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Sample records for biomass oxidative pyrolysis

  1. Modeling of biomass pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samo, S.R.; Memon, A.S.; Akhund, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The fuels used in industry and power sector for the last two decades have become expensive. As a result renewable energy source have been emerging increasingly important, of these, biomass appears to be the most applicable in the near future. The pyrolysis of biomass plays a key role amongst the three major and important process generally encountered in a gas producer, namely, pyrolysis, combustion and reduction of combustion products. Each biomass has its own pyrolysis characteristics and this important parameters must be known for the proper design and efficient operation of a gasification system. Thermogravimetric analysis has been widely used to study the devolatilization of solid fuels, such as biomass. It provides the weight loss history of a sample heated at a predetermined rate as a function of time and temperature. This paper presents the experimental results of modelling the weight loss curves of the main biomass components i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Thermogravimetric analysis of main components of biomass showed that pyrolysis is first order reaction. Furthermore pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloe can be regarded as taking place in two stages, for while lignin pyrolysis is a single stage process. This paper also describes the Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) technique to predict the weight retained during pyrolysis at any temperature, for number of biomass species, such as cotton stalk, bagasse ad graoundnut shell. (author)

  2. MINIMIZING NET CO2 EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL / BIOMASS BLENDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd Lang; Robert Hurt

    2001-12-23

    This study presents a set of thermodynamic calculations on the optimal mode of solid fuel utilization considering a wide range of fuel types and processing technologies. The technologies include stand-alone combustion, biomass/coal cofiring, oxidative pyrolysis, and straight carbonization with no energy recovery but with elemental carbon storage. The results show that the thermodynamically optimal way to process solid fuels depends strongly on the specific fuels and technologies available, the local demand for heat or for electricity, and the local baseline energy-production method. Burning renewable fuels reduces anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions as widely recognized. In certain cases, however, other processing methods are equally or more effective, including the simple carbonization or oxidative pyrolysis of biomass fuels.

  3. Refining fast pyrolysis of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil produced from biomass is a promising renewable alternative to crude oil. Such pyrolysis oil has transportation, storage, and processing benefits, none of which are offered by the bulky, inhomogeneous solid biomass from which it originates. However, pyrolysis oil has both a different

  4. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Biomass fast pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgewater Anthony V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy is now accepted as having the potential to provide the major part of the projected renewable energy provisions of the future. Fast pyrolysis is one of the three main thermal routes, with gasification and combustion, to providing a useful and valuable biofuel. It is one of the most recent renewable energy processes to have been introduced and offers the advantages of a liquid product bio-oil that can be readily stored and trans ported, and used as a fuel, an energy carrier and a source of chemicals. Fast pyrolysis has now achieved commercial success for production of some chemicals, liquid fuel and electricity. Bio-oils have been success fully tested in engines turbines and boilers, and have been upgraded to high quality hydrocarbon fuels although at a presently unacceptable energetic and financial cost. This review concentrates on the technology of pyrolysis and applications for the liquid product. The basic pyrolysis process and the characteristics of the main liquid product bio-oil are first summarized followed by a review of applications for bio-oil. The main technical and non-technical barriers to implementation are identified.

  6. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sensho Honma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds.

  7. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Sensho; Hata, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds. PMID:25614894

  8. Pyrolysis of chitin biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Yan; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The thermal degradation of chitin biomass with various molecular structures was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG), and the gaseous products were analyzed by connected mass spectroscopy (MS). The chemical structure and morphology of char residues collected at 750°C using the model...

  9. Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Richard; Brandvold, Timothy A; Kocal, Joseph A

    2013-08-27

    Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing them from carbonaceous biomass feedstock are provided. The carbonaceous biomass feedstock is pyrolyzed in the presence of a catalyst comprising base metal-based catalysts, noble metal-based catalysts, treated zeolitic catalysts, or combinations thereof to produce pyrolysis gases. During pyrolysis, the catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction whereby at least a portion of the oxygenated hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis gases are converted into hydrocarbons. The oxygen is removed as carbon oxides and water. A condensable portion (the vapors) of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  10. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of biomass torrefied in various atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Quang-Vu; Trinh, Trung Ngoc; Tran, Khanh-Quang; Thi, Ngoc Bao Dung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Norway spruce is torrefied in different conditions relevant to oxy-fuel combustion. • Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of torrefied spruce are investigated. • Effects of non-oxidative gases are unpronounced. • Effects of oxygen are significant. • Torrefaction temperature have strong effects on the kinetic data. - Abstract: This study aims at investigating into the pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of torrefied Norway spruce obtained from our previous work on development of a biomass torrefaction process integrated with oxy-fuel combustion. Thermogravimetric analysis technique was employed to study the effects of different torrefaction conditions (including various torrefaction atmospheres and different temperatures) relevant to oxy-fuel combustion on the pyrolysis behavior of the torrefied biomass. Thereafter, a global kinetic model with an assumption of a three-pseudocomponent mechanism was used for kinetic modeling and evaluation. The results showed that torrefaction temperature and oxygen concentration in torrefaction gas have significant effects on the pyrolysis peak height and peak temperature of the torrefied biomass. In addition, more hemicellulose was removed during torrefaction in CO 2 , compared with torrefaction in N 2 and CO 2 /H 2 O. Moreover, high oxygen concentration in torrefaction gas and high torrefaction temperature can completely remove hemicellulose. The kinetic evaluation revealed that non-oxidative torrefaction atmospheres do not influent the pyrolysis kinetics of three main biomass components, but only their contribution factors. However, the presence of oxygen in torrefaction gas and the torrefaction temperature have significant effects on the kinetic data.

  11. Fast pyrolysis of biomass at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna

    on the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis. In contrast to expectations of graphitic structures to react slower than amorphous samples, beechwood andwheat straw soot were 35 and 571 times more reactive than pinewood soot prepared at 1400°C.The presence of potassium in wheat straw soot mainly...... pyrolysis at high temperatures plays a significant role in the overall combustion process since the biomass type, the reaction kinetics and heat transfer rates during pyrolysis influence the volatile gas release. The solid residue yield and its properties in suspension firing, including particle size...... that potassium has a dominating effect on the soot reactivity compared to nanostructure and particle size. A mathematical model of biomass fast pyrolysis was developed to predict the gas and char yield of wood and herbaceous biomass at heating rates > 600K s-1. The model includes both kinetics and external...

  12. Co pyrolysis of biomass and PP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Hyeon Su; Kim, Jung Hwan; Cho, Hye Jung; Ko, Jeong Huy; Park, Hye Jin; Bae, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full text: While bio-oil has received considerable attention both as a source of energy and as an organic feedstock, its stability as fuel is very low due to high oxygen content. Therefore, there are many efforts to upgrade it. Among them, co pyrolysis with polyolefin can be a method to obtain stable bio-oil. Because polyolefins contain higher hydrogen and carbon content than biomass and no oxygen, plastic/ biomass co pyrolysis may upgrade the bio-oil properties by increasing the carbon and hydrogen contents while reducing oxygen content. In this study, wood biomass was mixed with PP and then co pyrolysis was carried out in a batch reactor. The produced oil and gas was analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Also elemental analysis was performed to know the hydrogen, carbon and oxygen content of bio-oil. The effect of various reaction conditions on bio-oil properties were presented in detail. (author)

  13. TG-FTIR analysis of biomass pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassilakis, R.; Carangelo, R.M.; Wojtowicz, M.A. [Advanced Fuel Research Inc., Hartford, CT (United States)

    2001-10-09

    A great need exists for comprehensive biomass-pyrolysis models that could predict yields and evolution patterns of selected volatile products as a function of feedstock characteristics and process conditions. A thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis of evolving products (TG-FTIR) can provide useful input to such models in the form of kinetic information obtained under low heating rate conditions. In this work, robust TG-FTIR quantification routes were developed for infrared analysis of volatile products relevant to biomass pyrolysis. The analysis was applied to wheat straw, three types of tobacco (Burley, Oriental, and Bright) and three biomass model compounds (xylan, chlorogenic acid, and D-glucose). Product yields were compared with literature data, and species potentially quantifiable by FT-IR are reviewed. Product-evolution patterns are reported for all seven biomass samples. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B.

    1980-09-01

    All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  15. Environmental control technology for biomass flash pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Seward, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    The rapid commercialization of biomass gasification and pyrolysis technologies will raise questions concerning the environmental impacts of these systems and the associated costs for appropriate control technologies. This study concentrates on characterizing the effluent emissions and control technologies for a dual fluid-bed pyrolysis unit run by Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona. The ASU system produces a raw product gas that is passed through a catalytic liquefaction system to produce a fuel comparable to No. 2 fuel oil. Argonne National Laboratory is conducting a program that will survey several biomass systems to standardize the sampling techniques, prioritize standard analyses and develop a data base so that environmental issues later may be addressed before they limit or impede the commercialization of biomass gasification and pyrolysis technologies. Emissions will be related to both the current and anticipated emissions standards to generate material balances and set design parameters for effluent treatment systems. This will permit an estimate to be made of the capital and operating costs associated with these technologies.

  16. Methods for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-06-30

    Methods for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. A method for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil comprising the steps of combining a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream with a heated low-oxygen-pyoil diluent recycle stream to form a heated diluted pyoil feed stream is provided. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream has a feed temperature of about 150.degree. C. or greater. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a first deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at first hydroprocessing conditions effective to form a low-oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil effluent.

  17. Biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis over hierarchical ZSM-5 and Beta zeolites modified with Mg and Zn oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernando, H.; Moreno, I.; Fermoso, J.; Ochoa-Hernández, Cristina; Pizarro, P.; Coronado, J. M.; Čejka, Jiří; Serrano, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2017), s. 289-304 ISSN 2190-6815 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : catalytic fast pyrolysis * hierarchial zeolite * bio -oil upgrading Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  18. Biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis over hierarchical ZSM-5 and Beta zeolites modified with Mg and Zn oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernando, H.; Moreno, I.; Fermoso, J.; Ochoa-Hernández, Cristina; Pizarro, P.; Coronado, J. M.; Čejka, Jiří; Serrano, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2017), s. 289-304 ISSN 2190-6815 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : catalytic fast pyrolysis * hierarchial zeolite * bio-oil upgrading Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  19. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Vapors with Nano Metal Oxides: An Analytical Py-GC/MS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fast pyrolysis of poplar wood followed with catalytic cracking of the pyrolysis vapors was performed using analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The catalysts applied in this study were nano MgO, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, NiO and ZnO. These catalysts displayed different catalytic capabilities towards the pyrolytic products. The catalysis by CaO significantly reduced the levels of phenols and anhydrosugars, and eliminated the acids, while it increased the formation of cyclopentanones, hydrocarbons and several light compounds. ZnO was a mild catalyst, as it only slightly altered the pyrolytic products. The other four catalysts all decreased the linear aldehydes dramatically, while the increased the ketones and cyclopentanones. They also reduced the anhydrosugars, except for NiO. Moreover, the catalysis by Fe2O3 resulted in the formation of various hydrocarbons. However, none of these catalysts except CaO were able to greatly reduce the acids.

  20. Biofuels Production through Biomass Pyrolysis —A Technological Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been an enormous amount of research in recent years in the area of thermo-chemical conversion of biomass into bio-fuels (bio-oil, bio-char and bio-gas through pyrolysis technology due to its several socio-economic advantages as well as the fact it is an efficient conversion method compared to other thermo-chemical conversion technologies. However, this technology is not yet fully developed with respect to its commercial applications. In this study, more than two hundred publications are reviewed, discussed and summarized, with the emphasis being placed on the current status of pyrolysis technology and its potential for commercial applications for bio-fuel production. Aspects of pyrolysis technology such as pyrolysis principles, biomass sources and characteristics, types of pyrolysis, pyrolysis reactor design, pyrolysis products and their characteristics and economics of bio-fuel production are presented. It is found from this study that conversion of biomass to bio-fuel has to overcome challenges such as understanding the trade-off between the size of the pyrolysis plant and feedstock, improvement of the reliability of pyrolysis reactors and processes to become viable for commercial applications. Further study is required to achieve a better understanding of the economics of biomass pyrolysis for bio-fuel production, as well as resolving issues related to the capabilities of this technology in practical application.

  1. Development of advanced technologies for biomass pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ran

    The utilization of biomass resources as a renewable energy resource is of great importance in responding to concerns over the protection of the environment and the security of energy supply. This PhD research focuses on the investigation of the conversion of negative value biomass residues into value-added fuels through flash pyrolysis. Pyrolysis Process Study. A pilot plant bubbling fluidized bed pyrolyzer has been set up and extensively used to thermally crack various low or negative value agricultural, food and biofuel processing residues to investigate the yields and quality of the liquid [bio-oil] and solid (bio-char] products. Another novel aspect of this study is the establishment of an energy balance from which the thermal self-sustainability of the pyrolysis process can be assessed. Residues such as grape skins and mixture of grape skins and seeds, dried distiller's grains from bio-ethanol plants, sugarcane field residues (internal bagasse, external and whole plant) have been tested. The pyrolysis of each residue has been carried out at temperatures ranging from 300 to 600°C and at different vapor residence times, to determine its pyrolysis behavior including yields and the overall energy balance. The thermal sustainability of the pyrolysis process has been estimated by considering the energy contribution of the product gases and liquid bio-oll in relation to the pyrolysis heat requirements. The optimum pyrolysis conditions have been identified in terms of maximizing the liquid blo-oil yield, energy density and content of the product blo-oil, after ensuring a self-sustainable process by utilizing the product gases and part of char or bio-oil as heat sources. Adownflow pyrolyzer has also been set up. Preliminary tests have been conducted using much shorter residence times. Bio-oil Recovery. Bio-oil recovery from the pyrolysis unit includes condensation followed by demisting. A blo-oil cyclonic condensing system is designed A nearly tangential entry forces

  2. Effects of potassium salts loading on calcium oxide on the hydrogen production from pyrolysis-gasification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiping; Wang, Daqian; Li, Bin; Zeng, Zhiwei; Qu, Lei; Zhang, Wennan; Chen, Hanping

    2018-02-01

    The effects of potassium (K) salts loading on CaO on the H 2 production from pyrolysis-gasification of wheat straw were investigated. The loading of 0.25 wt% KCl could significantly enhance the CO 2 absorption capability of CaO. The CO 2 concentration in the product gas decreased sharply from 20.83 to 11.70 vol%, and the H 2 concentration increased from 48.2 to 55.5 vol%. While the loading of 0.25 wt% K 2 CO 3 /K 2 SO 4 inhibited the enhancing effect of CaO. Further increasing the loading of KCl on CaO, the CO 2 absorption of CaO declined, but the catalytic effect of KCl on the gasification process was promoted. The loading of 0.25 wt% KCl on CaO significantly improved the cyclic performance of CaO during the pyrolysis-gasification process. Higher H 2 concentration and more CO 2 absorbed by CaO were obtained with the loading of 0.25 wt% KCl even after 5 cycles compared with those of pure CaO in the first cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fates of Chemical Elements in Biomass during Its Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Li, Wen-Wei; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-05-10

    Biomass is increasingly perceived as a renewable resource rather than as an organic solid waste today, as it can be converted to various chemicals, biofuels, and solid biochar using modern processes. In the past few years, pyrolysis has attracted growing interest as a promising versatile platform to convert biomass into valuable resources. However, an efficient and selective conversion process is still difficult to be realized due to the complex nature of biomass, which usually makes the products complicated. Furthermore, various contaminants and inorganic elements (e.g., heavy metals, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine) embodied in biomass may be transferred into pyrolysis products or released into the environment, arousing environmental pollution concerns. Understanding their behaviors in biomass pyrolysis is essential to optimizing the pyrolysis process for efficient resource recovery and less environmental pollution. However, there is no comprehensive review so far about the fates of chemical elements in biomass during its pyrolysis. Here, we provide a critical review about the fates of main chemical elements (C, H, O, N, P, Cl, S, and metals) in biomass during its pyrolysis. We overview the research advances about the emission, transformation, and distribution of elements in biomass pyrolysis, discuss the present challenges for resource-oriented conversion and pollution abatement, highlight the importance and significance of understanding the fate of elements during pyrolysis, and outlook the future development directions for process control. The review provides useful information for developing sustainable biomass pyrolysis processes with an improved efficiency and selectivity as well as minimized environmental impacts, and encourages more research efforts from the scientific communities of chemistry, the environment, and energy.

  4. Release of Chlorine and Sulfur during Biomass Torrefaction and Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, Suriyati Binti; Flensborg, Julie Pauline; Shoulaifar, Tooran Khazraie

    2014-01-01

    The release of chlorine (Cl) and sulfur (S) during biomass torrefaction and pyrolysis has been investigated via experiments in two laboratory-scale reactors: a rotating reactor and a fixed bed reactor. Six biomasses with different chemical compositions covering a wide range of ash content and ash...... reporting that biomasses with a lower chlorine content release a higher fraction of chlorine during the pyrolysis process. A significant sulfur release (about 60%) was observed from the six biomasses investigated at 350 degrees C. The initial sulfur content in the biomass did not influence the fraction...

  5. Biomass Pyrolysis in DNS of Turbulent Particle-Laden Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Fröhlich, Jochen; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Armenio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is important for co-firing in coal power plants thereby reducing CO2 emissions. Modeling the combustion of biomass involves various physical and chemical processes, which take place successively and even simultaneously [1, 2]. An important step in biomass combustion is pyrolysis, in which

  6. Evaporation of biomass fast pyrolysis oil: evaluation of char formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balegedde Ramachandran, P.; van Rossum, G.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Evaporation experiments of biomass fast pyrolysis oil and its aqueous fractions at low (TGA-10°C/min, Glass tube-100°C/min) and high (atomization ~10 6°C/min) heating rates are performed. Slow heating of pyrolysis oil produced ~28% char (on carbon basis), whereas atomization of oil droplets (~117µm)

  7. Upgrading biomass pyrolysis bio-oil to renewable fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis is a process that can convert woody biomass to a crude bio-oil (pyrolysis oil). However, some of these compounds : contribute to bio-oil shelf life instability and difficulty in refining. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the bio-o...

  8. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  9. Pyrolysis of biomass briquettes, modelling and experimental verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, B; Lammers, G; Beenackers, AACM; Kopetz, H; Weber, T; Palz, W; Chartier, P; Ferrero, GL

    1998-01-01

    Carbonisation of biomass briquettes was studied using a dedicated single briquette carbonisation reactor. The reactor enabled continuous measurement of the briquette mass and continuous measurement of the radial temperature profile in the briquette. Furthermore pyrolysis gas production and

  10. Fractional condensation of biomass pyrolysis vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Garcia Perez, M.; Wang, Zhouhong; Oudenhoven, Stijn; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the possibilities to steer the composition and, thus, the quality of pyrolysis liquids by the reactor temperature and the pyrolysis vapor condenser temperature. Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized-bed pyrolysis reactor operated at 330 or 480 °C. The

  11. [Bio-oil production from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dengxiang; Cai, Tengyue; Ai, Ning; Yu, Fengwen; Jiang, Hongtao; Ji, Jianbing

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of pyrolysis conditions on bio-oil production from biomass in molten salt, experiments of biomass pyrolysis were carried out in a self-designed reactor in which the molten salt ZnCl2-KCl (with mole ratio 7/6) was selected as heat carrier, catalyst and dispersion agent. The effects of metal salt added into ZnCl2-KCl and biomass material on biomass pyrolysis were discussed, and the main compositions of bio-oil were determined by GC-MS. Metal salt added into molten salt could affect pyrolysis production yields remarkably. Lanthanon salt could enhance bio-oil yield and decrease water content in bio-oil, when mole fraction of 5.0% LaCl3 was added, bio-oil yield could reach up to 32.0%, and water content of bio-oil could reduce to 61.5%. The bio-oil and char yields were higher when rice straw was pyrolysed, while gas yield was higher when rice husk was used. Metal salts showed great selectivity on compositions of bio-oil. LiCl and FeCl2 promoted biomass to pyrolyse into smaller molecular weight compounds. CrCl3, CaCl2 and LaCl3 could restrain second pyrolysis of bio-oil. The research provided a scientific reference for production of bio-oil from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt.

  12. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    2017-01-01

    due to coking of the catalyst is an inhibitive problem for this technology. The objective of the present work is to produce oxygen free gasoline and diesel from biomass by hydrogen assisted catalytic fast pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis of beech wood has been performed in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere......Fast pyrolysis of biomass is a well-known technology for producing bio-oil, however in order to use the oil as transportation fuel the oxygen content must be decreased from approximately 30 wt.% to below 1 wt.%. This can be achieved by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Unfortunately, deactivation...

  13. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Schandel, Christian Bækhøj

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass is a well-known technology for producing bio-oil, however in order to use the oil as transportation fuel the oxygen content must be decreased from approximately 30 wt.% to below 1 wt.%. This can be achieved by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Unfortunately, deactivation...... due to coking of the catalyst is an inhibitive problem for this technology. The objective of the present work is to produce oxygen free gasoline and diesel from biomass by hydrogen assisted catalytic fast pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis of beech wood has been performed in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere...

  14. Combustion Properties of Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Oils: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. R. Shaddix; D. R. Hardesty

    1999-04-01

    Thermochemical pyrolysis of solid biomass feedstocks, with subsequent condensation of the pyrolysis vapors, has been investigated in the U.S. and internationally as a means of producing a liquid fuel for power production from biomass. This process produces a fuel with significantly different physical and chemical properties from traditional petroleum-based fuel oils. In addition to storage and handling difficulties with pyrolysis oils, concern exists over the ability to use this fuel effectively in different combustors. The report endeavors to place the results and conclusions from Sandia's research into the context of international efforts to utilize pyrolysis oils. As a special supplement to this report, Dr. Steven Gust, of Finland's Neste Oy, has provided a brief assessment of pyrolysis oil combustion research efforts and commercialization prospects in Europe.

  15. Additives initiate selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Wang, Lei; Qiu, Huizhe; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jianguo; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Jingmei; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    To improve chemicals selectivity under low temperature, a new method that involves the injection of additives into biomass pyrolysis is introduced. This method allows biomass pyrolysis to achieve high selectivity to chemicals under low temperature (300°C), while nothing was obtained in typical pyrolysis under 300°C. However, by using the new method, the first liquid drop emerged at the interval between 140°C and 240°C. Adding methanol to mushroom scrap pyrolysis obtained high selectivity to acetic acid (98.33%), while adding ethyl acetate gained selectivity to methanol (65.77%) in bagasse pyrolysis and to acetone (72.51%) in corncob pyrolysis. Apart from basic chemicals, one high value-added chemical (2,3-dihydrobenzofuran) was also detected, which obtained the highest selectivity (10.33%) in corncob pyrolysis through the addition of ethyl acetate. Comparison of HZSM-5 and CaCO3 catalysis showed that benzene emerged in the liquid because of the larger degree of cracking and hydrodeoxygenation over HZSM-5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Specialists' workshop on fast pyrolysis of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This workshop brought together most of those who are currently working in or have published significant findings in the area of fast pyrolysis of biomass or biomass-derived materials, with the goal of attaining a better understanding of the dominant mechanisms which produce olefins, oxygenated liquids, char, and tars. In addition, background papers were given in hydrocarbon pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis of biomass, and techniques for powdered-feedstock preparation in order that the other papers did not need to introduce in depth these concepts in their presentations for continuity. In general, the authors were requested to present summaries of experimental data with as much interpretation of that data as possible with regard to mechanisms and process variables such as heat flux, temperatures, partial pressure, feedstock, particle size, heating rates, residence time, etc. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  17. Methods and apparatuses for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-10-20

    Embodiments of methods and apparatuses for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. In one example, a method comprises the steps of separating a low-oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil effluent into a low-oxygen-pyoil organic phase stream and an aqueous phase stream. Phenolic compounds are removed from the aqueous phase stream to form a phenolic-rich diluent recycle stream. A biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is diluted and heated with the phenolic-rich diluent recycle stream to form a heated diluted pyoil feed stream. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen to deoxygenate the heated diluted pyoil feed stream.

  18. Integrated biomass pyrolysis with organic Rankine cycle for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, T. B.; Syahputra, A. W.

    2018-02-01

    The growing interest on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) application to produce electricity by utilizing biomass energy sources are increasingly due to its successfully used to generate power from waste heat available in industrial processes. Biomass pyrolysis is one of the thermochemical technologies for converting biomass into energy and chemical products consisting of liquid bio-oil, solid biochar, and pyrolytic gas. In the application, biomass pyrolysis can be divided into three main categories; slow, fast and flash pyrolysis mainly aiming at maximizing the products of bio-oil or biochar. The temperature of synthesis gas generated during processes can be used for Organic Rankine Cycle to generate power. The heat from synthesis gas during pyrolysis processes was transfer by thermal oil heater to evaporate ORC working fluid in the evaporator unit. In this study, the potential of the palm oil empty fruit bunch, palm oil shell, and tree bark have been used as fuel from biomass to generate electricity by integrated with ORC. The Syltherm-XLT thermal oil was used as the heat carrier from combustion burner, while R245fa was used as the working fluid for ORC system. Through Aspen Plus, this study analyses the influences on performance of main thermodynamic parameters, showing the possibilities of reaching an optimum performance for different working conditions that are characteristics of different design parameters.

  19. Relationships between biomass composition and liquid products formed via pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan eLin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conversion of biomass is a rapid, low-cost way to produce a dense liquid product, known as bio-oil, that can be refined to transportation fuels. However, utilization of bio-oil is challenging due to its chemical complexity, acidity, and instability—all results of the intricate nature of biomass. A clear understanding of how biomass properties impact yield and composition of thermal products will provide guidance to optimize both biomass and conditions for thermal conversion. To aid elucidation of these associations, we first describe biomass polymers, including phenolics, polysaccharides, acetyl groups, and inorganic ions, and the chemical interactions among them. We then discuss evidence for three roles (i.e., models for biomass components in formation of liquid pyrolysis products: (1 as direct sources, (2 as catalysts, and (3 as indirect factors whereby chemical interactions among components and/or cell wall structural features impact thermal conversion products. We highlight associations that might be utilized to optimize biomass content prior to pyrolysis, though a more detailed characterization is required to understand indirect effects. In combination with high-throughput biomass characterization techniques this knowledge will enable identification of biomass particularly suited for biofuel production and can also guide genetic engineering of bioenergy crops to improve biomass features.

  20. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass for liquid biofuels production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Production of 2nd-generation biofuels from biomass residues and waste feedstock is gaining great concerns worldwide. Pyrolysis, a thermochemical conversion process involving rapid heating of feedstock under oxygen-absent condition to moderate temperature and rapid quenching of intermediate produc...

  1. Biomass pyrolysis liquid to citric acid via 2-step bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiguang; Bai, Zhihui; Sun, Hongyan; Yu, Zhisheng; Li, Xingxing; Guo, Yifei; Zhang, Hongxun

    2014-12-31

    The use of fossil carbon sources for fuels and petrochemicals has serious impacts on our environment and is unable to meet the demand in the future. A promising and sustainable alternative is to substitute fossil carbon sources with microbial cell factories converting lignocellulosic biomass into desirable value added products. However, such bioprocesses require tolerance to inhibitory compounds generated during pretreatment of biomass. In this study, the process of sequential two-step bio-conversion of biomass pyrolysis liquid containing levoglucosan (LG) to citric acid without chemical detoxification has been explored, which can greatly improve the utilization efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. The sequential two-step bio-conversion of corn stover pyrolysis liquid to citric acid has been established. The first step conversion by Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium) is desirable to decrease the content of other compounds except levoglucosan as a pretreatment for the second conversion. The remaining levoglucosan in solution was further converted into citric acid by Aspergillus niger (A. niger) CBX-209. Thus the conversion of cellulose to citric acid is completed by both pyrolysis and bio-conversion technology. Under experimental conditions, levoglucosan yield is 12% based on the feedstock and the citric acid yield can reach 82.1% based on the levoglucosan content in the pyrolysis liquid (namely 82.1 g of citric acid per 100 g of levoglucosan). The study shows that P. chrysosporium and A. niger have the potential to be used as production platforms for value-added products from pyrolyzed lignocellulosic biomass. Selected P. chrysosporium is able to decrease the content of other compounds except levoglucosan and levoglucosan can be further converted into citric acid in the residual liquids by A. niger. Thus the conversion of cellulose to citric acid is completed by both pyrolysis and bio-conversion technology.

  2. Integrating sustainable biofuel and silver nanomaterial production for in situ upgrading of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Junjie; Dou, Guolan; Ziade, Elbara; Goldfarb, Jillian L.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Integrated production of biotemplated nanomaterials and upgraded biofuels (solid lines indicate current processes, dashed lines indicated proposed pathway). - Highlights: • Novel integrated process to co-produce nanomaterials and biofuels via pyrolysis. • Impregnation of biomass with silver nitrate upgrades bio-oil during pyrolysis. • Co-synthesis enhances syngas produced with more hydrogen. • Biomass template impacts bio-fuels and morphology of resulting nanomaterials. - Abstract: Replacing fossil fuels with biomass-based alternatives is a potential carbon neutral, renewable and sustainable option for meeting the world’s growing energy demand. However, pyrolytic conversions of biomass-to-biofuels suffer marginal total energy gain, and technical limitations such as bio-oils’ high viscosity and oxygen contents that result in unstable, corrosive and low-value fuels. This work demonstrates a new integrated biorefinery process for the co-production of biofuels and silver nanomaterials. By impregnating pure cellulose and corn stalk with silver nitrate, followed by pyrolysis, the gas yield (especially hydrogen) increases substantially. The condensable bio-oil components of the impregnated samples are considerably higher in furfurals (including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural). Though the overall activation energy barrier, as determined via the Distributed Activation Energy Model, does not change significantly with the silver nitrate pre-treatment, the increase in gases devolatilized, and improved 5-hydroxymethylfurfural yield, suggest a catalytic effect, potentially increasing decarboxylation reactions. After using this metal impregnation to improve pyrolysis fuel yield, following pyrolysis, the silver-char composite materials are calcined to remove the biomass template to yield silver nanomaterials. While others have demonstrated the ability to biotemplate such nanosilver on cellulosic biomass, they consider only impregnation and oxidation of the

  3. Simulating Biomass Fast Pyrolysis at the Single Particle Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciesielski, Peter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Jakes, Joseph E. [U.S. Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    2017-07-01

    Simulating fast pyrolysis at the scale of single particles allows for the investigation of the impacts of feedstock-specific parameters such as particle size, shape, and species of origin. For this reason particle-scale modeling has emerged as an important tool for understanding how variations in feedstock properties affect the outcomes of pyrolysis processes. The origins of feedstock properties are largely dictated by the composition and hierarchical structure of biomass, from the microstructural porosity to the external morphology of milled particles. These properties may be accounted for in simulations of fast pyrolysis by several different computational approaches depending on the level of structural and chemical complexity included in the model. The predictive utility of particle-scale simulations of fast pyrolysis can still be enhanced substantially by advancements in several areas. Most notably, considerable progress would be facilitated by the development of pyrolysis kinetic schemes that are decoupled from transport phenomena, predict product evolution from whole-biomass with increased chemical speciation, and are still tractable with present-day computational resources.

  4. Kinetic scheme of biomass pyrolysis considering secondary charring reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anca-Couce, Andrés; Mehrabian, Ramin; Scharler, Robert; Obernberger, Ingwald

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A mechanistic scheme for biomass pyrolysis from the literature is adapted. • Secondary char formation reactions and catalytic effect of alkalis are considered. • The adapted scheme is validated with experimental data from the literature. - Abstract: A widely applicable kinetic scheme for pyrolysis is still missing. In this work an adaptation of the mechanistic scheme developed by Ranzi et al. (2008) for pyrolysis of small ash free biomass particles is proposed. The scheme is modified to include secondary char formation reactions, which are relevant for particles of a certain thickness, and sugar formation is avoided due to the catalytic effect of alkali metals in biomass. The predictions of the adapted scheme are compared to experimental data from the literature of pyrolysis in fixed beds of particles with a size of around 1 cm. It is shown that the adaptation improves the prediction of the final char yield and its CHO composition and also the yields of the main groups of volatiles, as carbonyls + alcohols, sugars and water vapor

  5. Structural and Compositional Transformations of Biomass Chars during Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Steibel, Markus; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    In this work the physical and chemical transformations of biomass chars during fast pyrolysis, considered as a 2nd stage of combustion, has been investigated. Seven biomasses containing different amount of ash and organic components were reacted at up to 1673 K with high heating rates in a wire......-mesh reactor and the resulting chars were retrieved. In order to obtain information on the structural and compositional transformations of the biomass chars, samples were subjected to elemental analysis, scanning electron microcopy with EDX and Raman spectrometry. The results show that there are significant...

  6. Pyrolysis of biomass for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, Marius; David, Elena; Bucura, Felicia; Sisu, Claudia; Niculescu, Violeta

    2006-01-01

    Biomass processing is a new technology within the area of renewable energies. Current energy supplies in the world are dominated by fossil fuels (some 80% of the total use of over 400 EJ per year). Nevertheless, about 10-15% of this demand is covered by biomass resources, making biomass by far the most important renewable energy source used to date. On average, in the industrialized countries biomass contributes some 9-13% to the total energy supplies, but in developing countries the proportion is as high as a fifth to one third. In quite a number of countries biomass covers even over 50 to 90% of the total energy demand. Classic application of biomass combustion is heat production for domestic applications. A key issue for bio-energy is that its use should be modernized to fit into a sustainable development path. Especially promising are the production of electricity via advanced conversion concepts (i.e. gasification and state-of-the-art combustion and co-firing) and modern biomass derived fuels like methanol, hydrogen and ethanol from ligno-cellulosic biomass, which can reach competitive cost levels within 1-2 decades (partly depending on price developments with petroleum). (authors)

  7. Stabilization of biomass-derived pyrolysis oils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderbosch, R. H.; Ardiyanti, A. R.; Wildschut, J.; Oasmaa, A.; Heeres, H. J.

    BACKGROUND: Biomass is the only renewable feedstock containing carbon, and therefore the only alternative to fossil-derived crude oil derivatives. However, the main problems concerning the application of biomass for biofuels and bio-based chemicals are related to transport and handling, the limited

  8. Pyrolysis and Gasification Kinetics of Large Biomass Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenson, Jenny; Hagstroem, Magnus; Andersson, Patrik U.; Loenn, Benny; Pettersson, Jan B.C. [Goteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dep. of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science; Davidsson, Kent O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Energy Conversion

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the project is to provide experimental data on single biomass particle pyrolysis that have an applied as well as a fundamental bearing. Transport phenomena and kinetics on the single particle level are characterized, including heat and mass transport processes. New experimental techniques and methods are applied and developed within the project. A single-particle reactor has been developed for the investigations, and several detection techniques including fast thermogravimetric analysis, molecular beam mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy, video recording and pyrometry are applied. The experimental data are used to develop robust models for pyrolysis and gasification, which are essential components in the design of gasification and combustion reactors.

  9. A review on co-pyrolysis of biomass: An optional technique to obtain a high-grade pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnisa, Faisal; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The discussion emphasizes the use of biomass wastes in the co-pyrolysis process. • The co-pyrolysis can significantly improve the quantity and quality of pyrolysis oil. • Co-pyrolysis technique is more profitable than the pyrolysis of biomass alone. • By using this method, the volume of biomass wastes can be easily controlled. - Abstract: The oil produced by the pyrolysis of biomass has potential for use as a substitute for fossil fuels. However, the oil needs to be upgraded since it contains high levels of oxygen, which causes low caloric value, corrosion problems, and instability. Generally, upgrading the pyrolysis oil involves the addition of a catalyst, solvent and large amount hydrogen, which can cost more than the oil itself. In this regard, the co-pyrolysis technique offers simplicity and effectiveness in order to produce a high-grade pyrolysis oil. Co-pyrolysis is a process which involves two or more materials as feedstock. Many studies have shown that the use of co-pyrolysis is able to improve the characteristics of pyrolysis oil, e.g. increase the oil yield, reduce the water content, and increase the caloric value of oil. Besides, the use of this technique also contributed to reduce the production cost and solve some issues on waste management. This article tried to review the co-pyrolysis process through several points of view, including the process mechanism, feedstock, the exploration on co-pyrolysis studies, co-pyrolysis phenomena, characteristics of byproducts, and economic assessment. Additionally, several outlooks based on studies in the literature are also presented in this paper

  10. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    This thesis explores the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of pyrolysis oils to syngas and chemicals. First, an exploration of model compounds and their chemistries under CPO conditions is considered. Then CPO experiments of raw pyrolysis oils are detailed. Finally, plans for future development in this field are discussed. In Chapter 2, organic acids such as propionic acid and lactic acid are oxidized to syngas over Pt catalysts. Equilibrium production of syngas can be achieved over Rh-Ce catalysts; alternatively mechanistic evidence is derived using Pt catalysts in a fuel rich mixture. These experiments show that organic acids, present in pyrolysis oils up to 25%, can undergo CPO to syngas or for the production of chemicals. As the fossil fuels industry also provides organic chemicals such as monomers for plastics, the possibility of deriving such species from pyrolysis oils allows for a greater application of the CPO of biomass. However, chemical production is highly dependent on the originating molecular species. As bio oil comprises up to 400 chemicals, it is essential to understand how difficult it would be to develop a pure product stream. Chapter 3 continues the experimentation from Chapter 2, exploring the CPO of another organic functionality: the ester group. These experiments demonstrate that equilibrium syngas production is possible for esters as well as acids in autothermal operation with contact times as low as tau = 10 ms over Rh-based catalysts. Conversion for these experiments and those with organic acids is >98%, demonstrating the high reactivity of oxygenated compounds on noble metal catalysts. Under CPO conditions, esters decompose in a predictable manner: over Pt and with high fuel to oxygen, non-equilibrium products show a similarity to those from related acids. A mechanism is proposed in which ethyl esters thermally decompose to ethylene and an acid, which decarbonylates homogeneously, driven by heat produced at the catalyst surface. Chapter 4

  11. Co-pyrolysis characteristic of biomass and bituminous coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaidan; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Aibin; Wang, Li; Yu, Guangsuo

    2015-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of biomass and bituminous coal have been studied in this work. The temperature was up to 900°C with the heating rates of 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30°C/min. Rice straw, saw dust, microcrystalline cellulose, lignin and Shenfu bituminous coal were chosen as samples. Six different biomass ratios were used. The individual thermal behavior of each sample was obtained. The experimental weight fractions of the blended samples and the calculated values were compared. The results show that the weight fractions of the blended samples behave differently with calculated ones during the co-pyrolysis process. With the increasing biomass ratio, relative deviations between experimental weight fractions and calculated ones are larger. H/C molar ratio, heat transfer properties of biomass would affect to the interaction between biomass and coal. The maximum degradation rates are slower than the calculated ones. The activation energy distributions also changed by adding some biomass into coal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Apparatuses and methods for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnes, Tom N.

    2015-12-29

    Apparatuses and methods for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In one example, the method comprises of dividing a feedstock stream into first and second feedstock portions. The feedstock stream comprises the biomass-derived pyrolysis oil and has a temperature of about 60.degree. C. or less. The first feedstock portion is combined with a heated organic liquid stream to form a first heated diluted pyoil feed stream. The first heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a first deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen to form an intermediate low-oxygen pyoil effluent. The second feedstock portion is combined with the intermediate low-oxygen pyoil effluent to form a second heated diluted pyoil feed stream. The second heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a second deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen to form additional low-oxygen pyoil effluent.

  13. Bio-methane via fast pyrolysis of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Görling, Martin; Larsson, Mårten; Alvfors, Per

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis gases can efficiently be upgraded to bio-methane. ► The integration can increase energy efficiency and provide a renewable vehicle fuel. ► The biomass to bio-methane conversion efficiency is 83% (HHV). ► The efficiency is higher compared to bio-methane produced via gasification. ► Competitive alternative to other alternatives of bio-oil upgrading. - Abstract: Bio-methane, a renewable vehicle fuel, is today produced by anaerobic digestion and a 2nd generation production route via gasification is under development. This paper proposes a poly-generation plant that produces bio-methane, bio-char and heat via fast pyrolysis of biomass. The energy and material flows for the fuel synthesis are calculated by process simulation in Aspen Plus®. The production of bio-methane and bio-char amounts to 15.5 MW and 3.7 MW, when the total inputs are 23 MW raw biomass and 1.39 MW electricity respectively (HHV basis). The results indicate an overall efficiency of 84% including high-temperature heat and the biomass to bio-methane yield amounts to 83% after allocation of the biomass input to the final products (HHV basis). The overall energy efficiency is higher for the suggested plant than for the gasification production route and is therefore a competitive route for bio-methane production

  14. Detailed modelling of biomass pyrolysis: biomass structure and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugony, F.; Migliavacca, G.; Faravelli, T.; Ranzi, E.

    2007-01-01

    The research routes followed in the field of numerical modelling development for biomass devolatilization are here summarised. In this first paper a wide introduction concerning the description of the chemical nature of the main classes of compounds which constitute biomasses is reported, it is the starting point for the subsequent description of the developed models, described in the companion paper [it

  15. Processes for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil, and apparatuses for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-11-24

    Processes and apparatuses for washing a spent ion exchange bed and for treating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided herein. An exemplary process for washing a spent ion exchange bed employed in purification of biomass-derived pyrolysis oil includes the step of providing a ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The ion-depleted pyrolysis oil stream is partially hydrotreated to reduce the oxygen content thereof, thereby producing a partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream having a residual oxygen content that is less than the original oxygen content. At least a portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream is passed through the spent ion exchange bed. Water is passed through the spent ion exchange bed after passing at least the portion of the partially hydrotreated pyrolysis oil stream therethrough.

  16. Influence of Temperature on Pyrolysis of Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Pattnaik, D.; Bhuyan, S. K.; Mishra, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    The Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory nature of the castor oil is used for the treatment of constipation and also used to clean the intestine before a surgical treatment. The growing demand castor oil due to its cheaper price and have much demand to grow hairs faster which give proteins to hair and increases the life span of hair and increases the hair capacity and provide hair smoothness because it has high ricinoleic ratio which is beneficial for skin and hair. The main objective of this paper is by observing its usefulness and the current aim for the research work is to produce bio-char/carbon compounds and extraction of higher carbon content. The castor leaves are collected and dried in the sun light to get it moisture free and proximate analysis is studied that reveals 14% of fixed amount of carbon. The dried leaves of castor plant are pyrolized at different temperature ranges 250°C, 350 °C, 450°C, 600°C and 900°C. The pyrolised specimens were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis which shows the transformation and formation of several bonds including carbon bonds which are affected during carbonization. Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy have been studied on pyrolised specimen to get microstructures elements in the bio-char. The parameter called carbon/oxygen ration gives the advantage of char in the agricultural land for fertility motive and discrepancy of carbon and oxygen contents have been analysed. It has been found that carbon/oxygen ration increased along increment in Pyrolysis tempt. Up to 500°C and therefore along moreover increment in tempt. Beyond 500°C there is a decrement trend has been found.

  17. Pyrolysis Strategies for Effective Utilization of Lignocellulosic and Algal Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddi, Balakrishna

    Pyrolysis is a processing technique involving thermal degradation of biomass in the absence of oxygen. The bio-oils obtained following the condensation of the pyrolysis vapors form a convenient starting point for valorizing the major components of lignocellulosic as well as algal biomass feed stocks for the production of fuels and value-added chemicals. Pyrolysis can be implemented on whole biomass or on residues left behind following standard fractionation methods. Microalgae and oil seeds predominantly consist of protein, carbohydrate and triglycerides, whereas lignocellulose is composed of carbohydrates (cellulose and hemicellulose) and lignin. The differences in the major components of these two types of biomass will necessitate different pyrolysis strategies to derive the optimal benefits from the resulting bio-oils. In this thesis, novel pyrolysis strategies were developed that enable efficient utilization of the bio-oils (and/or their vapors) from lignocellulose, algae, as well as oil seed feed stocks. With lignocellulosic feed stocks, pyrolysis of whole biomass as well as the lignin residue left behind following well-established pretreatment and saccharification (i.e., depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose to their monomeric-sugars) of the biomass was studied with and without catalysts. Following this, pyrolysis of (lipid-deficient) algae and lignocellulosic feed stocks, under similar reactor conditions, was performed for comparison of product (bio-oil, gas and bio-char) yields and composition. In spite of major differences in component bio-polymers, feedstock properties relevant to thermo-chemical conversions, such as overall C, H and O-content, C/O and H/C molar ratio as well as calorific values, were found to be similar for algae and lignocellulosic material. Bio-oil yields from algae and some lignocellulosic materials were similar; however, algal bio-oils were compositionally different and contained several N-compounds (most likely from

  18. Electrocatalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis oils to chemical and fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chun Ho

    The present project's aim is to liquefy biomass through fast pyrolysis and then upgrade the resulting "bio-oil" to renewable fuels and chemicals by intensifying its energy content using electricity. This choice reflects three points: (a) Liquid hydrocarbons are and will long be the most practical fuels and chemical feedstocks because of their energy density (both mass and volume basis), their stability and relative ease of handling, and the well-established infrastructure for their processing, distribution and use; (b) In the U.S., the total carbon content of annually harvestable, non-food biomass is significantly less than that in a year's petroleum usage, so retention of plant-captured carbon is a priority; and (c) Modern technologies for conversion of sunlight into usable energy forms---specifically, electrical power---are already an order of magnitude more efficient than plants are at storing solar energy in chemical form. Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) generates flammable gases, char, and "bio-oil", a viscous, corrosive, and highly oxygenated liquid consisting of large amounts of acetic acid and water together with hundreds of other organic compounds. With essentially the same energy density as biomass and a tendency to polymerize, this material cannot practically be stored or transported long distances. It must be upgraded by dehydration, deoxygenation, and hydrogenation to make it both chemically and energetically compatible with modern vehicles and fuels. Thus, this project seeks to develop low cost, general, scalable, robust electrocatalytic methods for reduction of bio-oil into fuels and chemicals.

  19. Oxidative desulfurization of tire pyrolysis oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low cost method for the purification of oils obtained from the pyrolysis of used tires. Oxidative desulfurization is a promising route for purification of tire pyrolysis oils as hydro-desulfurization may not be affordable for small scale industries. Different additives and acids have been employed for the enhancement of properties of pyrolytic oils. The experimental conditions were kept identical throughout, i.e. atmospheric pressure and 50°C temperature for comparison of performance of various additives. The use of hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid mixture (10 wt.% was found more economical and effective in desulfurization and improvement of fuel properties of sample oils. The contribution of sulfuric acid in desulfurization and decreasing viscosity was also satisfactory but due to high price of concentrated sulfuric acid its use may not be economical. Calcium oxide and Fuller’s earth was not found to be effective in desulfurization. Results indicate that oxidative desulfurization could render tire pyrolysis oils suitable for blending as heating fuel.

  20. Biofuels Production through Biomass Pyrolysis —A Technological Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury; Nanjappa Ashwath; Mohammad G. Rasul; Mohammad I. Jahirul

    2012-01-01

    There has been an enormous amount of research in recent years in the area of thermo-chemical conversion of biomass into bio-fuels (bio-oil, bio-char and bio-gas) through pyrolysis technology due to its several socio-economic advantages as well as the fact it is an efficient conversion method compared to other thermo-chemical conversion technologies. However, this technology is not yet fully developed with respect to its commercial applications. In this study, more than two hundred publication...

  1. INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

    2003-03-01

    Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

  2. INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandvig, Eric; Walling, Gary; Brown, Robert C.; Pletka, Ryan; Radlein, Desmond; Johnson, Warren

    2003-01-01

    Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW e ; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system

  3. Fast pyrolysis of biomass. An experimental study on mechanisms influencing yield and composition of the products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil originating from biomass has the potential to replace ‘crude fossil oil’ and to produce fuels and chemicals in a more sustainable way. The favorable perspective of fast pyrolysis as biomass pre-treatment step is directly related to the production of a liquid as main product and the

  4. Novel sorbent materials for environmental remediation via Pyrolysis of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaniotou, Anastasia

    2013-04-01

    One of the major challenges facing society at this moment is the transition from a non-sustainable, fossil resources-based economy to a sustainable bio-based economy. By producing multiple products, a biorefinery can take advantage of the differences in biomass components and intermediates and maximize the value derived from the biomass feedstock. The high-value products enhance profitability, the high-volume fuel helps meet national energy needs, and the power production reduces costs and avoids greenhouse-gas emissions From pyrolysis, besides gas and liquid products a solid product - char, is derived as well. This char contains the non converted carbon and can be used for activated carbon production and/or as additive in composite material production. Commercially available activated carbons are still considered expensive due to the use of non-renewable and relatively expensive starting material such as coal. The present study describes pyrolysis as a method to produce high added value carbon materials such as activated carbons (AC) from agricultural residues pyrolysis. Olive kernel has been investigated as the precursor of the above materials. The produced activated carbon was characterized by proximate and ultimate analyses, BET method and porosity estimation. Furthermore, its adsorption of pesticide compound in aqueous solution by was studied. Pyrolysis of olive kernel was conducted at 800 oC for 45min in a fixed reactor. For the production of the activated carbon the pyrolytic char was physically activated under steam in the presence of CO2 at 970oC for 3 h in a bench scale reactor. The active carbons obtained from both scales were characterized by N2 adsorption at 77 K, methyl-blue adsorption (MB adsorption) at room temperature and SEM analysis. Surface area and MB adsorption were found to increase with the degree of burn-off. The surface area of the activated carbons was found to increase up to 1500 m2/g at a burn-off level of 60-65wt.%, while SEM analysis

  5. Conventional and catalytic pyrolysis of pinyon juniper biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yathavan, Bhuvanesh Kumar

    Pinyon and juniper are invasive woody species in Western United States that occupy over 47 million acres of land. The US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has embarked on harvesting these woody species to make room for range grasses for grazing. The major application of harvested pinyon-juniper (PJ) is low value firewood. Thus, there is a need to develop new high value products from this woody biomass to reduce the cost of harvesting. In this research PJ biomass was processed through pyrolysis technology to produce value added products. The first part of the thesis demonstrates the effect of PJ wood, bark and mixture biomass and temperature on the product yield and on the quality of the bio-oil produced. The second part focuses on the optimization of process parameters for maximum yield and the third part focuses on upgrading the bio-oil with an industrial catalyst (HZSM5) and an industrial waste product (red mud). The results obtained from the first part showed that PJ wood produced maximum bio-oil yield, followed by PJ mixture and bark. The bio-oil yield from PJ wood had low viscosity when compared to PJ mixture and PJ bark. The second part focused on studying the effect of process parameters (temperature, feed rate and the gas flow rate) on the total liquid, organic, water, char and gas yield. The results show that each response is affected by different factor level combinations, and maximum yield for each response was obtained at different factors level. The third part focused on catalytic pyrolysis of PJ biomass using both HZSM-5 catalyst and red mud. The mechanisms of catalysis by the two catalysts were quite different. Whereas the HZSM-5 rejected oxygen mostly as carbon monoxide and water and produced lower amounts of carbon dioxide, on the contrary the red mud produced more carbon dioxide and water and less carbon monoxide. The higher heating value of the red mud catalyzed oil (29.46 MJ/kg) was slightly higher than that catalyzed by HZSM-5 (28.55 MJ/kg). Thus

  6. Study on biomass pyrolysis and gasification in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, X.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Tang, S.; Lu, Z.; Li, D. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Thermal Engineering Department

    2000-08-01

    Experimental investigations of biomass pyrolysis and gasification were performed in a fluidized bed reactor with steam and nitrogen as fluid medium respectively. The size of the stainless steel reactor is 150mm ID and 1360mm in height. Five biomass samples including poplar sawdust, bagasse, cotton stem, eucalyptus globulus and pinus ratiata, have been tested on the facility at the temperatures ranging from 923K to 1073K. During each test run, biomass feedstock was fed into the reactor continuously for twelve minutes and without residue discharge, meanwhile seven gas samples were taken, five during the feeding process and two after the stop of feeding. The transient and accumulated gas yields were measured with a rotameter and a gas meter. The temperatures of the fluidized bed and freeboard were acquired by a system of thermocouples connected with a computer. The gas samples were analyzed on a gas chromatograph. On the basis of the experimental results, the variations of gas yield, gas composition, energy conversion efficiency and mass conversion efficiency with temperature are discussed for each biomass feedstock in both cases of steam and nitrogen fluidization. It has been revealed in this investigation that the presence of steam in the fluidized bed reactor stimulates tar cracking to form the gas species of C{sub 2}H{sub 4}and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, etc. 8 ref., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. New Correlations for Coal and Biomass Pyrolysis Performances with Coal-Biomass Type Number and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Bindar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis of coal and biomass is generally reported as the mass yield of released chemicals at various temperatures, pressures, heating rates and coal or biomass type. In this work, a new coal-biomass type number, NCT, is introduced. This number is constructed from the mass fractions of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in the ultimate analysis. This number is unique for each coal or biomass type. For 179 different species of coal and biomass from the literature, the volatile matter mass yield can be expressed by the second order polynomial function ln(NCT. This unique correlation allows the effects of the temperature and heating rate on the volatile yield YVY for coal and biomass to be empirically correlated as well. The correlation for the mass fraction of each chemical component in the released volatile matter correlation is obtained from the YVY correlation. The weight factor for some of the components is constant for the variation of NCT, but not for others. The resulted volatile matter and yield correlations are limited to atmospheric pressure, very small particles (less than 0.212 mm and interpreted for wire-mesh pyrolysis reactor conditions and a nitrogen gas environment.

  8. Low-temperature co-pyrolysis behaviours and kinetics of oily sludge: effect of agricultural biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiehong; Jia, Hanzhong; Qu, Chengtun; Fan, Daidi; Wang, Chuanyi

    2017-02-01

    Pyrolysis is potentially an effective treatment of oily sludge for oil recovery, and its kinetics and efficiency are expected to be affected by additives. In the present study, the pyrolysis parameters, including heating rate, final pyrolysis temperature, and pyrolysis time of oily sludge in the presence of agricultural biomass, apricot shell, were systematically explored. As a result, maximum oil recovery is achieved when optimizing the pyrolysis conditionas15 K/min, 723 K, and 3 h for heating rate, final pyrolysis temperature, and pyrolysis time, respectively. Thermogravimetric experiments of oily sludge samples in the presence of various biomasses conducted with non-isothermal temperature programmes suggest that the pyrolysis process contains three stages, and the main decomposition reaction occurs in the range of 400-740 K. Taking Flynn-Wall-Ozawa analysis of the derivative thermogravimetry and thermogravimetry results, the activation energy (E a ) values for the pyrolysis of oily sludge in the presence and absence of apricot shell were derived to be 35.21 and 39.40 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The present work supports that the presence of biomass promotes the pyrolysis of oily sludge, implying its great potential as addictive in the industrial pyrolysis of oily sludge.

  9. Waste minimization pretreatment via pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, U.K.; Choi, K.; Yang, K.H.; Park, J.K.; Song, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrolysis and/or oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resins and other combustible waste may be effective pretreatment processes before vitrification. Three different methods were examined with the TGA to pretreat the resins: pyrolysis; oxidative pyrolysis; and oxidative pyrolyses of ash remaining after the pyrolysis of resin. The latter two methods were found to provide better volume reduction than the pyrolysis-only process. Between the two types of resins, cationic and anionic, the cationic exchange resin was less volatile. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of mixed resin (50% cation and 50% anion by wt.) showed volatilization at the temperatures where volatilization was observed for each of the separate resins. Because of certain limitations of the commercial TGA, tube furnace experiments were performed, generally, to examine the pyrolysis of larger quantities of cationic, anionic, and mixed resin, and to examine off-gas characteristics. The cationic resin-only and anionic resin-only gravimetric results showed good agreement with the smaller-scale TGA results. SEM pictures of the different variants of the resin (cationic, anionic, and mixed) show a different morphology for each. Off-gas data showed the presence of H 2 S, SO 2 , CO, and NO during the pyrolysis of cationic resin. CO was observed during the pyrolysis of anionic resin. The mixed resin trials showed the presence of the gases approximately at the temperatures where the gases would evolve if the results of the two different resins (cationic and anionic) were superimposed. However, the amount of hydrogen sulfide relative to the sulfur dioxide was found to increase significantly compared to the results of the cationic resin-only trials

  10. Modelling of pyrolysis of coal-biomass blends using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Anup Kumar; Gupta, Parthapratim; Goyal, Tripurari; Saha, Ranajit Kumar

    2008-11-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop an appropriate model to explain the co-pyrolysis behaviour of lignite coal-biomass blends with different proportions using a thermogravimetric analyzer. A new parallel-series kinetic model was proposed to predict the pyrolysis behaviour of biomass over the entire pyrolysis regime, while a kinetic model similar to that of Anthony and Howard [Anthony, D.B., Howard, J.B., 1976. Coal devolatilization and hydrogasification. AIChE Journal 22(4), 625-656] was used for pyrolysis of coal. Analysis of mass loss history of blends showed an absence of synergistic effect between coal and biomass. Co-pyrolysis mass-loss profiles of the blends were predicted using the estimated kinetic parameters of coal and biomass. Excellent agreement was found between the predicted and the experimental results.

