swimming training in the contemporary context of the sport. The phases leading to key temporal events of the swim-start, like water e...

  5. Multiscale modeling in biomechanics and mechanobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Presenting a state-of-the-art overview of theoretical and computational models that link characteristic biomechanical phenomena, this book provides guidelines and examples for creating multiscale models in representative systems and organisms. It develops the reader's understanding of and intuition for multiscale phenomena in biomechanics and mechanobiology, and introduces a mathematical framework and computational techniques paramount to creating predictive multiscale models.   Biomechanics involves the study of the interactions of physical forces with biological systems at all scales – including molecular, cellular, tissue and organ scales. The emerging field of mechanobiology focuses on the way that cells produce and respond to mechanical forces – bridging the science of mechanics with the disciplines of genetics and molecular biology. Linking disparate spatial and temporal scales using computational techniques is emerging as a key concept in investigating some of the complex problems underlying these...

  6. Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Poul MF; Miller, Karol; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Deformation and Flow

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Deformation and Flow collects the papers from the Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Toronto in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  7. Inhibition of Phosphatase Activity Follows Decline in Sulfatase Activity and Leads to Transcriptional Effects through Sustained Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor MITF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K

    2016-01-01

    Arylsulfatase B (B-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Decline in ARSB has been shown in malignant prostate, colonic, and mammary cells and tissues, and decline in ARSB leads to transcriptional events mediated by galectin-3 with AP-1 and Sp1. Increased mRNA expression of GPNMB (transmembrane glycoprotein NMB) in HepG2 cells and in hepatic tissue from ARSB-deficient mice followed decline in expression of ARSB and was mediated by the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), but was unaffected by silencing galectin-3. Since GPNMB is increased in multiple malignancies, studies were performed to determine how decline in ARSB increased GPNMB expression. The mechanism by which decline in ARSB increased nuclear phospho-MITF was due to reduced activity of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase with Src homology (SH2) domains that regulates multiple cellular processes. SHP2 activity declined due to increased binding with chondroitin 4-sulfate when ARSB was reduced. When SHP2 activity was inhibited, phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-associated phosphokinase (MAPK) and of MITF increased, leading to GPNMB promoter activation. A dominant negative SHP2 construct, the SHP2 inhibitor PHSP1, and silencing of ARSB increased phospho-p38, nuclear MITF, and GPNMB. In contrast, constitutively active SHP2 and overexpression of ARSB inhibited GPNMB expression. The interaction between chondroitin 4-sulfate and SHP2 is a novel intersection between sulfation and phosphorylation, by which decline in ARSB and increased chondroitin 4-sulfation can inhibit SHP2, thereby regulating downstream tyrosine phosphorylations by sustained phosphorylations with associated activation of signaling and transcriptional events. PMID:27078017

  8. Problems Associated with Declining National Oil Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Forecasts of peak oil production have focussed on the global impacts of declining production. Meanwhile, national oil production has declined in 20 countries, leading to local problems that receive little comment outside of the effected regions. Two problems deserve wider recognition: declining state revenues and fuel substitution. Most oil producing countries with large reserves adopted licensing practices that provide significant revenues to the host governments such that oil revenues generate from 40 to 80 percent of total government funds. Typically these governments allocate a fraction of this revenue to their state oil companies, utilizing the remainder for other activities. As oil revenues decline with falling production, host governments face a dilemma: either to increase state oil company budgets in order to stem the decline, or to starve the state oil company while maintaining other government programs. The declining oil revenues in these states can significantly reduce the government's ability to address important national issues. Mexico, Indonesia, and Yemen illustrate this situation in its early phases. Fuel substitution occurs whenever one fuel proves less expensive than another. The substitution of coal for wood in the eighteenth century and oil for coal in the twentieth century are classic examples. China and India appear to be at peak oil production, while their economies generate increasing demand for energy. Both countries are substituting coal and natural gas for oil with attendant environmental impacts. Coal-to-liquids projects are proposed in in both China, which will require significant water resources if they are executed. These examples suggest that forecasting the impact of peak oil at a regional level requires more than an assessment of proven-probable-possible reserves and a forecast of supply-demand scenarios. A range of government responses to declining oil income scenarios must also be considered, together with scenarios describing

  9. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu Kumari, S; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G; Menon, Anil G; Mathias, Richard T; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5(-/-)), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0(+/-); homozygous KO: AQP0(-/-); all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0(+/-) lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and together they help to confer

  10. Analysis of Biomechanical Factors in Bend Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sprint running is the demonstration of comprehensive abilities of technology and tactics, under various conditions. However, whether it is just to allocate the tracks for short-distance athletes from different racetracks has been the hot topic. This study analyzes its forces, differences in different tracks and winding influences, in the aspects of sport biomechanics. The results indicate, many disadvantages exist in inner tracks, middle tracks are the best and outer ones are inferior to middle ones. Thus it provides references for training of short-distance items in biomechanics and psychology, etc.

  11. Biomechanical evaluation of wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis in persons with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoun-Seung Kang, MD, PhD, CPO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis (WDFHO is a device used to restore hand function in persons with tetraplegic spinal cord injury by furnishing three-point prehension. We assessed the effectiveness and biomechanical properties of the WDFHO in 24 persons with cervical 6 or 7 tetraplegia who have severely impaired hand function. This study introduces a mechanical operating model to assess the efficiency of the WDFHO. Experimental results showed that pinch force increased significantly (p < 0.001 after using the WDFHO and was found to positively correlate with the strength of wrist extensor muscles (r = 0.41, p < 0.001. However, when the strength of the wrist extensors acting on the WDFHO was greater, the reciprocal wrist and finger motion that generates three-point prehension was less effective (r = 0.79, p < 0.001. Reliable and valid biomechanical evaluation of the WDFHO could improve our understanding of its biomechanics.

  12. Biomechanics of the press-fit phenomenon in dental implantology: an image-based finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Frisardi Gianni; Barone Sandro; Razionale Armando V; Paoli Alessandro; Frisardi Flavio; Tullio Antonio; Lumbau Aurea; Chessa Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A fundamental pre-requisite for the clinical success in dental implant surgery is the fast and stable implant osseointegration. The press-fit phenomenon occurring at implant insertion induces biomechanical effects in the bone tissues, which ensure implant primary stability. In the field of dental surgery, the understanding of the key factors governing the osseointegration process still remains of utmost importance. A thorough analysis of the biomechanics of dental implanto...

  13. Protocol for project FACT: a randomised controlled trial on the effect of a walking program and vitamin B supplementation on the rate of cognitive decline and psychosocial wellbeing in older adults with mild cognitive impairment [ISRCTN19227688

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, van J.G.Z.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Mechelen, van W.

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prevalence of individuals with cognitive decline is increasing since the number of elderly adults is growing considerably. The literature provides promising results on the beneficial effect of exercise and vitamin supplementation on cognitive function both in cognitively he

  14. Protocol for Project FACT: A randomised controlled trial on the effect of a walking program and vitamin B supplementation on the rate of cognitive decline and psychosocial wellbeing in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, J.G.Z. van; Hopman-Rock, M.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Mechelen, W. van

    2005-01-01

    Background: the prevalence of individuals with cognitive decline is increasing since the number of elderly adults is growing considerably. The literature provides promising results on the beneficial effect of exercise and vitamin supplementation on cognitive function both in cognitively healthy as w

  15. 有氧运动配合雷洛昔芬对骨生物力学性能影响的研究%Aerobic Exercise Combined with Effects of Raloxifene on Bone Biomechanical Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢江涛; 罗珊

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过对去势大鼠骨生物力学指标的检测,探讨有氧运动与雷洛昔芬联合作用对去势大鼠骨生物力学性能的影响。方法:将50只雌性SD大鼠随机分为5组:假手术组、模型组、有氧运动组、雷洛昔芬组、有氧运动+雷洛昔芬组。假手术组不去卵巢,其余各组去卵巢造模;有氧运动组、雷洛昔芬组、有氧运动+雷洛昔芬组分别在去卵巢的基础上进行有氧运动训练和(或)灌胃选择性雌激素受体调节剂雷洛昔芬。8周后比较各组大鼠股骨结构力学和材料力学指标的变化。结果:(1)与模型组相比,有氧运动组、雷洛昔芬组、有氧运动+雷洛昔芬组大鼠的各项指标都显著优于模型组(P<0.05),部分指标出现显著性差异(P<0.01)。(2)模型组各项指标都与假手术组有显著性差别(P<0.05)。结论:有氧运动配合雷洛昔芬治疗联合应用预防废用性骨质疏松比单独应用能获得更好的效果;并且更加安全易行。%Objective: ovariectomized rats bone biomechanical indicators detect, investigate the combined effects of aerobic exercise and raloxifene on ovariectomized rats bone biomechanical properties. Methods: 50 female SD rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham operation group, model group, aerobic exercise group, the raloxifene group, aerobic exercise + raloxifene group. Sham group only surgery but not ovariectomy, the rest of the group of ovariectomized modeling; aerobic exercise group, the raloxifene group aerobic exercise + raloxifene groups, respectively, based on ovariectomized aerobic exercise training and (or) orally selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene. After eight weeks, comparing changes in the rat femur structural mechanics and material mechanics index. Results: (1) Compared with model group, the aerobic exercise group, raloxifene group, the indicators of aerobic exercise + raloxifene rats

  16. Interdisciplinary Vertical Integration: The Future of Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The field of biomechanics has grown rapidly in the past 30 years in both size and complexity. As a result, the term might mean different things to different people. This article addresses the issues facing the field in the form of challenges biomechanists face in the future. Because the field is so diverse, strength within the different areas of…

  17. Expose Mechanical Engineering Students to Biomechanics Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui

    2011-01-01

    To adapt the focus of engineering education to emerging new industries and technologies nationwide and in the local area, a biomechanics module has been developed and incorporated into a mechanical engineering technical elective course to expose mechanical engineering students at ONU (Ohio Northern University) to the biomedical engineering topics.…

  18. Biomechanics/risk management (Working Group 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Mariano; Naert, Ignace; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The remit of this workgroup was to update the existing knowledge base in biomechanical factors, navigation systems and medications that may affect the outcome of implant therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The literature was systematically searched and critically reviewed. Five manuscrip...

  19. The biomechanical interaction between horse and rider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cocq, de P.

    2012-01-01

    The forces exerted by a rider on a horse have a direct influence on the mechanical load experienced by the horse and consequently on its motion pattern. The aim of this thesis is to explore the biomechanical interaction between rider, saddle and horse in order to get insight in the loading of the ho

  20. Understanding the biomechanical nature of musculoskeletal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karduna, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a general overview of the biomechanical principles associated with hand therapy. Specifically, it reviews the basic topics of material properties (including both theoretical principles and practical concepts), static analysis (including forces, moments, muscle forces, and Newton's laws), and ends with a clinical example involving analysis of the risk of damage to the A3 pulley. PMID:22507212

  1. The Value of Biomechanical Research in Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, D. A.

    Simple observation of dance movement, while very useful, can lead to misconceptions, about the physical realities of dance movement, that make learning difficult. This gap between reality and understanding can be reduced by the application of biomechanical techniques such as cinematography, electromyography, and force-plate analysis. Biomechanical…

  2. Cluster Decline and Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    -2011. Our longitudinal study reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to impairment of the cluster’s resilience in adapting to disruptions. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on cluster resilience, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing in...

  3. Mobility decline in old age

    OpenAIRE

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to promote mobility in old age.

  4. The biomechanics of the equine foot as it pertains to farriery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliashar, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    Shoes were originally applied to horses' feet to protect against excessive wear. Over the years, countless types of shoes and farriery techniques have been developed not only as a therapeutic aid to treat lameness but also to maintain or enhance functionality. The past 3 decades have provided equine veterinarians and farriers with new information relating to limb biomechanics and the effects of various farriery methods. This article describes the principles of foot biomechanics and how they are affected by some of the more common farriery and shoeing techniques. PMID:22981190

  5. Terminal decline in motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert S; Segawa, Eisuke; Buchman, Aron S; Boyle, Patricia A; Hizel, Loren P; Bennett, David A

    2012-12-01

    The study aim was to test the hypothesis that motor function undergoes accelerated decline proximate to death. As part of a longitudinal clinical-pathologic study, 124 older Roman Catholic nuns, priests, and monks completed at least 7 annual clinical evaluations, died, and underwent brain autopsy and uniform neuropathologic examination. Each evaluation included administration of 11 motor tests and 19 cognitive tests from which global measures of motor and cognitive function were derived. The global motor measure (baseline M = 0.82, SD = 0.21) declined a mean 0.024 unit per year (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.032, -0.016) until a mean of 2.46 years (95% CI: -2.870, -2.108) before death when rate of decline increased nearly fivefold to -0.117 unit per year (95% CI: -0.140, -0.097). The global cognitive measure (baseline M = 0.07, SD = 0.45) declined a mean of 0.027-unit per year (95% CI: -0.041, -0.014) until a mean of 2.76 years (95% CI: -3.157, -2.372) before death when rate of decline increased more than 13-fold to -0.371 unit per year (95% CI: -0.443, -0.306). Onset of terminal motor decline was highly correlated with onset of terminal cognitive decline (r = .94, 95% CI: 0.81, 0.99), but rates of motor and cognitive change were not strongly correlated (preterminal r = .20, 95% CI: -0.05, 0.38; terminal r = .34, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.62). Higher level of plaques and tangles was associated with earlier onset of terminal decline in motor function, but no pathologic measures were associated with rate of preterminal or terminal motor decline. The results demonstrate that motor and cognitive functions both undergo a period of accelerated decline in the last few years of life. PMID:22612603

  6. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guarnieri, Gianluigi, E-mail: gianluigiguarnieri@hotmail.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guglielmi, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.gugliemi@unifg.it [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability.

  7. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability

  8. A review of biomechanically informed breast image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, John H.; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Han, Lianghao; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Eiben, Björn; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiology encompasses the full range of imaging modalities from routine imaging via x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound (both two- and three-dimensional), to more recent technologies such as digital breast tomosynthesis, and dedicated breast imaging systems for positron emission mammography and ultrasound tomography. In addition new and experimental modalities, such as Photoacoustics, Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrical Impedance Tomography etc, are emerging. The breast is a highly deformable structure however, and this greatly complicates visual comparison of imaging modalities for the purposes of breast screening, cancer diagnosis (including image guided biopsy), tumour staging, treatment monitoring, surgical planning and simulation of the effects of surgery and wound healing etc. Due primarily to the challenges posed by these gross, non-rigid deformations, development of automated methods which enable registration, and hence fusion, of information within and across breast imaging modalities, and between the images and the physical space of the breast during interventions, remains an active research field which has yet to translate suitable methods into clinical practice. This review describes current research in the field of breast biomechanical modelling and identifies relevant publications where the resulting models have been incorporated into breast image registration and simulation algorithms. Despite these developments there remain a number of issues that limit clinical application of biomechanical modelling. These include the accuracy of constitutive modelling, implementation of representative boundary conditions, failure to meet clinically acceptable levels of computational cost, challenges associated with automating patient-specific model generation (i.e. robust image segmentation and mesh generation) and the complexity of applying biomechanical modelling methods in routine clinical practice.

  9. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation. PMID:26963387

  10. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ide

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  11. A steep decline of malaria morbidity and mortality trends in Eritrea between 2000 and 2004: the effect of combination of control methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremichael Andemariam

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a huge public health problem in Africa that is responsible for more than one million deaths annually. In line with the Roll Back Malaria initiative and the Abuja Declaration, Eritrea and other African countries have intensified their fight against malaria. This study examines the impact of Eritrea's Roll Back Malaria Programme: 2000–2004 and the effects and possible interactions between the public health interventions in use. Methods This study employed cross-sectional survey to collect data from households, community and health facilities on coverage and usage of Insecticide-Treated Nets (ITNs, Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS, larvicidal activities and malaria case management. Comparative data was obtained from a similar survey carried out in 2001. Data from the Health Management Information System (HMIS and reports of the annual assessments by the National Malaria Control Programme was used to assess impact. Time series model (ARIMA was used to assess association. Results In the period 2000–2004, approximately 874,000 ITNs were distributed and 13,109 health workers and community health agents were trained on malaria case management. In 2004, approximately 81% households owned at least one net, of which 73% were ITNs and 58.6% of children 0–5 years slept under a net. The proportion of malaria cases managed by community health agents rose from 50% in 1999 to 78% in 2004. IRS coverage increased with the combined amount of DDT and Malathion used rising from 6,444 kg, in 2000 to 43,491 kg, in 2004, increasing the population protected from 117,017 to 259,420. Drug resistance necessitated regimen change to chloroquine plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. During the period, there was a steep decline in malaria morbidity and case fatality by 84% and 40% respectively. Malaria morbidity was strongly correlated to the numbers of ITNs distributed (β = -0.125, p Conclusion Eritrea has within 5 years attained key Roll Back

  12. DIABETES MELLITUS: A PLOTTER OF COGNITIVE DECLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Mishra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes & its secondary complication have taken a troll over the past three decades. The picture is bleaker considering the elderly population is on rise. Endocannabinoid system (ECS plays crucial role in bridging gaps between oxidative stress, calcium signalling, appetite regulation & accelerated aging mechanism in diabetic person. Current antidiabetic therapies have failed to address many relevant aspect of diabetes. The meshwork of various mechanism ECS participate in, provides many opportunities for development of new drugs for management of disorder like diabetes, dyslipidaemias, obesity, cognitive decline due to diabetes & many more. Some these have already been studied extensively. Still many pathways remain less highlighted. Reason for cognitive decline in diabetes appears especially more to do with endocannabinoid system, due to its widespread effects on all changes occur in cognitive decline.

  13. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shiels, Alan [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); FitzGerald, Paul G. [Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Menon, Anil G. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mathias, Richard T. [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  14. Urban Decline and Durable Housing

    OpenAIRE

    Edward L. Glaeser; Joseph Gyourko

    2005-01-01

    Most of America’s largest cities in 1950 have declined since then. In these declining areas, most homes cost less than the cost of new construction. In 1990, nearly 60 percent of all owner-occupied single-unit residences in Midwest central cities were valued at less than the cost of construction. Indeed, these declining cities appear to persist because of the durability of housing. We present a durable housing model that explains a number of facts about urban dynamics. Housing durability expl...

  15. Consequences of biomechanically constrained tasks in the design and interpretation of synergy analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresch, Matthew C.; Perreault, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix factorization algorithms are commonly used to analyze muscle activity and provide insight into neuromuscular control. These algorithms identify low-dimensional subspaces, commonly referred to as synergies, which can describe variation in muscle activity during a task. Synergies are often interpreted as reflecting underlying neural control; however, it is unclear how these analyses are influenced by biomechanical and task constraints, which can also lead to low-dimensional patterns of muscle activation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether commonly used algorithms and experimental methods can accurately identify synergy-based control strategies. This was accomplished by evaluating synergies from five common matrix factorization algorithms using muscle activations calculated from 1) a biomechanically constrained task using a musculoskeletal model and 2) without task constraints using random synergy activations. Algorithm performance was assessed by calculating the similarity between estimated synergies and those imposed during the simulations; similarities ranged from 0 (random chance) to 1 (perfect similarity). Although some of the algorithms could accurately estimate specified synergies without biomechanical or task constraints (similarity >0.7), with these constraints the similarity of estimated synergies decreased significantly (0.3–0.4). The ability of these algorithms to accurately identify synergies was negatively impacted by correlation of synergy activations, which are increased when substantial biomechanical or task constraints are present. Increased variability in synergy activations, which can be captured using robust experimental paradigms that include natural variability in motor activation patterns, improved identification accuracy but did not completely overcome effects of biomechanical and task constraints. These results demonstrate that a biomechanically constrained task can reduce the accuracy of estimated synergies and highlight

  16. An Effective Continuum Model for the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Change in a Porous Medium Driven by Solute Diffusion: I. Constant Pressure Decline Rates; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, focuses on the isothermal gas phase growth from a supersaturated, slightly compressible, binary liquid in a porous medium. This is driven by mass transfer, the extent of which is controlled by the application of either a constant-rate decline of the system pressure or the withdrawal of the liquid at a constant rate. This report deals with the first process. Pressure depletion due to constant-rate liquid withdrawal is analyzed in a companion report

  17. Effect of attending to a ball during a side-cut maneuver on lower extremity biomechanics in male and female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedie, Rebecca; Carlstedt, Kristen; Willson, John D; Kernozek, Thomas W

    2010-09-01

    Many sports associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury require athletes attend to a ball during participation. We investigated effects of attending to a ball on lower extremity mechanics during a side-cut maneuver and if these effects are consistent for males and females. Sagittal and frontal plane hip and knee kinematics and joint moments were measured during side-cut maneuvers in 19 male and 19 female National Collegiate Athletic Association division III basketball players. Participants also experienced two side-cut conditions that required attention to a ball. Our results did not indicate that the effect of attention varies with gender. However, during side-cut conditions while attending to a ball, internal knee adductor moment was 20% greater (p = 0.03) and peak knee flexion angle was 4 degrees larger (p knee flexion (p knee abduction (p = 0.026) at initial contact during all side-cut conditions than males. Attention to a ball may affect lower extremity mechanics relevant to ACL injury. The validity of laboratory studies of lower extremity mechanics for sports that include attention to a ball may be increased if participants are required to attend to a ball during the task. PMID:21162362

  18. Stability of the unlinked Latitude total elbow prosthesis: A biomechanical in vitro analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, M.L.; Vos, M.J. de; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Eygendaal, D.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to assess the valgus and varus laxity of the unlinked version of the Latitude total elbow prosthesis and the effects of radial head preservation or replacement. METHODS: Biomechanical analysis of the valgus and varus laxity of the unlinked Latitude was perfor

  19. Stability of the unlinked Latitude total elbow prosthesis: A biomechanical in vitro analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, Marc L.; Vos, de Maarten J.; Hendriks, Jan C.M.; Eygendaal, Denise; Verdonschot, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to assess the valgus and varus laxity of the unlinked version of the Latitude total elbow prosthesis and the effects of radial head preservation or replacement. Methods Biomechanical analysis of the valgus and varus laxity of the unlinked Latitude was perform

  20. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the IM Province of the Columbia Basin, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielgus, Robert; Shipley, Lisa; Myers, Woodrow

    2003-09-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the sub basins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated 'press' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM sub basins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates

  1. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

    2002-07-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend

  2. Are cranial biomechanical simulation data linked to known diets in extant taxa? A method for applying diet-biomechanics linkage models to infer feeding capability of extinct species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Jack Tseng

    Full Text Available Performance of the masticatory system directly influences feeding and survival, so adaptive hypotheses often are proposed to explain craniodental evolution via functional morphology changes. However, the prevalence of "many-to-one" association of cranial forms and functions in vertebrates suggests a complex interplay of ecological and evolutionary histories, resulting in redundant morphology-diet linkages. Here we examine the link between cranial biomechanical properties for taxa with different dietary preferences in crown clade Carnivora, the most diverse clade of carnivorous mammals. We test whether hypercarnivores and generalists can be distinguished based on cranial mechanical simulation models, and how such diet-biomechanics linkages relate to morphology. Comparative finite element and geometric morphometrics analyses document that predicted bite force is positively allometric relative to skull strain energy; this is achieved in part by increased stiffness in larger skull models and shape changes that resist deformation and displacement. Size-standardized strain energy levels do not reflect feeding preferences; instead, caniform models have higher strain energy than feliform models. This caniform-feliform split is reinforced by a sensitivity analysis using published models for six additional taxa. Nevertheless, combined bite force-strain energy curves distinguish hypercarnivorous versus generalist feeders. These findings indicate that the link between cranial biomechanical properties and carnivoran feeding preference can be clearly defined and characterized, despite phylogenetic and allometric effects. Application of this diet-biomechanics linkage model to an analysis of an extinct stem carnivoramorphan and an outgroup creodont species provides biomechanical evidence for the evolution of taxa into distinct hypercarnivorous and generalist feeding styles prior to the appearance of crown carnivoran clades with similar feeding preferences.

