WorldWideScience

Sample records for biomass growth calculations

  1. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  2. Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This "Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator" helps school systems quantify all current spending aimed at improving teaching effectiveness. Part I provides worksheets to analyze total investment. Part II provides a system for evaluating investments based on purpose, target group, and delivery. In this Spending Calculator…

  3. Calculation of transportation energy for biomass collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai, G.; Takekura, K.; Kato, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yakushido, K. [National Agricultural Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study at a rice straw facility in Japan that produces bioethanol. Simulation modeling and calculations methods were used to examine the characteristics of field-to-facility transportation. Fuel consumption was found to be influenced by the conversion rate from straw to ethanol, the quantity of straw collected, and the ratio of the field area to that around the facility. Standard conditions were assumed based on reported data and actual observations for 15 ML/yr ethanol production, 0.3 kL output of ethanol from 1 t dry straw, 53.6 day/yr working days, 2.7 t truck load capacity, and 0.128 as the ratio of field to the area around the facility. According to calculations, a quantity of 50 kt dry straw requires 2.78 L of fuel to transport 1 t of dry straw, 109.5 trucks, and a 19.1 km collection area radius. The fuel consumption for transportation was found to be proportional to the quantity of straw to the 0.5 power, but inversely proportional to the ratio of field to the 0.5 power. The rate of increase in the number of trucks needed to collect straw increases with the decrease in the ratio of the field to area surface around the facility.

  4. Scaling-up vaccine production: implementation aspects of a biomass growth observer and controller

    OpenAIRE

    Soons, Z.I.T.A.; IJssel, van den, J.; Pol, van der, L.A.; Straten, van, G.; Boxtel, van, A.J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This study considers two aspects of the implementation of a biomass growth observer and specific growth rate controller in scale-up from small- to pilot-scale bioreactors towards a feasible bulk production process for whole-cell vaccine against whooping cough. The first is the calculation of the oxygen uptake rate, the starting point for online monitoring and control of biomass growth, taking into account the dynamics in the gas-phase. Mixing effects and delays are caused by amongst ...

  5. Reactive transport and biomass growth in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Meakin, Paul; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2007-07-07

    A Lagrangian multi-scale particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) was used to simulate pore-scale flow, reactive transport and biomass growth in fractured porous media. The biomass growth was controlled by double Monod kinetics. The deformation and attachment and detachment of biomass was modeled through a combination of pair-wise short range repulsive and medium range attractive forces and hydrodynamics forces resulting from the fluid flow.

  6. Scaling-up vaccine production: implementation aspects of a biomass growth observer and controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soons, Z.I.T.A.; IJssel, van den J.; Pol, van der L.A.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This study considers two aspects of the implementation of a biomass growth observer and specific growth rate controller in scale-up from small- to pilot-scale bioreactors towards a feasible bulk production process for whole-cell vaccine against whooping cough. The first is the calculation

  7. Biomass and grain yield of oats by growth regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Marolli, Anderson; Silva, José A. G. da; Romitti, Marcos V.; Mantai, Rubia D.; Hawerroth, Maraisa C.; Scremin, Osmar B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of growth regulator in oats can reduce plant lodging with reflections in biomass and grain yield. The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficiency of using Trinexapac-Ethyl regulator in the growth of white oat under different conditions of N-fertilizer and years favorable and unfavorable for cultivation. In this study, two experiments were conducted in the years 2011, 2012 and 2013, one for quantifying biomass production rate and the other for the de...

  8. Uav-Based Automatic Tree Growth Measurement for Biomass Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpina, M.; Jarząbek-Rychard, M.; Tymków, P.; Borkowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    Manual in-situ measurements of geometric tree parameters for the biomass volume estimation are time-consuming and economically non-effective. Photogrammetric techniques can be deployed in order to automate the measurement procedure. The purpose of the presented work is an automatic tree growth estimation based on Unmanned Aircraft Vehicle (UAV) imagery. The experiment was conducted in an agriculture test field with scots pine canopies. The data was collected using a Leica Aibotix X6V2 platform equipped with a Nikon D800 camera. Reference geometric parameters of selected sample plants were measured manually each week. In situ measurements were correlated with the UAV data acquisition. The correlation aimed at the investigation of optimal conditions for a flight and parameter settings for image acquisition. The collected images are processed in a state of the art tool resulting in a generation of dense 3D point clouds. The algorithm is developed in order to estimate geometric tree parameters from 3D points. Stem positions and tree tops are identified automatically in a cross section, followed by the calculation of tree heights. The automatically derived height values are compared to the reference measurements performed manually. The comparison allows for the evaluation of automatic growth estimation process. The accuracy achieved using UAV photogrammetry for tree heights estimation is about 5cm.

  9. A Screening Model to Predict Microalgae Biomass Growth in Photobioreactors and Raceway Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Chavis, Aaron R.; Hobbs, Watts B.; Crowe, Braden J.

    2013-06-01

    A microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in photobioreactors or outdoor ponds. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to Beer-Lambert’s law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires only two physical and two species-specific biological input parameters, all of which are relatively easy to determine: incident light intensity, culture depth, as well as the biomass light absorption coefficient and the specific growth rate as a function of light intensity. Roux bottle culture experiments were performed with Nannochloropsis salina at constant temperature (23 °C) at six different incident light intensities (5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 250, and 850 μmol/m2∙ sec) to determine both the specific growth rate under non-shading conditions and the biomass light absorption coefficient as a function of light intensity. The model was successful in predicting the biomass growth rate in these Roux bottle cultures during the light-limited linear phase at different incident light intensities. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor variations in the values of input parameters. The model was also successful in predicting the growth performance of Chlorella sp. cultured in LED-lighted 800 L raceway ponds operated at constant temperature (30 °C) and constant light intensity (1650 μmol/m2∙ sec). Measurements of oxygen concentrations as a function of time demonstrated that following exposure to darkness, it takes at least 5 seconds for cells to initiate dark respiration. As a result, biomass loss due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of a culture is unlikely to occur in highly mixed small-scale photobioreactors where cells move rapidly in and out of the light. By contrast, as

  10. A screening model to predict microalgae biomass growth in photobioreactors and raceway ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesemann, M H; Van Wagenen, J; Miller, T; Chavis, A; Hobbs, S; Crowe, B

    2013-06-01

    A microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in photobioreactors or outdoor ponds. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to Beer-Lambert's Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model uses only two physical and two species-specific biological input parameters, all of which are relatively easy to determine: incident light intensity, culture depth, as well as the biomass light absorption coefficient and the specific growth rate as a function of light intensity. Roux bottle culture experiments were performed with Nannochloropsis salina at constant temperature (23°C) at six different incident light intensities (10, 25, 50, 100, 250, and 850 µmol/m(2)  s) to determine both the specific growth rate under non-shading conditions and the biomass light absorption coefficient as a function of light intensity. The model was successful in predicting the biomass growth rate in these Roux bottle batch cultures during the light-limited linear phase at different incident light intensities. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor variations in the values of input parameters. The model was also successful in predicting the growth performance of Chlorella sp. cultured in LED-lighted 800 L raceway ponds operated in batch mode at constant temperature (30°C) and constant light intensity (1,650 µmol/m(2)  s). Measurements of oxygen concentrations as a function of time demonstrated that following exposure to darkness, it takes at least 5 s for cells to initiate dark respiration. As a result, biomass loss due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of a culture is unlikely to occur in highly mixed small-scale photobioreactors where cells move rapidly in and out of the light. By contrast

  11. Investigation into calculating tree biomass and carbon in the FIADB using a biomass expansion factor approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda S. Heath; Mark Hansen; James E. Smith; Patrick D. Miles

    2009-01-01

    The official U.S. forest carbon inventories (U.S. EPA 2008) have relied on tree biomass estimates that utilize diameter based prediction equations from Jenkins and others (2003), coupled with U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) sample tree measurements and forest area estimates. However, these biomass prediction equations are not the equations used...

  12. Growth characteristics and biomass production of kenaf | Tahery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is one of the important fibre crops next to cotton, which is planted throughout the world. It is cultivated for its core and bast fibres. Unlike cotton, the fibre of kenaf is obtained from vegetative part of plant. Hence, growth and biomass production of kenaf is a fundamental issue that should be ...

  13. Growth and biomass yield response of clover ( Trifolium decorum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low soil fertility status is a dominant challenge in Ethiopian agriculture for decades. Organic amendment from different sources could help to rebuild the soil fertility status of the country. Hence, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the outcome of organic treatment and preceding crops on growth and biomass yield of ...

  14. Biomass and grain yield of oats by growth regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Marolli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of growth regulator in oats can reduce plant lodging with reflections in biomass and grain yield. The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficiency of using Trinexapac-Ethyl regulator in the growth of white oat under different conditions of N-fertilizer and years favorable and unfavorable for cultivation. In this study, two experiments were conducted in the years 2011, 2012 and 2013, one for quantifying biomass production rate and the other for the determination of grain yield and lodging. The experimental design was randomized blocks with four replicates, in a 4 x 3 factorial scheme, for growth regulator doses (0, 200, 400 and 600 mL ha-1 and nitrogen doses (30, 90 and 150 kg ha-1, respectively. There is a linear reduction of biomass rate with the increase in the growth regulator dose in oat, regardless of the condition of year and use of N-fertilizer. The growth regulator dose of 495 mL ha-1 efficiently reduces lodging with reduced, high and very high use of N-fertilizer, without reducing the yield of oat grains, in favorable, intermediate or unfavorable year for cultivation.

  15. Influence of static magnetic fields on S. cerevisae biomass growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João B. Muniz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomass growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DAUFPE-1012 was studied in eight batch fermentations exposed to steady magnetic fields (SMF running at 23ºC (± 1ºC, for 24 h in a double cylindrical tube reactor with synchronic agitation. For every batch, one tube was exposed to 220mT flow intensity SMF, produced by NdFeB rod magnets attached diametrically opposed (N to S magnets on one tube. In the other tube, without magnets, the fermentation occurred in the same conditions. The biomass growth in culture (yeast extract + glucose 2% was monitored by spectrometry to obtain the absorbance and later, the corresponding cell dry weight. The culture glucose concentration was monitored every two hours so as the pH, which was maintained between 4 and 5. As a result, the biomass (g/L increment was 2.5 times greater in magnetized cultures (n=8 as compared with SMF non-exposed cultures (n=8. The differential (SMF-control biomass growth rate (135% was slightly higher than the glucose consumption rate (130 % leading to increased biomass production of the magnetized cells.O crescimento da biomassa da Saccharomyces cerevisiae DAUFPE-1012 foi estudado em oito bateladas de fermentação, cada uma exposta aos campos magnéticos contínuos (CMC, à 23ºC (± 1ºC, durante um período de 24 horas em um reator duplo com agitação sincrônica. Em cada batelada,um tubo foi exposto ao CMC, com 220mT de intensidade de fluxo, produzidos por imãs de NdFeB fixados diametralmente opostos (N para S em um tubo do reator de fermentação. Em outro tubo, sem imãs, a fermentação ocorreu nas mesmas condições. O crescimento da biomassa nas culturas (extrato de fermento + glicose 2% foi monitorado através de espectrometria e correlacionado ao peso seco de levedura. A concentração de glicose nas culturas foi monitorada a cada duas horas e o pH foi mantido entre 4 e 5. Como resultado, a biomassa (g/L aumentou 2,5 vezes nas culturas magnetizadas (n=8 quando comparadas com as

  16. Inhibitors in sorghum biomass during growth and processing into fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waniska, R.D.; Ring, A.S.; Doherty, C.A.; Poe, J.H.; Rooney, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    The presence and inhibitory activity of phenolic compounds in sorghum biomass were determined. Sorghum contains phenolic compounds at all stages of growth, with higher levels in leaves and glumes compared to stalks and caryopses. These phenolic compounds inhibited alpha- and gluco-amylase activity. Storage of sorghum resulted in increased levels of some phenolic acids. Levels of free phenolic compounds in ensiled sorghum leachate were sufficient to inhibit the hydrolysis of carbohydrates. The phenolic compounds from sorghum appeared to be detoxified during anaerobic digestion.

  17. Biomass growth aspects during bioreclamation of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elektorowicz, M.; Yong, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Some microorganisms metabolize petroleum compounds. Under favorable environmental conditions, the development of microorganisms can be used to reclamation of contaminated soils. The aim of each bioreclamation technique is to improve these conditions in order to accelerate microorganism activity in the soil. In practice, bioreclamation on an industrial scale is induced through the controlled growth of indigenous microorganisms or through inoculating the soil with specific microorganisms, developed in a lab. These two techniques can be applied either in-situ or ex-situ in the excavated soils. Generally, the growth process includes six phases: the lag phase, the acceleration phase, the exponential phase, the growth decline phase, the stationary phase and the endogenous phase. The goal of each technique is to diminish the time lag, increase the acceleration phase, extend the stationary phase and delay the endogenous phase. However, during the bioreclamation phase, the biochemical processes may postpone the treatment by slowing down its growth,. Very often, the advanced techniques developed in the laboratory does not equate with efficiency on the site itself. On the site, the biomass growth decreases faster then expected because of various interaction processes taking place in contaminated soil. The principal factors described in paper which delay the growth of microorganisms capable of reclaiming petroleum products include the following: competition among microorganisms, unavailability of nutrients, variation of the pH, inadequate moisture, temperature variation, sorption, toxicity of by-products, mutation and impact of additives. The most of the factors are insufficiently recognized, however, impact of some parameters is observed when additives as sawdust and nutrients are added. In similar cases the feasibility studies are necessary before implementation of any technique on industrial scale

  18. Idaho forest growth response to post-thinning energy biomass removal and complementary soil amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren A. Sherman; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Mark D. Coleman

    2018-01-01

    Utilization of woody biomass for biofuel can help meet the need for renewable energy production. However, there is a concern biomass removal will deplete soil nutrients, having short- and long-term effects on tree growth. This study aimed to develop short-term indicators to assess the impacts of the first three years after small-diameter woody biomass removal on forest...

  19. Environmental effects on growth and development of cassava (Manihot esculenta crantz). II. Crop growth rate and biomass yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, B.A.; Evenson, J.P.; Fukai, S.

    1982-12-01

    Frequent harvests of serial plantings of cassava (cv. M Aus 10) in S.E. Queensland, Australia (latitude 27 degrees 37'S) were used to examine the effect of environment on dry matter growth and biomass yield. Maximum crop growth rates (CGR) calculated from fitted logistic curves ranged from 23.8 to 2.4 g m-2 day-1 for the various planting dates and occurred in late summer to autumn, becoming progressively smaller and later for plantings made later in the growth season. Crop growth rate declined to zero or near zero for all planting dates in late winter. Maximum CGR's were higher than those reported for cassava at lower latitudes but, because of the restricted growing season, annual biomass yields from early planting times were similar and of the order of 30 tons per hectare-1 year-1. Multiple regression models were developed which could account for 89% of the variation in CGR in terms of mean air temperature or solar radiation and leaf area index (LAI). Temperature and solar radiation were highly correlated at this experimental site and it was not possible to distinguish their separate effects on CGR. (Refs. 18).

  20. Closed-loop system for growth of aquatic biomass and gasification thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler, James R.

    2017-09-19

    Processes, systems, and methods for producing combustible gas from wet biomass are provided. In one aspect, for example, a process for generating a combustible gas from a wet biomass in a closed system is provided. Such a process may include growing a wet biomass in a growth chamber, moving at least a portion of the wet biomass to a reactor, heating the portion of the wet biomass under high pressure in the reactor to gasify the wet biomass into a total gas component, separating the gasified component into a liquid component, a non-combustible gas component, and a combustible gas component, and introducing the liquid component and non-combustible gas component containing carbon dioxide into the growth chamber to stimulate new wet biomass growth.

  1. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Steve A. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-10-20

    Objectives: Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass Brachypodium distachyon also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation. Description: The project is divided in three main parts: 1) Performing time-lapse imaging and growth measurement in B. distachyon and S. bicolor to determine growth rate dynamic during the day/night cycle. Identifying growth-associated genes whose expression patterns follow the observed growth dynamics using deep sequencing technology, 2) identifying regulators of these genes by screening for DNA-binding proteins interacting with the growth-associated gene promoters identified in Aim 1. Screens will be performed using a validated yeast-one hybrid strategy paired with a specifically designed B. distachyon and S. bicolor transcription factor libraries (1000 clones each), and 3) Selecting 50 potential growth regulators from the screen for downstream characterization. The selection will be made by using a sytems biology approach by calculating the connectivity between growth rate, rhythmic gene expression profiles and TF expression profile and determine which TF is likely part of a hub

  2. Growth and biomass distribution of cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings as influenced by light availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile S. Gardiner; John D. Hodges

    1998-01-01

    Cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings were established and raised in the field under four light levels (100 percent. 53 percent, 27 percent or 8 percent of full sunlight) to study the effects of light availability on their shoot growth, biomass accumulation. and biomass distribution. After two growing seasons, greatest stem growth was observed on seedlings...

  3. Soil microbial biomass and root growth in Bt and non-Bt cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D. K. Y.; Broughton, K.; Knox, O. G.; Hulugalle, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has had a substantial impact on pest management in the cotton industry. While there has been substantial research done on the impact of Bt on the above-ground parts of the cotton plant, less is known about the effect of Bt genes on below ground growth of cotton and soil microbial biomass. The aim of this research was to test the hypothesis that Bt [Sicot 80 BRF (Bollgard II Roundup Ready Flex®)] and non-Bt [Sicot 80 RRF (Roundup Ready Flex®)] transgenic cotton varieties differ in root growth and root turnover, carbon indices and microbial biomass. A field experiment was conducted in Narrabri, north-western NSW. The experimental layout was a randomised block design and used minirhizotron and core break and root washing methods to measure cotton root growth and turnover during the 2008/09 season. Root growth in the surface 0-0.1 m of the soil was measured using the core break and root washing methods, and that in the 0.1 to 1 m depth was measured with a minirhizotron and an I-CAP image capture system. These measurements were used to calculate root length per unit area, root carbon added to the soil through intra-seasonal root death, carbon in roots remaining at the end of the season and root carbon potentially added to the soil. Microbial biomass was also measured using the ninhydrin reactive N method. Root length densities and length per unit area of non-Bt cotton were greater than Bt cotton. There were no differences in root turnover between Bt and non-Bt cotton at 0-1 m soil depth, indicating that soil organic carbon stocks may not be affected by cotton variety. Cotton variety did not have an effect on soil microbial biomass. The results indicate that while there are differences in root morphology between Bt and non-Bt cotton, these do not change the carbon turnover dynamics in the soil.

  4. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-06

    Mar 6, 2014 ... Abstract. In this paper a theoretical calculation is presented for the growth per cycle (GPC) of the film and the variation of GPC with OH concentration on the substrate surface. The calculated GPC range (0.179 nm–0.075 nm) agrees well with reported experimental values. The present approach yielded a ...

  5. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Steve A. [Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Hazen, Samuel [Scripps Research Inst., San Diego, CA (United States); Mullet, John [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-11-22

    Critical to the development of renewable energy sources from biofuels is the improvement of biomass from energy feedstocks, such as sorghum and maize. The specific goals of this project include 1) characterize the growth and gene expression patterns under diurnal and circadian conditions, 2) select transcription factors associated with growth and build a cis-regulatory network in yeast, and 3) perturb these transcription factors in planta using transgenic Brachypodium and sorghum, and characterize the phenotypic outcomes as they relate to biomass accumulation. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield.

  6. Biomass Allocation and Growth Data of Seeded Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set of leaf, stem, and root biomass for various plant taxa was compiled from the primary literature of the 20th century with a significant portion derived...

  7. Biomass Allocation and Growth Data of Seeded Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set of leaf, stem, and root biomass for various plant taxa was compiled from the primary literature of the 20th century with a significant...

  8. Biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Biomass constitutes the energetic form more important and of greater potential after solar energy (source of origin), being consumed in direct form through the combustion, or indirectly through the fossil fuels (those which originates) or by means of different technical of thermochemical and of biochemistry for its conversion and utilization. The current document describes the origin and the energetic characteristics of biomass, its energetic and environmental importance for a developing Country as Colombia, its possibilities of production and the technologies developed for its utilization and transformation, mainly, of the residual biomass

  9. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Steve A. [University of California San Diego

    2013-05-02

    Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

  10. Effects of precipitation changes on switchgrass photosynthesis, growth, and biomass: A mesocosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Dafeng; Yu, Chih-Li; Deng, Qi; Dzantor, E Kudjo; Zhou, Suping; Dennis, Sam; Sauve, Roger; Johnson, Terrance L; Fay, Philip A; Shen, Weijun; Luo, Yiqi

    2018-01-01

    Climate changes, including chronic changes in precipitation amounts, will influence plant physiology and growth. However, such precipitation effects on switchgrass, a major bioenergy crop, have not been well investigated. We conducted a two-year precipitation simulation experiment using large pots (95 L) in an environmentally controlled greenhouse in Nashville, TN. Five precipitation treatments (ambient precipitation, and -50%, -33%, +33%, and +50% of ambient) were applied in a randomized complete block design with lowland "Alamo" switchgrass plants one year after they were established from tillers. The growing season progression of leaf physiology, tiller number, height, and aboveground biomass were determined each growing season. Precipitation treatments significantly affected leaf physiology, growth, and aboveground biomass. The photosynthetic rates in the wet (+50% and +33%) treatments were significantly enhanced by 15.9% and 8.1%, respectively, than the ambient treatment. Both leaf biomass and plant height were largely increased, resulting in dramatically increases in aboveground biomass by 56.5% and 49.6% in the +50% and +33% treatments, respectively. Compared to the ambient treatment, the drought (-33% and -50%) treatments did not influence leaf physiology, but the -50% treatment significantly reduced leaf biomass by 37.8%, plant height by 16.3%, and aboveground biomass by 38.9%. This study demonstrated that while switchgrass in general is a drought tolerant grass, severe drought significantly reduces Alamo's growth and biomass, and that high precipitation stimulates its photosynthesis and growth.