  11. A practical approach for modelling and control of biomass pyrolysis pilot plant with heat recovery from combustion of pyrolysis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbassi, Mohamed Ammar; Grioui, Najla; Halouani, Kamel [Micro-Electro-Thermal Systems - Industrial Energy Systems Group (METS-ENIS), IPEIS, University of Sfax, B.P: 1172 - 3018, Sfax (Tunisia); Zoulalian, Andre [Laboratoire d' Etudes et de Recherches sur le Materiau Bois (LERMAB), Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1 (UHP), B.P: 239 - 54506 Vandoeuvre, les Nancy Cedex (France); Zeghmati, Belkacem [LAMPS-GME, Universite de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52, Avenue Paul Alduy 66860 Perpignan Cedex (France)

    2009-10-15

    A pilot plant of biomass pyrolysis using pyrolysis products as fuel has been tested and shown to improve energy balance of the process and to be environmentally friendly by avoiding rejection of pyrolysis pollutants fumes into the atmosphere. The high number of parameters involved in a pyrolysis process makes it difficult to specify an optimum procedure for charcoal yield and pyrolysis cycle durability. So the knowledge of the essential parameters which govern the kinetics mechanisms of the biomass thermal decomposition and the combustion of pyrolysis gases is very useful to understand the operating cycle of the plant. In the present study a thermochemical model is developed in order to simulate and control the operating cycle of the system. The effect of the inlet molar air flow rate on the temporal evolution of biomass mass loss rate and temperatures in the different active zones of the pilot plant as well as the determination of the critical inlet molar air flow rate for which accidental runaway of combustion reactions occurs are presented. To avoid this accidental phenomenon a Proportional-Integral-Derived (PID) anticipated regulation is used in order to control temperatures evolution in the different zones of the device and avoid the runaway of combustion reactions. (author)

  12. A kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes in Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Jens F.; Banks, Scott W.; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Dufour, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Predictive kinetic reaction model applicable to any lignocellulosic feedstock. • Calculates pyrolysis yields and product composition as function of reactor conditions. • Detailed modelling of product composition (33 model compounds for the bio-oil). • Good agreement with literature regarding yield curves and product composition. • Successful validation with pyrolysis experiments in bench scale fast pyrolysis rig. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes. The model is based on the three main building blocks of lignocellulosic biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin and can be readily implemented in Aspen Plus and easily adapted to other process simulation software packages. It uses a set of 149 individual reactions that represent the volatilization, decomposition and recomposition processes of biomass pyrolysis. A linear regression algorithm accounts for the secondary pyrolysis reactions, thus allowing the calculation of slow and intermediate pyrolysis reactions. The bio-oil is modelled with a high level of detail, using up to 33 model compounds, which allows for a comprehensive estimation of the properties of the bio-oil and the prediction of further upgrading reactions. After showing good agreement with existing literature data, our own pyrolysis experiments are reported for validating the reaction model. A beech wood feedstock is subjected to pyrolysis under well-defined conditions at different temperatures and the product yields and compositions are determined. Reproducing the experimental pyrolysis runs with the simulation model, a high coincidence is found for the obtained fraction yields (bio-oil, char and gas), for the water content and for the elemental composition of the pyrolysis products. The kinetic reaction model is found to be suited for predicting pyrolysis yields and product composition for any lignocellulosic biomass feedstock under typical pyrolysis conditions

  13. Modeling chemical and physical processes of wood and biomass pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Blasi, Colomba [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , P.le V. Tecchio, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    This review reports the state of the art in modeling chemical and physical processes of wood and biomass pyrolysis. Chemical kinetics are critically discussed in relation to primary reactions, described by one- and multi-component (or one- and multi-stage) mechanisms, and secondary reactions of tar cracking and polymerization. A mention is also made of distributed activation energy models and detailed mechanisms which try to take into account the formation of single gaseous or liquid (tar) species. Different approaches used in the transport models are presented at both the level of single particle and reactor, together with the main achievements of numerical simulations. Finally, critical issues which require further investigation are indicated. (author)

  14. Production of phenolic-rich bio-oil from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass using magnetic solid base catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhi-bo; Lu, Qiang; Ye, Xiao-ning; Li, Wen-tao; Hu, Bin; Dong, Chang-qing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Phenolic-rich bio-oil was selectively produced from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass using magnetic solid base catalyst. • The actual yield of twelve major phenolic compounds reached 43.9 mg/g. • The peak area% of all phenolics reached 68.5% at the catalyst-to-biomass ratio of 7. • The potassium phosphate/ferroferric oxide catalyst possessed promising recycling properties. - Abstract: A magnetic solid base catalyst (potassium phosphate/ferroferric oxide) was prepared and used for catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood to selectively produce phenolic-rich bio-oil. Pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of pyrolysis temperature and catalyst-to-biomass ratio on the product distribution. The actual yields of important pyrolytic products were quantitatively determined by the external standard method. Moreover, recycling experiments were performed to determine the re-utilization abilities of the catalyst. The results showed that the catalyst exhibited promising activity to selectively produce phenolic-rich bio-oil, due to its capability of promoting the decomposition of lignin to generate phenolic compounds and meanwhile inhibiting the devolatilization of holocellulose. The maximal phenolic yield was obtained at the pyrolysis temperature of 400 °C and catalyst-to-biomass ratio of 2. The concentration of the phenolic compounds increased monotonically along with the increasing of the catalyst-to-biomass ratio, with the peak area% value increasing from 28.1% in the non-catalytic process to as high as 68.5% at the catalyst-to-biomass ratio of 7. The maximal total actual yield of twelve quantified major phenolic compounds was 43.9 mg/g, compared with the value of 29.0 mg/g in the non-catalytic process. In addition, the catalyst could be easily recovered and possessed promising recycling properties.

  15. Finding the chemistry in biomass pyrolysis: Millisecond chemical kinetics and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Christoph

    Biomass pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical method for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable sources. Development of a fundamental understanding of biomass pyrolysis chemistry is difficult due to the multi-scale and multi-phase nature of the process; biomass length scales span 11 orders of magnitude and pyrolysis phenomena include solid, liquid, and gas phase chemistry in addition to heat and mass transfer. These complexities have a significant effect on chemical product distributions and lead to variability between reactor technologies. A major challenge in the study of biomass pyrolysis is the development of kinetic models capable of describing hundreds of millisecond-scale reactions of biomass into lower molecular weight products. In this work, a novel technique for studying biomass pyrolysis provides the first- ever experimental determination of kinetics and rates of formation of the primary products from cellulose pyrolysis, providing insight into the millisecond-scale chemical reaction mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of heat and mass transport limitations for cellulose pyrolysis chemistry and are used to identify the length scales at which transport limitations become relevant during pyrolysis. Through this technique, a transition is identified, known as the reactive melting point, between low and high temperature depolymerization. The transition between two mechanisms of cellulose decompositions unifies the mechanisms that govern low temperature char formation, intermediate pyrolysis conditions, and high temperature gas formation. The conditions under which biomass undergoes pyrolysis, including modes of heat transfer, have been shown to significantly affect the distribution of biorenewable chemical and fuel products. High-speed photography is used to observe the liftoff of initially crystalline cellulose particles when impinged on a heated surface, known as the Leidenfrost effect for room-temperature liquids. Order

  16. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis

  17. a novel interconnected fluidised bed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of char

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.M.C.; Janse, Arthur M.C.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1999-01-01

    A novel system of two adjacent fluidised beds operating in different gas atmospheres and exchanging solids was developed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of the produced char. Fluidised sand particles (200 μm < dp < 400 μm) are transported from the pyrolysis reactor to the

  18. A novel interconnected fluidised bed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of char.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Arthur M.C.; Janse, A.M.C.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2000-01-01

    A novel system of two adjacent fluidised beds operating in different gas atmospheres and exchanging solids was developed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of the produced char. Fluidised sand particles (200 μm < dp < 400 μm) are transported from the pyrolysis reactor to the

  19. Pyrolysis based bio-refinery for the production of bioethanol from demineralized ligno-cellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luque, L.; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; van Rossum, G.; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Berruti, F.; Rehmann, L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates a novel biorefinery approach for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass from pinewood. A combination of thermochemical and biochemical conversion was chosen with the main product being ethanol. Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomasss with fractional condensation of the

  20. Flash pyrolysis of heavy metal contaminated biomass from phytoremediation: Influence of temperature, entrained flow and wood/leaves blended pyrolysis on the behaviour of heavy metals

    OpenAIRE

    STALS, Mark; THIJSSEN, Elsy; VANGRONSVELD, Jaco; CARLEER, Robert; SCHREURS, Sonja; YPERMAN, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Phytoremediation crop disposal is a problem inhibiting the widespread use of the remediation technique. Flash pyrolysis as processing method for metal contaminated biomass is investigated: the rather low pyrolysis temperature prevents metal compounds from volatilisation while valuable pyrolysis oil is produced. Both plant stems and leaves are pyrolysed in a lab-scale semi-continuous reactor. Parameters under investigation are pyrolysis temperature (623, 723 and 823 K), the use of hot-gas filt...

  1. Thermal decomposition and gasification of biomass pyrolysis gases using a hot bed of waste derived pyrolysis char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rahbi, Amal S; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2016-03-01

    Chars produced from the pyrolysis of different waste materials have been investigated in terms of their use as a catalyst for the catalytic cracking of biomass pyrolysis gases during the two-stage pyrolysis-gasification of biomass. The chars were produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres, refused derived fuel and biomass in the form of date stones. The results showed that the hydrocarbon tar yields decreased significantly with all the char materials used in comparison to the non-char catalytic experiments. For example, at a cracking temperature of 800°C, the total product hydrocarbon tar yield decreased by 70% with tyre char, 50% with RDF char and 9% with biomass date stones char compared to that without char. There was a consequent increase in total gas yield. Analysis of the tar composition showed that the content of phenolic compounds decreased and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons increased in the product tar at higher char temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen-rich syngas production and tar removal from biomass gasification using sacrificial tyre pyrolysis char

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rahbi, AS; Williams, PT

    2017-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials have been proven to have a high catalytic activity for tar removal from the syngas produced from biomass gasification. The simultaneous reforming and gasification of pyrolysis gases and char could have a significant role in increasing the gas yield and decreasing the tar in the product syngas. This study investigates the use of tyre char as a catalyst for H2-rich syngas production and tar reduction during the pyrolysis-reforming of biomass using a two stage fixed bed re...

  3. Experimental study of cyclone pyrolysis - Suspended combustion air gasification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yijun; Feng, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhibo; Sun, Shaozeng; Zhou, Xinwei; Luan, Jiyi; Wu, Jiangquan

    2017-11-01

    Based on the original biomass cyclone gasifier, the cyclone pyrolysis-suspension combustion gasification technology was constituted with a bottom wind ring to build the biochar suspension combustion zone. This technology decouples the biomass pyrolysis, gasification (reduction reaction) and combustion (oxidation reaction) within the same device. With the feed amount and total air fixed, the effect of air rate arrangement on temperature distribution of the gasifier, syngas components and gasification parameters was studied. With the secondary air rate (0.20) and bottom air rate (0.50), the gasification efficiency was best, with gas heating value of 5.15MJ/Nm 3 , carbon conversion rate of 71.50%, gasification efficiency of 50.80% and syngas yield of 1.29Nm 3 /kg. The device with biochar for the tar catalytic cracking was installed at the gasifier outlet, effectively reducing the tar content in syngas, with a minimum value of 1.02g/Nm 3 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomass valorisation by staged degasification A new pyrolysis-based thermochemical conversion option to produce value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wild, P. J.; den Uil, H.; Reith, J. H.; Kiel, J. H. A.; Heeres, H. J.

    Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass leads to an array Of useful solid, liquid and gaseous products. Staged degasification is a pyrolysis-based conversion route to generate value-added chemicals from biomass. Because of different thermal stabilities of the main biomass constituents hemicellulose.

  5. Hybrid-renewable processes for biofuels production: concentrated solar pyrolysis of biomass residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Anthe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geier, Manfred [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dedrick, Daniel E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The viability of thermochemically-derived biofuels can be greatly enhanced by reducing the process parasitic energy loads. Integrating renewable power into biofuels production is one method by which these efficiency drains can be eliminated. There are a variety of such potentially viable "hybrid-renewable" approaches; one is to integrate concentrated solar power (CSP) to power biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL) processes. Barriers to CSP integration into BTL processes are predominantly the lack of fundamental kinetic and mass transport data to enable appropriate systems analysis and reactor design. A novel design for the reactor has been created that can allow biomass particles to be suspended in a flow gas, and be irradiated with a simulated solar flux. Pyrolysis conditions were investigated and a comparison between solar and non-solar biomass pyrolysis was conducted in terms of product distributions and pyrolysis oil quality. A novel method was developed to analyse pyrolysis products, and investigate their stability.

  6. Biomass pyrolysis/gasification for product gas production: the overall investigation of parametric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.; Andries, J.; Luo, Z.; Spliethoff, H.

    2003-01-01

    The conventional biomass pyrolysis/gasification process for production of medium heating value gas for industrial or civil applications faces two disadvantages, i.e. low gas productivity and the accompanying corrosion of downstream equipment caused by the high content of tar vapour contained in the gas phase. The objective of this paper is to overcome these disadvantages, and therefore, the effects of the operating parameters on biomass pyrolysis are investigated in a laboratory setup based on the principle of keeping the heating value of the gas almost unchanged. The studied parameters include reaction temperature, residence time of volatile phase in the reactor, physico-chemical pretreatment of biomass particles, heating rate of the external heating furnace and improvement of the heat and mass transfer ability of the pyrolysis reactor. The running temperature of a separate cracking reactor and the geometrical configuration of the pyrolysis reactor are also studied. However, due to time limits, different types of catalysts are not used in this work to determine their positive influences on biomass pyrolysis behaviour. The results indicate that product gas production from biomass pyrolysis is sensitive to the operating parameters mentioned above, and the product gas heating value is high, up to 13-15 MJ/N m 3

  7. Product Characterization and Kinetics of Biomass Pyrolysis in a Three-Zone Free-Fall Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaya Punsuwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of biomass including palm shell, palm kernel, and cassava pulp residue was studied in a laboratory free-fall reactor with three separated hot zones. The effects of pyrolysis temperature (250–1050°C and particle size (0.18–1.55 mm on the distribution and properties of pyrolysis products were investigated. A higher pyrolysis temperature and smaller particle size increased the gas yield but decreased the char yield. Cassava pulp residue gave more volatiles and less char than those of palm kernel and palm shell. The derived solid product (char gave a high calorific value of 29.87 MJ/kg and a reasonably high BET surface area of 200 m2/g. The biooil from palm shell is less attractive to use as a direct fuel, due to its high water contents, low calorific value, and high acidity. On gas composition, carbon monoxide was the dominant component in the gas product. A pyrolysis model for biomass pyrolysis in the free-fall reactor was developed, based on solving the proposed two-parallel reactions kinetic model and equations of particle motion, which gave excellent prediction of char yields for all biomass precursors under all pyrolysis conditions studied.

  8. Thermal and kinetic behaviors of biomass and plastic wastes in co-pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çepelioğullar, Özge; Pütün, Ayşe E.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Co-pyrolysis of biomass together with the plastic wastes in thermogravimetric analyzer. • Investigations into thermal and kinetic behaviors at high temperature regions. • Determination of the kinetic parameters. - Abstract: In this study, co-pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of biomass-plastic blends were investigated. Cotton stalk, hazelnut shell, sunflower residue, and arid land plant Euphorbia rigida, were blended in definite ratio (1:1, w/w) with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Experiments were conducted with a heating rate of 10 °C min −1 from room temperature to 800 °C in the presence of N 2 atmosphere with a flow rate of 100 cm 3 min −1 . After thermal decomposition in TGA, a kinetic analysis was performed to fit thermogravimetric data and a detailed discussion of co-pyrolysis mechanism was achieved. Experimental results demonstrated that the structural differences between biomass and plastics directly affect their thermal decomposition behaviors. Biomass pyrolysis generally based on three main steps while plastic material’s pyrolysis mechanism resulted in two steps for PET and three steps for PVC. Also, the required activation energies needed to achieve the thermal degradation for plastic were found higher than the biomass materials. In addition, it can be concluded that the evaluation of plastic materials together with biomass created significant changes not only for the thermal behaviors but also for the kinetic behaviors

  9. Evaluation of the production potential of bio-oil from Vietnamese biomass resources by fast pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, Binh M.Q.; Duong, Long T.; Nguyen, Viet D.; Tran, Trong B.; Nguyen, My H.H.; Nguyen, Luong H.; Nguyen, Duc A.; Luu, Loc C.

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural activities in Vietnam generate about 62 million tonnes of biomass (rice straw, rice husk, bagasse, corn cob, corn stover, etc.) annually. In this work, four different types of biomass from Vietnam, namely rice straw, rice husk, factory bagasse, and corn cob, have been studied as potential raw materials to produce bio-oil by fast pyrolysis technology. Test runs were conducted in a fluidized-bed reactor at a temperature of 500 °C and residence time less than 2 s. Size and moisture content of the feed were less than 2 mm and 2%, respectively. It was found that yields of bio-oil as a liquid product obtained from pyrolysis of these feedstocks were more than 50% and that obtained from the bagasse was the highest. Bio-oil quality from Vietnamese biomass resources satisfies ASTM D7544-12 standard for pyrolysis liquid biofuels. These results showed the potential of using biomass in Vietnam to produce bio-oil which could be directly used as a combustion fuel or upgraded into transportation fuels and chemicals. - Highlights: • Four types of Vietnamese biomass were firstly analyzed in detail. • Optimal conditions for fast pyrolysis reaction for Vietnamese biomass types. • Bio-oil product adapted to the standard specification for pyrolysis liquid biofuel

  10. Enhancing biochar yield by co-pyrolysis of bio-oil with biomass: impacts of potassium hydroxide addition and air pretreatment prior to co-pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksha, Andrei; Zaman, Waheed; Layzell, David B; Hill, Josephine M

    2014-11-01

    The influence of KOH addition and air pretreatment on co-pyrolysis (600 °C) of a mixture of bio-oil and biomass (aspen wood) was investigated with the goal of increasing biochar yield. The bio-oil was produced as a byproduct of the pyrolysis of biomass and recycled in subsequent runs. Co-pyrolysis of the biomass with the recycled bio-oil resulted in a 16% mass increase in produced biochar. The yields were further increased by either air pretreatment or KOH addition prior to co-pyrolysis. Air pretreatment at 220 °C for 3 h resulted in the highest mass increase (32%) compared to the base case of pyrolysis of biomass only. No synergistic benefit was observed by combining KOH addition with air pretreatment. In fact, KOH catalyzed reactions that increased the bed temperature resulting in carbon loss via formation of CO and CO2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrogen conversion under rapid pyrolysis of two types of aquatic biomass and corresponding blends with coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuai; Chen, Xue-li; Li, Wei-feng; Liu, Hai-feng; Wang, Fu-chen

    2011-11-01

    Rapid pyrolysis of two types of aquatic biomass (blue-green algae and water hyacinth), and their blends with two coals (bituminous and anthracite) was carried out in a high-frequency furnace. Nitrogen conversions during rapid pyrolysis of the two biomass and the interactions between the biomass and coals on nitrogen conversions were investigated. Results show that little nitrogen retained in char after the biomass pyrolysis, and NH(3) yields were higher than HCN. During co-pyrolysis of biomass and coal, interactions between biomass and coal decreased char-N yields and increased volatile-N yields, but the total yields of NH(3)+HCN in volatile-N were decreased in which HCN formations were decreased consistently, while NH(3) formations were only decreased in the high-temperature range but promoted in the low-temperature range. Interactions between blue-green algae and coals are stronger than those between water hyacinth and coal, and interactions between biomass and bituminous are stronger than those between biomass and anthracite. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. H-ZSM5 Catalyzed co-pyrolysis of biomass and plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aims at addressing two important problems vital to agriculture, disposal of agricultural plastics and production of drop-in fuels from biomass via co-pyrolysis of both feedstocks. Mixtures of biomass (switchgrass, cellulose, xylan and lignin) and plastic (polyethylene terephthalate (PET),...

  13. Potassium and soot interaction in fast biomass pyrolysis at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Hofmann Larsen, Flemming; Shchukarev, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the interaction between potassium and carbonaceous matrix of soot produced from wood and herbaceous biomass pyrolysis at high heating rates at 1250°C in a drop tube reactor. The influence of soot carbon chemistry and potassium content in the original biomass on the CO...

  14. Kinetic Modelling of the Pyrolysis of Biomass for the Development of Charcoal Briquette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Y. R.; Bayu, H. T.; Wintoko, J.; Murachman, B.; Yuliansyah, A. T.; Purwono, S.

    2017-06-01

    Waste of biomass can be utilized as an energy alternative such as a charcoal briquette. In the waste of biomass, there is carbon element bonded in the cellulose which can be utilized as an energy source of solid fuel. Charcoal briquette from waste of biomass can be developed via pyrolysis process. Terminalia Catappa L. and Myristica fragrans (nutmeg seeds shells) shells were used as raw material for the manufacture of charcoal briquettes. Pyrolysis process took place under isothermal conditions at a temperature of 350°C, 400°C, 450°C, 500°C, and 550°C with variation of times were 30 minutes, 60 minutes and 90 minutes. During the pyrolysis process, there were three main components observed, namely liquid (bio oil), gases and solids (char). Data obtained for measuring the kinetics of liquids and gases were taken in interval of 5 minutes. The results showed that the rise in temperature will increase the rate of pyrolysis process and increase the yield of gases and liquids as well as lowering the yield for solid. The best fitted kinetic model is the representation of biomass pyrolysis process involving secondary decomposition of the liquid. The results of briquette development showed that these two biomasses can be used as raw material of energy alternative.

  15. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of bio-oil through well-established technologies [1]. To utilizethis oil as liquid fuel the oxygen content must be reduced from 15-30 wt.% down to <1 wt.%, which increases heating value and stability and decreases acidity [1]. Upgrading bio-oil by c......Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of bio-oil through well-established technologies [1]. To utilizethis oil as liquid fuel the oxygen content must be reduced from 15-30 wt.% down to ...-oil by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is challenged by severe polymerization and coking upon heating the oil. Alternatively, performing fast pyrolysis in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere in a fluid bed reactor with a HDO catalyst as bed medium, could immediately stabilize reactive pyrolysis vapors [2...

  16. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

    2013-10-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  17. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of bio-oil through well-established technologies [1]. To utilize this oil as liquid fuel the oxygen content must be reduced from 15-30 wt.% down to ... of 100 to 300 g/h solid biomass, the aim is to provide a proof-of-concept for the continuous conversion of solid biomass to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil....

  18. Modelling of porous biomass pyrolysis in screw reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A. A.; Kozlov, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a model of wood pyrolysis in a screw reactor as the first stage of the multistage gasification process. To prevent clinkering of particles and thermal inhomogeneities, screw-type transportation is used to transport fuel. In order to describe kinetics of pyrolysis and transport of volatiles within the wood particles and their transition to the gas phase we carried out the studies using a complex of synchronous thermal analysis. A detailed numerical modeling of pyrolyzer was performed with the Comsol Multiphysics software which makes it possible to optimize the design and operating parameters of the pyrolysis process in a screw reactor.

  19. Dewatering and low-temperature pyrolysis of oily sludge in the presence of various agricultural biomasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Zhou, Xiehong; Wang, Chuanyi; Jia, Hanzhong

    2017-08-24

    Pyrolysis is potentially an effective treatment of waste oil residues for recovery of petroleum hydrocarbons, and the addition of biomass is expected to improve its dewatering and pyrolysis behavior. In this study, the dewatering and low-temperature co-pyrolysis of oil-containing sludge in the presence of various agricultural biomasses, such as rice husk, walnut shell, sawdust, and apricot shell, were explored. As a result, the water content gradually decreases with the increase of biomass addition within 0-1.0 wt % in original oily sludge. Comparatively, the dewatering efficiency of sludge in the presence of four types of biomasses follows the order of apricot shell > walnut shell > rice husk > sawdust. On the other hand, rice husk and sawdust are relatively more efficient in the recovery of petroleum hydrocarbons compared with walnut shell and apricot shell. The recovery efficiency generally increased with the increase in the biomass content in the range of 0-0.2 wt %, then exhibited a gradually decreasing trend with the increase in the biomass content from 0.2 to 1.0 wt %. The results suggest that optimum amount of biomass plays an important role in the recovery efficiency. In addition, the addition of biomass (such as rice husk) also promotes the formation of C x H y and CO, increasing the calorific value of pyrolysis residue, and controlled the pollution components of the exhaust gas discharged from residue incineration. The present work implies that biomass as addictive holds great potential in the industrial dewatering and pyrolysis of oil-containing sludge.

  20. Investigation of waste biomass co-pyrolysis with petroleum sludge using a response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Zhang, Xinying; Li, Yubao

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of waste biomass (sawdust) through co-pyrolysis with refinery oily sludge was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor. Response surface method was applied to evaluate the main and interaction effects of three experimental factors (sawdust percentage in feedstock, temperature, and heating rate) on pyrolysis oil and char yields. It was found that the oil and char yields increased with sawdust percentage in feedstock. The interaction between heating rate and sawdust percentage as well as between heating rate and temperature was significant on the pyrolysis oil yield. The higher heating value of oil originated from sawdust during co-pyrolysis at a sawdust/oily sludge ratio of 3:1 increased by 5 MJ/kg as compared to that during sawdust pyrolysis alone, indicating a synergistic effect of co-pyrolysis. As a result, petroleum sludge can be used as an effective additive in the pyrolysis of waste biomass for improving its energy recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. From biomass to advanced bio-fuel by catalytic pyrolysis/hydro-processing: hydrodeoxygenation of bio-oil derived from biomass catalytic pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxin; He, Tao; Liu, Kaituo; Wu, Jinhu; Fang, Yunming

    2012-03-01

    Compared hydrodeoxygenation experimental studies of both model compounds and real bio-oil derived from biomass fast pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis was carried out over two different supported Pt catalysts. For the model compounds, the deoxygenation degree of dibenzofuran was higher than that of cresol and guaiacol over both Pt/Al(2)O(3) and the newly developed Pt supported on mesoporous zeolite (Pt/MZ-5) catalyst, and the deoxygenation degree of cresol over Pt/MZ-5 was higher than that over Pt/Al(2)O(3). The results indicated that hydrodeoxygenation become much easier upon oxygen reduction. Similar to model compounds study, the hydrodeoxygenation of the real bio-oil derived from catalytic pyrolysis was much easier than that from fast pyrolysis over both Pt catalysts, and the Pt/MZ-5 again shows much higher deoxygenation ability than Pt/Al(2)O(3). Clearly synergy between catalytic pyrolysis and bio-oil hydro-processing was found in this paper and this finding will lead an advanced biofuel production pathway in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Catalytic pyrolysis of biomass: Effects of pyrolysis temperature, sweeping gas flow rate and MgO catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puetuen, Ersan

    2010-01-01

    Cotton seed, as a biomass source, is pyrolysed in a tubular fixed-bed reactor under various sweeping gas (N 2 ) flow rates at different pyrolysis temperatures. In the non-catalytic work, the maximum bio-oil yield was attained as 48.30% at 550 o C with a sweeping gas flow rate of 200 mL min -1 . At the optimum conditions, catalytic pyrolysis of biomass samples was performed with various amounts of MgO catalyst (5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.% of raw material). Catalyst addition decreased the quantity of bio-oil yet increased the quality of bio-oil in terms of calorific value, hydrocarbon distribution and removal of oxygenated groups. It was observed that increasing the amount of catalyst used, decreased the oil yields while increased the gas and char yields. Bio-oils obtained at the optimum conditions were separated into aliphatic, aromatic and polar sub-fractions. After the application of column chromatography, bio-oils were subjected into elemental, FT-IR and 1 H NMR analyses. Aliphatic sub-fractions of bio-oils were analyzed by GC-MS. It was deduced that the fuel obtained via catalytic pyrolysis mainly consisted of lower weight hydrocarbons in the diesel range. Finally, obtained results were compared with petroleum fractions and evaluated as a potential source for liquid fuels.

  3. Production and characterization of bio-oil from catalytic biomass pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonakou Eleni V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass flash pyrolysis is a very promising thermochemical process for the production of bio-fuels and/or chemicals. However, large-scale applications are still under careful consideration, because of the high bio-liquid upgrading cost. In this paper the production of bio-liquids from biomass flash pyrolysis in a single stage catalytic process is being investigated using a novel once through fluid bed reactor. This biomass pyrolysis unit was constructed in Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute and comprises of a catalyst regenerator, a biomass-vibrating hopper, a fluidization reactor (that consists of an injector and a riser reactor, a product stripper along with a hot cyclone and a filter housing and finally a product condensation/recovery section. The unit can process up to 20 g/min. of biomass (50-800 mm and can circulate up to 300 g/min. of catalyst or inert material. The experiments performed in the pilot plant showed that the unit operates without problems and with satisfactory mass balances in a wide range of experimental conditions both in the absence and presence of catalyst. With the incorporation of an FCC catalyst in the pyrolysis, the physical properties of the bio-oil produced changed, while more stable bio-oil was produced. .

  4. Production of methanol from biomass waste via pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, S K; Shamsul, N S; Ghani, J A; Chia, S K; Liew, H S; Samsudin, A S

    2013-02-01

    The production of methanol from agricultural, forestry, livestock, poultry, and fishery waste via pyrolysis was investigated. Pyrolysis was conducted in a tube furnace at 450-500 °C. Sugarcane bagasse showed the methanol production (5.93 wt.%), followed by roots and sawdust with 4.36 and 4.22 wt.%, respectively. Animal waste offered the lowest content of methanol, as only 0.46, 0.80, and 0.61 wt.% were obtained from fishery, goat, and cow waste, respectively. It was also observed that the percentage of methanol increased with an increase in volatile compounds while the percentage of ethanol increased with the percentage of ash and fix carbon. The data indicate that, pyrolysis is a means for production of methanol and ethanol after further optimization of the process and sample treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Can portable pyrolysis units make biomass utilization affordable while using bio-char to enhance soil productivity and sequester carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Coleman; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Jim Archuleta; Phil Badger; Woodum Chung; Tyron Venn; Dan Loeffler; Greg Jones; Kristin McElligott

    2010-01-01

    We describe a portable pyrolysis system for bioenergy production from forest biomass that minimizes long-distance transport costs and provides for nutrient return and long-term soil carbon storage. The cost for transporting biomass to conversion facilities is a major impediment to utilizing forest biomass. If forest biomass could be converted into bio-oil in the field...

  6. Effects of the cellulose, xylan and lignin constituents on biomass pyrolysis characteristics and bio-oil composition using the Simplex Lattice Mixture Design method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yongsheng; Cai, Yixi; Li, Xiaohua; Jiao, Lihua; Xia, Jisheng; Deng, Xiuli

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Simplex Lattice Mixture Design was firstly applied to study biomass pyrolysis process. • Interactions between the constituents had effects on the biomass pyrolysis behavior. • Biomass pyrolysis behavior can be predicted based on the ratios of three constituents. • Bio-oil composition was affected by the constituents and their pyrolysis products. - Abstract: In order to clarify the relationships between biomass pyrolysis mechanism and its main constituents. The effects of main constituents on biomass pyrolysis characteristics were firstly determined by thermo-gravimetric analysis based on the Simplex Lattice Mixture Design to investigate that whether the prediction of the pyrolysis behavior of a certain lignocellulosic biomass is possible when its main constituent contents are known. The results showed that there are constituent interactions in the pyrolysis process, which can be intuitively reflected through the change laws of kinetics parameters. The mathematical models for calculating kinetics values were established, and the models were proved to be valid for predicting lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis behavior. In addition, the effects of biomass constituents on bio-oil compositions were explored by subsequent vacuum pyrolysis experiments. The xylan pyrolysis had a certain inhibitory effect on the pyrolysis of cellulose, and the pyrolysis products of lignin might promote the further decomposition of sugars from cellulose pyrolysis, while the interaction between xylan and lignin had a little effect on the bio-oil composition.

  7. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of condensable oil at moderate temperature and low pressure.This bio-oil has adverse properties such as high oxygen and water contents, high acidity and immiscibility with fossil hydrocarbons. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is a promising technology...... that can be used to upgrade the crude bio-oil to fuel-grade oil. The development of the HDO process is challenged by rapid catalyst deactivation, instability of the pyrolysis oil, poorly investigated reaction conditions and a high complexity and variability of the input oil composition. However, continuous...... catalytic hydropyrolysis coupled with downstream HDO of the pyrolysis vapors before condensation shows promise (Figure 1). A bench scale experimental setup will be constructed for the continuous conversion of solid biomass (100g /h) to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil. The aim is to provide a proof...

  8. Stabilization of Pb(II) accumulated in biomass through phosphate-pretreated pyrolysis at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Saijun; Zhang, Tao; Li, Jianfa, E-mail: ljf@usx.edu.cn; Shi, Lingna; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Lü, Jinhong; Li, Yimin

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Phosphate-pretreated pyrolysis can stabilize Pb(II) accumulated in biomass. • More than 95% of Pb(II) in celery and wood biomass was stabilized. • Pb from biomass was almost totally retained in char. • Most Pb was transformed into phosphates according to XRD and SEM/EDX analyses. - Abstract: The remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil and water using plant biomass is considered to be a green technological approach, although the harmless disposal of biomass accumulated with heavy metals remains a challenge. A potential solution to this problem explored in this work involves combining phosphate pretreatment with pyrolysis. Pb(II) was accumulated in celery biomass with superior sorption capacity and also in ordinary wood biomass through biosorption. The Pb(II)-impregnated biomass was then pretreated with phosphoric acid or calcium dihydrogen phosphate (CaP) and pyrolyzed at 350 or 450 °C. Pb(II) from biomass was in turn almost totally retained in chars, and the percentage of DTPA-extractable Pb(II) was reduced to less than 5% of total Pb(II) in chars through CaP pretreatment. Pb(II) stabilization was further confirmed through a sequential extraction test, which showed that more than 95% of Pb(II) was converted into stable species composed mainly of lead phosphates according to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) analyses. Overall, phosphate-pretreated pyrolysis can stabilize both Pb(II) and degradable biomass, so as to control efficiently the hazards of heavy metal-contaminated biomass.

  9. Sustainability: The capacity of smokeless biomass pyrolysis for energy production, global carbon capture and sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of modern smokeless biomass pyrolysis for biochar and biofuel production is potentially a revolutionary approach for global carbon capture and sequestration at gigatons of carbon (GtC) scales. A conversion of about 7% of the annual terrestrial gross photosynthetic product (120 GtC y-1) i...

  10. Modeling the influence of potassium content and heating rate on biomass pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Surup, Gerrit; Shapiro, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a combined kinetic and particle model that describes the effect of potassium and heating rate during the fast pyrolysis of woody and herbaceous biomass. The model calculates the mass loss rate, over a wide range of operating conditions relevant to suspension firing...

  11. Torrefied biomass as feed for fast pyrolysis : An experimental study and chain analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwes, Alexander Charnchai; Basile, Lucia; Yukananto, Riza; Bhagwandas, Jina; Bramer, Eduard A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    A torrefaction pre-treatment could enhance the fast pyrolysis process to produce bio-oil by decreasing the required energy for grinding biomass particles and by improving bio-oil characteristics so they resemble more those of fossil fuels. To evaluate this hypothesis, this work compares fast

  12. Plate reactor as an analysis tool for rapid pyrolysis of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    This work presents a study of the performance of the modified plate reactor by rapid pyrolysis experiments with different biomass samples (MDF, bark pine and Avicel cellulose). The use of the plate instead of a grid allowed us to achieve a more homogeneous temperature distribution across the plate

  13. Thermal behavior and kinetic study for catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Lei, Hanwu; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Qian, Moriko; Yadavalli, Gayatri; Wu, Joan; Chen, Shulin

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to investigate the thermal decomposition behaviors and kinetics of biomass (cellulose/Douglas fir sawdust) and plastics (LDPE) in a non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis over ZSM-5 catalyst by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was found that there was a positive synergistic interaction between biomass and plastics according to the difference of weight loss (ΔW), which could decrease the formation of solid residue at the end of the experiment. The first order reaction model well fitted for both non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics. The activation energy (E) of Cellulose-LDPE-Catalyst and DF-LDPE-Catalyst are only 89.51 and 54.51kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics analysis showed that adding catalyst doesn't change the decomposition mechanism. As a result, the kinetic study on catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics was suggested that the catalytic co-pyrolysis is a promising technique that can significantly reduce the energy input. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biofuel and Methyl Levulinate from Biomass-Derived Fractional Condensed Pyrolysis Oil and Alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel J.M.; Oudenhoven, Stijn R.G.; Hu, Xun; Heeres, Hero J.; Li, Chun-Zhu; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential for the stabilization of biomass-derived pyrolysis oils by using acid-catalyzed (Amberlyst 70) reactions with alcohol (T=140–170 °C, P≈20 bar (1 bar=105 Pa)). The alcohol-stabilized oils were further upgraded by catalytic hydrotreatment (T=400

  15. Biofuel and Methyl Levulinate from Biomass- Derived Fractional Condensed Pyrolysis Oil and Alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel. J. M.; Oudenhoven, Stijn R. G.; Hu, Xun; Heeres, Hero J.; Li, Chun-Zhu; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Kersten, Sascha R. A.

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential for the stabilization of biomass-derived pyrolysis oils by using acidcatalyzed (Amberlyst 70) reactions with alcohol (T= 140-170 degrees C, P approximate to 20 bar (1 bar= 10(5) Pa)). The alcohol-stabilized oils were further upgraded by

  16. H2CAP – Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    . The objective of thepresent work is to convert biomass into gasoline and diesel. Fast pyrolysis of beech wood have beenconducted at high hydrogen pressure in a fluid bed reactor with a hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) catalyst asbed medium followed by a fixed bed HDO reactor for complete oxygen removal before oil...

  17. A Compact, Efficient Pyrolysis/Oxidation System for Solid Waste Resource Recovery in Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Both pyrolysis and oxidation steps have been considered as the key solid waste processing step for a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). Pyrolysis is...

  18. Syngas production by two-stage method of biomass catalytic pyrolysis and gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qinglong; Kong, Sifang; Liu, Yangsheng; Zeng, Hui

    2012-04-01

    A two-stage technology integrated with biomass catalytic pyrolysis and gasification processes was utilized to produce syngas (H(2)+CO). In the presence of different nickel based catalysts, effects of pyrolysis temperature and gasification temperature on gas production were investigated. Experimental results showed that more syngas and char of high quality could be obtained at a temperature of 750°C in the stage of pyrolysis, and in the stage of gasification, pyrolysis char (produced at 750°C) reacted with steam and the maximum yield of syngas was obtained at 850°C. Syngas yield in this study was greatly increased compared with previous studies, up to 3.29Nm(3)/kg biomass. The pyrolysis process could be well explained by Arrhenius kinetic first-order rate equation. XRD analyses suggested that formation of Mg(0.4)Ni(0.6)O and increase of Ni(0) crystallite size were two main reasons for the deactivation of nickel based catalysts at higher temperature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Co-pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and microalgae: Products characteristics and interaction effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yingquan; Yang, Haiping; Xia, Mingwei; Li, Kaixu; Chen, Xu; Chen, Hanping

    2017-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis of biomass has a potential to change the quality of pyrolytic bio-oil. In this work, co-pyrolysis of bamboo, a typical lignocellulosic biomass, and Nannochloropsis sp. (NS), a microalgae, was carried out in a fixed bed reactor at a range of mixing ratio of NS and bamboo, to find out whether the quality of pyrolytic bio-oil was improved. A significant improvement on bio-oil after co-pyrolysis of bamboo and NS was observed that bio-oil yield increased up to 66.63wt% (at 1:1) and the content of long-chain fatty acids in bio-oil also dramatically increased (the maximum up to 50.92% (13.57wt%) at 1:1) whereas acetic acid, O-containing species, and N-containing compounds decreased greatly. Nitrogen transformation mechanism during co-pyrolysis also was explored. Results showed that nitrogen in microalgae preferred to transform into solid char and gas phase during co-pyrolysis, while more pyrrolic-N and quaternary-N generated with diminishing protein-N and pyridinic-N in char. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrogen-rich syngas production and tar removal from biomass gasification using sacrificial tyre pyrolysis char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rahbi, Amal S.; Williams, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Tyre char is used as catalyst and syngas source in pyrolysis-reforming of biomass. • Metals in tyre char catalyse tar decomposition. • Increased steam and higher temperature promotes H 2 production. • Syngas H 2 /CO ratio varied between 1.3 to 2. • A waste derived catalyst degrades tar and is also sacrificed for char gasification. - Abstract: Carbonaceous materials have been proven to have a high catalytic activity for tar removal from the syngas produced from biomass gasification. The simultaneous reforming and gasification of pyrolysis gases and char could have a significant role in increasing the gas yield and decreasing the tar in the product syngas. This study investigates the use of tyre char as a catalyst for H 2 -rich syngas production and tar reduction during the pyrolysis-reforming of biomass using a two stage fixed bed reactor. The biomass sample was pyrolysed under nitrogen at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C, the evolved pyrolysis volatiles were passed to a second stage with steam and the gases were reformed in the presence of tyre char as catalyst. The influence of catalyst bed temperature, steam to biomass ratio, reaction time and tyre ash metals were investigated. The influence of the catalytic activity of tyre ash minerals on composition of syngas and tar decomposition during the steam reforming of biomass was significant as the removal of minerals led to a decrease in the H 2 yield. Raising the steam injection rate and reforming temperature resulted in an increase in H 2 production as steam reforming and char gasification reactions were enhanced. The maximum H 2 content in the product syngas of 56 vol.% was obtained at a reforming temperature of 900 °C and with a steam to biomass mass ratio of 6 (g/g). Further investigation of the influence of the biomass:steam ratio on syngas quality showed that the H 2 :CO molar ratio was increased from 1.8 (steam: biomass ratio; 1.82 g g −1 ) to 3 (steam: biomass ratio; 6 g g −1 ).

  1. A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, J P [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

  2. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis reactor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in an entrained flow pyrolysis reactor by feeding a premixed feedstock of the catalyst and biomass. Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 was very effective for de-oxygenation of the pyrolysis liquid and oxygen content of the bio-oil was decreased from 47.5 wt.% to 16.4 wt.%. An organic rich bio-oil was obtained with 5.8 wt.% water content and a higher heating value of 36.1 MJ/kg. Carboxylic acids were completely removed and the bio-oil had almost a neutral pH. This bio-oil of high calorific low, low water and oxygen content may be an attractive fuel precursor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor produced a very similar quality bio-oil compared to post treatment of pyrolysis vapors, and shows the possible application of Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 in a commercial type reactor system such as a fluidized bed reactor. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical modeling of NOx reduction using pyrolysis products from biomass-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisupati, Sarma V.; Bhalla, Sumeet

    2008-01-01

    Pyrolysis products of biomass (bio-oils) have been shown to cause a reduction in NO x emissions when used as reburn fuel in combustion systems. When these bio-oils are processed with lime, calcium is ion-exchanged and the product is called BioLime TM . BioLime TM , when introduced into a combustion chamber, causes oils to pyrolyze and reduce NO x emissions through reburn mechanisms while simultaneously causing Ca to react with SO 2 . Thus NO x and SO 2 emissions are reduced at the same time. The devolatilization rates of two biomass-based materials were studied using TGA and were related to the yield of pyrolysis gases and char during flash pyrolysis. Numerical simulations using CHEMKIN to model NO reduction through homogeneous gas phase reactions were reported. The numerical predictions were then compared to NO x emission levels from experiments in a down-fired combustor (DFC) to validate the model. A difference in NO reduction was observed by use of different bio-oils under similar operating conditions. This is believed to be due to the difference in yield of flash pyrolysis products of bio-oils. Also, different pyrolysis gases have different NO x reduction potentials. Knowledge of the relative contribution of pyrolysis gases in NO reduction will help choose a feedstock of biomass that will aid in increasing the yield of the desired species. A parametric analysis was done using the model to study the effect of varying concentrations of hydrocarbons, CO 2 , CO, and H 2 , and the results were then verified using a flow reactor. The analysis showed that hydrocarbons were mainly responsible for causing reduction in emissions of NO, whereas CO 2 , CO, and H 2 have very little effect on NO reduction

  4. Influence of pyrolysis conditions on the structure and gasification reactivity of biomass chars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Cetin; B. Moghtaderi; R. Gupta; T.F. Wall [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Discipline of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Engineering

    2004-11-01

    The physical and chemical structure as well as gasification reactivities of chars generated from several biomass species (i.e. pinus radiata, eucalyptus maculata and sugar cane bagasse) were studied to gain insight into the role of heating rate and pressure on the gasification characteristics of biomass chars. Char samples were generated in a suite of reactors including a wire mesh reactor, a tubular reactor, and a drop tube furnace. Scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffractometry, digital cinematography and surface area analysis were employed to determine the impact of operating conditions on the char structure. The global gasification reactivities of char samples were also determined for a range of pressures between 1 and 20 bar using pressurised thermogravimetric analysis technique. Char reactivities were found to increase with increasing pyrolysis heating rates and decreasing pyrolysis pressure. It was found that under high heating rates the char particles underwent plastic deformation (i.e. melted) developing a structure different to that of the virgin biomass. Pressure was also found to influence the physical and chemical structures of char particles. The difference in the gasification reactivities of biomass chars at pressure was found to correlate well with the effect of pyrolysis pressure on the graphitisation process in the biomass char structure. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during biomass pyrolysis and steam gasification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jiang; Song, Hu; Jun, Xiang; Sheng, Su; Lun-Shi, Sun; Kai, Xu; Yao, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Investigating the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) is of potential interest because of AAEM's possible useful service as catalysts in biomass thermal conversion. In this study, three kinds of typical Chinese biomass were selected to pyrolyse and their chars were subsequently steam gasified in a designed quartz fixed-bed reactor to investigate the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs). The results indicate that 53-76% of alkali metal and 27-40% of alkaline earth metal release in pyrolysis process, as well as 12-34% of alkali metal and 12-16% of alkaline earth metal evaporate in char gasification process, and temperature is not the only factor to impact AAEMs emission. The releasing characteristics of AAEMs during pyrolysis and char gasification process of three kinds of biomass were discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of fast pyrolysis conditions on yield and structural transformation of biomass chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2015-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass (wood, straw, rice husk) and its major components (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) was conducted in a wire mesh reactor. The aim of this study was to understand the influence of temperature (350-1400 ° C), heating rate (10-3000 ° C/s), particle size (0.05-2 mm) and hol......Fast pyrolysis of biomass (wood, straw, rice husk) and its major components (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) was conducted in a wire mesh reactor. The aim of this study was to understand the influence of temperature (350-1400 ° C), heating rate (10-3000 ° C/s), particle size (0.05-2 mm...... that the heat treatment temperature had a larger influence on the char yield than the heating rate. Scanning electron microscopy indicated different types of biomass char plasticization influenced by the applied temperatures, heating rates, particle sizes and holding times, except for the rice husk char...

  7. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps

  8. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

    2009-02-25

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed

  9. Energy Conversion Loop: A Testbed for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems Use in Biomass Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Kelley M.

    Nuclear hybrid energy systems are a possible solution for contemporary energy challenges. Nuclear energy produces electricity without greenhouse gas emissions. However, nuclear power production is not as flexible as electrical grids demand and renewables create highly variable electricity. Nuclear hybrid energy systems are able to address both of these problems. Wasted heat can be used in processes such as desalination, hydrogen production, or biofuel production. This research explores the possible uses of nuclear process heat in bio-oil production via biomass pyrolysis. The energy conversion loop is a testbed designed and built to mimic the heat from a nuclear reactor. Small scale biomass pyrolysis experiments were performed and compared to results from the energy conversion loop tests to determine future pyrolysis experimentation with the energy conversion loop. Further improvements must be made to the energy conversion loop before more complex experiments may be performed. The current conditions produced by the energy conversion loop are not conducive for current biomass pyrolysis experimentation.tion.

  10. The major parameters on biomass pyrolysis for hyperaccumulative plants--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilks, R T; Monette, F; Glaus, M

    2016-03-01

    Phytoextraction is one of the main phytoremediation techniques and it has often been described as a potentially feasible in situ soil decontamination method of large amounts of heavy metals, organic pollutants and explosive compounds. As this remediation technique is approaching extensive on-field experimentation and commercialization, research focus is on investigating new ways to achieve the valorisation of its by-products. Biomass pyrolysis represents a key step to numerous valorisation options and it is characterized by differential output products that are determined by the operating conditions of the process and the characteristics of the input. However, when used to valorise plants that have undergone significant metal uptake, this strategy involves some new aspects related to harvest, procedure and final product reutilization. This paper reviews the studies made on biomass pyrolysis of plants with emphasis on the differential quality and distribution of pyrolysis products in relation with the variables of the process and the metal-rich phytoextraction feedstock properties. By investigating these parameters, this survey provides indications on ways to optimize the valorisation of phytoremediation by-products through biomass pyrolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidative pyrolysis of kraft lignin in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongbing; Briens, Cedric; Berruti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of kraft lignin with partial (air) oxidation was studied in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor at reaction temperatures of 773 and 823 K. The bio-oil vapors were fractionated using a series of three condensers maintained at desired temperatures, providing a dry bio-oil with less than 1% water and over 96% of the total bio-oil energy. Oxygen feed was varied to study its effect on yield, composition, and energy recovery in the gas, char and oil products. The addition of oxygen to the pyrolysis process increased the production of gases such as CO and CO 2 . It also changed the dry bio-oil properties, reducing its heating value, increasing its oxygen content, reducing its average molecular weight and tar concentration, while increasing its phenolics concentration. The lower reaction temperature of 773 K was preferred for both dry bio-oil yield and quality. Autothermal operation of the pyrolysis process was achieved with an oxygen feed of 72 or 54 g per kg of biomass at the reaction temperatures of 773 and 823 K, respectively. Autothermal operation reduced both yield and total energy content of the dry bio-oil, with relative reductions of 24 and 20% for the yield, 28 and 23% for the energy content, at 773 and 823 K. - Highlights: • Autothermal pyrolysis of Kraft lignin is possible with introduction of air. • Under autothermal conditions, 24% of the dry bio-oil chemicals are lost at 773 K. • Partial oxidation helps produce more simple phenols and less pyrolytic lignin. • Bio-oil from lignin pyrolysis has a very high phenolics concentration

  12. Pyrolysis and Oxidation of PAN in Dry Air. Thermoanalytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna BIEDUNKIEWICZ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations on pyrolysis and oxidation of pure polyacrylonitrile (PAN and its mixture with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF under non-isothermal conditions at linear change of samples temperature in time are presented. In each case process proceeded in different way. During pyrolysis of pure PAN the material containing mainly the product after PAN cyclization was obtained, while pyrolysis of PAN+DMF mixture gave the product after cyclization and stabilization. Under conditions of measurements, in both temperature ranges, series of gaseous products were formed.For the PAN-DMF system measurements at different samples heating rates were performed. The obtained results were in accordance with the kinetics of heterogeneous processes theory. The process rates in stages increased along with the temperature increase, and TG, DTG and HF function curves were shifted into higher temperature range. This means that the process of pyrolysis and oxidation of PAN in dry air can be carried out in a controlled way.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.246

  13. Investigation of solid organic waste processing by oxidative pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolibaba, O. B.; Sokolsky, A. I.; Gabitov, R. N.

    2017-11-01

    A thermal analysis of a mixture of municipal solid waste (MSW) of the average morphological composition and its individual components was carried out in order to develop ways to improve the efficiency of its utilization for energy production in thermal reactors. Experimental studies were performed on a synchronous thermal analyzer NETZSCH STA 449 F3 Jupiter combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer QMC 403. Based on the results of the experiments, the temperature ranges of the pyrolysis process were determined as well as the rate of decrease of the mass of the sample of solid waste during the drying and oxidative pyrolysis processes, the thermal effects accompanying these processes, as well as the composition and volumes of gases produced during oxidative pyrolysis of solid waste and its components in an atmosphere with oxygen content of 1%, 5%, and 10%. On the basis of experimental data the dependences of the yield of gas on the moisture content of MSW were obtained under different pyrolysis conditions under which a gas of various calorific values was produced.

  14. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor Model Compounds over Molybdenum Sulfide Catalysts: Influence of Support, H2S and Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Pintos, Delfina Garcia

    Conventional fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of bio-oil through well-established technologies1. The produced bio-oil must be further processed in order to decrease the content of oxygen(from 15-30 wt% down to heating...... value,acidity and stability1-2. Upgrading of condensed pyrolysis oil is challenged by severe polymerization andcoking upon heating. Instead, it is proposed to perform pyrolysis in the presence of hydrogen and an HDOcatalyst for immediate stabilization and upgrading of reactive pyrolysis products...... is to provide a proof-ofconceptfor the continuous conversion of solid biomass to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil.In this contribution, a combined experimental, characterization and theoretical study of catalytic hydrodeoxygenationof biomass pyrolysis vapor model compounds over molybdenum sulfide catalysts...

  15. Power production from biomass III. Gasification and pyrolysis R and D and D for industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K.; Korhonen, M. [eds.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). New Energy Technologies

    1999-07-01

    The Seminar on Power Production from Biomass III. Gasification and Pyrolysis R and D and D for Industry, was held on 14-15 September 1998 in Espoo. The seminar was organised by VTT Energy in co-operation with the University of Groningen, EU-Thermie Programme and Technology Development Centre, Finland (Tekes). Overviews of current activities on power production from biomass and wastes in Europe and in the United States were given, and all European and U. S. demonstration projects on biomass gasification were presented. In Europe, the target is to produce additional 90 Mtoe/a of bioenergy for the market by 2010. This is a huge challenge for the bioenergy sector, including biomass production and harvesting, conversion technology, energy companies, and end users. In USA, U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the Biomass Power Programme to encourage and assist industry in the development and validation of renewable, biomass-based electricity generation systems, the objective being to double the present use of 7 000 MW biomass power by the year 2010. The new Finnish PROGAS Programme initiated by VTT was also introduced. Several gasification projects are today on the demonstration stage prior to entering the commercial level. Pyrolysis technologies are not yet on the demonstration stage on the energy market. Bio-oils can easily be transported, stored and utilised in existing boiler and diesel plants. The proceedings include the presentations given by the keynote speakers and other invited speakers, as well as some extended poster presentations. (orig.)

  16. Using pyrolytic acid leaching as a pretreatment step in a biomass fast pyrolysis plant: process design and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, Stijn; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; van den Berg, Henderikus; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Removing alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEMs) from biomass, with pyrolytic acids, before pyrolysis leads to increased organic oil and sugar yields. These pyrolytic acids are produced and concentrated within the pyrolysis process itself. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate under which

  17. Role of potassium exchange in catalytic pyrolysis of biomass over ZSM-5: Formation of alkyl phenols and furans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass with ZSM-5 type zeolites is a commonly considered in situ upgrading technique for the production of partially deoxygenated bio-oils. The acidity and structure of ZSM-5 catalysts favor the production of aromatic hydrocarbons from oxygenates present in the pyrolysis...

  18. A CFD model for biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingluan; Heindel, T. J.; Fox, R. O.

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is conducted to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of fluidized-bed reactors for fast pyrolysis of biomass to bio-oil. A comprehensive CFD model, coupling a pyrolysis kinetic model with a detailed hydrodynamics model, is developed. A lumped kinetic model is applied to describe the pyrolysis of biomass particles. Variable particle porosity is used to account for the evolution of particle physical properties. The kinetic scheme includes primary decomposition and secondary cracking of tar. Biomass is composed of reference components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Products are categorized into groups: gaseous, tar vapor, and solid char. The particle kinetic processes and their interaction with the reactive gas phase are modeled with a multi-fluid model derived from the kinetic theory of granular flow. The gas, sand and biomass constitute three continuum phases coupled by the interphase source terms. The model is applied to investigate the effect of operating conditions on the tar yield in a fluidized-bed reactor. The influence of various parameters on tar yield, including operating temperature and others are investigated. Predicted optimal conditions for tar yield and scale-up of the reactor are discussed.

  19. Effects of biomass type, blend composition, and co-pyrolysis temperature on hybrid coal quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasongko, Dwiwahju; Wulandari, Winny; Rubani, Inga Shaffira; Rusydiansyah, Rifqi

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study on co-pyrolysis of coal with biomass wastes to produce hybrid coal was conducted to investigate the effects of important process variables, namely biomass type (rice husk and sawdust), blend composition, and co-pyrolysis temperature on the quality of hybrid coal. The experiments were carried out using a vertical tubular furnace equipped with temperature controller to maintain the co-pyrolysis reactor at a given temperature. Nitrogen gas was introduced into the furnace to create an inert environment preventing the sample from burning. A known mass of solid sample consisting of manually granulated blend of coal and biomass with binder in spherical shape was contained in a basket made of stainless sieve. After a given residence time, the sample was taken from the furnace. The blend sample prior to experiment and the produced hybrid coal were then characterized for its proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and calorific value. Experimental findings suggested that by increasing co-pyrolysis temperature from 200 to 400 °C, the calorific value of hybrid coal will increase by 14.5-17.7% to be 5585-7060 kcal/kg. It was also showed that 30% increase in the biomass content in the fuel blend would produce a hybrid coal that emitting up to 25.9% less in CO2 when used for combustion, although its calorific value decreased down to 8% compared to the biomass blend. It is shown that hybrid coal obtained from this study is comparable in calorific value to bituminous coal, thus suitable for power plant while being more environmentally friendly.