  3. Are cranial biomechanical simulation data linked to known diets in extant taxa? A method for applying diet-biomechanics linkage models to infer feeding capability of extinct species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Flynn, John J

    2015-01-01

    Performance of the masticatory system directly influences feeding and survival, so adaptive hypotheses often are proposed to explain craniodental evolution via functional morphology changes. However, the prevalence of "many-to-one" association of cranial forms and functions in vertebrates suggests a complex interplay of ecological and evolutionary histories, resulting in redundant morphology-diet linkages. Here we examine the link between cranial biomechanical properties for taxa with different dietary preferences in crown clade Carnivora, the most diverse clade of carnivorous mammals. We test whether hypercarnivores and generalists can be distinguished based on cranial mechanical simulation models, and how such diet-biomechanics linkages relate to morphology. Comparative finite element and geometric morphometrics analyses document that predicted bite force is positively allometric relative to skull strain energy; this is achieved in part by increased stiffness in larger skull models and shape changes that resist deformation and displacement. Size-standardized strain energy levels do not reflect feeding preferences; instead, caniform models have higher strain energy than feliform models. This caniform-feliform split is reinforced by a sensitivity analysis using published models for six additional taxa. Nevertheless, combined bite force-strain energy curves distinguish hypercarnivorous versus generalist feeders. These findings indicate that the link between cranial biomechanical properties and carnivoran feeding preference can be clearly defined and characterized, despite phylogenetic and allometric effects. Application of this diet-biomechanics linkage model to an analysis of an extinct stem carnivoramorphan and an outgroup creodont species provides biomechanical evidence for the evolution of taxa into distinct hypercarnivorous and generalist feeding styles prior to the appearance of crown carnivoran clades with similar feeding preferences. PMID:25923776

  4. Effects of two football stud configurations on biomechanical characteristics of single-leg landing and cutting movements on infilled synthetic turf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Elizabeth; Zhang, Songning; Milner, Clare; Liu, Xuan; Brosnan, James T; Sorochan, John C

    2014-11-01

    Multiple playing surfaces and footwear used in American football warrant a better understanding of relationship between different combinations of turf and footwear. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of shoe and stud types on ground reaction force (GRF) and ankle and knee kinematics of a 180° cut and a single-leg 90° land-cut on synthetic turf. Fourteen recreational football players performed five trials of the 180° cut and 90° land-cut in three shoe conditions: non-studded running shoe, and football shoe with natural and synthetic turf studs. Variables were analyzed with a 3 × 2 (shoe × movement) repeated measures analysis of variance (p vertical GRF (p loading rate (p vertical GRF and loading rate compared to the 180° cut. Overall, increased GRFs in the 90° land-cut movement may increase the chance of injury. PMID:25301011

  5. The Effect of Chang Run Tong on Biomechanical Colon Remodeling in STZ-Induced Type I Diabetic Rats - Is It Related to Advanced Glycation End Product Formation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    effects. Meterials and METHODS: Morphometric properties, residual strains and stress-strain of the wall were studied in colonic segments obtained from diabetic (DM), CRT treated diabetic (T1, high dosage: 50g/kg; T2, low dosage: 25g/kg) and normal (Con) rats. Diabetes was induced by a single tail vein...... and the opening angle were measured from the digitized images of the segments in the no-load state and zero-stress state. The residual strain was computed from the morphometry data. Step-wise distension was done (from 0 to 20 cmH2O). Circumferential and longitudinal stresses and strains were computed...... from the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry. The expression of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and receptor of AGE (RAGE) were detected in different layers by using immunohistochemistry method and quantitatively analyzed by using imaging analysis software...

  6. Biomedical Imaging and Computational Modeling in Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Iacoviello, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This book collects the state-of-art and new trends in image analysis and biomechanics. It covers a wide field of scientific and cultural topics, ranging from remodeling of bone tissue under the mechanical stimulus up to optimizing the performance of sports equipment, through the patient-specific modeling in orthopedics, microtomography and its application in oral and implant research, computational modeling in the field of hip prostheses, image based model development and analysis of the human knee joint, kinematics of the hip joint, micro-scale analysis of compositional and mechanical properties of dentin, automated techniques for cervical cell image analysis, and iomedical imaging and computational modeling in cardiovascular disease.   The book will be of interest to researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to image analysis and understanding, medical imaging, biomechanics, simulation and modeling, experimental analysis.

  7. Biomechanics and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Vercillo Fabio; Dede Ozgur; Wu Changfu; Woo Savio; Noorani Sabrina

    2006-01-01

    Abstract For years, bioengineers and orthopaedic surgeons have applied the principles of mechanics to gain valuable information about the complex function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The results of these investigations have provided scientific data for surgeons to improve methods of ACL reconstruction and postoperative rehabilitation. This review paper will present specific examples of how the field of biomechanics has impacted the evolution of ACL research. The anatomy and biome...

  8. Homogenization of biomechanical models for plant tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Piatnitski, Andrey; Ptashnyk, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper homogenization of a mathematical model for plant tissue biomechanics is presented. The microscopic model constitutes a strongly coupled system of reaction-diffusion-convection equations for chemical processes in plant cells, the equations of poroelasticity for elastic deformations of plant cell walls and middle lamella, and Stokes equations for fluid flow inside the cells. The chemical process in cells and the elastic properties of cell walls and middle lamella are coupled becau...

  9. BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN FEMUR BONE

    OpenAIRE

    RAJI NARELIYA,; VEERENDRA KUMAR

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanics is the theory of how tissues, cells, muscles, bones, organs and the motion of them and how their form and function are regulated by basic mechanical properties. A finite element model of bones with accurate geometry and material properties retrieved from CT scan data are being widely used to make realistic investigations on the mechanical behavior of bone structures. The aim of this study is to create a model of real proximal human femur bone for evaluating the finite element ana...

  10. Numerical Simulation of Some Biomechanical Problems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedoma, Jiří; Klézl, Z.; Fousek, J.; Kestřánek, Zdeněk; Stehlík, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 61, 3-6 (2003), s. 283-295. ISSN 0378-4754. [MODELLING 2001. IMACS Conference on Mathematical Modelling and Computational Methods in Mechanics, Physics, Biomechanics and Geodynamics /2./. Pilsen, 19.06.2001-25.06.2001] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : non-linear elasticity * contact problems * variational inequality * finite element method * wrist * spine * fracture Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.558, year: 2003

  11. SERVICE IN BADMINTON: A BIOMECHANICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem Ahmed; Sartaj Khan; Manu Mishra; Touheed Akhter

    2015-01-01

    To find out the differences between forehand and backhand short services in badminton, the present study was designed to analyze the biomechanical variables and segmental angles - shuttle velocity, wrist angle, elbow angle and shoulder angle of six male badminton players. The data were recorded during “North-Zone Intervarsity Championship” held at Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. All subjects in the study were right handed badminton players. The mean age, body height ...

  12. Patient-Specific Models of Cardiac Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy CP

    2012-01-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-di...

  13. Analysis of Biomechanical Factors in Bend Running

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Zhang; Xinping You; Feng Li

    2013-01-01

    Sprint running is the demonstration of comprehensive abilities of technology and tactics, under various conditions. However, whether it is just to allocate the tracks for short-distance athletes from different racetracks has been the hot topic. This study analyzes its forces, differences in different tracks and winding influences, in the aspects of sport biomechanics. The results indicate, many disadvantages exist in inner tracks, middle tracks are the best and outer ones are inferior to midd...

  14. Computational Biomechanics Theoretical Background and BiologicalBiomedical Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masao; Nakamura, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments have taken place in biological/biomedical measurement and imaging technologies as well as in computer analysis and information technologies. The increase in data obtained with such technologies invites the reader into a virtual world that represents realistic biological tissue or organ structures in digital form and allows for simulation and what is called “in silico medicine.” This volume is the third in a textbook series and covers both the basics of continuum mechanics of biosolids and biofluids and the theoretical core of computational methods for continuum mechanics analyses. Several biomechanics problems are provided for better understanding of computational modeling and analysis. Topics include the mechanics of solid and fluid bodies, fundamental characteristics of biosolids and biofluids, computational methods in biomechanics analysis/simulation, practical problems in orthopedic biomechanics, dental biomechanics, ophthalmic biomechanics, cardiovascular biomechanics, hemodynamics...

  15. Biomechanical exploration on dynamic modes of lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, M; Smyth, G

    1992-03-01

    Whatever the lifting method used, dynamic factors appear to have an effect on the safe realization of movement, and NIOSH guidelines recommend smooth lifting with no sudden acceleration effects. On the other hand, inertial forces may play an important role in the process of transfer of momentum to the load. The direction by which these inertial forces may affect the loadings on body structures and processes of energy transfers cannot be determined a priori. A biomechanical experiment was performed to examine if there were differences in the execution processes between a slow-continuous lift and an accelerated-continuous lift, and also between accelerated lifts either executed continuously or interrupted with a pause. The lifts were executed from a height of 15 cm to a height of 185 cm above the head and with two different loads (6.4 and 11.6 kg). Five experienced workers in manual materials handling were used as subjects. Films and force platforms recordings supplied the data; dynamic segmental analyses were performed to calculate net muscular moments at each joint; a planar single-muscle equivalent was used to estimate compression loadings at L5/S1; total mechanical work, joint work distribution, and energy transfers were determined from a kinetic approach based on the integration of joint power as a function of time. Analyses of variance with repeated measures were applied to the three treatments. The results showed that joint muscular moments, spinal loadings, mechanical work, and muscular utilization ratios were generally increased by the presence of acceleration without inducing benefits of improved energy transfers; therefore slower lifts with reduced acceleration may be safer when handling moderately heavy loads. The maximum values of kinematic and kinetic factors were generally not affected by the pause, but the occurrence of jerks in the movement (acceleration, ground forces, and muscular moments) suggests that the pause may not be indicated when

  16. Biomechanical determinants of elite rowing technique and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, E M; Bull, A M J; McGregor, A H

    2015-04-01

    In rowing, the parameters of injury, performance, and technique are all interrelated and in dynamic equilibrium. Whilst rowing requires extreme physical strength and endurance, a high level of skill and technique is essential to enable an effective transfer of power through the rowing sequence. This study aimed to determine discrete aspects of rowing technique, which strongly influence foot force production and asymmetries at the foot-stretchers, as these are biomechanical parameters often associated with performance and injury risk. Twenty elite female rowers performed an incremental rowing test on an instrumented rowing ergometer, which measured force at the handle and foot-stretchers, while three-dimensional kinematic recordings of the ankle, knee, hip, and lumbar-pelvic joints were made. Multiple regression analyses identified hip kinematics as a key predictor of foot force output (R(2)  = 0.48), whereas knee and lumbar-pelvic kinematics were the main determinants in optimizing the horizontal foot force component (R(2)  = .41). Bilateral asymmetries of the foot-stretchers were also seen to significantly influence lumbar-pelvic kinematics (R(2)  = 0.43) and pelvic twisting (R(2)  = 0.32) during the rowing stroke. These results provide biomechanical evidence toward aspects of technique that can be modified to optimize force output and performance, which can be of direct benefit to coaches and athletes. PMID:25039605

  17. Biomechanical properties of decellularized porcine pulmonary valve conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Gernot; Grasl, Christian; Stoiber, Martin; Rieder, Erwin; Kasimir, Marie-Theres; Dunkler, Daniela; Simon, Paul; Weigel, Günter; Schima, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves constructed from a xenogeneic or allogeneic decellularized matrix might overcome the disadvantages of current heart valve substitutes. One major necessity besides effective decellularization is to preserve the biomechanical properties of the valve. Native and decellularized porcine pulmonary heart valve conduits (PPVCs) (with [n = 10] or without [n = 10] cryopreservation) were compared to cryopreserved human pulmonary valve conduits (n = 7). Samples of the conduit were measured for wall thickness and underwent tensile tests. Elongation measurement was performed with a video extensometer. Decellularized PPVC showed a higher failure force both in longitudinal (+73%; P < 0.01) and transverse (+66%; P < 0.001) direction compared to human homografts. Failure force of the tissue after cryopreservation was still higher in the porcine group (longitudinal: +106%, P < 0.01; transverse: +58%, P < 0.001). In comparison to human homografts, both decellularized and decellularized cryopreserved porcine conduits showed a higher extensibility in longitudinal (decellularized: +61%, P < 0.001; decellularized + cryopreserved: +51%, P < 0.01) and transverse (decellularized: +126%, P < 0.001; decellularized + cryopreserved: +118%, P < 0.001) direction. Again, cryopreservation did not influence the biomechanical properties of the decellularized porcine matrix. PMID:18181800

  18. Biomechanical changes in endothelial cells result from an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkus, Janina; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    During periods of infection and disease, the immune system induces the release of TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine, from a variety of cell types, such as macrophages. TNF-α, while circulating in the vasculature, binds to the apical surface of endothelial cells and causes a wide range of biological and mechanical changes to the endothelium. While the biological changes have been widely studied, the biomechanical aspects have been largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the biomechanical changes of the endothelium as a function of TNF-α treatment. First, we studied the traction forces applied by the endothelium, an effect that is much less studied than others. Through the use of traction force microscopy, we found that TNF-α causes an increase in traction forces applied by the endothelial cells as compared to non-treated cells. Then, we investigated cell morphology, cell mechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that in addition to increasing applied traction forces, TNF-α causes an increase in cell area and aspect ratio on average, as well as a shift in the organization of F-actin filaments within the cell. Combining these findings together, our results show that an inflammatory response heavily impacts the morphology, cell mechanics, migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, and applied traction forces of endothelial cells.

  19. Effect of the rider position during rising trot on the horse׳s biomechanics (back and trunk kinematics and pressure under the saddle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P; Cheze, L; Pourcelot, P; Desquilbet, L; Duray, L; Chateau, H

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about the horse-saddle-rider interaction remains limited. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the rider׳s position at rising trot on the pressure distribution, spine movements, stirrups forces and locomotion of the horse. The horse׳s back movements were measured using IMUs fixed at the levels of thoracic (T6, T12, T16) and lumbar (L2, L5) vertebrae, the pressure distribution using a pressure mat and stirrups forces using force sensors. The horse׳s and rider׳s approximated centres of mass (COM) were calculated using 2D reflective markers. To compare both trot phases (rider seated/rider standing), three horses were trotted at the rising trot by the same rider. Means±SD of each parameter for sitting and standing were compared using a Student׳s t test (p=0.05). Stirrups forces showed two peaks of equal magnitude in every stride cycle for left and right stirrups but increased during the standing phase. Simultaneously, the pressure for the whole mat significantly increased by +3.1kPa during the sitting phase with respect to standing phase. The T12-T16 and T16-L2 angular ranges of motion (ROM) were significantly reduced (-3.2° -1.2°) and the T6-T12 and L2-L5 ROM were significantly increased (+1.7° +0.7°) during sitting phase compared to standing phase. During rising trot, the sitting phase does not only increase the pressure on the horse׳s back but also reduces the back motion under the saddle compared to the standing phase. These results give new insights into the understanding of horse-rider interactions and equine back pain management. PMID:26947029

  20. Morphology and biomechanics of human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Polienko, Asel V.; Ivanov, Dmitry V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: A study of the biomechanical characteristics of the human heart ventricles was performed. 80 hearts were extracted during autopsy of 80 corpses of adults (40 women and 40 men) aged 31-70 years. The samples were investigated in compliance with the recommendations of the ethics committee. Methods: Tension and compression tests were performed with help of the uniaxial testing machine Instron 5944. Cardiometry was also performed. Results: In this work, techniques for human heart ventricle wall biomechanical properties estimation were developed. Regularities of age and gender variability in deformative and strength properties of the right and left ventricle walls were found. These properties were characterized by a smooth growth of myocardial tissue stiffness and resistivity at a relatively low strain against reduction in their strength and elasticity from 31-40 to 61-70 years. It was found that tissue of the left ventricle at 61-70 years had a lower stretchability and strength compared with tissues of the right ventricle and septum. These data expands understanding of the morphological organization of the heart ventricles, which is very important for the development of personalized medicine. Taking into account individual, age and gender differences of the heart ventricle tissue biomechanical characteristics allows to rationally choosing the type of patching materials during reconstructive operations on heart.

  1. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint. PMID:27007474

  2. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef A.

    2014-03-01

    Already the Roman Celsus recognized rigid tissue as characteristic for solid tumors. Conversely, changes towards a weaker cytoskeleton have been described as a feature of cancer cells since the early days of tumor biology. It remains unclear if a carcinoma's rigid signature stems from more inflexible cells or is caused by the stroma. Despite that the importance of cell biomechanics for tumor progression becomes more and more evident the chicken-and-egg problem to what extent cancer cells already change their mechanical properties within the solid tumor in order to transgress its boundary or mechanical changes are induced by the microenvironment when the cell has left the tumor has been discussed highly controversial. Comprehensive clinical biomechanical measurements only exist from tumor tissue without the possibility to identify individual cells or from individual cancer cells from pleural effusions. Since the biomechanical properties of cells in carcinomas remain unknown measurements on individual cells that directly stem out of primary tumor samples are required, which we have conducted. We found in cervix and mammary carcinomas a distinctive increase of softer cells as well as contractile cells. A soft and contractile cell is like a strong elastic rope. The cell can generate a strong tensile tension to pull its self along and is soft against compression to avoid jamming.

  3. Protocol for Project FACT: a randomised controlled trial on the effect of a walking program and vitamin B supplementation on the rate of cognitive decline and psychosocial wellbeing in older adults with mild cognitive impairment [ISRCTN19227688

    OpenAIRE

    Hopman-Rock Marijke; van Uffelen Jannique GZ; Chin A Paw Marijke JM; van Mechelen Willem

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background the prevalence of individuals with cognitive decline is increasing since the number of elderly adults is growing considerably. The literature provides promising results on the beneficial effect of exercise and vitamin supplementation on cognitive function both in cognitively healthy as well as in the demented elderly. Methods/Design the design is a two-by-two factorial randomised controlled trial. The study population consists of independently living elderly, between 70 an...

  4. Protocol for Project FACT: A randomised controlled trial on the effect of a walking program and vitamin B supplementation on the rate of cognitive decline and psychosocial wellbeing in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Uffelen, J.G.Z. van; Hopman-Rock, M.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; van Mechelen, W

    2005-01-01

    Background: the prevalence of individuals with cognitive decline is increasing since the number of elderly adults is growing considerably. The literature provides promising results on the beneficial effect of exercise and vitamin supplementation on cognitive function both in cognitively healthy as well as in the demented elderly. Methods/Design: the design is a two-by-two factorial randomised controlled trial. The study population consists of independently living elderly, between 70 and 80 ye...

  5. Effect of High Heels on Biomechanics of a Walking Woman's Trunk and Lower Limbs%高跟鞋对行走中女性躯干、下肢的力学影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华; 吴文华

    2011-01-01

    It is very useful for designing suitable high heels that we investigate the biomechanical characteristics of a woman' s trunk and lower limbs , who is walking with high heehs. This paper summarizes the common impairment caused by high-heels, including platypodia, toe deformity, sprain of ankle, gonarthritis,backache. The gait characters of walking women in high heels are with little stride, low step speed, long gait cycle, more fluctuant center of gravity, shorter phase of single-limb stance. The characters on mechanics shows that the pressure on pelma is not even, the stress at knee joint increases, the muscle power of lower limbs gets weak, and even the load on spine augments. Therefore woman walking in high heels for a long time causes a lot of adverse effects on trunk and lower limbs, that means a woman should wear high heels as few as possible in daily life.%通过探讨高跟鞋对行走中女性躯干、下肢的生物力学影响,可以为设计更符合人体运动功能的高跟鞋提供理论依据.通过总结本文得出高跟鞋对女性的常见损伤有扁平足、足趾畸形、踝关节扭伤、膝关节炎、腰背酸痛;穿高跟鞋行走的步态特征是步幅小、步速慢、周期长、重心起伏大、单支撑时相缩短;其力学特征有足底受力不均匀、踝关节受力减少、膝关节内压力增大、下肢肌肉肌力变小、脊柱负荷加大等.总之长期穿高跟鞋行走对女性躯干、下肢产生许多不利影响,因此建议女性平时尽量少穿高跟鞋.

  6. Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline

    OpenAIRE

    Sorwell, Krystina G.; Urbanski, Henryk F.

    2009-01-01

    In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the de...

  7. An introduction to biomechanics solids and fluids, analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, Jay D

    2004-01-01

    Designed to meet the needs of undergraduate students, Introduction to Biomechanics takes the fresh approach of combining the viewpoints of both a well-respected teacher and a successful student. With an eye toward practicality without loss of depth of instruction, this book seeks to explain the fundamental concepts of biomechanics. With the accompanying web site providing models, sample problems, review questions and more, Introduction to Biomechanics provides students with the full range of instructional material for this complex and dynamic field.

  8. Biomechanics of the elbow joint in tennis players.

    OpenAIRE

    Eygendaal, D.; Rahussen, F.T.; Diercks, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Elbow injuries constitute a sizeable percentage of tennis injuries. A basic understanding of biomechanics of tennis and analysis of forces, loads and motions of the elbow during tennis can will improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of these injuries. All different strokes in tennis have a different repetitive biomechanical nature which can result in tennis related injuries. In this article a biomechanically based evaluation of tennis strokes is presented. This overview includes all...

  9. Jet-Ricci Geometry of Time-Dependent Human Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2009-01-01

    We propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds derived from the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold. The corresponding Riemannian geometrical evolution follows the Ricci flow diffusion. In particular, we show that the exponential-like decay of total biomechanical energy (due to exh...

  10. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. PMID:25801423

  11. Migratory diversity predicts population declines in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, James J; Gill, Jennifer A; Butchart, Stuart H M; Jones, Victoria R; Franco, Aldina M A

    2016-03-01

    Declines in migratory species are a pressing concern worldwide, but the mechanisms underpinning these declines are not fully understood. We hypothesised that species with greater within-population variability in migratory movements and destinations, here termed 'migratory diversity', might be more resilient to environmental change. To test this, we related map-based metrics of migratory diversity to recent population trends for 340 European breeding birds. Species that occupy larger non-breeding ranges relative to breeding, a characteristic we term 'migratory dispersion', were less likely to be declining than those with more restricted non-breeding ranges. Species with partial migration strategies (i.e. overlapping breeding and non-breeding ranges) were also less likely to be declining than full migrants or full residents, an effect that was independent of migration distance. Recent rates of advancement in Europe-wide spring arrival date were greater for partial migrants than full migrants, suggesting that migratory diversity may also help facilitate species responses to climate change. PMID:26807694

  12. Biomechanical effects of dissecting flexor carpi ulnaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreulen, M; Smeulders, M J C; Hage, J J; Huijing, P A

    2003-08-01

    Our aim was to determine whether the length and function of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle were affected by separating it from its soft tissue connections. We measured the length of flexor carpi ulnaris before and after its dissection in ten patients with cerebral palsy. After tenotomy, tetanic contraction shortened the muscle by a mean of 8 mm. Subsequent dissection to separate it from all soft tissue connections, resulted in a further mean shortening of 17 mm (p pathway for the transmission of force. This may have clinical implications for the outcome after tendon transfer. PMID:12931805

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 Regulates Vein Wall Biomechanics in Murine Thrombus Resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh P Nguyen

    Full Text Available Deep venous thrombosis is a common vascular problem with long-term complications including post-thrombotic syndrome. Post-thrombotic syndrome consists of leg pain, swelling and ulceration that is related to incomplete or maladaptive resolution of the venous thrombus as well as loss of compliance of the vein wall. We examine the role of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, a gene important in extracellular remodeling in other vascular diseases, in mediating thrombus resolution and biomechanical changes of the vein wall.The effects of targeted deletion of MMP-9 were studied in an in vivo murine model of thrombus resolution using the FVB strain of mice. MMP-9 expression and activity significantly increased on day 3 after DVT. The lack of MMP-9 impaired thrombus resolution by 27% and this phenotype was rescued by the transplantation of wildtype bone marrow cells. Using novel biomechanical techniques, we demonstrated that the lack of MMP-9 significantly decreased thrombus-induced loss of vein wall compliance. Biomechanical analysis of the contribution of individual structural components showed that MMP-9 affected the elasticity of the extracellular matrix and collagen-elastin fibers. Biochemical and histological analyses correlated with these biomechanical effects as thrombi of mice lacking MMP-9 had significantly fewer macrophages and collagen as compared to those of wildtype mice.MMP-9 mediates thrombus-induced loss of vein wall compliance by increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix and collagen-elastin fibers during thrombus resolution. MMP-9 also mediates macrophage and collagen content of the resolving thrombus and bone-marrow derived MMP-9 plays a role in resolution of thrombus mass. These disparate effects of MMP-9 on various aspects of thrombus illustrate the complexity of individual protease function on biomechanical and morphometric aspects of thrombus resolution.