  11. Effects of precipitation changes on switchgrass photosynthesis, growth, and biomass: A mesocosm experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafeng Hui

    Full Text Available Climate changes, including chronic changes in precipitation amounts, will influence plant physiology and growth. However, such precipitation effects on switchgrass, a major bioenergy crop, have not been well investigated. We conducted a two-year precipitation simulation experiment using large pots (95 L in an environmentally controlled greenhouse in Nashville, TN. Five precipitation treatments (ambient precipitation, and -50%, -33%, +33%, and +50% of ambient were applied in a randomized complete block design with lowland "Alamo" switchgrass plants one year after they were established from tillers. The growing season progression of leaf physiology, tiller number, height, and aboveground biomass were determined each growing season. Precipitation treatments significantly affected leaf physiology, growth, and aboveground biomass. The photosynthetic rates in the wet (+50% and +33% treatments were significantly enhanced by 15.9% and 8.1%, respectively, than the ambient treatment. Both leaf biomass and plant height were largely increased, resulting in dramatically increases in aboveground biomass by 56.5% and 49.6% in the +50% and +33% treatments, respectively. Compared to the ambient treatment, the drought (-33% and -50% treatments did not influence leaf physiology, but the -50% treatment significantly reduced leaf biomass by 37.8%, plant height by 16.3%, and aboveground biomass by 38.9%. This study demonstrated that while switchgrass in general is a drought tolerant grass, severe drought significantly reduces Alamo's growth and biomass, and that high precipitation stimulates its photosynthesis and growth.

  12. Does chronic nitrogen deposition during biomass growth affect atmospheric emissions from biomass burning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael R Giordano; Joey Chong; David R Weise; Akua A Asa-Awuku

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nitrogen deposition has measureable impacts on soil and plant health.We investigate burning emissions from biomass grown in areas of high and low NOx deposition. Gas and aerosolphase emissions were measured as a function of photochemical aging in an environmental chamber at UC-Riverside. Though aerosol chemical speciation was not...

  13. Input of biomass in power plants for power generation. Calculation of the financial gap. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tilburg, X.; De Vries, H.J.; Pfeiffer, A.E.; Cleijne, J.W.

    2005-09-01

    The Ministry of Economic Affairs has requested ECN and KEMA to answer two questions. (1) Are the costs and benefits of projects in which wood-pellets are co-fired in a coal fired power plant representative for those of bio-oil fueled co-firing projects in a gas fired plant?; and (2) Are new projects representative for existing projects? To answer these questions, ECN and KEMA have calculated the financial gaps in six different situations: co-firing bio-oil in a gas fired power plant; co-firing bio-oil in a coal fired power plant; gasification of solid biomass; co-firing wood pellets in a coal fired power plant; co-firing agricultural residues in a coal fired power plant; and co-firing waste wood (A- and B-grade) in a coal fired power plant. The ranges and reference cases show that co-firing bio-oil on average has a smaller financial gap than the solid biomass reference case. On average it can also be concluded that when using waste wood or agro-residues, the financial gaps are smaller. Based on these findings it is concluded that: (1) The reference case of co-firing wood pellets in a coal fired power plant are not representative for bio-fuel options. A new category for bio-oil options seems appropriate; and (2) The financial gap of new projects as calculated in November 2004, is often higher then the ranges for existing projects indicate [nl

  14. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 3. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide nanolayers and dependence of GPC on surface OH concentration. Anu Philip Subin Thomas K Rajeev Kumar. Research Articles Volume 82 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 563-569 ...

  15. ABSOLUTE GROWTH AND BIOMASS OF Gracilaria sp. THAT CULTIVATED UNDER DIFFERENT DEPTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlaila Ervina Herliany

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is significant increasing of seaweeds demand over the years that affect the development of seaweeds farming in Indonesia. Gracilaria sp. is one of the species that cultivated in Indonesia. There are some factors that affect the successful of seaweeds cultivation, one of them is cultivation depth. The research was carried out to study the effect of different depth on absolute growth and biomass of Gracilaria sp. Gracilaria sp. was cultivated under three different depths (30, 45 and 60 cm. The result shows that absolute growth and biomass were influenced by cultivation depth. The best treatment was cultivation at 30 cm of depth. Water quality measurements shows that research location is suitable for the growth of seaweeds.Keywords : Absolute growth, Biomass, Cultivation depths, Gracilaria sp

  16. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Li; J. Zhu; H. Hu; Z. Guo; Y. Pan; R. Birdsey; J. Fang

    2016-01-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area) and forest growth (increase in biomass density). Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms...

  17. Climate-related variation in plant peak biomass and growth phenology across Pacific Northwest tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Kevin J.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Thorne, Karen M.

    2018-03-01

    The interannual variability of tidal marsh plant phenology is largely unknown and may have important ecological consequences. Marsh plants are critical to the biogeomorphic feedback processes that build estuarine soils, maintain marsh elevation relative to sea level, and sequester carbon. We calculated Tasseled Cap Greenness, a metric of plant biomass, using remotely sensed data available in the Landsat archive to assess how recent climate variation has affected biomass production and plant phenology across three maritime tidal marshes in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. First, we used clipped vegetation plots at one of our sites to confirm that tasseled cap greenness provided a useful measure of aboveground biomass (r2 = 0.72). We then used multiple measures of biomass each growing season over 20-25 years per study site and developed models to test how peak biomass and the date of peak biomass varied with 94 climate and sea-level metrics using generalized linear models and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) model selection. Peak biomass was positively related to total annual precipitation, while the best predictor for date of peak biomass was average growing season temperature, with the peak 7.2 days earlier per degree C. Our study provides insight into how plants in maritime tidal marshes respond to interannual climate variation and demonstrates the utility of time-series remote sensing data to assess ecological responses to climate stressors.

  18. Effect of growth media modifications on cell biomass and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth media dependency of S. frigidimarina in terms of its growth behavior in response to modifications made to the media as well as its potential to produce PUFAs was evaluated. S. frigidimarina was cultured in conventional shake-flasks and controlled bioreactors with a batch-type procedure using different media ...

  19. Modeling banded vegetation patterns in semiarid regions: Interdependence between biomass growth rate and relevant hydrological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursino, N.

    2007-04-01

    Vegetation patterns, such as regular spots and bands, have been observed in arid and semiarid lands. One of the most common explanations for vegetation banding is that the homogeneous steady state solution of soil moisture and vegetation biomass density balance, expressed in the form of a bucket model, may be unstable under conditions of scarce mean annual rainfall. Even though the theory seems to support our intuitive explanation of the phenomenon, there are still unresolved questions concerning soil parameterization, relevant hydrological processes, and the way plant physiology should be modeled in arid and semiarid environments where vegetation patterns have been observed. This paper examines the interrelation between hydrological processes and plant physiology. The biomass growth rate resembles plant physiology within the bucket model and determines the survival plant strategy given a limited soil moisture availability. The fact that very different hypotheses concerning the biomass growth rate have been formulated has not yet been given the important consideration it deserves. Different models for vegetation banding will be considered here. They are formulated by introducing different growth rates within the same soil moisture and vegetation balance equations. Linear stability analysis and numerical integration of the different models showed some relevant interrelation between hydrological and physiological features. It was demonstrated that the relation between biomass growth rate and biomass density determines which hydrological process enables vegetation pattern initiation. The discussion of this result leads to a critical review of previously published hypotheses on plant physiology and hydrological processes inducing vegetation organization.

  20. Explaining biomass growth of tropical canopy trees: the importance of sapwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sande, Masha T; Zuidema, Pieter A; Sterck, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Tropical forests are important in worldwide carbon (C) storage and sequestration. C sequestration of these forests may especially be determined by the growth of canopy trees. However, the factors driving variation in growth among such large individuals remain largely unclear. We evaluate how crown traits [total leaf area, specific leaf area and leaf nitrogen (N) concentration] and stem traits [sapwood area (SA) and sapwood N concentration] measured for individual trees affect absolute biomass growth for 43 tropical canopy trees belonging to four species, in a moist forest in Bolivia. Biomass growth varied strongly among trees, between 17.3 and 367.3 kg year(-1), with an average of 105.4 kg year(-1). We found that variation in biomass growth was chiefly explained by a positive effect of SA, and not by tree size or other traits examined. SA itself was positively associated with sapwood growth, sapwood lifespan and basal area. We speculate that SA positively affects the growth of individual trees mainly by increasing water storage, thus securing water supply to the crown. These positive roles of sapwood on growth apparently offset the increased respiration costs incurred by more sapwood. This is one of the first individual-based studies to show that variation in sapwood traits-and not crown traits-explains variation in growth among tropical canopy trees. Accurate predictions of C dynamics in tropical forests require similar studies on biomass growth of individual trees as well as studies evaluating the dual effect of sapwood (water provision vs. respiratory costs) on tropical tree growth.

  1. Optical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols: Comparison of Experimental Measurements and T-Matrix Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin Poudel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The refractive index (RI is an important parameter in describing the radiative impacts of aerosols. It is important to constrain the RI of aerosol components, since there is still significant uncertainty regarding the RI of biomass burning aerosols. Experimentally measured extinction cross-sections, scattering cross-sections, and single scattering albedos for white pine biomass burning (BB aerosols under two different burning and sampling conditions were modeled using T-matrix theory. The refractive indices were extracted from these calculations. Experimental measurements were conducted using a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measure the extinction, and a nephelometer to measure the scattering of size-selected aerosols. BB aerosols were obtained by burning white pine using (1 an open fire in a burn drum, where the aerosols were collected in distilled water using an impinger, and then re-aerosolized after several days, and (2 a tube furnace to directly introduce the BB aerosols into an indoor smog chamber, where BB aerosols were then sampled directly. In both cases, filter samples were also collected, and electron microscopy images were used to obtain the morphology and size information used in the T-matrix calculations. The effective radius of the particles collected on filter media from the open fire was approximately 245 nm, whereas it was approximately 76 nm for particles from the tube furnace burns. For samples collected in distilled water, the real part of the RI increased with increasing particle size, and the imaginary part decreased. The imaginary part of the RI was also significantly larger than the reported values for fresh BB aerosol samples. For the particles generated in the tube furnace, the real part of the RI decreased with particle size, and the imaginary part was much smaller and nearly constant. The RI is sensitive to particle size and sampling method, but there was no wavelength dependence over the range considered (500

  2. Assessing biomass accumulation in second growth forests of Puerto Rico using airborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinuzzi, S.; Cook, B.; Corp, L. A.; Morton, D. C.; Helmer, E.; Keller, M.

    2017-12-01

    Degraded and second growth tropical forests provide important ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration and soil stabilization. Lidar data measure the three-dimensional structure of forest canopies and are commonly used to quantify aboveground biomass in temperate forest landscapes. However, the ability of lidar data to quantify second growth forest biomass in complex, tropical landscapes is less understood. Our goal was to evaluate the use of airborne lidar data to quantify aboveground biomass in a complex tropical landscape, the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico provides an ideal place for studying biomass accumulation because of the abundance of second growth forests in different stages of recovery, and the high ecological heterogeneity. Puerto Rico was almost entirely deforested for agriculture until the 1930s. Thereafter, agricultural abandonment resulted in a mosaic of second growth forests that have recovered naturally under different types of climate, land use, topography, and soil fertility. We integrated forest plot data from the US Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program with recent lidar data from NASA Goddard's Lidar, Hyperspectral, and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager to quantify forest biomass across the island's landscape. The G-LiHT data consisted on targeted acquisitions over the FIA plots and other forested areas representing the environmental heterogeneity of the island. To fully assess the potential of the lidar data, we compared the ability of lidar-derived canopy metrics to quantify biomass alone, and in combination with intensity and topographic metrics. The results presented here are a key step for improving our understanding of the patterns and drivers of biomass accumulation in tropical forests.

  3. OSCAAR calculations for the Hanford dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS Theme 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Toshimitsu; Tomita, Kenichi

    2000-10-01

    This report presents the results obtained from the application of the accident consequence assessment code, called OSCAAR, developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the Hanford dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS Theme 2 organized by International Atomic Energy Agency. The scenario relates to an inadvertent release of 131 I to atmosphere from the Hanford Purex Chemical Separations Plant on 2-5 September 1963. This exercise was used to test the atmospheric dispersion and deposition models and food chain transport models for 131 I in OSCAAR with actual measurements and to identify the most important sources of uncertainty with respect both to the part of the assessment and to the overall assessment. The OSCAAR food chain model performed relatively well, while the atmospheric dispersion and deposition calculations made using wind data at the release height and wind fields by simple interpolation of the surrounding surface wind data indicated limited capabilities. The Monte Carlo based uncertainty and sensitivity method linked with OSCAAR successfully demonstrated its usefulness in the scenario. The method presented here also allowed the determination of the parameters that have the most important impact in accident consequence assessments. (author)

  4. OSCAAR calculations for the Hanford dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS Theme 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu; Tomita, Kenichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Inoue, Yoshihisa [Visible Information Center Inc., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    This report presents the results obtained from the application of the accident consequence assessment code, called OSCAAR, developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the Hanford dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS Theme 2 organized by International Atomic Energy Agency. The scenario relates to an inadvertent release of {sup 131}I to atmosphere from the Hanford Purex Chemical Separations Plant on 2-5 September 1963. This exercise was used to test the atmospheric dispersion and deposition models and food chain transport models for {sup 131}I in OSCAAR with actual measurements and to identify the most important sources of uncertainty with respect both to the part of the assessment and to the overall assessment. The OSCAAR food chain model performed relatively well, while the atmospheric dispersion and deposition calculations made using wind data at the release height and wind fields by simple interpolation of the surrounding surface wind data indicated limited capabilities. The Monte Carlo based uncertainty and sensitivity method linked with OSCAAR successfully demonstrated its usefulness in the scenario. The method presented here also allowed the determination of the parameters that have the most important impact in accident consequence assessments. (author)

  5. Testing the growth rate hypothesis in vascular plants with above- and below-ground biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yu

    Full Text Available The growth rate hypothesis (GRH proposes that higher growth rate (the rate of change in biomass per unit biomass, μ is associated with higher P concentration and lower C:P and N:P ratios. However, the applicability of the GRH to vascular plants is not well-studied and few studies have been done on belowground biomass. Here we showed that, for aboveground, belowground and total biomass of three study species, μ was positively correlated with N:C under N limitation and positively correlated with P:C under P limitation. However, the N:P ratio was a unimodal function of μ, increasing for small values of μ, reaching a maximum, and then decreasing. The range of variations in μ was positively correlated with variation in C:N:P stoichiometry. Furthermore, μ and C:N:P ranges for aboveground biomass were negatively correlated with those for belowground. Our results confirm the well-known association of growth rate with tissue concentration of the limiting nutrient and provide empirical support for recent theoretical formulations.

  6. Biomass allocation and long-term growth patterns of temperate lianas in comparison with trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Ryuji; Tateno, Masaki

    2015-08-01

    The host-dependent support habit of lianas is generally interpreted as a strategy designed to reduce resource investment in mechanical tissues; this allows preferential allocation to leaf and stem extension, thereby enhancing productivity and competitive abilities. However, this hypothesis has not been rigorously tested. We examined the aboveground allometries regarding biomass allocation (leaf mass and current-year stem mass (approximated as biomass allocated to extension growth) vs total aboveground mass) and long-term apparent growth patterns (height and aboveground mass vs age, i.e. numbers of growth rings) for nine deciduous liana species in Japan. Lianas had, on average, three- and five-fold greater leaf and current-year stem mass, respectively, than trees for a given aboveground mass, whereas the time course to reach the forest canopy was comparable and biomass accumulation during that period was only one-tenth that of co-occurring canopy trees. The balance between the lengths of yearly stem extension and existing older stems indicated that lianas lost c. 75% of stem length during growth to the canopy, which is probably a consequence of the host-dependent growth. Our observations suggest that, although lianas rely on hosts mechanically, allowing for short-term vigorous growth, this habit requires a large cost and could limit plant growth over protracted periods. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Stand structure, growth and biomass of Arundinaria alpina (highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the other hand, except clay content and soil moisture, chemical soil properties had similar or better status on 5-15% level to sloping land followed by 40-60% straight slope. Significantly bigger diameter (average 8.4 cm) and emerging height culms (average 15 m) with high growth rate (average maximum of 43 cm day-1) ...

  8. Nursery growth and biomass of the seedlings of nine tree species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of quality seedlings depends on the potting media. A nursery experiment was conducted in Pawe Agricultural Research Centre, in the northwest part of Ethiopia in 2006. The study was aimed at investigating the impact of different potting media on biomass and growth and also identifying the properties that ...

  9. Does warming affect growth rate and biomass production of shrubs in the High Arctic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campioli, Matteo; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Albert, Kristian Rost

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have assessed directly the impact of warming on plant growth and biomass production in the High Arctic. Here, we aimed to investigate the impact of 7 years of warming (open greenhouses) on the aboveground relative growth rate (RGR) of Cassiope tetragona and Salix arctica in North...... the secondary growth of old stem segments of Cassiope formed before the treatment began. The increase in Cassiope RGR was associated with an increase in gross photosynthetic uptake, branching and C concentration in old green tissues. Overall, the different growth measures consistently indicated that temperature...

  10. Accumulation of Biomass and Mineral Elements with Calendar Time by Corn: Application of the Expanded Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Allen R.; Scholtz, Richard V.

    2011-01-01

    The expanded growth model is developed to describe accumulation of plant biomass (Mg ha−1) and mineral elements (kg ha−1) in with calendar time (wk). Accumulation of plant biomass with calendar time occurs as a result of photosynthesis for green land-based plants. A corresponding accumulation of mineral elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium occurs from the soil through plant roots. In this analysis, the expanded growth model is tested against high quality, published data on corn (Zea mays L.) growth. Data from a field study in South Carolina was used to evaluate the application of the model, where the planting time of April 2 in the field study maximized the capture of solar energy for biomass production. The growth model predicts a simple linear relationship between biomass yield and the growth quantifier, which is confirmed with the data. The growth quantifier incorporates the unit processes of distribution of solar energy which drives biomass accumulation by photosynthesis, partitioning of biomass between light-gathering and structural components of the plants, and an aging function. A hyperbolic relationship between plant nutrient uptake and biomass yield is assumed, and is confirmed for the mineral elements nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). It is concluded that the rate limiting process in the system is biomass accumulation by photosynthesis and that nutrient accumulation occurs in virtual equilibrium with biomass accumulation. PMID:22194842

  11. Accumulation of biomass and mineral elements with calendar time by corn: application of the expanded growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen R Overman

    Full Text Available The expanded growth model is developed to describe accumulation of plant biomass (Mg ha(-1 and mineral elements (kg ha(-1 in with calendar time (wk. Accumulation of plant biomass with calendar time occurs as a result of photosynthesis for green land-based plants. A corresponding accumulation of mineral elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium occurs from the soil through plant roots. In this analysis, the expanded growth model is tested against high quality, published data on corn (Zea mays L. growth. Data from a field study in South Carolina was used to evaluate the application of the model, where the planting time of April 2 in the field study maximized the capture of solar energy for biomass production. The growth model predicts a simple linear relationship between biomass yield and the growth quantifier, which is confirmed with the data. The growth quantifier incorporates the unit processes of distribution of solar energy which drives biomass accumulation by photosynthesis, partitioning of biomass between light-gathering and structural components of the plants, and an aging function. A hyperbolic relationship between plant nutrient uptake and biomass yield is assumed, and is confirmed for the mineral elements nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, and potassium (K. It is concluded that the rate limiting process in the system is biomass accumulation by photosynthesis and that nutrient accumulation occurs in virtual equilibrium with biomass accumulation.

  12. Toward detection of CO2 fertilization of tree growth and biomass accumulation in Amazon forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. Q.; Negron Juarez, R. I.; Di Vittorio, A. V.; Marra, D.; Rifai, S. W.; Ribeiro, G.; Higuchi, N.

    2012-12-01

    Synthesis studies of old-growth tropical forest plot networks indicate a pantropical net carbon sink of more than 1 Pg C/yr. However a number of confounding factors limit our ability to attribute these changes to direct CO2 fertilization of tree growth and forest productivity. Of primary importance is determining if the plots adequately sample natural disturbance and recovery gradients, and the larger landscape successional mosaic. In addition, forest biomass dynamics which include tree growth, recruitment and mortality can interact in complex ways with changes in forest productivity and biomass accumulation. This study represents a novel approach to determine the sensitivity of different sampling strategies for detecting tropical forest CO2 fertilization while accounting for these confounding factors. Our approach, developed for Amazon forests in Brazil and Peru, combines extensive field plot data on biomass dynamics, remote sensing analyses to generate disturbance probability distribution functions, and individual-based simulation modeling for placing plot-level results into a landscape context. Results indicate that forest plots significantly larger than 10 ha are required to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio for detecting CO2 fertilization. We also present a field sampling strategy for quantifying site-to-site differences in forest biomass accumulation rates, which is useful for detecting regional differences in tropical forest sensitivity to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Overall, this approach is useful in developing field campaigns that explicitly account for landscape heterogeneity in testing key predictions of Earth system models.

  13. Effects of gamma radiation on stem diameter growth, carbon gain and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiede, M.E.; Link, S.O.; Fellows, R.J.; Beedlow, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the effects of gamma radiation on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning, 19-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) were given variable doses (0–40 Gy) from a 60Co gamma source. Exposure of plants to gamma radiation caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that very low doses of radiation could induce morphological growth changes. Carbohydrate analysis of plants exposed to 40 Gy demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less in stems 18 days after exposure compared with control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content of the roots of plants exposed to 40 Gy was not significantly different from non-irradiated plants 18 days after exposure. (author)

  14. Edge effects on growth and biomass partitioning of an Amazonian understory herb (Heliconia acuminata; Heliconiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Emilio M; de Andrade, Ana Segalin

    2011-10-01

    After deforestation, environmental changes in the remaining forest fragments are often most intense near the forest edge, but few studies have evaluated plant growth or plasticity of plant growth in response to edge effects. In a 2-year common garden experiment, we compared biomass allocation and growth of Heliconia acuminata with identical genotypes grown in 50 × 35 m common gardens on a 25-year-old edge and in a forest interior site. Genetically identical plants transplanted to the forest edge and understory exhibited different patterns of growth and biomass allocation. However, individuals with identical genotypes in the same garden often had very different responses. Plants on forest edges also had higher growth rates and increased biomass at the end of the experiment, almost certainly due to the increased light on the forest edge. With over 70000 km of forest edge created annually in the Brazilian Amazon, phenotypic plasticity may play an important role in mediating plant responses to these novel environmental conditions.

  15. Optimal control of nutrition restricted dynamics model of Microalgae biomass growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratianingsih, R.; Azim; Nacong, N.; Resnawati; Mardlijah; Widodo, B.