  20. Catalytic Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass Using Different Types of Zeolite and Online Vapor Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Imran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bio-oil produced from conventional flash pyrolysis has poor quality and requires expensive upgrading before it can be used as a transportation fuel. In this work, a high quality bio-oil has been produced using a novel approach where flash pyrolysis, catalysis and fractionation of pyrolysis vapors using two stage condensation are combined in a single process unit. A bench scale unit of 1 kg/h feedstock capacity is used for catalytic pyrolysis in an entrained down-flow reactor system equipped with two-staged condensation of the pyrolysis vapor. Zeolite-based catalysts are investigated to study the effect of varying acidities of faujasite Y zeolites, zeolite structures (ZSM5, different catalyst to biomass ratios and different catalytic pyrolysis temperatures. Low catalyst/biomass ratios did not show any significant improvements in the bio-oil quality, while high catalyst/biomass ratios showed an effective deoxygenation of the bio-oil. The application of zeolites decreased the organic liquid yield due to the increased production of non-condensables, primarily hydrocarbons. The catalytically produced bio-oil was less viscous and zeolites were effective at cracking heavy molecular weight compounds in the bio-oil. Acidic zeolites, H-Y and H-ZSM5, increased the desirable chemical compounds in the bio-oil such as phenols, furans and hydrocarbon, and reduced the undesired compounds such as acids. On the other hand reducing the acidity of zeolites reduced some of the undesired compounds in the bio-oil such as ketones and aldehydes. The performance of H-Y was superior to that of the rest of zeolites studied: bio-oil of high chemical and calorific value was produced with a high organic liquid yield and low oxygen content. H-ZSM5 was a close competitor to H-Y in performance but with a lower yield of bio-oil. Online fractionation of catalytic pyrolysis vapors was employed by controlling the condenser temperature and proved to be a successful process parameter

  1. Catalytic Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass Using Different Types of Zeolite and Online Vapor Fractionation

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2016-03-11

    Bio-oil produced from conventional flash pyrolysis has poor quality and requires expensive upgrading before it can be used as a transportation fuel. In this work, a high quality bio-oil has been produced using a novel approach where flash pyrolysis, catalysis and fractionation of pyrolysis vapors using two stage condensation are combined in a single process unit. A bench scale unit of 1 kg/h feedstock capacity is used for catalytic pyrolysis in an entrained down-flow reactor system equipped with two-staged condensation of the pyrolysis vapor. Zeolite-based catalysts are investigated to study the effect of varying acidities of faujasite Y zeolites, zeolite structures (ZSM5), different catalyst to biomass ratios and different catalytic pyrolysis temperatures. Low catalyst/biomass ratios did not show any significant improvements in the bio-oil quality, while high catalyst/biomass ratios showed an effective deoxygenation of the bio-oil. The application of zeolites decreased the organic liquid yield due to the increased production of non-condensables, primarily hydrocarbons. The catalytically produced bio-oil was less viscous and zeolites were effective at cracking heavy molecular weight compounds in the bio-oil. Acidic zeolites, H-Y and H-ZSM5, increased the desirable chemical compounds in the bio-oil such as phenols, furans and hydrocarbon, and reduced the undesired compounds such as acids. On the other hand reducing the acidity of zeolites reduced some of the undesired compounds in the bio-oil such as ketones and aldehydes. The performance of H-Y was superior to that of the rest of zeolites studied: bio-oil of high chemical and calorific value was produced with a high organic liquid yield and low oxygen content. H-ZSM5 was a close competitor to H-Y in performance but with a lower yield of bio-oil. Online fractionation of catalytic pyrolysis vapors was employed by controlling the condenser temperature and proved to be a successful process parameter to tailor the

  2. Chemical and physical characterisation of biomass-based pyrolysis oils. Literature view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagernaes, L. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1995-12-31

    Biomass-based pyrolysis oils are complex mixtures of mainly organic compounds and water. The determination of their physical and chemical properties and chemical composition is a challenge for researchers. Characterisation of biomass pyrolysis oils has been studied at many universities in North America and Europe in the 1980s and 1990s. The existing literature on the analytical methods used for these oils is reviewed in this report. For characterising the chemical composition, the bio-oils have first been mainly fractionated into different classes. Solvent extraction and adsorption chromatography are the most general methods used. In adsorption chromatography, the oils have been fractionated into different hydrocarbon and polar fractions. The fractions obtained have been analysed with various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique is the analytical method most widely used and well adaptable for the fractions. For high-molecular-mass and highly polar compounds liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques as well as infrared (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR and 13C NMR) spectroscopies are more suitable due to the low volatility of pyrolysis oils. For whole pyrolysis oils, LC techniques, primarily size exclusion chromatography and FT-IR and FT-NMR spectroscopies have proved to be useful methods

  3. Pyrolysis of oil palm empty fruit bunch biomass pellets using multimode microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salema, Arshad Adam; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2012-12-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch pellets were subjected to pyrolysis in a multimode microwave (MW) system (1 kW and 2.45 GHz frequency) with and without the MW absorber, activated carbon. The ratio of biomass to MW absorber not only affected the temperature profiles of the EFB but also pyrolysis products such as bio-oil, char, and gas. The highest bio-oil yield of about 21 wt.% was obtained with 25% MW absorber. The bio-oil consisted of phenolic compounds of about 60-70 area% as detected by GC-MS and confirmed by FT-IR analysis. Ball lightning (plasma arc) occurred due to residual palm oil in the EFB biomass without using an MW absorber. The bio-char can be utilized as potential alternative fuel because of its heating value (25 MJ/kg). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pyrolysis of corn stalk biomass briquettes in a scaled-up microwave technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salema, Arshad Adam; Afzal, Muhammad T; Bennamoun, Lyes

    2017-06-01

    Pyrolysis of corn stalk biomass briquettes was carried out in a developed microwave (MW) reactor supplied with 2.45GHz frequency using 3kW power generator. MW power and biomass loading were the key parameters investigated in this study. Highest bio-oil, biochar, and gas yield of 19.6%, 41.1%, and 54.0% was achieved at different process condition. In terms of quality, biochar exhibited good heating value (32MJ/kg) than bio-oil (2.47MJ/kg). Bio-oil was also characterised chemically using FTIR and GC-MS method. This work may open new dimension towards development of large-scale MW pyrolysis technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Power production from biomass II with special emphasis on gasification and pyrolysis R and DD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K.; Korhonen, M. [eds.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The Seminar on Power Production from Biomass II with special emphasis on gasification and pyrolysis R and DD, was organized by VTT Energy on 27 - 28 March 1995 in Espoo, Finland. All seminar speakers were invited in order to give a high-level overview of the achievements of biomass combustion, gasification and flash pyrolysis technologies. The sessions included presentations by all key industrial entrepreneurs in the field. The poster session was open to all groups interested. Globally bioenergy covers about 3 % of the primary energy consumption. Locally it has a significant role in many countries like in Finland, where bioenergy covers almost 15 % and peat 5 % of primary energy consumption. Today`s cost-effective heat and power production is based on industrial wood residues and spent cooking liquors in relatively large industrial units or municipal heating and power stations. Agricultural residues like straw and especially energy crops are becoming more interesting in co-utilization with other biomasses or fossil fuels. The seminar successfully displayed the status of present technologies as well as development targets for new gasification and flash pyrolysis technologies in the coming years. The many industrial participants showed that there are growing business possibilities in many countries all over the world. The proceedings include the most oral presentations given at the Seminar and also abstracts of poster presentations. (orig.)

  6. Fixed bed pyrolysis of biomass solid waste for bio-oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Ali, Mohamed Hairol Md; Haziq, Miftah

    2017-08-01

    Biomass solid waste in the form of rice husk particle is pyrolyzed in a fixed bed stainless steel pyrolysis reactor of 50 mm diameter and 50 cm length. The biomass solid feedstock is prepared prior to pyrolysis. The reactor bed is heated by means of a cylindrical heater of biomass source. A temperature of 500°C is maintained with an apperent vapor residence time of 3-5 sec. The products obtained are liquid bio-oil, solid char and gases. The liquid product yield is found to be 30% by weight of solid biomass feedstock while the solid product yield is found to be 35% by weight of solid biomass feedtock, the rest is gas. The bio-oil is a single-phase brownish color liquid of acrid smell. The heating value of the oil is determined to be 25 MJ/kg. The density and pH value are found to be 1.125 kg/m3 and 3.78 respectively.

  7. Pyrolysis kinetics study of three biomass solid wastes for thermochemical conversion into liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuly, S. S.; Parveen, M.; Islam, M. R.; Rahman, M. S.; Haniu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Pyrolysis has been considered as the most efficient way of producing liquid fuel from biomass and its wastes. In this study the thermal degradation characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics of three selected biomass samples of Jute stick (Corchorus capsularis), Japanese cedar wood (Cryptomeria japonica) and Tamarind seed (Tamarindus indica) have been investigated in a nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates of 10°C/min and 60°C/min over a temperature range of 30°C to 800°C. The weight loss region for the three biomass solid wastes has shifted to a higher temperature range and the weight loss rate has increased with increasing heating rate. In this case, the three biomass samples have represented the similar behavior. The initial reaction temperature has decreased with increasing heating rate but the reaction range and reaction rate have increased. The percentage of total weight loss is higher for cedar wood than jute stick and tamarind seed. For the three biomass wastes, the overall rate equation has been modeled properly by one simplified equation and from here it is possible to determine kinetic parameters of unreacted materials based on Arrhenious form. The calculated rate equation compares thoroughly well with the measured TG and DTG data.

  8. Pyrolysis kinetics of coking coal mixed with biomass under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ha Myung; Seo, Myung Won; Jeong, Sang Mun; Na, Byung Ki; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Jae Goo; Lee, Woon Jae

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the kinetic characteristics of coking coal mixed with biomass during pyrolysis, thermogravimetric (TG) and thermo-balance reactor (TBR) analyses were conducted under non-isothermal and isothermal condition. Yellow poplar as a biomass (B) was mixed with weak coking coal (WC) and hard coking coal (HC), respectively. The calculated activation energies of WC/B blends were higher than those of HC/B blends under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions. The coal/biomass blends show increased reactivity and decreased activation energy with increasing biomass blend ratio, regardless of the coking properties of the coal. The different char structures of the WC/B and HC/B blends were analyzed by BET and SEM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Flash pyrolysis at high temperature of ligno-cellulosic biomass and its components - production of synthesis gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couhert, C.

    2007-11-01

    Pyrolysis is the first stage of any thermal treatment of biomass and governs the formation of synthesis gas for the production of electricity, hydrogen or liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to establish a link between the composition of a biomass and its pyrolysis gas. We study experimental flash pyrolysis and fix the conditions in which quantities of gas are maximal, while aiming at a regime without heat and mass transfer limitations (particles about 100 μm): temperature of 950 C and residence time of about 2 s. Then we try to predict gas yields of any biomass according to its composition, applicable in this situation where thermodynamic equilibrium is not reached. We show that an additivity law does not allow correlating gas yields of a biomass with fractions of cellulose, hemi-cellulose and lignin contained in this biomass. Several explanations are suggested and examined: difference of pyrolytic behaviour of the same compound according to the biomass from which it is extracted, interactions between compounds and influence of mineral matter. With the aim of industrial application, we study pyrolysis of millimetric and centimetric size particles, and make a numerical simulation of the reactions of pyrolysis gases reforming. This simulation shows that the choice of biomass affects the quantities of synthesis gas obtained. (author)

  10. Microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass for production of phenolic-rich bio-oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaeva, Alisa; Tahmasebi, Arash; Tian, Lu; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-07-01

    Catalytic microwave pyrolysis of peanut shell (PT) and pine sawdust (PS) using activated carbon (AC) and lignite char (LC) for production of phenolic-rich bio-oil and nanotubes was investigated in this study. The effects of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature and biomass/catalyst ratio on the yields and composition of pyrolysis products were investigated. Fast heating rates were achieved under microwave irradiation conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of bio-oil showed that activated carbon significantly enhanced the selectivity of phenolic compounds in bio-oil. The highest phenolics content in the bio-oil (61.19 %(area)) was achieved at 300°C. The selectivity of phenolics in bio-oil was higher for PT sample compared to that of PS. The formation of nanotubes in PT biomass particles was observed for the first time in biomass microwave pyrolysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of torrefaction on compositions of bio-oil and syngas from biomass pyrolysis by microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shoujie; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Bu, Quan; Chen, Shulin; Wu, Joan; Julson, James; Ruan, Roger

    2013-05-01

    Microwave pyrolysis of torrefied Douglas fir sawdust pellet was investigated to determine the effects of torrefaction on the biofuel production. Compared to the pyrolysis of raw biomass, the increased concentrations of phenols and sugars and reduced concentrations of guaiacols and furans were obtained from pyrolysis of torrefied biomass, indicating that torrefaction as a pretreatment favored the phenols and sugars production. Additionally, about 3.21-7.50 area% hydrocarbons and the reduced concentration of organic acids were obtained from pyrolysis of torrefied biomass. Torrefaction also altered the compositions of syngas by reducing CO2 and increasing H2 and CH4. The syngas was rich in H2, CH4, and CO implying that the syngas quality was significantly improved by torrefaction process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The impacts of biomass properties on pyrolysis yields, economic and environmental performance of the pyrolysis-bioenergy-biochar platform to carbon negative energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqin; Dang, Qi; Brown, Robert C; Laird, David; Wright, Mark M

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of biomass properties on the pyrolysis product yields, economic and environmental performance for the pyrolysis-biochar-bioenergy platform. We developed and applied a fast pyrolysis, feedstock-sensitive, regression-based chemical process model to 346 different feedstocks, which were grouped into five types: woody, stalk/cob/ear, grass/plant, organic residue/product and husk/shell/pit. The results show that biomass ash content of 0.3-7.7wt% increases biochar yield from 0.13 to 0.16kg/kg of biomass, and decreases biofuel yields from 87.3 to 40.7 gallons per tonne. Higher O/C ratio (0.88-1.12) in biomass decreases biochar yield and increases biofuel yields within the same ash content level. Higher ash content of biomass increases minimum fuel selling price (MFSP), while higher O/C ratio of biomass decreases MFSP within the same ash content level. The impact of ash and O/C ratio of biomass on GHG emissions are not consistent for all feedstocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Poly generation property of agricultural straw based on biomass pyrolysis/gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yingquan; Zhu, Bo; Chen, Han Ping; Yang, Hai-Ping; Wang, Xian Hua; Zhang, Shihong

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A large mount of agricultural waste generated annually in China. The efficient and clean utilization of these biomass resources is seem to an opportunity not only enhancing the standard of living of peasant but also significantly reducing the emission of greenhouse gas. Poly generation of biomass not only generating gas product with high heat value but also producing bio-char with high quality, is one of the most promising technology for Chinese rural. Currently, fixed bed pyrolysis technology is attracted major concern, however, it resulted a no-continuous and unstable production. In this paper, a novel pyrolysis technology is introduced, and the pyrolysis property of local typical agricultural straw was investigated under variant condition. A pyrolysis gases containing CO, H 2 , CO 2 , CH 4 , and trace of small-molecule hydrocarbon were produced, and the heat value was above 17 MJ/ m 3 . It is sufficient for the requirement of local resident. The tar yield is very low since it condensed on the heated materials in the low temperature zone and was further cracked to a lower molecule gases in the high temperature zone, and the main liquid product is wood vinegar. It contained above 80 % wt of water, 5-12 % wt of acetic acid and some furan and phonetic. The wood charcoal is another important product possessing rather higher benefits than gas product. The heat value of the charcoal is over 27 MJ/ kg and without smoke during combustion, so there is a huge market on the catering industry for the charcoal whose cost is lower than the charcoal form forests woods, simultaneously the char have a good porosity as the BET surface area about 100 m 2 / g, so can be used as a lower cost adsorbent in the environment industry. As the commercialization of biomass poly generation technology, the high value conversion and utilization of wood vinegar and charcoal would bring considerable benefits for consumer. (author)

  14. Experimental Studies on Municipal Solid Waste and Biomass Pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Becidan, Michaël

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of this thesis (Chapters 1-9) presents the broader picture of waste management and thermal treatments (situation, trends and novel concepts) with a strong focus on nitrogen (N) in Chapter 6 (a summary of this chapter can be found on page 42). A new insight on N-functionalities is presented, mostly based on plant physiology publications widely ignored by the bioenergy world. N in biomass is found in a variety of chemical compounds and not only in protein compounds. An extensiv...

  15. Studies on liquefaction and pyrolysis of peat and biomass at KTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernbom, E.; Sjoestrom, K.; Hoernel, C.; Zanzi, R.; Bjoernbom, P.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the study on thermochemical conversion of solid fuels is done. The study have been performed in the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, since the outbreak of energy crisis in the seventies. The main problems connected with utilisation of peat for energy are: 90% moisture content in the deposits and 35-40% oxygen content in the dry substance. Simultaneous dewatering and liquefaction of peat have been achieved by the Bjoerbom method. The wet peat has been treated with CO and H 2 O without preliminary drying, using water as a medium agent. After treatment water has been phase-separated from the heavy oil product. Another approach is de-oxygenation of peat prior to liquefaction. A significant part of oxygen in peat and biomass can be removed by thermal decomposition of the fuels prior to liquefaction and removal of carbon dioxide and water from the organic matter in them. The products obtained after de-oxygenation demand low consumption of external hydrogenation agent because they are rich in hydrogen. Some criteria for selection of peat as a raw material for liquefaction are given. The equipment and experimental procedure for pyrolysis of peat and biomass are described. A free fall tubular reactor with max operating pressure of 5 MPa and temperature of 1100 o C has been used. The effect of treatment conditions under the rapid pyrolysis in the free fall reactor on the yield and the reactivity of char obtained after the final pyrolysis is shown. Peat and wood are transformed into pyrolysis products for less than 1 second; 35-50% of the moisture- and ash-free peat and 70% of the wood have been converted into gaseous products.The char obtained in the rapid pyrolysis contains a fraction which can be further de-volatilized by slow pyrolysis for a few minutes - time much longer than the time for formation of primary products. High reactivity of char is favoured by lower pyrolysis temperature, shorter residence time and larger particle size of the fuel

  16. Fast pyrolysis of biomass in the rotating cone reactor. Reactor development and operation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansekoele, E.; Wagenaar, B.M.

    2001-07-01

    This report describes the design and characteristics of BTGs pyrolysis plant with a biomass throughput capacity of 50 kg per hour. The pilot plant has been developed for 2 reasons: to produce modest quantities of bio-oil for application purposes, and to generate know-how for the development of a larger 200 kg/hr pilot plant. The design of the 50 kg/hr plant continues the development line which started in 1995 when a similar unit was delivered to China. Major design improvements of the current pyrolysis unit are that it can be operated in a continuous mode and utilizes the combustion heat of the produced char to heat the pyrolysis process. A measurement program has meanwhile been executed as a means to characterize the pyrolysis plant. Results of the characterization study were the following: the pilot plant produces approx. 35 liters of bio-oil per hour and thus achieves a maximum oil yield of 70 weight percent. The bio-oil yield of the plant was inversely proportional with the reactor temperature and inversely proportional with the gas phase residence time. As a result of the pilot plant operation, a few tons of bio-oil have been produced; alongside with a bulk of know-how. All know-how has successfully been utilized in the development of the 200 kg per hour facility

  17. Investigation of biomasses and chars obtained from pyrolysis of different biomasses with solid-state 13C and 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, S.; Arvelakis, S.; Spliethoff, H.; Waard, de P.; Samoson, A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of biomass samples (reed, pine pellets, Douglas fir wood chips, wheat straw, peach stones, and olive residue), pretreated biomass samples (leached wheat straw, leached peach stones, and leached olive residue), as well as their chars obtained by pyrolysis using different heating rates (5,

  18. Reducing the bioavailability and leaching potential of lead in contaminated water hyacinth biomass by phosphate-assisted pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lingna; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Tao; Li, Jianfa; Huang, Xiaoyi; Cai, Jing; Lü, Jinhong; Wang, Yue

    2017-10-01

    For the purpose of safe disposal of biomass contaminated by biosorption of heavy metals, phosphate-assisted pyrolysis of water hyacinth biomass contaminated by lead (Pb) was tried to reduce the bioavailability and leaching potential of Pb, using direct pyrolysis without additive as a control method. Direct pyrolysis of the contaminated biomass at low temperatures (300 and 400°C) could reduce the bioavailability of Pb, but the leaching potential of Pb was increased with the rising pyrolysis temperature. While phosphate-assisted pyrolysis significantly enhanced the recovery and stability of Pb in the char. Specifically, the percentages of bioavailable Pb and leachable Pb in the chars obtained by phosphate-assisted pyrolysis at low temperatures were reduced to less than 5% and 7%, respectively. The sequential extraction test indicated the transformation of Pb into more stable fractions after phosphate-assisted pyrolysis, which was related to the formation of Pb phosphate minerals including pyromorphite and lead-substituted hydroxyapatite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of Biofuel and Biochar Production from the Slow Pyrolysis of Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J.; Gao, B.; Nsf Reu in Water Resources

    2010-12-01

    Slow pyrolysis was performed on biomass samples (i.e., energy cane and air potato) to determine the most energy efficient conditions for producing biofuel and biochar. The potential of air potato as a source of fuel and char was also investigated. Dry biomass samples of 10, 15 and 20 g were heated in a reactor at a final temperatures of 300, 450, or 600 °C, and the minimum amount of time required to complete pyrolysis was recorded. Maximum biochar yield was obtained at 300°C for both energy cane and air potato at all masses, and maximum bio-oil yield was obtained at 450°C for all samples. Pyrolysis required the least amount of time at 450°C. Bio-oil yields for air potato were slightly lower than that of energy cane, while biochar yield was slightly higher. Since air potato showed similar product yields to energy cane, this indicates it has potential to be a good feedstock for biofuel and biochar productions.

  20. Biomass Chars: The Effects of Pyrolysis Conditions on Their Morphology, Structure, Chemical Properties and Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamseddine Guizani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid char is a product of biomass pyrolysis. It contains a high proportion of carbon, and lower contents of H, O and minerals. This char can have different valorization pathways such as combustion for heat and power, gasification for Syngas production, activation for adsorption applications, or use as a soil amendment. The optimal recovery pathway of the char depends highly on its physical and chemical characteristics. In this study, different chars were prepared from beech wood particles under various pyrolysis operating conditions in an entrained flow reactor (500–1400 °C. Their structural, morphological, surface chemistry properties, as well as their chemical compositions, were determined using different analytical techniques, including elementary analysis, Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX, Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR, and Raman Spectroscopy. The biomass char reactivity was evaluated in air using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The yield, chemical composition, surface chemistry, structure, morphology and reactivity of the chars were highly affected by the pyrolysis temperature. In addition, some of these properties related to the char structure and chemical composition were found to be correlated to the char reactivity.

  1. Selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis over metal chlorides supported on zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Cai, Qiuxia; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Yue'e; Wang, Jianguo

    2013-12-01

    Direct biomass conversion into chemicals remains a great challenge because of the complexity of the compounds; hence, this process has attracted less attention than conversion into fuel. In this study, we propose a simple one-step method for converting bagasse into furfural (FF) and acetic acid (AC). In this method, bagasse pyrolysis over ZnCl2/HZSM-5 achieved a high FF and AC yield (58.10%) and a 1.01 FF/AC ratio, but a very low yield of medium-boiling point components. However, bagasse pyrolysis using HZSM-5 alone or ZnCl2 alone still remained large amounts of medium-boiling point components or high-boiling point components. The synergistic effect of HZSM-5 and ZnCl2, which combines pyrolysis, zeolite cracking, and Lewis acid-selective catalysis results in highly efficient bagasse conversion into FF and AC. Therefore, our study provides a novel, simple method for directly converting biomass into high-yield useful chemical. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pyrolysis in the Countries of the North Sea Region: Potentially available quantities of biomass waste for biochar production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, van der J.W.H.; Zwart, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Interreg IVB project Biochar: Climate Saving Soils is to assess the amount of available biomass that could be used for the production of biochar. In this publication the authors give an impression of the amounts of biomass available for pyrolysis.

  3. Report - Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valkenburg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walton, C. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elliott, D. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevens, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this design case study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels.

  4. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass Pyrolysis Oxygenates with Vacuum Gas Oil Using a Davison Circulating Riser Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Mark W. [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Olstad, Jessica [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Parent, Yves [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Deutch, Steve [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Iisa, Kristiina [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Christensen, Earl [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Ben, Haoxi [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Black, Stuart [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Nimlos, Mark [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Magrini, Kim [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15523 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States

    2018-01-22

    We investigate and quantitate the changes in hydrocarbon product composition while evaluating the performance and operability of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Davison Circulating Riser (DCR) reactor system when biomass model compounds are cofed with traditional fluid catalyst cracking (FCC) feeds and catalyst: vacuum gas oil (VGO) and equilibrium zeolite catalyst (E-Cat). Three compounds (acetic acid, guaiacol, and sorbitan monooleate) were selected to represent the major classes of oxygenates present in biomass pyrolysis vapors. These vapors can contain 30-50% oxygen as oxygenates, which create conversion complications (increased reactivity and coking) when integrating biomass vapors and liquids into fuel and chemical processes long dominated by petroleum feedstocks. We used these model compounds to determine the appropriate conditions for coprocessing with petroleum and ultimately pure pyrolysis vapors only as compared with standard baseline conditions obtained with VGO and E-Cat only in the DCR. Model compound addition decreased the DCR catalyst circulation rate, which controls reactor temperature and measures reaction heat demand, while increasing catalyst coking rates. Liquid product analyses included 2-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (2D GCxGC TOFS), simulated distillation (SIM DIST), 13C NMR, and carbonyl content. Aggregated results indicated that the model compounds were converted during reaction, and despite functional group differences, product distributions for each model compound were very similar. In addition, we determined that adding model compounds to the VGO feed did not significantly affect the DCR's operability or performance. Future work will assess catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor to fungible hydrocarbon products using upgrading catalysts currently being developed at NREL and at Johnson Matthey.

  5. Thermogravimetric study of the pyrolysis of biomass residues from tomato processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangut, V.; Sabio, E.; Ganan, J.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Ramiro, A.; Gonzalez, C.M.; Roman, S.; Al-Kassir, A. [Department of Chemical and Energy Engineering, University of Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    There is an increasing concern with the environmental problems associated with the increasing CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions resulting from the rising use of fossil fuels. Renewable energy, mainly biomass, can contribute to reduce the fossil fuels consumption. Biomass is a renewable resource with a widespread world distribution. Tomato processing industry produces a high amount of biomass residue (peel and seeds) that could be used for thermal energy and electricity. A characterization and thermogravimetric study has been carried out. The residue has a high HHV and volatile content, and a low ash, and S contents. A kinetic model has been developed based on the degradation of hemicellulose, cellulose, lignin and oil that describe the pyrolysis of peel, seeds and peel and seeds residues. (author)

  6. Pyrolysis of coal, biomass and their blends: performance assessment by thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Francesca; Orsini, Alessandro; Plaisant, Alberto; Pettinau, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    With the aim to support the experimental tests in a gasification pilot plant, the thermal decomposition of coal, biomass and their mixtures has been carried out through a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a simplified kinetic analysis. The TGA of pure fuels indicates the low reactivity of South African coal and the relatively high reactivity of Sardinian Sulcis coal during pyrolysis. Among the tested fuels, biomass (stone pine wood chips) is the most reactive one. These results fully confirm those obtained during the experimental tests in the gasification pilot plant. As for the fuel blends, the analysis shows that the synergic effects between the considered coals and biomass are negligible when they are co-pyrolyzed. The results of the analysis confirm that TGA could be very useful to generally predict the gasification performance and to optimize the experimental campaigns in pilot-scale gasification plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomass pyrolysis: use of some agricultural wastes for alternative fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Lygia Maestri; Santos, Larissa Cardoso; Vieira, Paula Fraga; Parreira, Priciane Martins; Henrique, Humberto Molinar

    2009-01-01

    The use of biomass for energy generation has aroused great attention and interest because of the global climate changes, environmental pollution and reduction of availability of fossil energy. This study deals with pyrolysis of four agricultural wastes (sawdust, sugarcane straw, chicken litter and cashew nut shell) in a fixed bed pyrolytic reactor. The yields of char, liquid and gas were quantified at 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 deg C and the temperature and pressure effects were investigated. Pyrolytic liquids produced were separated into aqueous and oil phases. XRF spectroscopy was used for qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of the liquids and solids produced at whole temperature range. Calorific value analysis of liquids and solids were also performed for energy content evaluation. Experimental results showed sawdust, sugarcane straw and cashew nut waste have very good potential for using in pyrolysis process for alternative fuel production. (author)

  8. Pyrolysis of polystyrene - polyphenylene oxide to recover styrene and useful products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert J.; Chum, Helena L.

    1995-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide plastic waste to a given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature range to cause pyrolysis of given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide and its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and a support and treating the feed stream with the catalyst to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide in the first temperature range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of the high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomer constituent of styrene; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis to a different derived high value product of polyphenylene oxide from the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of the plastic into a polyphenylene oxide derived product; and separating the different derived high value polyphenylene oxide product.

  9. Biomass pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: Effects of pyrolysis parameters on product yields and characterization of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aysu, Tevfik; Küçük, M. Maşuk

    2014-01-01

    Slow pyrolysis of eastern giant fennel (Ferula orientalis L.) stalks has been performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor with (ZnO, Al 2 O 3 ) and without catalyst at six different temperatures ranging from 350 °C to 600 °C with heating rates of 15, 30, 50 °C/min. The amounts of bio-char, bio-oil and gas produced, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils were determined by FT-IR and GC–MS. The effects of pyrolysis parameters such as temperature, catalyst and ratio of catalyst, particle size (D p ) and sweeping gas flow rate on product yields were investigated. According to results, temperature and catalyst seem to be the main factors effecting the conversion of F. orientalis L. into solid, liquid and gaseous products. The highest liquid yield (45.22%) including water was obtained with 15% zinc oxide catalyst at 500 °C temperature at a heating rate of 50 °C/min when 0.224 > D p > 0.150 mm particle size raw material and 100 cm 3 /min of sweeping gas flow rate were used. - Highlights: • Ferula orientalis L. stalks were converted to solid, liquid and gaseous products. • Effects of various parameters on product yields were investigated. • 500 °C of temperature, heating rate of 50 °C/min and zinc oxide provide the optimum conditions for bio-oil formation. • 81 different compounds were identified by GC–MS in the bio-oils obtained at 500 °C

  10. Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.

    1986-06-01

    This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases and aqueous phases. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay and mouse skin tumorigenicity tests). These results are the first step of a longer term program to determine the properties, handling requirements, and utility of the condensates recovered from biomass gasification and pyrolysis. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures. 56 refs., 25 figs., 21 tabs.

  11. Portable in-woods pyrolysis: Using forest biomass to reduce forest fuels, increase soil productivity, and sequester carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah Page-Dumroese; Mark Coleman; Greg Jones; Tyron Venn; R. Kasten Dumroese; Nathanial Anderson; Woodam Chung; Dan Loeffler; Jim Archuleta; Mark Kimsey; Phil Badger; Terry Shaw; Kristin McElligott

    2009-01-01

    We describe the use of an in-woods portable pyrolysis unit that converts forest biomass to bio-oil and the application of the byproduct bio-char in a field trial. We also discuss how in-woods processing may reduce the need for long haul distances of lowvalue woody biomass and eliminate open, currently wasteful burning of forest biomass. If transportation costs can be...

  12. Product quality optimization in an integrated biorefinery: Conversion of pistachio nutshell biomass to biofuels and activated biochars via pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Işıtan, Seçil; Ceylan, Selim; Topcu, Yıldıray; Hintz, Chloe; Tefft, Juliann; Chellappa, Thiago; Guo, Jicheng; Goldfarb, Jillian L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis temperature key variable in manipulating biofuel quality. • Pyrolysis temperature does not impact activated biochar surface area. • Activation temperature key variable to optimize surface area of pistachio biochar. • Statistical model accurately predicts surface area of biochar, especially above 600 m 2 /g. - Abstract: An economically viable transition to a renewable, sustainable energy future hinges on the ability to simultaneously produce multiple high value products from biomass precursors. Though there is considerable literature on the thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels and biochars, there are few holistic examinations that seek to understand trade-offs between biofuel quality and the associated pyrolysis conditions on activated carbons made from the resulting biochars. Using an Ordinary Least Squares regression analysis, this study probes the impact of pyrolysis and activation temperature on surface areas and pore volumes for 28 carbon dioxide-activated carbons. Activation temperature has the largest single impact of any other variable; increasing the temperature from 800 to 900 °C leads to an increase in surface area of more than 300 m 2 /g. Contrary to some prior results, pyrolysis temperature has minimal effect on the resulting surface area and pore volume, suggesting that optimizing the temperature at which biofuels are extracted will have little impact on carbon dioxide-activated carbons. Increasing pyrolysis temperature increases methane formation but decreases gaseous hydrocarbons. Bio-oil obtained at lower pyrolysis temperatures shows fewer oxygenated compounds, indicating a greater stability, but higher pyrolysis temperatures maximize production of key biorefinery intermediaries such as furans. By analyzing data in such a holistic manner, it may be possible to optimize the production of biofuels and activated carbons from biomass by minimizing the amount of raw materials and energy necessary to maximize

  13. High-pressure pyrolysis and oxidation of ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob M.; Glarborg, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The pyrolysis and oxidation of ethanol has been investigated at temperatures of 600–900 K, a pressure of 50 bar and residence times of 4.3–6.8 s in a laminar flow reactor. The experiments, conducted with mixtures highly diluted in nitrogen, covered fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) of 0.1, 1.0, 43......, and ∞ . Ethanol pyrolysis was observed at temperatures above 850 K. The onset temperature of ethanol oxidation occurred at 700–725 K over a wide range of stoichiometries. A considerable yield of aldehydes was detected at intermediate temperatures. A detailed chemical kinetic model was developed and evaluated...... against the present data as well as ignition delay times and flame speed measurements from literature. The model predicted the onset of fuel conversion and the composition of products from the flow reactor experiments fairly well. It also predicted well ignition delays above 900 K whereas it overpredicted...

  14. Implementation of Fuzzy Sets in the Non-Isothermal Pyrolysis of Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Dhaundiyal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the study of the application of fuzzy logic on the relevant parameter of biomass pyrolysis. The frequency factor, the upper limit of ‘dE’, and the scale and shape parameters of the fuzzy Gamma distribution were fuzzified in order to estimate randomness and to accommodate realistic values. The distribution function, f (E, of the activation energies was assumed to follow the fuzzy Gamma distribution. Thermo-analytical data was found experimentally with the help of TGA/DTG analysis. The approximated solution of the DAEM was obtained using the asymptotic approach.

  15. Recycling slaughterhouse waste into fertilizer: how do pyrolysis temperature and biomass additions affect phosphorus availability and chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetsloot, Marie J; Lehmann, Johannes; Solomon, Dawit

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of slaughterhouse waste could promote more sustainable phosphorus (P) usage through the development of alternative P fertilizers. This study investigated how pyrolysis temperature (220, 350, 550 and 750 °C), rendering before pyrolysis, and wood or corn biomass additions affect P chemistry in bone char, plant availability, and its potential as P fertilizer. Linear combination fitting of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra demonstrated that higher pyrolysis temperatures decreased the fit with organic P references, but increased the fit with a hydroxyapatite (HA) reference, used as an indicator of high calcium phosphate (CaP) crystallinity. The fit to the HA reference increased from 0% to 69% in bone with meat residue and from 20% to 95% in rendered bone. Biomass additions to the bone with meat residue reduced the fit to the HA reference by 83% for wood and 95% for corn, and additions to rendered bone by 37% for wood. No detectable aromatic P forms were generated by pyrolysis. High CaP crystallinity was correlated with low water-extractable P, but high formic acid-extractable P indicative of high plant availability. Bone char supplied available P which was only 24% lower than Triple Superphosphate fertilizer and two- to five-fold higher than rock phosphate. Pyrolysis temperature and biomass additions can be used to design P fertilizer characteristics of bone char through changing CaP crystallinity that optimize P availability to plants. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Experimental Gasification of Biomass in an Updraft Gasifier with External Recirculation of Pyrolysis Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Surjosatyo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The updraft gasifier is a simple type of reactor for the gasification of biomass that is easy to operate and has high conversion efficiency, although it produces high levels of tar. This study attempts to observe the performance of a modified updraft gasifier. A modified updraft gasifier that recirculates the pyrolysis gases from drying zone back to the combustion zone and gas outlet at reduction zone was used. In this study, the level of pyrolysis gases that returned to the combustion zone was varied, and as well as measurements of gas composition, lower heating value and tar content. The results showed that an increase in the amount of pyrolysis gases that returned to the combustion zone resulted in a decrease in the amount of tar produced. An increase in the amount of recirculated gases tended to increase the concentrations of H2 and CH4 and reduce the concentration of CO with the primary (gasification air flow held constant. Increasing the primary air flow tended to increase the amount of CO and decrease the amount of H2. The maximum of lower heating value was 4.9 MJ/m3.

  17. Modeling of the pyrolysis of biomass under parabolic and exponential temperature increases using the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria-Verdugo, Antonio; Goos, Elke; Arrieta-Sanagustín, Jorge; García-Hernando, Nestor

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of biomass under parabolic and exponential temperature profiles is modeled. • The model is based on a simplified Distributed Activation Energy Model. • 4 biomasses are analyzed in TGA with parabolic and exponential temperature increases. • Deviations between the model prediction and TGA measurements are under 5 °C. - Abstract: A modification of the simplified Distributed Activation Energy Model is proposed to simulate the pyrolysis of biomass under parabolic and exponential temperature increases. The pyrolysis of pine wood, olive kernel, thistle flower and corncob was experimentally studied in a TGA Q500 thermogravimetric analyzer. The results of the measurements of nine different parabolic and exponential temperature increases for each sample were employed to validate the models proposed. The deviation between the experimental TGA measurements and the estimation of the reacted fraction during the pyrolysis of the four samples under parabolic and exponential temperature increases was lower than 5 °C for all the cases studied. The models derived in this work to describe the pyrolysis of biomass with parabolic and exponential temperature increases were found to be in good agreement with the experiments conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer.

  18. Experimental study on fragmental behavior of coals and biomasses during rapid pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tongmin; Xu, Jianliang; Fan, Wenke; Chang, Qinghua; Yu, Guangsuo; Wang, Fuchen

    2016-12-01

    In order to study the primary fragmentation behavior of coals and biomasses, experiments of rapid pyrolysis were carried out. This work focused on the devolatilization and fragmentation characteristics including the solid/gas yield, particle density/morphology, particle size and fragmental probability (S f ). The effects of temperature, time and solid property were investigated. The viscous flow model was employed to characterize the pressure difference (ΔP), which was considered as the driving force of diffusion and fragmentation. The Ohm principle was used to establish the linear relation of devolatilization rate and fragmentation rate. The result showed that temperature and time have positive contribution to the fragmentation. The occurrence of fragmentation was observed more apparently with the decreasing of the ash content in the biomass. The pressure difference has a positive correlation with the fragmental rate, which shows the validity of application Ohm principle in the prediction of fragmenting process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalytic Deoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapors to Improve Bio-oil Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayton, David C. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-12-22

    The President’s Advanced Energy Initiative called for a change in the way Americans fuel their vehicles to promote improved energy security. Increasing biofuels production from domestic lignocellulosic resources requires advanced technology development to achieve the aggressive targets set forth to reduce motor gasoline consumption by 20% in ten years (by 2017). The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of the Biomass Program (currently Bioenergy Technologies Office) is actively funding research and development in both biochemical and thermochemical conversion technologies to accelerate the deployment of biofuels technologies in the near future to meet the goals of the Advanced Energy Initiative. Thermochemical conversion technology options include both gasification and pyrolysis to enable the developing lignocellulosic biorefineries and maximize biomass resource utilization for production of biofuels.

  20. Integrated supply chain design for commodity chemicals production via woody biomass fast pyrolysis and upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Hu, Guiping; Brown, Robert C

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the optimal supply chain design for commodity chemicals (BTX, etc.) production via woody biomass fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing pathway. The locations and capacities of distributed preprocessing hubs and integrated biorefinery facilities are optimized with a mixed integer linear programming model. In this integrated supply chain system, decisions on the biomass chipping methods (roadside chipping vs. facility chipping) are also explored. The economic objective of the supply chain model is to maximize the profit for a 20-year chemicals production system. In addition to the economic objective, the model also incorporates an environmental objective of minimizing life cycle greenhouse gas emissions, analyzing the trade-off between the economic and environmental considerations. The capital cost, operating cost, and revenues for the biorefinery facilities are based on techno-economic analysis, and the proposed approach is illustrated through a case study of Minnesota, with Minneapolis-St. Paul serving as the chemicals distribution hub. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Approximations to the Non-Isothermal Distributed Activation Energy Model for Biomass Pyrolysis Using the Rayleigh Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaundiyal Alok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence of some parameters relevant to biomass pyrolysis on the numerical solutions of the nonisothermal nth order distributed activation energy model using the Rayleigh distribution. Investigated parameters are the integral upper limit, the frequency factor, the heating rate, the reaction order and the scale parameters of the Rayleigh distribution. The influence of these parameters has been considered for the determination of the kinetic parameters of the non-isothermal nth order Rayleigh distribution from the experimentally derived thermoanalytical data of biomass pyrolysis.

  2. Pyrolysis of Algal Biomass Obtained from High-Rate Algae Ponds Applied to Wastewater Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas e Silva, Fernanda; Monteggia, Luiz Olinto

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of the pyrolysis of algal biomass obtained from high-rate algae ponds treating sewage. The two high-rate algae ponds (HRAP) were built and operated at the São João Navegantes Wastewater Treatment Plant. The HRAP A was fed with raw sewage while the HRAP B was fed with effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The HRAP B provided higher productivity, presenting total solids concentration of 487.3 mg/l and chlorophyll a of 7735 mg/l. The algal productivity in the average depth was measured at 41.8 g·m −2 day −1 in pond A and at 47.1 g·m −2 day −1 in pond B. Algae obtained from the HRAP B were separated by the process of coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation. In the presence of alum, a separation efficiency in the range of 97% solid removal was obtained. After centrifugation the biomass was dried and comminuted. The biofuel production experiments were conducted via pyrolysis in a tubular quartz glass reactor which was inserted in a furnace for external heating. The tests were carried out in an inert nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 60 ml/min. The system was operated at 400, 500, and 600°C in order to determine the influence of temperature on the obtained fractional yields. The studies showed that the pyrolysis product yield was influenced by temperature, with a maximum liquid phase (bio-oil and water) production rate of 44% at 500°C, 45% for char and around 11% for gas.

  3. Pyrolysis of Algal Biomass Obtained from High-Rate Algae Ponds Applied to Wastewater Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas e Silva, Fernanda, E-mail: fervs@globo.com; Monteggia, Luiz Olinto [Institute of Hydraulic Research, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2015-06-30

    This work presents the results of the pyrolysis of algal biomass obtained from high-rate algae ponds treating sewage. The two high-rate algae ponds (HRAP) were built and operated at the São João Navegantes Wastewater Treatment Plant. The HRAP A was fed with raw sewage while the HRAP B was fed with effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The HRAP B provided higher productivity, presenting total solids concentration of 487.3 mg/l and chlorophyll a of 7735 mg/l. The algal productivity in the average depth was measured at 41.8 g·m{sup −2} day{sup −1} in pond A and at 47.1 g·m{sup −2} day{sup −1} in pond B. Algae obtained from the HRAP B were separated by the process of coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation. In the presence of alum, a separation efficiency in the range of 97% solid removal was obtained. After centrifugation the biomass was dried and comminuted. The biofuel production experiments were conducted via pyrolysis in a tubular quartz glass reactor which was inserted in a furnace for external heating. The tests were carried out in an inert nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 60 ml/min. The system was operated at 400, 500, and 600°C in order to determine the influence of temperature on the obtained fractional yields. The studies showed that the pyrolysis product yield was influenced by temperature, with a maximum liquid phase (bio-oil and water) production rate of 44% at 500°C, 45% for char and around 11% for gas.

  4. PYROLYSIS OF ALGAL BIOMASS OBTAINED FROM HIGH RATE ALGAE PONDS APPLIED TO WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda eVargas E Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of the pyrolysis of algal biomass obtained from high rate algae ponds treating sewage. The two high-rate algae ponds (HRAP were built and operated at the São João Navegantes Wastewater Treatment Plant. The HRAP A was fed with raw sewage while the HRAP B was fed with effluent from an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB reactor. The HRAP B provided higher productivity, presenting total solids concentration of 487.3mg/l and chlorophyll a of 7735mg/l. The algal productivity in the average depth was measured at 41,8 gm-2day-1 in pond A and at 47.1 gm-2day-1 in pond B. Algae obtained from the HRAP B were separated by the process of coagulation/flocculation and sedimentation. In the presence of alum, a separation efficiency in the range of 97% solids removal was obtained. After centrifugation the biomass was dried and comminuted. The biofuel production experiments were conducted via pyrolysis in a tubular quartz glass reactor which was inserted in a furnace for external heating. The tests were carried out in an inert nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 60ml/min. The system was operated at 400°C, 500°C and 600°C in order to determine the influence of temperature on the obtained fractional yields. The studies showed that the pyrolysis product yield was influenced by temperature, with a maximum liquid phase (bio-oil and water production rate of 44% at 500°C, 45% for char and around 11% for gas.

  5. Parametric study of thermal and thermodynamic properties on pyrolysis of biomass in thermally thick regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, B.V.; Chaurasia, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, a simultaneous chemical kinetics and heat transfer model is used to predict the effects of the most important thermal and thermodynamic properties (thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficient, emissivity and heat of reaction number) of the feedstock on the convective-radiant pyrolysis of biomass fuels. A finite difference pure implicit scheme utilizing the tri-diagonal matrix algorithm is employed for solving the heat transfer model equation. The Runge-Kutta fourth-order method is used for the chemical kinetics model equations. Simulations are performed considering cylindrical pellets of equivalent radius ranging from 0.003 to 0.011 m and temperatures ranging from 303 to 900 K. For conversion in the thermally thick regime (intra-particle heat transfer control), it is found that variations in the properties mainly affect the activity of the primary reactions. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to find the most dominant properties affecting the pyrolysis and found that the highest sensitivity is associated with the emissivity and thermal conductivity of the biomass. Applications of these findings in reactor design and operation are discussed. The results obtained using the improved models are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, much better than the agreement with the earlier models reported in the literature

  6. Renewable hydrocarbons for jet fuels from biomass and plastics via microwave-induced pyrolysis and hydrogenation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong

    This dissertation aims to enhance the production of aromatic hydrocarbons in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis, and maximize the production of renewable cycloalkanes for jet fuels in the hydrogenation process. In the process, ZSM-5 catalyst as the highly efficient catalyst was employed for catalyzing the pyrolytic volatiles from thermal decomposition of cellulose (a model compound of lignocellulosic biomass). A central composite experiment design (CCD) was used to optimize the product yields as a function of independent factors (e.g. catalytic temperature and catalyst to feed mass ratio). The low-density polyethylene (a mode compound of waste plastics) was then carried out in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis in the presence of ZSM-5 catalyst. Thereafter, the catalytic microwave-induced co-pyrolysis of cellulose with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was conducted over ZSM-5 catalyst. The results showed that the production of aromatic hydrocarbons was significantly enhanced and the coke formation was also considerably reduced comparing with the catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose or LDPE alone. Moreover, practical lignocellulosic biomass (Douglas fir sawdust pellets) was converted into aromatics-enriched bio-oil by catalytic microwave pyrolysis. The bio-oil was subsequently hydrogenated by using the Raney Ni catalyst. A liquid-liquid extraction step was implemented to recover the liquid organics and remove the water content. Over 20% carbon yield of liquid product regarding lignocellulosic biomass was obtained. Up to 90% selectivity in the liquid product belongs to jet fuel range cycloalkanes. As the integrated processes was developed, catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose with LDPE was conducted to improve aromatic production. After the liquid-liquid extraction by the optimal solvent (n-heptane), over 40% carbon yield of hydrogenated organics based on cellulose and LDPE were achieved in the hydrogenation process. As such, real

  7. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of spent organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.; Shirsat, A.N.; Bharadwaj, S.R.

    2005-08-01

    The spent IX resins from nuclear power reactors are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of nuclear reactors. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of these resins can lead to high volume reduction of these wastes. Low temperature pyrolysis of transition metal ion loaded IX resins in presence of nitrogen was carried out in order to optimize catalyst composition to achieve maximum weight reduction. Thermo gravimetric analysis of the pyrolysis residues was carried out in presence of air in order to compare the oxidative characteristics of transition metal oxide catalysts. Copper along with iron, chromium and nickel present in the spent IX resins gave the most efficient catalyst combination for catalytic and oxidative pyrolysis of the residues. During low temperature catalytic pyrolysis, 137 Cesium volatility was estimated to be around 0.01% from cationic resins and around 0.1% from anionic resins. During oxidative pyrolysis at 700 degC, nearly 10 to 40% of 137 Cesium was found to be released to off gases depending upon type of resin and catalyst loaded on to it. The oxidation of pyrolytic residues at 700 degC gave weight reduction of 15% for cationic resins and 93% for anionic resins. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis is attractive for reducing weight and volume of spent cationic resins from PHWRs and VVERs. (author)

  8. Novel energy crops for Mediterranean contaminated lands: Valorization of Dittrichia viscosa and Silybum marianum biomass by pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, María T; Madejón, Paula; Madejón, Engracia; Diaz, Manuel J

    2017-11-01

    Establishing energy crops could be a cost-efficient alternative towards the valorization of the plant biomass produced in contaminated lands, where they would not compete with food production for land use. Dittrichia viscosa and Silybum marianum are two native Mediterranean species recently identified as potential energy crops for degraded lands. Here, we present the first characterization of the decomposition of the biomass of these species during thermo-chemical conversion (pyrolysis). Using a greenhouse study we evaluated whether the quality of D. viscosa and S. marianum biomass for energy production through pyrolysis could be substantially influenced by the presence of high concentrations of soluble trace element concentrations in the growing substrate. For each species, biomass produced in two different soil types (with contrasted trace element concentrations and pH) had similar elemental composition. Behavior during thermal decomposition, activation energies and concentrations of pyrolysis gases were also similar between both types of soils. Average activation energy values were 295 and 300 kJ mol -1 (for a conversion value of α = 0.5) for S. marianum and D. viscosa, respectively. Results suggest that there were no major effects of soil growing conditions on the properties of the biomass as raw material for pyrolysis, and confirm the interest of these species as energy crops for Mediterranean contaminated lands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor Model Compounds over Molybdenum Sulfide Catalysts: Influence of Support, H2S and Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Pintos, Delfina Garcia

    Conventional fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of bio-oil through well-established technologies [1]. Theproduced bio-oil must be further processed in order to decrease the content of oxygen (from 15-30 wt% down to properties such as heating...... to provide a proof-of-concept for the continuous conversion of solid biomass to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil....

  11. Product Chemistry and Process Efficiency of Biomass Torrefaction, Pyrolysis and Gasification Studied by High-Throughput Techniques and Multivariate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li

    Despite the great passion and endless efforts on development of renewable energy from biomass, the commercialization and scale up of biofuel production is still under pressure and facing challenges. New ideas and facilities are being tested around the world targeting at reducing cost and improving product value. Cutting edge technologies involving analytical chemistry, statistics analysis, industrial engineering, computer simulation, and mathematics modeling, etc. keep integrating modern elements into this classic research. One of those challenges of commercializing biofuel production is the complexity from chemical composition of biomass feedstock and the products. Because of this, feedstock selection and process optimization cannot be conducted efficiently. This dissertation attempts to further evaluate biomass thermal decomposition process using both traditional methods and advanced technique (Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry). Focus has been made on data base generation of thermal decomposition products from biomass at different temperatures, finding out the relationship between traditional methods and advanced techniques, evaluating process efficiency and optimizing reaction conditions, comparison of typically utilized biomass feedstock and new search on innovative species for economical viable feedstock preparation concepts, etc. Lab scale quartz tube reactors and 80il stainless steel sample cups coupled with auto-sampling system were utilized to simulate the complicated reactions happened in real fluidized or entrained flow reactors. Two main high throughput analytical techniques used are Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIR) and Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (Py-MBMS). Mass balance, carbon balance, and product distribution are presented in detail. Variations of thermal decomposition temperature range from 200°C to 950°C. Feedstocks used in the study involve typical hardwood and softwood (red oak, white oak, yellow poplar, loblolly pine

  12. Pyrolysis/gasification of biomass for synthetic fuel production using a hybrid gas- water stabilized plasma torch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Van Oost, G.; Hrabovský, Milan; Kopecký, Vladimír; Konrád, Miloš; Hlína, Michal; Kavka, Tetyana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2008), s. 209-212 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermal plasma * pyrolysis * biomass gasification Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.114, year: 2008

  13. Pyrolysis/gasification of biomass for synthetic fuel production using a hybrid gas- water stabilized plasma torch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Van Oost, G.; Hrabovský, Milan; Kopecký, Vladimír; Konrád, Miloš; Hlína, Michal; Kavka, Tetyana; Beeckman, E.; Verstraeten, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2007), s. 9-12. ISBN 978-4-9900642-5-9 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0669 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermal plasma * pyrolysis * biomass gasification Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  14. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  15. Fast Pyrolysis of Tropical Biomass Species and Influence of Water Pretreatment on Product Distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor James Morgan

    Full Text Available The fast pyrolysis behaviour of pretreated banagrass was examined at four temperatures (between 400 and 600 C and four residence times (between ~1.2 and 12 s. The pretreatment used water washing/leaching to reduce the inorganic content of the banagrass. Yields of bio-oil, permanent gases and char were determined at each reaction condition and compared to previously published results from untreated banagrass. Comparing the bio-oil yields from the untreated and pretreated banagrass shows that the yields were greater from the pretreated banagrass by 4 to 11 wt% (absolute at all reaction conditions. The effect of pretreatment (i.e. reducing the amount of ash, and alkali and alkali earth metals on pyrolysis products is: 1 to increase the dry bio-oil yield, 2 to decrease the amount of undetected material, 3 to produce a slight increase in CO yield or no change, 4 to slightly decrease CO2 yield or no change, and 5 to produce a more stable bio-oil (less aging. Char yield and total gas yield were unaffected by feedstock pretreatment. Four other tropical biomass species were also pyrolyzed under one condition (450°C and 1.4 s residence time for comparison to the banagrass results. The samples include two hardwoods: leucaena and eucalyptus, and two grasses: sugarcane bagasse and energy-cane. A sample of pretreated energy-cane was also pyrolyzed. Of the materials tested, the best feedstocks for fast pyrolysis were sugarcane bagasse, pretreated energy cane and eucalyptus based on the yields of 'dry bio-oil', CO and CO2. On the same basis, the least productive feedstocks are untreated banagrass followed by pretreated banagrass and leucaena.

  16. Fast Pyrolysis of Tropical Biomass Species and Influence of Water Pretreatment on Product Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q.; Sun, Ning; George, Anthe

    2016-01-01

    The fast pyrolysis behaviour of pretreated banagrass was examined at four temperatures (between 400 and 600 C) and four residence times (between ~1.2 and 12 s). The pretreatment used water washing/leaching to reduce the inorganic content of the banagrass. Yields of bio-oil, permanent gases and char were determined at each reaction condition and compared to previously published results from untreated banagrass. Comparing the bio-oil yields from the untreated and pretreated banagrass shows that the yields were greater from the pretreated banagrass by 4 to 11 wt% (absolute) at all reaction conditions. The effect of pretreatment (i.e. reducing the amount of ash, and alkali and alkali earth metals) on pyrolysis products is: 1) to increase the dry bio-oil yield, 2) to decrease the amount of undetected material, 3) to produce a slight increase in CO yield or no change, 4) to slightly decrease CO2 yield or no change, and 5) to produce a more stable bio-oil (less aging). Char yield and total gas yield were unaffected by feedstock pretreatment. Four other tropical biomass species were also pyrolyzed under one condition (450°C and 1.4 s residence time) for comparison to the banagrass results. The samples include two hardwoods: leucaena and eucalyptus, and two grasses: sugarcane bagasse and energy-cane. A sample of pretreated energy-cane was also pyrolyzed. Of the materials tested, the best feedstocks for fast pyrolysis were sugarcane bagasse, pretreated energy cane and eucalyptus based on the yields of 'dry bio-oil', CO and CO2. On the same basis, the least productive feedstocks are untreated banagrass followed by pretreated banagrass and leucaena. PMID:26978265

  17. The influence of partial oxidation mechanisms on tar destruction in TwoStage biomass gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Egsgaard, Helge; Stelte, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    and conversion. The study identifies the following major impact factors regarding tar content in the producer gas: oxidation temperature, excess air ratio and biomass moisture content. In a experimental setup, wood pellets were pyrolyzed and the resulting pyrolysis gas was transferred in a heated partial...... tar destruction and a high moisture content of the biomass enhances the decomposition of phenol and inhibits the formation of naphthalene. This enhances tar conversion and gasification in the char-bed, and thus contributes in-directly to the tar destruction....

  18. Flash pyrolysis of heavy metal contaminated hardwoods from phytoremediation: Characterisation of biomass, pyrolysis oil and char/ash fraction

    OpenAIRE

    STALS, Mark; CARLEER, Robert; REGGERS, Guy; Schreurs, Sonja; YPERMAN, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Flash pyrolysis of heavy metal contaminated hardwoods originating from phytoremediation is studied. Different kinds of hardwoods, i.e. Salix fragilis (crack willow), Salix jorunn ("Jorunn" willow) and Populus grimminge (Grimminge poplar) are compared in a preliminary phase. Salix fragilis scores the best on both remediation capabilities and pyrolysis characteristics. Therefore, this cultivar is chosen for in-depth research. S. fragilis stems, leaves and stems mixed with leaves are pyrolysed. ...

  19. Ultra-fast biomass pyrolysis in a High-Temperature (22000C), Fluid-Wall Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corella, J.; Monzon, A.; Santamaria, J.; Gonzalez-Canibano, J.