  14. 月球赤纬角变化的旱灾效应%The Effect of Lunar Apparent Declination on Drought Hazard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮建勋

    2014-01-01

    行星对应区理论认为太阳系各星体及其格局对地球气候有影响。该理论较完整地解释了包括月球在内的太阳系各星体运行、格局对地球气候乃至旱涝灾害的影响规律。研究发现,月球对干旱的影响有地带性规律,月球回归赤纬偏北或偏南,均可造成华北或黄河流域的干旱。月球只能配合其他星体格局以触发干旱或洪涝灾害。据此判断,在2013-2017年期间,月球赤纬角进入最低值时期,预示着我国华北地区进入了连续几年将呈现大旱的状态。%The planetary corresponding area theory from the astronomical disasters point of view claims that those celestial bodies in the solar system can affect the Earth climates.The theory explains completely the affecting rules of the apparent positions and patterns of these major planets on many drought or rainstorm disasters on the Earth.Disaster impacts of different lunar right declinations are explored.It is found that the impact of the lunar motion has zonal rules on the Earth.Higher or lower of lunar regression of right declination would also bring drought disasters for the North China.The moon can only trigger the natural disasters together with the other planets.Dur-ing the period of 2013 to 2017,the right declination of the moon enters the lowest state.It means the North China will come into drought disaster period for several years.

  15. Biomechanical approaches to identify and quantify injury mechanisms and risk factors in women's artistic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth J; Hume, Patria A

    2012-09-01

    Targeted injury prevention strategies, based on biomechanical analyses, have the potential to help reduce the incidence and severity of gymnastics injuries. This review outlines the potential benefits of biomechanics research to contribute to injury prevention strategies for women's artistic gymnastics by identification of mechanisms of injury and quantification of the effects of injury risk factors. One hundred and twenty-three articles were retained for review after searching electronic databases using key words, including 'gymnastic', 'biomech*', and 'inj*', and delimiting by language and relevance to the paper aim. Impact load can be measured biomechanically by the use of instrumented equipment (e.g. beatboard), instrumentation on the gymnast (accelerometers), or by landings on force plates. We need further information on injury mechanisms and risk factors in gymnastics and practical methods of monitoring training loads. We have not yet shown, beyond a theoretical approach, how biomechanical analysis of gymnastics can help reduce injury risk through injury prevention interventions. Given the high magnitude of impact load, both acute and accumulative, coaches should monitor impact loads per training session, taking into consideration training quality and quantity such as the control of rotation and the height from which the landings are executed. PMID:23072044

  16. Evaluation of Corneal Topography and Biomechanical Parameters after Use of Systemic Isotretinoin in Acne Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Yildirim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We report the effect of isotretinoin on corneal topography, corneal thickness, and biomechanical parameters in patients with acne vulgaris. Method. Fifty-four eyes of 54 patients who received oral isotretinoin for treatment of acne vulgaris were evaluated. All patients underwent a corneal topographical evaluation with a Scheimpflug camera combined with Placido-disk (Sirius, ultrasonic pachymetry measurements, and corneal biomechanical evaluation with an ocular response analyzer at baseline, in the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months of treatment, and 6 months after isotretinoin discontinuation. Results. The thinnest corneal thickness measured with Sirius differed significantly in the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months compared with the baseline measurement; there was no significant change in ultrasonic central corneal thickness measurements and biomechanical parameters (corneal hysteresis and corneal resistance factor throughout the study. Average simulated keratometry and surface asymmetry index increased significantly only in the first month of treatment according to the baseline. All changes disappeared 6 months after the end of treatment. Conclusion. Basal tear secretion and corneal morphologic properties were significantly influenced during the systemic isotretinoin treatment and the changes were reversible after discontinuation. No statistical important biomechanical differences were found to be induced by isotretinoin.

  17. Numerical Reconstruction and Injury Biomechanism in a Car-Pedestrian Crash Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Dong-hua; LI Zheng-dong; SHAO Yu; FENG Hao; CHEN Jian-guo; LIU Ning-guo; HUANG Ping; CHEN Yi-jiu

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reconstruct a car-pedestrian crash accident using numerical simulation technology and explore the injury biomechanism as forensic evidence for injury identification.Methods An integration of multi-body dynamic,finite elcment (FE),and classical method was applied to a car-pedestrian crash accident.The location of the collision and the details of the traffic accident were determined by vehicle trace verification and autopsy.The accident reconstruction was performed by coupling the three-dimensional car behavior from PC-CRASH with a MADYMO dummy model.The collision FE models of head and leg,developed from CT scans of human remains,were loaded with calculated dummy collision parameters.The data of the impact biomechanical responses were extracted in terms of von Mises stress,relative displacement,strain and stress fringes.Results The accident reconstruction results were identical with the examined ones and the biomechanism of head and leg injuries,illustrated through the FE methods,were consistent with the classical injury theories.Conclusion The numerical simulation technology is proved to be effective in identifying traffic accidents and exploring of injury biomechanism.

  18. Lithuania: Fertility decline and its determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiva Jasilioniene

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 1990s, Lithuania has been undergoing significant transformations in family life and has experienced a precipitous decline in fertility. The determinants of the changes are diverse in character and are associated with socioeconomic transformations, economic difficulties faced by the post-Soviet society, inadequate social and family policies and changing value orientations and life styles. This article traces the fertility trends in Lithuania from the period and cohort perspective, providing adjusted TFR estimates that reveal the significance of the tempo effect on the recent decline in fertility. Furthermore, the main factors leading to the recently observed changes in family and fertility are identified and analysed. Finally, the characteristic features and necessary improvements of current Lithuanian family policy and its possible effects on individual behaviour and fertility trends are discussed.

  19. Lower limb biomechanics during running in individuals with achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Shannon E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal lower limb biomechanics is speculated to be a risk factor for Achilles tendinopathy. This study systematically reviewed the existing literature to identify, critique and summarise lower limb biomechanical factors associated with Achilles tendinopathy. Methods We searched electronic bibliographic databases (Medline, EMBASE, Current contents, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus in November 2010. All prospective cohort and case-control studies that evaluated biomechanical factors (temporospatial parameters, lower limb kinematics, dynamic plantar pressures, kinetics [ground reaction forces and joint moments] and muscle activity associated with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy were included. Quality of included studies was evaluated using the Quality Index. The magnitude of differences (effect sizes between cases and controls was calculated using Cohen's d (with 95% CIs. Results Nine studies were identified; two were prospective and the remaining seven case-control study designs. The quality of 9 identified studies was varied, with Quality Index scores ranging from 4 to 15 out of 17. All studies analysed running biomechanics. Cases displayed increased eversion range of motion of the rearfoot (d = 0.92 and 0.67 in two studies, reduced maximum lower leg abduction (d = -1.16, reduced ankle joint dorsiflexion velocity (d = -0.62 and reduced knee flexion during gait (d = -0.90. Cases also demonstrated a number of differences in dynamic plantar pressures (primarily the distribution of the centre of force, ground reaction forces (large effects for timing variables and also showed reduced peak tibial external rotation moment (d = -1.29. Cases also displayed differences in the timing and amplitude of a number of lower limb muscles but many differences were equivocal. Conclusions There are differences in lower limb biomechanics between those with and without Achilles tendinopathy that may have implications for the prevention and management of

  20. The declining talent pool of government

    OpenAIRE

    Dewan, Torun; Myatt, David

    2008-01-01

    We consider a government for which success requires high performance by talented ministers. A leader provides incentives to her ministers by firing those who fail. However, the consequent turnover drains a finite talent pool of potential appointees. The severity of the optimal firing rule and ministerial performances decline over time: the lifetime of an effective government is limited. We relate this lifetime to various factors, including external shocks, the replenishment of the talent pool...

  1. French Wines on the Decline?:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo

    2004-01-01

    French wines, differentiated by geographic origin, served for many decades as a basis for the French success in the British wine market. However in the early 1990s, market share began to decline. This article explores the values that market participants placed on labelling information on French w...

  2. Chinese culture and fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C; Jia, S

    1992-01-01

    Coale has suggested that cultural factors exert a significant influence on fertility reduction; countries in the "Chinese cultural circle" would be the first to show fertility decline. In China, the view was that traditional Chinese culture contributed to increased population. This paper examines the nature of the relationship between Chinese culture and fertility. Attention was directed to a comparison of fertility rates of developing countries with strong Chinese cultural influence and of fertility within different regions of China. Discussion was followed by an explanation of the theoretical impact of Chinese culture on fertility and direct and indirect beliefs and practices that might either enhance or hinder fertility decline. Emigration to neighboring countries occurred after the Qing dynasty. Fertility after the 1950s declined markedly in Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, and mainland China: all countries within the Chinese cultural circle. Other countries within the Chinese circle which have higher fertility, yet lower fertility than other non-Chinese cultural countries, are Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia. Within China, regions with similar fertility patterns are identified as coastal regions, central plains, and mountainous and plateau regions. The Han ethnic group has lower fertility than that of ethnic minorities; regions with large Han populations have lower fertility. Overseas Chinese in East Asian countries also tend to have lower fertility than their host populations. Chinese culture consisted of the assimilation of other cultures over 5000 years. Fertility decline was dependent on the population's desire to limit reproduction, favorable social mechanisms, and availability of contraception: all factors related to economic development. Chinese culture affects fertility reduction by affecting reproductive views and social mechanisms directly, and indirectly through economics. Confucianism emphasizes collectivism, self

  3. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorogieva Ojo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and SwetsWise databases. The duration of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin levels and glycaemic fluctuations were associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Similarly, hypoglycaemia was significantly related to increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, cognitive decline and dementia were associated with poorer diabetes management. There is evidence of the association between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia including the shared pathogenesis between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the self management of diabetes is affected by dementia and cognitive decline. It could be suggested that the association between diabetes and dementia is bidirectional with the potential to proceed to a vicious cycle. Further studies are needed in order to fully establish the relationship between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia. Patients who have diabetes and dementia could benefit from structured education strategies, which should involve empowerment programmes and lifestyle changes. The detection of cognitive decline should highlight the need for education strategies.

  4. BIOMECHANICAL FEATURES OF THE LATERALISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutnik B

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Was shown that if the angle of attachment of the FDI is greater on the left hand then the magnitude of the rotary force is potentially greater and consequently the muscle tension produced is likely to be used more economically and/or with more effect. Therefore it follows that the magnitude of maximal isometric muscle force even when derived from a single muscle is perhaps inadvisably adopted as a valid predictor of handedness.

  5. Biomechanics of male erectile function

    OpenAIRE

    Udelson, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Two major branches of engineering mechanics are fluid mechanics and structural mechanics, with many practical problems involving the effect of the first on the second. An example is the design of an aircraft's wings to bend within reasonable limits without breaking under the action of lift forces exerted by the air flowing over them; another is the maintenance of the structural integrity of a dam designed to hold back a water reservoir which would exert very large forces on it. Similarly, flu...

  6. Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, and the 75th Anniversary of RQES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Joseph; Haymes, Emily M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the biomechanics and exercise physiology studies published in the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) over the past 75 years. Studies in biomechanics, a relatively new subdiscipline that evolved from kinesiology, first appeared in the journal about 40 years ago. Exercise physiology studies have…

  7. Factors Related to Students' Learning of Biomechanics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, ChengTu; Smith, Jeremy D.; Bohne, Michael; Knudson, Duane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and expand a previous study to identify the factors that affect students' learning of biomechanical concepts. Students were recruited from three universities (N = 149) located in the central and western regions of the United States. Data from 142 students completing the Biomechanics Concept Inventory…

  8. The Undergraduate Biomechanics Experience at Iowa State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter R.

    This paper discusses the objectives of a program in biomechanics--the analysis of sports skills and movement--and the evolution of the biomechanics program at Iowa State University. The primary objective of such a course is to provide the student with the basic tools necessary for adequate analysis of human movement, with special emphasis upon…

  9. Biomechanical and neuromuscular characteristics of male athletes: implications for the development of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Dai; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Mendiguchía, Jurdan; Samuelsson, Kristian; Karlsson, Jon; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is likely the most effective strategy to reduce undesired health consequences including reconstruction surgery, long-term rehabilitation, and pre-mature osteoarthritis occurrence. A thorough understanding of mechanisms and risk factors of ACL injury is crucial to develop effective prevention programs, especially for biomechanical and neuromuscular modifiable risk factors. Historically, the available evidence regarding ACL risk factors has mainly involved female athletes or has compared male and female athletes without an intra-group comparison for male athletes. Therefore, the principal purpose of this article was to review existing evidence regarding the investigation of biomechanical and neuromuscular characteristics that may imply aberrant knee kinematics and kinetics that would place the male athlete at risk of ACL injury. Biomechanical evidence related to knee kinematics and kinetics was reviewed by different planes (sagittal and frontal/coronal), tasks (single-leg landing and cutting), situation (anticipated and unanticipated), foot positioning, playing surface, and fatigued status. Neuromuscular evidence potentially related to ACL injury was reviewed. Recommendations for prevention programs for ACL injuries in male athletes were developed based on the synthesis of the biomechanical and neuromuscular characteristics. The recommendations suggest performing exercises with multi-plane biomechanical components including single-leg maneuvers in dynamic movements, reaction to and decision making in unexpected situations, appropriate foot positioning, and consideration of playing surface condition, as well as enhancing neuromuscular aspects such as fatigue, proprioception, muscle activation, and inter-joint coordination. PMID:25663251

  10. Biomechanics aspects of technique of high jump

    OpenAIRE

    Adashevskiy V.M.; Iermakov S.S.; Marchenko A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of work consists in the theoretical ground of optimum biomechanics descriptions in high jumps. A mathematical model is developed for determination of influence on the height of jump: speed and corner of flight of centre-of-mass during pushing away, positions of centre-of-mass body of sportsman in the phases of pushing away and transition through a slat, forces of resistance of air environment, influences of moment of inertia of body. The basic technical run-time errors of sportsma...

  11. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling

  12. Pathophysiology and Biomechanics of the Aging Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Sapkas, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Katonis, Pavlos

    2011-01-01

    Aging of the spine is characterized by two parallel but independent processes: the reduction of bone mineral density and the development of degenerative changes. The combination of degeneration and bone mass reduction contribute, to a different degree, to the development of a variety of lesions. This results in a number of painful and often debilitating disorders. The present review constitutes a synopsis of the pathophysiological processes that take place in the aging spine as well as of the consequences these changes have on the biomechanics of the spine. The authors hope to present a thorough yet brief overview of the process of aging of the human spine. PMID:21966338

  13. Carpal Ligament Anatomy and Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulos, Nicholas; Bozentka, David J

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the ligamentous anatomy of the wrist is critical for any physician attempting to treat carpal instability. The anatomy of the wrist is complex, not only because of the number of named structures and their geometry but also because of the inconsistencies in describing these ligaments. The complex anatomy of the wrist is described through a review of the carpal ligaments and their effect on normal carpal motion. Mastery of this topic facilitates the physician's understanding of the patterns of instability that are seen clinically. PMID:26205699

  14. Is the Test Score Decline Responsible for the Productivity Growth Decline?

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, John Hillman

    1989-01-01

    The test score decline between 1967 and 1980 was large (about 1.25 grade level equivalents) and historically unprecedented. New estimates of the trends in academic achievement, of the effect of academic achievement on productivity, and of trends in the quality of the work force are developed. The test score decline did not cause the post-1965 productivity growth slowdown, but it did contribute to its perpetuation. If test scores had continued to grow after 1967 at the rate prevailing in the p...

  15. On the prospect of patient-specific biomechanics without patient-specific properties of tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karol; Lu, Jia

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents main theses of two keynote lectures delivered at Euromech Colloquium "Advanced experimental approaches and inverse problems in tissue biomechanics" held in Saint Etienne in June 2012. We are witnessing an advent of patient-specific biomechanics that will bring in the future personalized treatments to sufferers all over the world. It is the current task of biomechanists to devise methods for clinically-relevant patient-specific modeling. One of the obstacles standing before the biomechanics community is the difficulty in obtaining patient-specific properties of tissues to be used in biomechanical models. We postulate that focusing on reformulating computational mechanics problems in such a way that the results are weakly sensitive to the variation in mechanical properties of simulated continua is more likely to bear fruit in near future. We consider two types of problems: (i) displacement-zero traction problems whose solutions in displacements are weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of the considered continuum; and (ii) problems that are approximately statically determinate and therefore their solutions in stresses are also weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of constituents. We demonstrate that the kinematically loaded biomechanical models of the first type are applicable in the field of image-guided surgery where the current, intraoperative configuration of a soft organ is of critical importance. We show that sac-like membranes, which are prototypes of many thin-walled biological organs, are approximately statically determinate and therefore useful solutions for wall stress can be obtained without the knowledge of the wall's properties. We demonstrate the clinical applicability and effectiveness of the proposed methods using examples from modeling neurosurgery and intracranial aneurysms. PMID:23491073

  16. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney–Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney–Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney–Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior–posterior, and superior–inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. (paper)

  17. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention programme to prevent new falls and functional decline among elderly persons at risk: design of a replicated randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN64716113

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crebolder Harry FJM

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are common among community-dwelling elderly people and can have a considerable impact on quality of life and healthcare costs. People who have sustained a fall are at greater risk of falling again. We replicated a British randomised controlled trial which demonstrated the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention programme to prevent falls. The objective is to describe the design of a replication study evaluating a multidisciplinary intervention programme on recurrent falls and functional decline among elderly persons at risk. The study consists of an effect evaluation, an economic evaluation and a process evaluation. Methods/design The programme is aimed at community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 years or over who have visited an accident and emergency department (A&E department or a general practitioners' cooperative (GP cooperative because of a fall. The design involves a two-group randomised controlled trial. Participants are followed for twelve months after baseline. The intervention programme consists of a detailed medical and occupational therapy assessment with referral to relevant services if indicated. People in the control group receive usual care. The main outcome measures of the effect evaluation are number of falls and daily functioning. The economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective. A process evaluation will be carried out to evaluate the feasibility of the intervention programme.

  18. Jet Methods in Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds associated to the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold, called the configuration bundle. We start with an ordinary configuration manifold of human body motion, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF) for a particular movement. This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. By this extension, using techniques from fibre bundles, we defined the biomechanical configuration bundle. On the biomechanical bundle we define vector-fields, differential forms and affine connections, as well as the associat...

  19. Biomechanical factors associated with the development of tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tunen, Joyce A C; Dell'Isola, Andrea; Juhl, Carsten;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered biomechanics, increased joint loading and tissue damage, might be related in a vicious cycle within the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We have defined biomechanical factors as joint-related factors that interact with the forces, moments and kinematics in and around...... a synovial joint. Although a number of studies and systematic reviews have been performed to assess the association of various factors with the development of KOA, a comprehensive overview focusing on biomechanical factors that are associated with the development of KOA is not available. The aim...... of this review is (1) to identify biomechanical factors that are associated with (the development of) KOA and (2) to identify the impact of other relevant risk factors on this association. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Cohort, cross-sectional and case-control studies investigating the association of a biomechanical...

  20. Correlates of recent declines of rodents in northern and southern Australia : habitat structure is critical

    OpenAIRE

    Lawes, Michael J.; Fisher, Diana O; Johnson, Chris N.; Blomberg, Simon P.; Anke S K Frank; Fritz, Susanne A.; Hamish McCallum; Jeremy VanDerWal; Brett N Abbott; Sarah Legge; Mike Letnic; Thomas, Colette R.; Nikki Thurgate; Alaric Fisher; Gordon, Iain J.

    2015-01-01

    Australia has experienced dramatic declines and extinctions of its native rodent species over the last 200 years, particularly in southern Australia. In the tropical savanna of northern Australia significant declines have occurred only in recent decades. The later onset of these declines suggests that the causes may differ from earlier declines in the south. We examine potential regional effects (northern versus southern Australia) on biological and ecological correlates of range decline in A...

  1. Occupational biomechanics of athletes and dancers: a comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejjani, F J

    1987-07-01

    Muscle strains represent more than a third of all injuries in both dancers and athletes. Although often overlooked, anatomic variations play an important role in the etiology of these injuries, as does strength imbalance between agonists and antagonists. The incidence of spondylolysis is unusually high in ballet dancers and certain athletic groups, such as gymnasts, javelin throwers, and weight-lifters. Mechanical factors play a major role and can be exacerbated by congenital abnormalities. Various permanent adaptive musculoskeletal changes have been described both in dancers and athletes, especially those that start at a very young age. Task-related adaptive changes can also be seen in isokinetic strength measurements of various muscle groups, such as the spine muscles of Flamenco dancers. Shoes and floor surfaces can be directly responsible in part or in whole for many sports and dance injuries. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as an objective way to document their effect on biomechanical behavior. PMID:2886209

  2. Energetic and biomechanical constraints on animal migration distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Andrew M; Hou, Chen; Gillooly, James F

    2012-02-01

    Animal migration is one of the great wonders of nature, but the factors that determine how far migrants travel remain poorly understood. We present a new quantitative model of animal migration and use it to describe the maximum migration distance of walking, swimming and flying migrants. The model combines biomechanics and metabolic scaling to show how maximum migration distance is constrained by body size for each mode of travel. The model also indicates that the number of body lengths travelled by walking and swimming migrants should be approximately invariant of body size. Data from over 200 species of migratory birds, mammals, fish, and invertebrates support the central conclusion of the model - that body size drives variation in maximum migration distance among species through its effects on metabolism and the cost of locomotion. The model provides a new tool to enhance general understanding of the ecology and evolution of migration. PMID:22093885

  3. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  4. The biomechanics of solids and fluids: the physics of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David E.

    2016-09-01

    Biomechanics borrows and extends engineering techniques to study the mechanical properties of organisms and their environments. Like physicists and engineers, biomechanics researchers tend to specialize on either fluids or solids (but some do both). For solid materials, the stress–strain curve reveals such useful information as various moduli, ultimate strength, extensibility, and work of fracture. Few biological materials are linearly elastic so modified elastic moduli are defined. Although biological materials tend to be less stiff than engineered materials, biomaterials tend to be tougher due to their anisotropy and high extensibility. Biological beams are usually hollow cylinders; particularly in plants, beams and columns tend to have high twist-to-bend ratios. Air and water are the dominant biological fluids. Fluids generate both viscous and pressure drag (normalized as drag coefficients) and the Reynolds number (Re) gives their relative importance. The no-slip conditions leads to velocity gradients (‘boundary layers’) on surfaces and parabolic flow profiles in tubes. Rather than rigidly resisting drag in external flows, many plants and sessile animals reconfigure to reduce drag as speed increases. Living in velocity gradients can be beneficial for attachment but challenging for capturing particulate food. Lift produced by airfoils and hydrofoils is used to produce thrust by all flying animals and many swimming ones, and is usually optimal at higher Re. At low Re, most swimmers use drag-based mechanisms. A few swimmers use jetting for rapid escape despite its energetic inefficiency. At low Re, suspension feeding depends on mechanisms other than direct sieving because thick boundary layers reduce effective porosity. Most biomaterials exhibit a combination of solid and fluid properties, i.e., viscoelasticity. Even rigid biomaterials exhibit creep over many days, whereas pliant biomaterials may exhibit creep over hours or minutes. Instead of rigid materials

  5. BIOMECHANICS OF FLIGHT PHASE WHEN RUNNING LONG JUMP FROM PLACE OF DIFFERENT QUALIFICATION SPORTSMEN

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Razuvanova; Ye. V. Koshelskaya; V. I. Andreyev; I. V. Kapilevich

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical features of flight phase when running long jump from place of different qualification sportsmen were investigated by method of Motion Tracking. The obtained results showed that the effective control of body position during the phase of flight can improve the effectiveness of jump actions.. This control is performed by moving parts of the body – bending legs at the knee, extension in the hip joints, the joints of the spine, shoulder joints and, as a consequence, any additional to...

  6. Declining Efficiency in the Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses the concept of resource efficiency in the economy as a whole. This implies some unfoldings of the simple definition of efficiency as human satisfaction over throughput of resources. It is suggested, that the efficiency of the economic systems is declining in the countries with...... high material standard of living. Examples are presented as are suggestions for how to improve the efficiency. These improvements, however, have a tendency to reduce the gross domestic product and hence are conflicting with the conventional political goals of growing GDP.......The paper discusses the concept of resource efficiency in the economy as a whole. This implies some unfoldings of the simple definition of efficiency as human satisfaction over throughput of resources. It is suggested, that the efficiency of the economic systems is declining in the countries with a...