    2017-12-01

    The biomass of the microalgae is very potential to be proposed as an alternative renewable energy resources because it could be extracted into lipid. Afterward, the lipid could be processed to get the biodiesel or bioethanol. The extraction of the biomass on lipid synthesis process is very important to be studied because the process just gives some amount of lipid. A mathematical model of restricted microalgae biomass growth just gives 1/3 proportion of lipid with respect to the biomass in the synthesis process. An optimal control is designed to raise the ratio between the number of lipid formation and the microalgae biomass to be used in synthesis process. The minimum/ Pontryagin maximum principle is used to get the optimal lipid production. The simulation shows that the optimal lipid formation could be reach by simultaneously controlling the carbon dioxide, in the respiration and photosynthesis the process, and intake nutrition rates of liquid waste and urea substrate. The production of controlled microalgae lipid could be increase 6.5 times comparing to the uncontrolled one.

  16. Growth promoting characteristics of rhizobacteria and AM Fungi for biomass amelioration of Zea mays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and mycorrhiza were evaluated on the growth (biomass and yield of Zea mays. In the present study, selective rhizospheric PGPR (Azotobacter chroococcum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Azospirillum brasilense and Streptomyces sp. and a combination of six strains of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF (Acaulospora morrowae, Gigaspora margarita, Glomus constrictum, Glomus mossae, Glomus aggregatum and Scutellospora calospora were isolated and identified with standard methods and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. PGPR and AMF were checked for their growth-promoting behavior under specific treatment conditions. The 30-48-day-old treated plants in all combinations showed a significantly higher mass value. The average dry weight from the shoot was in a range from 41-52% as compared to the control. This increase also translated into a higher mass value of the roots. Overall, an 82% growth rate was observed in terms of height as the consequence of biomass production, specifically in the case of AMF + rhizobacteria combination. We report an efficient, sustainable and cost-effective biofertilizer for enhanced biomass of Z. mays, one of the staple food crops worldwide.

  17. Effect of culture conditions on the growth of biomass Yarrowia lipolytica - producing protein feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Korneeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fodder yeast is highly valuable protein-vitamin products. Protein digestibility by yeast and amino acid content, superior proteins of animal origin. Fodder yeast protein digested in animals by 95 %. The biological value of yeast protein is determined by the presence of a significant amount of essential amino acids. Moreover, yeast cells contain many vitamins microelement and a significant amount of fat, in which the predominant unsaturated fatty acid. Currently, fodder yeast successfully used in livestock and poultry, so the demand for them is increasing every year. For the production of fodder yeast using a yeast having the necessary technological properties: the ability of rapid growth in aerobic conditions to form protein, amino acids and vitamins, resistant crop production, the development of resistance to foreign microorganisms. Intensive education yeast biomass contributes to a number of conditions, including pH, temperature and aeration of the culture occupy an important place. The main criterion for comparison and selection of a culture medium for this is the speed of its growth and ability to assimilate all of the nutrients with high economic factor. It depends on the performance of the enterprise, energy consumption and other technical - economic performance. The effect of pH of the medium on the biomass accumulation of yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Found that at pH 5,2 - 5,5 observed maximum growth rate of the yeast cells. The effect of temperature on the accumulation of yeast biomass. The temperature of the culture medium determines the intensity of metabolism in cells. It was found that the optimal growth temperature of the culture Yarrowia lipolytica is 33 0C. The effect of aeration on the growth rate of yeast cells. Tro-established that the maximum increase of biomass was obtained with the aeration of 70 cm3 /cm3hrs.

  18. Calculation of economic viability and environmental costs of biomass from dende oil for small communities of Brazilian northeast region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stecher, Luiza C.; Pacheco, Rafael R.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: luizastecher@usp.br, E-mail: rafaelrade@gmail.com, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The current environmental problems caused by human activity has been gaining attention in society, i.e., as it has influenced in the growth and development of the global economic. The availability of energy resources is central point to economic development and the generation of energy is responsible for a significant portion of the emissions causing the greenhouse effect nowadays. The Brazil, a developing country, still has a large number of people without access to electricity, which affects the quality of life of individuals. In this context, it should think in the sustainable economic development, so the alternative energy sources emerge as an option for power generation. Can highlight biomass as a source in the Brazilian scenario by its wide availability and variety. Therefore, the objective of this work is to estimate the economic viability of the decentralized generation of electricity based on the use of biomass from dende oil in small communities in the Brazilian Northeast considering the environmental costs involved for the source in question. The methodology is based on economic concepts and economic evaluation of environmental resources. The biomass from dende oil was adopted in this work by its characteristics and availability in the studied region. The results show that the generation of energy by biomass from dende oil, it will contribute significantly to the sustainable development of the region, already that it will bring gains environmental, social and financial to society. (author)

  19. Calculation of economic viability and environmental costs of biomass from dende oil for small communities of Brazilian northeast region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecher, Luiza C.; Pacheco, Rafael R.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2015-01-01

    The current environmental problems caused by human activity has been gaining attention in society, i.e., as it has influenced in the growth and development of the global economic. The availability of energy resources is central point to economic development and the generation of energy is responsible for a significant portion of the emissions causing the greenhouse effect nowadays. The Brazil, a developing country, still has a large number of people without access to electricity, which affects the quality of life of individuals. In this context, it should think in the sustainable economic development, so the alternative energy sources emerge as an option for power generation. Can highlight biomass as a source in the Brazilian scenario by its wide availability and variety. Therefore, the objective of this work is to estimate the economic viability of the decentralized generation of electricity based on the use of biomass from dende oil in small communities in the Brazilian Northeast considering the environmental costs involved for the source in question. The methodology is based on economic concepts and economic evaluation of environmental resources. The biomass from dende oil was adopted in this work by its characteristics and availability in the studied region. The results show that the generation of energy by biomass from dende oil, it will contribute significantly to the sustainable development of the region, already that it will bring gains environmental, social and financial to society. (author)

  20. Looking for age-related growth decline in natural forests: unexpected biomass patterns from tree rings and simulated mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jane R; D'Amato, Anthony W; Bradford, John B

    2014-05-01

    Forest biomass growth is almost universally assumed to peak early in stand development, near canopy closure, after which it will plateau or decline. The chronosequence and plot remeasurement approaches used to establish the decline pattern suffer from limitations and coarse temporal detail. We combined annual tree ring measurements and mortality models to address two questions: first, how do assumptions about tree growth and mortality influence reconstructions of biomass growth? Second, under what circumstances does biomass production follow the model that peaks early, then declines? We integrated three stochastic mortality models with a census tree-ring data set from eight temperate forest types to reconstruct stand-level biomass increments (in Minnesota, USA). We compared growth patterns among mortality models, forest types and stands. Timing of peak biomass growth varied significantly among mortality models, peaking 20-30 years earlier when mortality was random with respect to tree growth and size, than when mortality favored slow-growing individuals. Random or u-shaped mortality (highest in small or large trees) produced peak growth 25-30% higher than the surviving tree sample alone. Growth trends for even-aged, monospecific Pinus banksiana or Acer saccharum forests were similar to the early peak and decline expectation. However, we observed continually increasing biomass growth in older, low-productivity forests of Quercus rubra, Fraxinus nigra, and Thuja occidentalis. Tree-ring reconstructions estimated annual changes in live biomass growth and identified more diverse development patterns than previous methods. These detailed, long-term patterns of biomass development are crucial for detecting recent growth responses to global change and modeling future forest dynamics.

  1. Distribution of biomass in an Indiana old-growth forest from 1926 to 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin A. Spetich; George R. Parker

    1998-01-01

    We examined the structural and spatial distribution of woody biomass in relationship to disturbance in an Indiana old-growth deciduous forest over a 66-year period. Analysis was done on the core 7.92 ha of a 20.6 ha forest in which every tree 10 cm dbh and over has been tagged and mapped since 1926. Five years are compared - 1926, 1976, 1981, 1986 and 1992....

  2. Plot size recommendations for biomass estimation in a midwestern old-growth forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin A. Spetich; George R Parker

    1998-01-01

    The authors examine the relationship between disturbance regime and plot size for woody biomass estimation in a midwestern old-growth deciduous forest from 1926 to 1992. Analysis was done on the core 19.6 ac of a 50.1 ac forest in which every tree 4 in. d.b.h. and greater has been tagged and mapped since 1926. Five windows of time are compared—1926, 1976, 1981, 1986...

  3. Exploring Bioeconomy Growth through the Public Release of the Biomass Scenario Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newes, Emily K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Inman, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vimmerstedt, Laura J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Steve [Lexidyne, LLC

    2017-08-02

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is an important tool for exploring vibrant future bioeconomy scenarios that leverage domestic resources. Developed by NREL and BETO, this model of the domestic biofuels supply chain has been used to explore success strategies for BETO's activities towards bioeconomy growth. The BSM offers a robust test bed for detailed exploration of effects of BETO activities within the complex context of resource availability; physical, technological, and economic constraints; behavior; and policy. The public release of the model in 2017 will allow broad engagement with the theme of the conference as model users can analyze bioeconomy growth, domestic biomass resource use, and associated effects. The BSM is a carefully validated, state-of-the-art, dynamic model of the biomass to biofuels supply chain. Using a system dynamics simulation modeling approach, the model tracks long-term deployment of biofuels given technology development and investment, considering land availability, the competing oil market, consumer demand, and government policies over time. Sample outputs include biofuels production, feedstock use, capital investment, incentives, and costs of feedstocks and fuels. BSM scenarios reveal technological, economic, and policy challenges, as well as opportunities for dynamic growth of the bioeconomy with strategic public and private investment at key points in the system. The model logic and results have been reviewed extensively, through collaborative analysis, expert reviews and external publications (https://www.zotero.org/groups/bsm_publications/).

  4. Higher biomass productivity of microalgae in an attached growth system, using wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Hee-Mock; Jo, Beom-Ho; Lee, Sang-A; Shin, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Hee-Sik; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Ahn, Chi-Yong

    2014-11-28

    Although most algae cultivation systems are operated in suspended culture, an attached growth system can offer several advantages over suspended systems. Algal cultivation becomes light-limited as the microalgal concentration increases in the suspended system; on the other hand, sunlight penetrates deeper and stronger in attached systems owing to the more transparent water. Such higher availability of sunlight makes it possible to operate a raceway pond deeper than usual, resulting in a higher areal productivity. The attached system achieved 2.8-times higher biomass productivity and total lipid productivity of 9.1 g m(-2) day(-1) and 1.9 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively, than the suspended system. Biomass productivity can be further increased by optimization of the culture conditions. Moreover, algal biomass harvesting and dewatering were made simpler and cheaper in attached systems, because mesh-type substrates with attached microalgae were easily removed from the culture and the remaining treated wastewater could be discharged directly. When the algal biomass was dewatered using natural sunlight, the palmitic acid (C16:0) content increased by 16% compared with the freeze-drying method. There was no great difference in other fatty acid composition. Therefore, the attached system for algal cultivation is a promising cultivation system for mass biodiesel production.

  5. Loblolly Pine Growth Patterns on Reclaimed Mineland: Allometry, Biomass, and Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Priest

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface lignite coal mines in east Texas are commonly reforested using loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. following mining and reclamation activities. Due to the nature of such an extreme disturbance, altered growth patterns, growth rates, and productivity could be expected. We destructively sampled above- and belowground tissue to develop prediction equations specific to these sites. These prediction equations differed statistically from those found in the literature regarding unmined land. At the stand level, biomass and volume productivity appeared similar with young stands on reclaimed mineland performing slightly poorer than similarly managed unmined sites. Allometric partitioning of above- and belowground biomass differed statistically from the unmined allometric model previously studied. The allometric pattern on reclaimed mineland indicated greater partitioning of biomass belowground for young stands of low quadratic mean diameter relative to unmined stands. Older stands on reclaimed mineland exhibited no allometric partitioning differences from unmined stands, indicating the normal allometric pattern is resumed for stands greater than 10 years of age.

  6. The effect of interspecies interactions and water deficit on spring barley and red clover biomass accumulation at successive growth stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jastrzębska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted in a greenhouse in Olsztyn, Poland, in the period 2010–2012. The aim of the study was to examine whether soil water deficit would change biomass volume and distribution of pure sown spring barley and red clover as well as growth rate during their joint vegetation and mutual interactions. The interactions between spring barley and red clover were of a competitive character, and the cereal was the stronger crop. The strength of this competition increased in time with the growing season. Through most of the growing season, the competition was poorer in water deficit conditions. The impact of clover on barley before the heading stage showed facilitation symptoms. Interspecific competition reduced the rate of barley biomass accumulation and decreased stem and leaf biomass towards the end of the growing season. Intensified translocation of assimilates from the vegetative parts to grain minimized the decrease in spike biomass. Water deficit stress had a more inhibitory effect on the biomass and growth rate of barley than competition, and competition did not exacerbate the adverse influence of water deficit stress on barley. Competition from barley significantly reduced the biomass and biomass accumulation rate of clover. Water deficit stress did not exacerbate barley’s competitive effect on clover, but it strongly inhibited the growth of aboveground biomass in pure-sown clover.

  7. SIMULATION OF MICROALGAL GROWTH IN A CONTINUOUS PHOTOBIOREACTOR WITH SEDIMENTATION AND PARTIAL BIOMASS RECYCLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. de Farias Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Microalgae are considered as promising feedstocks for the third generation of biofuels. They are autotrophic organisms with high growth rate and can stock an enormous quantity of lipids (about 20 - 40% of their dried cellular weight. This work was aimed at studying the cultivation of Scenedesmus obliquus in a two-stage system composed of a photobioreactor and a settler to concentrate and partially recycle the biomass as a way to enhance the microalgae cellular productivity. It was attempted to specify by simulation and experimental data a relationship between the recycling rate, kinetic parameters of microalgal growth and photobioreactor operating conditions. Scenedesmus obliquus cells were cultivated in a lab-scale flat-plate reactor, homogenized by aeration, and running in continuous flow with a residence time of 1.66 day. Experimental data for the microalgal growth were used in a semi-empirical simulation model. The best results were obtained for Fw=0.2FI, when R = 1 and kd = 0 and 0.05 day-1, with the biomass production in the reactor varying between 8 g L -1 and 14 g L-1, respectively. The mathematical model fitted to the microalgal growth experimental data was appropriate for predicting the efficiency of the reactor in producing Scenedesmus obliquus cells, establishing a relation between cellular productivity and the minimum recycling rate that must be used in the system.

  8. Staged cultivation enhances biomass accumulation in the green growth phase of Haematococcus pluvialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Liu, Bin; Lu, Xue; Cheng, Ka-Wing; Chen, Feng

    2017-06-01

    An innovative staged cultivation (SC) method was proposed to overcome the limiting factors associated with the growth of Haematococcus pluvialis in the green growth phase. This strategy led to a 1.16-fold increase in biomass concentration. Light wavelength, nutrient concentration and extracellular metabolite were identified to be key limiting factors when cells of H. pluvialis were in the low, medium, and high cell density sub-phase, respectively. A mix of red and white light (2:1) was demonstrated for the first time to accelerate cell growth in the low cell density sub-phase. Shortage of nutrients during the medium density sub-phase was overcome with a fed-batch approach maintained at stable pH, while the inhibitory effect of extracellular metabolites during the high density sub-phase was overcome with replacement cultivation. The findings of the present study suggest SC in the green growth phase may be a promising approach to significantly enhance biomass accumulation in culturing microalgae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis during energetically limited growth and respiratory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Blank, Lars Mathias; Solem, Christian

    2008-01-01

    (glucose/mannose-specific phosphotransferase system). Amino acid catabolism could be excluded as the source of the additional ATP. Since mutants without a functional H+-ATPase produced less ATP under sugar starvation and respiratory conditions, the additional ATP yield appears to come partly from energy......Lactococcus lactis is known to be capable of respiration under aerobic conditions in the presence of haemin. In the present study the effect of respiration on ATP production during growth on different sugars was examined. With glucose as the sole carbon source, respiratory conditions in L. lactis...... MG1363 resulted in only a minor increase, 21%, in biomass yield. Since ATP production through substrate-level phosphorylation was essentially identical with and without respiration, the increased biomass yield was a result of energy-saving under respiratory conditions estimated to be 0.4 mol of ATP...

  10. A tree biomass and carbon estimation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily B. Schultz; Thomas G. Matney; Donald L. Grebner

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate forest management decisions for the developing woody biofuel and carbon credit markets require inventory and growth-and-yield systems reporting component tree dry weight biomass estimates. We have developed an integrated growth-and-yield and biomass/carbon calculator. The objective was to provide Mississippi’s State inventory system with bioenergy economic...

  11. Metabolic efficiency in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to temperature dependent growth and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Yang, Xuelian; Reuss, Matthias; Pörtner, Hans Otto

    2015-08-01

    Canonized view on temperature effects on growth rate of microorganisms is based on assumption of protein denaturation, which is not confirmed experimentally so far. We develop an alternative concept, which is based on view that limits of thermal tolerance are based on imbalance of cellular energy allocation. Therefore, we investigated growth suppression of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the supraoptimal temperature range (30-40°C), i.e. above optimal temperature (Topt). The maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of biomass, its concentration and yield on glucose (Yx/glc) were measured across the whole thermal window (5-40°C) of the yeast in batch anaerobic growth on glucose. Specific rate of glucose consumption, specific rate of glucose consumption for maintenance (mglc), true biomass yield on glucose (Yx/glc(true)), fractional conservation of substrate carbon in product and ATP yield on glucose (Yatp/glc) were estimated from the experimental data. There was a negative linear relationship between ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations and specific growth rate at any growth conditions, whilst the energy charge was always high (~0.83). There were two temperature regions where mglc differed 12-fold, which points to the existence of a 'low' (within 5-31°C) and a 'high' (within 33-40°C) metabolic mode regarding maintenance requirements. The rise from the low to high mode occurred at 31-32°C in step-wise manner and it was accompanied with onset of suppression of μmax. High mglc at supraoptimal temperatures indicates a significant reduction of scope for growth, due to high maintenance cost. Analysis of temperature dependencies of product formation efficiency and Yatp/glc revealed that the efficiency of energy metabolism approaches its lower limit at 26-31°C. This limit is reflected in the predetermined combination of Yx/glc(true), elemental biomass composition and degree of reduction of the growth substrate. Approaching the limit implies a reduction of the safety margin

  12. Growth, mortality and spawning stock biomass of the striped red mullet Mullus surmuletus, in the Egyptian Mediterranean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. MEHANNA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Population parameters such as age, growth, mortality and maturity-at-age are crucial parameters for accurate stock assessment and management plans to ensure the sustainable development of fisheries. Also, they are essential for the calculation of spawning stock biomass (SSB and equilibrium yield as well as biological reference points including Fmax, F0.1 and F30%SSB. Age and growth parameters were estimated for the striped red mullet, Mullus surmuletus, sampled from commercial landings of the trawl fishery in the Egyptian Mediterranean waters, using the otolith reading technique. M. surmuletus has a longevity of 5 years, but over 70% of fish were less than 2 years old. The growth parameter estimates were K= 0.47 yrs-1, L∞= 31.74 cm, and to= -0.3 yrs. Natural mortality (M was 0.43 yrs-1, fishing mortality (F was 0.73 yrs-1, survival rate (S was 0.31 and exploitation ratio was 0.63 yr-1. Length-at-50% maturity was estimated at 15.1 cm TL, while the length at first capture was estimated at 11.6 cm TL. SSB analysis showed that effort reduction is strongly recommended such that F be reduced by 40% to rebuild spawner biomass to acceptable levels. Per-recruit analysis revealed that F should be reduced by about 27% to achieve the maximum Y/R. All approaches point to the need for drastic reduction in fishing pressure by about 30-40% in the Egyptian Mediterranean fisheries.

  13. Growth and biomass development of the introduced red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla is unaffected by nutrient limitation and grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejrup, Lars Brammer; Pedersen, Morten Foldager

    2010-01-01

    observed variations in biomass. The biomass of G. vermiculophylla at the eutrophic site (Holckenhavn Fjord) was ca. 300-fold larger than at the oligotrophic site (Fyns Hoved). Growth rates ranged from almost 0 in early spring to ca. 0.08 d–1 in mid-summer and did not vary among sites. The seasonal pattern......The invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla was first recorded in Denmark and Sweden in 2003 and has since been reported from several sites in Denmark, Sweden and northern Germany. The abundance of G. vermiculophylla is typically high at more eutrophic sites, whereas it remains relatively low...... at more oligotrophic sites. We recorded seasonal variations in growth and biomass development at 2 sites with contrasting nutrient status (eutrophic versus oligotrophic) to investigate whether nutrient limitation of growth and loss of biomass due to grazing from invertebrate herbivores could explain...

  14. 47 CFR 36.604 - Calculation of the rural growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of the rural growth factor. 36.604..., REVENUES, EXPENSES, TAXES AND RESERVES FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES 1 Universal Service Fund General § 36.604 Calculation of the rural growth factor. The Rural Growth Factor (RGF) is equal to the sum of...

  15. Dynamics of Aviation Biofuel Investment, Incentives, and Market Growth: An Exploration Using the Biomass Scenario Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura; Newes, Emily

    2016-10-25

    The Federal Aviation Administration promotes the development of an aviation biofuel market, and has pursued a goal of 1 billion gallons of production annually by 2018. Although this goal is unlikely to be met, this analysis applies the Biomass Scenario Model to explore conditions affecting market growth, and identifies policy incentive and oil price conditions under which this level of production might occur, and by what year. Numerous combinations of conditions that are more favorable than current conditions can reach the goal before 2030.

  16. Comparison of the growth and biomass production of Miscanthus sinensis, Miscanthus floridulus and Saccharum arundinaceum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X.; He, Y.; Fang, J.; Fang, Z.; Jiang, B.; Brancourt-Hulmel, M.; Zheng, B.; Jiang, D.