    1988-01-01

    The pyrolysis of pine sawdust has been carried out in a High-Temperature Fluid-Wall Reactor. This unit has been specially designed to withstand working temperatures of up to 2200 0 C. The biomass is fed to the top of the reactor after sieving to the appropriate size, at a rate of 1.0 to 1.8 kgmin. The feed falls and, at the same time is very quickly heated by radiation to the reaction temperature. The estimated heating rate is on the order of 10 60 Cs for reactant surfaces. The fluid-wall, produced by a nitrogen flow through the 30 cm diameter porous reactor core, prevents both reactants and products from reaching the reactor wall. The product distribution at the reactor exit has been determined for different operating conditions. The influence of reactor temperature, biomass feed rate, and biomass particle size on the product distribution and on the heating value of the exit gas has been investigated

  20. Biomass Pyrolysis Solids as Reducing Agents: Comparison with Commercial Reducing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrados, Aitziber; De Marco, Isabel; López-Urionabarrenechea, Alexander; Solar, Jon; Caballero, Blanca M.; Gastelu, Naia

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most suitable options to be used as renewable energy source due to its extensive availability and its contribution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass under appropriate conditions (slow heating rate and high temperatures) can produce a quality solid product, which could be applicable to several metallurgical processes as reducing agent (biocoke or bioreducer). Two woody biomass samples (olives and eucalyptus) were pyrolyzed to produce biocoke. These biocokes were characterized by means of proximate and ultimate analysis, real density, specific surface area, and porosity and were compared with three commercial reducing agents. Finally, reactivity tests were performed both with the biocokes and with the commercial reducing agents. Bioreducers have lower ash and sulfur contents than commercial reducers, higher surface area and porosity, and consequently, much higher reactivity. Bioreducers are not appropriate to be used as top burden in blast furnaces, but they can be used as fuel and reducing agent either tuyére injected at the lower part of the blast furnace or in non-ferrous metallurgical processes where no mechanical strength is needed as, for example, in rotary kilns. PMID:28787805

  1. Pyrolysis based bio-refinery for the production of bioethanol from demineralized ligno-cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Luis; Westerhof, Roel; Van Rossum, Guus; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Kersten, Sascha; Berruti, Franco; Rehmann, Lars

    2014-06-01

    This paper evaluates a novel biorefinery approach for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass from pinewood. A combination of thermochemical and biochemical conversion was chosen with the main product being ethanol. Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomasss with fractional condensation of the products was used as the thermochemical process to obtain a pyrolysis-oil rich in anhydro-sugars (levoglucosan) and low in inhibitors. After hydrolysis of these anhydro-sugars, glucose was obtained which was successfully fermented, after detoxification, to obtain bioethanol. Ethanol yields comparable to traditional biochemical processing were achieved (41.3% of theoretical yield based on cellulose fraction). Additional benefits of the proposed biorefinery concept comprise valuable by-products of the thermochemical conversion like bio-char, mono-phenols (production of BTX) and pyrolytic lignin as a source of aromatic rich fuel additive. The inhibitory effect of thermochemically derived fermentation substrates was quantified numerically to compare the effects of different process configurations and upgrading steps within the biorefinery approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Norms, Standards, and Legislation for Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oasmaa, Anja; van de Beld, Bert; Saari, Pia; Elliott, Douglas C.; Solantausta, Yrjo

    2015-04-16

    Fast pyrolysis of woody biomass is close to full maturity, with first-of-its-kind commercial size installations for fuel production being commissioned in Finland (Fortum) and in The Netherlands (Empyro), and in the design phase in Brazil (Ensyn). In the industrial-scale combustion tests, the use of fast pyrolysis bio-oil (FPBO) has been demonstrated to be a viable option to replace heavy fuel oil in district heating applications. Commercially usable district heating boilers and burners suitable for FPBO are available. There is research on diesel-engine and gas-turbine applications but, so far, no proven demonstrations. FPBO is completely different from mineral oils; hence, standards are needed. Analytical methods have been systematically validated and modifications to the standards as well as completely new methods have been made. Two ASTM burner fuel standards already exist and European boiler fuel grades are being developed under CEN. The focus on CEN standardization is on boiler use, because of its commercial readiness.

  3. Ex situ thermo-catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors using a traveling wave microwave reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muley, P.D.; Henkel, C.E.; Aguilar, G.; Klasson, K.T.; Boldor, D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ex-situ microwave reactor was used to heat catalyst bed for pyrolysis upgrading. • Results were compared with conventional catalytic reactor. • Microwave heating yielded higher aromatic compounds. • Catalyst deactivation due to coking was lower in microwave reactor. • 30% decrease in energy input for microwave reactor. - Abstract: Microwave heating offers a number of advantages over conventional heating methods, such as, rapid and volumetric heating, precise temperature control, energy efficiency and lower temperature gradient. In this article we demonstrate the use of 2450 MHz microwave traveling wave reactor to heat the catalyst bed for thermo-catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors. HZSM-5 catalyst was tested at three different temperatures (290°, 330° and 370 °C) at a catalyst to biomass ratio of 2. Results were compared with conventional heating and induction heating method of catalyst bed. The yields of aromatic compounds and coke deposition were dependent on temperature and method of heating. Microwave heating yielded higher aromatic compounds and lower coke deposition. Microwave heating was also energy efficient compared to conventional reactors. The rate of catalyst deterioration was lower for catalyst heated in microwave system.

  4. Properties of bio-oils produced by biomass fast pyrolysis in a cyclone reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Lede; Francois Broust; Fatou-Toutie Ndiaye; Monique Ferrer [CNRS-ENSIC-INPL, Nancy (France). Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique

    2007-08-15

    The present paper reports the experimental results of the fast pyrolysis of biomass performed in a cyclone reactor heated at its walls. The conditions of pyroliquefaction are chosen (walls temperature between 900 and 983 K) in order to enhance bio-oils production. Their yields reach 74% while those of char and gases are respectively 10% and 16%. The bio-oils are condensed and trapped at different temperatures. Three main fractions are recovered: heavy oils, light oils and aerosols. Their physicochemical properties (water and particles content, viscosity, density, pH, fraction of pyrolytic lignin and elementary molar composition) as well as stability during storage are measured and compared with literature. The results show very different behaviours according to the types of oils fractions. 32 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Kinetic Study of Coal and Biomass Co-Pyrolysis Using Thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Hedges, Sheila W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Chaudharib, Kiran [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering; Turtonb, Richard [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2013-10-29

    The objectives of this study are to investigate thermal behavior of coal and biomass blends in inert gas environment at low heating rates and to develop a simplified kinetic model using model fitting techniques based on TGA experimental data. Differences in thermal behavior and reactivity in co-pyrolysis of Powder River Basin (PRB) sub-bituminous coal and pelletized southern yellow pine wood sawdust blends at low heating rates are observed. Coal/wood blends have higher reactivity compared to coal alone in the lower temperature due to the high volatile matter content of wood. As heating rates increase, weight loss rates increase. The experiment data obtained from TGA has a better fit with proposed two step first order reactions model compared single first order reaction model.

  6. Intermediate pyrolysis of agro-industrial biomasses in bench-scale pyrolyser: Product yields and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinwala, Farha; Mohanty, Pravakar; Parmar, Snehal; Patel, Anant; Pant, Kamal K

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of woody biomass, agro-residues and seed was carried out at 500 ± 10 °C in a fixed bed pyrolyser. Bio-oil yield was found varying from 20.5% to 47.5%, whereas the biochar and pyrolysis gas ranged from 27.5% to 40% and 24.5% to 40.5%, respectively. Pyrolysis gas was measured for flame temperature along with CO, CO2, H2, CH4 and other gases composition. HHV of biochar (29.4 MJ/kg) and pyrolitic gas (8.6 MJ/kg) of woody biomass was higher analogous to sub-bituminous coal and steam gasification based producer gas respectively, whereas HHV of bio-oil obtained from seed (25.6 MJ/kg) was significantly more than husks, shells and straws. TGA-DTG studies showed the husks as potential source for the pyrolysis. Bio-oils as a major by-product of intermediate pyrolysis have several applications like substitute of furnace oil, extraction of fine chemicals, whereas biochar as a soil amendment for enhancing soil fertility and gases for thermal application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Change of physical and chemical properties of the solid phase during biomass pyrolysis; Aenderung der physikalisch-chemischen Eigenschaften des Feststoffs waehrend der Biomassepyrolyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, Wolfgang [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermische Energietechnik; Rincon, Sonia; Gomez, Alexander [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica

    2009-01-15

    The effects of the final pyrolysis temperature on the development of the chemical composition and on the porosity of biomass undergoing pyrolysis are investigated through experiments in a thermobalance at laboratory scale of grams. Changes in the grain size of individual particles of biomass during pyrolysis are also investigated as a function of temperature in a microscope equipped with heating and camera. Oil palm shells are selected as raw materials due to their availability as biomass residue and their physical and chemical characteristics. These experiments are important for reactor design purposes in the field of thermochemical conversion, offering important information for the mathematical modelling of the processes. (orig.)

  8. Selective Oxidation of Biomass-Derived Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modvig, Amalie Elise

    . The objective of this dissertation was to develop new, alternative and sustainable methods for oxidative catalytic upgrading of biomass-derived compounds, with focus on oxidation of glycolaldehyde and simple alcohols as model substrates for larger sugars. Supported gold nanoparticle were studied...... for the selective oxidation of glycolaldehyde to glycolic acid, which has found applications in various industries. Limitations by competing reactions and catalyst deactivation was observed, affording up to 68% of glycolic acid at mild and aqueous conditions. The green oxidant, molecular oxygen, was applied...... for these oxidations and the reaction took place under base-free conditions. Oxidation of glycolaldehyde was further studied in the formation of formic acid. Efficient release of hydrogen from formic acid has proven formic acid a viable precursor for hydrogen, facilitating safe transportation and storage. Hydrogen has...

  9. Mixed-waste pyrolysis of biomass and plastics waste – A modelling approach to reduce energy usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyedun, Adetoyese Olajire; Gebreegziabher, Tesfaldet; Ng, Denny K.S.; Hui, Chi Wai

    2014-01-01

    Thermal co-processing of waste mixtures had gained a lot of attention in the last decade. This is largely due to certain synergistic effects such as higher quantity and better quality of oil, limited supply of certain feedstock and improving the overall pyrolysis process. Many experiments have been conducted via TGA analysis and different reactors to achieve the stated synergistic effects in co-pyrolysis of biomass and plastic wastes. The thermal behaviour of plastics during pyrolysis is different from that of biomass because its decomposition happens at a high temperature range with sudden release of volatile compared to biomass which have a wide range of thermal decomposition. A properly designed recipe and operational strategy of mixing feedstock can ease the operational difficulties and at the same time decrease energy consumption and/or improve the product yield. Therefore it is worthwhile to study the possible synergistic effects on the overall energy used during co-pyrolysis process. In this work, two different modelling approaches were used to study the energy related synergistic effect between polystyrene (PS) and bamboo waste. The mass loss and volatile generation profiles show that significant interactions between the two feedstocks exist. The results also show that both modelling approaches give an appreciable synergy effect of reduction in overall energy when PS and bamboo are co-pyrolysed together. However, the second approach which allows interaction between the two feedstocks gives a more reduction in overall energy usage up to 6.2% depending on the ratio of PS in the mixed blend. - Highlights: • Proposed the mixed-waste pyrolysis modelling via two modelling approaches. • Study the energy related synergistic effects when plastics and biomass are pyrolysed together. • Mass loss and volatile generation profiles show the existence of significant interactions. • Energy usage can be reduced by up to 6.2% depending on the percentage of the plastic

  10. Properties of Spray Pyrolysied Copper Oxide Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper oxide (CuO thin films were deposited on well cleaned glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique (SPT from cupric acetate (Cu(CH3COO2.H2O precursor solutions of 0.05 – 0.15 M molar concentrations (MC at a substrate temperature of 350 °C and at an air pressure of 1 bar. Effect of varying MC on the surface morphology, structural optical and electrical properties of CuO thin films were investigated. XRD patterns of the prepared films revealed the formation of CuO thin films having monoclinic structure with the main CuO (111 orientation and crystalline size ranging from 8.02 to 9.05 nm was observed. The optical transmission of the film was found to decrease with the increase of MC. The optical band gap of the thin films for 0.10 M was fond to be 1.60 eV. The room temperature electrical resistivity varies from 31 and 24 ohm.cm for the films grown with MC of 0.05 and 0.10 M respectively. The change in resistivity of the films was studied with respect to the change in temperature was shown that semiconductor nature is present. This information is expected to underlie the successful development of CuO films for solar windows and other semi-conductor applications including gas sensors.

  11. Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M. M.; Satrio, J. A.; Brown, R. C.; Daugaard, D. E.; Hsu, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    This study develops techno-economic models for assessment of the conversion of biomass to valuable fuel products via fast pyrolysis and bio-oil upgrading. The upgrading process produces a mixture of naphtha-range (gasoline blend stock) and diesel-range (diesel blend stock) products. This study analyzes the economics of two scenarios: onsite hydrogen production by reforming bio-oil, and hydrogen purchase from an outside source. The study results for an nth plant indicate that petroleum fractions in the naphtha distillation range and in the diesel distillation range are produced from corn stover at a product value of $3.09/gal ($0.82/liter) with onsite hydrogen production or $2.11/gal ($0.56/liter) with hydrogen purchase. These values correspond to a $0.83/gal ($0.21/liter) cost to produce the bio-oil. Based on these nth plant numbers, product value for a pioneer hydrogen-producing plant is about $6.55/gal ($1.73/liter) and for a pioneer hydrogen-purchasing plant is about $3.41/gal ($0.92/liter). Sensitivity analysis identifies fuel yield as a key variable for the hydrogen-production scenario. Biomass cost is important for both scenarios. Changing feedstock cost from $50-$100 per short ton changes the price of fuel in the hydrogen production scenario from $2.57-$3.62/gal ($0.68-$0.96/liter).

  12. A review of catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass for value-added fuel and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Hervan Marion; Bu, Quan; Liang, Jianghui; Liu, Yujing; Mao, Hanping; Shi, Aiping; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant renewable resource and can be efficiently converted into bio-energy by a bio-refinery. From the various techniques available for biomass thermo-chemical conversion; microwave assisted pyrolysis (MAP) seems to be the very promising. The principles of microwave technology were reviewed and the parameters for the efficient production of bio-oil using microwave technology were summarized. Microwave technology by itself cannot efficiently produce high quality bio-oil products, catalysts are used to improve the reaction conditions and selectivity for valued products during MAP. The catalysts used to optimize MAP are revised in the development of this article. The origins for bio-oils that are phenol rich or hydrocarbon rich are reviewed and their experimental results were summarized. The kinetics of MAP is discussed briefly in the development of the article. Future prospects and scientific development of MAP are also considered in the development of this article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical and structural characterization of char development during lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafu, Lihle D; Neomagus, Hein W J P; Everson, Raymond C; Strydom, Christien A; Carrier, Marion; Okolo, Gregory N; Bunt, John R

    2017-11-01

    The chemical and structural changes of three lignocellulosic biomass samples during pyrolysis were investigated using both conventional and advanced characterization techniques. The use of ATR-FTIR as a characterization tool is extended by the proposal of a method to determine aromaticity, the calculation of both CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and the degree of aromatic ring condensation ((R/C) u ). With increasing temperature, the H/C and O/C ratios, X A and CH 2 /CH 3 ratio decreased, while (R/C) u and aromaticity increased. The micropore network developed with increasing temperature, until the coalescence of pores at 1100°C, which can be linked to increasing carbon densification, extent of aromatization and/or graphitization of the biomass chars. WAXRD-CFA measurements indicated the gradual formation of nearly parallel basic structural units with increasing carbonization temperature. The char development can be considered to occur in two steps: elimination of aliphatic compounds at low temperatures, and hydrogen abstraction and aromatic ring condensation at high temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis and comparison of biomass pyrolysis/gasification condensates: an interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report provides results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from eleven biomass gasification and pyrolysis systems. The analyses were performed in order to provide more detailed data concerning these condensates for the different process research groups and to allow a determination of the differences in properties of the condensates as a function of reactor environment. The samples were representative of the various reactor configurations being researched within the Department of Energy, Biomass Thermochemical Conversion program. The condensates included tar phases, aqueous phases and, in some cases, both phases depending on the output of the particular reactor system. The analyses included gross compositional analysis (elemental analysis, ash, moisture), physical characterization (pour point, viscosity, density, heat of combustion, distillation), specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and biological activity (Ames assay). The analytical data demonstrate the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recovered in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic components in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Influence of Promotor, H2O and H2S on the Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor over MoS2 Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine M. H.; Høj, Martin; Gaur, Abhijeet

    Catalytic hydropyrolysis combines fast pyrolysis with catalytic upgrading by hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) in a single step for the production of fuel oil from biomass in which reactive pyrolysis vapors are upgraded before condensation. Catalyst activity and lifetime is challenged by carbon deposition...

  16. Synergetic effect of sewage sludge and biomass co-pyrolysis: A combined study in thermogravimetric analyzer and a fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuebin; Deng, Shuanghui; Tan, Houzhang; Adeosun, Adewale; Vujanović, Milan; Yang, Fuxin; Duić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The synergetic effect of sewage sludge and wheat straw co-pyrolysis was studied. • The mass balance measurement of gas, tar, and char was performed. • The synergetic effect shows strongest under a certain biomass addition ratio around 60%. • The required heat of co-pyrolysis is significantly reduced. - Abstract: Much attention has been given to the valuable products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge. In this study, the pyrolysis of sewage sludge, biomass (wheat straw) and their mixtures in different proportions were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and percentage of wheat straw in wheat straw–sewage sludge mixtures on product distributions in terms of gas, liquid and char and the gas composition were investigated. Results indicate that there is a significantly synergetic effect during the co-pyrolysis processes of sewage sludge and wheat straw, accelerating the pyrolysis reactions. The synergetic effect resulted in an increase in gas and liquid yields but a decrease in char yield. The gas composition and the synergetic effect degree are strongly affected by the wheat straw proportions, and the strongest synergetic effect of sewage sludge and wheat straw co-pyrolysis appears at the biomass proportion of 60 wt.%. With an increase of temperature, the gas yield from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge increased but the liquid and char yields decreased. Moreover, the required heat of co-pyrolysis is significantly reduced compared with the pyrolysis of sewage sludge and wheat straw pyrolysis alone, because of the exothermic reactions between the ash components in two fuel samples.

  17. Synergistic effect on thermal behavior during co-pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass model components blend with bituminous coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shuzhong; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Lin; Meng, Haiyu

    2014-10-01

    Co-thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass and coal has been investigated as an effective way to reduce the carbon footprint. Successful evaluating on thermal behavior of the co-pyrolysis is prerequisite for predicting performance and optimizing efficiency of this process. In this paper, pyrolysis and kinetics characteristics of three kinds of lignocellulosic biomass model components (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) blended with a kind of Chinese bituminous coal were explored by thermogravimetric analyzer and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method. The results indicated that the addition of model compounds had different synergistic effects on thermal behavior of the bituminous coal. The cellulose showed positive synergistic effects on the thermal decomposition of the coal bituminous coal with lower char yield than calculated value. For hemicellulose and lignin, whether positive or negative synergistic was related to the mixed ratio and temperature range. The distribution of the average activation energy values for the mixtures showed nonadditivity performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Rashid

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

  19. Pyrolysis of chitin biomass: TG-MS analysis and solid char residue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yan; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Ying; Sun, Haizhen; Jia, Shiyu; Shi, Junyan; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Wang, Yingxiong; Hou, Xianglin

    2015-11-20

    The thermal degradation of chitin biomass with various molecular structures was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG), and the gaseous products were analyzed by connected mass spectroscopy (MS). The chemical structure and morphology of char residues collected at 750°C using the model substrates GlcNH2 and GlcNAc, were characterized systematically. The experimental results disclosed that one main mass loss stage was observed for each substrate. Chitosan samples with high molecular weight shown the more thermal stability, and chitin showed the highest thermal stability. Additionally, it was found that catalysts play a significant role during the pyrolysis. The gaseous evolution components, including NH3, H2O, CO, and CO2 were observed by on line MS. The experimental results disclosed that the obtained carbonaceous materials had lost the original hydrocarbon structure totally, and transformed into an aromatic structure with high carbon and nitrogen content, which was identified by XPS and solid state NMR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-oxidative and oxidative torrefaction characterization and SEM observations of fibrous and ligneous biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lu, Ke-Miao; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Lin, Ta-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-oxidative and oxidative torrefaction of biomass is studied. • Two fibrous biomasses and two ligneous biomasses are tested. • SEM observations of four biomasses are provided. • Fibrous biomass is more sensitive to O 2 concentration than ligneous biomass. • The performance of non-oxidative torrefaction is better than that of oxidative torrefaction. - Abstract: Oxidative torrefaction is a method to reduce the operating cost of upgrading biomass. To understand the potential of oxidative torrefaction and its impact on the internal structure of biomass, non-oxidative and oxidative torrefaction of two fibrous biomass materials (oil palm fiber and coconut fiber) and two ligneous ones (eucalyptus and Cryptomeria japonica) at 300 °C for 1 h are studied and compared with each other. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations are also performed to explore the impact of torrefaction atmosphere on the lignocellulosic structure of biomass. The results indicate that the fibrous biomass is more sensitive to O 2 concentration than the ligneous biomass. In oxidative torrefaction, an increase in O 2 concentration decreases the solid yield. The energy yield is linearly proportional to the solid yield, which is opposite to the behavior of non-oxidative torrefaction. The performance of non-oxidative torrefaction is better than that of oxidative torrefaction. As a whole, ligneous biomass can be torrefied in oxidative environments at lower O 2 concentrations, whereas fibrous biomass is more suitable for non-oxidative torrefaction

  1. Comparative study on the pyrolysis behaviour and kinetics of two macroalgae biomass (Gracilaria changii and Gelidium pusillum) by thermogravimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslee, A. N.; Munajat, N. F.

    2017-10-01

    Macroalgae are often referred as seaweed and could be significant biomass resource for the production of numerous energy carriers including biofuels. In this study, the chemical composition of Gracilaria changii (G. changii) and Gelidium pusillum (G. pusillum) were determined through proximate and ultimate analysis and the thermal degradation behaviour of G. changii and G. pusillum were investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in determining the important main composition to be considered as biomass fuels. It has found the pyrolysis of G. changii and G. pusillum consists of three stages and stage II is the main decomposition stage with major mass loss of around 52.16% and 44.42%, respectively. The TGA data were then used for determination of kinetic parameters of the pyrolysis process using three model-free methods: Kissinger, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO). The apparent activation energy calculated by using Kissinger method for G. changii was lower than G. Pusillum, i.e.173.12 kJ/mol and 193.22 kJ/mol, respectively. The activation energies calculated from KAS and FWO methods were increased with increasing the pyrolysis conversion with average activation energies of 172.32 kJ/mol and 181.19 kJ/mol for G. changii while for G. pusillum (177.42 kJ/mol and 187.4 kJ/mol). G. pusillum has lower and wider distribution of activation energy and revealed that the pyrolysis process for G. changii was easier than G. pusillum. These data provide information for further application for designing and modelling in thermochemical conversion system of macroalgae biomass.

  2. Synthesis of tungsten oxide nano structures by laser pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mwakikunga, BW

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the proposal to synthesise materials by laser assisted pyrolysis in the 1970s, and its practical realisation in 1982, a number of researchers have used this method in obtaining nano-powders from liquid droplets. This study revisits...

  3. Determination of silicon in biomass and products of pyrolysis process via high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadi, Flávio V; Prodanov, Caroline; Boschetti, Wiliam; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2018-03-01

    Thermochemical processes can convert the biomass into fuels, such as bio-oil. The biomass submitted to pyrolysis process, such as fibers, are generally rich in silicon, an element that can lead to damages in an engine when there is high concentration in a fuel. High-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) is an interesting alternative for Si determination in the products and byproducts of the pyrolysis process because, besides the flame (F) and graphite furnace (GF) atomizers, it has enhanced the application of direct analysis of solid samples (SS) within GF. This study aimed the development of methods to determine Si in biomass samples, their products and byproducts using HR-CS AAS. A high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer contrAA 700 equipped with F and GF atomizers was used throughout the study. HR-CS F AAS (λ = 251.611nm, 1 detection pixel, N 2 O/C 2 H 2 flame) was used to evaluate Si content in biomass and ash, after a microwave-assisted acid digestion with HNO 3 and HF. HR-CS GF AAS (T pyr = 1400°C, T atom = 2650°C) has evaluated Si in pyrolysis water and bio-oil at 251.611nm, and in peach pit biomass and ash at 221.174nm using SS, both wavelengths with 1 detection pixel. Rhodium (300μg) was applied as permanent modifier and 10μgPd + 6μg Mg were pipetted onto the standards/samples at each analysis. Three different biomass samples were studied: palm tree fiber, coconut fiber and peach pit, and three certified reference materials (CRM) were used to verify the accuracy of the methods. The figures of merit were LOD 0.09-20mgkg -1 , and LOQ 0.3-20mgkg -1 , considering all the methods. There were no significant differences between the CRM certified values and the determined ones, using a Student t-test with a confidence interval of 95% (n = 5). Si concentration ranged from 0.11-0.92% mm -1 , 1.1-1.7mgkg -1 , 3.3-13mgkg -1 , and 0.41-1.4%mm -1 , in biomass, bio-oil, pyrolysis water and ash, respectively

  4. Integration of biomass fast pyrolysis and precedent feedstock steam drying with a municipal combined heat and power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohl, Thomas; Laukkanen, Timo P.; Järvinen, Mika P.

    2014-01-01

    Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) is a promising pre-treatment technology for converting biomass to transport fuel and in the future also for high-grade chemicals. BFP can be integrated with a municipal combined heat and power (CHP) plant. This paper shows the influence of BFP integration on a CHP plant's main parameters and its effect on the energetic and environmental performance of the connected district heating network. The work comprises full- and part-load operation of a CHP plant integrated with BFP and steam drying. It also evaluates different usage alternatives for the BFP products (char and oil). The results show that the integration is possible and strongly beneficial regarding energetic and environmental performance. Offering the possibility to provide lower district heating loads, the operation hours of the plant can be increased by up to 57%. The BFP products should be sold rather than applied for internal use as this increases the district heating network's primary energy efficiency the most. With this integration strategy future CHP plants can provide valuable products at high efficiency and also can help to mitigate global CO 2 emissions. - Highlights: • Part load simulation of a cogeneration plant integrated with biomas fast pyrolysis. • Analysis of energetic and environmental performance. • Assessment of different uses of the pyrolysis products

  5. Effects of several types of biomass fuels on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot from fast pyrolysis at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of biomass origin on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Soot was produced from wood and herbaceous biomass pyrolysis at high heating rates and at temperatures of 1250 and 1400 °C in a drop tube furnace. The structure of solid residues was characterized...

  6. Flash pyrolysis at high temperature of ligno-cellulosic biomass and its components - production of synthesis gas; Pyrolyse flash a haute temperature de la biomasse ligno-cellulosique et de ses composes - production de gaz de synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couhert, C

    2007-11-15

    Pyrolysis is the first stage of any thermal treatment of biomass and governs the formation of synthesis gas for the production of electricity, hydrogen or liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to establish a link between the composition of a biomass and its pyrolysis gas. We study experimental flash pyrolysis and fix the conditions in which quantities of gas are maximal, while aiming at a regime without heat and mass transfer limitations (particles about 100 {mu}m): temperature of 950 C and residence time of about 2 s. Then we try to predict gas yields of any biomass according to its composition, applicable in this situation where thermodynamic equilibrium is not reached. We show that an additivity law does not allow correlating gas yields of a biomass with fractions of cellulose, hemi-cellulose and lignin contained in this biomass. Several explanations are suggested and examined: difference of pyrolytic behaviour of the same compound according to the biomass from which it is extracted, interactions between compounds and influence of mineral matter. With the aim of industrial application, we study pyrolysis of millimetric and centimetric size particles, and make a numerical simulation of the reactions of pyrolysis gases reforming. This simulation shows that the choice of biomass affects the quantities of synthesis gas obtained. (author)

  7. Morphology and microstructure of co-pyrolysis char from bituminous coal blended with lignocellulosic biomass: Effects of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Wangcai; Chen, Lin; Meng, Haiyu; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Shuzhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Influence of biomass model compounds on co-pyrolysis char structure was investigated. • Transformation of carbon structure was explored by Raman and spectral deconvolution. • Evolution of surface morphology was quantitatively described by the fractal analysis. • Three biomass model compounds showed different influence on the structure evolution. - Abstract: Co-pyrolysis of coal and lignocellulose biomass and coal is the key step of other co-thermochemical conversion, and conversion of co-pyrolysis char is the rate-determining step of co-gasification and co-combustion. In this paper, the influence of biomass model compounds (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, abbreviated as CE, HCE and LIG) on the co-pyrolysis char structure transformation was investigated. Carbon structure and surface morphology of co-pyrolysis char were examined by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). A comprehensive comparison of Raman spectral deconvolution methods based on various fitting functions and peak numbers was explored, and Gaussian-Lorentzian-function with no less than nine peaks showed the best performance. Three biomass model show different effects on the transformation of microstructure structure. The addition of CE increased the ordering of char structure. HCE promoted the disordering degree of microstructure structure and reached the maximum at 50% HCE mass ratio. The microstructure structure changes of co-pyrolysis char for 25% and 50% LIG mass ratios were not evident, while 75% LIG increased the disordering degree of the co-pyrolysis char. Fractal analysis was applied for describing the char surface morphology quantitatively with two and three-dimensional fractal dimensions. CE decreased the fractal dimensions of co-pyrolysis, and the influence of HCE and LIG depended on the mass ratio.

  8. Fast pyrolysis of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor: in-situ filtering of the vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; Hogendoorn, Kees; Wang, X.; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Groeneveld, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    A system to remove in situ char/ash from hot pyrolysis vapors has been developed and tested at the University of Twente. The system consists of a continuous fluidized bed reactor (0.7 kg/h) with immersed filters (wire mesh, pore size 5 μm) for extracting pyrolysis vapors. Integration of the filter

  9. Bio-flex obtained from pyrolysis of biomass as fuel; Bio-flex obtido da pirolise de biomassa como combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesa Perez, Juan Miguel; Viltre Rodriguez, Roberto Alfonso; Marin Mesa, Henry Ramon [Bioware Tecnologia, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Jose Dilcio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico; Samaniego, Manuel Raul Pelaez [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Planejamento de Sistemas Energeticos; Cortez, Luis Augusto Barbosa [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the BIOWARE experience in the bio fuel production from biomass residues. Fast pyrolysis of a mixture of sugar cane trash and elephant grass carried out in a fluidized bed reactor with capacity of 200 kg/h dry feed (12% w/w). The co-products particulate charcoal, acid extract, and bio-oil were obtained. The fast pyrolysis pilot plant PPR-200 belonged to UNICAMP and is operated by BIOWARE personnel. This paper presents the chemical rote to bio-flex production (a kind of bio diesel from acid esterification) from pyrolytic carboxylic acids. Both ethanol and methanol were used as reactant but higher yields were found with methanol. (author)

  10. Monitoring `Renewable fuels`. Gasification and pyrolysis of biomass. Second situation report; Monitoring ``Nachwachsende Rohstoffe``. Vergasung und Pyrolyse von Biomasse. Zweiter Sachstandsbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, C.; Wintzer, D.

    1997-04-01

    The second situation report deals with gasification and pyrolysis as means of improving the energetic utilisation of wood and strawlike biomass and with various possibilities of utilising the gas produced in these processes. It also presents different gasification techniques, measures for gas purification, and ways of utilising gas for electricity generation. Out of the wide range of possible process combinations for producing energy from biomass the report only deals more closely with a few concepts that appear very promising from today`s viewpoint. Working from the current state and perspectives of technical development and from prospective operating conditions and potential market chances of pyrolysis and gasification the report deliberates on the future orientation of research, development, and demonstration activities. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Im zweiten Sachstandsbericht werden die Vergasung und Pyrolyse zur besseren energetischen Nutzung von Holz und halmartiger Biomasse und verschiedene Moeglichkeiten zur Verwertung des dabei erzeugten Gases betrachtet. Es werden unterschiedliche Vergasungstechniken, Massnahmen zur Gasreinigung und Arten der Gasnutzung zur Stromgewinnung dargestellt. Aus der Vielzahl an moeglichen Kombinationen werden einige, aus gegenwaertiger Sichtweise besonders vielversprechende Konzepte zur Energieerzeugung ueber die Biomassevergasung naeher ausgefuehrt. Ausgehend vom Stand und von den Perspektiven der technischen Entwicklungen sowie den Einsatzbedingungen und potentiellen Marktchancen werden Schlussfolgerungen fuer die zukuenftige Ausrichtung im Bereich Forschung, Entwicklung und Demonstration Anstrengungen gezogen. (orig./SR)

  11. Pyrolysis of energy cane bagasse and invasive Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera L.) biomass in an inductively heated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, Charles; Muley, Pranjali D.; Abdollahi, Kamran K.; Marculescu, Cosmin; Boldor, Dorin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy cane & Chinese tallow tree (CTT) biomass was pyrolyzed via induction heating. • Increasing temperature (500–700°C) increased gas yield & decreased liquid yield. • Highest liquid yield was achieved for energy cane at 500 °C. • Nitrogen and hydrogen content of CTT bio-oil increased as the temperature increased. • CTT bio-oil had higher % fatty alcohols; energy cane bio-oil was richer in phenols. - Abstract: The growing demand for energy and the increasing opposition to fossil fuels has given rise to the need for alternative fuels. The pyrolysis process is one viable option that converts lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuel. This study focuses, for the first time, on the use of an induction heating mechanism to pyrolyze biomass from energy cane (Saccharum complex) bagasse and invasive Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera L.). Energy cane and tallow wood were pyrolyzed at 500, 550, 600, 650, and 700 °C at atmospheric pressure in a laboratory scale batch process with an initial loading of 15 g and 30 g for energy cane bagasse and CTT respectively. The results indicate that the highest liquid yield was obtained at 500 °C for both biomasses. The yields of char declined and the gas yields increased as the reaction temperature increased, as the biomass was more thoroughly decomposed at the higher reaction temperatures. GC–MS results show that the liquid product was rich in oxygenated compounds such as phenols, ketones and alcohols for biomasses at all temperatures. Bio-oil obtained from pyrolysis of Chinese tallow tree showed small concentration of fatty alcohols. Concentration of smaller compounds in the liquid product increased as the reaction temperature increased. Highest energy content and liquid yields (34 MJ/kg and 35.4%) amongst the tested temperatures was obtained at 500 °C for both energy cane and tallow wood pyrolysis. Higher heating values were obtained for bio-oil from energy cane compared to tallow tree biomass.

  12. Kinetics of n-heptane pyrolysis over metal oxide- and synthetic aluminosilicate-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop, G.; Petre, K.; Pop, E.; Tomi, P.

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics of n-heptane pyrolysis over metal oxide- and synthetic aluminosilicate-based catalysts, including ..cap alpha..-A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/-CaO, A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/-MgO, and decationated mordenite-type zeolites with the SiO/sub 2/-A1/sub 2/0/sub 3/ ratio (R) of 15-200:1, were studied in a dynamic integral reactor at 650/sup 0/C and 0.015 MPa diluted with steam. The reaction rates and kinetic parameters observed with the mixed oxide and the ..cap alpha..-alumina catalysts were almost identical to those for thermal pyrolysis and were somewhat increased by the addition of K/sub 2/O to these oxides. The zeolites increased the reaction rate by over an order of magnitude and more than halved the activation energy (E). E passed through a strong minimum and the rate of coke formation through a maximum at R approx. 30:1; the rate constant increased with R, but all these parameters stabilized at R Vertical Bar3: 60. The product distributions over the oxide catalysts were similar to those observed in thermal pyrolysis and were consistent with the Rice and Kossiakoff free radical chain mechanism. By contrast, pyrolysis over the zeolites was characterized by a product distribution typical of catalytic cracking by a carbocation mechanism, including larger yields of propylene than of ethylene.

  13. Electron microscopic study on pyrolysis of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T.; Bronsveld, P.M; Vystavel, T.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Kakitani, T.; Otono, A.; Imamura, Y.

    The effectiveness of pyrolysis as a possible technique for disposing of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood was studied. A CCA-treated sample given an extra heat treatment at 450 degreesC for 10 min was thoroughly investigated in order to establish the details of the reaction in

  14. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Padmaperuma, Asanga [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jacobson, Jacob [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cafferty, Kara [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  15. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Padmaperuma, Asanga B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jacobson, Jacob [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cafferty, Kara [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  16. Entrained-Flow, Fast Ablative Pyrolysis of Biomass - Annual Report, 1 December 1984 - 31 December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, J. P.; Scahill, J. W.; Evans, R. J.

    1986-07-01

    The ablative, fast pyrolysis system was relocated to SERI's new, permanent Field Test Laboratory. Pyrolysis system modifications were made to increase the energy available to the vortex reactor and to enhance the collection efficiency of primary pyrolysis vapors. Mathematical modeling of the vapor cracker has resulted in the ability to accurately predict experimental results with respect to the thermal cracking of the primary vapors, the generation of noncondensible gases, and the gas composition. The computer algorithm of this model can be readily used to perform experimental simulation and/or reactor scale-up due to its fundamental nature. Preliminary screening tests with pure ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, supplied by Mobil Research and Development Corporation, have shown promise for the conversion of primary pyrolysis oil vapors to aromatic hydrocarbons; i.e., gasoline.

  17. Experimental and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of Dimethylcyclohexane Oxidation and Pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Eldeeb, Mazen A.

    2016-08-30

    A combined experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of the high-temperature ignition and pyrolysis of 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (13DMCH) is presented. Ignition delay times are measured behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1049–1544 K and pressures of 3.0–12 atm. Pyrolysis is investigated at average pressures of 4.0 atm at temperatures of 1238, 1302, and 1406 K. By means of mid-infrared direct laser absorption at 3.39 μm, fuel concentration time histories are measured under ignition and pyrolytic conditions. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 13DMCH combustion is developed. Ignition measurements show that the ignition delay times of 13DMCH are longer than those of its isomer, ethylcyclohexane. The proposed chemical kinetic model predicts reasonably well the effects of equivalence ratio and pressure, with overall good agreement between predicted and measured ignition delay times, except at low dilution levels and high pressures. Simulated fuel concentration profiles agree reasonably well with the measured profiles, and both highlight the influence of pyrolysis on the overall ignition kinetics at high temperatures. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses provide further insight into the kinetic processes controlling ignition and pyrolysis. The work contributes toward improved understanding and modeling of the oxidation and pyrolysis kinetics of cycloalkanes.

  18. Investigation on the fast co-pyrolysis of sewage sludge with biomass and the combustion reactivity of residual char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuanghui; Tan, Houzhang; Wang, Xuebin; Yang, Fuxin; Cao, Ruijie; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Renhui

    2017-09-01

    Gaining the valuable fuels from sewage sludge is a promising method. In this work, the fast pyrolysis characteristics of sewage sludge (SS), wheat straw (WS) and their mixtures in different proportions were carried out in a drop-tube reactor. The combustion reactivity of the residual char obtained was investigated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results indicate that SS and WS at different pyrolysis temperatures yielded different characteristic gas compositions and product distributions. The co-pyrolysis of SS with WS showed that there existed a synergistic effect in terms of higher gas and bio-oil yields and lower char yield, especially at the WS adding percentage of 80wt%. The addition of WS to SS increased the carbon content in the SS char and improved char porous structures, resulting in an improvement in the combustion reactivity of the SS char. The research results can be used to promote co-utilization of sewage sludge and biomass. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Bio-oil production via fast pyrolysis of biomass residues from cassava plants in a fluidised-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattiya, Adisak

    2011-01-01

    Biomass residues from cassava plants, namely cassava stalk and cassava rhizome, were pyrolysed in a fluidised-bed reactor for production of bio-oil. The aims of this work were to investigate the yields and properties of pyrolysis products produced from both feedstocks as well as to identify the optimum pyrolysis temperature for obtaining the highest organic bio-oil yields. Results showed that the maximum yields of the liquid bio-oils derived from the stalk and rhizome were 62 wt.% and 65 wt.% on dry basis, respectively. The pyrolysis temperatures that gave highest bio-oil yields for both feedstocks were in the range of 475-510 °C. According to the analysis of the bio-oils properties, the bio-oil derived from cassava rhizome showed better quality than that derived from cassava stalk as the former had lower oxygen content, higher heating value and better storage stability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Design, fabrication, operation and Aspen simulation of oil shale pyrolysis and biomass gasification process using a moving bed downdraft reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpour, Hassan

    Energy is the major facilitator of the modern life. Every developed and developing economy requires access to advanced sources of energy to support its growth and prosperity. Declining worldwide crude oil reserves and increasing energy needs has focused attention on developing existing unconventional fossil fuels like oil shale and renewable resources such as biomass. Sustainable, renewable and reliable resources of domestically produced biomass comparing to wind and solar energy is a sensible motivation to establish a small-scale power plant using biomass as feed to supply electricity demand and heat for rural development. The work in Paper I focuses on the possibility of water pollution from spent oil shale which should be studied before any significant commercial production is attempted. In Paper II, the proposed Aspen models for oil shale pyrolysis is to identify the key process parameters for the reactor and optimize the rate of production of syncrude from oil shale. The work in Paper III focuses on (1) Design and operation of a vertical downdraft reactor, (2) Establishing an optimum operating methodology and parameters to maximize syngas production through process testing. Finally in Paper IV, a proposed Aspen model for biomass gasification simulates a real biomass gasification system discussed in Paper III.

  1. Carbon dioxide assisted sustainability enhancement of pyrolysis of waste biomass: A case study with spent coffee ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Cho, Seong-Heon; Song, Hocheol; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2015-01-01

    This work mainly presents the influence of CO2 as a reaction medium in the thermo-chemical process (pyrolysis) of waste biomass. Our experimental work mechanistically validated two key roles of CO2 in pyrolysis of biomass. For example, CO2 expedited the thermal cracking of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) evolved from the thermal degradation of spent coffee ground (SCG) and reacted with VOCs. This enhanced thermal cracking behavior and reaction triggered by CO2 directly led to the enhanced generation of CO (∼ 3000%) in the presence of CO2. As a result, this identified influence of CO2 also directly led to the substantial decrease (∼ 40-60%) of the condensable hydrocarbons (tar). Finally, the morphologic change of biochar was distinctive in the presence of CO2. Therefore, a series of the adsorption experiments with dye were conducted to preliminary explore the physico-chemical properties of biochar induced by CO2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Catalytic co-pyrolysis of paper biomass and plastic mixtures (HDPE (high density polyethylene), PP (polypropylene) and PET (polyethylene terephthalate)) and product analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Jayeeta; Pathak, T.S.; Srivastava, R.; Singh, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass and plastics (HDPE (high density polyethylene), PP (polypropylene) and PET (polyethylene terephthalate)) has been performed in a fixed-bed reactor in presence of cobalt based alumina, ceria and ceria-alumina catalysts to analyze the product distribution and selectivity. Catalysts are synthesized using co-precipitation method and characterized by BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller) surface area and XRD analysis. The effect of catalytic co-pyrolysis at different temperature with product distribution has been evaluated. The results have clearly shown the synergistic effect between biomass and plastics, the liquid products gradually increases forming with rise in the plastic content in the blend. Gaseous products have yielded most during pyrolysis of blend having biomass/plastics ratio of 5:1 with the presence of 40% Co/30% CeO 2 /30% Al 2 O 3 catalyst with hydrogen gas production touched its peak of 47 vol%. Catalytic performance enhanced with increase with the cobalt loading, with best performance attributing to 40% Co/30% CeO 2 /30% Al 2 O 3 catalyst. - Highlights: • Catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass and plastics (HDPE, PP & PET) blends in fixed-bed reactor. • Strong synergistic effect evident between biomass and plastics. • Solid residue diminished with application of catalysts. • Aromatics and olefins production increases with higher plastic content. • More hydrogen production with application of catalysts with higher cobalt content.

  3. Oxidation resistance of biochars as a function of feedstock and pyrolysis condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lanfang; Ro, Kyoung S; Wang, Yu; Sun, Ke; Sun, Haoran; Libra, Judy A; Xing, Baoshan

    2018-03-01

    Assessing biochar's ability to resist oxidation is fundamental to understanding its potential to sequester carbon. Chemical oxidation exhibits good performance in estimating the oxidation resistance of biochar. Herein, oxidation resistance of 14 types of biochars produced from four feedstocks at different pyrolysis conditions (hydrothermal versus thermal carbonization) was investigated via hydrogen peroxide oxidation with varying concentrations. The oxidation resistance of organic carbon (C) of hydrochars was relatively higher than that of 250°C pyrochars (P250) but was comparable to that of 450°C pyrochars (P450). Both hydrochars and P450 from ash-rich feedstocks contained at least three different C pools (5.9-18.3% labile, 43.2-56.5% semi-labile and 26.9-45.9% stable C). Part (oxidation resistance of biochars depended on the feedstock. For ash-rich feedstock (rice straw, swine manure and poultry litter), the oxidation resistance of biochars was determined by both aromaticity and mineral components, and mineral protection was regulated by pyrolysis conditions. The amorphous silicon within hydrochars and P450 could interact with C, preventing C from being oxidized, to some extent. Nevertheless, this type of protection did not occur for P250 and P600. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pyrolysis of biomass and refuse-derived fuel performance in laboratory scale batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluska Jacek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of pyrolysis of pine chips and refuse derived fuel fractions are presented. The experiments were carried out in a pilot pyrolysis reactor. The feedstock was analyzed by an elemental analyzer and the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine the elemental composition. To find out optimum conditions for pyrolysis and mass loss as a function of temperature the thermogravimetric analysis was applied. Gases from the thermogravimetric analysis were directed to the infrared spectrometer using gas-flow cuvette to online analysis of gas composition. Chemical composition of the produced gas was measured using gas chromatography with a thermal conductivity detector and a flame ionization detector. The product analysis also took into account the mass balance of individual products.

  5. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Impregnated with Potassium Phosphate in a Hydrogen Atmosphere for the Production of Phenol and Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-xi; Wang, Xin; Guo, Hao-qiang; Cui, Min-shu; Yang, Yong-ping

    2018-01-01

    A new technique was proposed to co-produce phenol and activated carbon (AC) from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with K3PO4 in a hydrogen atmosphere, followed by activation of the pyrolytic solid residues. Lab-scale catalytic fast pyrolysis experiments were performed to quantitatively determine the pyrolytic product distribution, as well as to investigate the effects of several factors on the phenol production, including pyrolysis atmosphere, catalyst type, biomass type, catalytic pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst impregnation content. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residues were activated to prepare ACs with high specific surface areas. The results indicated that phenol could be obtained due to the synergistic effects of K3PO4 and hydrogen atmosphere, with the yield and selectivity reaching 5.3 wt% and 17.8% from catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood with 8 wt% K3PO4 at 550°C in a hydrogen atmosphere. This technique was adaptable to different woody materials for phenol production. Moreover, gas product generated from the pyrolysis process was feasible to be recycled to provide the hydrogen atmosphere, instead of extra hydrogen supply. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residue was suitable for AC preparation, using CO2 activation method, the specific surface area was as high as 1,605 m2/g. PMID:29515994

  6. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Impregnated with Potassium Phosphate in a Hydrogen Atmosphere for the Production of Phenol and Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A new technique was proposed to co-produce phenol and activated carbon (AC from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with K3PO4 in a hydrogen atmosphere, followed by activation of the pyrolytic solid residues. Lab-scale catalytic fast pyrolysis experiments were performed to quantitatively determine the pyrolytic product distribution, as well as to investigate the effects of several factors on the phenol production, including pyrolysis atmosphere, catalyst type, biomass type, catalytic pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst impregnation content. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residues were activated to prepare ACs with high specific surface areas. The results indicated that phenol could be obtained due to the synergistic effects of K3PO4 and hydrogen atmosphere, with the yield and selectivity reaching 5.3 wt% and 17.8% from catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood with 8 wt% K3PO4 at 550°C in a hydrogen atmosphere. This technique was adaptable to different woody materials for phenol production. Moreover, gas product generated from the pyrolysis process was feasible to be recycled to provide the hydrogen atmosphere, instead of extra hydrogen supply. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residue was suitable for AC preparation, using CO2 activation method, the specific surface area was as high as 1,605 m2/g.

  7. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Impregnated with Potassium Phosphate in a Hydrogen Atmosphere for the Production of Phenol and Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-Xi; Wang, Xin; Guo, Hao-Qiang; Cui, Min-Shu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2018-01-01

    A new technique was proposed to co-produce phenol and activated carbon (AC) from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with K 3 PO 4 in a hydrogen atmosphere, followed by activation of the pyrolytic solid residues. Lab-scale catalytic fast pyrolysis experiments were performed to quantitatively determine the pyrolytic product distribution, as well as to investigate the effects of several factors on the phenol production, including pyrolysis atmosphere, catalyst type, biomass type, catalytic pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst impregnation content. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residues were activated to prepare ACs with high specific surface areas. The results indicated that phenol could be obtained due to the synergistic effects of K 3 PO 4 and hydrogen atmosphere, with the yield and selectivity reaching 5.3 wt% and 17.8% from catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood with 8 wt% K 3 PO 4 at 550°C in a hydrogen atmosphere. This technique was adaptable to different woody materials for phenol production. Moreover, gas product generated from the pyrolysis process was feasible to be recycled to provide the hydrogen atmosphere, instead of extra hydrogen supply. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residue was suitable for AC preparation, using CO 2 activation method, the specific surface area was as high as 1,605 m 2 /g.

  8. Evaluation of Brazilian biomasses as potential feedstocks for fuel production via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The utilization of lignocellulosic materials to generate energy is constantly expanding around the world. In addition to the well-known biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, advanced biofuels obtained by thermochemical conversion routes have been explored, including pyrolysis oil, biochar and syng...

  9. Physical characterization of biomass-based pyrolysis liquids. Application of standard fuel oil analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oasmaa, A.; Leppaemaeki, E.; Koponen, P.; Levander, J.; Tapola, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The main purpose of the study was to test the applicability of standard fuel oil methods developed for petroleum-based fuels to pyrolysis liquids. In addition, research on sampling, homogeneity, stability, miscibility and corrosivity was carried out. The standard methods have been tested for several different pyrolysis liquids. Recommendations on sampling, sample size and small modifications of standard methods are presented. In general, most of the methods can be used as such but the accuracy of the analysis can be improved by minor modifications. Fuel oil analyses not suitable for pyrolysis liquids have been identified. Homogeneity of the liquids is the most critical factor in accurate analysis. The presence of air bubbles may disturb in several analyses. Sample preheating and prefiltration should be avoided when possible. The former may cause changes in the composition and structure of the pyrolysis liquid. The latter may remove part of organic material with particles. The size of the sample should be determined on the basis of the homogeneity and the water content of the liquid. The basic analyses of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) include water, pH, solids, ash, Conradson carbon residue, heating value, CHN, density, viscosity, pourpoint, flash point, and stability. Additional analyses are carried out when needed. (orig.) 53 refs.

  10. Effect of fast pyrolysis conditions on biomass solid residues at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    % (daf) points lower than in the WMR. During fast pyrolysis pinewood underwent drastic morphological transformations, whereas beechwood and straw samples retained the original porous structure of the parental fuel with slight melting on the surface. The particle size of Danish wheat straw char decreased...

  11. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on Structural Transformation and Reactivity of Herbaceous Biomasses at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    of organic and inorganic matter on the char structural transformations. The results indicate no influence of the free radicals on char reactivity and burnout. The formation of free radicals in fast pyrolysis is related to the differences in the ash composition, namely presence of K+ ions in the wheat straw...

  12. Oxidative and inert pyrolysis on-line coupled to gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection: On the pyrolysis products of tobacco additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Meike; Hutzler, Christoph; Henkler, Frank; Luch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    According to European legislation, tobacco additives may not increase the toxicity or the addictive potency of the product, but there is an ongoing debate on how to reliably characterize and measure such properties. Further, too little is known on pyrolysis patterns of tobacco additives to assume that no additional toxicological risks need to be suspected. An on-line pyrolysis technique was used and coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to identify the pattern of chemical species formed upon thermal decomposition of 19 different tobacco additives like raw cane sugar, licorice or cocoa. To simulate the combustion of a cigarette it was necessary to perform pyrolysis at inert conditions as well as under oxygen supply. All individual additives were pyrolyzed under inert or oxidative conditions at 350, 700 and 1000°C, respectively, and the formation of different toxicants was monitored. We observed the generation of vinyl acrylate, fumaronitrile, methacrylic anhydride, isobutyric anhydride and 3-buten-2-ol exclusively during pyrolysis of tobacco additives. According to the literature, these toxicants so far remained undetectable in tobacco or tobacco smoke. Further, the formation of 20 selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with molecular weights of up to 278Da was monitored during pyrolysis of cocoa in a semi-quantitative approach. It was shown that the adding of cocoa to tobacco had no influence on the relative amounts of the PAHs formed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass and Algal Residues via Integrated Pyrolysis, Catalytic Hydroconversion and Co-processing with Vacuum Gas Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olarte, M. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, T. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-21

    Beginning in 2010, UOP, along with the Department of Energy and other project partners, designed a pathway for an integrated biorefinery to process solid biomass into transportation fuel blendstocks. The integrated biorefinery (IBR) would convert second generation feedstocks into pyrolysis oil which would then be upgraded into fuel blendstocks without the limitations of traditional biofuels.

  14. Kinetics of ethylcyclohexane pyrolysis and oxidation: An experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2015-07-01

    Ethylcyclohexane (ECH) is a model compound for cycloalkanes with long alkyl side-chains. A preliminary investigation on ECH (Wang et al., Proc. Combust. Inst., 35, 2015, 367-375) revealed that an accurate ECH kinetic model with detailed fuel consumption mechanism and aromatic growth pathways, as well as additional ECH pyrolysis and oxidation data with detailed species concentration covering a wide pressure and temperature range are required to understand the ECH combustion kinetics. In this work, the flow reactor pyrolysis of ECH at various pressures (30, 150 and 760Torr) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and gas chromatography (GC). The mole fraction profiles of numerous major and minor species were evaluated, and good agreement was observed between the PIMS and GC data sets. Furthermore, a fuel-rich burner-stabilized laminar premixed ECH/O2/Ar flame at 30Torr was studied using synchrotron VUV PIMS. A detailed kinetic model for ECH high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation was developed and validated against the pyrolysis and flame data performed in this work. Further validation of the kinetic model is presented against literature data including species concentrations in jet-stirred reactor oxidation, ignition delay times in a shock tube, and laminar flame speeds at various pressures and equivalence ratios. The model well predicts the consumption of ECH, the growth of aromatics, and the global combustion properties. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were utilized to elucidate chemical kinetic features of ECH combustion under various reaction conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  15. Mechanism of waste biomass pyrolysis: Effect of physical and chemical pre-treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Oisik [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman 99164-6120, WA (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Sarmah, Ajit K., E-mail: a.sarmah@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2015-12-15

    To impart usability in waste based biomass through thermo-chemical reactions, several physical and chemical pre-treatments were conducted to gain an insight on their mode of action, effect on the chemistry and the change in thermal degradation profiles. Two different waste biomasses (Douglas fir, a softwood and hybrid poplar, a hardwood) were subjected to four different pre-treatments, namely, hot water pre-treatment, torrefaction, acid (sulphuric acid) and salt (ammonium phosphate) doping. Post pre-treatments, the changes in the biomass structure, chemistry, and thermal makeup were studied through electron microscopy, atomic absorption/ultra violet spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, and thermogravimetry. The pre-treatments significantly reduced the amounts of inorganic ash, extractives, metals, and hemicellulose from both the biomass samples. Furthermore, hot water and torrefaction pre-treatment caused mechanical disruption in biomass fibres leading to smaller particle sizes. Torrefaction of Douglas fir wood yielded more solid product than hybrid poplar. Finally, the salt pre-treatment increased the activation energies of the biomass samples (especially Douglas fir) to a great extent. Thus, salt pre-treatment was found to bestow thermal stability in the biomass. - Highlights: • Pre-treatments reduce ash, extractives, alkalines and hemicellulose from biomass. • Torrefaction of Douglas fir yields more solid product than hybrid poplar. • Salt pretreatment significantly increases the activation energy of biomass. • Acid and salt pretreatment bestows thermal stability in biomass.

  16. Mechanism of waste biomass pyrolysis: Effect of physical and chemical pre-treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Oisik; Sarmah, Ajit K.

    2015-01-01

    To impart usability in waste based biomass through thermo-chemical reactions, several physical and chemical pre-treatments were conducted to gain an insight on their mode of action, effect on the chemistry and the change in thermal degradation profiles. Two different waste biomasses (Douglas fir, a softwood and hybrid poplar, a hardwood) were subjected to four different pre-treatments, namely, hot water pre-treatment, torrefaction, acid (sulphuric acid) and salt (ammonium phosphate) doping. Post pre-treatments, the changes in the biomass structure, chemistry, and thermal makeup were studied through electron microscopy, atomic absorption/ultra violet spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, and thermogravimetry. The pre-treatments significantly reduced the amounts of inorganic ash, extractives, metals, and hemicellulose from both the biomass samples. Furthermore, hot water and torrefaction pre-treatment caused mechanical disruption in biomass fibres leading to smaller particle sizes. Torrefaction of Douglas fir wood yielded more solid product than hybrid poplar. Finally, the salt pre-treatment increased the activation energies of the biomass samples (especially Douglas fir) to a great extent. Thus, salt pre-treatment was found to bestow thermal stability in the biomass. - Highlights: • Pre-treatments reduce ash, extractives, alkalines and hemicellulose from biomass. • Torrefaction of Douglas fir yields more solid product than hybrid poplar. • Salt pretreatment significantly increases the activation energy of biomass. • Acid and salt pretreatment bestows thermal stability in biomass.

  17. Ultra-fast biomass pyrolysis in a High-Temperature (2200/sup 0/C), Fluid-Wall Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Monzon, A.; Santamaria, J.; Gonzalez-Canibano, J.

    1988-02-01

    The pyrolysis of pine sawdust has been carried out in a High-Temperature Fluid-Wall Reactor. This unit has been specially designed to withstand working temperatures of up to 2200/sup 0/C. The biomass is fed to the top of the reactor after sieving to the appropriate size, at a rate of 1.0 to 1.8 kgmin. The feed falls and, at the same time is very quickly heated by radiation to the reaction temperature. The estimated heating rate is on the order of 10/sup 60/Cs for reactant surfaces. The fluid-wall, produced by a nitrogen flow through the 30 cm diameter porous reactor core, prevents both reactants and products from reaching the reactor wall. The product distribution at the reactor exit has been determined for different operating conditions. The influence of reactor temperature, biomass feed rate, and biomass particle size on the product distribution and on the heating value of the exit gas has been investigated.

  18. Carbon aerogels by pyrolysis of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sizhao; Feng, Jian; Feng, Junzong; Jiang, Yonggang; Ding, Feng

    2018-05-01

    Although carbon aerogels derived from naturally occurring materials have been developed extensively, a reasonable synthetic approach using cellulose-resource remains unclear. Here, we report a strategy to prepare carbon aerogels originated from cellulose position-selectively oxidized by TEMPO-oxidized process. Contrary to non-TEMPO-oxidized cellulose-derived carbon aerogels (NCCA) with relative loose structure, TEMPO-oxidized cellulose-derived carbon aerogels (TCCA) with tight fibrillar-continuous network are monitored, suggesting the importance of TEMPO-oxidized modification towards creating the architecture of subsequently produced carbon aerogels. TCCA endows a higher BET area despite owning slightly dense bulk density comparing with that of NCCA. The structural texture of TCCA could be maintained in a way in comparison to TEMPO-oxidized cellulose-derived aerogel, due to the integration and aggregation effect by losing the electric double layer repulsion via ionization of the surface carboxyl groups. FTIR and XPS analyses signify the evidence of non-functionalized carbon-skeleton network formation in terms of TCCA. Further, the mechanism concerning the creation of carbon aerogels is also established. These findings not only provide new insights into the production of carbon aerogels but also open up a new opportunity in the field of functional carbon materials.