  7. Cardiovascular Prevention of Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Monsuez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Midlife cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipemia, and an unhealthy lifestyle, have been linked to subsequent incidence, delay of onset, and progression rate of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Conversely, optimal treatment of cardiovascular risk factors prevents and slows down age-related cognitive disorders. The impact of antihypertensive therapy on cognitive outcome in patients with hypertension was assessed in large trials which demonstrated a reduction in progression of MRI white matter hyperintensities, in cognitive decline and in incidence of dementia. Large-scale database correlated statin use and reduction in the incidence of dementia, mainly in patients with documented atherosclerosis, but clinical trials failed to reach similar conclusions. Whether a multitargeted intervention would substantially improve protection, quality of life, and reduce medical cost expenditures in patients with lower risk profile has not been ascertained. This would require appropriately designed trials targeting large populations and focusing on cognitive decline as a primary outcome endpoint.

  8. Inframammary Fold Reconstruction: A Biomechanical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Julia; Uener, Jens; Prescher, Andreas; Scaal, Martin; Puppe, Julian; Warm, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inframammary fold reconstruction has scarcely been evaluated in literature. No biomechanical analyses have been performed comparing different reconstructive methods. This evaluation compares the gold-standard suture reconstruction with an intrarib anchor system (Micro BioComposite SutureTak, Arthrex). Methods: Three analysis groups were compared including 8 Sawbone blocks, 22 embalmed cadaver, and 27 regular cadaver specimens (N = 57). Transient mechanical analysis was performed at 5 N/s using an Instron 5565 test frame. Results: Ultimate load favored the anchor system (compared with the gold-standard suture) by a factor of 9.8 (P group and a factor of 1.7 (P group. A similar statistically significant benefit was shown for stiffness and load at 2-mm displacement. Conclusions: This analysis showed an anchor system to be the biomechanically superior fixation method in terms of ultimate load, fixation stiffness, and displacement at failure when compared with the gold-standard suture method in inframammary fold reconstruction. Because of superior stability in every aspect, an anchor system may be considered for inframammary fold reconstruction. PMID:27257564

  9. Biomechanical analysis of jaw-closing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolstra, J H; van Eijden, T M

    1995-09-01

    This study concerns the complex interaction between active muscle forces and passive guiding structures during jaw-closing movements. It is generally accepted that the ligaments of the joint play a major role in condylar guidance during these movements. While these ligaments permit a wide range of motions, it was assumed that they are not primarily involved in force transmission in the joints. Therefore, it was hypothesized that muscle forces and movement constraints caused by the articular surfaces imply a necessary and sufficient condition to generate ordinary jaw-closing movements. This hypothesis was tested by biomechanical analysis. A dynamic six-degrees-of-freedom mathematical model of the human masticatory system has been developed for qualitative analysis of the contributions of the different masticatory muscles to jaw-closing movements, it was found that the normally observed movement, which includes a swing-slide condylar movement along the articular eminence, can be generated by various separate pairs of masticatory muscles, among which the different parts of the masseter as well as the medial pterygoid muscle appeared to be the most suitable to complete this action. The results seem to be in contrast to the general opinion that a muscle with a forward-directed force component may not be suitable for generating jaw movements in which the condyle moves backward. The results can be explained, however, by biomechanical analysis which includes not only muscle and joint forces as used in standard textbooks of anatomy, but also the torques generated by these forces. PMID:7560417

  10. Integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Löberg, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna.Loberg@dentsply.com [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Mattisson, Ingela [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Ahlberg, Elisabet [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-01-30

    In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed.

  11. Integrative Structural Biomechanical Concepts of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonse T. Masi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is not fully explained by inflammatory processes. Clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and course of disease features indicate additional host-related risk processes and predispositions. Collectively, the pattern of predisposition to onset in adolescent and young adult ages, male preponderance, and widely varied severity of AS is unique among rheumatic diseases. However, this pattern could reflect biomechanical and structural differences between the sexes, naturally occurring musculoskeletal changes over life cycles, and a population polymorphism. During juvenile development, the body is more flexible and weaker than during adolescent maturation and young adulthood, when strengthening and stiffening considerably increase. During middle and later ages, the musculoskeletal system again weakens. The novel concept of an innate axial myofascial hypertonicity reflects basic mechanobiological principles in human function, tissue reactivity, and pathology. However, these processes have been little studied and require critical testing. The proposed physical mechanisms likely interact with recognized immunobiological pathways. The structural biomechanical processes and tissue reactions might possibly precede initiation of other AS-related pathways. Research in the combined structural mechanobiology and immunobiology processes promises to improve understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of AS than prevailing concepts. The combined processes might better explain characteristic enthesopathic and inflammatory processes in AS.

  12. Biomechanical Energy Harvester Design For Active Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Oğuz Kaptı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors restricting the functions of active prostheses is limited charge times and weights of the batteries. Therefore, some biomechanical energy harvesting studies are conducted for reducing the dependence on batteries and developing the systems that produce energy by utilizing one's own actions during daily living activities. In this study, as a new approach to meet energy needs of active-controlled lower limb prostheses, the design of a biomechanical energy harvester that produces electrical energy from the movements of the knee joint during gait were carried out. This harvester is composed of the generator, planetary gear system and one-way clutch that transmit just the knee extension. Low weight, low additional metabolic power consumption requirement and high electrical power generation are targeted in design process. The total reduction ratio of the transmission is 104, and the knee joint reaction torque applied by the system is 6 Nm. Average electrical powers that can be obtained are 17 W and 5,8 W for the swing extension phase and the entire cycle, respectively. These values seem to be sufficient for charging the battery units of many prostheses and similar medical systems, and portable electronic devices such as mobile phones, navigation devices and laptops.

  13. Integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löberg, Johanna; Mattisson, Ingela; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed.

  14. Modeling the biomechanics of fetal movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Loo, Jessica H W; Hayat, Tayyib T A; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A; Phillips, Andrew T M; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2016-08-01

    Fetal movements in the uterus are a natural part of development and are known to play an important role in normal musculoskeletal development. However, very little is known about the biomechanical stimuli that arise during movements in utero, despite these stimuli being crucial to normal bone and joint formation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to create a series of computational steps by which the forces generated during a kick in utero could be predicted from clinically observed fetal movements using novel cine-MRI data of three fetuses, aged 20-22 weeks. A custom tracking software was designed to characterize the movements of joints in utero, and average uterus deflection of [Formula: see text] mm due to kicking was calculated. These observed displacements provided boundary conditions for a finite element model of the uterine environment, predicting an average reaction force of [Formula: see text] N generated by a kick against the uterine wall. Finally, these data were applied as inputs for a musculoskeletal model of a fetal kick, resulting in predicted maximum forces in the muscles surrounding the hip joint of approximately 8 N, while higher maximum forces of approximately 21 N were predicted for the muscles surrounding the knee joint. This study provides a novel insight into the closed mechanical environment of the uterus, with an innovative method allowing elucidation of the biomechanical interaction of the developing fetus with its surroundings. PMID:26534772

  15. : Cognitive complaints and cognitive decline.

    OpenAIRE

    Dufouil, Carole; Fuhrer, Rebecca; Alpérovitch, Annick

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore whether more cognitive complaints are associated with previous or future cognitive decline. DESIGN: Longitudinal; epidemiology vascular aging study. SETTING: Community in Nantes, France. PARTICIPANTS: Seven hundred thirty-three subjects, aged 59 to 71. MEASUREMENTS: Subjective cognitive complaints were recorded at 4-year follow-up examination in a prospective study of people aged 59 to 71 at study entry. Participants' cognitive performances were assessed repeatedly at e...

  16. Fibrin-genipin adhesive hydrogel for annulus fibrosus repair: performance evaluation with large animal organ culture, in situ biomechanics, and in vivo degradation tests

    OpenAIRE

    Likhitpanichkul, M.; Dreischarf, M; S Illien-Junger; BA Walter; T Nukaga; RG Long; Sakai, D; AC Hecht; JC Iatridis

    2014-01-01

    Annulus fibrosus (AF) defects from annular tears, herniation, and discectomy procedures are associated with painful conditions and accelerated intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Currently, no effective treatments exist to repair AF damage, restore IVD biomechanics and promote tissue regeneration. An injectable fibrin-genipin adhesive hydrogel (Fib-Gen) was evaluated for its performance repairing large AF defects in a bovine caudal IVD model using ex vivo organ culture and biomechanical t...

  17. Is human fecundity declining in Western countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velde, Egbert; Burdorf, Alex; Nieschlag, Eberhard; Eijkemans, René; Kremer, Jan A M; Roeleveld, Nel; Habbema, Dik

    2010-06-01

    Since Carlsen and co-workers reported in 1992 that sperm counts have decreased during the second half of the last century in Western societies, there has been widespread anxiety about the adverse effects of environmental pollutants on human fecundity. The Carlsen report was followed by several re-analyses of their data set and by many studies on time trends in sperm quality and on secular trends in fecundity. However, the results of these studies were diverse, complex, difficult to interpret and, therefore, less straightforward than the Carlsen report suggested. The claims that population fecundity is declining and that environmental pollutants are involved, can neither be confirmed nor rejected, in our opinion. However, it is of great importance to find out because the possible influence of widespread environmental pollution, which would adversely affect human reproduction, should be a matter of great concern triggering large-scale studies into its causes and possibilities for prevention. The fundamental reason we still do not know whether population fecundity is declining is the lack of an appropriate surveillance system. Is such a system possible? In our opinion, determining total sperm counts (as a measure of male reproductive health) in combination with time to pregnancy (as a measure of couple fecundity) in carefully selected populations is a feasible option for such a monitoring system. If we want to find out whether or not population fecundity will be declining within the following 20-30 years, we must start monitoring now. PMID:20395222

  18. Farmer's lung is now in decline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arya, A

    2012-02-03

    Farmer\\'s lung incidence in Ireland was constant until 1996, even though hay making methods were revolutionised in late 1980\\'s. We undertook this study to find out the incidence of farmer\\'s lung in Ireland from 1982-2002 and its correlation with rainfall and the effect of changing farm practices. The primary cases of farmer\\'s lung were identified from Hospital in Patients Enquiry (HIPE) unit of the national Economic & Social Research Institute (ESRI) Dublin. Rainfall data were obtained from Met Eireann whereas population, hay production and silage production were obtained from the Central Statistics Office, Dublin. As the farming population is in decline, we used the annual working unit (AWU), which reflects the true population at risk. An AWU is the equivalent of 1800 hours per farm worker per year. The incidence rates were constant from 1982-1996, but from 1997-2002 a marked decline was observed. There was strong positive correlation with hay production (r = 0.81) and strong negative correlation with silage production (r = -0.82). This study indicates that the incidence of farmer\\'s lung is now in decline.

  19. Biomechanics of forearm rotation: force and efficiency of pronator teres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Ibáñez-Gimeno

    Full Text Available Biomechanical models are useful to assess the effect of muscular forces on bone structure. Using skeletal remains, we analyze pronator teres rotational efficiency and its force components throughout the entire flexion-extension and pronation-supination ranges by means of a new biomechanical model and 3D imaging techniques, and we explore the relationship between these parameters and skeletal structure. The results show that maximal efficiency is the highest in full elbow flexion and is close to forearm neutral position for each elbow angle. The vertical component of pronator teres force is the highest among all components and is greater in pronation and elbow extension. The radial component becomes negative in pronation and reaches lower values as the elbow flexes. Both components could enhance radial curvature, especially in pronation. The model also enables to calculate efficiency and force components simulating changes in osteometric parameters. An increase of radial curvature improves efficiency and displaces the position where the radial component becomes negative towards the end of pronation. A more proximal location of pronator teres radial enthesis and a larger humeral medial epicondyle increase efficiency and displace the position where this component becomes negative towards forearm neutral position, which enhances radial curvature. Efficiency is also affected by medial epicondylar orientation and carrying angle. Moreover, reaching an object and bringing it close to the face in a close-to-neutral position improve efficiency and entail an equilibrium between the forces affecting the elbow joint stability. When the upper-limb skeleton is used in positions of low efficiency, implying unbalanced force components, it undergoes plastic changes, which improve these parameters. These findings are useful for studies on ergonomics and orthopaedics, and the model could also be applied to fossil primates in order to infer their locomotor form

  20. Morphological characteristics of the developing proximal femur: A biomechanical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In contrast to a plethora of studies on the proximal femur in adults, its external and internal morphology in growing children has not been sufficiently analyzed. Objective. We analyzed changes in external and internal morphology of the proximal femur during growth and development to interpret the links between them and concepts of the human femoral biomechanics. Methods. We assessed external geometry, internal trabecular and cortical arrangement, and bone mineral density (BMD of the proximal femur in 29 children (age at death from 1 month to 14 years from archaeological context by using microscopic and radiographic methods. Results. The results showed that both the femoral neck width and length increased with age, with the femoral neck becoming more elongated, while the collo-diaphyseal angle decreased. A strong relationship between age and adjusted areal BMD was found, showing continuous increase during childhood. Parallel trabecular pattern at birth changed to mature three distinct trabecular groups (longitudinal – principal compressive, transversal – tensile and randomly scattered starting from the age of 8 months. In older children the superior and inferior aspects of the femoral neck differently changed with growth, with medial neck having thicker cortex and trabeculae. Conclusion. In the light of bone adaptation principle, the observed changes in external and internal morphology are governed by mechanical forces acting on the developing femur. Our findings on the development of trabecular pattern and cortical distribution are compatible with recent views on the femoral biomechanics which point out the predominance of compressive stresses in the femoral neck, adaptation to shear stresses, multiaxial loading perspective, prevalence of muscle effects over body weight, and existence of adaptational eccentricity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45005

  1. Biomechanics of Forearm Rotation: Force and Efficiency of Pronator Teres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Malgosa, Assumpció; Manyosa, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical models are useful to assess the effect of muscular forces on bone structure. Using skeletal remains, we analyze pronator teres rotational efficiency and its force components throughout the entire flexion-extension and pronation-supination ranges by means of a new biomechanical model and 3D imaging techniques, and we explore the relationship between these parameters and skeletal structure. The results show that maximal efficiency is the highest in full elbow flexion and is close to forearm neutral position for each elbow angle. The vertical component of pronator teres force is the highest among all components and is greater in pronation and elbow extension. The radial component becomes negative in pronation and reaches lower values as the elbow flexes. Both components could enhance radial curvature, especially in pronation. The model also enables to calculate efficiency and force components simulating changes in osteometric parameters. An increase of radial curvature improves efficiency and displaces the position where the radial component becomes negative towards the end of pronation. A more proximal location of pronator teres radial enthesis and a larger humeral medial epicondyle increase efficiency and displace the position where this component becomes negative towards forearm neutral position, which enhances radial curvature. Efficiency is also affected by medial epicondylar orientation and carrying angle. Moreover, reaching an object and bringing it close to the face in a close-to-neutral position improve efficiency and entail an equilibrium between the forces affecting the elbow joint stability. When the upper-limb skeleton is used in positions of low efficiency, implying unbalanced force components, it undergoes plastic changes, which improve these parameters. These findings are useful for studies on ergonomics and orthopaedics, and the model could also be applied to fossil primates in order to infer their locomotor form. Moreover, activity

  2. Changes in Corneal Biomechanical Properties after Long-Term Topical Prostaglandin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaobo; Li, Mengwei; Wen, Wen; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare corneal biomechanical properties, measured by a newly developed tonometer (Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology, Corvis ST), in untreated primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients, POAG patients with long-term topical prostaglandin analog (PGA) therapy and in normal controls. Further is to investigate the potential effects of PGA on corneal biomechanics. Methods In this case-control study, 35 consecutive medication naïve eyes with POAG, 34 POAG eyes with at least 2 years treatment by PGA and 19 normal eyes were included. Intraocular pressure (IOP), central corneal thickness (CCT) and corneal biomechanical parameters, including deformation amplitude (DA), applanation time (AT1 and AT2), applanation length (AL1 and AL2), applanation velocity (AV1 and AV2), and peak distance and radius were measured using Corvis ST. Axial length and corneal curvature were measured with partial coherence interferometry (IOLMaster, Zeiss, Germany). General linear model analysis was performed to investigate the corneal biomechanical property changes among the normal controls, newly diagnosed POAG patients and POAG patients with long-term PGA treatment, and among the subgroups of different types of PGA treatment, including bimatoprost, latanoprost and travoprost. Furthermore, pairwise comparisons using Bonferroni correction for least squares means were employed. Results AT1 (p<0.0001), AV1 (p<0.0001), AT2 (p = 0.0001), AV2 (p<0.0001) and DA (p = 0.0004) in newly diagnosed glaucoma patients were significantly different from those in normal subjects and in patients underwent at least 2 years topical PGA therapy after adjusting for age and gender. After adjusting for age, gender, IOP, CCT, axial length and corneal curvature, a significant difference was detected for DA between glaucoma patients without PGA treatment and patients with long-term PGA therapy (p = 0.0387). Furthermore, there were no statistical significant differences in all of the corneal

  3. Longitudinal Decline in Lung Function Measurements among Saskatchewan Grain Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punam Pahwa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between the long term effects of grain dust and decline in lung function among grain elevator workers in Saskatchewan, studied over a 15-year period.

  4. Root system in declining forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, F.H.

    1987-07-11

    Trees with obligate ectomycorrhiza are more sensitive to environmental stress than those without ectomycorrhiza or with facultative ectomycorrhiza. With spruce seedlings growing in humus material from a declining spruce forest an experimental proof was given, that reduction of the mineral nitrogen content by adding sawdust to the rooting substrate increases the share of root tips converted to ectomycorrhizas. A close correlation has been found between the mycorrhiza frequency and the number of root tips. This means, that the ramification of a root system is the more intense the better the conditions for mycorrhizal development are.

  5. Ulnar impaction syndrome with different operative methods: a comparative biomechanical study

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Ya-Dong; Wu, Tao; Tian, Fang-Tao; Shang, Yun-Tao; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Bai, Yan-Bin; Han, Chang-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ulnar impaction syndrome seriously impairs wrist and hand function. Three main treatment procedures are available; however, little systematic research on the post-operation changes in wrist biomechanics currently exists. This study aimed to determine the long-term effects of these procedures and the optimal treatment methods for ulnar impaction syndrome. Methods: Twenty-four cases of fresh upper limb specimens were randomized into four groups: (1) the control group, (2) the ulnar-s...

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis in persons with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yeoun-Seung Kang, MD, PhD, CPO; Yoon-Ghil Park, MD, PhD; Bum-Suk Lee, MD; Hyung-Soon Park, PhD

    2013-01-01

    The wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis (WDFHO) is a device used to restore hand function in persons with tetraplegic spinal cord injury by furnishing three-point prehension. We assessed the effectiveness and biomechanical properties of the WDFHO in 24 persons with cervical 6 or 7 tetraplegia who have severely impaired hand function. This study introduces a mechanical operating model to assess the efficiency of the WDFHO. Experimental results showed that pinch force increased significantly (p ...

  7. Ovariectomy decreases biomechanical quality of skin via oxidative stress in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Çömelekoğlu, Ülkü; YALIN, Serap; BALLI, Ebru; Berköz, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ovariectomy on the skin using biomechanical, biochemical, and histological techniques in the ovariectomized rat model. Ovariectomy causes significant changes in the physical characteristics of the skin. Materials and methods: Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into 2 groups, with each group consisting of 10 rats: the control group and the ovariectomized group. The ovariectomized group underwent bilateral ovariectomy via ventral incision and the contr...

  8. Heparin nanomodification improves biocompatibility and biomechanical stability of decellularized vascular scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Y; Hu T; Wu Z.; Tang H; Hu Y; Tan Q; Wu C

    2012-01-01

    Yunming Tao,1,2 Tiehui Hu,1 Zhongshi Wu,1 Hao Tang,1 Yerong Hu,1 Qi Tan,1 Chunlin Wu11Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha; 2Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Ji'an Central People’s Hospital, Ji'an, Jiangxi Province, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Biocompatibility and biomechanical stability are two of the main obstacles limiting the effectiveness of vascular sca...

  9. Effect and Countermeasure of School-age Population Decline on Higher Education%适龄人口下降对高等教育的影响及应对措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童乃诚

    2013-01-01

      我国人口出生率下降导致了高等教育适龄人口下降,适龄人口下降对高等教育的生源数量、办学效益、教育结构、队伍建设和教育质量等带来影响。要减少这些影响,高等教育必须未雨绸缪,提前应对。应对的措施应该是政府统筹与市场竞争机制相结合,保持适度的办学规模,改革人事制度,拓展高等教育功能,调整高校发展思路,拓展生源市场,同时采取保护性措施扶持高职教育、民办教育和师范教育。%  Chinese birth rate decline led to a decline in school -age population in higher education.The decline in the school -age population had influenced on the number of higher education students 、school effectiveness、educa-tional structure、team -building、 the quality of education,etc.In order to reduce the effects, higher education should be prepared in advance .Measures is that to combine government and market competition mechanism to maintain the modest size of the student body ; to reform the personnel system for expanding higher education func -tions; to adjust the university & college development ideas for expanding the student market ; to take protective measures to support vocational education 、 private education and teacher education at the same time .

  10. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  11. Biomechanical Analysis of T2 Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, John K.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Everett, Meghan; Newby, Nathaniel; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Guilliams, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Crewmembers regularly perform treadmill exercise on the ISS. With the implementation of T2 on ISS, there is now the capacity to obtain ground reaction force (GRF) data GRF data combined with video motion data allows biomechanical analyses to occur that generate joint torque estimates from exercise conditions. Knowledge of how speed and load influence joint torque will provide quantitative information on which exercise prescriptions can be based. The objective is to determine the joint kinematics, ground reaction forces, and joint kinetics associated with treadmill exercise on the ISS. This study will: 1) Determine if specific exercise speed and harness load combinations are superior to others in exercise benefit; and 2) Aid in the design of exercise prescriptions that will be most beneficial in maintaining crewmember health.