    2015-07-01

    Miscanthus and Saccharum are considered excellent candidates for bioenergy feedstock production. A field experiment was conducted in Zhejiang province of China to characterize the phenotypic differences in three species, two of Miscanthus (M. sinensis and M. floridulus) and one of Saccharum (S. arundinaceum), each with two accessions collected from China. Agronomical traits, including plant height, culm number, tuft diameter and culm diameter, were monitored monthly for the first 3 years of growth. For each year of trail, flowering time was observed and biomass yield was harvested. M. floridulus produced a superior biomass yield with increasing plant age associated with higher yields (4.18, 24.16 and 29.01 t dry matter/hain November of years one to three, respectively). Higher culm diameter, plant height and tuft diameter values were observed for M. floridulus when compared to the other species. Biomass yield was positively correlated to tuft diameter, culm diameter, culm number and negatively to flowering time, but it showed no correlation with plant height. Tuft diameter and culm diameter could be suitable indicators in the selection of accessions for crop yield at the yield-building phase. Studies of the primary colonizers of Miscanthus and Saccharum in their original location may be of interest from the perspective of bioenergy germplasm resource collection. (Author)

  17. Engineering of the growth environment of microalgae with high biomass and lipid productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Tzu; Lee, Huei-Teng; Lai, Chung-Wei

    2013-03-01

    Pure cultures of Botryococcus sp. microalgae have great potential for generating huge amounts of algae lipid that can be further converted into biodiesel. Lipids with nanometer in size can be applied to medicine and pharmacy recently. In this study, the effects of light intensity and CO2 concentration on the biomass productivity, lipid content, and lipid productivity of Botryococcus braunii were examined in 21-day intervals. The optimum cultivating conditions for biomass accumulation were 6,000 lux with 0.04% CO2 and 21 days of culturing; this provided the highest biomass productivity of 140.46 mg L(-1) d(-1). The highest lipid productivity of 44.46 mg L(-1) d(-1) occurred at 6,000 lux with 5% CO2 and 21 days of culturing. The maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)) was similar among different concentrations of CO2 (0.682 d(-1) under 12,000 lux at 10% CO2; 0.585 d(-1) under 6,000 lux at 5% CO2). Culturing at 5% or 10% CO2 has been shown to enhance the accumulation of lipids, introducing the possibility of using flue gas as a carbon source. The nanotechnology in this study will be helpful towards research in green science and engineering such as bio-fixation of CO2 and drug delivery systems.

  18. Microalgae cultivation using an aquaculture wastewater as growth medium for biomass and biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Liu, Yuan; Guo, Haiyan; Yan, Song; Mu, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Microalgae as a main feedstock has attracted much attention in recent years but is still not economically feasible due to high algal culture cost. The objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive eco-friendly technology for cultivating microalgae Platymonas subcordiformis using aquaculture wastewater as growth medium for biomass and biofuel production. Platymonas subcordiformis was grown in pretreated flounder aquaculture wastewaters taken from different stages. Each of wastewater contained different levels of nutrients. The biomass yield of microalgae and associated nitrogen and phosphorous removal were investigated. The results showed that algal cell density increased 8.9 times than the initial level. Platymonas subcordiformis removed nitrogen and phosphorus from wastewater with an average removal efficiency of 87%-95% for nitrogen and 98%-99% for phosphorus. It was feasible to couple the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from wastewater to algal biomass and biofuel production. However, further studies are required to make this technologies economically viable for algae biofuel production. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. OSCAAR calculations for the Iput dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS theme 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu; Matsunaga, Takeshi [Department of Reactor Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results obtained from the application of the accident consequence assessment code, called OSCAAR, developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the Iput dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS Theme 2 organized by International Atomic Energy Agency. The Iput Scenario deals with {sup 137}Cs contamination of the catchment basin and agricultural area in the Bryansk Region of Russia, which was heavily contaminated after the Chernobyl accident. This exercise was used to test the chronic exposure pathway models in OSCAAR with actual measurements and to identify the most important sources of uncertainly with respect to each part of the assessment. The OSCAAR chronic exposure pathway models almost successfully reconstructed the whole 10-year time course of {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in most requested types of agricultural products and natural foodstuffs. Modeling of {sup 137}Cs downward migration in soils is, however, still incomplete and more detail modeling of the changes of cesium bioavailability with time is needed for long term predictions of the contamination of food. (author)

  20. OSCAAR calculations for the Iput dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS theme 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Toshimitsu; Matsunaga, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results obtained from the application of the accident consequence assessment code, called OSCAAR, developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the Iput dose reconstruction scenario of BIOMASS Theme 2 organized by International Atomic Energy Agency. The Iput Scenario deals with 137 Cs contamination of the catchment basin and agricultural area in the Bryansk Region of Russia, which was heavily contaminated after the Chernobyl accident. This exercise was used to test the chronic exposure pathway models in OSCAAR with actual measurements and to identify the most important sources of uncertainly with respect to each part of the assessment. The OSCAAR chronic exposure pathway models almost successfully reconstructed the whole 10-year time course of 137 Cs activity concentrations in most requested types of agricultural products and natural foodstuffs. Modeling of 137 Cs downward migration in soils is, however, still incomplete and more detail modeling of the changes of cesium bioavailability with time is needed for long term predictions of the contamination of food. (author)

  1. Biomass and water storage dynamics of epiphytes in old-growth and secondary montane cloud forest stands in Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, L.; Tobon, C.; Frumau, K.F.A.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Epiphytic biomass, canopy humus and associated canopy water storage capacity are known to vary greatly between old-growth tropical montane cloud forests but for regenerating forests such data are virtually absent. The present study was conducted in an old-growth cloud forest and in a 30-year-old

  2. Biomass removal, soil compaction, and vegetation control effects on five-year growth of Douglas-fir in coastal Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Ares; T. Terry; C. Harrington; W. Devine; D. Peter; J. Bailey

    2007-01-01

    Sustainable forest production requires an understanding of the effects of site disturbance on tree growth and the consequences of soil amelioration and vegetation control practices. We assessed the impacts of biomass removals at harvest, soil compaction and tillage, and vegetation control on early growth of Douglas-fir in coastal Washington. Harvest treatments included...

  3. Earthworms (Amynthas spp. increase common bean growth, microbial biomass, and soil respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julierme Zimmer Barbosa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have evaluated the effect of earthworms on plants and biological soil attributes, especially among legumes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of earthworms (Amynthas spp. on growth in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and on soil biological attributes. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse using a completely randomized design with five treatments and eight repetitions. The treatments consisted of inoculation with five different quantities of earthworms of the genus Amynthas (0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 worms per pot. Each experimental unit consisted of a plastic pot containing 4 kg of soil and two common bean plants. The experiment was harvested 38 days after seedling emergence. Dry matter and plant height, soil respiration, microbial respiration, microbial biomass, and metabolic quotient were determined. Earthworm recovery in our study was high in number and mass, with all values above 91.6% and 89.1%, respectively. In addition, earthworm fresh biomass decreased only in the treatment that included eight earthworms per pot. The presence of earthworms increased the plant growth and improved soil biological properties, suggesting that agricultural practices that favor the presence of these organisms can be used to increase the production of common bean, and the increased soil CO2 emission caused by the earthworms can be partially offset by the addition of common bean crop residues to the soil.

  4. The stability analysis of the nutrition restricted dynamic model of the microalgae biomass growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratianingsih, R.; Fitriani, Nacong, N.; Resnawati, Mardlijah, Widodo, B.

    2018-03-01

    The biomass production is very essential in microalgae farming such that its growth rate is very important to be determined. This paper proposes the dynamics model of it that restricted by its nutrition. The model is developed by considers some related processes that are photosynthesis, respiration, nutrition absorption, stabilization, lipid synthesis and CO2 mobilization. The stability of the dynamical system that represents the processes is analyzed using the Jacobian matrix of the linearized system in the neighborhood of its critical point. There is a lipid formation threshold needed to require its existence. In such case, the absorption rate of respiration process has to be inversely proportional to the absorption rate of CO2 due to photosynthesis process. The Pontryagin minimal principal also shows that there are some requirements needed to have a stable critical point, such as the rate of CO2 released rate, due to the stabilization process that is restricted by 50%, and the threshold of its shifted critical point. In case of the rate of CO2 released rate due to the photosynthesis process is restricted in such interval; the stability of the model at the critical point could not be satisfied anymore. The simulation shows that the external nutrition plays a role in glucose formation such that sufficient for the biomass growth and the lipid production.

  5. Calculation of energy costs of composite biomass stirring at biogas stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, D. Yu; Temnikov, D. O.

    2018-03-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the equipment to produce biogas fuel from organic wastes. The bioreactor equipped with a combined stirring system ensuring mechanical and bubbling stirring is designed. The method of energy cost calculation of the combined stirring system with original design is suggested. The received expressions were used in the calculation of the stirring system installed in the 10 m3 bioreactor: power consumed by the mixer during the start-up period made Nz =9.03 kW, operating power of the mixer made NE =1.406 kW, compressor power for bubbling stirring made NC =18.5 kW. Taking into account the operating mode of single elements of the stirring system, the energy cost made 4.38% of the total energy received by the biogas station.

  6. Species Specific Responses to Age on Nodule Formation, Seedling Growth, and Biomass Production of Acacia auriculiformis at Nursery Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Salim Azad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodulation responses of leguminous trees are very important for intercropping to reduce reliance on artificial nitrogen input through nitrogen fixation in agroforestry system. This study was carried out to evaluate the status of nodulation (i.e., the number of nodules and their shape and size in root and biomass production of plant growth parameters (i.e., number of leaves, shoot height, root biomass, and shoot biomass of A. auriculiformis seedlings. The assessment was conducted 60 days after seed germination. The study revealed significant differences in nodule number per seedling, leaf number per seedling, shoot height, and biomass accumulation (both green and oven dry weight with seedling age (p<0.05. The study also revealed significant correlation among the variables of nodulation responses and biomass production. The results obtained using principal component analysis (PCA justified correlation matrix of nodulation responses and biomass production of this species. The PCA showed that root biomass per seedling, leaf number per seedling, nodule number per seedling, shoot height, age of seedling, and shoot biomass per seedling were clustered with PC1 (with an eigenvalue of 5.59 and root shoot ratios were clustered with PC2 (with an eigenvalue of 1.82. Our study justified that shoot height may be an important determinant of nodule formation of A. auriculiformis.

  7. Modeling Forest Biomass and Growth: Coupling Long-Term Inventory and Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Chad; Finley, Andrew O.; Cook, Bruce D.; Weiskittel, Andrew; Woodall, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Combining spatially-explicit long-term forest inventory and remotely sensed information from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) datasets through statistical models can be a powerful tool for predicting and mapping above-ground biomass (AGB) at a range of geographic scales. We present and examine a novel modeling approach to improve prediction of AGB and estimate AGB growth using LiDAR data. The proposed model accommodates temporal misalignment between field measurements and remotely sensed data-a problem pervasive in such settings-by including multiple time-indexed measurements at plot locations to estimate AGB growth. We pursue a Bayesian modeling framework that allows for appropriately complex parameter associations and uncertainty propagation through to prediction. Specifically, we identify a space-varying coefficients model to predict and map AGB and its associated growth simultaneously. The proposed model is assessed using LiDAR data acquired from NASA Goddard's LiDAR, Hyper-spectral & Thermal imager and field inventory data from the Penobscot Experimental Forest in Bradley, Maine. The proposed model outperformed the time-invariant counterpart models in predictive performance as indicated by a substantial reduction in root mean squared error. The proposed model adequately accounts for temporal misalignment through the estimation of forest AGB growth and accommodates residual spatial dependence. Results from this analysis suggest that future AGB models informed using remotely sensed data, such as LiDAR, may be improved by adapting traditional modeling frameworks to account for temporal misalignment and spatial dependence using random effects.

  8. Growth of algal biomass in laboratory and in large-scale algal photobioreactors in the temperate climate of western Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Christina; Behrendt, Dominik; Huber, Gregor; Pfaff, Christian; Widzgowski, Janka; Ackermann, Bärbel; Müller, Andreas; Zachleder, Vilém; Moudříková, Šárka; Mojzeš, Peter; Schurr, Ulrich; Grobbelaar, Johan; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2017-06-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris was characterized as a function of irradiance in a laboratory turbidostat (1L) and compared to batch growth in sunlit modules (5-25L) of the commercial NOVAgreen photobioreactor. The effects of variable sunlight and culture density were deconvoluted by a mathematical model. The analysis showed that algal growth was light-limited due to shading by external construction elements and due to light attenuation within the algal bags. The model was also used to predict maximum biomass productivity. The manipulative experiments and the model predictions were confronted with data from a production season of three large-scale photobioreactors: NOVAgreen (photobioreactors. An additional limitation of the biomass productivity was caused by the nitrogen starvation that was used to induce lipid accumulation. Reduction of shading and separation of biomass and lipid production are proposed for future optimization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Growth, biomass production and ions accumulation in Atriplex nummularia Lindl grown under abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidelblandi F. de Melo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Atriplex nummularia is a halophyte of great importance in the recovery of saline soils and is considered as a model plant to study biosaline scenarios. This study aimed to evaluate biometric parameters, biomass production and the accumulation of ions in A. nummularia grown under abiotic stresses. Cultivation was carried out in a Fluvic Neosol for 100 days, adopting two water regimes: 37 and 70% of field capacity. Plants were irrigated with saline solutions containing two types of salts (NaCl and a mixture of NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 at six levels of electrical conductivity: 0, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 dS m-1, arranged in a 6 x 2 x 2 factorial with 4 replicates, forming 96 plots. At the end of the experiment, plants were divided into leaves, stem and roots, for the determination of fresh matter (FM, dry matter (DM and estimated leaf area (LA, besides the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ and Cl-. The type of salt did not influence plant growth or biomass production; however, it influenced the levels of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and Cl- in the leaves and Mg2+, K+ and Cl- in the roots. Increase in salinity reduced the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ and Cl- for all treatments.

  10. Growth and biomass partitioning of mulungu seedlings in response to phosphorus fertilization and mycorrhizal inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago de Sousa Leite

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the initial growth and biomass partitioning of mulungu (Erythrina velutina Willd. seedlings under different rates of phosphorus in the presence and absence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (FMA’s. A randomized blocks design in a 5 x 2 factorial arrangement was used, with four replicates and three plants per plot. Treatments consisted of five phosphorus rates (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg.Kg soil-1, using as source the superphosphate fertilizer, and presence or absence of FMA’s. At 98 days after sowing (DAS, shoot height, stem diameter, leaf number, leaf chlorophyll index, leaf dry matter, stem dry matter, root dry matter, leaf area, Dickson quality index and height/stem diameter ratio were evaluated. The phosphorus rate of 200 mg.kg-1 proved to be the most efficient for production of Erythrina velutina seedlings, but with a significant reduction in the biological association of this plant with rhizobacteria. Biomass distribution within the different parts of the plants did not change with distinct rates of P, and there were no benefits in the use of FMA’s until 98 DAS.

  11. Optical Properties of Fresh Biomass Burning Aerosols: A comparison of experimental measurements and T-Matrix Method Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Samin; Bililign, Solomon; Smith, Damon; Fiddler, Marc; Flurchick, K. M.

    Due to their abundance the absorption properties of airborne soot aerosols from biomass burning (BB) may influence directly the atmospheric visibility as well as local and global climate. A major issue with soot particles is that they cannot be considered as spherical and thus, `conventional' scattering theories such as the Mie theory results cannot be compared with the experimental measurements. An adequate numerical treatment is possible with the T-matrix method. We measured the extinction and scattering cross sections of fresh BB aerosols experimentally in our lab. TEM images of filter samples revealed the shape and morphology of the soot particles. Assuming that the particles can be approximated by spheroids, T-matrix method can be used. This is a suitable numerical tool, since it is an exact method based on a solution of Maxwell's equations. We used the FORTRAN code provided by Mishchenko and Travis and calculated the absorption, and scattering cross sections of soot. We present preliminary results comparing the measured and calculated values at selected wavelengths of light. The authors acknowledge the support from the National Science Foundation for this work under Grant Number NSF-AGS- 1555479.

  12. The use of flue gas for the growth of microalgal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiler, K.G.; Kadam, K.L.; Heacox, D.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Capture and utilization of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by microalgae is a promising technology to help reduce emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Microalgae are of particular interest because of their rapid growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions. Laboratory work is directed toward investigating the effects of simulated flue gas on microalgae, while engineering studies have focused on the economics of the technology. One strain of a green algae, Monoraphidium minutum, has shown excellent tolerance and growth when exposed to simulated flue gas which meets the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (1990 CAAA). Biomass concentrations of {similar_to}2g/L have been measured in batch culture. Several other microalgae have also shown tolerance to simulated flue gas; however, the growth of these strains is not equivalent to that observed for M. minutum. Coupling the production of biodiesel or other microalgae-derived commodity chemicals with the use of flue gas carbon dioxide is potentially a zero-cost method of reducing the amount of carbon dioxide contributed to the atmosphere by fossil fuel-fired power plants. We have identified two major biological performance parameters which can provide sufficient improvement in this technology to render it cost-competitive with other existing CO{sub x} mitigation technologies. These are algal growth rate and lipid content. An updated economic analysis shows that growth rate is the more important of the two, and should be the focus of near term research activities. The long term goal of achieving zero cost will require other, non-biological, improvements in the process.

  13. Effect of acetate to biomass ratio on simultaneous polyhydroxybutyrate generation and direct microbial growth in fast growing microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biros, Yester; Çokgör, Emine Ubay; Yağcı, Nevin; Pala-Ozkok, Ilke; Çakar, Zeynep Petek; Sözen, Seval; Orhon, Derin

    2014-11-01

    The study investigated the effect of variations in the acetate to biomass ratio on substrate storage potential, and the kinetics of substrate utilization. A series of batch experiments were conducted with biomass taken from the fill and draw reactor operated at a sludge age of 2 d. One of the batch reactors duplicated the substrate loading in the main reactor. The others were started with different initial acetate to biomass ratios both in lower and higher ranges. Increasing available acetate did not totally divert excess substrate to storage; the microbial culture adjusted the kinetics of the metabolic reactions to a higher growth rate so that more substrate could be utilized for direct growth at high acetate levels. Conversely, storage rate was increased, utilizing a higher substrate fraction for polyhydroxybutyrate generation when acetate concentration was lowered. The physiological and molecular bases of storage at low substrate levels were discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Growth of filamentous blue-green algae at high temperatures: a source of biomass for renewable fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timourian, H.; Ward, R.L.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1977-08-17

    The growth of filamentous blue-green algae (FBGA) at high temperatures in outdoor, shallow solar ponds is being investigated. The temperature of the 60-m/sup 2/ ponds can be controlled to an average temperature of 45/sup 0/C. The growth of FBGA at high temperatures offers an opportunity, not presently available from outdoor algal ponds or energy farms, to obtain large amounts of biomass. Growth of algae at high temperatures results in higher yields because of increased growth rate, the higher light intensity that can be used before saturating the photosynthetic process, easier maintenance of selected FBGA strains, and fewer predators to decimate culture. Additional advantages of growing FBGA as a source of biomass include: bypassing the limitations of nutrient sources, because FBGA fix their own nitrogen and require only CO/sub 2/ when inorganic nutrients are recycled; toleration of higher salinity and metal ion concentrations; and easier and less expensive harvesting procedures.

  15. Glucocorticosteroids do not impact directly growth rate and biomass of Rhizopus arrhizus (syn. R. oryzae) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, A P; Minetos, Y D; Albert, N; Shirazi, F; Walsh, T J; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) use is a common risk factor for invasive fungal infections. This is attributed to the complex dysregulation of immunity caused by GCs. However, studies have demonstrated increased growth with GC exposure for some molds, such as Aspergillus fumigatus and Exserohilum rostratum. No such data exist for Mucorales. Therefore, we investigated the influence of GC exposure on the growth of Rhizopus arrhizus (syn. R. oryzae) in different culture media and in different atmospheres. We measured continuous spore growth using spectrophotometry and biomass variations using XTT assay. We did not observe enhanced growth or biomass variation with any of the GCs regardless of the medium or conditions. These results support the existence of fungus-specific differences in the effect of GCs on fungal biology.

  16. Growth and biomass productivity of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus, L.) under different agricultural inputs and management practices in central Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danalatos, N.G.; Archontoulis, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    The growth and biomass productivity of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus, L.) cultivars Tainung 2 and Everglades 41 were determined under three irrigation applications (low: 25%, moderate: 50% and fully: 100% of maximum evapotranspiration; ETm), four nitrogen dressings (0, 50, 100 and 150 kg hat), two

  17. Effects of light and biomass partitioning on growth, photosynthesis and carbohydrate content of the seagrass Zostera nolti Hornem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivé, I.; Brun Murillo, F.G.; Vergara, J.J.; Pérez-Lloréns, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Plants of the seagrass Zostera noltii were cultured in the laboratory (mesocosms) for two weeks to assess the effect of above:below-ground (AG/BG) biomass ratios and light on growth, photosynthesis and chemical composition. Experimental plant units (EPUs) with different proportions between AG and BG

  18. Biomass and leaf-level gas exchange characteristics of three African savanna C4 grass species under optimum growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantlana, K.B.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Arneth, A.; Grispen, V.; Bonyongo, C.M.; Heitkönig, I.M.A.; Lloyd, J.

    2009-01-01

    C4 savanna grass species, Digitaria eriantha, Eragrostis lehmanniana and Panicum repens, were grown under optimum growth conditions with the aim of characterizing their above- and below-ground biomass allocation and the response of their gas exchange to changes in light intensity, CO2 concentration

  19. Effects of heavy-metal-contaminated soil on growth, phenology and biomass turnover of Hieracium piloselloides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryser, Peter; Sauder, Wendy R.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of low levels of heavy metals on plant growth, biomass turnover and reproduction were investigated for Hieracium pilosella. Plants were grown for 12 weeks on substrates with different concentrations of heavy metals obtained by diluting contaminated soils with silica sand. To minimize effects of other soil factors, the substrates were limed, fertilized, and well watered. The more metal-contaminated soil the substrate contained, the lower the leaf production rate and the plant mass were, and the more the phenological development was delayed. Flowering phenology was very sensitive to metals. Leaf life span was reduced at the highest and the lowest metal levels, the latter being a result of advanced seed ripening. Even if the effect of low metal levels on plant growth may be small, the delayed and reduced reproduction may have large effects at population, community and ecosystem level, and contribute to rapid evolution of metal tolerance. - Flowering phenology shows a very sensitive response to heavy metal contamination of soils

  20. Calculating second derivatives of population growth rates for ecology and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Esther; Caswell, Hal

    2014-05-01

    1. Second derivatives of the population growth rate measure the curvature of its response to demographic, physiological or environmental parameters. The second derivatives quantify the response of sensitivity results to perturbations, provide a classification of types of selection and provide one way to calculate sensitivities of the stochastic growth rate. 2. Using matrix calculus, we derive the second derivatives of three population growth rate measures: the discrete-time growth rate λ, the continuous-time growth rate r = log λ and the net reproductive rate R 0 , which measures per-generation growth. 3. We present a suite of formulae for the second derivatives of each growth rate and show how to compute these derivatives with respect to projection matrix entries and to lower-level parameters affecting those matrix entries. 4. We also illustrate several ecological and evolutionary applications for these second derivative calculations with a case study for the tropical herb Calathea ovandensis .