  19. Influence of CuSO4 initiation additive on kinetic characteristics of coal oxidation and pyrolysis processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larioinov, K. B.; Mishakov, I. V.; Gromov, A. A.; Matveev, A. S.; Zenkov, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Coals oxidation and pyrolysis processes of different metamorphic grades containing 5%wt of initiation additive were studied. The experiment was performed by thermogravimetric analysis method at a heating rate of 2.5°C/min to a maximum temperature of 600°C in an atmosphere of air and nitrogen. Based on the results of TGA, an analytical evaluation of kinetic characteristics of pyrolysis and oxidation processes was conducted. It has been established that addition of CuSO4 initiating agent leads to significant decrease in the initial temperature of oxidation and pyrolysis processes, which promotes the shift of the reaction to a low-temperature region. Change of the initial reaction temperature ΔTi for oxidation process was 30°C, ΔTd for pyrolysis was 45°C. Effect of initiation additive was also expressed in significant reduction of sample residence time within volatile substances sublimation zone: for oxidation Δti was 14 minutes, for pyrolysis Δtd was 18 min. For modified sample characterized by lower stage of metamorphism, the decrease in oxidation time Δtf was the greatest (22 min), which is explained by the high content of volatile substances. According to mass-spectrometric analysis, presence of SO2 (intense peaks at 290°C and 440°C) was recorded in modified samples oxidation products, which is explained by partial hydrolysis of copper sulfate.

  20. Tailoring ZSM-5 Zeolites for the Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass to Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Thomas C.; Gardner, David W.; Thilakaratne, Rajeeva

    2016-01-01

    The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose by zeolite-catalyzed fast pyrolysis involves a complex reaction network sensitive to the zeolite structure, crystallinity, elemental composition, porosity, and acidity. The interplay of these parameters under the reaction conditions represents...... a major roadblock that has hampered significant improvement in catalyst design for over a decade. Here, we studied commercial and laboratory-synthesized ZSM-5 zeolites and combined data from 10 complementary characterization techniques in an attempt to identify parameters common to high...

  1. Processing of biomass to Hydrocarbons – using a new catalytic steam pyrolysis route

    OpenAIRE

    Mellin, Pelle; Kantarelis, Efthymios; Yang, Weihong

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining renewable transportation fuel has been identified as one of the main challenges for a sustainable society. Catalytic pyrolysis followed by hydrotreatment has been demonstrated as one possible route for producing transportation fuels. Using steam in this process could have a number of benefits as given by our research effort. For this paper, we will show that a catalyst together with steam prolongs the activity of the catalyst by preventing coking. This means that both steam and cata...

  2. Release of K, Cl, and S during Pyrolysis and Combustion of High-Chlorine Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Joakim Myung; Jakobsen, Jon Geest; Frandsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    ranging from 500 to 1150 °C, under both pyrolysis and combustion atmospheres. The volatilized material was quantified by means of mass balances based on char and ash elemental analysis, compared to a corresponding feedstock fuel analysis. Close relations between the observed K and Cl release are found....... The silicate/ alumina chemistry is found to play a significant role in the alkali retention. The Si-rich sample is capable of retaining all excess K not released as KCl....

  3. Selectively improving the bio-oil quality by catalytic fast pyrolysis of heavy-metal-polluted biomass: take copper (Cu) as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Tian, Ke; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xue-Song; Ding, Hong-Sheng; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-07-17

    Heavy-metal-polluted biomass derived from phytoremediation or biosorption is widespread and difficult to be disposed of. In this work, simultaneous conversion of the waste woody biomass into bio-oil and recovery of Cu in a fast pyrolysis reactor were investigated. The results show that Cu can effectively catalyze the thermo-decomposition of biomass. Both the yield and high heating value (HHV) of the Cu-polluted fir sawdust biomass (Cu-FSD) derived bio-oil are significantly improved compared with those of the fir sawdust (FSD) derived bio-oil. The results of UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectra of bio-oil indicate pyrolytic lignin is further decomposed into small-molecular aromatic compounds by the catalysis of Cu, which is in agreement with the GC-MS results that the fractions of C7-C10 compounds in the bio-oil significantly increase. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of the migration and transformation of Cu in the fast pyrolysis process show that more than 91% of the total Cu in the Cu-FSD is enriched in the char in the form of zerovalent Cu with a face-centered cubic crystalline phase. This study gives insight into catalytic fast pyrolysis of heavy metals, and demonstrates the technical feasibility of an eco-friendly process for disposal of heavy-metal-polluted biomass.

  4. A Short Historical Review of Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Une brève revue historique de la pyrolyse rapide de la biomasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlein D.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this short review, we survey the historical progress of fast pyrolysis technologies for thermochemical liquefaction of biomass to produce so-called "bio-oil". Our focus is on the potential applications of bio-oil as a liquid fuel for heat and power generation. We point out some of the inherent properties of bio-oil that create difficulties standing in the way of these applications. Finally, we take a brief look at some processes that aim to valorize bio-oil by conversion to higher value liquid fuel products. Dans cette revue nous nous proposons de dresser un rappel historique des progrès relatifs aux technologies de liquéfaction thermochimiques par pyrolyse rapide, encore appelée pyrolyse flash, de la biomasse pour produire ce que l’on appelle communément une "bio-huile". Nous insisterons sur ses applications comme combustible liquide pour la production de chaleur et d’électricité. Nous ferons ressortir quelques propriétés spécifiques aux bio-huiles qui peuvent créer des difficultés d’usage. Nous terminerons par un bref aperçu de quelques procédés permettant de valoriser la bio-huile en carburants liquides de plus forte valeur ajoutée.

  5. Experimental investigation into fast pyrolysis of biomass using an entrained flow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, M.; Benham, C.

    1981-02-01

    Pyrolysis experiments were performed with steam as a carrier gas and two different feedstocks - wheat straw and powdered material derived from municipal solid waste (ECO-II TM). Reactor wall temperature was varied from 7000 to 1400 C. Gas composition data from the ECO-II tests were comparable to previously reported data but ethylene yield appeared to vary with reactor wall temperature and residence time. The important conclusion from the wheat straw tests is that olefin yields are about one half that obtained from ECO-II. Evidence was found that high olefin yields from ECO-II are due to the presence of plastics in the feedstock.

  6. PYROLYSIS OF ISOCHRYSIS MICROALGAE WITH METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS FOR BIO-OIL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEVFİK AYSU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of Isochrysis microalgae was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor without and with metal oxide catalysts (CeO2, TiO2, Al2O3 at the temperatures of 450, 500 and 550 oC with a constant heating rate of 40 oC/min. The pyrolysis conditions including catalyst and temperature were studied in terms of their effects on the yields of pyrolysis products and quality. The amount of bio-char, bio-oil and gas products was calculated. The composition of the produced bio-oils was determined by Elemental analysis (EA, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR and Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC–MS techniques. As a result of the pyrolysis experiments, it is shown that there have been significant effects of both catalyst and temperature on the conversion of Isochrysis microalgae into solid, liquid (bio-oil and gas products. The highest bio-oil yield (24.30 % including aqueous phase was obtained in the presence of TiO2 (50% as catalyst at 500 °C. 98 different compounds were identified by GC-MS in bio-oils obtained at 500 oC. According to 1H NMR analysis, bio-oils contained ∼60-64 % aliphatic and ∼17-19 % aromatic structural units. EA showed that the bio-oils contained ∼66-69 % C and having 31-34 MJ/kg higher heating values.

  7. Indium oxide deposition on glass by aerosol pyrolysis (Pyrosol (R) process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandenet, G.; Lagarde, Y.; Spitz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The pyrosol (R) process involves the pyrolysis of an aerosol generated by ultrasonic nebulisation from a solution of organic or inorganic compounds. This technique was used to deposit transparent n-conducting indium oxide films on glass. The electrical and optical properties of these films were studied as a function of the deposition temperature and doping (using tin or fluorine). A deposition temperature of 480 deg C and a Sn/In ratio of about 5% gave the best results. In this case, the transmission in the visible range was 92%, the infrared reflection 84% and the electrical resistivity 1.7x10 -4 ohm.cm [fr

  8. Investigation on thermochemical behaviour of low rank Malaysian coal, oil palm biomass and their blends during pyrolysis via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Siti Shawalliah; Abd Rahman, Norazah; Ismail, Khudzir; Alias, Azil Bahari; Abd Rashid, Zulkifli; Aris, Mohd Jindra

    2010-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the behaviour of Malaysian sub-bituminous coal (Mukah Balingian), oil palm biomass (empty fruit bunches (EFB), kernel shell (PKS) and mesocarp fibre (PMF)) and their respective blends during pyrolysis using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coal/palm biomass blends were prepared at six different weight ratios and experiments were carried out under dynamic conditions using nitrogen as inert gas at various heating rates to ramp the temperature from 25 degrees C to 900 degrees C. The derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) results show that thermal decomposition of EFB, PMF and PKS exhibit one, two and three distinct evolution profiles, respectively. Apparently, the thermal profiles of the coal/oil palm biomass blends appear to correlate with the percentage of biomass added in the blends, thus, suggesting lack of interaction between the coal and palm biomass. First-order reaction model were used to determine the kinetics parameters for the pyrolysis of coal, palm biomass and their respective blends. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biomass Pyrolysis to Hydrocarbon Fuels in the Petroleum Refining Context: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, Helena L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on developing a thermochemical route to produce biofuels from agricultural wastes such as sugar cane bagasse, wood chips or corn stover; more specifically it intends to develop the biomass pyrolysis route, which produces bio-oils. Production of bio-oils by pyrolysis is a commercial technology. However, bio-oils are currently not being used for liquid fuels production. Although bio-oils can be produced by high-pressure liquefaction, pyrolysis is a less expensive technology. Nevertheless, bio-oils cannot be used directly as a transportation fuel without upgrading, since they are generally unstable, viscous, and acidic. Thus NREL and Petrobras intend to use their combined expertise to develop a two-step route to biofuels production: in the first step, a stable bio-oil is produced by NREL biomass pyrolysis technology, while in the second step it is upgraded by using two distinct catalytic processes under development by Petrobras. The first process converts bio-oil into gasoline, LPG, and fuel oil using the catalytic cracking process, while the second one, converts bio-oil into synthesis gas. Syngas gasification catalysts provided by both NREL and Petrobras will be tested. The work includes experiments at both sites to produce bio-oil and then biofuels, life-cycle analysis of each route, personnel training and development of analytical methods with a duration time of two years.

  10. An Euler–Euler approach to modeling biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors – Focusing on the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellin, Pelle; Zhang, Qinglin; Kantarelis, Efthymios; Yang, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    A developed 3D Euler–Euler CFD model, with an integrated pyrolysis model, is proposed as a way of predicting vapor phase dynamics and product distributions in the fluidized bed process for biomass fast pyrolysis. The main interest in this work is the gases resulting from the pyrolysis mixed with the fluidizing gas. We propose therefore a simple rendering of the solid material while directing attention to the vapor phase. At the same time the required computational resources for reaching stabilized conditions in the reactor are reduced. Temperature profile, velocity profile and pyrolysis products are predicted and globally verified by a series of parallel cases, which are compared to experimental measurements and known trends of liquid, solid and gas yields. The comparison of experimental measurements and model predictions satisfy the accuracy of the model and on a quantitative basis, the product yields agree with commonly known trends of bio oil versus temperature and residence time. -- Highlights: • A 3-D CFD model for fast pyrolysis in fluidized beds has been developed. • Focus is on the vapor phase which permits a simplified rendering of the solids. • Predicted results largely agree with measured temperature, pressure, and bed height

  11. An approach for upgrading biomass and pyrolysis product quality using a combination of aqueous phase bio-oil washing and torrefaction pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Cen, Kehui; Jing, Xichun; Gao, Jinghui; Li, Chen; Ma, Zhongqing

    2017-06-01

    Bio-oil undergoes phase separation because of poor stability. Practical application of aqueous phase bio-oil is challenging. In this study, a novel approach that combines aqueous phase bio-oil washing and torrefaction pretreatment was used to upgrade the biomass and pyrolysis product quality. The effects of individual and combined pretreatments on cotton stalk pyrolysis were studied using TG-FTIR and a fixed bed reactor. The results showed that the aqueous phase bio-oil washing pretreatment removed metals and resolved the two pyrolysis peaks in the DTG curve. Importantly, it increased the bio-oil yield and improved the pyrolysis product quality. For example, the water and acid content of bio-oil decreased significantly along with an increase in phenol formation, and the heating value of non-condensable gases improved, and these were more pronounced when combined with torrefaction pretreatment. Therefore, the combined pretreatment is a promising method, which would contribute to the development of polygeneration pyrolysis technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Life Cycle Assessment of high ligno-cellulosic biomass pyrolysis coupled with anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Serena; Bandini, Vittoria; Marazza, Diego; Baioli, Filippo; Torri, Cristian; Contin, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    A Life Cycle Assessment is conducted on pyrolysis coupled to anaerobic digestion to treat corn stovers and to obtain bioenergy and biochar. The analysis takes into account the feedstock treatment process, the fate of products and the indirect effects due to crop residue removal. The biochar is considered to be used as solid fuel for coal power plants or as soil conditioner. All results are compared with a corresponding fossil-fuel-based scenario. It is shown that the proposed system always enables relevant primary energy savings of non-renewable sources and a strong reduction of greenhouse gases emissions without worsening the abiotic resources depletion. Conversely, the study points out that the use of corn stovers for mulch is critical when considering acidification and eutrophication impacts. Therefore, removal of corn stovers from the fields must be planned carefully. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. p-n Heterojunction of doped graphene films obtained by pyrolysis of biomass precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Sánchez, Marcos; Primo, Ana; Atienzar, Pedro; Forneli, Amparo; García, Hermenegildo

    2015-02-25

    Nitrogen-doped graphene [(N)G] obtained by pyrolysis at 900 °C of nanometric chitosan films exhibits a Hall effect characteristic of n-type semiconductors. In contrast, boron-doped graphene [(B)G] obtained by pyrolysis of borate ester of alginate behaves as a p-type semiconductor based also on the Hall effect. A p-n heterojunction of (B)G-(N)G films is built by stepwise coating of a quartz plate using a mask. The heterojunction is created by the partial overlapping of the (B)G-(N)G films. Upon irradiation with a xenon lamp of aqueous solutions of H(2) PtCl(6) and MnCl(2) in contact with the heterojunction, preferential electron migration from (B)G to (N)G with preferential location of positive holes on (B)G is established by observation in scanning electron microscopy of the formation of Pt nanoparticles (NP) on (N)G and MnO(2) NP on (B)G. The benefits of the heterojunction with respect to the devices having one individual component as a consequence of the electron migration through the p-n heterojunction are illustrated by measuring the photocurrent in the (B)G-(N)G heterojunction (180% current enhancement with respect to the dark current) and compared it to the photocurrent of the individual (B)G (15% enhancement) and (N)G (55% enhancement) components. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Copenhaver, Sally C.; Aines, Roger D.

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  15. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapours over Sodium-Based Catalyst; A Study on teh State of Sodium on the Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Gupta, K.B. Sai Sankar; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2015-01-01

    In situ upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours over Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was studied in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor at 500 °C. Catalytic oil exhibits a significant improvement over its non-catalytic counterpart, such as lower oxygen content (12.3 wt % compared to 42.1 wt %), higher

  16. Biomass pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor. Part 2: experimental validation of model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2005-01-01

    Various types of cylindrical biomass particles (pine, beech, bamboo, demolition wood) have been pyrolyzed in a batch-wise operated fluid bed laboratory setup. Conversion times, product yields, and product compositions were measured as a function of the particle size (0.7−17 mm), the vapor's

  17. Effect of pyrolysis conditions and composition on the char structure and char yield of biomass chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Steibel, Markus; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    slow (10 K/min) and fast heating (600 K/min) by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), elementary analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to determine the effect of operating conditions and the biomass composition on the char...

  18. Investigation on the pure and fluorine doped vanadium oxide thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margoni, Mudaliar Mahesh; Mathuri, S. [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, – 603203 Kancheepuram Dt., Tamil Nadu (India); Ramamurthi, K., E-mail: krmurthin@yahoo.co.in [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, – 603203 Kancheepuram Dt., Tamil Nadu (India); Babu, R. Ramesh [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli – 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sethuraman, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai – 625021, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-01

    Vanadium oxide and fluorine doped vanadium oxide thin films were deposited on the micro-slide glass substrates at 400 °C by spray pyrolysis technique. Vanadium oxide films were deposited using 0.1 M ammonium meta vanadate aqua solution. Precursor solution used to deposit fluorine doped vanadium oxide films was prepared adding separately 5 wt.%, 10 wt.%, 15 wt.% and 20 wt.% of ammonium fluoride with the 0.1 M ammonium meta vanadate aqua solution. X-ray diffraction results showed that the films are in mixed phases of β-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and V{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Surface morphology and band gap of these films were modified due to different levels of fluorine doping. The average visible transmittance (500–800 nm) of vanadium oxide films is decreased due to low level concentration of fluorine doping. - Highlights: • Addition of a few ml HCl yielded clear precursor aqua solution. • F doped vanadium oxide films were deposited for less concentration of fluorine. • Low level fluorine doping modified the surface morphology of the thin films. • Direct band gap of vanadium oxide film is slightly increased by fluorine doping.

  19. Numerical Simulation on the Device of Rare Earth Oxide Preparation by Rare Earth Chloride Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the industrial applications of jet pyrolysis technology and it being used for the production of rare earth oxides, the paper hopes to find out an efficient, economic, and environmental friendly new technology which is suitable for production of rare earth oxides. In this paper, a chloride pyrolysis water model is designed, and standard κ-ε turbulence model and VOF model were coupled to simulate the three-dimensional steady gas-liquid flow in jet reactor. The valuable parameter we got provides strong basis for the experimental equipment manufacturing in thermal state and determining test program. Conclusions show that when the drainage tube diameter is 3 mm, it can guarantee that two-phase distribution of the gas-liquid is more uniform and easy for gas-liquid mixing in the tail region of the Venturi tube. If the fluid near the middle of the duct in front of the Venturi starts to reach equilibrium as constant speed flowing, it proves that elongated pipe is conducive to obtain a stable flow of air required by experiments. In the adjustable pipeline location of the Venturi tube, fluid can form a closed loop and generate reflux in the export where atomization and gas-liquid mixing have good effects.

  20. Electric plants to gas, influence of both Mineral Matter and Air Oxidation in coal pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, F.; Jaramillo, A.; Quintero, G.

    1995-01-01

    In this work some coal samples from different Colombia's deposits are analyzed. In first stage, material matter is removed from coal by acid treatment with HF/HCl, and aerial oxidation of coal is made with air in oven to 150 Centigrade degree temperature. In second stage, pyrolysis is carried out in two different techniques: 1. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and 2. Programmed Temperature Pyrolysis (PTP) in a pyrolyzer equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In both techniques, the coal samples are heated in different rates to 650 Centigrade degree. During PTP trials the evolution of CH4, H2S, hydrocarbons (m/z=42), CO2, benzene and toluene are monitored. Studied coal samples showed: 1). A gas conversion range between 48.8% to 21.8%; 2). A decrease in the gas conversion between 2% to 4%, when oxidation it is applied; 3). The temperature at the one which is presented the maximum evolution of CH4 is similar for all coal samples; 4). The maximum evolution of H2S depends on mineral matter composition, occurs between 480 to 550 Centigrade degrees and is presented due to pyrite decomposition. 5). The evolution of CO2 occurs between 100 to 650 Centigrade degree, its production is generated in different stage of the mentioned temperature range, and in some coal samples is presented due to inorganic origin

  1. Slow pyrolysis for rural small biomass energy by joint project developments of Brazil and Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampegowda, Rajesh; Chandayot, Pongchan [Asian University, Chonburi (Thailand)], email: rkempegowda@asianust.ac.th; Pannirselvam, Pagandai V.; Humberto, Maricy; Santos, Joao Matias [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (DEQ/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Grupo de Pesquisa em Engenharia de Custos], email: pannirbr@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The efficiency for carbonization by slow pyrolysis is still low in the current method studied using rice straw in Thailand and cashewnut shell in Brazil, however direct heating process yields better char yield of 17% as compared to indirect heating with 15% process using horizontal metal drum kiln.where as vertical kiln were mainly used in Brazil. Higher yield is made possible from Brasilian cashew nut shell to make oil and char. Carbon and energy balance was also carried out and the results were compared for the direct and indirect process. Burning by indirect draft gives better results like more char, faster process. Direct draft gives less char, but higher quality (higher C and H2). Also a lot of straw is left unburnt in the direct draft kiln, because of bad temperature distribution and flow inside. The kiln design is found to be more suitable for indirect draft rather than direct draft. Both methods still give rice straw charcoal that has low calorific value with an output char LHV of 4337 kcal/kg as compared to fresh rice straw of 3412 kcal/kg. In the direct heating method output char is enriched to 45% with a still unburnt rice straw left out as compared to indirect heating method with carbon enrichment of 39%. There is a loss of 13% of carbon through the ash in the both the methods. The carbon content in the condensate is in the order of 18.5% for the indirect process as compared to 13.9% in the direct process due to less exhaust and carbon enrichment inside the kiln. There is a loss of 43% of carbon in the exhaust from indirect heating process as compared to direct heating process which is reduced to 26%. The energy balance predicts a heat loss of 14% in exhaust gases. A practical small scale slow pyrolysis project was developed to meet rural energy and heat requirements. to make the clean energy from waste resources possible by the joint project. (author)

  2. Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandvold, Timothy A; Baird, Lance Awender; Frey, Stanley Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In an embodiment, a method of preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil includes providing a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is hydrodeoxygenated under catalysis in the presence of hydrogen to form a hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream comprising a cyclic paraffin component. At least a portion of the hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream is dehydrogenated under catalysis to form the upgraded pyrolysis oil.

  3. High-yield harvest of nanofibers/mesoporous carbon composite by pyrolysis of waste biomass and its application for high durability electrochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Tian, Ke; He, Yan-Rong; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-12-02

    Disposal and recycling of the large scale biomass waste is of great concern. Themochemically converting the waste biomass to functional carbon nanomaterials and bio-oil is an environmentally friendly apporach by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by open burning. In this work, we reported a scalable, "green" method for the synthesis of the nanofibers/mesoporous carbon composites through pyrolysis of the Fe(III)-preloaded biomass, which is controllable by adjustment of temperature and additive of catalyst. It is found that the coupled catalytic action of both Fe and Cl species is able to effectively catalyze the growth of the carbon nanofibers on the mesoporous carbon and form magnetic nanofibers/mesoporous carbon composites (M-NMCCs). The mechanism for the growth of the nanofibers is proposed as an in situ vapor deposition process, and confirmed by the XRD and SEM results. M-NMCCs can be directly used as electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage without further separation, and exhibit favorable energy storage performance with high EDLC capacitance, good retention capability, and excellent stability and durability (more than 98% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles). Considering that biomass is a naturally abundant and renewable resource (over billions tons biomass produced every year globally) and pyrolysis is a proven technique, M-NMCCs can be easily produced at large scale and become a sustainable and reliable resource for clean energy storage.

  4. Structural, optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benamar, E.; Rami, M.; Messaoudi, C.; Sayah, D.; Ennaoui, A. [Deptartmento de Physique, Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1014, Ave Inb Battouta, Rabat (Morocco)

    1998-11-27

    Spray pyrolysis process has been used to deposit highly transparent and conducting films of tin-doped indium oxide onto glass substrates. The electrical, structural and optical properties have been investigated as a function of various deposition parameters namely dopant concentrations, temperature and nature of substrate. The morphology of the surface as a function of the substrate temperature has been studied using atomic force microscopy. XRD has shown that deposited films are polycrystalline without second phases and have a preferred orientation (4 0 0). Indium tin oxide layers with low resistivity values around 4x10{sup -5} {Omega} cm and transmission coefficients in the visible and near-infrared range of about 85-90% have been easily obtained

  5. Development of transition metal oxide catalysts for treatment of off-gases released during pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2005-08-01

    The spent IX resin wastes arising from nuclear power plants have high radiation level due to fission product 137 Cesium and activation product 60 Cobalt. The pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis processes have potential to minimize final waste form volumes of these wastes. The major difficulty in deploying these processes for treatment of spent IX resins is release of off-gases containing large quantities of aromatic hydrocarbons, amines, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, carbonyl sulphide etc. As an alternative to high temperature incineration of the pyrolysis off gases, feasibility of using catalytic combustion at moderate temperatures was investigated in the laboratory. Copper chromite, copper oxide-ceric oxide and vanadium pentaoxide catalysts supported on alumina were prepared and tested for oxidation of styrene monomer, toluene, ethyl benzene and trimethyl amine at 22500 hr -1 space velocity and temperature range of 300 to 500 degC. At temperatures over 475 degC, all three catatyst gave oxidation efficiency of over 97% for these compounds over concentration range of few tens of ppm to few thousands ppm. A composite catalyst bed of three catalysts comprising principally of copper chromite is proposed for treatment of IX resin pyrolysis off-gases. (author)

  6. Pyrolysis of wetland biomass waste: Potential for carbon sequestration and water remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoqiang; Hao, Hulin; He, Zhenli; Stoffella, Peter J; Yang, Xiaoe

    2016-05-15

    Management of biomass waste is crucial to the efficiency and sustainable operation of constructed wetlands. In this study, biochars were prepared using the biomass of 22 plant species from constructed wetlands and characterized by BET-N2 surface area analysis, FTIR, TGA, SEM, EDS, and elemental compositions analysis. Biochar yields ranged from 32.78 to 49.02%, with mesopores dominating the pore structure of most biochars. The biochars had a R50 recalcitrance index of class C and the carbon sequestration potential of 19.4-28%. The aquatic plant biomass from all the Chinese constructed wetlands if made into biochars has the potential to sequester 11.48 Mt carbon yr(-1) in soils over long time periods, which could offset 0.4% of annual CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion in China. In terms of adsorption capacity for selected pollutants, biochar derived from Canna indica plant had the greatest adsorption capacity for Cd(2+) (98.55 mg g(-1)) and NH4(+) (7.71 mg g(-1)). Whereas for PO4(3-), Hydrocotyle verticillata derived biochar showed the greatest adsorption capacities (2.91 mg g(-1)). The results from this present study demonstrated that wetland plants are valuable feedstocks for producing biochars with potential application for carbon sequestration and contaminant removal in water remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  8. Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Biomass/Oil Mixture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Václav; Hanika, Jiří; Tukač, V.; Lederer, J.; Kovač, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2013), s. 1940-1945 ISSN 1934-8983 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MPO 2A-2TP1/024 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hydrocarbon oil * biomass * catalytic partial oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.davidpublishing.com/journals_info.asp?jId=1718#

  9. Catalytic upgrading of sugar fractions from pyrolysis oils in supercritical mono-alcohols over Cu doped porous metal oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Wang; Venderbosch, Hendrikus; Bottari, Giovanni; Krawzcyk, Krzysztof K.; Barta, Katalin; Heeres, Hero Jan

    In this work, we report on the catalytic valorization of sugar fractions, obtained by aqueous phase extraction of fast pyrolysis oils, in supercritical methanol (scMeOH) and ethanol (scEtOH) over a copper doped porous metal oxide (Cu-PMO). The product mixtures obtained are, in principle, suitable

  10. Two-step fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass for bio-oil production using microwave absorbent and HZSM-5 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Xie, Qinglong; Liu, Shiyu; Ruan, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A novel technology of two-step fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis (fMAP) of corn stover for bio-oil production was investigated in the presence of microwave absorbent (SiC) and HZSM-5 catalyst. Effects of fMAP temperature and catalyst-to-biomass ratio on bio-oil yield and chemical components were examined. The results showed that this technology, employing microwave, microwave absorbent and HZSM-5 catalyst, was effective and promising for biomass fast pyrolysis. The fMAP temperature of 500°C was considered the optimum condition for maximum yield and best quality of bio-oil. Besides, the bio-oil yield decreased linearly and the chemical components in bio-oil were improved sequentially with the increase of catalyst-to-biomass ratio from 1:100 to 1:20. The elemental compositions of bio-char were also determined. Additionally, compared to one-step fMAP process, two-step fMAP could promote the bio-oil quality with a smaller catalyst-to-biomass ratio. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Characterization of the Water-Soluble Fraction of Woody Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovikj, Filip; McDonald, Armando G.; Helms, Gregory L.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2017-01-31

    This paper reports a study of the chemical composition of the water soluble (WS) fraction obtained by cold water precipitation of two commercial wood pyrolysis oils (BTG and Amaron). The fraction studied accounts for between 50.3 and 51.3 wt. % of the oils. With the most common analytical techniques used today for the characterization of this fraction (KF titration, GC/MS, hydrolysable sugars and total carbohydrates), it is possible to quantify only between 45 and 50 wt. % of it. Our results confirm that most of the total carbohydrates (hydrolysable sugars and non-hydrolysable) are soluble in water. The ion chromatography hydrolysis method showed that between 11.6 and 17.3 wt. % of these oils were hydrolysable sugars. A small quantity of phenols detectable by GC/MS (between 2.5 and 3.9 wt. %) were identified. It is postulated that the unknown high molecular weight fraction (30-55 wt. %) is formed by highly dehydrated sugars rich in carbonyl groups and WS phenols. The overall content of carbonyl, carboxyl, hydroxyl and phenolic compounds in the WS fraction were quantified by titration, Folin-Ciocalteu, 31P-NMR and 1H-NMR. The WS fraction contains between 5.5 and 6.2 mmol/g of carbonyl groups, between 0.4 and 1.0 mmol/g of carboxylic acid groups, between 1.2 and 1.8 mmol/g phenolic -OH, and between 6.0 and 7.9 mmol/g of aliphatic alcohol groups. Translation into weight fractions of the WS was done by supposing surrogate structures for the water soluble phenols, carbonyl and carboxyl groups and we estimated the content of WS phenols (21-27 wt. %), carbonyl (5-14 wt.%), and carboxyl (0-4 wt.%). Together with the total carbohydrates (23-27 wt.%), this approach leads to > 90 wt. % of the WS material in the bio-oils being quantified. We speculate the larger portion of the difference between the total carbohydrates and hydrolysable sugars is the missing furanic fraction. Further refinement of the suggested methods and development of separation schemes to obtain and

  12. Analysis of coals and biomass pyrolysis using the distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqi; Liu, Chunlong; Chen, Zhichao; Qian, Juan; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Qunyi

    2009-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of coals and biomass was studied using thermogravimetric analysis with the distributed activation energy model. The integral method resulted in Datong bituminous coal conversions of 3-73% at activation energies of 100-486 kJ/mol. The corresponding frequency factors were e(19.5)-e(59.0)s(-1). Jindongnan lean coal conversions were 8-52% at activation energies of 100-462 kJ/mol. Their corresponding frequency factors were e(13.0)-e(55.8)s(-1). The conversion of corn-stalk skins were 1-84% at activation energies of 62-169 kJ/mol with frequency factors of e(10.8)-e(26.5)s(-1). Datong bituminous coal, Jindongnan lean coal and corn-stalk skins had approximate Gaussian distribution functions with linear ln k(0) to E relationships.

  13. Atmospheric Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Vapor by MoO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Le, Duy Michael

    2016-01-01

    16.2 wt %daf organic liquid, while achieving 52% degree of deoxygenation at 450 °C catalyst temperature under 89 vol % H2 concentration. The corresponding energy recovery in the liquid phase was 23.5%. The spent catalyst showed two deactivation routes, coke formation and reduction of MoO3 to MoO2......, which is inactive in HDO. The catalyst experienced severe reduction at temperatures higher than 400 °C. The yields of coke relative to the fed biomass were in the range of 3–4 wt %daf for lignin and 5–6 wt %daf for wood. Compared to untreated bio-oil the upgraded lignin organic liquid showed improved...

  14. Continuous pyrolysis of biomass feedstocks in rotary kiln convertors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Jr, H. H.; Kimzey, J. R.; Turpin, J. L.; MacCallum, R. N.

    1979-08-30

    The biomass research program at the University of Arkansas has developed three experimental projects or tasks for the attainment of its objectives. They are: (1) utilization of the existing full scale convertor for testing and data acquisition at Jonesboro, Arkansas; (2) development of a scale model rotary pyrolytic convertor (bench scale research kiln); and (3) development of analytical laboratory services for the analysis of feedstocks and products, and for basic pyrolytic process studies. The project at Jonesboro, Arkansas, which aimed at testing the Angelo convertor concept through heat and material balances over the available range of operations, could not completely achieve this objective because of the severe mechanical and structural deficiencies in the full scale convertor. A limited number of data have been taken in spite of the deficiencies of the machine. The scale model rotary kiln has been the most successful of the three projects. The kiln has been completed as planned and successfully operated with a number of feedstock materials. Good qualitative data have been obtained on conversion rate capacities, charcoal yields, and off gas combustion product temperatures. In all, about one hundred test runs were made in the scale model kiln. About 90% of the results expected were attained. The laboratory services project was designed to provide analytical testing for the other two projects and to do basic studies in biomass material conversion processes. The project delivered the testing services, but was severely restricted in the area of basic studies because of the failure of the main instrument, the gas chromatograph, to operate successfully. In all it is estimated that this project attained about 80% of its expected goals.

  15. Biomass to fuels : Upgrading of flash pyrolysis oil by reactive distillation using a high boiling alcohol and acid catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F.H.; Melian Cabrera, I.V.; Manurung, R.M.; Heeres, H.J.

    We here report our studies on the upgrading of flash pyrolysis oil using an improved alcohol treatment method. The method consists of treating pyrolysis oil with a high boiling alcohol like n-butanol in the presence of a (solid) acid catalyst at 323-353 K under reduced pressure (<10 kPa). Using this

  16. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of index profile of indium tin oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Rhaleb, H.; Benamar, E.; Rami, M.; Roger, J.P.; Hakam, A.; Ennaoui, A.

    2002-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterisation. It was used to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films deposited by spray pyrolysis onto Pyrex substrates. Dielectric ITO films often present microstructures which give rise to a variation of the refractive index with the distance from substrate. In this work, it was found that the fit between ellipsometric data and optical models results could be significantly improved when it was assumed that the refractive index of ITO films varied across the upper 60 nm near the film surface. Also, the surface roughness was modelled and compared with that given by the atomic force microscope (AFM)

  17. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of index profile of indium tin oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rhaleb, H.; Benamar, E.; Rami, M.; Roger, J. P.; Hakam, A.; Ennaoui, A.

    2002-11-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterisation. It was used to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films deposited by spray pyrolysis onto Pyrex substrates. Dielectric ITO films often present microstructures which give rise to a variation of the refractive index with the distance from substrate. In this work, it was found that the fit between ellipsometric data and optical models results could be significantly improved when it was assumed that the refractive index of ITO films varied across the upper 60 nm near the film surface. Also, the surface roughness was modelled and compared with that given by the atomic force microscope (AFM).

  18. Spray pyrolysis of doped-ceria barrier layers for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczewska, Dagmara; Chrzan, Aleksander; Karczewski, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    of elements. The parameters of the fabrication process are linked to the measured area specific resistances of the symmetrical cells and the efficiency of the fuel cells. Results show, that application of 800 nm thick barrier effectively hinder negative reactions, while 400 nm thick layer is sufficient......Gadolinium doped ceria (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 − x-CGO) layer fabricated by spray pyrolysis is investigated as the diffusion barrier for solid oxide fuel cell. It is deposited between the La0.6Sr0.4FeO3 − δ cathode and the yttria stabilized zirconia electrolyte to mitigate harmful interdiffusion...

  19. Evolution of Zinc Oxide Nanostructures Grown on Graphene by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis and Its Statistical Growth Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amgad Ahmed; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of zinc oxide nanostructures grown on graphene by alcohol-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis was investigated. The evolution of structures is strongly depended on pyrolysis parameters, i.e., precursor molarity, precursor flow rate, precursor injection/deposition time, and substrate temperature. Field-effect scanning electron microscope analysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the properties of the synthesized nanostructures and to provide evidence for the structural changes according to the changes in the pyrolysis parameters. The optimum parameters to achieve maximum density and well-defined hexagonally shaped nanorods were a precursor molarity of 0.2 M, an injection flow rate of 6 ml/min, an injection time of 10 min, and a substrate temperature of 250-355 °C. Based on the experimental results, the response surface methodology (RSM) was used to model and optimize the independent pyrolysis parameters using the Box-Behnken design. Here, the responses, i.e., the nanostructure density, size, and shape factor, are evaluated. All of the computations were performed using the Design-Expert software package. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate the results of the model and to determine the significant values for the independent pyrolysis parameters. The evolution of zinc oxide (ZnO) structures are well explained by the developed modelling which confirms that RSM is a reliable tool for the modelling and optimization of the pyrolysis parameters and prediction of nanostructure sizes and shapes.

  20. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells coupled with a biomass gasification unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypkiewicz Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of fuelling a solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC with biomass fuels can be realized by coupling a SOFC system with a self-standing gasification unit. Such a solution enables multi-fuel operation, elasticity of the system as well as the increase of the efficiency of small-scale biomass-to-electricity conversion units. A system of this type, consisting of biomass gasification unit, gas purification unit, SOFC stack, anode off-gas afterburner and peripherals was constructed and operated successfully. During the process, biomass fuel (wood chips was gasified with air as gasification agent. The gasifier was capable of converting up to 30 kW of fuel to syngas with efficiencies up to 75%. Syngas leaving the gasification unit is delivered to a medium temperature adsorber for sulphur compounds removal. Steam is added to the purified fuel to maintain steam to carbon ratio higher than 2. The syngas then is passed to a SOFC stack through a fuel preheater. In such a configuration it was possible to operate a commercial 1.3 kW stack within its working regime. Conducted tests confirmed successful operation of a SOFC stack fuelled by biomass-sourced syngas.

  1. Preparation and application of porous nitrogen-doped graphene obtained by co-pyrolysis of lignosulfonate and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Bo; Wang, Wen-Dong; Lü, Qiu-Feng; Lin, Ting-Ting; Lin, Qilang; Yang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene with in-plane porous structure was fabricated by simple co-pyrolysis of lignosulfonate and graphene oxide in the presence of urea. Lignosulfonate first performs as a dispersant adsorbed on the surface of graphene oxide to prevent the aggregation of graphene oxide sheets for preparing homogeneous nitrogen-containing precursor, and then acts as a porogen to render graphene sheets with nanopores in the pyrolysis process of the nitrogen-containing precursor. Urea was used as a nitrogen source to incorporate nitrogen atoms into graphene basal plane. The special nanoporous structure combined with nitrogen content of 7.41at.% endows the nitrogen-doped graphene electrode material with super capacitance up to 170Fg(-1), high rate performance, and excellent cycling stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling of pyrolysis of peat and biomass under combustion and gasification; Pyrolyysimalli turpeen ja biomassan poltolle ja kaasutukselle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Haukka, P.; Vehmaan-Kreula, M. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Technology

    1997-10-01

    In the model developed during the research the chemical kinetics of pyrolysis is described with `the two competing reactions model`. Heat transfer in particle consists of convection and conduction. With the help of the model all the kinetic parameters of the two pyrolysis reactions are fitted with measured values. Also simple correlations for pyrolysis of peat under fluidized bed and pulverised flame conditions are given. The effect of the heating rate can be taken into account by using two competing Arrhenius-type reactions. In this model pyrolysis is modelled by using two reactions; one for the low temperature level and the other for the high temperature level. Both of these reactions consume the same unreacted fuel and this model is able to describe the pyrolysis at different temperature levels. Pyrolysis takes place in the heating stage of the particle before heterogeneous combustion and therefore temperature and density profiles inside the particle have to be solved simultaneously. The energy and mass balance equations of the particle form a set of partial differential equations (PDE), which is solved numerically by using so called method of lines, by converting PDE into a set of ordinary differential equations (ODE). The final solution of ODEs is received by using LSODE algorithm of Hindmash. An user friendly interface for the pyrolysis model is programmed by using Visual Basic enabling convenient variation of the conditions and observation of the results

  3. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  4. Indium oxide thin-film transistors processed at low temperature via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Faber, Hendrik

    2015-01-14

    The use of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is demonstrated for the growth of polycrystalline, highly uniform indium oxide films at temperatures in the range of 200-300 °C in air using an aqueous In(NO3)3 precursor solution. Electrical characterization of as-deposited films by field-effect measurements reveals a strong dependence of the electron mobility on deposition temperature. Transistors fabricated at ∼250 °C exhibit optimum performance with maximum electron mobility values in the range of 15-20 cm2 V -1 s-1 and current on/off ratio in excess of 106. Structural and compositional analysis of as-grown films by means of X-ray diffraction, diffuse scattering, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal that layers deposited at 250 °C are denser and contain a reduced amount of hydroxyl groups as compared to films grown at either lower or higher temperatures. Microstructural analysis of semiconducting films deposited at 250 °C by high resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals that as-grown layers are extremely thin (∼7 nm) and composed of laterally large (30-60 nm) highly crystalline In2O3 domains. These unique characteristics of the In2O3 films are believed to be responsible for the high electron mobilities obtained from transistors fabricated at 250 °C. Our work demonstrates the ability to grow high quality low-dimensional In2O3 films and devices via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis over large area substrates while at the same time it provides guidelines for further material and device improvements.

  5. Shock tube and modeling study of 2,7-dimethyloctane pyrolysis and oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sijie

    2015-05-01

    High molecular weight iso-paraffinic molecules are found in conventional petroleum, Fischer-Tropsch (FT), and other alternative hydrocarbon fuels, yet fundamental combustion studies on this class of compounds are lacking. In the present work, ignition delay time measurements in 2,7-dimethyloctane/air were carried out behind reflected shock waves using conventional and constrained reaction volume (CRV) methods. The ignition delay time measurements covered the temperature range 666-1216K, pressure range 12-27atm, and equivalence ratio of 0.5 and 1. The ignition delay time temperatures span the low-, intermediate- and high-temperature regimes for 2,7-dimethyloctane (2,7-DMO) oxidation. Clear evidence of negative temperature coefficient behavior was observed near 800K. Fuel time-history measurements were also carried out in pyrolysis experiments in mixtures of 2000ppm 2,7-DMO/argon at pressures near 16 and 35atm, and in the temperature range of 1126-1455K. Based on the fuel removal rates, the overall 2,7-DMO decomposition rate constant can be represented with k =4.47×105 exp(-23.4[kcal/mol]/RT) [1/s]. Ethylene time-history measurements in pyrolysis experiments at 16atm are also provided. The current shock tube dataset was simulated using a novel chemical kinetic model for 2,7-DMO. The reaction mechanism includes comprehensive low- and high-temperature reaction classes with rate constants assigned using established rules. Comparisons between the simulated and experimental data show simulations reproduce the qualitative trends across the entire range of conditions tested. However, the present kinetic modeling simulations cannot quantitatively reproduce a number of experimental data points, and these are analyzed herein.

  6. Physico-chemical, optical and electrochemical properties of iron oxide thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dghoughi, L.; Elidrissi, B.; Bernede, C.; Addou, M.; Lamrani, M. Alaoui; Regragui, M.; Erguig, H.

    2006-01-01

    Iron oxide thin films were prepared by spray pyrolysis technique onto glass substrates from iron chloride solution. They were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The films deposited at T s ≤ 450 deg. C were amorphous; while those produced at T sub = 500 deg. C were polycrystalline α-Fe 2 O 3 with a preferential orientation along the (1 0 4) direction. By observing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it was seen that iron oxide films were relatively homogeneous uniform and had a good adherence to the glass substrates. The grain size was found (by RX) between 19 and 25 nm. The composition of these films was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). These films exhibited also a transmittance value about 80% in the visible and infrared range. The cyclic voltammetry study showed that the films of Fe 2 O 3 deposited on ITO pre-coated glass substrates were capable of charge insertion/extraction when immersed in an electrolyte of propylene carbonate (PC) with 0.5 M LiCLO 4

  7. Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass via Integrated Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydroconversion - Wastewater Cleanup by Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olarte, Mariefel V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, Todd R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-19

    DOE-EE Bioenergy Technologies Office has set forth several goals to increase the use of bioenergy and bioproducts derived from renewable resources. One of these goals is to facilitate the implementation of the biorefinery. The biorefinery will include the production of liquid fuels, power and, in some cases, products. The integrated biorefinery should stand-alone from an economic perspective with fuels and power driving the economy of scale while the economics/profitability of the facility will be dependent on existing market conditions. UOP LLC proposed to demonstrate a fast pyrolysis based integrated biorefinery. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has expertise in an important technology area of interest to UOP for use in their pyrolysis-based biorefinery. This CRADA project provides the supporting technology development and demonstration to allow incorporation of this technology into the biorefinery. PNNL developed catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) for use with aqueous streams within the pyrolysis biorefinery. These aqueous streams included the aqueous phase separated from the fast pyrolysis bio-oil and the aqueous byproduct streams formed in the hydroprocessing of the bio-oil to finished products. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a technically and economically viable technology for converting renewable biomass feedstocks to sustainable and fungible transportation fuels. To demonstrate the technology, UOP constructed and operated a pilot-scale biorefinery that processed one dry ton per day of biomass using fast pyrolysis. Specific objectives of the project were to: The anticipated outcomes of the project were a validated process technology, a range of validated feedstocks, product property and Life Cycle data, and technical and operating data upon which to base the design of a full-scale biorefinery. The anticipated long-term outcomes from successful commercialization of the technology were: (1) the replacement of a significant

  8. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  9. Study of Structural and Optical Properties of Zinc Oxide Rods Grown on Glasses by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sonmez, Erdal; Aydin, Serdar; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Yurtcan, Mustafa Tolga; Karacali, Tevhit; Ertugrul, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated morphological and optical properties of zinc oxide rods. Highly structured ZnO layers comprising with well-shaped hexagonal rods were prepared by spray pyrolysis deposition of zinc chloride aqueous solutions at ~550∘C. The rods were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy measurements. The deposition of the 0.1 mol/L solution at ~550∘C resulted in crys...

  10. Quantification of Lignin and Its Structural Features in Plant Biomass Using 13C Lignin as Internal Standard for Pyrolysis-GC-SIM-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erven, Gijs; de Visser, Ries; Merkx, Donny W H; Strolenberg, Willem; de Gijsel, Peter; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2017-10-17

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying plant biomass recalcitrance at the molecular level can only be achieved by accurate analyses of both the content and structural features of the molecules involved. Current quantification of lignin is, however, majorly based on unspecific gravimetric analysis after sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Hence, our research aimed at specific lignin quantification with concurrent characterization of its structural features. Hereto, for the first time, a polymeric 13 C lignin was used as internal standard (IS) for lignin quantification via analytical pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography with mass-spectrometric detection in selected ion monitoring mode (py-GC-SIM-MS). In addition, relative response factors (RRFs) for the various pyrolysis products obtained were determined and applied. First, 12 C and 13 C lignin were isolated from nonlabeled and uniformly 13 C labeled wheat straw, respectively, and characterized by heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and py-GC/MS. The two lignin isolates were found to have identical structures. Second, 13 C-IS based lignin quantification by py-GC-SIM-MS was validated in reconstituted biomass model systems with known contents of the 12 C lignin analogue and was shown to be extremely accurate (>99.9%, R 2 > 0.999) and precise (RSD < 1.5%). Third, 13 C-IS based lignin quantification was applied to four common poaceous biomass sources (wheat straw, barley straw, corn stover, and sugar cane bagasse), and lignin contents were in good agreement with the total gravimetrically determined lignin contents. Our robust method proves to be a promising alternative for the high-throughput quantification of lignin in milled biomass samples directly and simultaneously provides a direct insight into the structural features of lignin.

  11. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  12. Preparation and chemical characterization of neodymium-doped molybdenum oxide films grown using spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, J. E. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ciencia Materiales y Superficies, AA 5997 Bogota DC (Colombia); Moreno, L. C., E-mail: jealfonsoo@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Quimica, AA 5997 Bogota DC (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    We studied the crystalline, morphology, and surface composition of Nd-doped molybdenum oxide films grown on glass slides through spray pyrolysis. After fabrication, the films were subjected to thermal treatment in oxygen for periods ranging from 2 to 20 hours. The films were structurally characterized though X-ray diffraction (XRD), their bulk chemical composition was determined using Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and their surface composition was determined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XP S). The XRD results show that the films obtained from different dissolution volumes and at substrate temperature of 300 grades C exhibit the characteristics of the oxygen-deficient molybdenum trioxide Mo{sub 9}O{sub 26} phase. The films subjected to different thermal treatments exhibit a mixture of Mo{sub 9}O{sub 26} and Mo{sub 17}O{sub 47} phases. EDX study shows the energy belonging to the L line of Nd. Finally, films doped with Nd and subjected to a thermal treatment of 20 h were analyzed through XP S, showing the binding energies at the crystalline lattice correspond to Nd{sub 2} (MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7}. (Author)

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nickel oxide thin films deposited on glass substrates using spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jlassi, M., E-mail: mohamedjlassilpv@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Sta, I. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Hajji, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Ecole Nationale d’Electronique et des Communications de Sfax, Technopole de Sfax, BP 1163, CP 3021 (Tunisia); Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2014-07-01

    A simple and inexpensive spray pyrolysis technique was employed to deposit nickel oxide (NiO) thin films from hydrated nickel chloride salt solution onto amorphous glass substrate. The as-deposited films were transparent, uniform and well adherent to the glass substrate. The effect of the substrate temperature, the volume and the concentration of the sprayed solution on the structural, optical and electrical properties was studied using X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance, four point probe, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The structural analyses show that all the samples have a cubic structure. It was found that the increase in the volume of sprayed solution leads to an increment in the crystallite size of NiO and improves the homogeneity of the film. Optical measurements have shown that an increase in the thickness of the layer results in a decrease in the optical transmission, but it remains higher than 70% even if the thickness exceeds 600 nm. At the same time, the optical gap decreases from 3.7 to 3.55 eV when the thickness increases from 133 to 620 nm. Low values of the electrical resistivity (less than 10 Ω cm) were obtained for thin films with thicknesses less than about 240 nm, but for higher thicknesses the resistivity increases linearly to reach about 170 Ω cm for a thickness of 620 nm.

  14. Optical and Electrical Properties of Copper Oxide Thin Films Synthesized by Spray Pyrolysis Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Roy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Copper oxide (CuO thin films have been synthesized on to glass substrates at different temperatures in the range 250-450 °C by spray pyrolysis technique from aqueous solution using cupric acetate Cu(CH3COO2·H2O as a precursor. The structure of the deposited CuO thin films characterized by X-ray diffraction, the surface morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope, the presence of elements was detected by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, the optical transmission spectra was recorded by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and electrical resistivity was studied by Van-der Pauw method. All the CuO thin films, irrespective of growth temperature, showed a monoclinic structure with the main CuO (111 orientation, and the crystallite size was about 8.4784 Å for the thin film synthesized at 350 °C. The optical transmission of the as-deposited film is found to decrease with the increase of substrate temperature, the optical band gap of the thin films varies from 1.90 to 1.60 eV and the room temperature electrical resistivity varies from 30 to18 Ohm·cm for the films grown at different substrate temperatures.

  15. Investigation on vanadium oxide thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margoni, Mudaliar Mahesh; Mathuri, S.; Ramamurthi, K., E-mail: krmurthin@yahoo.co.in, E-mail: ramamurthi.k@ktr.srmuniv.ac.in [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, SRM University, Kattankulathur – 603 203, Kancheepuram Dt., Tamil Nadu (India); Babu, R. Ramesh [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli – 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sethuraman, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai – 625 021, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-06

    Vanadium oxide thin films were deposited at 400 °C by spray pyrolysis technique using 0.1 M aqueous precursor solution of ammonium meta vanadate (AMV) with two different pH values. X-ray diffraction results showed that the film prepared using aqueous precursor AMV solution (solution A; pH 7) is amorphous in nature and the film prepared by adding HNO{sub 3} in the AMV aqua solution A (solution B; pH 3) is polycrystalline in nature. Vanadium oxide film prepared from the precursor solution B is in the mixed phases of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and V{sub 4}O{sub 7}. Crystallinity is improved for the film prepared using solution B when compared to film prepared from solution A. Crystallite size, strain and dislocation density calculated for the film prepared from solution B is respectively 72.1 nm, 0.4554 × 10{sup −3} lin.{sup −2}m{sup −4} and 1.7263 × 10{sup 14} lin.m{sup −2}. Morphology study revealed that the size of the flakes formed on the surface of the films is influenced by the pH of the precursor solution. Average Visible Transmittance and maximum transmittance of the deposited films exceed 70% and the direct optical band gap value calculated for the films deposited from A and B solution is 1.91 eV and 2.08 eV respectively.

  16. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on the Biomass Solid Residues at High Temperatures (1000-1400°C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    and morphology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), elementary analysis, CAMSIZER XT, ash compositional analysis were applied to characterize the effect of operational conditions on the solid and gas products. Char yield from fast pyrolysis in the DFT setup was 2 to 6 % (daf) lower than in the WMR apparatus...

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis-gc/ms of spirulina: evaluation of a highly proteinaceous biomass source for production of fuels and chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of microalgae offers a pathway towards the production of compounds derived from the thermal decomposition of triglycerides, proteins as well as lignocelluloses and their combinations thereof. When catalytically induced, this could lead to the production of fuels and chemicals including aro...

  18. A Compact, Efficient Pyrolysis/Oxidation System for Solid Waste Resource Recovery in Space, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pyrolysis processing can be used in near term missions for volume reduction, water recovery (drying), stabilization, and enhanced water and oxygen recovery through...

  19. Influence of Promotor, H2O and H2S on the Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor over MoS2 Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine M. H.; Høj, Martin; Gaur, Abhijeet

    and by the presence of alkali, nitrogen, sulfur and water. In this contribution, a combined experimental, characterization (in-situ Quick-EXAFS) and theoretical (DFT) study of catalytic HDO of biomass pyrolysis model compounds over MoS2 based catalysts is presented with emphasis on the influence of water and H2S....

  20. Oxidative pyrolysis of polystyrene into styrene monomers in an autothermal fixed-bed catalytic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Rosenthal, Corey; Schmidt, Lanny D

    2012-10-01

    Styrene monomer recovery: A selective stream of styrene from fast pyrolysis of polystyrene is obtained with an autothermal fixed-bed reactor containing noble-metal (Rh, Pt) catalysts. Autothermal fast pyrolysis of polystyrene is an efficient means of recovering monomers from waste polystyrene in a continuous, high-throughput process without external heating. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  2. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  3. Biomass-powered Solid Oxide Fuel Cells : Experimental and Modeling Studies for System Integrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass is a sustainable energy source which, through thermo-chemical processes of biomass gasification, is able to be converted from a solid biomass fuel into a gas mixture, known as syngas or biosyngas. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a power generation device that directly converts the chemical

  4. Uncatalysed and potassium-catalysed pyrolysis of the cell-wall constituents of biomass and their model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowski, Daniel J.; Jones, Jenny M. [Energy and Resources Research Institute, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering (SPEME), University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    Cell-wall components (cellulose, hemicellulose (oat spelt xylan), lignin (Organosolv)), and model compounds (levoglucosan (an intermediate product of cellulose decomposition) and chlorogenic acid (structurally similar to lignin polymer units)) have been investigated to probe in detail the influence of potassium on their pyrolysis behaviours as well as their uncatalysed decomposition reaction. Cellulose and lignin were pretreated to remove salts and metals by hydrochloric acid, and this dematerialized sample was impregnated with 1% of potassium as potassium acetate. Levoglucosan, xylan and chlorogenic acid were mixed with CH{sub 3}COOK to introduce 1% K. Characterisation was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). In addition to the TGA pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PY-GC-MS) analysis was introduced to examine reaction products. Potassium-catalysed pyrolysis has a huge influence on the char formation stage and increases the char yields considerably (from 7.7% for raw cellulose to 27.7% for potassium impregnated cellulose; from 5.7% for raw levoglucosan to 20.8% for levoglucosan with CH{sub 3}COOK added). Major changes in the pyrolytic decomposition pathways were observed for cellulose, levoglucosan and chlorogenic acid. The results for cellulose and levoglucosan are consistent with a base catalysed route in the presence of the potassium salt which promotes complete decomposition of glucosidic units by a heterolytic mechanism and favours its direct depolymerization and fragmentation to low molecular weight components (e.g. acetic acid, formic acid, glyoxal, hydroxyacetaldehyde and acetol). Base catalysed polymerization reactions increase the char yield. Potassium-catalysed lignin pyrolysis is very significant: the temperature of maximum conversion in pyrolysis shifts to lower temperature by 70 K and catalysed polymerization reactions increase the char yield from 37% to 51%. A similar trend

  5. Characterization of cobalt oxide thin films prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louardi, A.; Rmili, A.; Ouachtari, F.; Bouaoud, A. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Elidrissi, B., E-mail: e.bachir@mailcity.com [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Erguig, H. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films show a micro porous structure. > Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films are formed with spherical grains less than 50 nm in diameter. > The porous structure of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} films is expected to have promising application in electrochromism. - Abstract: Cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer from aqueous solution of hydrated cobalt chloride salt (CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O) as source of cobalt. The films were deposited onto the amorphous glass substrates kept at different temperatures (300-500 deg. C). The influences of molar concentration of the starting solution and substrate temperature on the structural, morphological and optical properties of (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were studied. It was found from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis that the films prepared with molar concentration greater than 0.025 M/L were polycrystalline spinel type cubic structure. The preferred orientation of the crystallites of these films changes gradually from (6 2 2) to (1 1 1) when the substrate temperature increases. By Raman spectroscopy, five Raman active modes characteristic of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel type cubic structure were found and identified at 194, 484, 522, 620 and 691 cm{sup -1}. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed micro porous structure with very fine grains less than 50 nm in diameter. These films exhibited also a transmittance value of about 70% in the visible and infra red range.

  6. Investigation on the quality of bio-oil produced through fast pyrolysis of biomass-polymer waste mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourabchi, S. A.; Ng, H. K.; Gan, S.; Yap, Z. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A high-impact poly-styrene (HIPS) was mixed with dried and ground coconut shell (CS) at equal weight percentage. Fast pyrolysis was carried out on the mixture in a fixed bed reactor over a temperature range of 573 K to 1073 K, and a nitrogen (N2) linear velocity range of 7.8x10-5 m/s to 6.7x10-2 m/s to produce bio-oil. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics of the pyrolysis process inside the reactor was visualised by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The CFD modelling was validated by experimental results and they both indicated that at temperature of 923 K and N2 linear velocity of 7.8x10-5 m/s, the maximum bio-oil yield of 52.02 wt% is achieved.