  12. The biomechanics of vertical hopping: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Mario; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive vertical hopping is a simple and relatively controlled task useful for studying basic neuromuscular properties and tissue mechanics. However, several biomechanical and physiological factors are involved. This article provides an overview of muscle and tendon properties and how these interact during vertical hopping. Muscle properties discussed are force-velocity and force-length relationships, electromechanical delay, muscle fiber type, stretch induced contraction amplification, and muscle spindle afferent feedback. Tendon properties include storage and reuse of elastic energy, tendon stiffness, afferent information from Golgi tendon organs, and failure points. These muscle and tendon properties interact to generate vertical hopping force and power. In addition to these basic properties, there are other more complicated factors to consider when analyzing vertical hopping such as balance and coordination. A wealth of information can be gathered by studying vertical hopping. Caution should be taken, however, to prevent inappropriate conclusions being drawn about hop performance due to oversimplification. PMID:24067123

  13. Laryngeal biomechanics of the singing voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufman, J A; Radomski, T A; Joharji, G M; Russell, G B; Pillsbury, D C

    1996-12-01

    By transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy, patients with functional voice often demonstrate abnormal laryngeal biomechanics, commonly supraglottic contraction. Appropriately, such conditions are sometimes termed muscle tension dysphonias. Singers working at the limits of their voice may also transiently demonstrate comparable tension patterns. However, the biomechanics of normal singing, particularly for different singing styles, have not been previously well characterized. We used transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy to study 100 healthy singers to assess patterns of laryngeal tension during normal singing and to determine whether factors such as sex, occupation, and style of singing influence laryngeal muscle tension. Thirty-nine male and 61 female singers were studied; 48 were professional singers, and 52 were amateurs. Examinations of study subjects performing standardized and nonstandardized singing tasks were recorded on a laser disk and subsequently analyzed in a frame-by-frame fashion by a blinded otolaryngologist. Each vocal task was graded for muscle tension by previously established criteria, and objective muscle tension scores were computed. The muscle tension score was expressed as a percentage of frames for each task with one of the laryngeal muscle tension patterns shown. The lowest muscle tension scores were seen in female professional singers, and the highest muscle tension scores were seen in amateur female singers. Male singers (professional and amateur) had intermediate muscle tension scores. Classical singers had lower muscle tension scores than nonclassical singers, with the lowest muscle tension scores being seen in those singing choral music (41%), art song (47%), and opera (57%), and the highest being seen in those singing jazz/pop (65%), musical theater (74%), bluegrass/country and western (86%), and rock/gospel (94%). Analyzed also were the influences of vocal nodules, prior vocal training, number of performance and practice hours per week

  14. Biomechanical research in dance: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Donna; Wilmerding, M Virginia; Stecyk, Shane; Wyon, Matthew; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2011-03-01

    The authors reviewed the literature, published from 1970 through December 2009, on biomechanical research in dance. To identify articles, the authors used search engines, including PubMed and Web of Science, five previous review articles, the Dance Medicine and Science Bibliography, and reference lists of theses, dissertations, and articles being reviewed. Any dance research articles (English language) involving the use of electromyography, forceplates, motion analysis using photography, cinematography or videography, and/or physics analysis were included. A total of 89 papers, theses/dissertations, and abstracts were identified and reviewed, grouped by the movement concept or specialized movements being studied: alignment (n = 8), plié (8), relevé (8), passé (3), degagé (3), développé (7), rond de jambe (3), grand battement (4), arm movements (1), forward stepping (3), turns (6), elevation work (28), falls (1), and dance-specific motor strategies (6). Several recurring themes emerged from these studies: that elite dancers demonstrate different and superior motor strategies than novices or nondancers; that dancers perform differently when using a barre as opposed to without a barre, both in terms of muscle activation patterns and weight shift strategies; that while skilled dancers tend to be more consistent across multiple trials of a task, considerable variability is seen among participants, even when matched for background, years of training, body type, and other variables; and that dance teachers recommend methods of achieving movement skills that are inconsistent with optimal biomechanical function, as well as inconsistent with strategies employed by elite dancers. Measurement tools and the efficacy of study methodologies are also discussed. PMID:21442132

  15. Biomechanical Comparison of Spinal Fusion Methods Using Interspinous Process Compressor and Pedicle Screw Fixation System Based on Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jisoo; Kim, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of a newly proposed Interspinous Process Compressor (IPC) and compare with pedicle screw fixation at surgical and adjacent levels of lumbar spine. Methods A three dimensional finite element model of intact lumbar spine was constructed and two spinal fusion models using pedicle screw fixation system and a new type of interspinous devices, IPC, were developed. The biomechanical effects such as range of motion (ROM) and facet contact force were analyzed at surgical level (L3/4) and adjacent levels (L2/3, L4/5). In addition, the stress in adjacent intervertebral discs (D2, D4) was investigated. Results The entire results show biomechanical parameters such as ROM, facet contact force, and stress in adjacent intervertebral discs were similar between PLIF and IPC models in all motions based on the assumption that the implants were perfectly fused with the spine. Conclusion The newly proposed fusion device, IPC, had similar fusion effect at surgical level, and biomechanical effects at adjacent levels were also similar with those of pedicle screw fixation system. However, for clinical applications, real fusion effect between spinous process and hooks, duration of fusion, and influence on spinous process need to be investigated through clinical study. PMID:26962413

  16. Individual athletes’ biomechanical features of interaction with objects in art gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adashevskiy V.M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To design a biomechanical model of interaction of athlete with the subject, as well as the development of areas of its use in practice. Material : The study involved 10 students - athletes. Results : The presented computational schemes create direction of flight of different items (rope, hoop, ball, ribbon, clubs. The characteristics of the time of flight trajectories and with regard for the resistance force of the air environment. Shows the influence of initial parameters on departure flight time items. Graphic characteristics are presented trajectories of objects depending on the parameters of their departure. Conclusions : It is recommended to improve the judicial assessment and effective implementation gymnast exercises during the flight characteristics of the various items to consider trajectories of objects. Note that age, height and distance from the athletes at the end of the flight object defined biomechanical characteristics that can realize an athlete: absolute initial velocity of departure, departure angle, height of the center of mass manufacture items.

  17. Soft Tissue Biomechanical Modeling for Computer Assisted Surgery

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

      This volume focuses on the biomechanical modeling of biological tissues in the context of Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). More specifically, deformable soft tissues are addressed since they are the subject of the most recent developments in this field. The pioneering works on this CAS topic date from the 1980's, with applications in orthopaedics and biomechanical models of bones. More recently, however, biomechanical models of soft tissues have been proposed since most of the human body is made of soft organs that can be deformed by the surgical gesture. Such models are much more complicated to handle since the tissues can be subject to large deformations (non-linear geometrical framework) as well as complex stress/strain relationships (non-linear mechanical framework). Part 1 of the volume presents biomechanical models that have been developed in a CAS context and used during surgery. This is particularly new since most of the soft tissues models already proposed concern Computer Assisted Planning, with ...

  18. Protocol for Project FACT: a randomised controlled trial on the effect of a walking program and vitamin B supplementation on the rate of cognitive decline and psychosocial wellbeing in older adults with mild cognitive impairment [ISRCTN19227688

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopman-Rock Marijke

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background the prevalence of individuals with cognitive decline is increasing since the number of elderly adults is growing considerably. The literature provides promising results on the beneficial effect of exercise and vitamin supplementation on cognitive function both in cognitively healthy as well as in the demented elderly. Methods/Design the design is a two-by-two factorial randomised controlled trial. The study population consists of independently living elderly, between 70 and 80 years old, with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. In the RCT the effect of two interventions, a walking program and vitamin supplementation, is examined. The walking program (WP is a group-based program aimed at improving cardiovascular endurance; frequency two lessons a week; lesson duration one hour; program duration one year. Non-walking groups receive a placebo activity program (PAP (i.e. low intensive non-aerobic group exercises, like stretching with the same frequency, lesson and program duration. Vitamin supplementation consists of a single daily vitamin supplement containing 50 mg B6, 5 mg folic acid and 0,4 mg B12 for one year. Subjects not receiving vitamin supplements are daily taking an identically looking placebo pill, also for a year. Participants are randomised to four groups 1 WP and vitamin supplements; 2 WP and placebo supplements; 3 PAP and vitamin supplements; 4 PAP and placebo supplements. Primary outcome measures are measures of cognitive function. Secondary outcomes include psychosocial wellbeing, physical activity, cardiovascular endurance and blood vitamin levels. Discussion no large intervention study has been conducted yet on the effect of physical activity and vitamin supplementation in a population-based sample of adults with MCI. The objective of the present article is to describe the design of a randomised controlled trial examining the effect of a walking program and vitamin B supplementation on the rate of cognitive

  19. Waves and high nutrient loads jointly decrease survival and separately affect morphological and biomechanical properties in the seagrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Nafie, Y.A.; de los Santos, C.B.; Brun, F.G.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Bouma, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    In an 8-week aquarium experiment, we investigated the interactive effects of waves (present vs. absent) and water-column nutrient level (high vs. low) on the survival, growth, morphology, and biomechanics of the seagrass, Zostera noltii. Survival was reduced when plants were exposed to both waves an

  20. Declining amphibian populations: a global phenomenon in conservation biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardner, T.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the recent reductions in the Earth's biodiversity can be attributed to direct human impacts on the environment. An increasing number of studies over the last decade have reported declines in amphibian populations in areas of pristine habitat. Such reports suggest the role of indirect factors and a global effect of human activities on natural systems. Declines in amphibian populations bear significant implications for the functioning of many terrestrial ecosystems, and may signify important implications for human welfare. A wide range of candidates have been proposed to explain amphibian population declines. However, it seems likely that the relevance of each factor is dependent upon the habitat type and species in question, and that complex synergistic effects between a number of environmental factors is of critical importance. Monitoring of amphibian populations to assess the extent and cause of declines is confounded by a number of ecological and methodological limitations.

  1. The search for performance related factors in biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The identification of performance related factors (PRFs) is a major goal in sports biomechanics. However, PRFs identified across studies are inconsistent and this might be explained by the limitations of discrete point analysis, which is commonly used. New data analysis techniques involving continuous waveform analysis (e.g. functional principal component analysis, fPCA) have been suggested, but their use in biomechanics is not widespread, and they also have limitations. Anot...

  2. BIOMECHANICAL PRINCIPLES PHYSICAL REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Korshunov; K. V. Davletyarova; L. V. Kapilevich

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We studied the basic biomechanical principles of physical rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy.Materials and methods. Methods of Motion Tracking and electromyography investigated the biomechanical characteristics of gait in children with cerebral palsy. It is shown that the main differences between dynamic stereotype walk pediatric patients is to delay moving forward center of gravity and the disorganization of the lower limb movements (especially knee) in the vertical plane. P...

  3. Biomechanics and Cycling BIOMECÁNICA Y CICLISMO

    OpenAIRE

    M. Gutierrez

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this essay is giving a general overview about sport cycling from a biomechanical perspective. Although it is necessary to say that the extraordinary dimension of the huge scientific production related to the topic makes difficult to deal this area in just one essay. Due to the variety of contents included into cycling biomechanics, contents in this essay have been restricted into three units: the first, focusing the study of forces opposed to displacement, and specially to the anal...

  4. Biomechanics and control of vocalization in a non-songbird

    OpenAIRE

    Elemans, Coen P.H; Zaccarelli, Riccardo; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2007-01-01

    The neuromuscular control of vocalization in birds requires complicated and precisely coordinated motor control of the vocal organ (i.e. the syrinx), the respiratory system and upper vocal tract. The biomechanics of the syrinx is very complex and not well understood. In this paper, we aim to unravel the contribution of different control parameters in the coo of the ring dove (Streptopelia risoria) at the syrinx level. We designed and implemented a quantitative biomechanical syrinx model that ...

  5. Jet Methods in Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds associated to the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold, called the configuration bundle. We start with an ordinary configuration manifold of human body motion, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF) for ...

  6. Biomechanics of occlusion--implications for oral rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C

    2016-03-01

    The dental occlusion is an important aspect of clinical dentistry; there are diverse functional demands ranging from highly precise tooth contacts to large crushing forces. Further, there are dogmatic, passionate and often diverging views on the relationship between the dental occlusion and various diseases and disorders including temporomandibular disorders, non-carious cervical lesions and tooth movement. This study provides an overview of the biomechanics of the masticatory system in the context of the dental occlusion's role in function. It explores the adaptation and precision of dental occlusion, its role in bite force, jaw movement, masticatory performance and its influence on the oro-facial musculoskeletal system. Biomechanics helps us better understand the structure and function of biological systems and consequently an understanding of the forces on, and displacements of, the dental occlusion. Biomechanics provides insight into the relationships between the dentition, jaws, temporomandibular joints, and muscles. Direct measurements of tooth contacts and forces are difficult, and biomechanical models have been developed to better understand the relationship between the occlusion and function. Importantly, biomechanical research will provide knowledge to help correct clinical misperceptions and inform better patient care. The masticatory system demonstrates a remarkable ability to adapt to a changing biomechanical environment and changes to the dental occlusion or other components of the musculoskeletal system tend to be well tolerated. PMID:26371622

  7. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPORTS BIOMECHANICS: NEW DAWN OR FALSE HOPE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bartlett

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews developments in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI in sports biomechanics over the last decade. It outlines possible uses of Expert Systems as diagnostic tools for evaluating faults in sports movements ('techniques' and presents some example knowledge rules for such an expert system. It then compares the analysis of sports techniques, in which Expert Systems have found little place to date, with gait analysis, in which they are routinely used. Consideration is then given to the use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs in sports biomechanics, focusing on Kohonen self-organizing maps, which have been the most widely used in technique analysis, and multi-layer networks, which have been far more widely used in biomechanics in general. Examples of the use of ANNs in sports biomechanics are presented for javelin and discus throwing, shot putting and football kicking. I also present an example of the use of Evolutionary Computation in movement optimization in the soccer throw in, which predicted an optimal technique close to that in the coaching literature. After briefly overviewing the use of AI in both sports science and biomechanics in general, the article concludes with some speculations about future uses of AI in sports biomechanics.

  8. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Omorogieva Ojo; Joanne Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and Swet...

  9. 31 CFR 240.7 - Declination protest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Declination protest. 240.7 Section... STATES TREASURY General Provisions § 240.7 Declination protest. (a) Who may protest. Only a presenting bank may protest the declination of a check that it has presented to a Federal Reserve Bank for...

  10. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  11. Investigating the effects of decline of participatiation of citizens in directing urban zones (A case study of zone number 3 in Shiraz city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Taghvaie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   The present research aims to identify effective factors on the reduction of social cooperation with the purpose of attracting social cooperation in directing city zones (zone number 3 in Shiraz.The methodology of this research was based on documentary and survey methods. The statistical sample of this research contains people 18 years old and over who live in zone number 3 in Shiraz, of whom 385 individuals were chosen as the sample of this research using Cochran method. To collect data, a research made questionnaire (analysis of effective factors on social cooperation in directing city zones was utilized. The findings show that the effectiveness rate of cooperation, trust in executives and organizations, training, residency, education, motivation, and the role of the person in the family are preventing factors of social cooperation in directing the city zones (zone number 3 in Shiraz. Therefore, if responsible authorities are fond of removing the obstacles of social cooperation in directing the city zones (zone number 3 in Shiraz, they should think about above mentioned obstacles and decide on these items for their long term goals.      * Correspondent Author: 09133273643 Email:m.tahgvaei@ltr.ui.ac.ir

  12. Biomechanical properties of a novel biodegradable magnesium-based interference screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ezechieli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57. Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05. Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesiumbased screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32. MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future.

  13. Inter-assessor reliability of practice based biomechanical assessment of the foot and ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvis Hannah L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus on which protocols should be used to assess foot and lower limb biomechanics in clinical practice. The reliability of many assessments has been questioned by previous research. The aim of this investigation was to (i identify (through consensus what biomechanical examinations are used in clinical practice and (ii evaluate the inter-assessor reliability of some of these examinations. Methods Part1: Using a modified Delphi technique 12 podiatrists derived consensus on the biomechanical examinations used in clinical practice. Part 2: Eleven podiatrists assessed 6 participants using a subset of the assessment protocol derived in Part 1. Examinations were compared between assessors. Results Clinicians choose to estimate rather than quantitatively measure foot position and motion. Poor inter-assessor reliability was recorded for all examinations. Intra-class correlation coefficient values (ICC for relaxed calcaneal stance position were less than 0.23 and were less than 0.14 for neutral calcaneal stance position. For the examination of ankle joint dorsiflexion, ICC values suggest moderate reliability (less than 0.61. The results of a random effects ANOVA highlight that participant (up to 5.7°, assessor (up to 5.8° and random (up to 5.7° error all contribute to the total error (up to 9.5° for relaxed calcaneal stance position, up to 10.7° for the examination of ankle joint dorsiflexion. Kappa Fleiss values for categorisation of first ray position and mobility were less than 0.05 and for limb length assessment less than 0.02, indicating slight agreement. Conclusion Static biomechanical assessment of the foot, leg and lower limb is an important protocol in clinical practice, but the key examinations used to make inferences about dynamic foot function and to determine orthotic prescription are unreliable.

  14. Does student learning style affect performance on different formats of biomechanics examinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chengtu; Mache, Melissa; Knudson, Duane

    2012-03-01

    Students' learning style preferences have been widely adapted into teaching and learning environments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported and assessed learning style preferences (visual, auditory, reading/writing, kinesthetic: VARK) on performance in different types of multiple-choice examinations (T1: text only format and T2: visual format) given in an introductory biomechanics class. Students who enrolled in three biomechanics classes at a state university were recruited to participate in the study. Ninety students (47 males and 43 females) completed a learning style survey and two types of examinations. Results showed that approximately half of the students were assessed and self-reported as kinesthetic for their preferred learning style. There was no significant difference in test performance between students who preferred visual and reading/writing learning styles (self-reported and assessed). These students demonstrated similar learning and comprehension of biomechanical concepts regardless of whether the test material was presented in their preferred sensory mode or not. Interestingly, female students' perceptions of their learning style preference may have a positive effect on the test results when the test is presented in their preferred format. PMID:22518949

  15. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-01

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. PMID:26631334

  16. Biomechanical and structural parameters of tendons in rats subjected to swimming exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, M A; Santos de Lira, K D; Coutinho, M P G; de Mesquita, G N; Novaes, K A; da Silva, R T B; de Brito Nascimento, A K; Inácio Teixeira, M F H B; Moraes, S R A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of swimming exercise, without overloading, on the biomechanical parameters of the calcaneal tendon of rats. 27 male Wistar rats (70 days) were distributed randomly into 2 groups, Control Group (CG; n=15) with restricted movements inside the cage and Swimming Group (SG; n=12), subjected to exercise training in a tank with a water temperature of 30±1°C, for 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks. All animals were kept in a reversed light/dark cycle of 12 h with access to food and water ad libitum. After that, they were anesthetized and had their calcaneus tendons collected from their left rear paws. The tendon was submitted to a mechanical test on a conventional test machine. From the stress vs. strain curve, the biomechanical data were analyzed. For the statistical analysis, the Student-T test was used (pexercise training, without overloading, was an important stimulus for improving the biomechanical parameters and structural properties of the calcaneal tendon. PMID:23740340

  17. Structural and biomechanical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment with statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, L P; Vieira, C P; Guerra, F D; Almeida, M S; Pimentel, E R

    2015-03-01

    Cases of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures have been reported as side effects associated with statin therapy. This work assessed possible changes in the structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons after chronic treatment with statins. Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), simvastatin (S-20 and S-80) and the group that received no treatment (C). The doses of statins were calculated using allometric scaling, based on the doses of 80 mg/day and 20 mg/day recommended for humans. The morphological aspect of the tendons in A-20, S-20 and S-80 presented signals consistent with degeneration. Both the groups A-80 and S-80 showed a less pronounced metachromasia in the compression region of the tendons. Measurements of birefringence showed that A-20, A-80 and S-80 groups had a lower degree of organization of the collagen fibers. In all of the groups treated with statins, the thickness of the epitenon was thinner when compared to the C group. In the biomechanical tests the tendons of the groups A-20, A-80 and S-20 were less resistant to rupture. Therefore, statins affected the organization of the collagen fibers and decreased the biomechanical strength of the tendons, making them more predisposed to ruptures. PMID:25544391

  18. Biomechanical metrics of aesthetic perception in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Shippen, James

    2015-12-01

    The brain may be tuned to evaluate aesthetic perception through perceptual chunking when we observe the grace of the dancer. We modelled biomechanical metrics to explain biological determinants of aesthetic perception in dance. Eighteen expert (EXP) and intermediate (INT) dancers performed développé arabesque in three conditions: (1) slow tempo, (2) slow tempo with relevé, and (3) fast tempo. To compare biomechanical metrics of kinematic data, we calculated intra-excursion variability, principal component analysis (PCA), and dimensionless jerk for the gesture limb. Observers, all trained dancers, viewed motion capture stick figures of the trials and ranked each for aesthetic (1) proficiency and (2) movement smoothness. Statistical analyses included group by condition repeated-measures ANOVA for metric data; Mann-Whitney U rank and Friedman's rank tests for nonparametric rank data; Spearman's rho correlations to compare aesthetic rankings and metrics; and linear regression to examine which metric best quantified observers' aesthetic rankings, p < 0.05. The goodness of fit of the proposed models was determined using Akaike information criteria. Aesthetic proficiency and smoothness rankings of the dance movements revealed differences between groups and condition, p < 0.0001. EXP dancers were rated more aesthetically proficient than INT dancers. The slow and fast conditions were judged more aesthetically proficient than slow with relevé (p < 0.0001). Of the metrics, PCA best captured the differences due to group and condition. PCA also provided the most parsimonious model to explain aesthetic proficiency and smoothness rankings. By permitting organization of large data sets into simpler groupings, PCA may mirror the phenomenon of chunking in which the brain combines sensory motor elements into integrated units of behaviour. In this representation, the chunk of information which is remembered, and to which the observer reacts, is the elemental mode shape of

  19. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm). PMID:14770335

  20. Musculoskeletal health, frailty and functional decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milte, R; Crotty, M

    2014-06-01

    Frailty in older people is associated with a vulnerability to adverse events. While ageing is associated with a loss of physiological reserves, identifying those with the syndrome of frailty has the potential to assist clinicians to tailor treatments to those at the risk of future decline into disability with an increased risk of complications, morbidity and mortality. Sarcopenia is a key component of the frailty syndrome and on its own puts older people at risk of fragility fractures; however, the clinical syndrome of frailty affects the musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal systems. Hip fractures are becoming a prototype condition in the study of frailty. Following a hip fracture, many of the interventions are focused on limiting mobility disability and restoring independence with activities of daily living, but there are multiple factors to be addressed including osteoporosis, sarcopenia, delirium and weight loss. Established techniques of geriatric evaluation and management allow systematic assessment and intervention on multiple components by multidisciplinary teams and deliver the best outcomes. Using the concept of frailty to identify older people with musculoskeletal problems as being at the risk of a poor outcome assists in treatment planning and is likely to become more important as effective pharmacological treatments for sarcopenia emerge. This review will focus on the concept of frailty and its relationship with functional decline, as well as describing its causes, prevalence, risk factors, potential clinical applications and treatment strategies. PMID:25481423

  1. Comparative biomechanics: life's physical world (second edition)

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Why do you switch from walking to running at a specific speed? Why do tall trees rarely blow over in high winds? And why does a spore ejected into air at seventy miles per hour travel only a fraction of an inch? Comparative Biomechanics is the first and only textbook that takes a comprehensive look at the mechanical aspects of life--covering animals and plants, structure and movement, and solids and fluids. An ideal entry point into the ways living creatures interact with their immediate physical world, this revised and updated edition examines how the forms and activities of animals and plants reflect the materials available to nature, considers rules for fluid flow and structural design, and explores how organisms contend with environmental forces. Drawing on physics and mechanical engineering, Steven Vogel looks at how animals swim and fly, modes of terrestrial locomotion, organism responses to winds and water currents, circulatory and suspension-feeding systems, and the relationship between size and mech...

  2. SERVICE IN BADMINTON: A BIOMECHANICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To find out the differences between forehand and backhand short services in badminton, the present study was designed to analyze the biomechanical variables and segmental angles - shuttle velocity, wrist angle, elbow angle and shoulder angle of six male badminton players. The data were recorded during “North-Zone Intervarsity Championship” held at Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. All subjects in the study were right handed badminton players. The mean age, body height and body weight were reported as 18.33 years (±1.71, 166.5cm (±3.30 and 57.17kg (±7.93 respectively. The movements were recorded by ‘Canon Legria HF S10 Comcorder’ operating at 60 Hz. The identified clips were analyzed with the help of ‘Silicon Coach Pro 7’ motion analysis software. The result revealed that there was significant difference found between forehand and backhand short service in respect to shoulder angle at 0.05 level of significance.

  3. Functional anatomy and biomechanics of the carpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wrist is an exceedingly complex structure composed of several joints and a dedicated ligamentous system. Its functional principles allow a wide range of carpal motion and make the wrist remarkably resistant to external stress forces: The proximal carpal row serves as an intercalated link interposed between the static elements of both the forearm and the distal carpal row. Like a flexible placeholder, the proximal row synchronously adapts to the spatial and temporal requirements of the wrist. There are synergistic movement patterns including simultaneous flexion of the proximal row as the wrist is deviated radially and simultaneous extension during ulnar deviation. Together with pronosupination of the radioulnar joints, the combined radial/ulnar inclination and flexion/extension enable spherical, out-of-plane movements of the hand. Carpal function is best explained by the ''model of a ring under tension.'' This review addresses the anatomy and the biomechanics of the wrist and illustrates systematic image analysis by using carpal lines and angles as well as indices of carpal height. (orig.)