  1. Nitrogen nutrition of Canna indica: Effects of ammonium versus nitrate on growth, biomass allocation, photosynthesis, nitrate reductase activity and N uptake rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Dennis; Brix, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The effects of inorganic nitrogen (N) source (NH4+, NO3- or both) on growth, biomass allocation, photosynthesis, N uptake rate, nitrate reductase activity and mineral composition of Canna indica were studied in hydroponic culture. The relative growth rates (0.05-0.06 g g-1 d-1), biomass allocation...

  2. Overexpression of Populus trichocarpa CYP85A3 promotes growth and biomass production in transgenic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan-Li; Tang, Ren-Jie; Wang, Hai-Hai; Jiang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Yan; Yang, Yang; Liang, Mei-Xia; Sun, Zhen-Cang; Kong, Fan-Jing; Li, Bei; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2017-10-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential hormones that play crucial roles in plant growth, reproduction and response to abiotic and biotic stress. In Arabidopsis, AtCYP85A2 works as a bifunctional cytochrome P450 monooxygenase to catalyse the conversion of castasterone to brassinolide, a final rate-limiting step in the BR-biosynthetic pathway. Here, we report the functional characterizations of PtCYP85A3, one of the three AtCYP85A2 homologous genes from Populus trichocarpa. PtCYP85A3 shares the highest similarity with AtCYP85A2 and can rescue the retarded-growth phenotype of the Arabidopsis cyp85a2-2 and tomato d x mutants. Constitutive expression of PtCYP85A3, driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, increased the endogenous BR levels and significantly promoted the growth and biomass production in both transgenic tomato and poplar. Compared to the wild type, plant height, shoot fresh weight and fruit yield increased 50%, 56% and 43%, respectively, in transgenic tomato plants. Similarly, plant height and stem diameter increased 15% and 25%, respectively, in transgenic poplar plants. Further study revealed that overexpression of PtCYP85A3 enhanced xylem formation without affecting the composition of cellulose and lignin, as well as the cell wall thickness in transgenic poplar. Our finding suggests that PtCYP85A3 could be used as a potential candidate gene for engineering fast-growing trees with improved wood production. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Lipid for biodiesel production from attached growth Chlorella vulgaris biomass cultivating in fluidized bed bioreactor packed with polyurethane foam material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Sahib, Ainur-Assyakirin; Lim, Jun-Wei; Lam, Man-Kee; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ho, Chii-Dong; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed; Wong, Chung-Yiin; Rosli, Siti-Suhailah

    2017-09-01

    The potential to grow attached microalgae Chlorella vulgaris in fluidized bed bioreactor was materialized in this study, targeting to ease the harvesting process prior to biodiesel production. The proposed thermodynamic mechanism and physical property assessment of various support materials verified polyurethane to be suitable material favouring the spontaneous adhesion by microalgae cells. The 1-L bioreactor packed with only 2.4% (v/v) of 1.00-mL polyurethane foam cubes could achieve the highest attached growth microalgae biomass and lipid weights of 812±122 and 376±37mg, respectively, in comparison with other cube sizes. The maturity of attached growth microalgae biomass for harvesting could also be determined from the growth trend of suspended microalgae biomass. Analysis of FAME composition revealed that the harvested microalgae biomass was dominated by C16-C18 (>60%) and mixture of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (>65%), satiating the biodiesel standard with adequate cold flow property and oxidative stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanisms for catalytic carbon nanofiber growth studied by ab initio density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Rostrup-Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms and energetics of graphene growth catalyzed by nickel nanoclusters were studied using ab initio density functional theory calculations. It is demonstrated that nickel step-edge sites act as the preferential growth centers for graphene layers on the nickel surface. Carbon is transported...

  5. Improved growth media and culture techniques for genetic analysis and assessment of biomass utilization by Caldicellulosiruptor bescii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Joel; Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Copeland, Jennifer; Grayeski, Philip; Westpheling, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Methods for efficient growth and manipulation of relatively uncharacterized bacteria facilitate their study and are essential for genetic manipulation. We report new growth media and culture techniques for Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, the most thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium known. A low osmolarity defined growth medium (LOD) was developed that avoids problems associated with precipitates that form in previously reported media allowing the monitoring of culture density by optical density at 680 nm (OD(680)) and more efficient DNA transformation by electroporation. This is a defined minimal medium and does not support growth when a carbon source is omitted, making it suitable for selection of nutritional markers as well as the study of biomass utilization by C. bescii. A low osmolarity complex growth medium (LOC) was developed that dramatically improves growth and culture viability during storage, making it a better medium for routine growth and passaging of C. bescii. Both media contain significantly lower solute concentration than previously published media, allowing for flexibility in developing more specialized media types while avoiding the issues of growth inhibition and cell lysis due to osmotic stress. Plating on LOD medium solidified by agar results in ~1,000-fold greater plating efficiency than previously reported and allows the isolation of discrete colonies. These new media represent a significant advance for both genetic manipulation and the study of biomass utilization in C. bescii, and may be applied broadly across the Caldicellulosiruptor genus.

  6. Parallelised online biomass monitoring in shake flasks enables efficient strain and carbon source dependent growth characterisation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Stefan; Reifenrath, Mara; Thomik, Thomas; Boles, Eckhard; Herzog, Konrad

    2016-07-25

    Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as one of the most often used workhorses in biotechnology has been developed into a huge family of application optimised strains in the last decades. Increasing numbers of strains render their characterisation highly challenging, even with the simple methods of growth-based analytics. Here we present a new sensor system for the automated, non-invasive and parallelisable monitoring of biomass in continuously shaken shake flask cultures, called CGQ ("cell growth quantifier"). The CGQ implements a dynamic approach of backscattered light measurement, allowing for efficient and accurate growth-based strain characterisation, as exemplarily demonstrated for the four most commonly used laboratory and industrial yeast strains, BY4741, W303-1A, CEN.PK2-1C and Ethanol Red. Growth experiments revealed distinct carbon source utilisation differences between the investigated S. cerevisiae strains. Phenomena such as diauxic shifts, morphological changes and oxygen limitations were clearly observable in the growth curves. A strictly monotonic non-linear correlation of OD600 and the CGQ's backscattered light intensities was found, with strain-to-strain as well as growth-phase related differences. The CGQ measurements showed high resolution, sensitivity and smoothness even below an OD600 of 0.2 and were furthermore characterised by low background noise and signal drift in combination with high reproducibility. With the CGQ, shake flask fermentations can be automatically monitored regarding biomass and growth rates with high resolution and parallelisation. This makes the CGQ a valuable tool for growth-based strain characterisation and development. The exceptionally high resolution allows for the identification of distinct metabolic differences and shifts as well as for morphologic changes. Applications that will benefit from that kind of automatized biomass monitoring include, amongst many others, the characterization of deregulated native or

  7. Effects of different sources of organic waste application on the growth and biomass production of kenaf (hibiscus cannabinus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahariar, M.S.; Tashin, S.; Gani, N.; Muhammad, S.; Huq, I.

    2012-01-01

    The growth and biomass productivity of kenaf(Hibiscus cannabinus L.) grown with different sources of organic waste viz. sewage sludge, poultry litter, cow dung and rice straw application were observed in a field experiment. Organic wastes were applied at the rate of 5 t/ha and were compared with recommended dose of fertilizers and control. The plants were harvested at 120 days after sowing (at the flowering stage). Different sources of organic wastes had a significant effect (P cow dung>poultry litter> rice straw treatments. Among the four sources of organic wastes, sewage sludge treated plot produced the highest mean biomass of 23.33 t/ha (dry weight basis) which was 14.64% higher than the mean biomass production from control plot. (author)

  8. Biomass recalcitrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felby, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Alternative and renewable fuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass offer a promising alternative to conventional energy sources, and provide energy security, economic growth, and environmental benefits. However, plant cell walls naturally resist decomposition from microbes and enzymes - this co...

  9. Lipase Production in Solid-State Fermentation Monitoring Biomass Growth of Aspergillus niger Using Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Julio C. V.; da Terzi, Selma C.; Bevilaqua, Juliana Vaz; Damaso, Mônica C. T.; Couri, Sônia; Langone, Marta A. P.; Senna, Lilian F.

    The aim of this study was to monitor the biomass growth of Aspergillus niger in solid-state fermentation (SSF) for lipase production using digital image processing technique. The strain A. niger 11T53A14 was cultivated in SSF using wheat bran as support, which was enriched with 0.91% (m/v) of ammonium sulfate. The addition of several vegetable oils (castor, soybean, olive, corn, and palm oils) was investigated to enhance lipase production. The maximum lipase activity was obtained using 2% (m/m) castor oil. In these conditions, the growth was evaluated each 24 h for 5 days by the glycosamine content analysis and digital image processing. Lipase activity was also determined. The results indicated that the digital image process technique can be used to monitor biomass growth in a SSF process and to correlate biomass growth and enzyme activity. In addition, the immobilized esterification lipase activity was determined for the butyl oleate synthesis, with and without 50% v/v hexane, resulting in 650 and 120 U/g, respectively. The enzyme was also used for transesterification of soybean oil and ethanol with maximum yield of 2.4%, after 30 min of reaction.

  10. Organic and inorganic fertilizer effect on soil CO2 flux, microbial biomass, and growth of Nigella sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Aliyeh; Fallah, Seyfollah; Sourki, Ali Abasi

    2017-01-01

    Cattle manure has a high carbon/nitrogen ratio and may not decompose; therefore, full-dose application of urea fertilizer might improve biological properties by increasing manure decomposition. This study aimed to investigate the effect of combining cattle manure and urea fertilizer on soil CO2 flux, microbial biomass carbon, and dry matter accumulation during Nigella sativa L. (black cumin) growth under field conditions. The treatments were control, cattle manure, urea, different levels of split and full-dose integrated fertilizer. The results showed that integrated application of cattle manure and chemical fertilizer significantly increased microbial biomass carbon by 10%, soil organic carbon by 2.45%, total N by 3.27%, mineral N at the flowering stage by 7.57%, and CO2 flux by 9% over solitary urea application. Integrated application increased microbial biomass carbon by 10% over the solitary application and the full-dose application by 5% over the split application. The soil properties and growth parameters of N. sativa L. benefited more from the full-dose application than the split application of urea. Cattle manure combined with chemical fertilizer and the full-dose application of urea increased fertilizer efficiency and improved biological soil parameters and plant growth. This method decreased the cost of top dressing urea fertilizer and proved beneficial for the environment and medicinal plant health.

  11. Seedling growth and biomass allocation in relation to leaf habit and shade tolerance among 10 temperate tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrzyński, Jerzy; Chmura, Daniel J; Tjoelker, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Initial growth of germinated seeds is an important life history stage, critical for establishment and succession in forests. Important questions remain regarding the differences among species in early growth potential arising from shade tolerance. In addition, the role of leaf habit in shaping relationships underlying shade tolerance-related differences in seedling growth remains unresolved. In this study we examined variation in morphological and physiological traits among seedlings of 10 forest tree species of the European temperate zone varying in shade tolerance and leaf habit (broadleaved winter-deciduous species vs needle-leaved conifers) during a 10-week period. Seeds were germinated and grown in a controlled environment simulating an intermediate forest understory light environment to resolve species differences in initial growth and biomass allocation. In the high-resource experimental conditions during the study, seedlings increased biomass allocation to roots at the cost of leaf biomass independent of shade tolerance and leaf habit. Strong correlations between relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), leaf area ratio (LAR), specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf mass fraction (LMF) indicate that physiology and biomass allocation were equally important determinants of RGR as plant structure and leaf morphology among these species. Our findings highlight the importance of seed mass- and seed size-related root morphology (specific root length-SRL) for shade tolerance during early ontogeny. Leaf and plant morphology (SLA, LAR) were more successful in explaining variation among species due to leaf habit than shade tolerance. In both broadleaves and conifers, shade-tolerant species had lower SRL and greater allocation of biomass to stems (stem mass fraction). Light-seeded shade-intolerant species with greater SRL had greater RGR in both leaf habit groups. However, the greatest plant mass was accumulated in the group of heavy-seeded shade

  12. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cassandra E; Beri, Nina R; Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-11-01

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interaction between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. We applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-decade biomass dynamics in an old-growth hemlock-northern hardwood forest, Michigan, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry D. Woods

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trends in living aboveground biomass and inputs to the pool of coarse woody debris (CWD in an undisturbed, old-growth hemlock-northern hardwood forest in northern MI were estimated from multi-decade observations of permanent plots. Growth and demographic data from seven plot censuses over 47 years (1962–2009, combined with one-time measurement of CWD pools, help assess biomass/carbon status of this landscape. Are trends consistent with traditional notions of late-successional forests as equilibrial ecosystems? Specifically, do biomass pools and CWD inputs show consistent long-term trends and relationships, and can living and dead biomass pools and trends be related to forest composition and history? Aboveground living biomass densities, estimated using standard allometric relationships, range from 360–450 Mg/ha among sampled stands and types; these values are among the highest recorded for northeastern North American forests. Biomass densities showed significant decade-scale variation, but no consistent trends over the full study period (one stand, originating following an 1830 fire, showed an aggrading trend during the first 25 years of the study. Even though total above-ground biomass pools are neither increasing nor decreasing, they have been increasingly dominated, over the full study period, by very large (>70 cm dbh stems and by the most shade-tolerant species (Acer saccharum and Tsuga canadensis.CWD pools measured in 2007 averaged 151 m3/ha, with highest values in Acer-dominated stands. Snag densities averaged 27/ha, but varied nearly ten-fold with canopy composition (highest in Tsuga-dominated stands, lowest in Acer-dominated; snags constituted 10–50% of CWD biomass. Annualized CWD inputs from tree mortality over the full study period averaged 1.9–3.2 Mg/ha/yr, depending on stand and species composition. CWD input rates tended to increase over the course of the study. Input rates may be expected to increase over longer

  14. [Characteristics of Stipa grandis growth and reproductive biomass allocation at different hill position of Xilingol grassland, Inner Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Gao, Yu-bao; Liu, Hai-ying; Liu, Jing-ling

    2009-09-01

    An investigation was conducted on the vegetative and reproductive biomass allocation of Stipa grandis at the hill-top and hill-foot of Xilingol grassland, and relatedness- and factor analyses were made to study the effects of hill position on the S. grandis seed biomass. Significant differences were observed in the vegetative and reproductive growth of S. grandis plants at the hill-top and hill-foot. At hill-foot, the height and number of non-flowering S. grandis ramets increased by 24.69% and 35.37%, respectively, the number of flowering ramets increased by 102.97%, the vegetative, reproductive, and total biomass increased by 44.14%, 95.59% and 47.45%, respectively, and the 100-grain mass increased by 25.00%, as compared with those at hill-top. The seed biomass of S. grandis at hill-top was mainly affected by soil moisture content, while that at hill-foot was mainly affected by soil pH. Hill position induced the differentiation of soil moisture and N contents, and made the S. grandis at the fertile hill-foot allocating more energy to its sexual reproduction.

  15. Media arrangement impacts cell growth in anaerobic fixed-bed reactors treating sugarcane vinasse: Structured vs. randomic biomass immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Samuel; Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Pires, Eduardo Cleto

    2017-07-01

    This study reports on the application of an innovative structured-bed reactor (FVR) as an alternative to conventional packed-bed reactors (PBRs) to treat high-strength solid-rich wastewaters. Using the FVR prevents solids from accumulating within the fixed-bed, while maintaining the advantages of the biomass immobilization. The long-term operation (330days) of a FVR and a PBR applied to sugarcane vinasse under increasing organic loads (2.4-18.0kgCODm -3 day -1 ) was assessed, focusing on the impacts of the different media arrangements over the production and retention of biomass. Much higher organic matter degradation rates, as well as long-term operational stability and high conversion efficiencies (>80%) confirmed that the FVR performed better than the PBR. Despite the equivalent operating conditions, the biomass growth yield was different in both reactors, i.e., 0.095gVSSg -1 COD (FVR) and 0.066gVSSg -1 COD (PBR), indicating a clear control of the media arrangement over the biomass production in fixed-bed reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing the growth and yield of Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.) by ramie biomass waste in liquid form and gibberellic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman, C.; Nuraini, A.; Wulandari, A. P.; Kadapi, M.

    2017-05-01

    Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.) is one of the most important sources of natural fibre, a sustainable biomass. The growth and yield of ramie are affected by mineral nutrients. In the present study, we usedfertilizers from waste of ramie biomass in liquid form (liquid organic fertilizer, LOF) and the other treatment is by gibberellic acid (GA3). This study was to obtain the effect of treatments on enhance the growth and yield of ramie. Hence, we measure the character that related to the important parameter for biomass product of ramie. Such plant height, stem diameter, dry plant weight, and ramie fresh stem weight of ramie clone Pujon 13. This research was conducted from January 2016 to March 2016 at Research Field Ciparanje, Faculty of Agriculture, Padjadjaran University, Jatinangor, Sumedang, West Java with an altitude of about ± 750 m above sea level. The type of Soil in this area is Inceptisolsoil order and thetype of rainfall according to Schmidt and Fergusson Classification is C type. The experiment used Randomized Block Design (RBD) which consisted of eight treatments (GA and LOF) and four replications. The concentration of GA from 0, 50, 100 and 150 ppm and for concentration of LOF is 40 mlL-1. We suggested the treatment of GA 150 ppm with 40 mlL-1 LOF was the best treatment on enhancing plant height and stem fresh weight of ramie clone Pujon 13.

  17. Seasonal trends in growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and metals in six species of emergent aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrends, L.L.; Bailey, E.; Bulls, M.J.; Coonrod, H.S.; Sikora, F.J.

    1996-05-01

    Growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and trace metals were monitored for six species of aquatic macrophytes during June, August and November, 1993. Plant species were cultivated in two polyculture treatments, each replicated three times. Polyculture I consisted of Scirpus acutus (hardstem bullrush), Phragmites communes (common reed), and Phalaris arundinacea (canary grass). Polyculture H consisted of Typha spp. (cattail), Scirpus atrovirens (green bullrush), and Scirpus cyperinus (wool grass). Each of the six cells (6 x 9 x 0.6 m), was operated as a gravel-substrate, subsurface-flow wetlands in a continuous recirculating mode. At six week intervals, macro, micro and trace elements were dissolved and added to the sump of the recirculating system. On each of three sampling dates, replicate shoot and root samples were collected, segregated by species and tissue type (roots, rhizomes, stems and leaves), and prepared for gravimetric biomass estimates and chemical analysis. Tissue specific concentrations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu, were determined on each date for each species and tissue type. Results will be discussed with respect to species specific growth rates, biomass accumulation, and seasonal uptake and translocation of plant nutrients.

  18. The drought calculator: decision support tool for predicting forage growth during drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Drought Calculator (DC), a spreadsheet-based decision support system, was developed to help ranchers and range managers predict reductions in forage production due to drought. Forage growth potential (FGP) is predicted as a weighted average of monthly precipitation during the spring. Precipita...

  19. Ab initio calculations and kinetic modeling of thermal conversion of methyl chloride: implications for gasification of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Mallika; Rasmussen, Morten Lund; Hashemi, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    . In the present work, the thermal conversion of CH3Cl under gasification conditions was investigated. A detailed chemical kinetic model for pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl chloride was developed and validated against selected experimental data from the literature. Key reactions of CH2Cl with O2 and C2H4......Limitations in current hot gas cleaning methods for chlorine species from biomass gasification may be a challenge for end use such as gas turbines, engines, and fuel cells, all requiring very low levels of chlorine. During devolatilization of biomass, chlorine is released partly as methyl chloride...... in low-temperature gasification. The present work illustrates how ab initio theory and chemical kinetic modeling can help to resolve emission issues for thermal processes in industrial scale....

  20. [Microbial biomass and growth kinetics of microorganisms in chernozem soils under different farm land use modes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskiĭ, S A; Bogomolova, I N; Blagodatskaia, E V

    2008-01-01

    The carbon content of microbial biomass and the kinetic characteristics of microbial respiration response to substrate introduction have been estimated for chernozem soils of different farm lands: arable lands used for 10, 46, and 76 years, mowed fallow land, non-mowed fallow land, and woodland. Microbial biomass and the content of microbial carbon in humus (Cmic/Corg) decreased in the following order: soils under forest cenoses-mowed fallow land-10-year arable land-46- and 75-year arable land. The amount of microbial carbon in the long-plowed horizon was 40% of its content in the upper horizon of non-mowed fallow land. Arable soils were characterized by a lower metabolic diversity of microbial community and by the highest portion of microorganisms able to grow directly on glucose introduced into soil. The effects of different scenarios of carbon sequestration in soil on the reserves and activity of microbial biomass are discussed.