  7. Membrane fractionation of biomass fast pyrolysis oil and impact of its presence on a petroleum gas oil hydrotreatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro , Ana; Hudebine , Damien; Dupassieux , Nathalie; Charon , Nadège; Geantet , Christophe

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In order to limit the greenhouse effect causing climate change and reduce the needs of the transport sector for petroleum oils, transformation of lignocellulosic biomass is a promising alternative route to produce automotive fuels, chemical intermediates and energy. Gasification and liquefaction of biomass resources are the two main routes that are under investigation to convert biomass into biofuels. In the case of the liquefaction, due to the unstability of the lique...

  8. Exploratory studies on fast pyrolysis oil upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, Farchad Husein

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil is a dark brown liquid which can be produced in high yield from different kind of biomass sources by means of fast pyrolysis. Pyrolysis oil is considered as a promising second generation energy carrier and may play an important role in the future of "biobased economies". The energy

  9. Glycolate oxidation in A. thaliana chloroplasts improves biomass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eMaier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A complete glycolate catabolic cycle was established in chloroplasts of the C3-model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by which one molecule of glycolate is completely oxidized within the chloroplast to two molecules of CO2. Genes coding for glycolate oxidase, malate synthase, and catalase were introduced into the nuclear genome of A. thaliana by step-wise transformation. Other genes required for a fully operational pathway are the endogenous NADP-malic enzyme and pyruvate dehydrogenase. Transgenic lines expressing the complete novel pathway produced rossettes with more leaves and higher fresh and dry weight but individual leaves were flatter and thinner than the wild type. The photosynthetic rates of the transgenic plants were higher on a dry weight and chlorophyll basis, but there were no differences in the compensation point. In addition, transgenic plants showed a lower glycine/serine ratio than the wild type indicating a reduction of the flux through the photorespiratory pathway. In this way, due to the increased oxidation of glycolate inside the chloroplasts, a photorespiratory bypass was created, which resulted in higher CO2 assimilation and enhanced biomass production.

  10. Fabrication of Biomass-Derived Carbon Aerogels with High Adsorption of Oils and Organic Solvents: Effect of Hydrothermal and Post-Pyrolysis Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Aishu; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xueming

    2016-09-06

    Biomass is the most plentiful and well-utilized renewable carbon resource on the earth. Direct conversion of biomass to carbon aerogel provides a promising approach to develop adsorbent materials. In the present work, the effect of presence of water during hydrothermal treatment and holding temperature during post-pyrolysis process have been investigated for the preparation of carbon aerogels (CAs) using eggplant as raw material. The results showed that the addition of water during hydrothermal treatment was advantageous for the preparation of CA samples with higher surface area and stronger hydrophobicity, resulting in superior adsorption capacities of CAs for both oil and organic solvents compared with that fabricated without the presence of water. The optimized carbon aerogel possessed higher specific surface of 249 m²·g -1 and exhibited excellent hydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 133°. The adsorption capacities of carbon aerogel for oils and organic solvents could reach 35-45 times its own weight. In addition, the adsorbed oil and organic solvents could be recovered by distillation, and the regenerated carbon aerogels samples exhibited the stable performance and outstanding reusability. Therefore, the carbon aerogel has great potential in application of oil recovery and environmental protection.

  11. Fabrication of Biomass-Derived Carbon Aerogels with High Adsorption of Oils and Organic Solvents: Effect of Hydrothermal and Post-Pyrolysis Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishu Yin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is the most plentiful and well-utilized renewable carbon resource on the earth. Direct conversion of biomass to carbon aerogel provides a promising approach to develop adsorbent materials. In the present work, the effect of presence of water during hydrothermal treatment and holding temperature during post-pyrolysis process have been investigated for the preparation of carbon aerogels (CAs using eggplant as raw material. The results showed that the addition of water during hydrothermal treatment was advantageous for the preparation of CA samples with higher surface area and stronger hydrophobicity, resulting in superior adsorption capacities of CAs for both oil and organic solvents compared with that fabricated without the presence of water. The optimized carbon aerogel possessed higher specific surface of 249 m2·g−1 and exhibited excellent hydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 133°. The adsorption capacities of carbon aerogel for oils and organic solvents could reach 35–45 times its own weight. In addition, the adsorbed oil and organic solvents could be recovered by distillation, and the regenerated carbon aerogels samples exhibited the stable performance and outstanding reusability. Therefore, the carbon aerogel has great potential in application of oil recovery and environmental protection.

  12. Biomass torrefaction characteristics in inert and oxidative atmospheres at various superficial velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lu, Ke-Miao; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Tsai, Chi-Ming; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Ta-Chang

    2013-10-01

    The reaction characteristics of four biomass materials (i.e. oil palm fiber, coconut fiber, eucalyptus, and Cryptomeria japonica) with non-oxidative and oxidative torrefaction at various superficial velocities are investigated where nitrogen and air are used as carrier gases. Three torrefaction temperatures of 250, 300, and 350 °C are considered. At a given temperature, the solid yield of biomass is not affected by N2 superficial velocity, revealing that the thermal degradation is controlled by heat and mass transfer in biomass. Increasing air superficial velocity decreases the solid yield, especially in oil palm fiber and coconut fiber, implying that the torrefaction reaction of biomass is dominated by surface oxidation. There exists an upper limit of air superficial velocity in the decrement of solid yield, suggesting that beyond this limit the thermal degradation of biomass is no longer governed by surface oxidation, but rather is controlled by internal mass transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhancement of bio-oil production via pyrolysis of wood biomass by pretreatment with H2SO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Shogo; Matsuno, Ryo; Grause, Guido; Kameda, Tomohito; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a Japanese cedar wood sample was treated during the first step at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure using several concentrations of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in a stirred flask. During this pretreatment C-O bonds of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin were cleaved. The second step involved the pyrolysis of the pretreated wood sample at 550 °C in a quartz glass tube reactor. A maximum oil yield of 46.8 wt% with the minimum char yield of 10.1 wt% was obtained by the treatment with 3 M H2SO4, whereas untreated wood samples resulted in a 30.1 wt% yield of oil. The main components in the oils were levoglucosan and tar. These results suggest that moderate acid pretreatment produced shorter chain units of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, thereby facilitating the conversion into oil by pyrolysis. The results of thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy supported the presence of shorter chain units in the pretreated wood samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  15. Unravelling the Chemical Complexity of Biomass Burning VOC Emissions via H3O+ ToF-CIMS: Separation of High- and Low-temperature Pyrolysis Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, K.; Koss, A.; Gilman, J.; Selimovic, V.; Coggon, M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Yuan, B.; Lerner, B. M.; Brown, S. S.; Warneke, C.; Yokelson, R. J.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning is a large source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and many other trace species to the atmosphere. These VOCs can act as precursors to formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and fine particles, and some VOCs can also have direct effects on human and ecosystem health. Multiple different and complex processes take place in biomass burning, e.g., distillation, flaming, and smoldering combustion processes. In a given fire, most of these processes occur simultaneously, but the relative importance of each can change over the course of a fire. This gives rise to some of the variability in VOC emissions between different fires. To study gas-phase emissions from biomass burning, an H3O+ ToF-CIMS was deployed during the FIREX 2016 laboratory intensive at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. This instrument has a fast time response and the measurements in stack burns show the varying gas-phase emissions as the mix of distillation, flaming, and smoldering varies. We used positive matrix factorization (PMF) to reduce and explain the observed chemical complexity in the gas phase. Despite the complexity and variability of emissions, we found that a solution including just two emission profiles explained on average 85% of the VOC emissions across 15 different fuel types including pines, firs, spruce, grass, shrubs, chaparrals, and wood wool. We identified the two profiles as resulting from high-temperature and low-temperature pyrolysis processes, and found that the profiles were remarkably similar (correlation coefficient r > 0.9) across nearly all the fuel types described above. Some of the remaining differences in VOC emission profiles between fuel types, and exceptions to the two-profile solution, can be explained by differences in the chemical composition of the fuels.

  16. Kinetic and isothermal adsorption-desorption of PAEs on biochars: effect of biomass feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, and mechanism implication of desorption hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Fanqi; Pan, Minjun; Chen, Jiawei

    2018-02-09

    Biochar has the potential to sequester biomass carbon efficiently into land, simultaneously while improving soil fertility and crop production. Biochar has also attracted attention as a potential sorbent for good performance on adsorption and immobilization of many organic pollutants such as phthalic acid esters (PAEs), a typical plasticizer in plastic and presenting a current environmental issue. Due to lack of investigation on the kinetic and thermodynamic adsorption-desorption of PAEs on biochar, we systematically assessed adsorption-desorption for two typical PAEs, dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP), using biochar derived from peanut hull and wheat straw at different pyrolysis temperatures (450, 550, and 650 °C). The aromaticity and specific surface area of biochars increased with the pyrolysis temperature, whereas the total amount of surface functional groups decreased. The quasi-second-order kinetic model could better describe the adsorption of DMP/DEP, and the adsorption capacity of wheat straw biochars was higher than that of peanut hull biochars, owing to the O-bearing functional groups of organic matter on exposed minerals within the biochars. The thermodynamic analysis showed that DMP/DEP adsorption on biochar is physically spontaneous and endothermic. The isothermal desorption and thermodynamic index of irreversibility indicated that DMP/DEP is stably adsorbed. Sorption of PAEs on biochar and the mechanism of desorption hysteresis provide insights relevant not only to the mitigation of plasticizer mobility but also to inform on the effect of biochar amendment on geochemical behavior of organic pollutants in the water and soil.

  17. Utilization possibilities of palm shell as a source of biomass energy in Malaysia by producing bio-oil in pyrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnisa, Faisal; Daud, W.M.A. Wan; Husin, W.N.W.; Sahu, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Agriculture residues such as palm shell are one of the biomass categories that can be utilized for conversion to bio-oil by using pyrolysis process. Palm shells were pyrolyzed in a fluidized-bed reactor at 400, 500, 600, 700 and 800 o C with N 2 as carrier gas at flow rate 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 L/min. The objective of the present work is to determine the effects of temperature, flow rate of N 2 , particle size and reaction time on the optimization of production of renewable bio-oil from palm shell. According to this study the maximum yield of bio-oil (47.3 wt%) can be obtained, working at the medium level for the operation temperature (500 o C) and 2 L/min of N 2 flow rate at 60 min reaction time. Temperature is the most important factor, having a significant positive effect on yield product of bio-oil. The oil was characterized by Fourier Transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. -- Highlights: → This study reports the results of experimental investing of conversion palm shell into bio-oil by using pyrolysis and to find the optimum condition to produce the highest yield of bio-oil. → Several parameters which have effect to the process such as temperature, N 2 flow rate, reaction time and particle size is will be investigated in this study. → The outcome of this result will be important for abatement and control of increasingly waste palm shell storage problems any energy source to the world.

  18. Effects of Biomass Feedstock on the Yield and Reactivity of Soot from Fast Pyrolysis at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter A.; Glarborg, Peter

    microscopy techniques, X-ray diffraction and N2-adsorption. The reactivity of soot was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that the reactivity of soot, generated at 1400°C was higher than that at 1250°C for all biomass types. Wood and wheat straw soot demonstrated differences......This study investigated the effect of feedstock on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Woody and herbaceous biomass were pyrolyzed at high heating rates and temperatures of 1250 and 1400°C in a drop tube furnace. The collected solid residues were structurally characterized by electron...

  19. Pyrolysis with staged recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Norman W.; Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Lumpkin, Robert E.; Winter, Bruce L.

    1979-03-20

    In a continuous process for recovery of values contained in a solid carbonaceous material, the carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to flash pyrolysis in the presence of a particulate heat source fed over an overflow weir to form a pyrolysis product stream containing a carbon containing solid residue and volatilized hydrocarbons. After the carbon containing solid residue is separated from the pyrolysis product stream, values are obtained by condensing volatilized hydrocarbons. The particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing carbon in the solid residue.

  20. Pyrolysis with cyclone burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Norman W.; Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Lumpkin, Robert E.

    1978-07-25

    In a continuous process for recovery of values contained in a solid carbonaceous material, the carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to flash pyrolysis in the presence of a particulate heat source over an overflow weir to form a pyrolysis product stream containing a carbon containing solid residue and volatilized hydrocarbons. After the carbon containing solid residue is separated from the pyrolysis product stream, values are obtained by condensing volatilized hydrocarbons. The particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing carbon in the solid residue and separating out the fines.

  1. On the atomization and combustion of liquid biofuels in gas turbines: towards the application of biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sallevelt, J.L.H.P.

    2015-01-01

    The combustion of liquid biofuels in gas turbines is an efficient way of generating heat and power from biomass. Gas turbines play a major role in the global energy supply and are suitable for a wide range of applications. However, biofuels generally have different properties compared to

  2. Study of Structural and Optical Properties of Zinc Oxide Rods Grown on Glasses by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Sonmez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated morphological and optical properties of zinc oxide rods. Highly structured ZnO layers comprising with well-shaped hexagonal rods were prepared by spray pyrolysis deposition of zinc chloride aqueous solutions at ~550∘C. The rods were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy measurements. The deposition of the 0.1 mol/L solution at ~550∘C resulted in crystals with a diameter of 400–1000 nm and length of 500–2000 nm. Sharp near-band edge emission peaks, centered at 3844 and 3680 Å, dominated the PL spectra of ZnO at 300 K and 6.2 K, respectively. In addition to this, absorption coefficient was determined by absorption measurement. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, results suggest that ZnO rods, prepared by spray pyrolysis, have high crystalline quality. This is desirable in nanotechnology applications.

  3. Pressurized Oxidative Recovery of Energy from Biomass Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Misra

    2007-06-10

    This study was conducted to evaluate the technical feasibility of using pressurized oxyfuel, the ThermoEnergy Integrated Power System (TIPS), to recover energy from biomass. The study was focused on two fronts—computer simulation of the TIPS plant and corrosion testing to determine the best materials of construction for the critical heat exchanger components of the process. The goals were to demonstrate that a successful strategy of applying the TIPS process to wood waste could be achieved. To fully investigate the technical and economic benefits of using TIPS, it was necessary to model a conventional air-fired biomass power plant for comparison purposes. The TIPS process recovers and utilizes the latent heat of vaporization of water entrained in the fuel or produced during combustion. This latent heat energy is unavailable in the ambient processes. An average composition of wood waste based on data from the Pacific Northwest, Pacific Southwest, and the South was used for the study. The high moisture content of wood waste is a major advantage of the TIPS process. The process can utilize the higher heating value of the fuel by condensing most of the water vapor in the flue gas and making the flue gas a useful source of heat. This is a considerable thermal efficiency gain over conventional power plants which use the lower heating value of the fuel. The elevated pressure also allows TIPS the option of recovering CO2 at near ambient temperatures with high purity oxygen used in combustion. Unlike ambient pressure processes which need high energy multi-stage CO2 compression to supply pipeline quality product, TIPS is able to simply pump the CO2 liquid using very little auxiliary power. In this study, a 15.0 MWe net biomass power plant was modeled, and when a CO2 pump was included it only used 0.1 MWe auxiliary power. The need for refrigeration is eliminated at such pressures resulting in significant energy, capital, and operating and maintenance savings. Since wood

  4. Results of a demonstration experiment: Hydrogenation of pyrolysis oils from biomass; Ergebnisse eines Demonstrationsversuchs zur Hydrierung von Pyrolyseoelen aus Biomassen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, M. [DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Sump phase hydrogenation is a technique specially developed for coal liquefaction; it provides a possibility of processing the liquid products of biomass pyrolyis into high-grade carburettor fuels. A demonstration experiment was carried out at the hydrogenation plant of DMT. The plant has a capacity of 10 kg/h. The technical feasibility of hydrogenation of biomass oils was demonstrated in a continuous experiment. The contribution describes the experimental conditions, yields, and product qualities. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die fuer die Kohleverfluessigung entwickelte Sumpfphasenhydrierung bietet die Moeglichkeit, die Fluessigprodukte der Pyrolyse von Biomassen zu hochwertigen Vergaserkraftstoffen zu veredeln. Im Hydriertechnikum der DMT wurde hierzu ein Demonstrationsversuch durchgefuehrt. Die Anlage ist fuer einen Kohledurchsatz von 10 kg/h ausgelegt. In einem kontinuierlichen Versuchslauf wurde mit dieser Anlage die technische Machbarkeit der Hydrierung von Bio-Oelen demonstriert. In dem vorliegenden Beitrag werden die Versuchsbedingungen, Ausbeuten und Produktqualitaeten vorgestellt. (orig.)

  5. Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Oxidation of NO on F- and N-Codoped Spherical TiO2 Synthesized via Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheuk, Wahkit; Wu, Yifan; Lee, Frank S. C.; Ho, Wingkei

    2012-01-01

    The fluorine- and nitrogen-codoped TiO2 was synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method with titanium tetrafluoride and urea as precursor. The codoped TiO2 was characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Nitric oxide (NO) photocatalytic oxidation in gas-phase medium was employed as a probe reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic ...

  6. An experimental investigation into the formation of polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from pyrolysis of biomass materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, T.; Sharma, R.; Hajaligol, M. [Philip Morris USA, Richmond, VA (United States). Research Center

    2001-10-09

    The formation of polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the pyrolysis of cellulose, pectin and chlorogenic acid was studied. The primary product, mostly primary volatile tar, was exposed to a higher thermal severity i.e. high temperatures and long residence times. The reactor setup consisted of a quartz tube with two zones, zone I and II, each heated and controlled separately. Zone I was used to first pyrolyse the substrate at 300{degree}C to produce a low temperature tar (LTT) as well as to pyrolyse the product char at 600{degree}C to produce a high temperature tar (HTT). The LTT and HTT were then subjected to a high thermal severity in the second zone (zone II) where the temperature was varied between 700 and 850{degree}C. The residence time of the volatiles in zone II was varied between ca. 90 and 1400 ms (calculated at 800{degree}C). The results show that the yield of most PAHs increased with temperature, except in a few cases where the yield of two- and three-ring PAHs exhibited a maximum. PAHs yields also generally increased as the residence time was increased from 90 to 1400 ms at 800{degree}C. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The conversion of biomass to light olefins on Fe-modified ZSM-5 catalyst: Effect of pyrolysis parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihong; Yang, Mingfa; Shao, Jingai; Yang, Haiping; Zeng, Kuo; Chen, Yingquan; Luo, Jun; Agblevor, Foster A; Chen, Hanping

    2018-07-01

    Light olefins are the key building blocks for the petrochemical industry. In this study, the effects of in-situ and ex-situ process, temperature, Fe loading, catalyst to feed ratio and gas flow rate on the olefins carbon yield and selectivity were explored. The results showed that Fe-modified ZSM-5 catalyst increased the olefins yield significantly, and the ex-situ process was much better than in-situ. With the increasing of temperature, Fe-loading amount, catalyst to feed ratio, and gas flow rate, the carbon yields of light olefins were firstly increased and further decreased. The maximum carbon yield of light olefins (6.98% C-mol) was obtained at the pyrolysis temperature of 600°C, catalyst to feed ratio of 2, gas flow rate of 100ml/min, and 3wt% Fe/ZSM-5 for cellulose. The selectivity of C 2 H 4 was more than 60% for all feedstock, and the total light olefins followed the decreasing order of cellulose, corn stalk, hemicelluloses and lignin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of Transparent Conducting Oxide Based on Al Doped ZnO Prepared by Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeslam DOUAYAR

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO thin films were deposited on glass substrates at 350 °C by spray pyrolysis technique. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the undoped and AZO films exhibit the hexagonal wűrtzite crystal structure with a preferential orientation along 2 direction. AFM images showed that AZO film with 3 % of Al has a uniform grain sizes with a surface roughness of about 24 nm. All films present a high transmittance in the visible range. Both undoped and AZO films were n-type degenerate semiconductor and the best electrical resistivity value was around 8.0 ´ 10- 2 W.cm obtained for 3 % Al content.

  9. Characterization and Gas Sensing Properties of Copper-doped Tin Oxide Thin Films Deposited by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia ZHAI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tin oxide-based thin films are deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technology, in which Cu addition is introduced to enhance the gas sensing performance by H2S detection. The thin films are porous and comprise nano-sized crystallites. One of the Cu-containing thin film sensors demonstrates a fast and significant response to H2S gas. The values of power law exponent n are calculated to discuss the sensitivity of the sensors, which is significantly promoted by Cu additive. The sensitivity of Cu-doped SnO2 gas sensors is determined by two mechanisms. One is the normal gas sensing mechanism of SnO2 grains, and the other is the promoted mechanism caused by the transformation between CuO and CuS in the H2S detection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12917

  10. Effect of tin doping on the optical properties of indium oxide films by a spray pyrolysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim Abu Talib; Muhammad Mat Salleh; Muhammad Yahya; Mod Noor Bader Sher

    1993-01-01

    Thin films of stannum doped indium oxide were deposited on glass by a X-ray pyrolysis method. The substrate temperature and the rate of flow of the carrier gas were fixed at 450 0 C and 2.5 litre/minute respectively during deposition. The dependence of the optical properties of the films on the doping concentration was studied. It is found that the transmission of the visible wavelengths (300 to 800 nm) through the films increases around 5% from 74.9% as the film was doped with 10% stannum. It is also found that the optical energy bandgap increases 0.2 eV from 3.16 to 3.36 eV by doping the film with 10% stannum. The increase is attributed to the Bernstein-Moss (1) and self-energy (2) effects

  11. Chemical evaluation of chars produced by thermochemical conversion (gasification, pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization) of agro-industrial biomass on a commercial scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedner, Katja; Rumpel, Cornelia; Steiner, Christoph; Pozzi, Alessandro; Maas, Robert; Glaser, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Technologies for agro-industrial feedstock utilization such as pyrolysis, gasification and hydrothermal carbonization at industrial scale develop rapidly. The thermochemically converted biomasses of these production technologies have fundamentally different properties controlled by the production technology. This is reflected by general properties such as pH or elemental composition. The 13 C NMR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and black carbon results confirmed these observations showing that hydrochars have lower proportions of aromatic compounds than biochars (less stable) but are rich in functional groups (higher cation exchange capacity) than biochars. Analyses of pollutants indicate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as dioxin contents of most samples were under the threshold values recommended by International Biochar Initiative and European Biochar Certificate. In conclusion, biochars and hydrochars are entirely different from each other and these materials will probably have a complementary reaction in a soil environment. -- Highlights: • Production technologies influences fundamentally chemical properties of chars. • Carbonized materials have different behaviour in soil environment. • Environmental risk of chars is low with respect to PAH and dioxin contents. • Certification standard for biochars is not suitable for hydrochars. • Commercial scale reactors are able to produce high quality biochars according to the regulations of the EBC or IBI

  12. Modification of bio-char derived from fast pyrolysis of biomass and its application in removal of tetracycline from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Liu, Wu-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jie-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-10-01

    In this work, bio-char, a mass productive by-product of biomass fast pyrolysis, was adopted as an adsorbent to remove tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. To enhance the adsorption capacity, a simple modification of bio-char with acid and alkali was carried out. Bio-char samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm. The results show that the alkali treated bio-char possesses larger surface area than those of raw and acid treated bio-chars, and accordingly exhibits a more excellent adsorption performance (58.8 mg/g) than the other two bio-chars and other adsorbents reported previously. The graphite-like structure of bio-char facilitates the formation of π-π interactions between ring structure in tetracycline molecule and graphite-like sheets. The surface area showed significant effects on TC adsorption as well as O-containing functional groups, whereas the initial pH of solution has small effects on TC adsorption under the experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pyrolysis/gasification of pine sawdust biomass briquettes under carbon dioxide atmosphere: Study on carbon dioxide reduction (utilization) and biochar briquettes physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zewei; Zhang, Fengxia; Liu, Huili; Ba, Fei; Yan, Sijia; Hu, Jianhang

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature and CO 2 content on CO 2 reduction (utilization) efficiency and physicochemical properties of pyrolysis/gasification biochar briquettes were investigated. The CO 2 reduction (utilization) efficiency (CRE) reached the peak value of 74.9% in a 10% CO 2 /90% N 2 atmosphere at 600 °C. The crackings of hydroxyl, CC bonds, methyl and methylene groups of biochars briquette were enhanced by high temperature and CO 2 . The increase of CO 2 concentration was beneficial for developing biochar microporosity, but not conductive to enhance higher heating value, volume density and durability of biochar briquette. To get a higher CRE and make feasible biochar briquettes are the primary goal for this work. Therefore, the optimal introduced CO 2 to biomass ratio is calculated to be 135 g/kg for experiments done with 10% CO 2 with N 2 at 600 °C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fast oxidative pyrolysis of sugar cane straw in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesa-Pérez, Juan Miguel; Rocha, José Dilcio; Barbosa-Cortez, Luis Augusto; Penedo-Medina, Margarita; Luengo, Carlos Alberto; Cascarosa, Esther

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the technical viability evaluation of the fast pyrolysis of sugar cane straw for its energy use. By means of this thermochemical process, the sugar cane straw is converted into bio-fuels (biochar, bio-oil) and non-condensable gases. The bio-fuels obtained could be used as fuel or as raw material in the chemical industry. The fast pyrolysis of sugar cane straw has been developed in a fluidized bed reactor. In order to improve this process to obtain high bio-oil yield, the influence of the operational conditions (equivalence ratio and temperature) on the product yields and on their characteristics was evaluated. The product yields of bio-oil and char were up to 35.5 wt.% and 48.2 wt.% respectively. The maximum bio-oil yield was achieved at temperature and equivalence ratio conditions of 470 °C and 0.14. The bio-oil obtained has low oxygen content (38.48 wt.% dry basis), very low water content, and a lower heating value of 22.95 MJ/kg. The gas chromatographic analyses allowed the identification of oxygenated compounds and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The bio-oil pH ranged between 3.14 and 3.57 due to the presence of acid organic compounds. The char obtained has a high fixed carbon and volatile matter content. Its HHV value is 13.54 MJ/kg. -- Highlights: • Pyrolysis of sugar cane straw was studied in a fluidized bed reactor. • The product yields were evaluated. • The composition of the liquid and solid products obtained was analyzed. • This is an environmentally friendly use for this waste

  15. Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atherton, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

  16. Characterization and Catalytic Upgrading of Crude Bio-oil Produced by Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Swine Manure and Pyrolysis of Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dan

    The distillation curve of crude bio-oil from glycerol-assisted hydrothermal liquefaction of swine manure was measured using an advanced distillation apparatus. The crude bio-oil had much higher distillation temperatures than diesel and gasoline and was more distillable than the bio-oil produced by the traditional liquefaction of swine manure and the pyrolysis of corn stover. Each 10% volumetric fraction was analyzed from aspects of its chemical compositions, chemical and physical properties. The appearance of hydrocarbons in the distillates collected at the temperature of 410.9°C and above indicated that the thermal cracking at a temperature from 410°C to 500°C may be a proper approach to upgrade the crude bio-oil produced from the glycerol-assisted liquefaction of swine manure. The effects of thermal cracking conditions including reaction temperature (350-425°C), retention time (15-60 min) and catalyst loadings (0-10 wt%) on the yield and quality of the upgraded oil were analyzed. Under the optimum thermal cracking conditions at 400°C, a catalyst loading of 5% by mass and the reaction time of 30 min, the yield of bio-oil was 46.14% of the mass of the crude bio-oil and 62.5% of the energy stored in the crude bio-oil was recovered in the upgraded bio-oil. The upgraded bio-oil with a heating value of 41.4 MJ/kg and viscosity of 3.6 cP was comparable to commercial diesel. In upgrading crude bio-oil from fast pyrolysis, converting organic acids into neutral esters is significant and can be achieved by sulfonated activated carbon/bio-char developed from fermentation residues. Acitivated carbon and bio-char were sulfonated by concentrated sulfuric acid at 150°C for 18 h. Sulfonation helped activated carbon/bio-char develop acid functional groups. Sulfonated activated carbon with BET surface area of 349.8 m2/g, was effective in converting acetic acid. Acetic acid can be effectively esterified by sulfonated activated carbon (5 wt%) at 78°C for 60 min with the

  17. Study on the hydrodeoxygenative upgrading of crude bio-oil produced from woody biomass by fast pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Seung; Oh, Shinyoung; Kim, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Joon Weon

    2014-01-01

    Crude bio-oil produced from fast pyrolysis of yellow poplar wood was subjected to HDO (hydrodeoxygenation) for the purpose of reducing water content as well as increasing heating value. HDO was performed in an autoclave reactor at three different reaction factors: temperature (250–370 °C), reaction time (40–120 min), and Pd/C catalyst loading (0–6 wt%) under hydrogen atmosphere. After completion of HDO, gas, char, and two immiscible liquid products (light oil and heavy oil) were obtained. Liquid products were less acidic and contained less water than crude bio-oil. Water content of heavy oil was ranged between 0.4 wt% and 1.9 wt%. Heating values of heavy oil were estimated between 28.7 and 37.4 MJ/kg, which was about twice higher than that of crude bio-oil. Elemental analysis revealed that heavy oil had a lower O/C ratio (0.17–0.36) than crude bio-oil (0.71). H/C ratio of heavy oil decreased from 1.50 to 1.32 with an increase of temperature from 250 °C to 350 °C, respectively. - Highlights: • Bio-oil was subjected to hydrodeoxygenation with Pd/C catalyst in supercritical ethanol. • Gas, char and two immiscible liquids (light/heavy oil) were obtained as final products. • Ethanol addition reduced the char formation during hydrodeoxygenation. • The heavy oil was characteristic to less acidic and less water content than bio-oil. • Higher heating value of the heavy oil was measured to 28.7–37.4 MJ/kg

  18. Proceedings of the Biomass Pyrolysis Oil Properties and Combustion Meeting, 26-28 September 1994, Estes Park, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, T.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing scale-up of fast pyrolysis in North America and Europe, as well as the exploration and expansion of markets for the energy use of biocrude oils that now needs to take place, suggested that it was timely to convene an international meeting on the properties and combustion behavior of these oils. A common understanding of the state-of-the-art and technical and other challenges which need to be met during the commercialization of biocrude fuel use, can be achieved. The technical issues and understanding of combustion of these oils are rapidly being advanced through R&D in the United States. Canada, Europe and Scandinavia. It is obvious that for the maximum economic impact of biocrude, it will be necessary to have a common set of specifications so that oils can be used interchangeably with engines and combustors which require minimal modification to use these renewable fuels. Fundamental and applied studies being pursued in several countries are brought together in this workshop so that we can arrive at common strategies. In this way, both the science and the commercialization are advanced to the benefit of all, without detracting from the competitive development of both the technology and its applications. This United States-Canada-Finland collaboration has led to the two and one half day specialists meeting at which the technical basis for advances in biocrude development is discussed. The goal is to arrive at a common agenda on issues that cross national boundaries in this area. Examples of agenda items are combustion phenomena, the behavior of trace components of the oil (N, alkali metals), the formation of NOx in combustion, the need for common standards and environmental safety and health issues in the handling, storage and transportation of biocrudes.

  19. Upgrading of the liquid fuel from fast pyrolysis of biomass over MoNi/γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The hydrotreatment of bio-oil, which obtained from fast pyrolysis of pine sawdust, was investigated over MoNi/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst under mild conditions (373 K, 3 MPa hydrogen pressure). Acetic acid was taken as a model compound to investigate the effects of Mo promoter contents and reducing temperatures of catalysts on the catalysts activity under the condition of 473 K and 3 MPa hydrogen pressure. X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed reduction showed that the addition of Mo promoter benefited the uniformity of nickel species and inhibited the formation of NiAl 2 O 4 spinel in the catalysts. The GC spectrum of liquid products showed the mechanism of the model reaction. The maximum conversion of acetic acid (33.20%) was attained over 0.06MoNi/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts being reduced at 873 K. This catalyst was chosen for the upgrading of raw bio-oil. After the upgrading process, the pH value of the bio-oil increased from 2.33 to 2.77. The water content increased from 35.52 wt.% to 41.55 wt.% and the gross calorific value increased from 13.96 MJ/kg to 14.17 MJ/kg. The hydrogen content in the bio-oil increased from 6.25 wt.% to 6.95 wt.%. The product properties of the upgraded bio-oil, particularly the hydrogen content and the acidity were considerably improved. The results of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that both hydrotreatment and esterification had happened over 0.06MoNi/γ-Al 2 O 3 (873) catalyst during the upgrading process.

  20. Flash co-pyrolysis of biomass with polyhydroxybutyrate: Part 1. Influence on bio-oil yield, water content, heating value and the production of chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Cornelissen; M. Jans; J. Yperman; G. Reggers; S. Schreurs; R. Carleer [Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium). Laboratory of Applied Chemistry

    2008-09-15

    Bio-oil obtained via flash pyrolysis shows potential to be applied as a renewable fuel. However, bio-oil often contains high amounts of water, which is a major drawback for its application. The influence of a biopolymer - polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) on the pyrolysis of willow is investigated using a semi-continuous home-built pyrolysis reactor. The flash co-pyrolysis of willow/PHB blends (w/w ratio 7:1, 3:1, 2:1 and 1:1) clearly shows particular merits: a synergetic increase in pyrolysis yield, a synergetic reduction of the water content in bio-oil, an increase in heating value, and a production of easily separable chemicals. The occurrence of synergetic interactions is observed based on a comparison between the actual pyrolysis results of the willow/PHB blends, the theoretical pyrolysis results calculated from the reference pyrolysis experiments (pure willow and pure PHB) and their respective w/w ratio. The co-pyrolysis of 1:1 willow/PHB shows the best overall results. 24 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Zinc oxide nanoparticles affect biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping eWang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ~20% and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO, CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG, COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1, MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD, and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2, PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2, PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN were reduced about 5-fold in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6, PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS, and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  2. Polarized matrix infrared spectra of cyclopentadienone: observations, calculations, and assignment for an important intermediate in combustion and biomass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Thomas K; Scheer, Adam M; Nimlos, Mark R; Robichaud, David J; Daily, John W; Stanton, John F; Ellison, G Barney

    2014-01-30

    A detailed vibrational analysis of the infrared spectra of cyclopentadienone (C5H4═O) in rare gas matrices has been carried out. Ab initio coupled-cluster anharmonic force field calculations were used to guide the assignments. Flash pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulfite (C6H4O2SO) was used to provide a molecular beam of C5H4═O entrained in a rare gas carrier. The beam was interrogated with time-of-flight photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS), confirming the clean, intense production of C5H4═O. Matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy coupled with 355 nm polarized UV for photoorientation and linear dichroism experiments was used to determine the symmetries of the vibrations. Cyclopentadienone has 24 fundamental vibrational modes, Γvib = 9a1 ⊕ 3a2 ⊕ 4b1 ⊕ 8b2. Using vibrational perturbation theory and a deperturbation-diagonalization method, we report assignments of the following fundamental modes (cm(-1)) in a 4 K neon matrix: the a1 modes of X̃ (1)A1 C5H4═O are found to be ν1 = 3107, ν2 = (3100, 3099), ν3 = 1735, ν5 = 1333, ν7 = 952, ν8 = 843, and ν9 = 651; the inferred a2 modes are ν10 = 933, and ν11 = 722; the b1 modes are ν13 = 932, ν14 = 822, and ν15 = 629; the b2 fundamentals are ν17 = 3143, ν18 = (3078, 3076) ν19 = (1601 or 1595), ν20 = 1283, ν21 = 1138, ν22 = 1066, ν23 = 738, and ν24 = 458. The modes ν4 and ν6 were too weak to be detected, ν12 is dipole-forbidden and its position cannot be inferred from combination and overtone bands, and ν16 is below our detection range (calculations, assigned as two quantum transitions, and used to assign some of the weak and infrared inactive fundamental vibrations.

  3. CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION AND OXIDATION OF BIOMASS-DERIVED LEVULINIC ACID

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Gong; Lu Lin; Zhipei Yan

    2011-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA), 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, is a new platform chemical with various potential uses. In this paper, catalytic hydrogenation and oxidation of levulinic acid were studied. It was shown from experiments that levulinic acid can be hydrogenated to γ-valerolactone (GVL) over transition metal catalysts and oxidative-decarboxylated to 2-butanone (methyl-ethyl-ketone, MEK) and methyl-vinyl-ketone (MVK) by cupric oxide (CuO), cupric oxide/cerium oxide (CuO/CeO2), cupric oxide/ alumina (Cu...

  4. Biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Biomass constitutes the energetic form more important and of greater potential after solar energy (source of origin), being consumed in direct form through the combustion, or indirectly through the fossil fuels (those which originates) or by means of different technical of thermochemical and of biochemistry for its conversion and utilization. The current document describes the origin and the energetic characteristics of biomass, its energetic and environmental importance for a developing Country as Colombia, its possibilities of production and the technologies developed for its utilization and transformation, mainly, of the residual biomass

  5. Indium tin oxide thin-films prepared by vapor phase pyrolysis for efficient silicon based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simashkevich, Alexei, E-mail: alexeisimashkevich@hotmail.com [Institute of Applied Physics, 5 Academiei str., Chisinau, MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Serban, Dormidont; Bruc, Leonid; Curmei, Nicolai [Institute of Applied Physics, 5 Academiei str., Chisinau, MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Hinrichs, Volker [Institut für Heterogene Materialsysteme, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Lise-Meitner Campus, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Rusu, Marin [Institute of Applied Physics, 5 Academiei str., Chisinau, MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Institut für Heterogene Materialsysteme, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Lise-Meitner Campus, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The vapor phase pyrolysis deposition method was developed for the preparation of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films with thicknesses ranging between 300 and 400 nm with the sheet resistance of 10–15 Ω/sq. and the transparency in the visible region of the spectrum over 80%. The layers were deposited on the (100) surface of the n-type silicon wafers with the charge carriers concentration of ~ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3}. The morphology of the ITO layers deposited on Si wafers with different surface morphologies, e.g., smooth (polished), rough (irregularly structured) and textured (by inversed pyramids) was investigated. The as-deposited ITO thin films consist of crystalline columns with the height of 300–400 nm and the width of 50–100 nm. Photovoltaic parameters of mono- and bifacial solar cells of Cu/ITO/SiO{sub 2}/n–n{sup +} Si/Cu prepared on Si (100) wafers with different surface structures were studied and compared. A maximum efficiency of 15.8% was achieved on monofacial solar cell devices with the textured Si surface. Bifacial photovoltaic devices from 100 μm thick Si wafers with the smooth surface have demonstrated efficiencies of 13.0% at frontal illumination and 10% at rear illumination. - Highlights: • ITO thin films prepared by vapor phase pyrolysis on Si (100) wafers with a smooth (polished), rough (irregularly structured) and textured (by inversed pyramids) surface. • Monofacial ITO/SiO2/n-n+Si solar cells with an efficiency of 15.8% prepared and bifacial PV devices with front- and rear-side efficiencies up to 13% demonstrated. • Comparative studies of photovoltaic properties of solar cells with different morphologies of the Si wafer surface presented.

  6. Flash pyrolysis of coal-solvent slurry prepared from the oxidized coal and the coal dissolved in solvent; Ichibu yokaishita sanka kaishitsutan slurry no jinsoku netsubunkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, T.; Mae, K.; Okutsu, H.; Miura, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-28

    In order to develop a high-efficiency coal pyrolysis method, flash pyrolysis was experimented on slurry prepared by using liquid-phase oxidation reformed coal and a methanol-based solvent mixture. Australian Morwell coal was used for the experiment. The oxidized coal, into which carboxyl groups have been introduced, has the condensation structure relaxed largely, and becomes highly fluid slurry by means of the solvent. Char production can be suppressed by making the oxidation-pretreated coal into slurry, resulting in drastically improved pyrolytic conversion. The slurry was divided into dissolved solution, dried substance, extracted residue, and residual slurry, which were pyrolized independently. The dissolved solution showed very high conversion. Improvement in the conversion is contributed by separating the dissolved substances (coal macromolecules) at molecular levels, coagulating the molecules, suppressing cross-link formation, and reducing molecular weight of the dissolved substances. Oxidized coal can be dissolved to 80% or higher by using several kinds of mixed solvents. As a result of the dissolution, a possibility was suggested on pyrolysis which is easy in handling and high in conversion. 7 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Effect of acetic acid on ZnO:In transparent conductive oxide prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, B.C.; Zhang, X.D., E-mail: xdzhang@nankai.edu.cn; Wei, C.C.; Sun, J.; Huang, Q.; Zhao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Undoped and indium doped zinc oxide (ZnO) transparent conductive oxide were prepared by a low-cost Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis. The influence of acetic acid on properties of the ZnO thin films was investigated. The complex formed by [CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}] and [Zn{sup 2+}] in precursor solution was better for the growth of ZnO film. The acetic acid added in precursor solution can supply [CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}] for both [Zn{sup 2+}] and [In{sup 3+}] to form complexes. That made the [Zn{sup 2+}] and [In{sup 3+}] have similar statement, which can promote the indium doping in the ZnO films. The surface morphology, structural and electrical properties of the ZnO thin films were influenced by the acetic acid adding. The total transmittance of the ZnO thin films is above 80% in the wide wavelength region from 400 nm to 2000 nm.

  8. Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Reactors: A Review of a Few Scientific Challenges and of Related Recommended Research Topics Réacteur de pyrolyse rapide de la biomasse : une revue de quelques verrous scientifiques et d’actions de recherches recommandées

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lédé J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomass as an alternative energy resource requires its prior processing. Many options are possible. The present paper focuses on thermochemical routes and more specifically on fast pyrolysis carried out for the preparation of so called bio-oils. The optimization and scaling up of fast pyrolysis processes for improving bio oils yields and properties come up against several difficulties. The aim of the paper is to show that some of them are related to the lack of several basic scientific knowledges, more specifically at the level of the high temperature fast pyrolysis reactor. The analysis of these challenges (biomass sample thermal decomposition, biomass-reactor interactions, secondary reactions suggests the development of several research topics. L’utilisation de la biomasse en tant que ressource énergétique de substitution nécessite sa transformation préalable. De nombreuses options sont possibles. Cet article s’intéresse aux voies thermochimiques et plus spécifiquement à la pyrolyse rapide mise en oeuvre pour la préparation d’huiles de pyrolyse. L’optimisation et l’extrapolation des procédés de pyrolyse rapide pour améliorer les rendements et propriétés des huiles de pyrolyse se heurtent à plusieurs difficultés. Le but de cet article est de montrer que certaines sont liées au manque de certaines connaissances scientifiques de base, plus précisément au niveau du réacteur haute température. L’analyse de ces verrous (décomposition thermique d’un grain de biomasse, interactions biomasse-réacteur, réactions secondaires suggère le développement de plusieurs axes de recherche.

  9. Solar selective coatings based on nickel oxide obtained via spray pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Mihaela; Ienei, Elena; Bogatu, Cristina; Duta, Anca

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents the optimization process for obtaining NiO thin layers on copper substrate for solar absorber coatings, using an inexpensive and up-scalable technique: spray pyrolysis deposition (SPD). Efficient selective coatings must present a high absorption coefficient of the incident solar irradiation, and low emission of heat. The solar selective coatings design involves tailoring the surface properties for superior optical properties. The deposition parameters were varied for maximizing the solar absorbance and minimizing the thermal emittance. The film morphology was controlled using copolymers of the maleic anhydride as additives into the precursors' solution. The structural and surface properties of the films were investigated by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The Cu/CuO(x)/NiO solar absorber shows good values for the solar absorptance (alpha(s) = 0.95) and thermal emittance (epsilon(T) = 0.05) compared with the ones obtained by other methods employed in literature and new additives are recommended in tailoring the surface of solar selective coatings.

  10. The Leidenfrost effect during spray pyrolysis of nickel oxide-gadolinia doped ceria composite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muecke, Ulrich P. [ETH Zurich, Department of Materials, Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: ulrich.muecke@mat.ethz.ch; Messing, Gary L. [Pennsylvania State University, Materials Science and Engineering, 121 Steidle Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 (United States)], E-mail: messing@ems.psu.edu; Gauckler, Ludwig J. [ETH Zurich, Department of Materials, Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: ludwig.gauckler@mat.ethz.ch

    2009-01-01

    NiO-Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9-x} (CGO) thin films were prepared by air blast spray pyrolysis with precursors containing nickel nitrate, cerium nitrate and gadolinium chloride in ethanol and a high boiling point organic solvent. Precursors containing solvents with boiling points between 120 and 314 deg. C were sprayed on sapphire, silicon, Foturan, yttria stabilized zirconia and CGO at different substrate surface temperatures. A maximum deposition temperature, above which film deposition ceased completely, was observed. The limiting temperature for film formation was correlated with the Leidenfrost phenomenon. At temperatures above the Leidenfrost point of the precursor, the sprayed droplets do not impact and spread on the substrate surface but levitate on a vapour cushion above the substrate and are swept away by the air stream. The Leidenfrost point of a precursor was found to depend on the solvent boiling point, the metal salt concentration and the thermal properties of the substrate expressed as the product of density, thermal conductivity and heat capacity. The maximum deposition temperature increased with increasing solvent boiling point or metal salt concentration and with decreasing product of density, thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the substrate.

  11. Application of the 15N tracer method to study the effect of pyrolysis temperature and atmosphere on the distribution of biochar nitrogen in the biomass-biochar-plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhongxin; Ye, Zhixiong; Zhang, Limei; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2018-05-01

    Biochar nitrogen is key to improving soil fertility, but the distribution of biochar nitrogen in the biomass-biochar-plant system is still unclear. To provide clarity, the 15 N tracer method was utilised to study the distribution of biochar nitrogen in the biochar both before and after its addition to the soil. The results can be summarised as follows. 1) The retention rate of 15 N in biochar decreases from 45.23% to 20.09% with increasing pyrolysis temperature from 400 to 800°C in a CO 2 atmosphere. 2) The retention rate of 15 N in biochar prepared in a CO 2 atmosphere is higher than that prepared in a N 2 atmosphere when the pyrolysis temperature is below 600°C. 3) Not only can biochar N slowly facilitate the adsorption of N by plants but the addition of biochar to the soil can also promote the supply of soil nitrogen to the plant; in contrast, the direct return of wheat straw biomass to the soil inhibits the absorption of soil N by plants. 4) In addition, the distribution of nitrogen was clarified; that is, when biochar was prepared by the pyrolysis of wheat straw at 400°C in a CO 2 atmosphere, the biochar retained 45.23% N, and after the addition of this biochar to the soil, 39.99% of N was conserved in the biochar residue, 4.55% was released into the soil, and 0.69% was contained in the wheat after growth for 31days. Therefore, this study very clearly shows the distribution of nitrogen in the biomass-biochar-plant system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Deposition of tin oxide doped with fluorine produced by sol-gel method and deposited by spray-pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maia, Paulo Herbert Franca; Lima, Francisco Marcone; Sena, Aline Cosmo de; Silva, Alvaro Neuton; Almeida, Ana Fabiola Leite de; Freire, Francisco Nivaldo Aguiar, E-mail: phfmj@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marconeufc@gmail.com, E-mail: alinedesena@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: alvaro_neutron@hotmail.com, E-mail: anfaleal@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nivaldo@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFCE), CE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Solar energy is one of the most important sources of renewable energy today, but its production is based on silicon cells, expensive and difficult to produce, so the research seek new materials to replace them. This work aims to deposit tin oxide doped with fluorine on the glass substrate using the sol-gel method to provide a working solution and spray pyrolysis technique to perform the deposition. F-SnO2 (FTO) were synthesized by sol-gel method, employing NH{sub 4}F and SnCl{sub 2} precursor in an ethanol solution. Before the formation of the gel phase, the entire solution was sprayed, with the aid of a pistol aerographic substrate under heated at 600 °C divided by 50 applications and cooled in the furnace. The substrates had resistances between 10 and 30 S.cm. The energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) revealed the presence of fluorine in the SnO{sub 2} network. (author)

  13. Compositional dependence of optical and electrical properties of indium doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintle, Lawrence K.; Luhanga, Pearson V. C.; Moditswe, Charles; Muiva, Cosmas M.

    2018-05-01

    The structural and optoelectronic properties of undoped and indium doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films grown on glass substrates through a simple reproducible custom-made pneumatic chemical spray pyrolysis technique are presented. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed a polycrystalline structure of hexagonal wurtzite phase growing preferentially along the (002) plane for the undoped sample. Increase in dopant content modified the orientation leading to more pronounced (100) and (101) reflections. Optical transmission spectra showed high transmittance of 80-90% in the visible range for all thin films. The optical band gap energy (Eg) was evaluated on the basis of the derivative of transmittance (dT/dλ) versus wavelength (λ) model and Tauc's extrapolation method in the region where the absorption coefficient, α ≥ 104 cm-1. The observed values of Eg were found to decrease generally with increasing In dopant concentration. From the figure of merit calculations a sample with 4 at.% In dopant concentration showed better optoelectronic properties.

  14. Structure, optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide ultra thin films prepared by jet nebulizer spray pyrolysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thirumoorthi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide (ITO thin films have been prepared by jet nebulizer spray pyrolysis technique for different Sn concentrations on glass substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that all the films are polycrystalline of cubic structure with preferentially oriented along (222 plane. SEM images show that films exhibit uniform surface morphology with well-defined spherical particles. The EDX spectrum confirms the presence of In, Sn and O elements in prepared films. AFM result indicates that the surface roughness of the films is reduced as Sn doping. The optical transmittance of ITO thin films is improved from 77% to 87% in visible region and optical band gap is increased from 3.59 to 4.07 eV. Photoluminescence spectra show mainly three emissions peaks (UV, blue and green and a shift observed in UV emission peak. The presence of functional groups and chemical bonding was analyzed by FTIR. Hall effect measurements show prepared films having n-type conductivity with low resistivity (3.9 × 10−4 Ω-cm and high carrier concentrations (6.1 × 1020 cm−3.

  15. Synthesis of nano-structured tin oxide thin films with faster response to LPG and ammonia by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    PrasannaKumari, K.; Thomas, Boben

    2018-01-01

    Nanostructured SnO2 thin film have been efficiently fabricated by spray pyrolysis using atomizers of different types. The structure and morphology of as-prepared samples are investigated by techniques such as x-ray diffraction, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Significant morphological changes are observed in films by modifying the precursor atomization as a result of change of spray device. The optical characterization indicates that change in atomization, affects the absorbance and the band gap, following the varied crystallite size. Gas sensing investigations on ultrasonically prepared tin oxide films show NH3 response at operating temperatures lower down to 50 °C. For 1000 ppm of LPG the response at 350 °C for air blast atomizer film is about 99%, with short response and recovery times. The photoluminescence emmision spectra reveal the correlation between atomization process and the quantity of oxygen vacancies present in the samples. The favorable size reduction in microstructure with good crystallinity with slight change in lattice properties suggest their scope in gas sensing applications. On the basis of these characterizations, the mechanism of LPG and NH3 gas sensing of nanostructured SnO2 thin films has been proposed.

  16. Iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in activated carbons prepared from hydrothermally treated waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenming; Björkman, Eva; Yun, Yifeng; Lilliestråle, Malte; Hedin, Niklas

    2014-03-01

    Particles of iron oxide (Fe3O4 ; 20–40 nm) were embedded within activated carbons during the activation of hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses in a flow of CO2. Four different HTC biomass samples (horse manure, grass cuttings, beer production waste, and biosludge) were used as precursors for the activated carbons. Nanoparticles of iron oxide formed from iron catalyst included in the HTC biomasses. After systematic optimization, the activated carbons had specific surface areas of about 800 m2g1. The pore size distributions of the activated carbons depended strongly on the degree of carbonization of the precursors. Activated carbons prepared from highly carbonized precursors had mainly micropores, whereas those prepared from less carbonized precursors contained mainly mesopores. Given the strong magnetism of the activated carbon–nano-Fe3O4 composites, they could be particularly useful for water purification.

  17. The effect of oxidation time on the parameters of ITO/Si solar cell prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandil, S. A; Afifi, H. H; El-hefnawi, S. H; Eliwa, A.Y [Electronic Research Institute, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)

    2000-07-01

    The indium tin oxide (ITO/N-Si) solar cells have been fabricated by spray pyrolysis technique. The silicon wafers are heated at 500 Celsius degrees with different oxidation time (2-20 min). The best values obtained for ITO/Si solar cell output parameters; open circuit voltage V{sub o}c, short circuit current density J{sub s}c, fill factor FF and efficiency {eta} are 0.48 V, 15 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.7 and 10.1% respectively. The preceding results were obtained under conditions of 5 minutes oxidation time and the surface area equal to 8 mm{sup 2} when the light intensity is 50 MW/ cm{sup 2}. The values of V{sub o}c, J{sub s}c, FF and {eta} are affected strongly by the varying the oxidation time. This paper is devoted to explain the effect of the interfacial layer SiO{sub 2} thickness on the ITO/Si solar cell parameters as deduced from the I-V and C-V measurements. [Spanish] Mediante tecnicas de pirolisis de dispersion se han fabricado celdas solares de oxido de Indio estanado ITO/N-Si. Las obleas de silicon se calientan a 500 con diferentes tiempos de oxidacion (2-20 min.) Los mejores valores obtenidos para los parametros de produccion de las celdas solares ITO-Si de voltaje en circuito abierto V{sub o}c densidad de corriente de corto circuito J{sub s}c factor de llenado FF y eficiencia {eta} son de 0.48 V, 15 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.7% y 10.1% respectivamente los resultados precedentes se obtuvieron bajo condiciones de 5 minutos de tiempo de oxidacion y la superficie del area=8 mm{sup 2} cuando la intensidad de la luz es de 50mW/Cm{sup 2}. Los valores de V{sub o}c, J{sub s}c, FF y {eta} se afectan fuertemente por la variacion del tiempo de oxidacion. Este articulo esta dedicado a explicar el efecto del espesor de la capa interfacial de SiO{sub 2} en los parametros de la celda solar ITO-Si como se deduce de las mediciones I-V y C-V.

  18. Adiabatic Gasification and Pyrolysis of Coffee Husk Using Air-Steam for Partial Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Catalina Rodriguez; Gerardo Gordillo

    2011-01-01

    Colombian coffee industry produces about 0.6 million tons of husk (CH) per year which could serve as feedstock for thermal gasification to produce gaseous and liquid fuels. The current paper deals with: (i) CH adiabatic gasification modeling using air-steam blends for partial oxidation and (ii) experimental thermogravimetric analysis to determine the CH activation energy (E). The Chemical Equilibrium with Applications Program (CEA), developed by NASA, was used to estimate the effect of equiva...

  19. Preparation, properties, and bonding utilization of pyrolysis bio-oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rapid increase in energy consumption, limited fossil fuel resource, and environmental concerns have stimulated the research need for biomass-derived fuels and chemicals. Pyrolysis is a thermal degradation process of biomass in the absence of oxygen. The liquid product from pyrolysis is known as ...

  20. Extra and intracellular synthesis of nickel oxide nanoparticles mediated by dead fungal biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Regina Salvadori

    Full Text Available The use of dead biomass of the fungus Hypocrea lixii as a biological system is a new, effective and environmentally friendly bioprocess for the production and uptake of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NPs, which has become a promising field in nanobiotechnology. Dead biomass of the fungus was successfully used to convert nickel ions into nickel oxide NPs in aqueous solution. These NPs accumulated intracellularly and extracellularly on the cell wall surface through biosorption. The average size, morphology and location of the NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The NPs were mainly spherical and extra and intracellular NPs had an average size of 3.8 nm and 1.25 nm, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of nickel oxide NPs. Infrared spectroscopy detected the presence of functional amide groups, which are probable involved in particle binding to the biomass. The production of the NPs by dead biomass was analyzed by determining physicochemical parameters and equilibrium concentrations. The present study opens new perspectives for the biosynthesis of nanomaterials, which could become a potential biosorbent for the removal of toxic metals from polluted sites.

  1. Growth of tin oxide thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paloly, Abdul Rasheed; Satheesh, M. [Nano Functional Materials Lab, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682022, Kerala (India); Martínez-Tomás, M. Carmen; Muñoz-Sanjosé, Vicente [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de Valencia, c/Dr Moliner 50, Burjassot, Valencia 46100 (Spain); Rajappan Achary, Sreekumar [Nano Functional Materials Lab, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682022, Kerala (India); Bushiri, M. Junaid, E-mail: junaidbushiri@gmail.com [Nano Functional Materials Lab, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682022, Kerala (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • SnO{sub 2} thin films were grown on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass substrates. • Samples on hydrophobic substrates are having comparatively larger lattice volume. • Films on hydrophobic substrates have larger particles and low density distribution. • Substrate dependent photoluminescence emission is observed and studied. • SnO{sub 2} thin films grown over hydrophobic substrates may find potential applications. - Abstract: In this paper, we have demonstrated the growth of tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophobic (siliconized) and hydrophilic (non-siliconized) glass substrates by using the spray pyrolysis technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the formation of SnO{sub 2} thin films with tetragonal rutile-phase structure. Average particle size of nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 3–4 nm measured from the front view images obtained by a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FESEM), while the size of nanoparticle clusters, when present, were in the range of 11–20 nm. Surface morphology of SnO{sub 2} films grown over hydrophobic substrates revealed larger isolated particles which are less crowded compared to the highly crowded and agglomerated smaller particles in films on hydrophilic substrates. Blue shift in the band gap is observed in samples in which the average particle size is slightly larger than the exciton Bohr radius. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples grown over hydrophobic substrates exhibited an intense defect level emission and a weak near band edge emission. The enhanced visible emission from these SnO{sub 2} thin films is attributed to lattice defects formed during the film growth due to the mismatch between the film and the hydrophobic substrate surface.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cells powered by biomass gasification for high efficiency power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadsbøll, Rasmus Østergaard; Thomsen, Jesper; Bang-Møller, Christian

    2017-01-01

    efficiencies, flexibility and possibly costs of current biomass power generating systems, a power plant concept combining solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and gasification is investigated experimentally. The aim of the study is to examine the commercial operation system potential of these two technologies......Increased use of bioenergy is a very cost-effective and flexible measure to limit changes in the climate and the infrastructure. One of the key technologies toward a higher implementation of biomass is thermal gasification, which enables a wide span of downstream applications. In order to improve...