  4. The biomechanics of throwing: simplified and cogent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alexander E; Kontaxis, Andreas; O'Brien, Stephen J; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-06-01

    The majority of shoulder injuries occur due to repetitive overhead movements, with baseball pitching being the most common mechanism for overuse injury. Before studying the treatment of these shoulder injuries, it is paramount that the health professional have an understanding of the etiology of and the underlying mechanisms for shoulder pathology. The act of overhead throwing is an eloquent full-body motion that requires tremendous coordination from the time of force generation to follow-through. The shoulder complex is a crucial component of the upper body kinetic chain as it transmits force created in the lower body to the arm and hand to produce velocity and accuracy with ball release. The focus of this article is on the biomechanics of the throwing motion, with emphasis on the kinematics of the shoulder. The established phases of the throwing motion will be reviewed in a stepwise manner and the contributions of osseous and soft-tissue structures to the successful completion of each phase will be discussed. PMID:24787720

  5. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  6. The corneoscleral shell of the eye: potentials of assessing biomechanical parameters in normal and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Iomdina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews modern methods of evaluating the biomechanical properties of the corneoscleral shell of the eye that can be used both in the studies of the pathogenesis of various ophthalmic pathologies and in clinical practice. The biomechanical parameters of the cornea and the sclera have been shown to be diagnostically significant in assessing the risk of complications and the effectiveness of keratorefractive interventions, in the diagnosis and the prognosis of keratoconus, progressive myopia, or glaucoma. In clinical practice, a special device, Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, has been used on a large scale. The analyzer is used to assess two parameters that characterize viscoelastic properties of the cornea — corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF. Reduced levels of CH and CRF have been noted after eximer laser surgery, especially that administered to patients who demonstrate a regression in the refraction effect or suffer from keratoconus. This fact justifies the use of these biomechanical parameters as additional diagnostic criteria in the evaluation of the state of the cornea. At the same time, ORA data are shown to reflect the biomechanical response to the impact of the air pulse not only from the cornea alone but also from the whole corneoscleral capsule. This is probably the cause of reduced CH in children with progressive myopia and a weakened supportive function of the sclera, as well as such reduction in glaucomatous adult patients. It is hypothesized that a low CH value is a result of remodeling of the connective tissue matrix of the corneoscleral shell of the eye and can be an independent factor testifying to a risk of glaucoma progression. Reduced CH in primary open-angle glaucoma occurs in parallel with the development of pathological structural changes of the optic disc, and deterioration of visual fields, which is an evidence of a specific character and sensitivity of this parameter. The

  7. Wheelchair Propulsion Biomechanics in Junior Basketball Players: A Method for the Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Specific Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bergamini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As participation in wheelchair sports increases, the need of quantitative assessment of biomechanical performance indicators and of sports- and population-specific training protocols has become central. The present study focuses on junior wheelchair basketball and aims at (i proposing a method to identify biomechanical performance indicators of wheelchair propulsion using an instrumented in-field test and (ii developing a training program specific for the considered population and assessing its efficacy using the proposed method. Twelve athletes (10 M, 2 F, age = 17.1 ± 2.7 years, years of practice = 4.5 ± 1.8 equipped with wheelchair- and wrist-mounted inertial sensors performed a 20-metre sprint test. Biomechanical parameters related to propulsion timing, progression force, and coordination were estimated from the measured accelerations and used in a regression model where the time to complete the test was set as dependent variable. Force- and coordination-related parameters accounted for 80% of the dependent variable variance. Based on these results, a training program was designed and administered for three months to six of the athletes (the others acting as control group. The biomechanical indicators proved to be effective in providing additional information about the wheelchair propulsion technique with respect to the final test outcome and demonstrated the efficacy of the developed program.

  8. The cause of global amphibian declines: a developmental endocrinologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, T B; Falso, P; Gallipeau, S; Stice, M

    2010-03-15

    Greater than 70% of the world's amphibian species are in decline. We propose that there is probably not a single cause for global amphibian declines and present a three-tiered hierarchical approach that addresses interactions among and between ultimate and proximate factors that contribute to amphibian declines. There are two immediate (proximate) causes of amphibian declines: death and decreased recruitment (reproductive failure). Although much attention has focused on death, few studies have addressed factors that contribute to declines as a result of failed recruitment. Further, a great deal of attention has focused on the role of pathogens in inducing diseases that cause death, but we suggest that pathogen success is profoundly affected by four other ultimate factors: atmospheric change, environmental pollutants, habitat modification and invasive species. Environmental pollutants arise as likely important factors in amphibian declines because they have realized potential to affect recruitment. Further, many studies have documented immunosuppressive effects of pesticides, suggesting a role for environmental contaminants in increased pathogen virulence and disease rates. Increased attention to recruitment and ultimate factors that interact with pathogens is important in addressing this global crisis. PMID:20190117

  9. New Trends in Dental Biomechanics with Photonics Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Engineering techniques used to evaluate strain-stress fields, materials’ mechanical properties, and load transfer mechanisms, among others, are useful tools in the study of biomechanical applications. These engineering tools, as experimental and numerical ones, were imported to biomechanics, in particular in dental biomechanics, a few decades ago. Several experimental techniques have been used in dental biomechanics, like photoelasticity, ESPI (Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry, strain gages, and other kinds of transducers. However, these techniques have some limitations. For instance, photoelasticity and ESPI give the overall field pattern of the strain, showing the stress-strain concentration points. These methods cannot give an accurate measurement at all points. On the contrary, strain gages can be used to perform local measurements. However, as they use electrical resistances, their use is limited to perform in vivo measurements. Optical fiber sensors have already been used in dentistry, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, and in dental biomechanics studies. Lasers have also been used in clinical dentistry for a few decades. Other optical technologies, like optical coherence tomography (OCT, became suitable for dental practice and nowadays it is perhaps one that has had more development in dentristry, along with lasers.

  10. Biomechanical analysis of plate stabilization on cervical part of spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main aim of the work was determination of biomechanical analysis of cervical spine – stabilizer system made of stainless steel (Cr-Ni-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.Design/methodology/approach: To define biomechanical characteristic of the system the finite elements method (FEM was applied. Geometric model of part of spine C5-C7 and stabilizer were discretized by SOLID95 element. Appropriate boundary conditions imitating phenomena in real system with appropriate accuracy were established.Findings: The result of biomechanical analysis was calculation of displacements and stresses in the vertebras and the stabilizer in a function of the applied loading: 50-300 N for the stabilizer made of stainless steel (Cr-Ni-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.Research limitations/implications: The result of biomechanical analysis for plate stabilizer obtained by FEM can be use to determine a construction features of the stabilizer, and to select mechanical properties of metallic biomaterial and estimation of stabilization quality. The calculation of displacements for part C5-C7 show that the proposed type of stabilizer enables correct stabilization used to clinical apply.Practical implications: The results of biomechanical analysis showed correct mechanical properties used to made the plate stabilizer.Originality/value: The obtained numerical results should be verified in “in vitro” tests.

  11. A selection of biomechanical research problems: From modeling to experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Cyrus Omid

    The research undertakings within this manuscript illustrate the importance of biomechanics in today's science. Without doubt, biomechanics can be utilized to obtain a better understanding of many unsolved mysteries involved in the field of medicine. Moreover, biomechanics can be used to develop better prosthetic or surgical devices as well. Chapter 2 represents a medical problem, which has not been solved for more than a century. With the use of fundamental principles of biomechanics', a better insight of this problem and its possible causes were obtained. Chapter 3 investigates the mechanical interaction between the human teeth and some processed food products during mastication, which is a routine but crucial daily activity of a human being. Chapter 4 looks at a problem within the field of surgery. In this chapter the stability and reliability of two different Suturing-Techniques are explored. Chapters 5 and 6 represent new patent designs as a result of the investigations made in Chapter 4. Chapter 7 studies the impact and load transfer patterns during the collision between a child's head and the ground. All of the above mentioned chapters show the significance of biomechanics in solving a range of different medical problems that involve physical and or mechanical characters.

  12. Decline and repair, and covariate effects

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shaomin; Scarf, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The failure processes of repairable systems may be impacted by operational and environmental stress factors. To accommodate such factors, reliability can be modelled using a multiplicative intensity function. In the proportional intensity model, the failure intensity is the product of the failure intensity function of the baseline system that quantifies intrinsic factors and a function of covariates that quantify extrinsic factors. The existing literature has extensively studied the failure p...

  13. Physical Activity and Obesity: Biomechanical and Physiological Key Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nantel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight (OW and obesity (OB are often associated with low levels of physical activity. Physical activity is recommended to reduce excess body weight, prevent body weight regain, and decrease the subsequent risks of developing metabolic and orthopedic conditions. However, the impact of OW and OB on motor function and daily living activities must be taken into account. OW and OB are associated with musculoskeletal structure changes, decreased mobility, modification of the gait pattern, and changes in the absolute and relative energy expenditures for a given activity. While changes in the gait pattern have been reported at the ankle, knee, and hip, modifications at the knee level might be the most challenging for articular integrity. This review of the literature combines concepts and aims to provide insights into the prescription of physical activity for this population. Topics covered include the repercussions of OW and OB on biomechanical and physiological responses associated with the musculoskeletal system and daily physical activity. Special attention is given to the effect of OW and OB in youth during postural (standing and various locomotor (walking, running, and cycling activities.

  14. Growth Cone Biomechanics in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Koch, Daniel; Rosoff, Will; Geller, Herbert

    2012-02-01

    The growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of an axon, integrates information about the local environment and modulates outgrowth and guidance, but little is known about effects of external mechanical cues and internal mechanical forces on growth-cone mediated guidance. We have investigated neurite outgrowth, traction forces and cytoskeletal substrate coupling on soft elastic substrates for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (from the peripheral nervous system) and hippocampal neurons (from the central) to see how the mechanics of the microenvironment affect different populations. We find that the biomechanics of DRG neurons are dramatically different from hippocampal, with DRG neurons displaying relatively large, steady traction forces and maximal outgrowth and forces on substrates of intermediate stiffness, while hippocampal neurons display weak, intermittent forces and limited dependence of outgrowth and forces on substrate stiffness. DRG growth cones have slower rates of retrograde actin flow and higher density of localized paxillin (a protein associated with substrate adhesion complexes) compared to hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the difference in force generation is due to stronger adhesions and therefore stronger substrate coupling in DRG growth cones.

  15. Muscular activity and its relationship to biomechanics and human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Gideon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to address the issue of muscular activity, human motion, fitness, and exercise. Human activity is reviewed from the historical perspective as well as from the basics of muscular contraction, nervous system controls, mechanics, and biomechanical considerations. In addition, attention has been given to some of the principles involved in developing muscular adaptations through strength development. Brief descriptions and findings from a few studies are included. These experiments were conducted in order to investigate muscular adaptation to various exercise regimens. Different theories of strength development were studied and correlated to daily human movements. All measurement tools used represent state of the art exercise equipment and movement analysis. The information presented here is only a small attempt to understand the effects of exercise and conditioning on Earth with the objective of leading to greater knowledge concerning human responses during spaceflight. What makes life from nonliving objects is movement which is generated and controlled by biochemical substances. In mammals. the controlled activators are skeletal muscles and this muscular action is an integral process composed of mechanical, chemical, and neurological processes resulting in voluntary and involuntary motions. The scope of this discussion is limited to voluntary motion.

  16. Problem-Based Learning in Biomechanics: Advantages, Challenges, and Implementation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyne, Alisa Morss; Billiar, Kristen L

    2016-07-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been shown to be effective in biomedical engineering education, particularly in motivating student learning, increasing knowledge retention, and developing problem solving, communication, and teamwork skills. However, PBL adoption remains limited by real challenges in effective implementation. In this paper, we review the literature on advantages and challenges of PBL and present our own experiences. We also provide practical guidelines for implementing PBL, including two examples of PBL modules from biomechanics courses at two different institutions. Overall, we conclude that the benefits for both professors and students support the use of PBL in biomedical engineering education. PMID:27210616

  17. Computational biomechanics for medicine new approaches and new applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologiesand advancements. Thisvolumecomprises twelve of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, France, Spain and Switzerland. Some of the interesting topics discussed are:real-time simulations; growth and remodelling of soft tissues; inverse and meshless solutions; medical image analysis; and patient-specific solid mechanics simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  18. Computational biomechanics for medicine imaging, modeling and computing

    CERN Document Server

    Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul; Miller, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements. This volume comprises eighteen of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, Switzerland, Scotland, France and Russia. Some of the interesting topics discussed are: tailored computational models; traumatic brain injury; soft-tissue mechanics; medical image analysis; and clinically-relevant simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  19. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  20. The increasing importance of the biomechanics of impact trauma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Murray Mackay

    2007-08-01

    The evolution of experimental biomechanics and crash injury research is summarized briefly to show that they both play a major role in mitigating traffic deaths and injuries. Historically, the subject has been based largely in western countries and thus focused on vehicle occupants, whereas some 80% of traffic casualties in the world are outside the vehicle as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists. The subject is close to the regulatory process which controls vehicle design and is thus heavily influenced by government and industry, yet it is now in an expanding period because of new techniques to replicate the human frame’s response to impact forces. New knowledge is likely to emerge from addressing population variations and combining real world accident investigations with experimental biomechanics. The application of impact biomechanics to the vulnerable road users is of particular importance.

  1. The biomechanical and structural properties of CS2 fimbriae

    CERN Document Server

    Mortezaei, Narges; Zakrisson, Johan; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide, and infection of children in underdeveloped countries often leads to high mortality rates. Isolated ETEC express a plethora of colonization factors (fimbriae/pili), of which CFA/I and CFA/II that are assembled via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP), are amongst the most common. Fimbriae are filamentous structures, whose shafts are primarily composed of helically arranged single pilin-protein subunits, with a unique biomechanical capability allowing them to unwind and rewind. A sustained ETEC infection, under adverse conditions of dynamic shear forces, is primarily attributed to this biomechanical feature of ETEC fimbriae. Recent understandings about the role of fimbriae as virulence factors are pointing to an evolutionary adaptation of their structural and biomechanical features. In this work, we investigated the biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae from the CFA/II group. Homology modelling its major structural subunit CotA ...

  2. Biomechanical Profile of Danish Elite and Sub-elite Soccer Goalkeepers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Thomassen, Martin; Zacho, Morten

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define a biomechanical profile of the soccer goalkeeper. We tested whether the skill level of 6 goalkeepers correlated with a number of biomechanical tests. The skill level of each goalkeeper was defined as the league he played in. The biomechanical tests were...

  3. The modern biomechanics technology in practice of preparedness athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmetov R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized information about directions of application of biomechanics technologies in modern sport is resulted. Some aspects of the use of biomechanics ergogenical tools of the moved delayed action in the system of preparation of athletes-jumpers are considered. Presents the possibility of using training complex «easy leading» for perfection of structure of motive actions of sportsmen, specialized in high jumps. The introduction of a vast arsenal of technical tools in practice the training process open new prospects associated with increased efficiency in the preparation of athletes.

  4. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old......) with a suspected degenerative medial meniscal tear participated in this study. Three dimensional knee biomechanics were assessed on the injured and contralateral leg before and three months after APM. The visual analogue scale was used to assess knee pain and the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score was used...

  5. Advances in compression nails - principles and biomechanical photoelastic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelmeier, W.; Hauschild, M.; Bader, R.; Steinhauser, E. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik fuer Orthopaedie und Sportorthopaedie

    2001-12-01

    The nail-osteosynthesis is an established concept for shaft-fractures of long bones. The compression-nail ICN enables a favourable primary-stability and also a former full weight-bearing over a precompression of the nail-bone-system. The indications of the compression-nail include beside more diaphyseal cross fractures and short oblique fractures non-unions and correction-osteotomies. Newer modular nail-types like the tandem compression nail (TCN) can improve the biomechanical prerequisites of the compression nail principle. Key-words: internal fixation - interlocking-nail - modular - compression - biomechanics - non-union (orig.)

  6. Forest declines: Some perspectives on linking processes and patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regional decline in vigor of some species of forest trees has become an important component in the ecological, aesthetic, and economic criteria by which the costs of anthropogenic pollution are weighed. Because declines are often complex and virtually never without significant natural environmental modifiers, determining the role of specific anthropogenic stresses in initiating or enhancing the rate and direction of change in forest condition represents a significant research challenge. Separation of primary mechanisms that point to principal causes from secondary responses that result from internal feedbacks and the milieu of modifying agents is a critical issue in diagnosing forest decline. Air pollutant stress may have its most significant effects on forest processes by accelerating or amplifying natural stresses. Studies of changes in forest metabolic processes have played an important role in evaluating the role of air pollution in four regional forest declines that are the focus of this paper. The decline of ponderosa pine in the San Bernardino Mountains of California, Norway spruce and silver fir in Europe, loblolly and shortleaf pine in the Southeastern United States, and red spruce in the Eastern Appalachian Mountains provide case studies in which physiological responses to air pollutants under field and laboratory conditions have provided important analytical tools for assessing likely causes. These tools are most effective when both mechanistic explanations and larger scale patterns of response are evaluated in an iterative feedback loop that examines plausible mechanisms and patterns of response at levels ranging from cell membranes to plant populations

  7. Retirement Age Declines Again in 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendell, Murray

    2001-01-01

    The average retirement age continued to decline in the 1990s after having leveled off during the preceding 10-15 years. The resumption of the decline is attributed largely to a rise in the labor force participation rate of older men and women between the mid-1980s and 2000. (Author/JOW)

  8. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  9. Do Cells Contribute to Tendon and Ligament Biomechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Niels; Huster, Daniel; Fritsch, Sebastian; Hädrich, Carsten; Koch, Holger; Schmidt, Peter; Sichting, Freddy; Wagner, Martin Franz-Xaver; Boldt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen. Material and Methods Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay. Results The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain. Discussion The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in

  10. Efeito da heparina sódica e da enoxaparina na consolidação de fratura da tíbia no rato: avaliação clínica e anatomopatológica e biomecânica Effect of heparin-sodium and enoxaparin on rats tibial fracture healing: clinical,anatomopathological, and biomechanical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Carlos Curcelli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado estudo experimental em ratos para avaliar o efeito do anticoagulante na consolidação óssea, conforme critérios clínicos, anatomopatológicos e biomecânicos. Manualmente, após perfuração do osso, foi produzida fratura aberta, na diáfise da tíbia direita, mantida sem imobilização, em 72 ratos machos da linhagem Wistar, com 60 dias de idade e peso médio de 242 gramas. Doze horas após a fratura, foi iniciado tratamento anticoagulante, mantido por 28 dias. Via subcutânea, um grupo recebeu heparina sódica na dose de 200UI/Kg de 12 em 12 horas, enquanto outro, recebeu enoxaparina na dose de 1mg/Kg de 12 em 12 horas, doses preconizadas para tratamento do tromboembolismo em humanos. O terceiro grupo, controle, recebeu água destilada. Durante o experimento, os animais foram avaliados clinicamente e após 28 dias, sacrificados. Nos animais dos três grupos, a evolução clínica foi semelhante. Mediante análise anatomopatológica efetuada por estudo descritivo e quantitativo, foi observada presença de fibrose, cartilagem e osso igualmente nos três grupos, sempre com predomínio de tecido ósseo. O estudo biomecânico, realizado por intermédio de ensaios de flexão, demonstrou coeficiente de rigidez e carga máxima semelhantes nos três grupos. Nenhuma diferença clínica, anatomopatológica e biomecânica foi encontrada, resultando todas as fraturas em consolidação de acordo com os critérios adotados, concluindo-se, portanto, que a heparina sódica e a enoxaparina nas doses, via e tempo de administração utilizados não interfiriram na consolidação da fratura da tíbia do rato.An experimental study in rats was accomplished to evaluate the effect of anticoagulant on fracture union, according to clinical, anatomopathological, and biomechanical approaches. Manually, after bone perforation, fracture was produced in the diaphysis of the right tibia, and maintained without immobilization in 72 male rats of Wistar lineage

  11. Expandable intramedullary nail - experimental biomechanical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kajzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents results of experimental analysis of femur and femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The aim of the work was to determine displacement in three models. In addition, the torsion of the system aiming at determining the moments depending on the torsional angle of the bone was carried out.Design/methodology/approach: Three femurs were selected for studies. The analysis was carried out on the femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The influence of the loads and displacements on the bone – nail system on the results of experimental analysis was analysed. In order to carry out calculations, three models were selected: model I – bone without fracture gap, model II and III – femur with expansion intramedullary nails – fracture gap was located 100 mm under greater trochanter. The studies were performed on femur models produced by Swedish company Sawbones. The intramedullary „Fixion IM” nails (Ti-6Al-4V alloy were implanted into the bone. Displacements of determinated models were being recorded from the sensors every 100 N from 10 N to 2000 N.Findings: The analyses showed the difference in displacements, depending on the selected models.Research limitations/implications: The limitations were connected with simplification of boundary conditions during analysis which were the result of the simplification of the models. While studying, muscles and ligaments supporting the bone in anatomic position were not taken into consideration. Instead, the system has been loaded with the axial force (compression.Practical implications: The obtained results can be useful in clinical practice. They can be applied in selection of stabilization methods or rehabilitation as well as in describing the biomechanical conditions connected with type of bone fracture obtained from medical imaging.Originality/value: . The work compares the values of displacement of characteristic points of femur (healthy – model I with the

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Maximum Flow Declination Rate versus Maximum Area Declination Rate in Phonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Maximum flow declination rate (MFDR) in the glottis is known to correlate strongly with vocal intensity in voicing. This declination, or negative slope on the glottal airflow waveform, is in part attributable to the maximum area declination rate (MADR) and in part to the overall inertia of the air column of the vocal tract (lungs to…

  13. Biomechanical Assessment of the Strength of Volleyball Players in Different Stages of the Training Macrocycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwa Marcin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In order to help volleyball players achieve superior results, their coaches are constantly seeking new training methods. One of the methods used to improve the effectiveness of the training that is being implemented is conducting tests which make it possible to assess the player’s locomotor system in terms of its motor and biomechanical functions. The aim of the study was to determine the torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles of volleyball players in three stages of the annual macrocycle.

  14. Biomechanical characteristics of polymeric UHMWPE composites with hybrid matrix and dispersed fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, Sergey; Kornienko, Lyudmila; Shilko, Sergey; Thuc, Nguyen Xuan; Korchagin, Mikhail; Chaikina, Marina

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop artificial joint implants some biomechanical properties of composites with UHMWPE and hybrid (polymer-polymeric) "UHMWPE+PTFE" matrix with dispersed fillers were studied. A comparative analysis of the effectiveness of adding hydroxyapatite micron- and nanopowders as a biocompatible filler was carried out. It was shown that under dry sliding friction the wear rate of nanocomposites with the hybrid matrix is lower as compared with composites with the non-hybrid one. Mechanical activation of components further enhances the durability of nano- and microcomposites to almost double it without any significant reduction in the strength characteristics.

  15. Sequential compression biomechanical device in patients with critical limb ischemia and nonreconstructible peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2011-08-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients who are unsuitable for intervention face the dire prospect of primary amputation. Sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) therapy provides a limb salvage option for these patients. This study assessed the outcome of SCBD in severe CLI patients who otherwise would face an amputation. Primary end points were limb salvage and 30-day mortality. Secondary end points were hemodynamic outcomes (increase in popliteal artery flow and toe pressure), ulcer healing, quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity of treatment (Q-TwiST), and cost-effectiveness.

  16. Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility Spring 2016 Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Abhishektha

    2016-01-01

    The Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) at Johnson Space Center supports the Space Human Factors Engineering portfolio of the Human Research Program. ABF provides capability to verify the accommodation and comfort of crewmembers through anthropometry and biomechanics analyses. Anthropometric measurements are derived from three-dimensional (3D) whole body scan images. The scans are currently taken by a Human Solutions Vitus 3D Laser Scanning System. ABF has purchased a 3dMD photogrammetry scanner system to speed up the process of collecting 3D scans. The photogrammetry scanner system features a faster data collection time, as well as fewer holes in the scans. This internship was mainly focused on developing calibration, measurement, data acquisition, and analysis processes for the new system. In addition, I also participated in a project to validate the use of a pressure mat sensor on the shoulder during in-suit testing. My duties for the scanner validation project started with identifying and documenting a calibration process. The calibration process proved vital to using the system as the quality of the scans was directly related to the success of the calibration. In addition, the calibration process suggested by the system vendor required the user to hold a large calibration board at precise locations. To aid in this, I built a calibration stand which held a calibration board at constant positions throughout numerous calibration process. The calibration process was tested extensively until proven acceptable. The standardized process reduced calibration time from over 10 minutes to just below three minutes. As a result, the calibration process could be completed painlessly and precisely, and scan quality was constant between sessions. After standardizing the calibration process, I proceeded to modify the locations of the cameras in order to capture the full volume of a person. The scanning system needed to capture a full T-pose of a person in one scan

  17. An Investigation of the Afternoon Decline in Tropical Forest Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, C.; Goulden, M. L.; Miller, S. D.; Menton, M. C.; da Rocha, H.; Freitas, H.; Figueira, M. A.; da Sousa, C. A.; Maia, A.