  1. Coordination between water transport capacity, biomass growth, metabolic scaling and species stature in co-occurring shrub and tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Duncan D; Sperry, John S

    2014-12-01

    The significance of xylem function and metabolic scaling theory begins from the idea that water transport is strongly coupled to growth rate. At the same time, coordination of water transport and growth seemingly should differ between plant functional types. We evaluated the relationships between water transport, growth and species stature in six species of co-occurring trees and shrubs. Within species, a strong proportionality between plant hydraulic conductance (K), sap flow (Q) and shoot biomass growth (G) was generally supported. Across species, however, trees grew more for a given K or Q than shrubs, indicating greater growth-based water-use efficiency (WUE) in trees. Trees also showed slower decline in relative growth rate (RGR) than shrubs, equivalent to a steeper G by mass (M) scaling exponent in trees (0.77-0.98). The K and Q by M scaling exponents were common across all species (0.80, 0.82), suggesting that the steeper G scaling in trees reflects a size-dependent increase in their growth-based WUE. The common K and Q by M exponents were statistically consistent with the 0.75 of ideal scaling theory. A model based upon xylem anatomy and branching architecture consistently predicted the observed K by M scaling exponents but only when deviations from ideal symmetric branching were incorporated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Batch Growth of Chlorella Vulgaris CCALA 896 versus Semi-Continuous Regimen for Enhancing Oil-Rich Biomass Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigita Vaičiulytė

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to induce lipid accumulation in Chlorella cells by creating stressful growth conditions. Chlorella vulgaris CCALA 896 was grown under various batch growth modes in basal and modified BG-11 and Kolkwitz culture broths, using a continuous light regimen of 150 µE/m2/s, at 30 °C. In order to perform the experiments, two indoor photobioreactor shapes were used: a cylindrical glass photobioreactor (CGPBR with a working volume of 350 mL, and a flat glass photobioreactor (FGPBR with a working volume of 550 mL. Stress-eliciting conditions, such as nitrogen and phosphorous starvation, were imposed in order to induce lipid accumulation. The results demonstrated that more than 56% of the lipids can be accumulated in Chlorella biomass grown under two-phase batch growth conditions. The highest biomass productivity of 0.30 g/L/d was obtained at the highest nominal dilution rate (0.167 day−1 during a semi-continuous regimen, using a modified Kolkwitz medium. During the pH-stress cycles, the amount of lipids did not increase significantly and a flocculation of Chlorella cells was noted.

  3. Yield and grain quality of spring barley as affected by biomass formation at early growth stages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křen, J.; Klem, Karel; Svobodová, I.; Míša, P.; Neudert, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 5 (2014), s. 221-227 ISSN 1214-1178 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI111A133 Keywords : Hordeum vulgare L * above-ground biomass * tillering * grain yield formation * grain protein content Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2014

  4. Impact of thermal stress on the growth, size-distribution and biomass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports an in-vivo account of the impact of thermal stress on the biomass and sizedistribution of estuarine populations of Pachymelania aurita in Epe Lagoon, Nigeria. Off all physicochemical variables investigated only water temperature was statistically different among study stations. A total of 7626 individuals of ...

  5. Effects of simultaneous ozone exposure and nitrogen loads on carbohydrate concentrations, biomass, and growth of young spruce trees (Picea abies)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.F.D.; Braun, S.; Flueckiger, W.

    2005-01-01

    Spruce saplings were grown under different nitrogen fertilization regimes in eight chamberless fumigation systems, which were fumigated with either charcoal-filtered (F) or ambient air (O 3 ). After the third growing season trees were harvested for biomass and non-structural carbohydrate analysis. Nitrogen had an overall positive effect on the investigated plant parameters, resulting in increased shoot elongation, biomass production, fine root soluble carbohydrate concentrations, and also slightly increased starch concentrations of stems and roots. Only needle starch concentrations and fine root sugar alcohol concentrations were decreased. Ozone fumigation resulted in needle discolorations and affected most parameters negatively, including decreased shoot elongation and decreased starch concentrations in roots, stems, and needles. In fine roots, however, soluble carbohydrate concentrations remained unaffected or increased by ozone fumigation. The only significant interaction was an antagonistic effect on root starch concentrations, where higher nitrogen levels alleviated the negative impact of ozone. - Simultaneous ozone fumigation and nitrogen fertilization have no synergistic impacts on carbohydrate concentrations, biomass, or growth of Picea abies saplings

  6. Predicting tree biomass growth in the temperate-boreal ecotone: is tree size, age, competition or climate response most important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jane R.; Finley, Andrew O.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    As global temperatures rise, variation in annual climate is also changing, with unknown consequences for forest biomes. Growing forests have the ability to capture atmospheric CO2and thereby slow rising CO2 concentrations. Forests’ ongoing ability to sequester C depends on how tree communities respond to changes in climate variation. Much of what we know about tree and forest response to climate variation comes from tree-ring records. Yet typical tree-ring datasets and models do not capture the diversity of climate responses that exist within and among trees and species. We address this issue using a model that estimates individual tree response to climate variables while accounting for variation in individuals’ size, age, competitive status, and spatially structured latent covariates. Our model allows for inference about variance within and among species. We quantify how variables influence aboveground biomass growth of individual trees from a representative sample of 15 northern or southern tree species growing in a transition zone between boreal and temperate biomes. Individual trees varied in their growth response to fluctuating mean annual temperature and summer moisture stress. The variation among individuals within a species was wider than mean differences among species. The effects of mean temperature and summer moisture stress interacted, such that warm years produced positive responses to summer moisture availability and cool years produced negative responses. As climate models project significant increases in annual temperatures, growth of species likeAcer saccharum, Quercus rubra, and Picea glauca will vary more in response to summer moisture stress than in the past. The magnitude of biomass growth variation in response to annual climate was 92–95% smaller than responses to tree size and age. This means that measuring or predicting the physical structure of current and future forests could tell us more about future C dynamics than growth

  7. Effects of artificial defoliation on growth and biomass accumulation in short-rotation sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetton, Robert M; Robison, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Sweetgum, Liquidambar styraciflua L. (Hamamelidales: Hamamelidaceae), is a species of interest for short-rotation plantation forestry in the southeastern United States. Despite its high levels of resistance to many native insects and pathogens, the species is susceptible to generalist defoliators during outbreak epidemics. The objective of this field study was to evaluate the potential impact of defoliation on sweetgum growth and productivity within the context of an operational plantation. Over three growing seasons, trees were subjected to artificial defoliation treatments of various intensity (control = 0% defoliation; low intensity = 33% defoliation; moderate intensity = 67% defoliation; high intensity = 99% defoliation) and frequency (not defoliated; defoliated once in April of the first growing season; defoliated twice, once in April of the first growing season and again in April of the second growing season). The responses of stem height, stem diameter, stem volume, crown volume, total biomass accumulation, and branch growth were measured in November of each growing season. At the end of the first growing season, when trees had received single defoliations, significant reductions in all growth traits followed the most severe (99%) defoliation treatment only. After the second and third growing seasons, when trees had received one or two defoliations of varying intensity, stem diameter and volume and total tree biomass were reduced significantly by 67 and 99% defoliation, while reductions in stem height and crown volume followed the 99% treatment only. All growth traits other than crown volume were reduced significantly by two defoliations but not one defoliation. Results indicate that sweetgum is highly resilient to single defoliations of low, moderate, and high intensity. However, during the three-year period of the study, repeated high-intensity defoliation caused significant reductions in growth and productivity that could have lasting impacts on yield

  8. Predicting tree biomass growth in the temperate-boreal ecotone: Is tree size, age, competition, or climate response most important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jane R; Finley, Andrew O; D'Amato, Anthony W; Bradford, John B; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2016-06-01

    As global temperatures rise, variation in annual climate is also changing, with unknown consequences for forest biomes. Growing forests have the ability to capture atmospheric CO2 and thereby slow rising CO2 concentrations. Forests' ongoing ability to sequester C depends on how tree communities respond to changes in climate variation. Much of what we know about tree and forest response to climate variation comes from tree-ring records. Yet typical tree-ring datasets and models do not capture the diversity of climate responses that exist within and among trees and species. We address this issue using a model that estimates individual tree response to climate variables while accounting for variation in individuals' size, age, competitive status, and spatially structured latent covariates. Our model allows for inference about variance within and among species. We quantify how variables influence aboveground biomass growth of individual trees from a representative sample of 15 northern or southern tree species growing in a transition zone between boreal and temperate biomes. Individual trees varied in their growth response to fluctuating mean annual temperature and summer moisture stress. The variation among individuals within a species was wider than mean differences among species. The effects of mean temperature and summer moisture stress interacted, such that warm years produced positive responses to summer moisture availability and cool years produced negative responses. As climate models project significant increases in annual temperatures, growth of species like Acer saccharum, Quercus rubra, and Picea glauca will vary more in response to summer moisture stress than in the past. The magnitude of biomass growth variation in response to annual climate was 92-95% smaller than responses to tree size and age. This means that measuring or predicting the physical structure of current and future forests could tell us more about future C dynamics than growth responses

  9. Forest biomass carbon sinks in East Asia, with special reference to the relative contributions of forest expansion and forest growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingyun; Guo, Zhaodi; Hu, Huifeng; Kato, Tomomichi; Muraoka, Hiroyuki; Son, Yowhan

    2014-06-01

    Forests play an important role in regional and global carbon (C) cycles. With extensive afforestation and reforestation efforts over the last several decades, forests in East Asia have largely expanded, but the dynamics of their C stocks have not been fully assessed. We estimated biomass C stocks of the forests in all five East Asian countries (China, Japan, North Korea, South Korea, and Mongolia) between the 1970s and the 2000s, using the biomass expansion factor method and forest inventory data. Forest area and biomass C density in the whole region increased from 179.78 × 10(6) ha and 38.6 Mg C ha(-1) in the 1970s to 196.65 × 10(6) ha and 45.5 Mg C ha(-1) in the 2000s, respectively. The C stock increased from 6.9 Pg C to 8.9 Pg C, with an averaged sequestration rate of 66.9 Tg C yr(-1). Among the five countries, China and Japan were two major contributors to the total region's forest C sink, with respective contributions of 71.1% and 32.9%. In China, the areal expansion of forest land was a larger contributor to C sinks than increased biomass density for all forests (60.0% vs. 40.0%) and for planted forests (58.1% vs. 41.9%), while the latter contributed more than the former for natural forests (87.0% vs. 13.0%). In Japan, increased biomass density dominated the C sink for all (101.5%), planted (91.1%), and natural (123.8%) forests. Forests in South Korea also acted as a C sink, contributing 9.4% of the total region's sink because of increased forest growth (98.6%). Compared to these countries, the reduction in forest land in both North Korea and Mongolia caused a C loss at an average rate of 9.0 Tg C yr(-1), equal to 13.4% of the total region's C sink. Over the last four decades, the biomass C sequestration by East Asia's forests offset 5.8% of its contemporary fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Tree growth, biomass, allometry and nutrient distribution in Gmelina arborea stands grown in red lateritic soils of Central India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swamy, S.L.; Kushwaha, S.K.; Puri, S. [Indira Gandhi Agricultural Univ., Raipur (India). Dept. of Forestry

    2004-04-01

    A chronosequence of Gmelina arborea Roxb. stands ranging from 1 to 6 years old was measured to document changes in growth, biomass and nutrient (N, P and K) contents for three red lateritic sites in Chhattisgarh, India. The stand's density, survival and growth parameters (DBH, total height, crown diameter and number of branches) varied significantly with age and site. The number of stems was highest (789 trees/ha) in a 1-year-old plantation at site 3 (Kusumi) and lowest (724 trees/ha) in a 6-year-old stand at site 2 (Anandgoan). Allometric equations for stem wood, branches, leaves and roots to tree diameter at breast height were developed to estimate above ground and below ground tree biomass. The total biomass ranged from 3.9 Mg ha{sup -1} in 1-year-old to 53.7 Mg ha{sup -1} in 6-year-old stand. The stem wood contributed from 55.3% (site 3) to 56.3% (site 1), branch wood from 18.3% (site 2) to 19.8% (site 3), roots from 17.9% (site 3) to 18.5% (site 2) and foliage from 6.6% (site 2) to 7.0% (site 3) of the total biomass. The growth and biomass production were poor from establishment to 3 years age and it increased by 1.5-2 times as the plantation aged from 4-6 years. Nutrient accumulation in tree biomass increased with stand age, following the pattern of biomass accumulation. The total nitrogen accumulation in 6-year-old stands at three sites ranged from 212.9 to 279.5 kg ha{sup -1} with a mean annual storage of 238.4 kg ha{sup -1} and total K ranged from 170.8 to 220.5 kg ha{sup -1} with a mean annual storage of 189.9 kg ha{sup -1} Phosphorous storage was lowest which ranged from 15.0 to 19.6 kg ha{sup -1} with a mean storage of 16.8 kg ha{sup -1} The organic matter and nutrients in the soils improved significantly after 6 years of planting. Available N enhanced by 14.9%, 12.0% and 11.3%, K by 10.0%, 9.1% and 10.6%, whereas phosphorous declined by 2.6%, 23.0% and 20.0%, respectively, at soil depths of 0-20, 21-40 and 41-60 cm. The paper discusses the

  11. Comparative Secretome Analysis of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger during Growth on Sugarcane Biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Pagotto Borin

    Full Text Available Our dependence on fossil fuel sources and concern about the environment has generated a worldwide interest in establishing new sources of fuel and energy. Thus, the use of ethanol as a fuel is advantageous because it is an inexhaustible energy source and has minimal environmental impact. Currently, Brazil is the world's second largest producer of ethanol, which is produced from sugarcane juice fermentation. However, several studies suggest that Brazil could double its production per hectare by using sugarcane bagasse and straw, known as second-generation (2G bioethanol. Nevertheless, the use of this biomass presents a challenge because the plant cell wall structure, which is composed of complex sugars (cellulose and hemicelluloses, must be broken down into fermentable sugar, such as glucose and xylose. To achieve this goal, several types of hydrolytic enzymes are necessary, and these enzymes represent the majority of the cost associated with 2G bioethanol processing. Reducing the cost of the saccharification process can be achieved via a comprehensive understanding of the hydrolytic mechanisms and enzyme secretion of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing microorganisms. In many natural habitats, several microorganisms degrade lignocellulosic biomass through a set of enzymes that act synergistically. In this study, two fungal species, Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei, were grown on sugarcane biomass with two levels of cell wall complexity, culm in natura and pretreated bagasse. The production of enzymes related to biomass degradation was monitored using secretome analyses after 6, 12 and 24 hours. Concurrently, we analyzed the sugars in the supernatant.Analyzing the concentration of monosaccharides in the supernatant, we observed that both species are able to disassemble the polysaccharides of sugarcane cell walls since 6 hours post-inoculation. The sugars from the polysaccharides such as arabinoxylan and β-glucan (that compose the most external

  12. The effect of water availability on plastic responses and biomass allocation in early growth traits of Pinus radiata D. Don

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Espinoza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of water availability on plastic responses and biomass allocation in early growth traits of Pinus radiata D. Don.Area of study: Seedlings of 69 families of P. radiata belonging to five different sites in Central Chile, ranging from coastal range to fothills of the Andes, were grown in controlled conditions to evaluate differences in response to watering.Material and methods: The seedlings were subjected to two watering regimes: well-watered treatment, in which seedlings were watered daily, and water stress treatment in which seedlings were subjected to three cyclic water deficits by watering to container capacity on 12 days cycles each. After twenty-eight weeks root collar diameter, height, shoot dry weight (stem + needles, root dry weight, total dry weight, height/diameter ratio and root/shoot ratio were recorded. Patterns and amounts of phenotypic changes, including changes in biomass allocation, were analyzed.Main results: Families from coastal sites presented high divergence for phenotypic changes, allocating more biomass to shoots, and those families from interior sites presented low phenotypic plasticity, allocating more biomass to roots at the expense of shoots. These changes are interpreted as a plastic response and leads to the conclusion that the local landrace of P. radiata in Chile originating from contrasting environments possess distinct morphological responses to water deficit which in turn leads to phenotypic plasticity.Research highlights: Families belonging to sandy soil sites must be considered for tree breeding in dry areas, selecting those with high root: shoot ratio.Key words: early testing; environmental interaction; ontogeny; plasticity index; water stress.

  13. Ab initio calculations and kinetic modeling of thermal conversion of methyl chloride: implications for gasification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Mallika; Rasmussen, Morten Lund; Hashemi, Hamid; Wu, Hao; Glarborg, Peter; Pelucchi, Matteo; Faravelli, Tiziano; Marshall, Paul

    2018-01-24

    Limitations in current hot gas cleaning methods for chlorine species from biomass gasification may be a challenge for end use such as gas turbines, engines, and fuel cells, all requiring very low levels of chlorine. During devolatilization of biomass, chlorine is released partly as methyl chloride. In the present work, the thermal conversion of CH 3 Cl under gasification conditions was investigated. A detailed chemical kinetic model for pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl chloride was developed and validated against selected experimental data from the literature. Key reactions of CH 2 Cl with O 2 and C 2 H 4 for which data are scarce were studied by ab initio methods. The model was used to analyze the fate of methyl chloride in gasification processes. The results indicate that CH 3 Cl emissions will be negligible for most gasification technologies, but could be a concern for fluidized bed gasifiers, in particular in low-temperature gasification. The present work illustrates how ab initio theory and chemical kinetic modeling can help to resolve emission issues for thermal processes in industrial scale.

  14. Study on grain growth of fine grained WC-Co hardmetal by numerical calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, N. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Hayashi, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of industrial Science

    2000-12-15

    This paper reviews our simulation study by numerical calculation based on two-, three- and multi-grain-size models on WC grain growth in fine grained WC-Co hardmetal doped with VC. The study aimed to presume or predict the following: (1) the cause and conditions for the abnormal grain growth which occurs in some cases in the fine grained hardmetal prepared from fine WC powders with mean grain size below about 0.2{mu}m, and (2) how the mean grain size of the hardmetal varies with decreasing mean grain size of the WC starting powder to 0.1 pm or nano-meter size. The calculation results by these three kinds of models suggested the following, respectively: (1) the occurrence of the abnormal grain growth is generally substantial for WC starting powder with bimodal size-distribution and mean gram size below 0.1 - 0.2{mu}m, and not due to the non-uniform distribution of the grain growth inhibitor, (2) the introduction of middle grains caused the disappearance of small (fine) grains during sintering, leading to abruptly increase of the mean grain size of alloy, and (3) the mean grain size of alloy becomes so large as about 0.3 - 0.4{mu}m, even when the WC starting powders with nano-size as well as 0.1 {mu}m are used. (author)

  15. Growth responses, biomass partitioning, and nitrogen isotopes of prairie legumes in response to elevated temperature and varying nitrogen source in a growth chamber experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Heather R; Deede, Laura; Powers, Jennifer S

    2012-05-01

    Because legumes can add nitrogen (N) to ecosystems through symbiotic fixation, they play important roles in many plant communities, such as prairies and grasslands. However, very little research has examined the effect of projected climate change on legume growth and function. Our goal was to study the effects of temperature on growth, nodulation, and N chemistry of prairie legumes and determine whether these effects are mediated by source of N. We grew seedlings of Amorpha canescens, Dalea purpurea, Lespedeza capitata, and Lupinus perennis at 25/20°C (day/night) or 28/23°C with and without rhizobia and mineral N in controlled-environment growth chambers. Biomass, leaf area, nodule number and mass, and shoot N concentration and δ(15)N values were measured after 12 wk of growth. Both temperature and N-source affected responses in a species-specific manner. Lespedeza showed increased growth and higher shoot N content at 28°C. Lupinus showed decreases in nodulation and lower shoot N concentration at 28°C. The effect of temperature on shoot N concentration occurred only in individuals whose sole N source was N(2)-fixation, but there was no effect of temperature on δ(15)N values in these plants. Elevated temperature enhanced seedling growth of some species, while inhibiting nodulation in another. Temperature-induced shifts in legume composition or nitrogen dynamics may be another potential mechanism through which climate change affects unmanaged ecosystems.

  16. Growth, biomass, and production of two small barbs (Barbus humilis and B. tanapelagius, Cyprinidae) and their role in the food web of Lake Tana (Ethiopia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejen, E.; Vijverberg, J.; Nagelkerke, L.A.J.; Sibbing, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Growth, biomass and production of two small barbs (Barbus humilis and Barbus tanapelagius) and their role in the food web of Lake Tana were investigated. From length–frequency distribution of trawl monitoring surveys growth coefficient, F' values were estimated at 3.71–4.17 for B. humilis and

  17. Growth, biomass, and production of two small barbs (Barbus humilis and B. tanapelagius, Cyprinidae) and their role in the food web of Lake Tana (Ethiopia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejen, E.; Vijverberg, J.; Nagelkerke, L.A.J.; Sibbing, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Growth, biomass and production of two small barbs (Barbus humilis and Barbus tanapelagius) and their role in the food web of Lake Tana were investigated. From length–frequency distribution of trawl monitoring surveys growth coefficient, Φ′ values were estimated at 3.71–4.17 for B. humilis and

  18. Effect of growth regulator Kelpak SL on the formation of aboveground biomass of Festulolium braunii (K. Richt. A. Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Sosnowski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the cultivation of Festulolium braunii cv. 'Felopa' was carried out using polyurethane rings with a diameter of 36 cm and a height of 40 cm, which were sunk into the ground to a depth of 30 cm and filled with soil material. In this experiment, Kelpak SL was used as a bioregulator. It consists of natural plant hormones such as auxins (11 mg in dm3 and cytokinins (0.03 mg in dm3. The experimental factors were as follows: A1-control; A2 – 20% solution of the growth regulator; A3 – 40% solution; and A4 – 60% solution. The preparation was applied to all three regrowths in the form of spray, at a rate of 3 cm3 ring-1, at the stem elongation stage. The full period of this experiment was in the years 2010–2011. During this time, detailed investigations were carried out on aboveground biomass yield (g DM ring-1, number of shoots (pcs ring-1, leaf blade length (cm, width of the leaf blade base (mm, leaf greenness index (SPAD. The study showed a significant effect of the growth regulator on the formation of Festulolium braunii biomass. However, its highest effectiveness was observed when the 60% solution was applied.

  19. Influence of growth regulators in biomass production and volatile profile of in vitro plantlets of Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affonso, Vanessa Ribeiro; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Lage, Celso Luiz Salgueiro; Sato, Alice

    2009-07-22

    In vitro shoots of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) were established, and the effects of the auxin indole-3-acetic (IAA) acid and the cytokinins benzyladenine (BA), zeatin (ZEA), and kinetin (KIN) at 1.0, 5.0, and 10.0 microM on rooting, biomass production, and volatile compounds production by these plants were investigated. The volatiles were extracted by solid phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography. The highest biomass shoot growth was obtained with BA at 5.0 microM, while IAA at all concentrations tested achieved 100% rooting frequency. The three major compounds were gamma-terpinene (22.8-38.8%), p-cymene (13.8-27.9%), and thymol (6.5-29.0%). Quantitative changes of these compounds were observed in response to the effect of varying growth regulators concentrations in the culture medium. Growing Thymus vulgaris L. plants in media supplemented with IAA at 1.0 microM increased volatile compounds such as thymol by 315%. Nevertheless, the same major compounds were produced in all treatments and no qualitative changes were observed in the volatile profile of thyme plants.