  3. Sustainable Steelmaking Using Biomass and Waste Oxides (TRP9902)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard J. Fruehan

    2004-09-30

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed to employ renewable energy in the form of wood charcoal to produce hot metal. The process was aimed at the market niche of units ranging from 400,000 to 1 million tons of hot metal a year. In the new process, a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) would be combined with a smelter to produce hot metal. This combination was proposed to overcome the technical hurdles of energy generation in smelters and the low productivity of RHFs, and also allow the use of wood charcoal as energy source and reductant. In order to assess the feasibility of the new process, it was necessary to estimate the productivity of the two units involved, the RHF and the smelter. This work concentrated on the development of a productivity model for the RHF able to predict changes in productivity according to the type of carbon and iron oxides used as feed materials. This model was constructed starting with the most fundamental aspect of reduction in composites measuring intrinsic rates of oxidation of different carbons in CO{sub 2}-CO atmospheres and reduction of different oxides in the same atmospheres. After that, a model was constructed considering the interplay of intrinsic kinetics and the transfer of heat to and within pellets such as used in the RHF. Finally, a productivity model for the RHF was developed based on the model developed for a pellet and the differences in heat transfer conditions between the laboratory furnace and the actual RHF. The final model produced for the RHF predicts production rates within 30% of actual plant data reported with coal and indicates that productivity gains as high as 50% could be achieved replacing coal with wood charcoal in the green balls owing to the faster reaction rates achieved with the second carbon. This model also indicates that an increase of less than 5% in total carbon consumption should take place in operations using wood charcoal instead of coal.

  4. Pyrolysis result of polyethylene waste as fuel for solid oxide fuel cell with samarium doped-ceria (SDC)-carbonate as electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahputra, R. J. E.; Rahmawati, F.; Prameswari, A. P.; Saktian, R.

    2017-02-01

    In this research, the result of pyrolysis on polyethylene was used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The pyrolysis result is a liquid which consists of hydrocarbon chains. According to GC-MS analysis, the hydrocarbons mainly consist of C7 to C20 hydrocarbon chain. Then, the liquid was applied to a single cell of NSDC-L | NSDC | NSDC-L. NSDC is a composite SDC (samarium doped-ceria) with sodium carbonate. Meanwhile, NSDC-L is a composite of NSDC with LiNiCuO (LNC). NSDC and LNC were analyzed by X-ray diffraction to understand their crystal structure. The result shows that presence of carbonate did not change the crystal structure of SDC. SEM EDX analysis for fuel cell before and after being loaded with polyethylene oil to get information of element diffusion to the electrolyte. Meanwhile, the conductivity properties were investigated through impedance measurement. The presence of carbonate even increases the electrical conductivity. The single cell test with the pyrolysis result of polyethylene at 300 - 600 °C, found that the highest power density is at 600 °C with the maximum power density of 0.14 mW/cm2 and open circuit voltage of 0.4 Volt. Elemental analysis at three point spots of single cell NDSC-L |NSDC|NSDC-L found that a migration of ions was occurred during fuel operation at 300 - 600 °C.

  5. Fast pyrolysis of lignin, macroalgae and sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung

    is available in the literature. Nonconventional biomass feedstock may also be applicable for fast pyrolysis processes. Among the forms of nonconventional biomasses: macroalgae, lignin (industrial residue) and sewage sludge may be attractive materials due to their low price, non-competitiveness with food crops......In the last twenty years, the fast pyrolysis process has been explored to produce bio-oil from biomass. Fast pyrolysis is a thermal conversion technology that is performed at a temperatures of 450 - 600 ºC, high biomass heating ratess (100 - 2000 K/s), a short gas residence time (less than 2 s......) with no presence of oxygen. Fast pyrolysis can convert a large fraction of the biomass to bio-oil, and smaller fractions of char and gas. The pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) has been developed at the CHEC center at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. The reactor is a compact design that uses a low flow rate...

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of index profile of indium tin oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Rhaleb, H.; Benamar, E.; Rami, M.; Roger, J.P.; Hakam, A.; Ennaoui, A

    2002-11-30

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterisation. It was used to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films deposited by spray pyrol onto Pyrex substrates. Dielectric ITO films often present microstructures which give rise to a variation of the refractive index with the distance from substrate. In this work, it was found that the fit between ellipsometric data and optical models results could be significantly improved when it was assumed that the refractive index of ITO films varied across the upper 60 nm near the film surface. Also, the surface roughness was modelled and compared with that given by the atomic force microscope (AFM)

  7. Reproducibility of the Synthesis of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Produced by Laser Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, R.; Bouzas, V.; Costo, R.; Dumitrache, F.; García, M. A.; Morales, M. P.; Morjan, I.; Serna, C. J.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.

    2010-10-01

    During the development of the BONSAI Project, the need for high quantities of iron oxide nanoparticles with some specific characteristics intensified the problem of the reproducibility in the nanoparticle production. Given the fact that the reaction yield for the production of the smallest and more homogeneous nanoparticles (BONFEX4) was very low (in the range of 1g/day), the process had to be repeated several times. These repetitions involved the use of three different CO2 lasers (two of monomodal gaussian beams TEMoo mode with spot sizes of 4 and 3.5 mm and one multimodal of 4 mm spot size). Keeping constant the rest of the experiment parameters (including the laser density) we obtained similar powders in nature as revealed by X-ray diffraction, and similar particle size distributions, but with different magnetic properties. When the same laser was used the reproducibility of the magnetic properties increased significantly.

  8. Adiabatic Gasification and Pyrolysis of Coffee Husk Using Air-Steam for Partial Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colombian coffee industry produces about 0.6 million tons of husk (CH per year which could serve as feedstock for thermal gasification to produce gaseous and liquid fuels. The current paper deals with: (i CH adiabatic gasification modeling using air-steam blends for partial oxidation and (ii experimental thermogravimetric analysis to determine the CH activation energy (E. The Chemical Equilibrium with Applications Program (CEA, developed by NASA, was used to estimate the effect of equivalence ratio (ER and steam to fuel ratio (S : F on equilibrium temperature and gas composition of ~150 species. Also, an atom balance model was developed for comparison purposes. The results showed that increased ER and (S : F ratios produce mixtures that are rich in H2 and CO2 but poor in CO. The value for the activation energy was estimated to be 221 kJ/kmol.

  9. Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: 2012 State of Technology and Projections to 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

    2013-08-27

    This report summarizes the economic impact of the work performed at PNNL during FY12 to improve fast pyrolysis oil upgrading via hydrotreating. A comparison is made between the projected economic outcome and the actual results based on experimental data. Sustainability metrics are also included.

  10. Effects of pyrolysis temperature, time and leaf litter and powder coal ash addition on sludge-derived adsorbents for nitrogen oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoli; Liang, Baohong; Liu, Min; Xu, Xiaoyuan; Cui, Meihua

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this research was to seek a cost effective solution to prepare adsorbents for nitrogen oxide from surplus sludge. Leaf litter and powder coal ash were used as cheap and easily available additives. An adsorbent for nitrogen oxide was prepared by pyrolysis of dried sludge mixed with zinc chloride. Under optimum pyrolysis conditions of 375°C for 90 min and a zinc chloride content of 30%, the surface area of the adsorbent with leaf litter was 514.41 m(2)/g, the surface area of the adsorbent with powder coal ash was 432.34 m(2)/g, respectively, corresponding to an increase of 90.70% and 60.27% when compared to the adsorbent without the additives. The saturated adsorption quantity of the adsorbent with leaf litter reached 271 mg/g at 20°C. The results indicated that the sludge-derived adsorbent was quite promising for nitrogen oxide removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microwave-induced co-processing of coal and biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jie-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis is an attractive alternative for the conversion of solid fuels to valuable chemicals and bio-fuels. In order to obtain more H2 and syngas from pyrolysis of coal and biomass, microwave has been adopted to enhance the co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass, which has been investigated systematically in this study. Firstly, conventional pyrolysis of coal and biomass was carried out using a vertical tube furnace. Characterizations of pyrolytic gas, liquid and solid products were conducted...

  12. Thermodynamic simulation of biomass gas steam reforming for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sordi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to simulate a small-scale fuel cell system for power generation using biomass gas as fuel. The methodology encompasses the thermodynamic and electrochemical aspects of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC, as well as solves the problem of chemical equilibrium in complex systems. In this case the complex system is the internal reforming of biomass gas to produce hydrogen. The fuel cell input variables are: operational voltage, cell power output, composition of the biomass gas reforming, thermodynamic efficiency, electrochemical efficiency, practical efficiency, the First and Second law efficiencies for the whole system. The chemical compositions, molar flows and temperatures are presented to each point of the system as well as the exergetic efficiency. For a molar water/carbon ratio of 2, the thermodynamic simulation of the biomass gas reforming indicates the maximum hydrogen production at a temperature of 1070 K, which can vary as a function of the biomass gas composition. The comparison with the efficiency of simple gas turbine cycle and regenerative gas turbine cycle shows the superiority of SOFC for the considered electrical power range.

  13. Hydrogen Production via Synthetic Gas by Biomass/Oil Partial Oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanika, Jiří; Lederer, J.; Tukač, V.; Veselý, Václav; Kováč, D.

    176-177, - (2011), s. 286-290 ISSN 1385-8947. [International Conference on Chemical Reactors CHEMREACTOR-19 /19./. Vienna, 05.09.2010-09.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-2TP1/024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : hydrogen * biomass * partial oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.461, year: 2011

  14. Torrefaction/biochar production by microwave and conventional slow pyrolysis - comparison of energy properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gronnow, Mark; Budarin, Vitaly; Masek, Ondrej; Crombie, Kyle; Brownsort, Peter; Shuttleworth, Peter; Hurst, Peter; Clark, James

    2013-01-01

    The energy efficiency of torrefaction/pyrolysis of biomass to fuel/biochar was studied using conventional (slow) and microwave (low temperature) pyrolysis. Conventional pyrolysis is approximately three times as energy efficient as microwave pyrolysis, in terms of the energy required to process a unit of feedstock. However, this is more than compensated for by the higher energy content of the condensable and gaseous coproducts from microwave pyrolysis, as these can be utilized to generate the ...

  15. Characterization and integration of oxidation catalysts at small-scale biomass combustion furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Mirjam; Hartmann, Ingo; Schenk, Joachim; Enke, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    Small-scale biomass combustion is a major part in heat supply from renewable resources. Drawbacks to the environmental background are the pollutant emissions, which are formed as a result of maloperation, suboptimal furnace construction or the biomass fuel composition. The named primary factors can be influenced by several measures, but the achievable emission results are limited. To provide real clean combustion technology with nearly zero pollutant emissions, secondary emission reduction measures are necessary. One of these measures is the application of catalytic flue gas cleaning as integrated or downstream solution. Catalysis is already a state of the art element in many processes and following this, some studies reveal already its potential to reduce CO, VOC as well as particle emissions in small-scale biomass combustion systems. However, a wide application of catalysts in wood combustion units didn't take place so far, because the challenging process conditions demand a proper integration and highly stable and active catalytic materials. For the achievement of well-functioning combustion systems with catalyst solutions a procedure for application-oriented characterization is presented. Initial investigations with commercially available catalysts have shown that the gas hourly space velocity and the oxygen content have the most significant influence on the conversion rate of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide. Two samples with different active phases have been compared, one with solely metal oxides and one with metal oxides and noble metals. The one with noble metals showed as expected a higher activity, but also a higher stability.

  16. Method and a Mobile Unit for Collecting Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A method for collecting biomass, such as straw, and for producing a pyrolysis liquid, such as oil or tar, from the biomass, comprises the step of collecting the biomass from a growth site, e.g. a field, by means of a mobile unit. The biomass is continuously fed into a pyrolysis apparatus (200......) accommodated by the mobile unit, as the mobile unit is moved across the growth site. While the biomass is processed in the pyrolysis apparatus, further biomass is simultaneously being collected. The pyrolysis apparatus may be a flash pyrolysis or fast pyrolysis apparatus relying on centrifugal forces...... for forcing biomass towards a reactive surface in a pyrolysis reactor. The mobile unit may be self-propelled....

  17. Transparent conducting properties of Ni doped zinc oxide thin films prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaoud, A.; Rmili, A.; Ouachtari, F.; Louardi, A.; Chtouki, T. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Elidrissi, B., E-mail: e.bachir@mailcity.com [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Erguig, H. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Ecole Nationale des Sciences Appliquees de Kenitra (ENSAK) (Morocco)

    2013-01-15

    Undoped and Ni doped zinc oxide (Ni-ZnO) thin films were prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer from aqueous solution of anhydrous zinc acetate (Zn(CH{sub 3}COOH){sub 2} and hexahydrated nickel chloride (NiCl{sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O) as sources of zinc and nickel, respectively. The films were deposited onto the amorphous glass substrates kept at (450 Degree-Sign C). The effect of the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of Ni doped ZnO thin film was studied. It was found from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis that both the undoped and Ni doped ZnO films were crystallized in the hexagonal structure with a preferred orientation of the crystallites along the [002] direction perpendicular to the substrate. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed a relatively dense surface structure composed of crystallites in the spherical form whose average size decreases when the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio increases. The optical study showed that all the films were highly transparent. The optical transmittance in the visible region varied between 75 and 85%, depending on the dopant concentrations. The variation of the band gap versus the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio showed that the energy gap decreases from 2.95 to 2.72 eV as the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio increases from 0 to 0.02 and then increases to reach 3.22 eV for [Ni]/[Zn] = 0.04. The films obtained with the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio = 0.02 showed minimum resistivity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm at room temperature. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optical transmittance of Ni doped ZnO varies between 75 and 85%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The energy gap of these films decreases from 2.95 to 2.72 eV as the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio increases from 0 to 0.02. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The energy gap increases to reach 3.22 eV for [Ni]/[Zn] = 0.04. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films obtained with [Ni]/[Zn] ratio = 0.02 show minimum resistivity of 2

  18. Defect-induced magnetism in undoped and Mn-doped wide band gapzinc oxide grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motaung, DE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a systemic study on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of the un-doped and Mn doped ZnO thin films grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis at different deposition times. XRD profilinghas shown that the structures of the prepared...

  19. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    requirement for commercial deployment of biomass-based power/heat co-generation and biofuels production. There are several commonly used syngas clean-up technologies: (1) Syngas cooling and water scrubbing has been commercially proven but efficiency is low and it is only effective at small scales. This route is accompanied with troublesome wastewater treatment. (2) The tar filtration method requires frequent filter replacement and solid residue treatment, leading to high operation and capital costs. (3) Thermal destruction typically operates at temperatures higher than 1000oC. It has slow kinetics and potential soot formation issues. The system is expensive and materials are not reliable at high temperatures. (4) In-bed cracking catalysts show rapid deactivation, with durability to be demonstrated. (5) External catalytic cracking or steam reforming has low thermal efficiency and is faced with problematic catalyst coking. Under this program, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) is being evaluated for syngas tar clean-up in biomass gasification. The CPO reaction is exothermic, implying that no external heat is needed and the system is of high thermal efficiency. CPO is capable of processing large gas volume, indicating a very compact catalyst bed and a low reactor cost. Instead of traditional physical removal of tar, the CPO concept converts tar into useful light gases (eg. CO, H2, CH4). This eliminates waste treatment and disposal requirements. All those advantages make the CPO catalytic tar conversion system a viable solution for biomass gasification downstream gas clean-up. This program was conducted from October 1 2008 to February 28 2011 and divided into five major tasks. - Task A: Perform conceptual design and conduct preliminary system and economic analysis (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2009) - Task B: Biomass gasification tests, product characterization, and CPO tar conversion catalyst preparation. This task will be conducted after completing process design and system economics analysis

  20. Thermal characteristics and surface morphology of char during co-pyrolysis of low-rank coal blended with microalgal biomass: Effects of Nannochloropsis and Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Wangcai; Yang, Bolun

    2018-02-01

    In this work, the influence of Nannochloropsis and Chlorella on the thermal behavior and surface morphology of char during the co-pyrolysis process were explored. Thermogravimetric and iso-conversional methods were applied to analyzing the pyrolytic and kinetic characteristics for different mass ratios of microalgae and low-rank coal (0, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3 and 1). Fractal theory was used to quantitatively determine the effect of microalgae on the morphological texture of co-pyrolysis char. The result indicated that both the Nannochloropsis and Chlorella promoted the release of volatile from low-rank coal. Different synergistic effects on the thermal parameters and yield of volatile were observed, which could be attributed to the different compositions in the Nannochloropsis and Chlorella and operating condition. The distribution of activation energies shows nonadditive characteristics. Fractal dimensions of the co-pyrolysis char were higher than the individual char, indicating the promotion of disordered degree due to the addition of microalgae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physico-chemical properties and gasification reactivity of co-pyrolysis char from different rank of coal blended with lignocellulosic biomass: Effects of the cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shuzhong; Luo, Zhengyuan; Chen, Lin; Meng, Haiyu; Zhao, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of cellulose on the physicochemical properties and the gasification reactivity of co-pyrolysis char was investigated. A specific surface area analyzer and an X-ray diffraction system were used to characterize the pore structure and the micro-crystalline structure of char. Fractal theory and deconvolution method were applied to quantitatively investigate the influence of cellulose on the structure of co-pyrolysis char. The results indicate that the improvements in the pore structure due to the presence of cellulose are more pronounced in the case of anthracite char with respect to bituminous char. Cellulose promotes the ordering of micro-scale structure and the uniformity of both anthracite and bituminous char, while the negative synergetic effect was observed during gasification of co-pyrolysis char. The exponential relationships between fractal dimension and specific surface area were determined, along with the relations between the gasification reactivity index and the microcrystalline structure parameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Co-pyrolysis behavior of microalgae biomass and low-quality coal: Products distributions, char-surface morphology, and synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Wangcai; Li, Yaowu; Yang, Bolun

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the distributions and releasing properties of the primary volatile products during co-pyrolysis of low-rank coal and green algae (GA) has been studied using fixed-bed reactor with online mass spectrometry. Surface morphology of the char was described quantitatively by SEM combined with fractal theory. Different forms of synergistic effects existed from both the yields of products and composition of the main gaseous products. Positive synergistic effects from tar yield were observed under 25% of GA from 600 to 850 °C, indicating GA promoted the formation of tar. Opposite synergistic effects on the content of H 2 and CO were gained when the mass ratio of GA was 50%. The fractal dimensions of co-pyrolysis char were less than the calculated values except under 650 °C, which meant the GA promoted the homogeneity of char surface. This work could provide essential data for proper operation parameters selecting for co-pyrolysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    % oxygen with those under inert atmosphere revealed two distinct pathways, pyrolysis and exothermic heterogeneous oxidation. At low temperatures and sufficient oxygen availability, heterogeneous oxidation of the solid seems to be favored over pyrolysis for wood, but not for coal. Current ignition models do......Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages....... This is not very well explained by apply-ing conventional thermal ignition theory. An experimental study at lab scale, using pinewood as an example fuel, was conducted to examine self-heating and self-ignition. Supplemental experiments were performed with bituminous coal. Instead of characterizing ignition...

  4. Electrochemical and/or microbiological treatment of pyrolysis wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, José R O; Santos, Dara S; Santos, Ubiratan R; Eguiluz, Katlin I B; Salazar-Banda, Giancarlo R; Schneider, Jaderson K; Krause, Laiza C; López, Jorge A; Hernández-Macedo, Maria L

    2017-10-01

    Electrochemical oxidation may be used as treatment to decompose partially or completely organic pollutants (wastewater) from industrial processes such as pyrolysis. Pyrolysis is a thermochemical process used to obtain bio-oil from biomasses, generating a liquid waste rich in organic compounds including aldehydes and phenols, which can be submitted to biological and electrochemical treatments in order to minimize its environmental impact. Thus, electrochemical systems employing dimensionally stable anodes (DSAs) have been proposed to enable biodegradation processes in subsurface environments. In order to investigate the organic compound degradation from residual coconut pyrolysis wastewater, ternary DSAs containing ruthenium, iridium and cerium synthetized by the 'ionic liquid method' at different calcination temperatures (500, 550, 600 and 700 °C) for the pretreatment of these compounds, were developed in order to allow posterior degradation by Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp. or Acinetobacter sp. bacteria. The electrode synthesized applying 500 °C displayed the highest voltammetric charge and was used in the pretreatment of pyrolysis effluent prior to microbial treatment. Regarding biological treatment, the Pseudomonas sp. exhibited high furfural degradation in wastewater samples electrochemically pretreated at 2.0 V. On the other hand, the use of Acinetobacter efficiently degraded phenolic compounds such as phenol, 4-methylphenol, 2,5-methylphenol, 4-ethylphenol and 3,5-methylphenol in both wastewater samples, with and without electrochemical pretreatment. Overall, the results indicate that the combination of both processes used in this study is relevant for the treatment of pyrolysis wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. One-step synthesis of bismuth molybdate catalysts via flame spray pyrolysis for the selective oxidation of propylene to acrolein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuh, K.; Kleist, W.; Høj, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) of Bi(III)-and Mo(VI)-2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in xylene resulted in various nanocrystalline bismuth molybdate phases depending on the Bi/Mo ratio. Besides alpha-Bi2Mo3O12 and gamma-Bi2MoO6, FSP gave direct access to the metastable beta-Bi2Mo2O9 phase with high surfa...... to acrolein at temperatures relevant for industrial applications (360 degrees C)....

  6. Respirometric characterization of aerobic sulfide, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur oxidation by S-oxidizing biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mabel; López, Luis R; Lafuente, Javier; Pérez, Julio; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2016-02-01

    Respirometry was used to reveal the mechanisms involved in aerobic biological sulfide oxidation and to characterize the kinetics and stoichiometry of a microbial culture obtained from a desulfurizing biotrickling filter. Physical-chemical processes such as stripping and chemical oxidation of hydrogen sulfide were characterized since they contributed significantly to the conversions observed in respirometric tests. Mass transfer coefficient for hydrogen sulfide and the kinetic parameters for chemical oxidation of sulfide with oxygen were estimated. The stoichiometry of the process was determined and the different steps in the sulfide oxidation process were identified. The conversion scheme proposed includes intermediate production of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate and the subsequent oxidation of both compounds to sulfate. A kinetic model describing each of the reactions observed during sulfide oxidation was calibrated and validated. The product selectivity was found to be independent of the dissolved oxygen to hydrogen sulfide concentration ratio in the medium at sulfide concentrations ranging from 3 to 30 mg S L(-1). Sulfide was preferentially consumed (SOURmax = 49.2 mg DO g(-1) VSS min(-1)) and oxidized to elemental sulfur at dissolved oxygen concentrations above 0.8 mg DO L(-1). Substrate inhibition of sulfide oxidation was observed (K(i,S(2-))= 42.4 mg S L(-1)). Intracellular sulfur accumulation also affected negatively the sulfide oxidation rate. The maximum fraction of elemental sulfur accumulated inside cells was estimated (25.6% w/w) and a shrinking particle equation was included in the kinetic model to describe elemental sulfur oxidation. The microbial diversity obtained through pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Thiothrix sp. was the main species present in the culture (>95%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tracking nitrogen oxides, nitrous acid, and nitric acid from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, J.; Miller, D. J.; Scheuer, E. M.; Dibb, J. E.; Hastings, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning emissions are an important source of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and nitrous acid (HONO), which play important roles in atmosphere oxidation capacity (hydroxyl radical and ozone formation) and have severe impacts on air quality and climate in the presence of sunlight and volatile organic compounds. However, tracking NOx and HONO and their chemistry in the atmosphere based on concentration alone is challenging. Isotopic analysis provides a potential tracking tool. In this study, we measured the nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of NOx (NO + NO2) and HONO, and soluble HONO and HNO3 during the Fire Influence on Regional and Global Environments Experiment (FIREX) laboratory experiments at the Missoula Fire Laboratory. Our newly developed and validated annular denuder system (ADS) enabled us to effectively trap HONO prior to a NOx collection system in series for isotopic analysis. In total we investigated 25 "stack" fires of various biomass materials where the emissions were measured within a few seconds of production by the fire. HONO concentration was measured in parallel using mist chamber/ion chromatography (MC/IC). The recovered mean HONO concentrations from ADS during the burn of each fire agree well with that measured via MC/IC. δ15N-NOx ranged from -4.3 ‰ to + 7.0 ‰ with a median of 0.7 ‰. Combined with a similar, recent study by our group [Fibiger et al., ES&T, 2017] the δ15N-NOx follows a linear relationship with δ15N-biomass (δ15N-NOx =0.94 x δ15N-biomass +1.98; R2=0.72). δ15N-HONO ranged from -5.3 to +8.3 ‰ with a median of 1.4 ‰. While both HONO and NOx are sourced from N in the biomass fuel, the secondary formation of HONO likely induces fractionation of the N that leads to the difference between δ15N-NOx and δ15N-HONO. We found a correlation of δ15N-HONO= 0.86 x δ15N-NOx + 0.52 (R2=0.55), which can potentially be used to track the chemistry of HONO formation following fire emissions. The methods

  8. Laser oxidative pyrolysis synthesis and annealing of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles embedded in carbon–silica shells/matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleaca, C.T. [National Institute for Plasma, Laser and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 36, R-077125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); “Politehnica” University of Bucharest, Physics Department, Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania); Scarisoreanu, M., E-mail: monica.scarisoreanu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Plasma, Laser and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 36, R-077125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Morjan, I.; Luculescu, C.; Niculescu, A.-M.; Badoi, A. [National Institute for Plasma, Laser and Radiation Physics (NILPRP), Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 36, R-077125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Vasile, E. [“Politehnica” University of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Gh. Polizu 1-7, Bucharest (Romania); Kovacs, G. [“Babes-Boyai” University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Arany Janos 11, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}-based nanocomposites were obtained by one-step laser oxidative pyrolysis. • Titania particles are surrounded by/embedded in carbon/silica shells/matrix. • They contain an anatase/rutile mixture with mean crystalline diameters up to 24 nm. • Their carbon content decreased with the increasing of introduced air coflow. • Their bandgap energy decreased due to the carbon incorporation. - Abstract: Titania nanoparticles containing a mixture of anatase and rutile phases (with mean crystalline sizes up to 24 nm) covered with/embedded in carbon/silica thin layers or matrix were obtained in a single step using laser oxidative pyrolysis. Titanium tetrachloride and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors were separately introduced into the reaction zone – both together with the laser-absorbing agent (sensitizer) ethylene – which acts also as carbon source – and the oxidant (air) – through the inner and the concentric nozzle, respectively. By increasing the air flow through the annular nozzle, while keeping constant the TiC{sub 4}, inner air, HMDSO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} flows, the atomic carbon concentration as well as the rutile to anatase ratio in the resulted nanopowders decrease. A much brighter and extended flame was observed for the experiment involving the greatest air flow. The Ti/Si atomic ratio in the resulted nanocomposites was higher than that from the introduced precursors (1.8), indicating a partial siloxane conversion to silica. The annealed powders (at 450 °C to further carbon content reducing) exhibit a lower bandgap energy than those of the reference sample without silica (and also lower than the commercial Degussa P25 nano-TiO{sub 2})

  9. Thermal reactivity of SOC linked to iron oxide content: Pyrolysis-AMS study of mineral-associated SOC on Kohala Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K. E.; Galy, V.; Derry, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a heterogeneous mixture of carbon compounds. This mixture, especially under variable redox conditions, can form semi-stable associations with amorphous Fe and Al minerals, potentially leading to long-term stabilization of soil carbon. How stable are these interactions if soil conditions, such as precipitation, pH, or soil redox state, change? Sixteen samples characterized as andic haplustand to hydric haplaudand soils derived from a 400 ka Pololu (basaltic) lava flow formed on a precipitation gradient on Kohala Volcano, HI were analyzed on the ramped pyrolysis-AMS (PyRox) system at Woods Hole NOSAMS facility. Samples from 50-90 cm depth were analyzed to eliminate signals from converted pasture grasses on the lower, drier half of the precipitation gradient. Redox conditions change along the gradient, with increased Fe loss at higher, wetter elevations. Samples were freeze-dried, homogenized, and combusted under a programed temperature pyrolysis or oxidation regime from 25 to 900°C; evolved CO2 was collected in fractions for 14C analysis. Results comprise a combination of pyrolysis (no O2 during temperature ramp) and oxidation (6% O2 during temperature ramp) experiments. Subsamples were digested in a combination of HF/HNO3/HCL and analyzed by ICP-OES for major elements and ICP-MS for Ti and Zr. Soil samples with iron oxide concentration ranging from 3.8 to 57.3% Fe2O3 were run on the PyRox system. Iron loss, which becomes pronounced at high precipitation (>200 cm MAP), is associated with younger 14C ages. Bulk 14C ages ranged from 1,700 radiocarbon years to 10,100 radiocarbon years. The shape of the thermographs (i.e. thermal reactivity) and by extension chemical reactivity is a function of Fe content. Lower T-max values of the individual thermograms are correlated to increasing Fe2O3 values. PyRox analyses across Kohala transect sites have given uniform age distributions, meaning the 14C age of low and high temperature components is

  10. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  11. Biomass [updated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Biomass resources and conversion technologies are diverse. Substantial biomass resources exist including woody crops, herbaceous perennials and annuals, forest resources, agricultural residues, and algae. Conversion processes available include fermentation, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, combustion, and transesterification. Bioderived products include liquid fuels (e.g. ethanol, biodiesel, and gasoline and diesel substitutes), gases, electricity, biochemical, and wood pellets. At present the major sources of biomass-derived liquid fuels are from first generation biofuels; ethanol from maize and sugar cane (89 billion L in 2013) and biodiesel from vegetable oils and fats (24 billion liters in 2011). For other than traditional uses, policy in the forms of mandates, targets, subsidies, and greenhouse gas emission targets has largely been driving biomass utilization. Second generation biofuels have been slow to take off.

  12. FAST PYROLYSIS TEST WITH WHOLE SUGARCANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. B. CORTEZ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a preliminary study proposing the usage of whole sugarcane in the thermoconversion process. . Tests were made on fast pyrolysis of biomass as whole sugarcane (bagasse, sugar and sugarcane straw crushed and dry. These experiments were performed in order to verify the suitability of this type of biomass for the fast pyrolysis process in a fluidized bed. The pre-treatment was assessed, during which, for the preparation of the whole sugarcane, an ordinary machine for chopping and grinding was employed. The pyrolysis process was conducted without major changes in the plant operating conditions to other biomass such as sugarcane trash. The efficiency of energy conversion of biomass to fine coal and bio-oil was 41%, resulting in a production of 3034 MJ per ton of the whole sugarcane processed, compared to 1900.6 MJ obtained in the production of ethanol via fermentation, where the conversion efficiency was around 26%. With the advances in this pyrolysis, efficiency may increase in the coming years, an interesting route for production of second generation fuels via catalytic synthesis using syngas from gasification of the mixture of bio-oil and fine charcoal. Keywords: Bioenergy, Whole sugarcane, Bio-oil, Fast pyrolysis.

  13. TDT-3R Clean Multi Fuels. ECN contribution to WP3. Lab-/bench-scale pyrolysis test of biomass and analysis of byproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.; Oudhuis, A.B.J.; Zwart, R.W.R.; Boersma, A.R.

    2005-11-01

    Under the present conditions it is expected that coal will still be used for a long period as a energy source. Furthermore, biomass is emerging as a new renewable CO2-neutral energy source in the future. Both fuels need significantly lower emissions to meet new (future) European Union environmental norms for sustainable clean energy production. Several technologies and 'end-of pipe' solutions have been developed in the past to reach these stricter emission limits. Examples are integrated combined cycle gasification systems (IGCC) for large scale use (>250 MW capacity). Also, a large number of gas cleaning technologies have been developed. These technologies are up-to-now rather complicated and/or costly and therefore also new solutions have to be developed. The 3R Multifuel process is aimed to offer a solution to these problems, especially for low-rank coals like brown coal, lignite, high sulfur coal, derived fuels and biomass. The objectives for ECN in the Work Package 3 of this project are: (a) to summarise and update data for the potential of biomass and waste streams in Europe for power production; and (b) to select biomass/waste streams to be tested in the lab/bench-scale facility and to generate design data for clean solid fuel production from biomass to be used for a pilot facility in Hungary. TDT-3R stands for Thermal Desorption Technology-Recycle-Reduce-Reuse

  14. Pure hydrogen from pyrolysis oil by the steam-iron process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    The steam-iron process is an old process, which was used for the production of hydrogen from cokes at the beginning of the twentieth century. In this thesis the steam-iron process is used to produce pure hydrogen from pyrolysis oil. Pyrolysis oil, obtained from the pyrolysis of biomass, is used to

  15. Modelling of flash pyrolysis of a single wood particle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.M.C.; Janse, A.M.C.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Prins, W.

    2000-01-01

    Reactors for flash pyrolysis of biomass are designed to maximize the yield of bio-oil, at the expense of the by-products gas and char. To understand which chemical and physical factors influence the yield to bio-oil, the flash pyrolysis of a cylindrical wood particle with a maximum diameter of 1000

  16. A Comparison of Lignin, Macroalgae, Wood and Straw Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis of macroalgae showed a promising result with a bio-oil yield of 65 wt% dry ash free basis (daf) and 76 % energy recovery in the bio-oil while the lignin fast pyrolysis provides a bio-oil yield of 47 wt% daf and energy recovery in bio-oil of 45 %. The physiochemical properties...

  17. Pyrolysis bio-oil upgrading to renewable fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to upgrade woody biomass pyrolysis bio-oil into transportation fuels by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation : (HDO) using nanospring (NS) supported catalyst via the following research objectives: (1) develop nanospring-based : catalysts (nan...

  18. Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Oxidation of NO on F- and N-Codoped Spherical TiO2 Synthesized via Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluorine- and nitrogen-codoped TiO2 was synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method with titanium tetrafluoride and urea as precursor. The codoped TiO2 was characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Nitric oxide (NO photocatalytic oxidation in gas-phase medium was employed as a probe reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic reactivity of the catalysts. The results indicated that spherical codoped TiO2 photocatalysts with unique puckered surface were obtained by this method. The codoped catalysts have solely anatase crystalline structure. The optical characterization of the codoped catalysts showed that the codoped samples could be excited by visible light photons in the 400–550 nm and could efficiently oxidize NO under visible light irradiation. The mechanism of special morphology formation of prepared codoped TiO2 structure is also discussed.

  19. Biomass conversion processes for energy and fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, S. S.; Zaborsky, O. R.

    The book treats biomass sources, promising processes for the conversion of biomass into energy and fuels, and the technical and economic considerations in biomass conversion. Sources of biomass examined include crop residues and municipal, animal and industrial wastes, agricultural and forestry residues, aquatic biomass, marine biomass and silvicultural energy farms. Processes for biomass energy and fuel conversion by direct combustion (the Andco-Torrax system), thermochemical conversion (flash pyrolysis, carboxylolysis, pyrolysis, Purox process, gasification and syngas recycling) and biochemical conversion (anaerobic digestion, methanogenesis and ethanol fermentation) are discussed, and mass and energy balances are presented for each system.

  20. Bitumen pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, G.; Noll, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the past bitumen was a preferred matrix for the embedding of low and intermediate level radioactive waste: its geological history promised long term stability in final repositories. A great variety of waste has been embedded: technological waste, spent ion exchange resins, concrete, rubble, etc. Liquid waste like evaporator concentrates can be dried and embedded simultaneously in extruders, allowing simple processes and equipment. Unfortunately, during long term intermediate storage the bituminized waste drums proved out being not as stable as expected: a significant number turned out to be no longer acceptable for final disposal, and some of them even needed repacking to enable further intermediate storage. A method to rework such drums with bituminized radioactive waste seems to be urgently needed. Pyrolysis and pyro-hydrolysis (= pyrolysis with water steam added) have a long history for the treatment of organic waste: spent solvent (TBP), spent ion exchange resins, alpha waste (predominantly PVC), etc. Due to its low process temperature and the endothermic character, such processes offer significant safety advantages, as compared to incineration or dissolving in organic solvents. Results of lab-scale investigations and concepts for facilities are presented. (authors)

  1. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from

  2. Effect of rice husk ash mass on sustainability pyrolysis zone of fixed bed downdraft gasifier with capacity of 10 kg/hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjosatyo, Adi; Haq, Imaduddin; Dafiqurrohman, Hafif; Gibran, Felly Rihlat

    2017-03-01

    The formation of pyrolysis sustainability (Sustainable Pyrolysis) is the objective of the gasification process. Pyrolysis zone in the gasification process is the result of the endothermic reaction that get heat from oxidation (combustion) of the fuel with oxygen, where cracking biomass rice husk result of such as charcoal, water vapor, steam tar, and gas - gas (CO, H 2, CH 4, CO 2 and N 2) and must be maintained at a pyrolysis temperature to obtain results plentiful gas (producer gas) or syngas (synthetic gas). Obtaining continuously syngas is indicated by flow rate (discharge) producer gas well and the consistency of the flame on the gas burner, it is highly influenced by the gasification process and the operation of the gasifier and the mass balance (mass balance) between the feeding rate of rice husk with the disposal of ash (ash removal). In experiments conducted is using fixed bed gasifier type downdraft capacity of 10 kg/h. Besides setting the mass of rice husks into the gasifier and disposal arrangements rice husk ash may affect the sustainability of the pyrolysis process, but tar produced during the gasification process causes sticky rice husk ash in the plenum gasifier. Modifications disposal system rice husk ash can facilitate the arrangement of ash disposal then could control the temperature pyrolysis with pyrolysis at temperatures between 500-750 ° C. The experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of mass quantities of rice husk ash issued against sustainability pyrolysis temperature which is obtained at each time disposal of rice husk ash to produce 60-90 grams of ash issued. From some experimental phenomena is expected to be seen pyrolysis and its effect on the flow rate of syngas and the stability of the flame on the gas burner so that this research can find a correlation to obtain performance (performance) gasifier optimal.

  3. Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, H.M. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Torres, J., E-mail: njtorress@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Lopez Carreno, L.D. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)

    2013-01-15

    Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

  4. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1983-02-01

    A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

  5. SIMULATION OF OLIVE PITS PYROLYSIS IN A ROTARY KILN PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacobbe Braccio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the simulation of an olive pits fed rotary kiln pyrolysis plant installed in Southern Italy. The pyrolysis process was simulated by commercial software CHEMCAD. The main component of the plant, the pyrolyzer, was modelled by a Plug Flow Reactor in accordance to the kinetic laws. Products distribution and the temperature profile was calculated along reactor's axis. Simulation results have been found to fit well the experimental data of pyrolysis. Moreover, sensitivity analyses were executed to investigate the effect of biomass moisture on the pyrolysis process.

  6. Pyrolysis of marine biomass to produce bio-oil and its upgrading using a novel multi-metal catalyst prepared from the spent car catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabegh, Mahzad Yaghmaei; Norouzi, Omid; Jafarian, Sajedeh; Khosh, Akram Ghanbari; Tavasoli, Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    In order to reduce the economic and environmental consequences caused by spent car catalyst, we herein report for the first time a novel promising multi-metal catalyst prepared from spent car catalytic converters to upgrade the pyrolysis bio-oils. The physico-chemical properties of prepared catalyst were characterized by XRD, EDS, FESEM, and FT-IR analyses. The thermal stability of the multi-metal catalyst was studied with TGA. To investigate the activity of the catalyst, Conversion of Cladophora glomerata (C. glomerata) into bio-products was carried out via a fixed bed reactor with and without catalyst at the temperature of 500°C. Although the catalyst didn't catalyze the gasification reaction, bio-oil was upgraded over the catalyst. The main effect of the catalyst on the bio-oil components is deoxygenating of nitrogen compounds and promotion the ketonization reaction, which converts acid to ketone and declines the corrosive nature of bio-oil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Quantification of Lignin and Its Structural Features in Plant Biomass Using 13C Lignin as Internal Standard for Pyrolysis-GC-SIM-MS

    OpenAIRE

    van Erven, Gijs; de Visser, Ries; Merkx, Donny W. H.; Strolenberg, Willem; de Gijsel, Peter; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying plant biomass recalcitrance at the molecular level can only be achieved by accurate analyses of both the content and structural features of the molecules involved. Current quantification of lignin is, however, majorly based on unspecific gravimetric analysis after sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Hence, our research aimed at specific lignin quantification with concurrent characterization of its structural features. Hereto, for the first time, a polymeric 13C l...

  8. Quantification of Lignin and Its Structural Features in Plant Biomass Using 13C Lignin as Internal Standard for Pyrolysis-GC-SIM-MS

    OpenAIRE

    Erven, Van, Gijs; Visser, de, Ries; Merkx, Donny W.H.; Strolenberg, Willem; Gijsel, de, Peter; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying plant biomass recalcitrance at the molecular level can only be achieved by accurate analyses of both the content and structural features of the molecules involved. Current quantification of lignin is, however, majorly based on unspecific gravimetric analysis after sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Hence, our research aimed at specific lignin quantification with concurrent characterization of its structural features. Hereto, for the first time, a polymeric 13C l...

  9. Insights into the oxidative degradation of cellulose by a copper metalloenzyme that exploits biomass components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, R Jason; Sweeney, Matt D; Lo Leggio, Leila; Otten, Harm; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Krogh, Kristian B R M; Jørgensen, Christian Isak; Tovborg, Morten; Anthonsen, Annika; Tryfona, Theodora; Walter, Clive P; Dupree, Paul; Xu, Feng; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2011-09-13

    The enzymatic degradation of recalcitrant plant biomass is one of the key industrial challenges of the 21st century. Accordingly, there is a continuing drive to discover new routes to promote polysaccharide degradation. Perhaps the most promising approach involves the application of "cellulase-enhancing factors," such as those from the glycoside hydrolase (CAZy) GH61 family. Here we show that GH61 enzymes are a unique family of copper-dependent oxidases. We demonstrate that copper is needed for GH61 maximal activity and that the formation of cellodextrin and oxidized cellodextrin products by GH61 is enhanced in the presence of small molecule redox-active cofactors such as ascorbate and gallate. By using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, the active site of GH61 is revealed to contain a type II copper and, uniquely, a methylated histidine in the copper's coordination sphere, thus providing an innovative paradigm in bioinorganic enzymatic catalysis.

  10. Emission of nitrogen oxides from small biomass-fired grate boilers - a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Daniel

    1999-05-01

    A literature study has been carried out to find mechanisms for control of nitrogen oxide emissions from small-scale biomass fired combustion devices. The underlying nitrogen chemistry has been studied. Three paths of nitrogen oxide formation has been identified: 1. Thermal NO x , 2, Prompt NO x , and, 3. Fuel NO x . Out of these three mechanisms only fuel NO x is of interest, and the others are neglected at the temperature level concerned. The results from this study have been used to identify limitations and possibilities for NO x and CO abatement. A beacon has been to find efficient methods for NO x abatement at the same time as complete burn-out of the fuel is of greatest importance. The NO x abatement work of many of the Swedish manufacturers of small-scale combustion devices is described. This gives valuable insight in the practical possibilities and limitations in strive for low NOx emissions. From the literature and the contacts with manufacturers some factors of great importance for NO x emission control have been identified. These are: * The fuel (nitrogen content, shape, size, the height of the fuel layer and the tendency of the fuel to stick), * The stoichiometry in the volume above the fuel bed (should be 0.6 - 0.8), * The mixing of the gases above the fuel bed, * The mixing of tertiary air into the main gas flow, and * The thermal load of the combustion chamber (residence time). All the secondary measures studied but selective catalytic reduction have been rejected. Selective catalytic reduction could be a possible solution to the NO x emission problem if it is necessary to further lower the emissions from these small-scale biomass combustion devices despite the cost Project report from the program: Small scale combustion of biofuels. 22 refs, 30 figs, 4 tabs

  11. Semivolatile organic (GC-MS) and inorganic analyses of groundwater samples during the hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) field test in Visalia, CA, 1997; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarappa, M; Knauss, K G; Kumamoto, G; Leif, R N; Newmark, R L

    1998-01-01

    Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) is a novel, in situ, thermal-remediation technology that uses hot, oxygenated groundwater to completely oxidize a wide range of organic pollutants. A field demonstration of HPO was performed during the summer of 1997 at the Southern California Edison Pole Yard in Visalia, California, a site contaminated with creosote. The goal of the field experiment was to confirm the success of HPO under field remediation conditions. The groundwater was heated by steam injections, and oxygen was added by co-injection of compressed air. The progress of the HPO remediation process was evaluated by monitoring groundwater from multiple wells for dissolved oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon, and dissolved organic contaminant levels. Analyses of groundwater chemistry allowed us to measure the concentrations of creosote components and to identify oxygenated intermediates produced by the HPO treatment. Dissolved organic carbon levels increased in response to steam injections because of the enhanced dissolution and mobilization of the creosote into the heated groundwater. Elevated concentrations of phenols and benzoic acid were measured in wells affected by the steam injections. Concentrations of other oxygenated compounds (i.e., fluorenone, anthrone, and 9,10-anthracenedione) increased in response to the steam injections. The production of these partially oxidized compounds is consistent with the aqueous-phase HPO reactions of creosote. Additional changes in the groundwater in response to steam injection were also consistent with the groundwater HPO chemistry. A drop in dissolved oxygen was observed in the aquifer targeted for the steam injections, and isotope shifts in the dissolved inorganic pool reflected the input of oxidized carbon derived from the creosote carbon

  12. Catalytic hydrotreatment of pyrolysis liquids and fractions : Catalyst Development and Process Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Wang

    2017-01-01

    The use of sustainable and renewable lignocellulosic biomass is of particular interest to (partly) replace fossil resources. Fast pyrolysis is a promising technology to convert lignocellulosic biomass to a liquid energy carrier. The products, also known as fast pyrolysis liquids (PLs), have a higher

  13. Pyrolysis oil upgrading for Co-processing in standard refinery units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Miguel Mercader, F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis considers the route that comprises the upgrading of pyrolysis oil (produced from lingo-cellulosic biomass) and its further co-processing in standard refineries to produce transportation fuels. In the present concept, pyrolysis oil is produced where biomass is available and then

  14. Catalytic transformations of biomass substrates using mixed metal oxides derived from substituted hydrotalcites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macala, Gerald Stephen, II

    Fueled by seemingly endless reserves of cheap and easily accessible fossil energy, the industrial age has brought to the developed world tremendous advances in human health and well being. Unfortunately the burning of fossil fuels has also been implicated in increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global climate change. Concerns about short-term and long-term supply further build a case for the need for alternative energy sources. Biomass derived materials are a tantalizing source of fuels and fine chemicals. Unlike petroleum derived hydrocarbons, biomass can be both renewable and carbon neutral. Crops can be regenerated annually or even more often in tropical climates, and since the captured carbon originates as atmospheric CO2, the overall cycle has the potential to be nearly carbon neutral regardless of the final fate of the carbon. In contrast to petroleum derived hydrocarbons, which can often be made more valuable by adding functionality, biomass derived materials are already highly functionalized and can usually be made more valuable by selective removal of functionality. The development of robust catalysts capable of selective defuntionalization of biomass derived substrates remains an important challenge with potentially enormous economic and societal impact. In addition to being robust and selective, catalysts should preferably be heterogeneous to allow for easier removal and regeneration after the reaction is complete. New materials consisting of Mg-Al hydrotalcite-like structures, with a limiting percentage of Mg or Al substituted with other M2+ or M3+ cations, were synthesized by a co-precipitation process in basic aqueous solution with carbonate as counterion. Calcination of these materials at 460 °C resulted in evolution of CO2 and water and yielded high surface area mixed metal oxides with enhanced reactivity. Materials were characterized by ICP for elemental analysis, XRD for structural information, XPS for surface elemental analysis and TEM

  15. Dependence of Heterogeneous OH Kinetics with Biomass Burning Aerosol Proxies on Oxidant Concentration and Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical transformations of aerosol particles by heterogeneous reactions with trace gases such as OH radicals can influence particle physicochemical properties and lifetime, affect cloud formation, light scattering, and human health. Furthermore, OH oxidation can result in degradation of particle mass by volatilization reactions, altering the budget of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, the reactive uptake coefficient (γ) and particle oxidation degree can vary depending on several factors including oxidant concentration and relative humidity (RH). While RH can influence the extent of dissociation/ionization, it can also affect particle phase and thus oxidant diffusivity. Only one study so far has investigated the effect of RH on the rate of OH uptake to organic surfaces; however, the underlying processes affecting OH reactivity with organic aerosol under humidified conditions still remains elusive. Here, we determine the effect of RH on OH reactivity with laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles: levoglucosan and 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol. The effect of OH concentration on γ for three common BBA molecular markers (levoglucosan, abietic acid, and nitroguaiacol) under dry conditions was investigated from [OH]≈107-1011 molecule cm-3, covering both [OH] in biomass burning plumes and [OH] commonly used in particle aging studies. Furthermore, key VOC reaction products and their production pathways resulting from BBA volatilization by OH were identified. OH radicals are produced using a microwave induced plasma (MIP) of H2 in He or Ar followed by reaction with O2, or by photolysis of O3 in the presence of H2O. A cylindrical rotating wall flow-tube reactor and fast-flow aerosol flow reactor are used for conducting kinetic studies. OH is detected using a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) is employed for VOC analysis. γ decreases from 0.2-0.5 at

  16. Upgrading of the liquid fuel from fast pyrolysis of biomass over MoNi/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Wei [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong; Zhang, Qi [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2010-09-15

    The hydrotreatment of bio-oil, which obtained from fast pyrolysis of pine sawdust, was investigated over MoNi/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst under mild conditions (373 K, 3 MPa hydrogen pressure). Acetic acid was taken as a model compound to investigate the effects of Mo promoter contents and reducing temperatures of catalysts on the catalysts activity under the condition of 473 K and 3 MPa hydrogen pressure. X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed reduction showed that the addition of Mo promoter benefited the uniformity of nickel species and inhibited the formation of NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel in the catalysts. The GC spectrum of liquid products showed the mechanism of the model reaction. The maximum conversion of acetic acid (33.20%) was attained over 0.06MoNi/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts being reduced at 873 K. This catalyst was chosen for the upgrading of raw bio-oil. After the upgrading process, the pH value of the bio-oil increased from 2.33 to 2.77. The water content increased from 35.52 wt.% to 41.55 wt.% and the gross calorific value increased from 13.96 MJ/kg to 14.17 MJ/kg. The hydrogen content in the bio-oil increased from 6.25 wt.% to 6.95 wt.%. The product properties of the upgraded bio-oil, particularly the hydrogen content and the acidity were considerably improved. The results of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that both hydrotreatment and esterification had happened over 0.06MoNi/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (873) catalyst during the upgrading process. (author)

  17. Upgrading of liquid fuel from the vacuum pyrolysis of biomass over the Mo-Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Lu [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou Guangdong 510640 (China); Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, CAS, Guangzhou Guangdong 510640 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong; Zhang, Qi [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou Guangdong 510640 (China); Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, CAS, Guangzhou Guangdong 510640 (China)

    2009-08-15

    High amounts of acid compounds in bio-oil not only lead to the deleterious properties such as corrosiveness and high acidity, but also set up many obstacles to its wide applications. By hydrotreating the bio-oil under mild conditions, some carboxylic acid compounds could be converted to alcohols which would esterify with the unconverted acids in the bio-oil to produce esters. The properties of the bio-oil could be improved by this method. In the paper, the raw bio-oil was produced by vacuum pyrolysis of pine sawdust. The optimal production conditions were investigated. A series of nickel-based catalysts were prepared. Their catalytic activities were evaluated by upgrading of model compound (glacial acetic acid). Results showed that the reduced Mo-10Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst had the highest activity with the acetic acid conversion of 33.2%. Upgrading of the raw bio-oil was investigated over reduced Mo-10Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. After the upgrading process, the pH value of the bio-oil increased from 2.16 to 2.84. The water content increased from 46.2 wt.% to 58.99 wt.%. The H element content in the bio-oil increased from 6.61 wt.% to 6.93 wt.%. The dynamic viscosity decreased a little. The results of GC-MS spectrometry analysis showed that the ester compounds in the upgraded bio-oil increased by 3 times. It is possible to improve the properties of bio-oil by hydrotreating and esterifying carboxyl group compounds in the bio-oil. (author)

  18. Investigation on the removal of H2S from microwave pyrolysis of sewage sludge by an integrated two-stage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Tian, Yu; Yin, Linlin; Zuo, Wei; Gong, Zhenlong; Zhang, Jie

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an integrated two-stage system, including the in-situ catalytic microwave pyrolysis (ICMP) and subsequent catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) processes, was proposed to remove H 2 S released from microwave-induced pyrolysis of sewage sludge. The emission profile and H 2 S removal from the pyrolysis of raw sewage sludge (SS) and sewage sludge spiked with conditioner CaO (SS-CaO) were investigated. The results showed that CaO played a positive role on sulfur fixation during the pyrolysis process. It was found that SS-CaO (10 wt.%) contributed to about 35% of H 2 S removal at the first stage (ICMP process). Additionally, the CWO process was demonstrated to have promising potential for posttreatment of remaining H 2 S gas. At the Fe 3+ concentration of 30 g/L, the maximum H 2 S removal efficiency of 94.8% was obtained for a single Fe 3+ /Cu 2+ solution. Finally, at the pyrolysis temperature of 800 °C, 99.7% of H 2 S was eliminated by the integrated two-stage system meeting the discharge standard of China. Therefore, the integrated two-stage system of ICMP + CWO may provide a promising strategy to remove H 2 S dramatically for the biomass pyrolysis industry.

  19. Laboratory Measurements of Gas Phase Pyrolysis Products from Southern Wildland Fuels using Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharko, N.; Safdari, S.; Danby, T. O.; Howarth, J.; Beiswenger, T. N.; Weise, D.; Myers, T. L.; Fletcher, T. H.; Johnson, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Combustion is an oxidation reaction that occurs when there is less fuel available than oxidizers, while pyrolysis is a thermal decomposition process that occurs under "fuel rich" conditions where all of the available oxidizers are consumed leaving some fuel(s) either unreacted or partially reacted. Gas-phase combustion products from biomass burning experiments have been studied extensively; less is known, however, about pyrolysis processes and products. Pyrolysis is the initial reaction occurring in the burning process and generates products that are subsequently oxidized during combustion, yielding highly-oxidized chemicals. This laboratory study investigates the pyrolysis processes by using an FTIR spectrometer to detect and quantify the gas-phase products from thermal decomposition of intact understory fuels from forests in the southeastern United States. In particular, a laboratory flat-flame burner operating under fuel rich conditions (no oxygen) was used to heat individual leaves to cause decomposition. The gas-phase products were introduced to an 8 meter gas cell coupled to an infrared spectrometer were used to monitor the products. Trace gas emissions along with emission ratios, which are calculated by dividing the change in the amount of the trace gas by the change in the amount of CO, for the plant species, gallberry (Ilex glabra) and swampbay (Persea palustris) were determined. Preliminary measurements observed species such as CO2, CO, C2H2, C2H4, HCHO, CH3OH, isoprene, 1,3-butadiene, phenol and NH3 being produced as part of the thermal decomposition process. It is important to note that FTIR will not detect H2.

  20. Mesoporous carbon stabilized MgO nanoparticles synthesized by pyrolysis of MgCl2 preloaded waste biomass for highly efficient CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Tian, Ke; Ding, Yan-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-08-20

    Anthropogenic CO2 emission makes significant contribution to global climate change and CO2 capture and storage is a currently a preferred technology to change the trajectory toward irreversible global warming. In this work, we reported a new strategy that the inexhaustible MgCl2 in seawater and the abundantly available biomass waste can be utilized to prepare mesoporous carbon stabilized MgO nanoparticles (mPC-MgO) for CO2 capture. The mPC-MgO showed excellent performance in the CO2 capture process with the maximum capacity of 5.45 mol kg(-1), much higher than many other MgO based CO2 trappers. The CO2 capture capacity of the mPC-MgO material kept almost unchanged in 19-run cyclic reuse, and can be regenerated at low temperature. The mechanism for the CO2 capture by the mPC-MgO was investigated by FTIR and XPS, and the results indicated that the high CO2 capture capacity and the favorable selectivity of the as-prepared materials were mainly attributed to their special structure (i.e., surface area, functional groups, and the MgO NPs). This work would open up a new pathway to slow down global warming as well as resolve the pollution of waste biomass.

  1. A kinetic study of pyrolysis and combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris using thermo-gravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2013-01-01

    This work uses thermo-gravimetric, differential thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analyses to evaluate the kinetics of pyrolysis (in inert/N(2) atmosphere) and (oxidative) combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris by heating from 50 to 800 °C at heating rates of 5-40 °C/min. This study shows that combustion produces higher biomass conversion than pyrolysis, and that three stages of decomposition occur in both cases, of which, the second one--consisting of two temperature zones--is the main stage of devolatization. Proteins and carbohydrates are decomposed in the first of the two zones at activation energies of 51 and 45 kJ/mol for pyrolysis and combustion, respectively, while lipids are decomposed in its second zone at higher activation energies of 64 and 63 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetic expressions of the reaction rates in the two zones for pyrolysis and combustion have been obtained and it has been shown that increased heating rates result in faster and higher conversion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optical, Electrical, and Morphological Effects of Yttrium Doping of Cadmium Oxide Thin Films Grown by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombak, Ahmet; Baturay, Silan; Kilicoglu, Tahsin; Ocak, Yusuf Selim

    2017-04-01

    CdO films doped with Y concentrations of 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3% were deposited onto soda lime glass using ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effect of the doping level on the structural, morphological, optical, and electrical properties of the films was characterized. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to establish that all of the samples were polycrystalline and to determine the structural parameters, i.e., lattice spacing ( d), phases and associated ( hkl) planes, grain size ( D), and dislocation density ( δ). The films possessed high conductivity and carrier concentration, showing n-type semiconducting behavior. The films were almost transparent over the range from 600 nm to 1100 nm. The energy bandgap was 2.43 eV, 2.53 eV, 2.68 eV, and 2.70 eV for Y doping of 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3%, respectively. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the films over the range from 700 nm to 1100 nm were determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Atomic force microscopy revealed the effect of Y doping on the surface morphology of the CdO films.