    2002-12-01

    The recent use of eddy covariance to measure the net exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and a tropical forest in Santarem Para, Brazil, has indicated a substantial decline in forest photosynthesis in the afternoon, even after taking light differences into account. Afternoon declines in leaf-level gas exchange have been reported for many ecosystems, including tropical forests. Potential causes for this decline include stomatal responses to VPD, low leaf water potential, changes in biochemistry due to elevated temperature, photoinhibition, photorespiration, or intrinsic circadian rhythm. This study attempts to understand this decline by using leaf gas exchange to measure photosynthesis while canopy leaves are kept under constant light, humidity, and temperature conditions for 24 to 36 hours hours.At constant light levels of 100 PAR æmol~m-2s-1, 7 of 12 species tested showed a substantial decline photosynthesis at night, and a subsequent recovery in photosynthesis during the next day. In most cases, the internal CO2 of these plants increased at night, indicating that this diel cycle was not simply an effect of a circadian rhythm in stomatal conductance. Rather, the photosynthesis of a significant fraction of the plants surveyed appears to be under the direct control of a circadian oscillator.

  18. Declining mortality from smoking in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodu, Brad; Cole, Philip

    2007-07-01

    The proportion of Americans who smoke cigarettes has declined 50% since 1965. The effect on mortality of this considerable reduction has received little attention and is described in this study. U.S. national data were used to enumerate current, former, and never-smokers aged 35 years or older in 1987 and 2002. Mortality rate ratios were used to estimate smoking-attributable deaths among these groups, and corresponding age-adjusted smoking-attributable mortality rates (SAMRs) were calculated. There were 402,000 deaths attributable to smoking in 1987 and 322,000 in 2002. The SAMR for men aged 35 years or more was 556 deaths per 100,000 person-years in 1987, accounting for 24% of all male deaths. By 2002 the SAMR declined 41% to 329 and accounted for only 17% of deaths. The SAMR for women in 1987 was 175, accounting for 12% of deaths. By 2002 the SAMR among women had declined 30% to 122, representing 9% of deaths. The U.S. mortality rate attributable to smoking declined about 35% between 1987 and 2002. The impact of smoking on American society will diminish even further in the foreseeable future as smoking prevalence continues its decline among men and women. PMID:17577808

  19. Invasive alien predator causes rapid declines of native European ladybirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Helen E.; Adriaens, Tim; Isaac, Nick J.B.;

    2012-01-01

    Aim Invasive alien species (IAS) are recognized as major drivers of biodiversity loss, but few causal relationships between IAS and species declines have been documented. In this study, we compare the distribution (Belgium and Britain) and abundance (Belgium, Britain and Switzerland) of formerly...... common and widespread native ladybirds before and after the arrival of Harmonia axyridis, a globally rapidly expanding IAS. Location Europe Methods We used generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) to assess the distribution trends of eight conspicuous and historically widespread and common species...... surveys of deciduous trees in Belgium, Britain and Switzerland. Results Five (Belgium) and seven (Britain) of eight species studied show substantial declines attributable to the arrival of H. axyridis. Indeed, the two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, declined by 30% (Belgium) and 44% (Britain) over 5...

  20. Quantitative modelling of the biomechanics of the avian syrinx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Coen P. H.; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Hoffmann, Marc R.;

    2003-01-01

    We review current quantitative models of the biomechanics of bird sound production. A quantitative model of the vocal apparatus was proposed by Fletcher (1988). He represented the syrinx (i.e. the portions of the trachea and bronchi with labia and membranes) as a single membrane. This membrane acts...

  1. Biomechanics Curriculum: Its Content and Relevance to Movement Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    While the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) has outlined a number of learning outcomes for undergraduate biomechanics, there are a number of factors that can influence the curriculum in such courses. These factors create a situation that indeed can influence students and their attitude towards these classes.…

  2. Focusing on the Hard parts: A Biomechanics Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerut, Jonathan; Orbe, Kristina; Flynn, Daniel; Habdas, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    As part of a biomechanics course aimed at both upper-division Biology and Physics majors, this laboratory exercise introduces students to the ingenious ways in which organisms vary the composition and form of support and defensive structures such as bone and shell to maximize their strength while minimizing the energetic cost needed to produce…

  3. Corneal biomechanical changes following toric soft contact lens wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Radaie-Moghadam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: CH and CRF decreased significantly one month after fitting toric soft contact lenses while CCT and K mean did not change significantly. Corneal biomechanical parameters may alter with toric soft contact lens use and such changes may have implications with long-term use such lenses.

  4. Biomechanics of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Health and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease. The biome...

  5. How to Assess the Biomechanical Risk Levels in Beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, G; Rossi, F; Baracco, A

    2016-01-01

    Beekeepers are at particular risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders, but many of the studies lack detailed exposure assessment. To evaluate the biomechanical overload exposure in a specific farming activity, a multitasking model has been developed through the characterization of 37 basic operational tasks typical of the beekeeping activity. The Occupational Repetitive Actions (OCRA) Checklist and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Lifting Index methodologies have been applied to these elementary tasks to evaluate the exposure, and the resulting risk indices have been time-weighted averaged. Finally, an easy access, computer-assisted toolkit has been developed to help the beekeepers in the biomechanical risk assessment process. The risk of biomechanical overload for the upper limbs ranges from acceptable (maintenance and recovery of woody material and honey packaging with dosing machine tasks) to high (distribution of the top supers) risk level. The risk for back injury is always borderline in women and increases with exposure time, whereas it ranges from acceptable to borderline in men. The definition of the biomechanical risk levels allows for planning of corrective actions aimed at preventing and reducing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders through engineering, administrative, and behavioral interventions. The methodology can be used for risk assessment in other mainly manual agricultural activities. PMID:26765780

  6. Computational modelling of biomechanical behaviour of skeletal elements and implants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jíra, J.; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Jírová, Jitka

    Anaheim Calgary Zurich : ACTA Press, 2004 - (Hamza, M.), s. 170 ISBN 0-88986-448-9. [Biomechanics /2./. Honolulu (US), 23.08.2004-25.08.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2071913 Keywords : FE model of pelvis * skull and long bone * CT scan Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics

  7. A review of probabilistic analysis in orthopaedic biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Laz, P.J.; Browne, M.

    2010-01-01

    Probabilistic analysis methods are being increasingly applied in the orthopaedics and biomechanics literature to account for uncertainty and variability in subject geometries, properties of various structures, kinematics and joint loading, as well as uncertainty in implant alignment. As a complement to experiments, finite element modelling, and statistical analysis, probabilistic analysis provides a method of characterizing the potential impact of variability in parameters on performa...

  8. The Biomechanical Implications of Obesity in K-12 Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeyer, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Few biomechanical studies have examined obese individuals as primary subjects. However, some mechanical differences have been identified between overweight or obese individuals and nonoverweight movers. It is not clear how obesity affects the onset of osteoarthritis, for example, but it is evident that obesity does place significant limitations on…

  9. A highly versatile autonomous underwater vehicle with biomechanical propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.G.; Bergers, M.M.C.; Henrion, S.; Hulzenga, J.I.J.; Jutte, R.W.; Pas, W.M.G.; Van Schravendijk, M.; Vercruyssen, T.G.A.; Wilken, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    An autonomous underwater vehicle with a biomechanical propulsion system is a possible answer to the demand for small, silent sensor platforms in many fields. The design of Galatea, a bio-mimetic AUV, involves four aspects: hydrodynamic shape, the propulsion, the motion control systems and payload. T

  10. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  11. Biomechanics of the elbow joint in tennis players.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eygendaal, D.; Rahussen, F.T.; Diercks, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Elbow injuries constitute a sizeable percentage of tennis injuries. A basic understanding of biomechanics of tennis and analysis of forces, loads and motions of the elbow during tennis can will improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of these injuries. All different strokes in tennis have a

  12. The decline of hysterectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, R P

    2012-01-31

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynaecological surgical procedures performed but there appears to be a decline in the performance of this procedure in Ireland in recent times. We set out to establish the extent of the decline of hysterectomy and to explore possible explanations. Data for hysterectomy for benign disease from Ireland was obtained from the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry Scheme (HIPE) section of the Economic and Social Research Institute for the years 1999 to 2006. The total number of hysterectomies performed for benign disease showed a consistent decline during this time. There was a 36% reduction in the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures performed.

  13. The Decline of Literature: A Public Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Albalawi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After centuries of dominance, literature has not been in a robust health for the last few decades.  Several scholars have addressed the decline of literature in a number of books and articles attributing it to institutional and economic reasons. However, a major factor has not been taken into account. It is the larger audience who receives and absorbs literature. In this paper, I argue that the decline of literature emanates from the lack of appreciation of literature among the public who have deserted this field of humanity in the present days. I will investigate the causes of this desertion and explore its consequences in the field of literature. Through using a questionnaire, this paper looks and evaluates the experiences and perspectives of public. It is expected that the findings will contribute to literature to better understanding the decline.Keywords: Humanities-Literature Decline-Reading Literature

  14. Physiological and biomechanical adaptations to the cycle to run transition in Olympic triathlon: review and practical recommendations for training

    OpenAIRE

    Millet, G.; Vleck, V

    2000-01-01

    Current knowledge of the physiological, biomechanical, and sensory effects of the cycle to run transition in the Olympic triathlon (1.5 km, 10 km, 40 km) is reviewed and implications for the training of junior and elite triathletes are discussed. Triathlon running elicits hyperventilation, increased heart rate, decreased pulmonary compliance, and exercise induced hypoxaemia. This may be due to exercise intensity, ventilatory muscle fatigue, dehydration, muscle fibre damage, a shift in metabol...

  15. Biomechanics and Thermodynamics of Nanoparticle Interactions with Plasma and Endosomal Membrane Lipids in Cellular Uptake and Endosomal Escape

    OpenAIRE

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Jin, Shihua; Weimer, Jonathan; Elegbede, Adekunle; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(d,l-lactide-co-gl...

  16. An antiaging skin care system containing alpha hydroxy acids and vitamins improves the biomechanical parameters of facial skin

    OpenAIRE

    Tran D.; Townley JP; Barnes TM; Greive KA

    2014-01-01

    Diana Tran, Joshua P Townley, Tanya M Barnes, Kerryn A Greive Ego Pharmaceuticals, Braeside, Victoria, Australia Background: The demand for antiaging products has dramatically increased in recent years, driven by an aging population seeking to maintain the appearance of youth. This study investigates the effects of an antiaging skin care system containing alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) in conjunction with vitamins B3, C, and E on the biomechanical parameters of facial skin. Methods: Fifty two vo...

  17. A Decline in Solar Cycle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, G. A.; de Toma, G.; Cookson, A.

    2013-12-01

    The strength of solar activity appears to be in decline over the past three solar cycles. The decline is seen in sunspot area, facular/network area and the sunspot number. In addition, cycle 24 has been unusual in that many, if not most, of the bipolar sunspot groups have had only a leader spot with no follower spot. This research was partially supported by grants from NSF and NASA. Corrected spot area from CFDT1 at the San Fernando Observatory

  18. Intraguild Predation and Native Lady Beetle Decline

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Mary M.; Matthew E O'Neal; Landis, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Coccinellid communities across North America have experienced significant changes in recent decades, with declines in several native species reported. One potential mechanism for these declines is interference competition via intraguild predation; specifically, increased predation of native coccinellid eggs and larvae following the introduction of exotic coccinellids. Our previous studies have shown that agricultural fields in Michigan support a higher diversity and abundance of exotic coccin...

  19. Microrobotized blasting improves the bone-to-textured implant response. A preclinical in vivo biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Paulo G; Gil, Luiz F; Neiva, Rodrigo; Jimbo, Ryo; Tovar, Nick; Lilin, Thomas; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of microrobotized blasting of titanium endosteal implants relative to their manually blasted counterparts. Two different implant systems were utilized presenting two different implant surfaces. Control surfaces (Manual) were fabricated by manually grit blasting the implant surfaces while experimental surfaces (Microblasted) were fabricated through a microrobotized system that provided a one pass grit blasting routine. Both surfaces were created with the same ~50µm average particle size alumina powder at ~310KPa. Surfaces were then etched with 37% HCl for 20min, washed, and packaged through standard industry procedures. The surfaces were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical interferometry, and were then placed in a beagle dog radius model remaining in vivo for 3 and 6 weeks. The implant removal torque was recorded and statistical analysis evaluated implant system and surface type torque levels as a function of time in vivo. Histologic sections were qualitatively evaluated for tissue response. Electron microscopy depicted textured surfaces for both manual and microblasted surfaces. Optical interferometry showed significantly higher Sa, Sq, values for the microblasted surface and no significant difference for Sds and Sdr values between surfaces. In vivo results depicted that statistically significant gains in biomechanical fixation were obtained for both implant systems tested at 6 weeks in vivo, while only one system presented significant biomechanical gain at 3 weeks. Histologic sections showed qualitative higher amounts of new bone forming around microblasted implants relative to the manually blasted group. Microrobotized blasting resulted in higher biomechanical fixation of endosteal dental implants and should be considered as an alternative for impant surface manufacturing. PMID:26703231

  20. Biomechanical approaches to understanding the potentially injurious demands of gymnastic-style impact landings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gittoes Marianne JR

    2012-01-01

    effectiveness of gymnastics injury counter measures has been advocated over the past decade, a lack of information based on randomised controlled studies or actual evaluation of counter measures in the field setting has been highlighted. The subsequent integration of insight into biomechanical risk factors of landing with clinical practice interventions has been recently advocated.

  1. The birth rate decline in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, B

    1993-01-01

    Family planning programs historically have played an important role in providing information and counseling and supplying modern methods. Most programs are effective due to socioeconomic development and strong political support. Potential demand for services will be growing. This means that donor agencies must commit additional funding, and users must begin paying or paying more for contraceptives. Services and method choices need to be expanded, and quality of care needs to be improved. Three primary factors will impact on fertility decline: 1) the rate of social development, 2) the speed with which small family norms spread and contraception is adopted, and 3) the facility of private and public suppliers to meet contraceptive demand. Other factors influence reproductive decisions (women's roles and status, economic hardships or opportunities, religion, ethnicity, culture, and tradition). Contraceptive prevalence has increased from under 10% in the 1960s to 38% of all married, reproductive age women in the developing world, excluding China, which has contraceptive prevalence of 72%. Regional differences are wide. In Latin America, contraceptive use averages nearly 60% and ranges from over 50% in 10 countries and below 38% in Bolivia, Guatemala, and Haiti. Contraceptive prevalence is above average in Indonesia (50%), Sri Lanka (62%), and Thailand (68%) and just below average in Bangladesh (40%), India (45%), Philippines (34%), and Vietnam (53%). Sub-Saharan Africa has the lowest prevalence, except for Zimbabwe (45%), Botswana (35%), and Kenya (27%). 80% of current users rely on modern methods. In most surveyed countries, 20-30% of married women have unmet demand. Fertility decline, unmet demand, and contraceptive use have all been affected by the diffusion of ideas about the use of family planning and the small family norm. Innovators are usually high status, educated women, who spread their views to other social groups or geographic areas. The spread can be rapid

  2. Development and decline of upright gait stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Iosa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Upright gait is a peculiar characteristic of humans that requires the ability to manage upper body dynamic balance while walking, despite the perturbations that are generated by movements of the lower limbs. Most of the studies on upright gait stability have compared young adults and the elderly to determine the effects of aging. In other studies the comparison was between healthy subjects and patients to examine specific pathologies. Fewer researches have also investigated the development of upright gait stability in children.This review discusses these studies in order to provide an overview of this relevant aspect of human locomotion. A clear trend from development to decline of upright gait stability has been depicted across the entire lifespan, from toddlers at first steps to elderly. In old individuals, even if healthy, the deterioration of skeletal muscle, combined with sensorial and cognitive performance, reduces the ability to maintain an upright trunk during walking, increasing the instability and the risk of falls. Further, the pathological causes of altered development or of a sudden loss of gait stability, as well as the environmental influence are investigated. The last part of this review is focused on the control of upper body accelerations during walking, a particularly interesting topic for the recent development of low-cost wearable accelerometers.

  3. Comparative adaptations of lower limb biomechanics during unilateral and bilateral landings after different neuromuscular-based ACL injury prevention protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tyler N; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M; McLean, Scott G

    2014-10-01

    Potentially valuable anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention strategies are lengthy, limiting training success. Shorter protocols that achieve beneficial biomechanical adaptations may improve training effectiveness. This study examined whether core stability/balance and plyometric training can modify female landing biomechanics compared with the standard neuromuscular and no training models. Forty-three females had lower limb biomechanics analyzed during unilateral and bilateral landings immediately before and after a 6-week neuromuscular or no training programs. Sagittal and frontal plane hip and knee kinematics and kinetics were submitted to 3-way repeated-measures analyses of variance to test for the main and interaction effects of training group, landing type, and testing time. Greater peak knee flexion was evident in the standard neuromuscular group following training, during both bilateral (p = 0.027) and unilateral landings (p = 0.076 and d = 0.633). The plyometric group demonstrated reduced hip adduction (p = 0.010) and greater knee flexion (p = 0.065 and d = 0.564) during bilateral landings following training. The control group had significant reduction in peak stance knee abduction moment (p = 0.003) posttraining as compared with pretraining. The current outcomes suggest that significant biomechanical changes are possible by an isolated plyometric training component. The benefits, however, may not be evident across all landing types, seemingly limited to simplistic, bilateral landings. Integrated training protocols may still be the most effective training model, currently improving knee flexion posture during both bilateral and unilateral landings following training. Future prevention efforts should implement integrated training protocols that include plyometric exercises to reduce ACL injury risk of female athletes. PMID:24714537

  4. Improving predictions of root biomechanical properties, is age a better determinant than diameter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loades, Kenneth; Hallett, Paul; Lynch, Jonathan; Chimungu, Joseph; Bengough, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Roots mechanically reinforce many soils. Root tensile strength and stiffness is critical for soil stabilisation with plants potentially providing civil engineers a 'green' alternative for soil stabilisation. Relatively little is known on factors influencing root tensile strength. Through a better understanding of these factors the adoption of 'green engineering' techniques by civil engineers will improve. Existing models are limited in their accuracy due to simplistic assumptions to derive root contributions to the resistance of soil to failure. Current models typically use relationships between strength and diameter, however, there are a number of other factors potentially influencing root biomechanical properties. The effects of root age on biomechanical properties have largely been overlooked. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) was grown under differing soil conditions, waterlogged, moderate mechanical impedance and in unimpeded, control, conditions. The root system was excavated and tensile tests performed on root sections along the length of each root axis. Root tensile strength increased with increasing distance along the root axes in control soil from 0.5 MPa to 7.0 MPa at a distance of 800mm from the root tip and from 1.0 Mpa to 8.0 MPa, 500mm from the root tip when under moderate mechanical impedance. Increases in strength were also observed when plants were subjected to waterlogging with tensile strength increasing from 1.0 MPa to 3.0 MPa, 200mm from the root tip. Young's modulus increased from ~10 MPa at the root tip to ~60 MPa 400mm and 800mm from the root tip in mechanically impeded and control treatments respectively. Distance from root tip explained over 47% of the variance in root tensile strength and 34% of root stiffness. Including root diameter in the model led to further improvements in predicting root properties, explaining ~54% of root strength variance and ~49% of root stiffness. Root age has been shown to improve predictions of root tensile strength

  5. Assessing the changes in the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens induced by cold cataract with air-pulse OCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C.; Singh, M.; Liu, C.-H.; Han, Z.; Li, J.; Raghunathan, R.; Larin, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A cataract is the increase in opacity of the crystalline lens that can pathologically degrade visual acuity. In this study, we utilized a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to study the effects of a cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of the porcine crystalline lens in vitro. The cold cataract was induced by placing the whole lens in a low temperature environment until the lens was obviously clouded. Air-pulse OCE measurements were conducted on 6 lenses before and after cold cataract induction. A low amplitude displacement (≤ 10 µm) was induced by a focused air-pulse and the temporal deformation profiles from the surface and within the lenses were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the stiffness of the porcine lens increased after induction of the cold cataract, and it demonstrated the feasibility of OCE to assess the biomechanical changes in the lens due to cataract.

  6. A multi-scale biomechanical model based on the physiological structure and lignocellulose components of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longjian; Li, Aiwei; He, Xueqin; Han, Lujia

    2015-11-20

    Biomechanical behavior is a fundamental property for the efficient utilization of wheat straw in such applications as fuel and renewable materials. Tensile experiments and lignocellulose analyses were performed on three types of wheat straw. A multi-scale finite element model composed of the microscopic model of the microfibril equivalent volume element and the macroscopic model of straw tissue was proposed based on the physiological structure and lignocellulose components of wheat straw. The tensile properties of wheat straw were simulated by ANSYS software. The predicted stress-strain data were compared with the observed data, and good correspondence was achieved for all three types of wheat straw. The validated multi-scale finite-element (FE) model was then used to investigate the effect of the lignocellulose components on the biomechanical properties of wheat straw. More than 80% of stress is carried by the cellulose fiber, whereas the strain is mainly carried by the amorphous cellulose. PMID:26344265

  7. The influence of biomechanical characteristics on pain and function outcomes from exercise in medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L; Dobson, Fiona; Roos, Ewa M.;

    2015-01-01

    influence the pain-relieving effects of two different types of exercise. Further research is needed to confirm whether exercise that is prescribed according to specific biomechanical characteristics optimises knee OA outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Objective: To investigate whether selected biomechanical characteristics influence changes in pain and physical function with exercise in people with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment. Methods: Post-hoc exploratory analyses from a randomised controlled trial involving 100...... people with medial knee OA and varus malalignment who were randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs; quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Outcome measures were change in overall average knee pain (visual analogue scale) and self-reported physical function (Western Ontario...

  8. Biomechanical Analysis of the Swim-Start: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Vantorre, Didier Chollet, Ludovic Seifert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This review updates the swim-start state of the art from a biomechanical standpoint. We review the contribution of the swim-start to overall swimming performance, the effects of various swim-start strategies, and skill effects across the range of swim-start strategies identified in the literature. The main objective is to determine the techniques to focus on in swimming training in the contemporary context of the sport. The phases leading to key temporal events of the swim-start, like water entry, require adaptations to the swimmer’s chosen technique over the course of a performance; we thus define the swim-start as the moment when preparation for take-off begins to the moment when the swimming pattern begins. A secondary objective is to determine the role of adaptive variability as it emerges during the swim-start. Variability is contextualized as having a functional role and operating across multiple levels of analysis: inter-subject (expert versus non-expert, inter-trial or intra-subject (through repetitions of the same movement, and inter-preference (preferred versus non-preferred technique. Regarding skill effects, we assume that swim-start expertise is distinct from swim stroke expertise. Highly skilled swim-starts are distinguished in terms of several factors: reaction time from the start signal to the impulse on the block, including the control and regulation of foot force and foot orientation during take-off; appropriate amount of glide time before leg kicking commences; effective transition from leg kicking to break-out of full swimming with arm stroking; overall maximal leg and arm propulsion and minimal water resistance; and minimized energy expenditure through streamlined body position. Swimmers who are less expert at the swim-start spend more time in this phase and would benefit from training designed to reduce: (i the time between reaction to the start signal and impulse on the block, and (ii the time in transition (i

  9. Biomechanical analysis of the swim-start: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantorre, Julien; Chollet, Didier; Seifert, Ludovic

    2014-05-01

    This review updates the swim-start state of the art from a biomechanical standpoint. We review the contribution of the swim-start to overall swimming performance, the effects of various swim-start strategies, and skill effects across the range of swim-start strategies identified in the literature. The main objective is to determine the techniques to focus on in swimming training in the contemporary context of the sport. The phases leading to key temporal events of the swim-start, like water entry, require adaptations to the swimmer's chosen technique over the course of a performance; we thus define the swim-start as the moment when preparation for take-off begins to the moment when the swimming pattern begins. A secondary objective is to determine the role of adaptive variability as it emerges during the swim-start. Variability is contextualized as having a functional role and operating across multiple levels of analysis: inter-subject (expert versus non-expert), inter-trial or intra-subject (through repetitions of the same movement), and inter-preference (preferred versus non-preferred technique). Regarding skill effects, we assume that swim-start expertise is distinct from swim stroke expertise. Highly skilled swim-starts are distinguished in terms of several factors: reaction time from the start signal to the impulse on the block, including the control and regulation of foot force and foot orientation during take-off; appropriate amount of glide time before leg kicking commences; effective transition from leg kicking to break-out of full swimming with arm stroking; overall maximal leg and arm propulsion and minimal water resistance; and minimized energy expenditure through streamlined body position. Swimmers who are less expert at the swim-start spend more time in this phase and would benefit from training designed to reduce: (i) the time between reaction to the start signal and impulse on the block, and (ii) the time in transition (i.e., between gliding and leg

  10. Neuropsychological Decline After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article “Neuropsychological decline after cath- eter ablation of atrial fibrillation” by Schwarz et al. is the first publication that focused on cognitive side effects of elective circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI.1 Adverse neuropsychological changes after left atrial catheter ablation, as report- ed in this paper, were found in verbal memory and the result, conjoined with ischemic brain lesions, might represent cerebral side-effects of the ablation procedure.