  20. Radiocarbon Analysis to Calculate New End-Member Values for Biomass Burning Source Samples Specific to the Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.; Fairley, D.; Sheesley, R. J.; Tang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental carbon (EC), also known as black carbon or soot, is an important particulate air pollutant that contributes to climate forcing through absorption of solar radiation and to adverse human health impacts through inhalation. Both fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, via residential firewood burning, agricultural burning, wild fires, and controlled burns, are significant sources of EC. Our ability to successfully control ambient EC concentrations requires understanding the contribution of these different emission sources. Radiocarbon (14C) analysis has been increasingly used as an apportionment tool to distinguish between EC from fossil fuel and biomass combustion sources. However, there are uncertainties associated with this method including: 1) uncertainty associated with the isolation of EC to be used for radiocarbon analysis (e.g., inclusion of organic carbon, blank contamination, recovery of EC, etc.) 2) uncertainty associated with the radiocarbon signature of the end member. The objective of this research project is to utilize laboratory experiments to evaluate some of these uncertainties, particularly for EC sources that significantly impact the San Francisco Bay Area. Source samples of EC only and a mix of EC and organic carbon (OC) were produced for this study to represent known emission sources and to approximate the mixing of EC and OC that would be present in the atmosphere. These samples include a combination of methane flame soot, various wood smoke samples (i.e. cedar, oak, sugar pine, pine at various ages, etc.), meat cooking, and smoldering cellulose smoke. EC fractions were isolated using a Sunset Laboratory's thermal optical transmittance carbon analyzer. For 14C analysis, samples were sent to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for isotope analysis using an accelerated mass spectrometry. End member values and uncertainties for the EC isolation utilizing this method will be reported.

  1. A Comparison Study of Machine Learning Based Algorithms for Fatigue Crack Growth Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxun; Zhang, Weifang; Sun, Fuqiang; Zhang, Wei

    2017-05-18

    The relationships between the fatigue crack growth rate ( d a / d N ) and stress intensity factor range ( Δ K ) are not always linear even in the Paris region. The stress ratio effects on fatigue crack growth rate are diverse in different materials. However, most existing fatigue crack growth models cannot handle these nonlinearities appropriately. The machine learning method provides a flexible approach to the modeling of fatigue crack growth because of its excellent nonlinear approximation and multivariable learning ability. In this paper, a fatigue crack growth calculation method is proposed based on three different machine learning algorithms (MLAs): extreme learning machine (ELM), radial basis function network (RBFN) and genetic algorithms optimized back propagation network (GABP). The MLA based method is validated using testing data of different materials. The three MLAs are compared with each other as well as the classical two-parameter model ( K * approach). The results show that the predictions of MLAs are superior to those of K * approach in accuracy and effectiveness, and the ELM based algorithms show overall the best agreement with the experimental data out of the three MLAs, for its global optimization and extrapolation ability.

  2. Xylose isomerase improves growth and ethanol production rates from biomass sugars for both Saccharomyces pastorianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristen P; Gowtham, Yogender Kumar; Henson, J Michael; Harcum, Sarah W

    2012-01-01

    The demand for biofuel ethanol made from clean, renewable nonfood sources is growing. Cellulosic biomass, such as switch grass (Panicum virgatum L.), is an alternative feedstock for ethanol production; however, cellulosic feedstock hydrolysates contain high levels of xylose, which needs to be converted to ethanol to meet economic feasibility. In this study, the effects of xylose isomerase on cell growth and ethanol production from biomass sugars representative of switch grass were investigated using low cell density cultures. The lager yeast species Saccharomyces pastorianus was grown with immobilized xylose isomerase in the fermentation step to determine the impact of the glucose and xylose concentrations on the ethanol production rates. Ethanol production rates were improved due to xylose isomerase; however, the positive effect was not due solely to the conversion of xylose to xylulose. Xylose isomerase also has glucose isomerase activity, so to better understand the impact of the xylose isomerase on S. pastorianus, growth and ethanol production were examined in cultures provided fructose as the sole carbon. It was observed that growth and ethanol production rates were higher for the fructose cultures with xylose isomerase even in the absence of xylose. To determine whether the positive effects of xylose isomerase extended to other yeast species, a side-by-side comparison of S. pastorianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was conducted. These comparisons demonstrated that the xylose isomerase increased ethanol productivity for both the yeast species by increasing the glucose consumption rate. These results suggest that xylose isomerase can contribute to improved ethanol productivity, even without significant xylose conversion. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  3. Thinning increases understory diversity and biomass, and improves soil properties without decreasing growth of Chinese fir in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Cai, Liping; He, Zongming; Wang, Rongwei; Wu, Pengfei; Ma, Xiangqing

    2016-12-01

    Sustainable forestry requires adopting more ecosystem-informed perspectives. Tree thinning improves forest productivity by encouraging the development of the understory, which in turn improves species diversity and nutrient cycling, thereby altering the ecophysiological environment of the stand. This study aimed to quantify tree growth, understory vegetation, and soil quality of 9- and 16-year-old Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) plantations in South China, 1-7 years after pre-commercial thinning. The quadratic mean diameter (QMD) and individual tree volume were greatly increased and compensated for the reduced stand yield in thinned stands. In 2011, the stand volume in unthinned and thinned stands were 276.33 and 226.46 and 251.30 and 243.64 m 3  ha -1 , respectively, for young and middle stage. Therefore, we predicted that over time, the stand volume in thinned stands should exceed that in unthinned stands. The composition, diversity, and biomass of understory vegetation of the plantation monocultures significantly increased after thinning. The effects of thinning management on understory development were dynamic and apparent within 1-2 years post-thinning. Some light-demanding plant species such as Styrax faberi, Callicarpa formosana, Lophatherum gracile, and Gahnia tristis emerged in the shrub and herb layer and became dominant with the larger gaps in the canopy in thinned stands. The trigger effects of thinning management on understory and tree growth were more pronounced in the young stage. The beneficial effects on soil physical and chemical properties were measurable at later stages (7 years after thinning). The strong positive relationship between understory biomass and volume increment (at the tree and stand levels) indicated that understory improvement after thinning did not restrict productivity within Chinese fir stands but rather, benefited soil water content and nutrient status and promoted tree growth.

  4. Salinity Reduction and Biomass Accumulation in Hydroponic Growth of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacerda, Laís Pessôa; Lange, Liséte Celina; Costa França, Marcel Giovanni; Zonta, Everaldo

    2015-01-01

    In many of the world's semi-arid and arid regions, the increase in demand for good quality water associated with the gradual and irreversible salinisation of the soil and water have raised the development of techniques that facilitate the safe use of brackish and saline waters for agronomic purposes. This study aimed to evaluate the salinity reduction of experimental saline solutions through the ions uptake capability of purslane (Portulaca oleracea), as well as its biomass accumulation. The hydroponic system used contained three different nutrient solutions composed of fixed concentrations of macro and micronutrients to which three different concentrations of sodium chloride had been added. Two conditions were tested, clipped and intact plants. It was observed that despite there being a notable removal of magnesium and elevated biomass accumulation, especially in the intact plants, purslane did not present the expected removal quantity of sodium and chloride. We confirmed that in the research conditions of the present study, purslane is a saline-tolerant species but accumulation of sodium and chloride was not shown as previously described in the literature.

  5. Use of green fluorescent protein to monitor fungal growth in biomass hydrolysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was introduced into the Ascomycete Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616, and fluorescence of cultures was monitored as a measure of cell growth. Fluorescence in the GFP-expressing strain was measured during growth of cells in defined and complex media as well as in the liq...

  6. Chaparral growth-ring analysis as an indicator of stand biomass development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellie A. Uyeda; Douglas A. Stow; John F. O' Leary; Christina Tague; Philip J. Riggan

    2016-01-01

    Chaparral wildfires typically create even-aged stands of vegetation that grow quickly in the first 2 decades following a fire. Patterns of this growth are important for understanding ecosystem productivity and re-establishment success, but are logistically challenging to measure over long time periods. We tested the utility of a novel method of using shrub growth rings...

  7. Assessing the fate of nutrients and carbon in the bioenergy chain through the modeling of biomass growth and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Jessica; Fortin, Mathieu; Patisson, Fabrice; Dufour, Anthony

    2014-12-02

    A forest growth model was coupled to a model of combined heat and power (CHP) production in a gasification plant developed in Aspen Plus. For a given production, this integrated forest-to-energy model made it possible to predict the annual flows in wood biomass, carbon, and nutrients, including N, S, P, and K, from the forest to the air emissions (NOx, SOx, PAH, etc.) and ash flows. We simulated the bioenergy potential of pure even-aged high-forest stands of European beech, an abundant forest type in Northeastern France. Two forest management practices were studied, a standard-rotation and a shorter-rotation scenario, along with two wood utilizations: with or without fine woody debris (FWD) harvesting. FWD harvesting tended to reduce the forested area required to supply the CHP by 15–22% since larger amounts of energy wood were available for the CHP process, especially in the short-rotation scenario. Because less biomass was harvested, the short-rotation scenario with FWD decreased the nutrient exports per hectare and year by 4–21% compared to standard practices but increased the amount of N, S, and P in the CHP process by 2–9%. This increase in the input nutrient flows had direct consequences on the inorganic air emissions, thus leading to additional NOx and SO2 emissions. This model is a valuable tool for assessing the life cycle inventories of the entire bioenergy chain.

  8. Spatial relationship of biomass and species distribution in an old-growth Pseudotsuga Tsuga forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiquan Chen; Bo Song; Mark Rudnicki; Melinda Moeur; Ken Bible; Malcolm North; Dave C. Shaw; Jerry F. Franklin; Dave M. Braun

    2003-01-01

    Old-growth forests are known for their complex and variable structure and function. In a 12-ha plot (300 m x 400 m) of an old-growth Douglas-fir forest within the T.T. Munger Research Natural Area in southern Washington, we mapped and recorded live/dead condition, species, and diameter at breast height to address the following objectives: (1) to quantify the...

  9. Landsat Time-series for the Masses: Predicting Wood Biomass Growth from Tree-rings Using Departures from Mean Phenology in Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. R.; D'Amato, A. W.; Itter, M.; Reinikainen, M.; Curzon, M.

    2017-12-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is perturbed when disturbances remove leaf biomass from the forest canopy during the growing season. Changes in foliar biomass arise from defoliation caused by insects, disease, drought, frost or human management. As ephemeral disturbances, these often go undetected and their significance to models that predict forest growth from climatic drivers remains unknown. Here, we seek to distinguish the roles of weather vs. canopy disturbance on forest growth by using dense Landsat time-series to quantify departures in mean phenology that in turn predict changes in leaf biomass. We estimated a foliar biomass index (FBMI) from 1984-2016, and predict plot-level wood growth over 28 years on 156 tree-ring monitoring plots in Minnesota, USA. We accessed the entire Landsat archive (sensors 4, 5 & 7) to compute FBMI using Google Earth Engine's cloud computing platform (GEE). GEE allows this pixel-level approach to be applied at any location; a feature we demonstrate with published wood-growth data from flux tower sites. Our Bayesian models predicted biomass changes from tree-ring plots as a function of Landsat FBMI and annual climate data. We expected model parameters to vary by tree functional groups defined by differences in xylem anatomy and leaf longevity, two traits with linkages to phenology, as reported in a recent review. We found that Landsat FBMI was a surprisingly strong predictor of aggregate wood-growth, explaining up to 80% of annual growth variation for some deciduous plots. Growth responses to canopy disturbance varied among tree functional groups, and the importance of some seasonal climate metrics diminished or changed sign when FBMI was included (e.g. fall and spring climatic water deficit), while others remained unchanged (current and lagged summer deficit). Insights emerging from these models can clear up sources of persistent uncertainty and open a new frontier for models of forest productivity.

  10. Biomass potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, D. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Biomass resources of the industrialised countries are enormous, if only a small fraction of set-aside fields were used for energy crops. Forest resources could also be utilised more efficiently than at present for large-scale energy production. The energy content of the annual net growth of the total wood biomass is estimated to be 180 million toe in Europe without the former USSR, and about 50 million toe of that in the EC area, in 1990. Presently, the harvesting methods of forest biomass for energy production are not yet generally competitive. Among the most promising methods are integrated harvesting methods, which supply both raw material to the industry and wood fuel for energy production. Several new methods for separate harvesting of energy wood are being developed in many countries. (orig.)

  11. Kinetic parameters of biomass growth in a UASB reactor treating wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Milton Montenegro Campos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the treatment of wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP in an anaerobic treatment system at a laboratory scale. The system included an acidification/equalization tank (AET, a heat exchanger, an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASB, a gas equalization device and a gas meter. The minimum and maximum flow rates and volumetric organic loadings rate (VOLR were 0.004 to 0.037 m 3 d -1 and 0.14 to 20.29 kgCOD m -3 d -1 , respectively. The kinetic parameters measured during the anaerobic biodegradation of the WCWP, with a minimal concentration of phenolic compounds of 50 mg L - ¹, were: Y = 0.37 mgTVS (mgCODremoved -1 , Kd = 0.0075 d-1 , Ks = 1.504mg L -1 , μmax = 0.2 d -1 . The profile of sludge in the reactor showed total solids (TS values from 22,296 to 55,895 mg L -1 and TVS 11,853 to 41,509 mg L -1 , demonstrating a gradual increase of biomass in the reactor during the treatment, even in the presence of phenolic compounds in the concentration already mentioned.

  12. Ex situ growth and biomass of Populus bioenergy crops irrigated and fertilized with landfill leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Edmund O. Bauer; Donald E. Riemenschneider

    2009-01-01

    Merging traditional intensive forestry with waste management offers dual goals of fiber and bioenergy production, along with environmental benefits such as soil/water remediation and carbon sequestration. As part of an ongoing effort to acquire data about initial genotypic performance, we evaluated: (1) the early aboveground growth of trees belonging to currently...

  13. Assessing wheat yield, Biomass, and water productivity responses to growth stage based irrigation water allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing irrigated wheat yields is important to the overall profitability of limited-irrigation cropping systems in western Kansas. A simulation study was conducted to (1) validate APSIM's (Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator) ability to simulate wheat growth and yield in Kansas, and (2) app...

  14. Changes in biomass allocation buffer low CO2effects on tree growth during the last glaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqi; Gerhart, Laci M; Harrison, Sandy P; Ward, Joy K; Harris, John M; Prentice, I Colin

    2017-02-24

    Isotopic measurements on junipers growing in southern California during the last glacial, when the ambient atmospheric [CO 2 ] (c a ) was ~180 ppm, show the leaf-internal [CO 2 ] (c i ) was approaching the modern CO 2 compensation point for C 3 plants. Despite this, stem growth rates were similar to today. Using a coupled light-use efficiency and tree growth model, we show that it is possible to maintain a stable c i /c a ratio because both vapour pressure deficit and temperature were decreased under glacial conditions at La Brea, and these have compensating effects on the c i /c a ratio. Reduced photorespiration at lower temperatures would partly mitigate the effect of low c i on gross primary production, but maintenance of present-day radial growth also requires a ~27% reduction in the ratio of fine root mass to leaf area. Such a shift was possible due to reduced drought stress under glacial conditions at La Brea. The necessity for changes in allocation in response to changes in [CO 2 ] is consistent with increased below-ground allocation, and the apparent homoeostasis of radial growth, as c a increases today.

  15. Effects of precipitation changes on switchgrass photosynthesis, growth, and biomass: A mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate changes, including chronic changes in precipitation amounts, will influence plant physiology and growth. However, such precipitation effects on switchgrass, a major bioenergy crop, have not been well investigated. We conducted a two-year precipitation simulation experiment using large pots...

  16. A structurally based analytic model of growth and biomass dynamics in single species stands of conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Tausch

    2015-01-01

    A theoretically based analytic model of plant growth in single species conifer communities based on the species fully occupying a site and fully using the site resources is introduced. Model derivations result in a single equation simultaneously describes changes over both, different site conditions (or resources available), and over time for each variable for each...

  17. Polarized matrix infrared spectra of cyclopentadienone: observations, calculations, and assignment for an important intermediate in combustion and biomass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Thomas K; Scheer, Adam M; Nimlos, Mark R; Robichaud, David J; Daily, John W; Stanton, John F; Ellison, G Barney

    2014-01-30

    A detailed vibrational analysis of the infrared spectra of cyclopentadienone (C5H4═O) in rare gas matrices has been carried out. Ab initio coupled-cluster anharmonic force field calculations were used to guide the assignments. Flash pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulfite (C6H4O2SO) was used to provide a molecular beam of C5H4═O entrained in a rare gas carrier. The beam was interrogated with time-of-flight photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS), confirming the clean, intense production of C5H4═O. Matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy coupled with 355 nm polarized UV for photoorientation and linear dichroism experiments was used to determine the symmetries of the vibrations. Cyclopentadienone has 24 fundamental vibrational modes, Γvib = 9a1 ⊕ 3a2 ⊕ 4b1 ⊕ 8b2. Using vibrational perturbation theory and a deperturbation-diagonalization method, we report assignments of the following fundamental modes (cm(-1)) in a 4 K neon matrix: the a1 modes of X̃ (1)A1 C5H4═O are found to be ν1 = 3107, ν2 = (3100, 3099), ν3 = 1735, ν5 = 1333, ν7 = 952, ν8 = 843, and ν9 = 651; the inferred a2 modes are ν10 = 933, and ν11 = 722; the b1 modes are ν13 = 932, ν14 = 822, and ν15 = 629; the b2 fundamentals are ν17 = 3143, ν18 = (3078, 3076) ν19 = (1601 or 1595), ν20 = 1283, ν21 = 1138, ν22 = 1066, ν23 = 738, and ν24 = 458. The modes ν4 and ν6 were too weak to be detected, ν12 is dipole-forbidden and its position cannot be inferred from combination and overtone bands, and ν16 is below our detection range (calculations, assigned as two quantum transitions, and used to assign some of the weak and infrared inactive fundamental vibrations.

  18. Influence of mechanical disintegration on the microbial growth of aerobic sludge biomass: A comparative study of ultrasonic and shear gap homogenizers by oxygen uptake measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divyalakshmi, P; Murugan, D; Sivarajan, M; Saravanan, P; Lajapathi Rai, C

    2015-11-01

    Wastewater treatment plant incorporates physical, chemical and biological processes to treat and remove the contaminants. The main drawback of conventional activated sludge process is the huge production of excess sludge, which is an unavoidable byproduct. The treatment and disposal of excess sludge costs about 60% of the total operating cost. The ideal way to reduce excess sludge production during wastewater treatment is by preventing biomass formation within the aerobic treatment train rather than post treatment of the generated sludge. In the present investigation two different mechanical devices namely, Ultrasonic and Shear Gap homogenizers have been employed to disintegrate the aerobic biomass. This study is intended to restrict the multiplication of microbial biomass and at the same time degrade the organics present in wastewater by increasing the oxidative capacity of microorganisms. The disintegrability on biomass was determined by biochemical methods. Degree of inactivation provides the information on inability of microorganisms to consume oxygen upon disruption. The soluble COD quantifies the extent of release of intra cellular compounds. The participation of disintegrated microorganism in wastewater treatment process was carried out in two identical respirometeric reactors. The results show that Ultrasonic homogenizer is very effective in the disruption of microorganisms leading to a maximum microbial growth reduction of 27%. On the other hand, Shear gap homogenizer does not favor the sludge growth reduction rather it facilitates the growth. This study also shows that for better microbial growth reduction, floc size reduction alone is not sufficient but also microbial disruption is essential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced biomass production of duckweeds by inoculating a plant growth-promoting bacterium, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23, in sterile medium and non-sterile environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, T; Kuroda, M; Ogata, Y; Hachiya, Y; Quach, A; Tokura, K; Tanaka, Y; Mori, K; Morikawa, M; Ike, M

    2017-09-01

    Duckweed offers the promise of a co-benefit culture combining water purification with biomass production. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium isolated from a duckweed, Lemna aequinoctialis. This study quantified its growth-promoting effect on three duckweeds (L. aoukikusa, L. minor, and Spirodela polyrhiza) in sterile Hoagland solution and evaluated its usefulness in duckweed culture under non-sterile conditions. P23 promoted growth of three duckweeds in sterile Hoagland solution at low to high nutrient concentrations (1.25-10 mg NO 3 -N/L and 0.25-2.0 mg PO 4 -P/L). It increased the biomass production of L. aequinoctialis 3.8-4.3-fold, of L. minor 2.3-3.3-fold, and of S. polyrhiza 1.4-1.5-fold after 7 days compared with noninoculated controls. P23 also increased the biomass production of L. minor 2.4-fold in pond water and 1.7-fold in secondary effluent of a sewage treatment plant under non-sterile conditions at laboratory-scale experiments. P23 rescued L. minor from growth inhibition caused by microorganisms indigenous to the pond water. The results demonstrate that the use of P23 in duckweed culture can improve the efficiency of duckweed biomass production, and a positive effect of P23 on duckweed-based wastewater treatment can be assumed.

  20. Impact of mine waste dumps on growth and biomass of economically important crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiyazhagan, Narayanan; Natarajan, Devarajan

    2012-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of magnesite and bauxite waste dumps on growth and biochemical parameters of some edible and economically important plants such as Vigna radiata, V. mungo, V. unguiculata, Eleusine coracana, Cajanus cajan, Pennisetum glaucum, Macrotyloma uniflorum, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolour, Sesamum indicum, Ricinus communis, Brassica juncea, Gossypium hirsutum and Jatropha curcas. The growth rate of all the crops was observed in the range of 75 to 100% in magnesite and 15 to 100% in bauxite mine soil. The moisture content of roots and shoots of all the crops were in the range of 24 to 77, 20 to 88% and 42 to 87, 59 to 88% respectively. The height of the crops was in the range of 2.6 to 48 cm in magnesite soil and 3 to 33 cm in bauxite soil. Thus the study shows that both mine soils reflects some physical and biomolecule impact on selected crops.