  3. Low-temperature growth of highly crystallized transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide films by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukano, Tatsuo; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2004-05-30

    Following the procedure by Sawada et al. (Thin Solid Films 409 (2002) 46), high-quality SnO{sub 2}:F films were grown on glass substrates at relatively low temperatures of 325-340C by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition using a perfume atomizer for cosmetics use. Even though the substrate temperature is low, as-deposited films show a high optical transmittance of 92% in the visible range, a low electric resistivity of 5.8x10{sup -4}{omega}cm and a high Hall mobility of 28cm{sup 2}/Vs. The F/Sn atomic ratio (0.0074) in the films is low in comparison with the value (0.5) in the sprayed solution. The carrier density in the film is approximately equal to the F-ion density, suggesting that most of the F-ions effectively function as active dopants. Films' transmittance and resistivity show little change after a 450C 60min heat treatment in the atmosphere, evidencing a high heat resistance. The SnO{sub 2}:F films obtained in this work remove the difficulty to improve the figure of merit at low synthesis temperatures.

  4. Plasma Treatments and Biomass Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luche, J.; Falcoz, Q.; Bastien, T.; Leninger, J. P.; Arabi, K.; Aubry, O.; Khacef, A.; Cormier, J. M.; Lédé, J.

    2012-02-01

    Exploitation of forest resources for energy production includes various methods of biomass processing. Gasification is one of the ways to recover energy from biomass. Syngas produced from biomass can be used to power internal combustion engines or, after purification, to supply fuel cells. Recent studies have shown the potential to improve conventional biomass processing by coupling a plasma reactor to a pyrolysis cyclone reactor. The role of the plasma is twofold: it acts as a purification stage by reducing production of tars and aerosols, and simultaneously produces a rich hydrogen syngas. In a first part of the paper we present results obtained from plasma treatment of pyrolysis oils. The outlet gas composition is given for various types of oils obtained at different experimental conditions with a pyrolysis reactor. Given the complexity of the mixtures from processing of biomass, we present a study with methanol considered as a model molecule. This experimental method allows a first modeling approach based on a combustion kinetic model suitable to validate the coupling of plasma with conventional biomass process. The second part of the paper is summarizing results obtained through a plasma-pyrolysis reactor arrangement. The goal is to show the feasibility of this plasma-pyrolysis coupling and emphasize more fundamental studies to understand the role of the plasma in the biomass treatment processes.

  5. Decentralized combined heat and power production by two-stage biomass gasification and solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Møller, Christian; Rokni, Masoud; Elmegaard, Brian

    2013-01-01

    To investigate options for increasing the electrical efficiency of decentralized combined heat and power (CHP) plants fuelled with biomass compared to conventional technology, this research explored the performance of an alternative plant design based on thermal biomass gasification and solid oxide......, carbon conversion factor in the gasifier and the efficiency of the DC/AC inverter were the most influential parameters in the model. Thus, a detailed study of the practical values of these parameters was conducted to determine the performance of the plant with the lowest possible uncertainty. The SOFC...

  6. Effects of feedstock characteristics on microwave-assisted pyrolysis - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaning; Chen, Paul; Liu, Shiyu; Peng, Peng; Min, Min; Cheng, Yanling; Anderson, Erik; Zhou, Nan; Fan, Liangliang; Liu, Chenghui; Chen, Guo; Liu, Yuhuan; Lei, Hanwu; Li, Bingxi; Ruan, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Microwave-assisted pyrolysis is an important approach to obtain bio-oil from biomass. Similar to conventional electrical heating pyrolysis, microwave-assisted pyrolysis is significantly affected by feedstock characteristics. However, microwave heating has its unique features which strongly depend on the physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstock. In this review, the relationships among heating, bio-oil yield, and feedstock particle size, moisture content, inorganics, and organics in microwave-assisted pyrolysis are discussed and compared with those in conventional electrical heating pyrolysis. The quantitative analysis of data reported in the literature showed a strong contrast between the conventional processes and microwave based processes. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis is a relatively new process with limited research compared with conventional electrical heating pyrolysis. The lack of understanding of some observed results warrant more and in-depth fundamental research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of pyrolysis gases from biogenic fuels as reductionfuels in coal dust furnaces; Einsatz von Pyrolysegasen aus biogenen Brennstoffen als Reduktionsbrennstoff in Kohlestaubfeuerungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruediger, H.; Greul, U.; Spliethoff, H.; Hein, K.R.G. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen (IVD)

    1996-12-31

    Co-combustion of refuse-derived fuels in the form of pyrolysis gases, with coal as primary fuel, has advantages in terms of fuel ash separation and nitric oxide emissions. Biomass or sewage sludge is degassed in a pyrolysis reactor, and the gas is used as secondary fuel in a coal dust furnace. The authors investigated the influence of reaction temperature, fuel moisture and reaction atmosphere in the pyrolysis stage on the product fractions gas, tar, and residual fuel, as well as the suitability of the resulting pyrolysis gas as secondary fuel in a coal dust furnace for the purpose of reducing nitric oxide emissions. (orig) [Deutsch] Ein am IVD betriebenes Konzept der Mitverbrennung von Brennstoffen in Form von Pyrolysegasen bietet Vorteile bezueglich der Trennung der Brennstoffaschen und Stickoxidemissionen bei der Feuerung des Primaerbrennstoffes Steinkohle. Biomasse oder Klaerschlamm wird hierbei in einem Pyrolysereaktor engast und gasfoermig als Sekundaerbrennstoff in einer Kohlenstaubfeuerung eingesetzt. Untersuchungsschwerpunkte in der Pyrolysestufe des Prozesses waren die Einfluesse von Reaktionstemperatur, Brennstofffeuchte und Reaktionsatmosphaere auf die Produktfraktionen Gas, Teer und Restbrennstoff sowie die Eignung des erzeugten Pyrolysegases als Sekundaerbrennstoff in einer Kohlenstaubfeuerung zur Senkung derKohlendioxidemissione. (orig)

  8. Indium-Nitrogen Codoped Zinc Oxide Thin Film Deposited by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis on n-(111 Si Substrate: The Effect of Film Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indium-nitrogen codoped zinc oxide (INZO thin films were fabricated by spray pyrolysis deposition technique on n-(111 Si substrate with different film thicknesses at 450°C using a precursor containing zinc acetate, ammonium acetate, and indium nitrate with 1 : 3 : 0.05 at.% concentration. The morphology and structure studies were carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The grain size of the films increased when increasing the film thickness. From XRD spectra, polycrystalline ZnO structure can be observed and the preferred orientation behavior varied from (002 to (101 as the film thickness increased. The concentration and mobility were investigated by Hall effect measurement. the p-type films with a hole mobility around 3 cm2V−1s−1 and hole concentration around 3×1019 cm−3 can be achieved with film thickness less than 385 nm. The n-type conduction with concentration 1×1020 cm−3 is observed for film with thickness 1089 nm. The defect states were characterized by photoluminescence. With temperature-dependent conductivity analysis, acceptor state with activation energy 0.139 eV dominate the p type conduction for thin INZO film. And the Zn-related shallow donors with activation energy 0.029 eV dominate the n-type conduction for the thick INZO film.

  9. The combustion of biomass - the impact of its types and combustion technologies on the emission of nitrogen oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Milica R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Harmonization of environmental protection and the growing energy needs of modern society promote the biomass application as a replacement for fossil fuels and a viable option to mitigate the green house gas emissions. For domestic conditions this is particularly important as more than 60% of renewables belongs to biomass. Beside numerous benefits of using biomass for energy purposes, there are certain drawbacks, one of which is a possible high emission of NOx during the combustion of these fuels. The paper presents the results of the experiments with multiple biomass types (soybean straw, cornstalk, grain biomass, sunflower oil, glycerin and paper sludge, using different combustion technologies (fluidized bed and cigarette combustion, with emphasis on the emission of NOx in the exhaust gas. A presentation of the experimental installations is given, as well as an evaluation of the effects of the fuel composition, combustion regimes and technology on the NOx emissions. As the biomass combustion took place at temperatures low enough that thermal and prompt NOx can be neglected, the conclusion is the emissions of nitrogen oxides primarily depend on the biomass composition- it is increasing with the increase of the nitrogen content, and decreases with the increase of the char content which provides catalytic surface for NOx reduction by CO. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33042: Improvement of the industrial fluidized bed facility, in scope of technology for energy efficient and environmentally feasible combustion of various waste materials in fluidized bed i br. III42011: Development and improvement of technologies for efficient use of energy of several forms of agricultural and forest biomass in an environmentally friendly manner, with the possibility of cogeneration

  10. Laser induced pyrolysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1976-01-01

    The application of laser pyrolysis techniques to the problems of chemical analysis is discussed. The processes occurring during laser pyrolysis are first briefly reviewed. The problems encountered in laser pyrolysis gas chromatography are discussed using the analysis of phenanthrene and binary hydrocarbons. The application of this technique to the characterization of naturally occurring carbonaceous material such as oil shales and coal is illustrated

  11. Dual Electrospray Pyrolysis for Mixed Metal Oxide (and Carbon) Composite Nanoparticle Synthesis with Applications in Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Justin; Liu, Wen; Wang, Hailiang; Gomez, Alessandro

    We present a novel approach to synthesizing mixed metal oxide nanoparticles with a continuous, scalable aerosol flow process using the electrospray. The electrospray is a liquid atomization technique that generates a monodisperse population of highly charged liquid droplets over a broad size range (nanometric to tens of microns). Each liquid droplet serves as a micro-reactor, containing a payload of suitable precursors (such as metal nitrides), allowing for precise control over particle composition and size. By using two electrosprays of opposite polarities, the two highly charged droplets plumes are electrostatically mixed to produce a charge-neutral aerosol. Electrostatically driven droplet-droplet collisions can also be used to control morphology to some degree. This aerosol is passed through a tubular furnace via carrier gas, pyrolizing the precursors to synthesize nanomaterials. We apply this approach to manganese oxide, cobalt oxide, and carbon composite nanoparticles for use in energy storage applications.

  12. Biomass gasification integrated with a solid oxide fuel cell and Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    An integrated gasification solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine for combined heat and power application is analyzed. The target for electricity production is 120 kW. Woodchips are used as gasification feedstock to produce syngas, which is then used to feed the SOFC stacks for electricity production. Unreacted hydrocarbons remaining after the SOFC are burned in a catalytic burner, and the hot off-gases from the burner are recovered in a Stirling engine for electricity and heat production. Domestic hot water is used as a heat sink for the Stirling engine. A complete balance-of-plant is designed and suggested. Thermodynamic analysis shows that a thermal efficiency of 42.4% based on the lower heating value (LHV) can be achieved if all input parameters are selected conservatively. Different parameter studies are performed to analyze the system behavior under different conditions. The analysis shows that the decreasing number of stacks from a design viewpoint, indicating that plant efficiency decreases but power production remains nearly unchanged. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is an optimum value for the utilization factor of the SOFC for the suggested plant design with the suggested input parameters. This optimum value is approximately 65%, which is a rather modest value for SOFC. In addition, introducing a methanator increases plant efficiency slightly. If SOFC operating temperature decreases due to new technology then plant efficiency will slightly be increased. Decreasing gasifier temperature, which cannot be controlled, causes the plant efficiency to increase also. - Highlights: • Design of integrated gasification with solid oxide fuel and Stirling engine. • Important plant parameters study. • Plant running on biomass with and without methanator. • Thermodynamics of integrated gasification SOFC-Stirling engine plants

  13. Lifecycle Assessment of Biofuel Production from Wood Pyrolysis Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyele, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    Due to a stronger dependency on biomass for energy, there is a need for improved technologies in biomass-to-energy conversion in Tanzania. This paper presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) of pyrolysis technology used for conversion of wood and wood waste to liquid biofuel. In particular, a survey of environmental impacts of the process is…

  14. Experimental investigation of solid oxide fuel cells using biomass gasification producer gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norheim, Arnstein

    2005-07-01

    The main objective of this thesis is theoretical and experimental investigations related to utilisation of biomass gasification producer gases as fuel for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Initial fundamental steps towards a future system of combined heat and power production based on biomass gasification and SOFC are performed and include: 1) Theoretical modeling of the composition of biomass gasification producer gases. 2) Experimental investigation of SOFC performance using biomass gasification producer gas as fuel. 3) Experimental investigation of SOFC performance using biomass gasification producer gas containing high sulphur concentration. The modeling of the composition of gasifier producer gas was performed using the program FactSage. The main objective was to investigate the amount and speciation of trace species in the producer gases as several parameters were varied. Thus, the composition at thermodynamic equilibrium of sulphur, chlorine, potassium, sodium and compounds of these were established. This was done for varying content of the trace species in the biomass material at different temperatures and fuel utilisation i.e. varying oxygen content in the producer gas. The temperature interval investigated was in the range of normal SOFC operation. It was found that sulphur is expected to be found as H2S irrespective of temperature and amount of sulphur. Only at very high fuel utilisation some S02 is formed. Important potassium containing compounds in the gas are gaseous KOH and K. When chlorine is present, the amount of KOH and K will decrease due to the formation of KCI. The level of sodium investigated here was low, but some Na, NaOH and NaCl is expected to be formed. Below a certain temperature, condensation of alkali rich carbonates may occur. The temperature at which condensation begins is mainly depending on the amount of potassium present; the condensation temperature increases with increasing potassium content. In the first experimental work

  15. Novel technique for coal pyrolysis and hydrogenation product analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, L.D.; Boyle, J.

    1993-03-15

    A microjet reactor coupled to a VUV photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to obtain species measurements during high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation of a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds ranging from allene and acetylene to cyclohexane, benzene and toluene. Initial work focused on calibration of the technique, optimization of ion collection and detection and characterization of limitations. Using the optimized technique with 118 nm photoionization, intermediate species profiles were obtained for analysis of the hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation mechanisms. The soft'' ionization, yielding predominantly molecular ions, allowed the study of reaction pathways in these high temperature systems where both sampling and detection challenges are severe. Work has focused on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures representative of coal pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis products. The detailed mass spectra obtained during pyrolysis and oxidation of hydrocarbon mixtures is especially important because of the complex nature of the product mixture even at short residence times and low primary reactant conversions. The combustion community has advanced detailed modeling of pyrolysis and oxidation to the C4 hydrocarbon level but in general above that size uncertainties in rate constant and thermodynamic data do not allow us to a priori predict products from mixed hydrocarbon pyrolyses using a detailed chemistry model. For pyrolysis of mixtures of coal-derived liquid fractions with a large range of compound structures and molecular weights in the hundreds of amu the modeling challenge is severe. Lumped models are possible from stable product data.

  16. Thermodynamic Performance Study of Biomass Gasification, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Micro Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Møller, Christian; Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    University of Denmark. The SOFC converts the syngas more efficiently than the MGT, which is reflected by the energetic electrical efficiency of the gasifier and MGT system in opposition to the gasifier and SOFC configuration – η_el = 28.1% versus η_el = 36.4%. By combining the SOFC and MGT, the unconverted......A system level modelling study of three combined heat and power systems based on biomass gasification is presented. Product gas is converted in a micro gas turbine (MGT) in the first system, in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) in the second system and in a combined SOFC–MGT arrangement in the third...... system. An electrochemical model of the SOFC has been developed and calibrated against published data from Topsoe Fuel Cells A/S and the Risø National Laboratory. The modelled gasifier is based on an up scaled version (~500 kW_th) of the demonstrated low tar gasifier, Viking, situated at the Technical...

  17. Pyrolysis of flax straw: Characterization of char, liquid, and gas as fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tushar, Mohammad Shahed Hasan Khan

    The demand for energy continues to outstrip its supply and necessitates the development of renewable energy options. Biomass has been recognized as a major renewable energy source to supplement the declining fossil fuel source of energy. It is the most popular form of renewable energy and, currently, biofuel production is becoming more promising. Being carbon neutral, readily available, and low in sulphur content makes biomass a very promising source of renewable energy. In the present research, both the isothermal and non-isothermal pressurized pyrolysis of flax straw is studied for the first time. In case of isothermal pyrolysis, the influence of pyrolysis temperature and reaction time on char yield and morphology was investigated. The applied pyrolysis temperature was varied between 300 and 500°C. The reaction time was varied from 15 to 60 min. The char yield was found to decrease as pyrolysis temperature and reaction time increased. The char structure and surface morphology were thoroughly investigated by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The degree of porosity and graphitization increased as pyrolysis temperature and time increased. In fact, the experiment performed at 500°C for 1h duration did not yield any char; only residual ash could be obtained. The TPO studies on the char samples corroborated the XRD findings and showed the presence of two types of carbon, namely, amorphous filamentous carbon and graphitic carbon. A thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the char was performed to gain an understanding of combustion kinetics and reactivity. It implied that the reactivity of the char decreases as temperature increases, and this finding is well supported by the TPO, TGA, SEM, and XRD characterization data. Furthermore, an empirical global model was devised based on the power law to estimate activation energy and other kinetic parameters. For the non-isothermal pressurized

  18. Pre-oxidation and its effect on reducing high-temperature corrosion of superheater tubes during biomass firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kvisgaard, M.; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    with a synthetic deposit of KCl and exposed at 560°C for 1 week to a gas mixture typical of biomass firing. Results show that pre-oxidation could hinder the corrosion attack; however, the relative success was different for the two alloys. While corrosion attack was observed on the pre-oxidised Kanthal APM, the pre......-oxidised Nimonic 80A remained unaffected suggesting protection of the alloy from the corrosive environment.......Superheater tubes in biomass-fired power plants experience high corrosion rates due to condensation of corrosive alkali chloride-rich deposits. To explore the possibility of reducing the corrosion attack by the formation of an initial protective oxide layer, the corrosion resistance of pre...

  19. Catalytic hydrotreatment of pyrolysis liquids and fractions: Catalyst Development and Process Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Wang

    2017-01-01

    The use of sustainable and renewable lignocellulosic biomass is of particular interest to (partly) replace fossil resources. Fast pyrolysis is a promising technology to convert lignocellulosic biomass to a liquid energy carrier. The products, also known as fast pyrolysis liquids (PLs), have a higher energy density than solid biomass. The applications of PLs are limited due to a high water and oxygen content and limited storage stability. As such upgrading technologies are required to broaden ...

  20. Design and Optimization of an Integrated Biomass Gasification and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Møller, Christian

    based on biomass will improve the competitiveness of decentralized CHP production from biomass as well as move the development towards a more sustainable CHP production. The aim of this research is to contribute to enhanced electrical efficiencies and sustainability in future decentralized CHP plants......-level modelling study of three conceptual plant designs based on two-stage gasification of wood chips with a thermal biomass input of ~0.5 MWth (LHV) is presented. Product gas is converted in a micro gas turbine (MGT) in the first plant design, in SOFCs in the second, and in a combined SOFC-MGT arrangement......Development of sustainable power plants has gained focus in the recent years and utilization of biomass resources are seen as a pathway towards a sustainable combined heat and power (CHP) production. Biomass resources are distributed, thus decentralized biomass conversion would avoid extensive cost...

  1. Structure, activity and kinetics of supported molybdenum oxide and mixed molybdenum-vanadium oxide catalysts prepared by flame spray pyrolysis for propane OHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Martin; Kessler, Thomas; Beato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy and evaluated as catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane. The results show that samples with high specific surface areas between 122 and 182 m2/g were obtained, resulting in apparent MoOx and VOx surface densities from 0.7 to 7.7 nm -2 and 1.5 to 1.9 nm-2......, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and XRD confirmed the high dispersion of molybdenum and vanadia species on γ-Al2O3 as the main crystalline phase. Only at the highest loading of 15 wt% Mo, with theoretically more than monolayer coverage, some crystalline molybdenum oxide was observed....... For the mixed molybdenum-vanadium oxide catalysts the surface species were separate molybdenum oxide and vanadium oxide monomers at low loadings of molybdenum, but with increasing molybdenum loading interactions between surface molybdenum and vanadium oxide species were observed with Raman spectroscopy...

  2. Comparison of combustion and pyrolysis for energy generation in a sugarcane mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nsaful, F.; Görgens, J.F.; Knoetze, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomass to energy processes for sugarmills via combustion and pyrolysis are modelled. • Models compared based on technical and economic performance for two mill efficiencies. • Combustion more suited for sugar mill energy supply. • Pyrolysis based models have higher overall process efficiencies. • Pyrolysis contributes more towards environmental mitigation but is less profitable. - Abstract: The study focusses on the comparison of biomass to energy conversion process (BMECP) models to convert sugar mill biomass (bagasse) into energy products via combustion and pyrolysis as thermochemical pathways. Bagasse was converted to steam and electricity via combustion using 40 bar, 63 bar and 82 bar Condensing Extraction Steam Turbines (CEST) systems and a 30 bar back pressure steam turbine (BPST) system. Two BMECPs, namely partial fast pyrolysis and pure fast pyrolysis systems, were modeled for the pyrolysis pathway. In the Pure Fast Pyrolysis BMECP all the input bagasse stream was converted to pyrolysis products, with subsequent combustion of some of these products to generate steam and electricity for sugar mill operations. In the partial fast pyrolysis BMECP, a fraction of the bagasse is combusted directly to supply steam and electricity to the sugar mill, while the remaining fraction is pyrolyzed to generate pyrolysis products. All process models were simulated in AspenPlus® and were assessed on their ability to supply the energy requirement of to two sugar mill scenarios: More efficient mill and less efficient mill. The economic viability of BMECPs was determined using Aspen Process Economic Analyzer. Both combustion based and pyrolysis based BMECPs were capable of meeting the energy requirement of the sugar mill, although the pyrolysis based BMECP had limited steam and electricity production rates due to the accumulation of energy in pyrolysis products. High energy valued pyrolysis products resulted in higher overall process efficiencies of 85

  3. Synthesis of carbon quantum dots and zinc oxide nanosheets by pyrolysis of novel metal–organic framework compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Qiliang; Zhang, Zhaochun; Yu, Zhenwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of porous MOFs. • One step synthesis of CQDs and ZnO nanosheets. • The coexistence of CQDs and ZnO nanosheets show strong ultraviolet emission. - Abstract: Here, the carbon quantum dots and zinc oxide nanosheets with novel superstructures are successfully synthesized simultaneously from a hydrothermal preparation and thermal decomposition of a porous precursor of metal–organic frameworks. Porous metal–organic frameworks are prepared by the hydrothermal process by using zinc nitrate hexahydrate, 4,4′-oxybisbenzoic acid and 4,4′-bipyridine as the starting materials. Fluorescence spectrophotometer, X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and property. The results show the coexistence of carbon quantum dots and zinc oxide nanosheets. The carbon quantum dots size is about 4 nm. Particularly, zinc oxide nanosheets show a new triangular sheet structure that has almost the same size. Strong ultraviolet emission of this coexistence system should be useful in developing visible light-emitting and nanophotonic devices

  4. Synthesis of carbon quantum dots and zinc oxide nanosheets by pyrolysis of novel metal–organic framework compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qiliang; Zhang, Zhaochun, E-mail: zhangzhaochun@shu.edu.cn; Yu, Zhenwei

    2015-09-05

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of porous MOFs. • One step synthesis of CQDs and ZnO nanosheets. • The coexistence of CQDs and ZnO nanosheets show strong ultraviolet emission. - Abstract: Here, the carbon quantum dots and zinc oxide nanosheets with novel superstructures are successfully synthesized simultaneously from a hydrothermal preparation and thermal decomposition of a porous precursor of metal–organic frameworks. Porous metal–organic frameworks are prepared by the hydrothermal process by using zinc nitrate hexahydrate, 4,4′-oxybisbenzoic acid and 4,4′-bipyridine as the starting materials. Fluorescence spectrophotometer, X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and property. The results show the coexistence of carbon quantum dots and zinc oxide nanosheets. The carbon quantum dots size is about 4 nm. Particularly, zinc oxide nanosheets show a new triangular sheet structure that has almost the same size. Strong ultraviolet emission of this coexistence system should be useful in developing visible light-emitting and nanophotonic devices.

  5. Avaliação de biocombustível derivado do bio-óleo obtido por pirólise rápida de biomassa lignocelulósica como aditivo para gasolina Evaluation of biofuel derived from lignocellulosic biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil for use as gasoline addictive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Luisa Barbosa Guedes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A biofuel was prepared from acid aqueous fraction (pH = 2 of bio-oil produced by fast pyrolysis (Bioware Technology of lignocellulosic biomass (sugar cane residue and tested in blends (2, 5, 10 e 20% v/v with gasoline type C (common marketed in Brazil. The specification tests made in the Refinery President Getúlio Vargas (PETROBRAS showed increasing in the octane number (MON and antiknock index (AKI with reduction in the residue generation during the combustion. The physicochemical characteristics of the biofuel were similar that combustible alcohol allowing its use as gasoline additive.

  6. Process for minimizing solids contamination of liquids from coal pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Gary H.; Knell, Everett W.; Shaw, Benjamin W.; Wang, Yue G.

    1981-04-21

    In a continuous process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a solid carbonaceous material by pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material in the presence of a particulate source of heat, particulate contamination of the liquid hydrocarbons is minimized. This is accomplished by removing fines from the solid carbonaceous material feed stream before pyrolysis, removing fines from the particulate source of heat before combining it with the carbonaceous material to effect pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material, and providing a coarse fraction of reduced fines content of the carbon containing solid residue resulting from the pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material before oxidizing carbon in the carbon containing solid residue to form the particulate source of heat.

  7. Influence of Carbon Modification on the Morphological, Structural, and Optical Properties of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Pneumatic Spray Pyrolysis Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taziwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reveals the influence of doping on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles (NPs synthesized by pneumatic spray pyrolysis technique (PSP, using zinc ethoxide ZnO2CH32 as the precursor. The prepared samples were characterized by XRD, HRTEM, SEM-EDX, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and RS. RS analysis has revealed that the unmodified ZnO and carbon modified ZnO samples have characteristic Raman optic modes at 325 cm−1, 373 cm−1, and 432 cm−1 belonging to Wurtzite ZnO structure. The XRD ZnO (C:ZnO NPS have characteristic peaks of hexagonal Wurtzite ZnO structure. HRTEM analysis has revealed that the synthesized ZnO NPs have particle size range of 8.8–11.82 nm. EDX spectra of both unmodified and modified ZnO nanoparticles have revealed prominent peaks at 0.51 keV, 1.01 keV, 1.49 keV, 8.87 keV, and 9.86 keV. The occurrence of these peaks in the EDX spectra endorses the existence of Zn and O atoms in the PSP synthesized ZnO NPs. The UV-Vis spectroscopy has revealed a red shift of the absorption edge, with the increase in C dopant level. The effect of nanocrystallite size and the gradual prominence of C into ZnO matrix due to increase in C dopant level in the PSP synthesized ZnO NPs was meticulously elaborated through Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  8. Photocatalytic Desulfurization of Waste Tire Pyrolysis Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napida Hinchiranan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Waste tire pyrolysis oil has high potential to replace conventional fossil liquid fuels due to its high calorific heating value. However, the large amounts of sulfurous compounds in this oil hinders its application. Thus, the aim of this research was to investigate the possibility to apply the photo-assisted oxidation catalyzed by titanium dioxide (TiO2, Degussa P-25 to partially remove sulfurous compounds in the waste tire pyrolysis oil under milder reaction conditions without hydrogen consumption. A waste tire pyrolysis oil with 0.84% (w/w of sulfurous content containing suspended TiO2 was irradiated by using a high-pressure mercury lamp for 7 h. The oxidized sulfur compounds were then migrated into the solvent-extraction phase. A maximum % sulfur removal of 43.6% was achieved when 7 g/L of TiO2 was loaded into a 1/4 (v/v mixture of pyrolysis waste tire oil/acetonitrile at 50 °C in the presence of air. Chromatographic analysis confirmed that the photo-oxidized sulfurous compounds presented in the waste tire pyrolysis oil had higher polarity, which were readily dissolved and separated in distilled water. The properties of the photoxidized product were also reported and compared to those of crude oil.

  9. PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Janušić

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is today most commonly produced from corn grain and sugar cane. It is expected that there will be limits to the supply of these raw materials in the near future. Therefore, lignocellulosic biomass, namely agricultural and forest waste, is seen as an attractive feedstock for future supplies of ethanol. Lignocellulosic biomass consists of lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose. Indeed, complexicity of the lignocellulosic biomass structure causes a pretreatment to be applied prior to cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis into fermentable sugars. Pretreatment technologies can be physical (mechanical comminution, pyrolysis, physico-chemical (steam explosion, ammonia fiber explosion, CO2 explosion, chemical (ozonolysis, acid hydrolysis, alkaline hydrolysis, oxidative delignification, organosolvent process and biological ones.

  10. A numerical model of a fluidized bed biomass gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongming Jiang; Morey, R.V. (Minnesota Univ., St. Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional, steady state, numerical model was developed for a fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The gasifier model consists of a fuel pyrolysis model, an oxidation model, a gasification model and a freeboard model. Given the bed temperature, ambient air flow rate and humidity ratio, fuel moisture content and reactor parameters, the model predicts the fuel feed rate for steady state operation, composition of the producer gas and fuel energy conversion. The gasifier model was validated with experimental results. The effects of major mechanisms (fuel pyrolysis and the chemical and the physical rate processes) were assessed in a sensitivity study of the gasification model. A parametric study was also conducted for the gasifier model. It is concluded that the model can be used for gasifier performance analysis. (author)

  11. Syngas suitability for solid oxide fuel cells applications produced via biomass steam gasification process: Experimental and modeling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieratti, Elisa; Baratieri, Marco; Ceschini, Sergio; Tognana, Lorenzo; Baggio, Paolo

    The technologies and the processes for the use of biomass as an energy source are not always environmental friendly. It is worth to develop approaches aimed at a more sustainable exploitation of biomass, avoiding whenever possible direct combustion and rather pursuing fuel upgrade paths, also considering direct conversion to electricity through fuel cells. In this context, it is of particular interest the development of the biomass gasification technology for synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) production, and the utilization of the obtained gas in fuel cells systems, in order to generate energy from renewable resources. Among the different kind of fuel cells, SOFCs (solid oxide fuel cells), which can be fed with different type of fuels, seem to be also suitable for this type of gaseous fuel. In this work, the syngas composition produced by means of a continuous biomass steam gasifier (fixed bed) has been characterized. The hydrogen concentration in the syngas is around 60%. The system is equipped with a catalytic filter for syngas purification and some preliminary tests coupling the system with a SOFCs stack are shown. The data on the syngas composition and temperature profile measured during the experimental activity have been used to calibrate a 2-dimensional thermodynamic equilibrium model.

  12. Fundamental Pyrolysis Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, T. A.; Evans, R. J.; Soltys, M. N.

    1983-03-01

    Progress on the direct mass spectrometric sampling of pyrolysis products from wood and its constituents is described for the period from June 1982 to February 1983. A brief summary and references to detailed reports, of the qualitative demonstration of our approach to the study of the separated processes of primary and secondary pyrolysis is presented. Improvements and additions to the pyrolysis and data acquisition systems are discussed and typical results shown. Chief of these are a heated-grid pyrolysis system for controlled primary pyrolysis and a sheathed flame arrangement for secondary cracking studies. Qualitative results of the secondary cracking of cellulose, lignin, and wood are shown as are comparisons with the literature for the pyrolysis spectra of cellulose, lignin, and levoglucosan. 'Fingerprints' for a number of materials are shown, with spectra taken under carefully controlled conditions so that sensitivity calibrations for different compounds, now being determined, can be applied.

  13. Fast Pyrolysis of Agricultural Wastes in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. H.; Chen, H. P.; Yang, H. P.; Dai, X. M.; Zhang, S. H.

    Solid biomass can be converted into liquid fuel through fast pyrolysis, which is convenient to be stored and transported with potential to be used as a fossil oil substitute. In China, agricultural wastes are the main biomass materials, whose pyrolysis process has not been researched adequately compared to forestry wastes. As the representative agricultural wastes in China, peanut shell and maize stalk were involved in this paper and pine wood sawdust was considered for comparing the different pyrolysis behaviors of agricultural wastes and forestry wastes. Fast pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor. The bio-oil yieldsof peanut shell and maize stalk were obviously lower than that ofpine sawdust. Compared with pine sawdust, the char yields of peanut shell and maize stalk were higher but the heating value of uncondensable gaswas lower. This means that the bio-oil cost will be higher for agricultural wastes if taking the conventional pyrolysis technique. And the characteristic and component analysis resultsof bio-oil revealed that the quality of bio-oil from agricultural wastes, especially maize stalk, was worse than that from pine wood. Therefore, it is important to take some methods to improve the quality of bio-oilfrom agricultural wastes, which should promote the exploitation of Chinese biomass resources through fast pyrolysis in afluidized bed reactor.

  14. Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis products separation for recycling organic materials from waste liquid crystal display panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis characteristics are conducted for a better understanding of LCDs pyrolysis. • Optimum design is developed which is significant to guide the further industrial process. • Acetic acid and TPP are recycled and separated. - Abstract: Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate with indium-tin oxide film), and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed beforehand since the organic matters would hinder the indium recycling process. In the present study, pyrolysis process is used to remove the organic materials and recycle acetic as well as and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) from waste LCD panels in an environmental friendly way. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics analysis are conducted which is significant to get a better understanding of the pyrolysis process. (ii) Optimum design is developed by applying Box–Behnken Design (BBD) under response surface methodology (RSM) for engineering application which is significant to guide the further industrial recycling process. The oil yield could reach 70.53 wt% and the residue rate could reach 14.05 wt% when the pyrolysis temperature is 570 °C, nitrogen flow rate is 6 L min −1 and the particle size is 0.5 mm. (iii) Furthermore, acetic acid and TPP are recycled, and then separated by rotary evaporation, which could reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid, and be reused in electronics manufacturing industry.

  15. Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis products separation for recycling organic materials from waste liquid crystal display panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming, E-mail: zmxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis characteristics are conducted for a better understanding of LCDs pyrolysis. • Optimum design is developed which is significant to guide the further industrial process. • Acetic acid and TPP are recycled and separated. - Abstract: Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate with indium-tin oxide film), and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed beforehand since the organic matters would hinder the indium recycling process. In the present study, pyrolysis process is used to remove the organic materials and recycle acetic as well as and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) from waste LCD panels in an environmental friendly way. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics analysis are conducted which is significant to get a better understanding of the pyrolysis process. (ii) Optimum design is developed by applying Box–Behnken Design (BBD) under response surface methodology (RSM) for engineering application which is significant to guide the further industrial recycling process. The oil yield could reach 70.53 wt% and the residue rate could reach 14.05 wt% when the pyrolysis temperature is 570 °C, nitrogen flow rate is 6 L min{sup −1} and the particle size is 0.5 mm. (iii) Furthermore, acetic acid and TPP are recycled, and then separated by rotary evaporation, which could reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid, and be reused in electronics manufacturing industry.

  16. Stabilization of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Post Processing Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-03-01

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, assembled a comprehensive team for a two-year project to demonstrate innovative methods for the stabilization of pyrolysis oil in accordance with DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-PS36-08GO98018, Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Stabilization. In collaboration with NREL, PNNL, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pall Fuels and Chemicals, and Ensyn Corporation, UOP developed solutions to the key technical challenges outlined in the FOA. The UOP team proposed a multi-track technical approach for pyrolysis oil stabilization. Conceptually, methods for pyrolysis oil stabilization can be employed during one or both of two stages: (1) during the pyrolysis process (In Process); or (2) after condensation of the resulting vapor (Post-Process). Stabilization methods fall into two distinct classes: those that modify the chemical composition of the pyrolysis oil, making it less reactive; and those that remove destabilizing components from the pyrolysis oil. During the project, the team investigated methods from both classes that were suitable for application in each stage of the pyrolysis process. The post processing stabilization effort performed at PNNL is described in this report. The effort reported here was performed under a CRADA between PNNL and UOP, which was effective on March 13, 2009, for 2 years and was subsequently modified March 8, 2011, to extend the term to December 31, 2011.

  17. Design of pyrolysis reactor for production of bio-oil and bio-char simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladin, Andi; Alwi, Ratna Surya; Syarif, Takdir

    2017-05-01

    The residues from the wood industry are the main contributors to biomass waste in Indonesia. The conventional pyrolysis process, which needs a large energy as well as to produce various toxic chemical to the environment. Therefore, a pyrolysis unit on the laboratory scale was designed that can be a good alternative to achieve zero-waste and low energy cost. In this paper attempts to discuss design and system of pyrolysis reactor to produce bio-oil and bio-char simultaneously.

  18. Co-pyrolysis of microalgae and sewage sludge: Biocrude assessment and char yield prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Bingwei; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • No interaction observed below 550 °C based on DTG experiments. • Pyrolysis mechanism changed in co-pyrolysis above 550 °C based on kinetic analysis. • Biocrude composition and carbon distribution change indicates interaction in pyrolysis product. • The maximum content of all biocrude is the compound of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone. • Relationship between H/C of feedstock and char yield was established. - Abstract: High feedstock price is an important barrier for microalgae pyrolysis to alternative biofuels, while high ash content and low heat value affect the stable operation of sewage sludge pyrolysis reactors. Co-pyrolysis of microalgae and sewage sludge can avoid the drawbacks in individual sludge pyrolysis and improve pyrolysis performances. For better understanding co-pyrolysis kinetics, biocrude characteristics and interaction of sewage sludge and microalgae, thermogrametric analysis (TGA) and fixed pyrolysis bed experiment have been conducted and carbon distribution and components in biocrude were evaluated based on quality and quantity. For TGA, there was nearly no difference between individual pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis below 550 °C, while obvious interaction was found from 550 °C to 700 °C in co-pyrolysis. According to analysis of co-pyrolysis kinetics, solid-phase decomposition reaction mechanism in sewage sludge individual pyrolysis turned into random nucleation and subsequent growth mechanism above 550 °C. For co-pyrolysis, there was a yield increase of C4 and C7 and a yield decrease of C9 in carbon distribution. Detailed comparison of biocrude composition and carbon distribution indicated interaction in the product of co-pyrolysis. Excellent linear relationship between H/C of feedstocks and pyrolysis char was observed. Co-pyrolysis products reduced in hydrocarbons and N-containing compounds but increased in ketones and aldehyde. Co-pyrolysis with microalgae biomass was superior to pyrolysis individual with sewage

  19. Effect of microwave pretreatment on pyrolysis of crude glycerol–olive kernel alternative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesapillai, M.; Manara, P.; Zabaniotou, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microwave activation investigated as pretreatment of glycerol–biomass mixtures. • Microwave irradiation was performed for a 25 wt% crude glycerol–olive kernel fuel. • Pyrolysis of microwave-activated fuel showed increased liquids at 500 °C. • Pyrolysis at 720 °C gave a high yield of syngas (84.9 wt%). • Microwave activation had no significant effect on char yields and characteristics. - Abstract: Pyrolysis is considered to be a sustainable energy technology and is practiced widely in waste management. In this study, three issues were explored: (a) the implication of crude glycerol addition to lignocellulosic biomass in pyrolysis, (b) the effect of microwave pretreatment on the pyrolysis product yields and (c) study of pyrolysis parameters and assessment of products quality. Characterization of the above glycerol–biomass mixtures along with pyrolysis products was performed by ICP–OES, SEM, EDX and GC techniques. It was resulted that higher liquid yield (max 59.53% v/v) obtained by pyrolysis of pretreated mixtures at 500 °C, compared to pyrolysis yields of non-pretreated mixtures, due to the prevalence of recombination reactions in pyrolysis of the microwave-pretreated mixtures. The gas produced from the microwave pretreated feedstock-based pyrolysis showed an enriched syngas (H 2 + CO) concentration (84.9% v/v), compared to the non-microwave pretreated samples (79.1% v/v), at 720 °C. No significant effect, either on the char yields or on the char structural characteristics were observed. Consequently, microwave pretreatment before pyrolysis, can serve as a potential pretreatment for enhanced production of fuels via post-pyrolysis.

  20. Gasification of peat and biomass in suspension flow; Turpeen ja biomassan suspensiokaasutus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Haukka, P. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Thermal Engineering

    1995-11-01

    This is the second phase of a project that started with examination of a gasification process for fuels containing high amounts of volatiles such as biomass. In the earlier phase of the project the gasification process was studied with the aid of computer models. Gas production with this gasification method is based mainly on rapid pyrolysis in dilute suspension flow enabling high solid to gas conversion. The two-stage approach eliminates char gasification as a limiting process step, and consequently, allows product temperature to be controlled by the kinetics of volatile reactions. A greater amount of enthalpy is made available for rapid pyrolysis through the total combustion of the residual char than is possible by partial oxidation. The main goal in the second year (1994) was to get experimental information on peat reactivity, main pyrolysis products and formation of nitrogen compounds in the early stages of peat pyrolysis in dilute pressurized flow conditions. These experiments were conducted using pressurized entrained flow reactor at VTT Energy (Jyvaeskylae). Preliminary experiments gave the result that pressure increase accelerates pyrolysis of peat at first (residence time < 100 ms), but this difference disappears gradually. The total amount of volatile matter does not seem to depend on pressure level. (author)

  1. Unravelling the Interactions between Hydrolytic and Oxidative Enzymes in Degradation of Lignocellulosic Biomass by Sporothrix carnis under Various Fermentation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola A. Ogunyewo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the action of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass remains unclear; hence, it is crucial to investigate enzymatic interactions involved in the process. In this study, degradation of corn cob by Sporothrix carnis and involvement of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation were investigated over 240 h cultivation period. About 60% degradation of corn cob was achieved by S. carnis at the end of fermentation. The yields of hydrolytic enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were higher than oxidative enzymes, laccase and peroxidase, over 144 h fermentation period. Maximum yields of cellulase (854.4 U/mg and xylanase (789.6 U/mg were at 96 and 144 h, respectively. Laccase and peroxidase were produced cooperatively with maximum yields of 489.06 U/mg and 585.39 U/mg at 144 h. Drastic decline in production of cellulase at 144 h (242.01 U/mg and xylanase at 192 h (192.2 U/mg indicates that they play initial roles in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass while laccase and peroxidase play later roles. Optimal degradation of corn cob (76.6% and production of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes were achieved with 2.5% inoculum at pH 6.0. Results suggest synergy in interactions between the hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes which can be optimized for improved biodegradation.

  2. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Cellulose by Integrating Dispersed Nickel Catalyst with HZSM-5 Zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaojuan; Bi, Yadong; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Hui; Hu, Jianli

    2018-01-01

    The effect of integrating dispersed nickel catalyst with HZSM-5 zeolite on upgrading of vapors produced from pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. The active component nickel nitrate was introduced onto the cellulose substrate by impregnation technique. Based on TGA experimental results, we discovered that nickel nitrate first released crystallization water, and then successively decomposed into nickel oxide which was reduced in-situ to metallic nickel through carbothermal reduction reaction. In-situ generated nickel nanoparticles were found highly dispersed over carbon substrate, which were responsible for catalyzing reforming and cracking of tars. In catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose, the addition of nickel nitrate caused more char formation at the expense of the yield of the condensable liquid products. In addition, the selectivity of linear oxygenates was increased whereas the yield of laevoglucose was reduced. Oxygen-containing compounds in pyrolysis vapors were deoxygenated into aromatics using HZSM-5. Moreover, the amount of condensable liquid products was decreased with the addition of HZSM-5.

  3. Effects of hot water extraction pretreatment on pyrolysis of shrub willow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of biomass via hot water extraction (HWE) reduces the amount of hemicellulose and ash in the biomass resulting in a concentration of cellulose and lignin content. In this study, we tested the effect of HWE as a biomass pretreatment on the pyrolysis of shrub willow via both conventional he...

  4. Federal Air Pollutant Emission Regulations and Preliminary Estimates of Potential-to-Emit from Biorefineries, Pathway #2: Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, Arpit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group; Zhang, Yimin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group; Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group; Thomas, Mae [Eastern Research Group, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Renzaglia, Jason [Eastern Research Group, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Biorefineries are subject to environmental laws, including complex air quality regulations that aim to protect and improve the quality of the air. These regulations govern the amount of certain types of air pollutants that can be emitted from different types of emission sources. To determine which federal air emission regulations potentially apply to the fast pyrolysis biorefinery, we first identified the types of regulated air pollutants emitted to the ambient environment by the biorefinery or from specific equipment. Once the regulated air pollutants are identified, we review the applicability criteria of each federal air regulation to determine whether the fast pyrolysis biorefinery or specific equipment is subject to it. We then estimate the potential-to-emit of pollutants likely to be emitted from the fast pyrolysis biorefinery to understand the air permitting requirements.

  5. Modelling of a Biomass Gasification Plant Feeding a Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Micro Gas Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Møller, Christian; Rokni, Masoud

    2009-01-01

    A system level modelling study on two combined heat and power (CHP) systems both based on biomass gasification. One system converts the product gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and the other in a combined SOFC and micro gas turbine (MGT) arrangement. An electrochemical model of the SOFC has...... been developed and calibrated against published data from Topsoe Fuel Cells A/S (TOFC) and Risø National Laboratory. The modelled gasifier is based on an up scaled version of the demonstrated low tar gasifier, Viking, situated at the Technical University of Denmark. The MGT utilizes the unconverted...

  6. Exergy analysis and optimization of a biomass gasification, solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine hybrid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Møller, Christian; Rokni, Masoud; Elmegaard, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid plant producing combined heat and power (CHP) from biomass by use of a two-stage gasification concept, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and a micro gas turbine was considered for optimization. The hybrid plant represents a sustainable and efficient alternative to conventional decentralized...... and exergy analyses were applied. Focus in this optimization study was heat management, and the optimization efforts resulted in a substantial gain of approximately 6% in the electrical efficiency of the plant. The optimized hybrid plant produced approximately 290 kWe at an electrical efficiency of 58...

  7. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-09-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, H4PVMo11O40 gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Time scale dependent negative emission potential of forests and biomass plantations via wood burial, torrefied biomass, biochar and pyrogas condensate sequestration in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Kammann, Claudia; Lucht, Wolfgang; Gerten, Dieter; Foidl, Nikolaus

    2017-04-01

    quality of the charred biomass (biochar), post thermal treatment and plant nutrient enhancement, regrowth is expected to accelerate and soil carbon content to increase. Overall, the time until such a biochar based CSS systems generates negative carbon emissions (biomass regrowth exceeds the C-loss from CSS transformation) can thus be reduced compared to BE-CCS while increasing the sustainability of the global biomass production system and fostering ecosystem services. In our presentation we will provide first assessments of various biochar-based CCS systems and compare them to conventional BE-CCS, an evaluation of their global time scale dependent C-sequestration potential and their economic frame. E.g. (1) a biochar system with pyrolysis temperatures of 750°C and without liquefying the pyrolysis gases delivers a very recalcitrant biochar but the C-efficiency is low (40%) and fostering of regrowth is only about 10-15%. A (2) biochar system with trunk burial, pyrolysis of needles, bark, twigs, and branches with organic N-enhancement, and pyrolysis gas condensation and chemical oxidation could achieve a C-efficiency of 85% to 90% and foster regrowth over a time scale of 60% by up to 50%. Future challenges of biochar classification, certification, ecotoxicology, C-leaching, carbon credits and integration into agro-forestry practices will be discussed.

  9. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    Sugars are the feedstocks for many promising advanced cellulosic biofuels. Traditional sugars derived from starch and sugar crops are limited in their availability. In principle, more plentiful supply of sugars can be obtained from depolymerization of cellulose, the most abundant form of biomass in the world. Breaking the glycosidic bonds between the pyranose rings in the cellulose chain to liberate glucose has usually been pursued by enzymatic hydrolysis although a purely thermal depolymerization route to sugars is also possible. Fast pyrolysis of pure cellulose yields primarily levoglucosan, an anhydrosugar that can be hydrolyzed to glucose. However, naturally occurring alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM) in biomass are strongly catalytic toward ring-breaking reactions that favor formation of light oxygenates over anhydrosugars. Removing the AAEM by washing was shown to be effective in increasing the yield of anhydrosugars; but this process involves removal of large amount of water from biomass that renders it energy intensive and thereby impractical. In this work passivation of the AAEM (making them less active or inactive) using mineral acid infusion was explored that will increase the yield of anhydrosugars from fast pyrolysis of biomass. Mineral acid infusion was tried by previous researchers, but the possibility of chemical reactions between infused acid and AAEM in the biomass appears to have been overlooked, possibly because metal cations might be expected to already be substantially complexed to chlorine or other strong anions that are found in biomass. Likewise, it appears that previous researchers assumed that as long as AAEM cations were in the biomass, they would be catalytically active regardless of the nature of their complexion with anions. On the contrary, we hypothesized that AAEM can be converted to inactive or less active salts using mineral acids. Various biomass feedstocks were infused with mineral (hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric and

  10. Biomass ignition in mills and storages – is it explained by conventional thermal ignition theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    Self-ignition temperatures determined in the framework of conventional thermal ignition theory does not explain why biomass is much more susceptible to spontaneous ignition in power plant mills or storages. Examining the onset of reactions at low temperatures may provide a better understanding......, suggesting that a heterogeneous oxidation is the dominating mechanism in self-ignition. It could also be shown that both mechanisms compete for reactive material. While oxidation was exothermic, pyrolysis was largely thermally neutral in these experiments. Reaction behavior was seen to depend highly...

  11. Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Mian; Wang, Xun; Chen, Jian; Yang, Ping; Liu, Cuixia; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Dabin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis process can be divided into three stages using differential DTG method. • A modified discrete DAEM model fitted experimental data well. • Fe/biochar catalyst showed a good performance on catalytic reforming process. - Abstract: Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste (pine sawdust (PS)) were investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor, respectively. In TGA, it was found that the pyrolysis of PS could be divided into three stages and stage II was the major mass reduction stage with mass loss of 73–74%. The discrete distributed activation energy model (DAEM) with discrete 200 first-order reactions was introduced to study the pyrolysis kinetic. The results indicated that the DAEM with 200 first-order reactions could approximate the pyrolysis process with an excellent fit between experimental and calculated data. The apparent activation energies of PS ranged from 147.86 kJ·mol −1 to 395.76 kJ·mol −1 , with corresponding pre-exponential factors of 8.30 × 10 13 s −1 to 3.11 × 10 25 s −1 . In the fixed-bed reactor, char supported iron catalyst was prepared for tar cracking. Compared with no catalyst which the gas yield and tar yield were 0.58 N m 3 /kg biomass and 201.23 g/kg biomass, the gas yield was markedly increased to 1.02 N m 3 /kg biomass and the tar yield was decreased to only 26.37 g/kg biomass in the presence of char supported iron catalyst. These results indicated that char supported iron catalyst could potentially be used to catalytically decompose tar molecules in syngas generated via biomass pyrolysis.

  12. Effect of torrefaction pretreatment and catalytic pyrolysis on the pyrolysis poly-generation of pine wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Li, Yanjun; Deng, Minsi; Wang, Jiayang; Chen, Miao; Yan, Bei; Yuan, Qiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Torrefaction of pine wood was performed in a tube furnace at three temperatures (220, 250, and 280°C) for 30min. Then catalytic pyrolysis of raw and torrefied pine wood was performed using HZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed-bed pyrolysis reactor at 550°C for 15min. Torrefaction pretreatment and catalytic pyrolysis have an very important effect on the yield, property, and energy distribution of pyrolysis products. The results showed that the yield of biochar rapidly increased, while that of bio-oil decreased with increasing torrefaction temperature. The oxy-compound content of bio-oil, such as acids and aldehydes, sharply decreased. However, the aromatic hydrocarbon content not only increased but also further promoted by HZSM-5 catalyst. With highest mass yields and energy yields, biochar was also the very important product of pyrolysis. The oxygen content in biomass was mainly removed in the form of CO2 and H2O, leading to increasing CO2 content in non-condensable gas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vacuum pyrolysis of swine manure : biochar production and characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, M. [Inst. de recherche et de developpement en agroenvironnement Inc., Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Centre de recherche industrielle du Quebec, Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Godbout, S.; Larouche, J.P.; Lemay, S.P.; Pelletier, F. [Inst. de recherche et de developpement en agroenvironnement Inc., Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Solomatnikova, O. [Centre de recherche industrielle du Quebec, Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Brar, S.K. [Inst. national de la recherche scientifique, eau, terre et environnement, Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Quebec accounts for nearly 25 per cent of swine production in Canada. The issue of swine manure is addressed through land spreading and conversion into fertilizer. However, current regulations restrict the use of swine manure as fertilizer on most farmlands due to the problem of surplus phosphorus and nitrogen. Although many technologies exist to separate phosphorus and nitrogen from the organic-rich dry matter in swine manure, about 40 per cent of the treated waste matter must still be disposed in an environmentally sound manner. This study investigated the technical feasibility of pretreating the swine manure solids into biofuels on a farm-scale basis using vacuum pyrolysis process. A custom built stainless steel pressure vessel was used to carry out pyrolysis reaction of swine manure biomass at a temperature range between 200 to 600 degrees C under vacuum. The pyrolytic vapour was condensed in 2 glass condensers in series. The biochar was collected directly from the pyrolysis vessel following completion of the pyrolysis batch. The non condensable vapour and gases were considered as losses. Biochar, bio-oil, an aqueous phase and a gas mixture were the 4 products of the pyrolysis process. A thermogravimetric analysis of the swine manure samples was conducted before the pyrolysis tests. The study showed that 238 degrees C is the optimal pyrolysis temperature for biochar production.

  14. Syngas from sugarcane pyrolysis. An experimental study for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Arni, Saleh [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa, GE (Italy); Bosio, Barbara; Arato, Elisabetta [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa, GE (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The use of biomass for the production of electrical energy is a promising technological solution for those countries where there are problems with the disposal of agricultural waste and/or the production of low-cost energy. The gasification and/or pyrolysis of the biomass produces a gas rich in hydrogen that can be used in a fuel cell system to produce electrical energy with reduced environmental impact and significant energy recovery. In this work, a study of the pyrolysis of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse was carried out. The experimental process consisted of the pyrolysis of the biomass material in a batch pyrolysis reactor. In some runs the biomass was dry, while in others it was pre-treated by the addition of water. It was noted that the water added to the biomass before the pyrolysis process resulted in a decrease in the quantity of steam added to the fuel cell feeding gas, necessary to avoid carbon deposition, and in an increase in cell power, but, at the same time, caused a decrease in the quantity of syngas produced. Then, the composition of the gas obtained from the experimental pyrolysis of the sugarcane was inserted in a simulation tool of a molten carbonate fuel cell system in order to estimate the feasibility of the entire process in terms of operating conditions and electrical performance. The present study indicates that the syngas obtained from the sugarcane biomass (about 40%) can be converted into electricity using a fuel cell system with a high efficiency. (author)

  15. Pyrolysis of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović, A.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of relevant literature on coal pyrolysis.Pyrolysis, as a process technology, has received considerable attention from many researchers because it is an important intermediate stage in coal conversion.Reactions parameters as the temperature, pressure, coal particle size, heating rate, soak time, type of reactor, etc. determine the total carbon conversion and the transport of volatiles and therebythe product distribution. Part of the possible environmental pollutants could be removed by optimising the pyrolysis conditions. Therefore, this process will be subsequently interesting for coal utilization in the future

  16. 3d Transition Metals and Oxides within Carbon Nanotubes by Co-Pyrolysis of Metallocene & Camphor: High Filling Efficiency and Self-Organized Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Aakanksha; Singh, Nitesh; Dey, Arka Bikash; Nigam, A. K.; Bajpai, Ashna

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a single zone furnace with a modified synthesis chamber design is sufficient to obtain metal (Fe, Co or Ni) filled carbon nanotubes (CNT) with high filling efficiency and controlled morphology. Samples are formed by pyrolysis of metallocenes, a synthesis technique that otherwise requires a dual zone furnace. Respective metallocene in all three cases are sublimed in powder form, a crucial factor for obtaining high filling efficiency. While Fe@CNT is routinely produced using...

  17. Pure hydrogen from pyrolysis oil using the steam-iron process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.F.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Veringa, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The novelty of using pyrolysis oil in the steam-iron process to produce pure hydrogen is introduced. In this process, products of pyrolysis oil gasification are used to reduce iron oxides which are subsequently oxidized with steam, resulting in pure hydrogen. Two process alternatives are considered:

  18. TG-FTIR Study of the Influence of potassium Chloride on Wheat Straw Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wójtowicz, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The interest in utilizing biomass as a CO2 neutral fuel by combustion, gasification or pyrolysis processes is increasing due to concern about the emission of green house gases from fossil fuel combustion. In thermal fuel conversion, pyrolysis is an important step which determines the split...... biomass. Combustion of the char remaining after pyrolysis showed that char combustion is catalyzed by the minerals present in wheat straw. Char from the washed straw with KCl added burned with two peaks in the derivative weight loss curve corresponding to a catalyzed and non-catalyzed part, indicating...

  19. Gold nanoparticle catalyzed oxidation of alcohols - From biomass to commodity chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarning, Esben; Christensen, Claus H.

    2007-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges that the chemical industry faces today is to become less dependent on fossil resources, and oil in particular. One way of addressing this challenge is to find ways to transform renewable resources into commodity chemicals. Renewable resources such as carbohydrates...... and glycerol are rich in alcohol functionalities. Thus, a key step in utilizing these resources lies in the conversion of this functional group. Benign oxidations involving oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant are important from both an environmental and economical perspective. Recently, it has become clear...... that supported gold nanoparticles are highly active catalysts for oxidizing alcohols and aldehydes using oxygen as the oxidant. This perspective will focus on the use of gold nanoparticles in the oxidation of renewables....

  20. Pyrolysis and Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Bilitewski, B.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification include processes that thermally convert carbonaceous materials into products such as gas, char, coke, ash, and tar. Overall, pyrolysis generates products like gas, tar, and char, while gasification converts the carboncontaining materials (e.g. the outputs from pyrolysis...... may often be described as gasification only. Pyrolysis, however, can also be employed without proceeding with gasification. Gasification is by no means a novel process; in the 19th century so-called ‘town gas’ was produced by the gasification of coal and for example used for illumination purposes....... In Europe during World War II, wood-fueled gasifiers (or ‘gas generators’) were used to power cars during shortages of oil-based fuels. Sparked by oil price crises in 1970s and 1980s, further development in gasification technologies focused mainly on coal as a fuel to substitute for oil-based products...