  11. Biomechanical loading of the shoulder complex and lumbosacral joints during dynamic cart pushing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Sun, Yun; Jaridi, Majid; Hsiao, Hongwei

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify the effect of dynamic cart pushing exertions on the biomechanical loading of shoulder and low back. Ten participants performed cart pushing tasks on flat (0°), 5°, and 10° ramped walkways at 20 kg, 30 kg, and 40 kg weight conditions. An optoelectronic motion capturing system configured with two force plates was used for the kinematic and ground reaction force data collection. The experimental data was modeled using AnyBody modeling system to compute three-dimensional peak reaction forces at the shoulder complex (sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and glenohumeral) and low back (lumbosacral) joints. The main effect of walkway gradient and cart weight, and gradient by weight interaction on the biomechanical loading of shoulder complex and low back joints was statistically significant (all p distraction loading of glenohumeral joint and inferosuperior loading of the acromioclavicular joint may contribute to the risk of work-related low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorder with prolonged and repetitive use of carts. PMID:23566675

  12. A dynamic distention protocol for whole-organ bladder decellularization: histological and biomechanical characterization of the acellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, F; Brizzola, S; Tremolada, G; Grieco, V; Riva, F; Acocella, F; Fiore, G B; Soncini, M

    2016-02-01

    A combined physical-chemical protocol for whole full-thickness bladder decellularization is proposed, based on organ cyclic distention through repeated infusion/withdrawal of the decellularization agents through the urethra. The dynamic decellularization was intended to enhance cell removal efficiency, facilitating the delivery of detergents within the inner layers of the tissue and the removal of cell debris. The use of mild chemical detergents (hypotonic solution and non-ionic detergent) was employed to limit adverse effects upon matrix 3D ultrastructure. Inspection of the presence of residual DNA and RNA was carried out on decellularized matrices to verify effective cell removal. Histological investigation was focused on assessing the retention of adequate structural and functional components that regulate the biomechanical behaviour of the acellular tissue. Biomechanical properties were evaluated through uniaxial tensile loading tests of tissue strips and through ex vivo filling cystometry to evaluate the whole-organ mechanical response to a physiological-like loading state. According to our results, a dynamic decellularization protocol of 17 h duration with a 5 ml/min detergent infusion flow rate revealed higher DNA removal efficiency than standard static decellularization, resulting in residual DNA content < 50 ng/mg dry tissue weight. Furthermore, the collagen network and elastic fibres distribution were preserved in the acellular ECM, which exhibited suitable biomechanical properties in the perspective of its future use as an implant for bladder augmentation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23737121

  13. Biomechanical analysis of press-extension technique on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and staggered facet joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hong-Gen; Liao, Sheng-Hui; Jiang, Zhong; Huang, Huan-Ming; Ning, Xi-Tao; Jiang, Neng-Yi; Pei, Jian-Wei; Huang, Qin; Wei, Hui

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of a new Chinese massage technique named "press-extension" on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation, and provides a biomechanical explanation of this massage technique. Self-developed biomechanical software was used to establish a normal L1-S1 lumbar 3D FE model, which integrated the spine CT and MRI data-based anatomical structure. Then graphic technique is utilized to build a degenerative lumbar FE model with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation. According to the actual press-extension experiments, mechanic parameters are collected to set boundary condition for FE analysis. The result demonstrated that press-extension techniques bring the annuli fibrosi obvious induction effect, making the central nucleus pulposus forward close, increasing the pressure in front part. Study concludes that finite element modelling for lumbar spine is suitable for the analysis of press-extension technique impact on lumbar intervertebral disc biomechanics, to provide the basis for the disease mechanism of intervertebral disc herniation using press-extension technique. PMID:27275119

  14. Changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics with a heat-mouldable semi-custom foot orthotic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferber Reed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Semi-custom foot orthoses (SCO are thought to be a cost-effective alternative to custom-made devices. However, previous biomechanical research involving either custom or SCO has only focused on rearfoot biomechanics. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics during shod walking with and without an SCO. We chose to investigate an SCO device that incorporates a heat-moulding process, to further understand if the moulding process would significantly alter rearfoot, midfoot, or shank kinematics as compared to a no-orthotic condition. We hypothesized the SCO, whether moulded or non-moulded, would reduce peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation, arch deformation, and plantar fascia strain as compared to the no-orthoses condition. Methods Twenty participants had retroreflective markers placed on the right limb to represent forefoot, midfoot, rearfoot and shank segments. 3D kinematics were recorded using an 8-camera motion capture system while participants walked on a treadmill. Results Plantar fascia strain was reduced by 34% when participants walked in either the moulded or non-moulded SCO condition compared to no-orthoses. However, there were no significant differences in peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation, or medial longitudinal arch angles between any conditions. Conclusions A semi-custom moulded orthotic does not control rearfoot, shank, or arch deformation but does, however, reduce plantar fascia strain compared to walking without an orthoses. Heat-moulding the orthotic device does not have a measurable effect on any biomechanical variables compared to the non-moulded condition. These data may, in part, help explain the clinical efficacy of orthotic devices.

  15. Global phytoplankton decline over the past century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Daniel G; Lewis, Marlon R; Worm, Boris

    2010-07-29

    In the oceans, ubiquitous microscopic phototrophs (phytoplankton) account for approximately half the production of organic matter on Earth. Analyses of satellite-derived phytoplankton concentration (available since 1979) have suggested decadal-scale fluctuations linked to climate forcing, but the length of this record is insufficient to resolve longer-term trends. Here we combine available ocean transparency measurements and in situ chlorophyll observations to estimate the time dependence of phytoplankton biomass at local, regional and global scales since 1899. We observe declines in eight out of ten ocean regions, and estimate a global rate of decline of approximately 1% of the global median per year. Our analyses further reveal interannual to decadal phytoplankton fluctuations superimposed on long-term trends. These fluctuations are strongly correlated with basin-scale climate indices, whereas long-term declining trends are related to increasing sea surface temperatures. We conclude that global phytoplankton concentration has declined over the past century; this decline will need to be considered in future studies of marine ecosystems, geochemical cycling, ocean circulation and fisheries. PMID:20671703

  16. 3D printed guides for controlled alignment in biomechanics tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Matthias A; Willemot, Laurent; Van Onsem, Stefaan; Stevens, Cyriëlle; Arnout, Nele; Victor, Jan

    2016-02-01

    The bone-machine interface is a vital first step for biomechanical testing. It remains challenging to restore the original alignment of the specimen with respect to the test setup. To overcome this issue, we developed a methodology based on virtual planning and 3D printing. In this paper, the methodology is outlined and a proof of concept is presented based on a series of cadaveric tests performed on our knee simulator. The tests described in this paper reached an accuracy within 3-4° and 3-4mm with respect to the virtual planning. It is however the authors' belief that the method has the potential to achieve an accuracy within one degree and one millimeter. Therefore, this approach can aid in reducing the imprecisions in biomechanical tests (e.g. knee simulator tests for evaluating knee kinematics) and improve the consistency of the bone-machine interface. PMID:26810696

  17. Valgus torque in youth baseball pitchers: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabick, Michelle B; Torry, Michael R; Lawton, Richard L; Hawkins, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical and anthropometric factors contributing to elbow valgus torque during pitching. Video data of 14 youth pitchers throwing fastballs were used to calculate shoulder and elbow kinematics and kinetics. Peak elbow valgus torque averaged 18 Nm and occurred just before maximal shoulder external rotation. The magnitude of valgus torque was most closely correlated with the thrower's weight. When subject weight and height were controlled for, maximum shoulder abduction torque and maximum shoulder internal rotation torque were most strongly associated with elbow valgus torque, accounting for 85% of its variance (P <.001). When only kinematic variables were considered, maximum shoulder external rotation accounted for 33% of the variance in valgus torque. Given that the biomechanical variables correlated with peak valgus torque are not easily modifiable, limiting the number of innings pitched is likely the best way to reduce elbow injury in youth pitchers. PMID:15111908

  18. Biomechanical Evaluation of 6.5-mm Cannulated Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin C; Litsky, Alan S; Pugh, Kevin J; Fowler, T Ty

    2016-01-01

    Although biomechanical and clinical evidence exists regarding smaller compression screws, biomechanical data regarding the larger headless screws are not currently available. Headed and headless 6.5-mm cannulated compression screws were examined, with analysis of interfragmentary compression, insertion torque, and resistance of the construct to a shear force. No significant differences were seen between the maximum insertion torque of the headless or headed screws. Maximum and steady-state compression forces were also not significantly different between groups. Countersinking the headless model 2 mm led to a 77.01% decrease in steady-state compression levels. Shear testing did not reveal any significant differences in peak load at ultimate failure, specimen stiffness, or final block displacement, although a trend to increased peak load and stiffness was seen with the headless specimens. PMID:27082882

  19. Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Soh, Chee-Kiong; Bhalla, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    "Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics" presents the latest developments in structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomechanics using smart materials. The book mainly focuses on piezoelectric, fibre optic and ionic polymer metal composite materials. It introduces concepts from the very basics and leads to advanced modelling (analytical/ numerical), practical aspects (including software/ hardware issues) and case studies spanning civil, mechanical and aerospace structures, including bridges, rocks and underground structures. This book is intended for practicing engineers, researchers from academic and R&D institutions and postgraduate students in the fields of smart materials and structures, structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomedical engineering. Professor Chee-Kiong Soh and Associate Professor Yaowen Yang both work at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Dr. Suresh Bhalla is an A...

  20. Biomechanical bases of rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlet'yarova, K. V.; Korshunov, S. D.; Kapilevich, L. V.

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis and the study results of children's with cerebral palsy (CP) muscles bioelectrical activity while walking on a flat surface are represented. Increased flexion in the hip and shoulder joints and extension in the elbow joint in children with cerebral palsy were observed, with the movement of the lower limbs had less smooth character in comparison with the control group. Herewith, the oscillation amplitude was significantly increased, and the frequency in the m. gastrocnemius and m. lateralis was decreased. It was shown, that the dynamic stereotype of walking in children with cerebral palsy was characterized by excessive involvement of m. gastrocnemius and m.latissimus dorsi in locomotion. Thus, resulting biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters of walking should be considered in the rehabilitation programs development.

  1. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint. PMID:26072625

  2. Hand Posture Prediction using Neural Networks within a Biomechanical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta C. Mora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs in the framework of a biomechanical hand model for grasping. ANNs enhance the model capabilities as they substitute estimated data for the experimental inputs required by the grasping algorithm used. These inputs are the tentative grasping posture and the most open posture during grasping. As a consequence, more realistic grasping postures are predicted by the grasping algorithm, along with the contact information required by\tthe dynamic biomechanical model (contact points and normals. Several neural network architectures are tested and compared in terms of prediction errors, leading to encouraging results. The performance of the overall proposal is also shown through simulation, where a grasping experiment is replicated and compared to the real grasping data collected by a data glove device.

  3. Scapholunate Interosseous Ligament Anatomy and Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Prashant V; Day, Charles S

    2015-08-01

    Injury to the scapholunate interosseous ligament is one of the most common causes of carpal instability and can impart considerable compromise to the patient's hand function. However, the management of scapholunate ligament injuries remains a dynamic concept, especially with regard to the multitude of options and techniques that exist for its surgical treatment. We present a thorough review of scapholunate anatomy and morphology, and the role of the scapholunate articulations in the kinetics and pathomechanics of wrist instability. We also review the current literature on the biomechanical properties of the scapholunate ligament and its subcomponents. A sound understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the scapholunate ligament can clarify its instability and may better orient current reconstructive procedures or pioneer better future techniques. PMID:26143029

  4. The biomechanics of kicking in soccer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, A; Asai, T; Andersen, T B; Nunome, H; Sterzing, T

    2010-06-01

    Kicking is the defining action of soccer, so it is appropriate to review the scientific work that provides a basis of our understanding of this skill. The focus of this review is biomechanical in nature and builds on and extends previous reviews and overviews. While much is known about the biomechanics of the kicking leg, there are several other aspects of the kick that have been the subject of recent exploration. Researchers have widened their interest to consider the kick beginning from the way a player approaches the ball to the end of ball flight, the point that determines the success of the kick. This interest has encapsulated characteristics of overall technique and the influences of the upper body, support leg and pelvis on the kicking action, foot-ball impact and the influences of footwear and soccer balls, ball launch characteristics and corresponding flight of the ball. This review evaluates these and attempts to provide direction for future research. PMID:20509089

  5. Meshless methods in biomechanics bone tissue remodelling analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Belinha, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the complete formulation of a new advanced discretization meshless technique: the Natural Neighbour Radial Point Interpolation Method (NNRPIM). In addition, two of the most popular meshless methods, the EFGM and the RPIM, are fully presented. Being a truly meshless method, the major advantages of the NNRPIM over the FEM, and other meshless methods, are the remeshing flexibility and the higher accuracy of the obtained variable field. Using the natural neighbour concept, the NNRPIM permits to determine organically the influence-domain, resembling the cellulae natural behaviour. This innovation permits the analysis of convex boundaries and extremely irregular meshes, which is an advantage in the biomechanical analysis, with no extra computational effort associated.   This volume shows how to extend the NNRPIM to the bone tissue remodelling analysis, expecting to contribute with new numerical tools and strategies in order to permit a more efficient numerical biomechanical analysis.

  6. Biomechanical tactics of chiral growth in emergent aquatic macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zi-Long; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Li, Bing-Wei; Nie, Ben-Dian; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2015-07-01

    Through natural selection, many plant organs have evolved optimal morphologies at different length scales. However, the biomechanical strategies for different plant species to optimize their organ structures remain unclear. Here, we investigate several species of aquatic macrophytes living in the same natural environment but adopting distinctly different twisting chiral morphologies. To reveal the principle of chiral growth in these plants, we performed systematic observations and measurements of morphologies, multiscale structures, and mechanical properties of their slender emergent stalks or leaves. Theoretical modeling of pre-twisted beams in bending and buckling indicates that the different growth tactics of the plants can be strongly correlated with their biomechanical functions. It is shown that the twisting chirality of aquatic macrophytes can significantly improve their survivability against failure under both internal and external loads. The theoretical predictions for different chiral configurations are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers mirror rate of cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolstad, Sindre; Berg, Anne Ingeborg; Bjerke, Maria; Johansson, Boo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wallin, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict future decline in cognitive systems using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers 42 amino acid form of amyloid-β (Aβ42) and total tau (T-tau) is not fully understood. In a clinical sample ranging from cognitively healthy to dementia (n = 326), linear regression models were performed in order to investigate the ability of CSF biomarkers to predict cognitive decline in all cognitive domains from baseline to 2-year follow-up. Gender, age, and years of education were included as covariates. In patients with subjective cognitive impairment, T-tau had a small impact on executive functions (r2 = 0.07). T-tau had a small to moderate influence (r2 = 0.06-0.11) on all cognitive functions with the exception of visuospatial functions in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In patients with dementia, the impact of T-tau was large (r2 = 0.29) on semantic memory. Aβ42 had a small effect (r2 = 0.07) on speed and executive functions in MCI. In patients with dementia, Aβ42 had a moderate influence (r2 = 0.13-0.24) on semantic and verbal working memory/fluency. Our results speak in favor of the notion that CSF biomarkers reflect the rate of cognitive decline across the continuum of cognitive impairment from healthy to dementia. CSF predicted subsequent decline in more cognitive domains among MCI cases, but the impact was most pronounced in patients with dementia. PMID:23313924

  8. Cognitive decline in older persons initiating anticholinergic medications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj C Shah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study examines the effect of initiating medications with anticholinergic activity on the cognitive functions of older persons. METHODS: Participants were 896 older community-dwelling, Catholic clergy without baseline dementia. Medication data was collected annually. The Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden Scale was utilized to identify use of a medication with probable or definite anticholinergic activity. Participants had at least two annual cognitive evaluations. RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up of 10 years, the annual rate of global cognitive function decline for never users, prevalent users, and incident users was -0.062 (SE = 0.005, -0.081(SE = 0.011, and -0.096 (SE = 0.007 z-score units/year, respectively. Compared to never users, incident users had a more rapid decline (difference = -0.034 z-score units/year, SE = 0.008, p<0.001 while prevalent users did not have a significantly more rapid decline (p = 0.1. CONCLUSIONS: Older persons initiating a medication with anticholinergic activity have a steeper annual decline in cognitive functioning than those who are not taking these medications.

  9. Land use, fishing, climate change, and decline of Thompson River, British Columbia, coho salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradford, M. J.; Irvine, J. R. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, BC (Canada)

    2000-01-01

    Reasons for the decline in abundance of Pacific salmon population in the Thompson River watershed in British Columbia was investigated. Results suggests that the decline could be the result of a declining trend in productivity related to changes in ocean conditions, overfishing, and changes in the freshwater habitat. The abundance of salmon correlated with agricultural land use, road density, and qualitative changes in stream habitat status; logging appeared to have had no such effect. It was concluded that salmon populations will continue to decline unless limits on fishing are strictly enforced, and unless salmon producing watersheds are restored and ocean conditions are significantly improved . 12 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Locomotion in degus on terrestrial substrates varying in orientation - implications for biomechanical constraints and gait selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, André

    2014-04-01

    To gain new insights into running gaits on sloped terrestrial substrates, metric and selected kinematic parameters of the common degu (Octodon degus) were examined. Individuals were filmed at their maximum voluntary running speed using a high-speed camera placed laterally to the terrestrial substrate varying in orientations from -30° to +30°, at 10° increments. Degus used trotting, lateral-sequence (LS) and diagonal-sequence (DS) running gaits at all substrate orientations. Trotting was observed across the whole speed range whereas DS running gaits occurred at significantly higher speeds than LS running gaits. Metric and kinematic changes on sloped substrates in degus paralleled those noted for most other mammals. However, the timing of metric and kinematic locomotor adjustments differed significantly between individual degus. In addition, most of these adjustments took place at 10° rather than 30° inclines and declines, indicating significant biomechanical demands even on slightly sloped terrestrial substrates. The results of this study suggest that DS and LS running gaits may represent an advantage in small to medium-sized mammals for counteracting some level of locomotor instability. Finally, changes in locomotor parameters of the forelimbs rather than the hindlimbs seem to play an important role in gait selection in small to medium-sized mammals. PMID:24439459

  11. Derivation, simulation and validation of poroelastic models in dental biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Favino, Marco; Krause, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Poroelasticity and mechanics of growth are playing an increasingly relevant role in biomechanics. This work is a self- contained and holistic presentation of the modeling and simulation of non-linear poroelasticity with and without growth inhomogeneities. Balance laws of poroelasticity are derived in Cartesian coordinates. These allow to write the governing equations in a form that is general but also readily implementable. Closure relations are formally derived from the study of dissipati...

  12. Biomechanical simulation of thorax deformation using finite element approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Chen, Xian; Ohgi, Junji; Miura, Toshiro; Nakamoto, Akira; Matsumura, Chikanori; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background The biomechanical simulation of the human respiratory system is expected to be a useful tool for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases. Because the deformation of the thorax significantly influences airflow in the lungs, we focused on simulating the thorax deformation by introducing contraction of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm, which are the main muscles responsible for the thorax deformation during breathing. Methods We constructed a finite element model of t...

  13. Biomechanical analysis of the camelid cervical intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean K. Stolworthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (LBP is a prevalent global problem, which is often correlated with degenerative disc disease. The development and use of good, relevant animal models of the spine may improve treatment options for this condition. While no animal model is capable of reproducing the exact biology, anatomy, and biomechanics of the human spine, the quality of a particular animal model increases with the number of shared characteristics that are relevant to the human condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the camelid (specifically, alpaca and llama cervical spine as a model of the human lumbar spine. Cervical spines were obtained from four alpacas and four llamas and individual segments were used for segmental flexibility/biomechanics and/or morphology/anatomy studies. Qualitative and quantitative data were compared for the alpaca and llama cervical spines, and human lumbar specimens in addition to other published large animal data. Results indicate that a camelid cervical intervertebral disc (IVD closely approximates the human lumbar disc with regard to size, spinal posture, and biomechanical flexibility. Specifically, compared with the human lumbar disc, the alpaca and llama cervical disc size are approximately 62%, 83%, and 75% with regard to area, depth, and width, respectively, and the disc flexibility is approximately 133%, 173%, and 254%, with regard to range of motion (ROM in axial-rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral-bending, respectively. These results, combined with the clinical report of disc degeneration in the llama lower cervical spine, suggest that the camelid cervical spine is potentially well suited for use as an animal model in biomechanical studies of the human lumbar spine.

  14. Biomechanical analysis of the camelid cervical intervertebral disc

    OpenAIRE

    Dean K. Stolworthy; R. Amy Fullwood; Tyler M. Merrell; Bridgewater, Laura C.; Anton E. Bowden

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent global problem, which is often correlated with degenerative disc disease. The development and use of good, relevant animal models of the spine may improve treatment options for this condition. While no animal model is capable of reproducing the exact biology, anatomy, and biomechanics of the human spine, the quality of a particular animal model increases with the number of shared characteristics that are relevant to the human condition. The purpose o...

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of an expansive pedicle screw in calf vertebrae

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to evaluate biomechanically a newly designed expansive pedicle screw (EPS) using fresh pedicles from calf lumber vertebrae in comparison with conventional pedicle screws, (CDH) CD Horizon, Universal Spine System pedicle screw (USS) and Tenor (Sofamor Denek). Pull-out and turning-back tests were performed on these pedicle screws to compare their holding strength. Additionally, revision tests were undertaken to evaluate the mechanical properties of EPS...

  16. A Microfluidic Platform for Profiling Biomechanical Properties of Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xuanhao; Weinlandt, William D; Patel, Harsh; WU, Mingming; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to resist mechanical forces is necessary for the survival and division of bacteria and has traditionally been probed using specialized, low-throughput techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to profile the stiffness of individual bacteria and populations of bacteria. The approach is similar to micropipette aspiration used to characterize the biomechanical performance of eukaryotic cells. However, the small size ...

  17. Application of optimal control to a biomechanics model

    OpenAIRE

    Krasovskii, A.

    2015-01-01

    A model of sport biomechanics describing short-distance running (sprinting) is developed by applying methods of optimal control. In the considered model, the motion of a sportsman is described by a second-order ordinary differential equation. Two interconnected optimal control problems are formulated and solved: the minimum energy and time-optimal control problems. Based on the comparison with real data, it is shown that the proposed approach to sprint modeling provides realistic results.

  18. Biomechanical considerations on tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Michalakis, Konstantinos X.; Calvani, Pasquale; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the connection of teeth to implants, in order to restore partial edentulism. The main problem arising from this connection is tooth intrusion, which can occur in up to 7.3% of the cases. The justification of this complication is being attempted through the perspective of biomechanics of the involved anatomical structures, that is, the periodontal ligament and the bone, as well as that of the teeth- and implant-supported fixed partial dentures.

  19. Multiscale computer modeling in biomechanics and biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews the state-of-the-art in multiscale computer modeling, in terms of both accomplishments and challenges. The information in the book is particularly useful for biomedical engineers, medical physicists and researchers in systems biology, mathematical biology, micro-biomechanics and biomaterials who are interested in how to bridge between traditional biomedical engineering work at the organ and tissue scales, and the newer arenas of cellular and molecular bioengineering.

  20. Corneal Structure and Biomechanics in Collagen Vascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Colaço, Maria Luisa; Franco, Mónica; Pinto, Rita; Maia Sêco, José

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate corneal biomechanics and structure in asymptomatic individuals with Collagen Vascular Diseases (CVD), and compare with an age- -matched control group. Methods: In this prospective study 23 patients with the diagnosis of CVD (46 eyes) and 17 healthy age and gender-matched controls (34 eyes) underwent Ocular Response Analyzer and Specular Microscopy measurements. CH and CRF were recorded for each eye using the ORA, pachymetry and endothelial ce...