  1. Diameter Growth, Biological Rotation Age and Biomass of Chinese Fir in Burning and Clearing Site Preparations in Subtropical China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustained forest management of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Chinese fir plantations in subtropical China is restricted by the limited availability of quantitative data. This study combines inventory data and tree-ring analysis of Chinese fir from natural and plantation forests that were subjected to controlled burning or brush clearing site preparations. Inter-annual variation of Chinese fir tree-ring widths were measured for the controlled burning, brush clearing and natural forest sites. The mean annual diametric growth of Chinese fir was 0.56 cm·year−1 for the natural forest, 0.80 cm·year−1 for the brush clearing site and 1.10 cm·year−1 for the controlled burning site. The time needed to reach the minimum cutting/logging diameter of 15 cm was 14 years in the controlled burning site, 19 years in the brush clearing site and >40 years in the natural forest. The biological rotation ages for the burning, cutting and natural forest sites were 15, 26 and >100 years, respectively. The total aboveground biomasses for the burning and clearing sites were 269.8 t·ha−1 and 252 t·ha−1, respectively. These results suggest that the current 25-year cutting cycle greatly underestimates the growth rate of Chinese fir plantations.

  2. Effect of indigo dye effluent on the growth, biomass production and phenotypic plasticity of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Chlorococcales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Mathias A; Musa, Rilwan I

    2014-03-01

    The effect of indigo dye effluent on the freshwater microalga Scenedesmus quadricauda ABU12 was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. The microalga was exposed to different concentrations of the effluent obtained by diluting the dye effluent from 100 to 175 times in bold basal medium (BBM). The growth rate of the microalga decreased as indigo dye effluent concentration increased (p indigo dye effluent concentration, their levels were higher at low effluent concentrations (p dye effluent concentration. A shift from large to small coenobia with increasing indigo dye effluent concentration was obtained. We conclude that even at low concentrations; effluents from textile industrial processes that use indigo dye are capable of significantly reducing the growth and biomass production, in addition to altering the morphological characteristics of the freshwater microalga S. quadricauda. The systematic reduction in the number of cells per coenobium observed in this study further confirms that environmental stress affects coenobium structure in the genus Scenedesmus, which means it can be considered an important biomarker for toxicity testing.

  3. Effect of indigo dye effluent on the growth, biomass production and phenotypic plasticity of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Chlorococcales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MATHIAS A. CHIA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of indigo dye effluent on the freshwater microalga Scenedesmus quadricauda ABU12 was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. The microalga was exposed to different concentrations of the effluent obtained by diluting the dye effluent from 100 to 175 times in bold basal medium (BBM. The growth rate of the microalga decreased as indigo dye effluent concentration increased (p <0.05. The EC50 was found to be 166 dilution factor of the effluent. Chlorophyll a, cell density and dry weight production as biomarkers were negatively affected by high indigo dye effluent concentration, their levels were higher at low effluent concentrations (p <0.05. Changes in coenobia size significantly correlated with the dye effluent concentration. A shift from large to small coenobia with increasing indigo dye effluent concentration was obtained. We conclude that even at low concentrations; effluents from textile industrial processes that use indigo dye are capable of significantly reducing the growth and biomass production, in addition to altering the morphological characteristics of the freshwater microalga S. quadricauda. The systematic reduction in the number of cells per coenobium observed in this study further confirms that environmental stress affects coenobium structure in the genus Scenedesmus, which means it can be considered an important biomarker for toxicity testing.

  4. A systems biology, whole-genome association analysis of the molecular regulation of biomass growth and composition in Populus deltoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirst, Matias [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-04-14

    Poplars trees are well suited for biofuel production due to their fast growing habit, favorable wood composition and adaptation to a broad range of environments. The availability of a reference genome sequence, ease of vegetative propagation and availability of transformation methods also make poplar an ideal model for the study of wood formation and biomass growth in woody, perennial plants. The objective of this project was to conduct a genome-wide association genetics study to identify genes that regulate bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood). Populus deltoides is a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detected by targeted resequencing of 18,153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. These polymorphism are critical tools for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.

  5. A systems biology, whole-genome association analysis of the molecular regulation of biomass growth and composition in Populus deltoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirst, Matias [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Poplars trees are well suited for biofuel production due to their fast growing habit, favorable wood composition and adaptation to a broad range of environments. The availability of a reference genome sequence, ease of vegetative propagation and availability of transformation methods also make poplar an ideal model for the study of wood formation and biomass growth in woody, perennial plants. The objective of this project was to conduct a genome-wide association genetics study to identify genes that regulate bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood). Populus deltoides is a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detected by targeted resequencing of 18,153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. These polymorphism are critical tools for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy.

  6. Leaf Area Index, Biomass Carbon and Growth Rate of Radiata Pine Genetic Types and Relationships with LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. McGaughey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between discrete-return light detection and ranging (LiDAR data and radiata pine leaf area index (LAI, stem volume, above ground carbon, and carbon sequestration were developed using 10 plots with directly measured biomass and leaf area data, and 36 plots with modelled carbon data. The plots included a range of genetic types established on north- and south-facing aspects. Modelled carbon was highly correlated with directly measured crown, stem, and above ground biomass data, with r = 0.92, 0.97 and 0.98, respectively. LiDAR canopy percentile height (P30 and cover, based on all returns above 0.5 m, explained 81, 88, and 93% of the variation in directly measured crown, stem, and above ground live carbon and 75, 89 and 88% of the modelled carbon, respectively. LAI (all surfaces ranged between 8.8–19.1 in the 10 plots measured at age 9 years. The difference in canopy percentile heights (P95–P30 and cover based on first returns explained 80% of the variation in total LAI. Periodic mean annual increments in stem volume, above ground live carbon, and total carbon between ages 9 and 13 years were significantly related to (P95–P30, with regression models explaining 56, 58, and 55%, respectively, of the variation in growth rate per plot. When plot aspect and genetic type were included with (P95–P30, the R2 of the regression models for stem volume, above ground live carbon, and total carbon increment increased to 90, 88, and 88%, respectively, which indicates that LiDAR regression equations for estimating stock changes can be substantially improved by incorporating supplementary site and crop data.

  7. A comparative study on the effect of gamma-irradiation on growth and biomass yield in certain fuel-wood species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.; Nandy, A.K.; Mallick, R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1990-01-01

    A trial was conducted to study a comparative effect of gamma-radiation on the growth behaviour vis-a-vis biomass yield of Acacia nilotica Delite, Leucaena leucocephala (Lam) De Wit and Prosopis chilensis D.C (sub-family Mimosoidae). Dry seeds were exposed to 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 KR doses of gammaradiation. Irradiat ed seeds were sown in the field along with the control. In case of L. leucocephala the growth of the plants as well as total biomass production increased steadily with increasing doses of irradiation upto 8 KR. In A. nilotica the response was similar to that of L leucocephala, but in this case maximum growth and biomass yield was obtained after 4 KR. On the other hand, P. chilensis did not exhibit a positive response to gammaradiation. Karyotype of the three species was also done. All these observations indicate the greater possibility of the utilization of gammaradiation in increasing biomass production. (author). 12 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  8. The Effect of Fermentation Time with Probiotic Bacteria on Organic Fertilizer as Daphnia magna Cultured Medium towards Nutrient Quality, Biomass Production and Growth Performance Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endar Herawati, Vivi; Agung Nugroho, Ristiawan; Pinandoyo; Darmanto, YS; Hutabarat, Johannes

    2018-02-01

    The nutrient quality and growth performance of D. magna are highly depend on the organic fertilizer which is used in its culture medium. The objective of this study was to identify the best fermentation time by using probiotic bacteria on organic fertilizer as mass culture medium to improve its nutrient quality, biomass production, and growth performance. This study was conducted using completely randomized experimental design with five treatments and three repetitions. Organic fertilizers used cultured medium with chicken manure, rejected bread and tofu waste fermented by probiotic bacteria then cultured for 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. The results showed that medium which used 25% chicken manure, 25% tofu waste and 50% rejected bread cultured for 28 days created the highest biomass production, population density and nutrient content of D. magna those are 233,980 ind/L for population density; 134.60 grams for biomass production, 0.574% specific growth rate; 68.06% protein content and 6.91% fat. The highest fatty acid profile is 4.83% linoleic and 3.54% linolenic acid. The highest essential amino acid is 53.94 ppm lysine. In general, the content of ammonia, DO, temperature, and pH during the study were in the good range of D. magna life. The conclusion of this research is medium which used 25% chicken manure, 25% tofu waste and 50% rejected bread cultured for 28 days created the highest biomass production, population and nutrient content of D. magna.

  9. Effects of Wood Ash Biomass Application on Growth Indices and Chlorophyll Content of Maize and Lima bean Intercrop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheedat Ajala

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wood ash generated from wood industries have enormous potential which can be utilized due to its properties which influences soil chemistry and fertility status of tropical acidic soils. Field experiments were conducted on an acidic sandy loam alfisol to investigate the effects of wood ash on the growth indices and chlorophyll content of maize and lima beans intercrop during the late and early seasons of 2014 and 2015 at Akure in the rainforest zone of southwestern Nigeria. The treatments were 100% sole maize with ash, 100% sole maize without ash, 75% maize + 25% lima beans with ash, 75% + 25% lima beans without ash, 50% maize + 50% lima beans with ash, 50% maize + 50% lima beans without ash, 25% maize + 75% lima beans with ash and 25% maize + 75% lima beans without ash. Wood ash was applied at 2.4kg/plot. Wood ash increased chlorophyll content in all amended treatments except in amended 25:75% maize-lima beans intercrop and 25:75% maize –lima beans intercrop without ash, however 75:25% maize-lima beans amended with wood ash significantly (P≥0.05 recorded the highest chlorophyll content. Growth parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, leaf area index, leaf length, stem diameter, number of flowers, number of pods, weight of plant and total biomass of amended maize-lima beans intercrop were significantly (P≥0.05 increased by wood ash application. Based on experimental findings, 25:75% maize-lima beans intercrop and 75%:25% maize-lima beans intercrop amended with wood ash was concluded to be more recommendable in the study area.

  10. Evaluation of growth, cell size and biomass of Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO with two LED regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Victor Cordoba-Matson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to crops, there are fewer studies using LED-based light with green microalgae and none cultivating the microalga Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO even though of its importance in marine aquaculture. The objective was to evaluate of white and red LEDs as an alternative source of light to cultivate I. aff. galbana (T-ISO. In order to carry this out white and red LEDs were used with a laboratory built Erlenmeyer-type photobioreactor to determine productivity, cell number and size and biomass composition. Results were compared with standard fluorescent lights of the same light intensity. The culture system consisted of 3 flasks for applying red LEDs and three for white LEDs and 3 control group flasks illuminated with the normal fluorescent lighting at the similar light intensity of ~60 mM m–2 s–1. It was found that the population cell density did not significantly increase with either red LEDs or white LEDs (p > 0.05, if at all. Standard fluorescent lighting (control group showed significant increases in population cell number (p < 0.05. Through microscopic observation cell size was found to be smaller for white LEDS and even smaller for red LEDs compared to fluorescent lighting. Biochemical composition of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids was similar for all light regimes. The authors suggest that the unexpected non-growth I. aff. galbana (T-ISO, a haptophyte microalga, with white and red LEDs is possibly due to fact that to initiate cell growth this microalgae requires other wavelengths (possibly green besides red and blue, to allow other pigments, probably fucoxanthin, to capture light

  11. Effects of simultaneous ozone exposure and nitrogen loads on carbohydrate concentrations, biomass, growth, and nutrient concentrations of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, V.F.D. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland)]. E-mail: vera.thomas@iap.ch; Braun, S. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland); Flueckiger, W. [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstr. 25/27, 4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    Beech seedlings were grown under different nitrogen fertilisation regimes (0, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) for three years and were fumigated with either charcoal-filtered (F) or ambient air (O{sub 3}). Nitrogen fertilisation increased leaf necroses, aphid infestations, and nutrient ratios in the leaves (N:P and N:K), as a result of decreased phosphorus and potassium concentrations. For plant growth, biomass accumulation, and starch concentrations, a positive nitrogen effect was found, but only for fertilisations of up to 40 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The highest nitrogen load, however, reduced leaf area, leaf water content, growth, biomass accumulation, and starch concentrations, whereas soluble carbohydrate concentrations were enhanced. The ozone fumigation resulted in reduced leaf area, leaf water content, shoot growth, root biomass accumulation, and decreased starch, phosphorus, and potassium concentrations, increasing the N:P and N:K ratios. A combined effect of the two pollutants was detected for the leaf area and the shoot elongation, where ozone fumigation amplified the nitrogen effects. - The effects of nitrogen and ozone on growth, carbohydrate concentrations, and nutrients are mainly additive.

  12. Sensitivity of growth and biomass allocation patterns to increasing nitrogen: a comparison between ephemerals and annuals in the Gurbantunggut Desert, north-western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Zhang, Yuanming; Niklas, Karl J

    2014-02-01

    Biomass accumulation and allocation patterns are critical to quantifying ecosystem dynamics. However, these patterns differ among species, and they can change in response to nutrient availability even among genetically related individuals. In order to understand this complexity further, this study examined three ephemeral species (with very short vegetative growth periods) and three annual species (with significantly longer vegetative growth periods) in the Gurbantunggut Desert, north-western China, to determine their responses to different nitrogen (N) supplements under natural conditions. Nitrogen was added to the soil at rates of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0 and 24.0 g N m(-2) year(-1). Plants were sampled at various intervals to measure relative growth rate and shoot and root dry mass. Compared with annuals, ephemerals grew more rapidly, increased shoot and root biomass with increasing N application rates and significantly decreased root/shoot ratios. Nevertheless, changes in the biomass allocation of some species (i.e. Erodium oxyrrhynchum) in response to the N treatment were largely a consequence of changes in overall plant size, which was inconsistent with an optimal partitioning model. An isometric log shoot vs. log root scaling relationship for the final biomass harvest was observed for each species and all annuals, while pooled data of three ephemerals showed an allometric scaling relationship. These results indicate that ephemerals and annuals differ observably in their biomass allocation patterns in response to soil N supplements, although an isometric log shoot vs. log root scaling relationship was maintained across all species. These findings highlight that different life history strategies behave differently in response to N application even when interspecific scaling relationships remain nearly isometric.

  13. Potential growth and biomass productivity of Miscanthus x giganteus as affected by plant density and N-fertilization in central Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danalatos, Nicholas G. [Department of Envir. Studies, University of Aegean, University Hill, Mytilini 81100 (Greece); Department of Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Fytoko 38446 Volos (Greece); Archontoulis, Sotiris V. [Department of Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Fytoko 38446 Volos (Greece); Department of Plant Science, Crop and Weed Ecology Group, Wageningen University, Haarweg 235, 6709 RP Wageningen (Netherlands); Mitsios, Ioannis [Department of Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Fytoko 38446 Volos (Greece)

    2007-02-15

    The potential growth and biomass productivity of Miscanthus x giganteus was investigated under constraint-free conditions during two years with appreciable different climatic conditions in central Greece, and under three different plant densities (0.66, 1, 2 pl m{sup -2}) and two different nitrogen dressings (N{sub 0}=50, N{sub 1}=100 kg N ha{sup -1}). The field experimental design was a 3 x 2 factorial split plot in four blocks. Plant height, tiller number, leaf area index and dry weight per plant component were measured in subsequent harvests throughout the growing periods of 2001 and 2002. It was found that fertilisation within the studied rates did not affect growth and biomass productivity of the crop, and no interaction between fertilization and plant density was observed in any of the samplings. Contrary to fertilization, a significant effect of plant density was found, with the denser populated plants (10,000-20,000 pl ha{sup -1}) performing growth rates of 250-350 kg ha{sup -1} d{sup -1} for large parts of the growing period, reaching maximum dry biomass yields in excess of 38 t ha{sup -1} in the more favorable year, 2002, and 28 t ha{sup -1} in the warmer and drier year 2001. Such high yield potentials were explained by the particularly great assimilation rates of this crop that were also measured under light saturation and optimum temperature and water regimes. With such biomass yields (11.2-15.2 t ha{sup -1} oil equivalent), obtainable particularly under modest fertilisation needs, Miscanthus sinensis should be considered as a very promising crop for biomass production in Greece in the near future. (author)

  14. Alley cropping of legumes with grasses as forages : Effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia on the growth and biomass production of forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Yuhaeni

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A study to evaluate the effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium on the growth and biomass production of forages in an alley cropping system was conducted in two different agroclimatical zones i.e. Bogor, located at 500 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 3,112 nun/year and Sukabumi located at 900 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 1,402 mm/year . Both locations have low N, P, and K content and the soil is classified as acidic. The experimental design used was a split plot design with 3 replicates . The main plots were different grass species i.e. king grass (Pennisetum purpureum x P. typhoides and elephant grass (P. purpureum. The sub plots were the row spacing of gliricidia at 2, 3, 4, 6 m (1 hedgerows and 4 m (2 hedgerows. The results indicated that the growth and biomass production of grasses were significantly affected (P<0 .05 by the treatments in Bogor. The highest biomass productions was obtained from the 2 m row spacing which gave the highest dry matter production of grasses (1 .65 kg/hill and gliricidia (0 .086 kg/tree . In Sukabumi the growth and biomass production of grasses and gliricidia were also significantly affected by the treatments . The highest dry matter production was obtained with 2 m row spacing (dry matter of grasses and gliricidia were 1 .12 kg/hill and 0 .026 kg/tree, respectively . The result further indicated that biomass production of forages increased with the increase in gliricidia population. The alley cropping system wich is suitable for Bogor was the 2 m row spacing of gliricidia intercropped with either king or elephant grass and for Sukabumi 2 and 4 m (2 rows of gliricidia row spacing intercropped with king or elephant grass .

  15. Nutritional value content, biomass production and growth performance of Daphnia magna cultured with different animal wastes resulted from probiotic bacteria fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endar Herawati, Vivi; Nugroho, R. A.; Pinandoyo; Hutabarat, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    Media culture is an important factor for the growth and quality of Daphnia magna nutrient value. This study has purpose to find the increasing of nutritional content, biomass production and growth performance of D. magna using different animal wastes fermented by probiotic bacteria. This study conducted using completely randomized experimental design with 10 treatments and 3 replicates. Those media used different animal manures such as chicken manure, goat manure and quail manure mixed by rejected bread and tofu waste fermented by probiotic bacteria then cultured for 24 days. The results showed that the media which used 50% chicken manure, 100% rejected bread and 50% tofu waste created the highest biomass production, population and nutrition content of D.magna about 2111788.9 ind/L for population; 342 grams biomass production and 68.85% protein content. The highest fatty acid profile is 6.37% of linoleic and the highest essential amino acid is 22.8% of lysine. Generally, the content of ammonia, DO, temperature, and pH during the study were in the good range of D. magna’s life. This research has conclusion that media used 50% chicken manure, 100% rejected bread and 50% tofu waste created the highest biomass production, population and nutrition content of D. magna.

  16. Biomass expansion factors for Eucalyptus globulus stands in Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, P.; Tome, M.

    2012-11-01

    One of several procedures for estimating carbon stocks in forests is the estimation of tree or stand biomass based on forest inventory data. The two approaches normally used to convert field measurements of trees to stand biomass values are allometric biomass equations and biomass expansion factors (BEFs). BEFs are used in published National Forest Inventory results in which biomass is not estimated or as a complement of growth models that do not include biomass predictions. In this paper, the effectiveness of BEFs for estimating total stand biomass in Portuguese Eucalyptus globulus plantations was analyzed. Here, BEF is defined as the ratio of total stand biomass (aboveground biomass plus root biomass) to stand volume with bark. To calculate total biomass, an equation was developed to estimate root biomass as a function of aboveground biomass. Changes of BEF with stand variables were analyzed. Strong relationships were observed between BEF and stand age, stand basal area, stand volume and dominant height. Consequently, an equation to predict BEF as a function of stand variables was fitted, and dominant height was selected as the predictor stand variable. Estimates of total stand biomass based on individual tree allometric equations were compared with estimates obtained with a constant BEF (0.77), used in the Portuguese National Inventory Report on Greenhouse Gases, and with estimates obtained using the dominant height-dependent BEF equation developed in this work. The BEF prediction model proposed in this work may be used to improve E. globulus Portuguese biomass estimates when tree allometric equations cannot be used. (Author) 40 refs.

  17. Negligible impacts of biomass removal on Douglas-fir growth 29 years after outplanting in the northern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woongsoon Jang; Christopher R. Keyes; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the long-term impacts of biomass harvesting on site productivity, we remeasured trees in the 1974 Forest Residues Utilization Research and Development Program at Coram Experimental Forest in western Montana. Three levels (high, medium, and low) of biomass removal intensity combined with broadcast burning treatment were assigned after clearcut in western...

  18. Experimental workflow for developing a feed forward strategy to control biomass growth and exploit maximum specific methane productivity of Methanothermobacter marburgensis in a biological methane production process (BMPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krajete

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interests for new biofuel generations allowing conversion of gaseous substrate(s to gaseous product(s arose for power to gas and waste to value applications. An example is biological methane production process (BMPP with Methanothermobacter marburgensis. The latter, can convert carbon dioxide (CO2 and hydrogen (H2, having different origins and purities, to methane (CH4, water and biomass. However, these gas converting bioprocesses are tendentiously gas limited processes and the specific methane productivity per biomass amount (qCH4 tends to be low. Therefore, this contribution proposes a workflow for the development of a feed forward strategy to control biomass, growth (rx and qCH4 in a continuous gas limited BMPP. The proposed workflow starts with a design of experiment (DoE to optimize media composition and search for a liquid based limitation to control selectively growth. From the DoE it came out that controlling biomass growth was possible independently of the dilution and gassing rate applied while not affecting methane evolution rates (MERs. This was done by shifting the process from a natural gas limited state to a controlled liquid limited growth. The latter allowed exploiting the maximum biocatalytic activity for methane formation of Methanothermobacter marburgensis. An increase of qCH4 from 42 to 129 mmolCH4 g−1 h−1 was achieved by applying a liquid limitation compare with the reference state. Finally, a verification experiment was done to verify the feeding strategy transferability to a different process configuration. This evidenced the ratio of the fed KH2PO4 to rx (R(FKH2PO4/rx has an appropriate parameter for scaling feeds in a continuous gas limited BMPP. In the verification experiment CH4 was produced in a single bioreactor step at a methane evolution rate (MER of   132 mmolCH4*L−1*h−1 at a CH4 purity of 93 [Vol.%].

  19. Growth, aboveground biomass, and nutrient concentration of young Scots pine and lodgepole pine in oil shale post-mining landscapes in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Tatjana; Tilk, Mari; Pärn, Henn; Lukjanova, Aljona; Mandre, Malle

    2011-12-01

    The investigation was carried out in 8-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm.) plantations on post-mining area, Northeast Estonia. The aim of the study was to assess the suitability of lodgepole pine for restoration of degraded lands by comparing the growth, biomass, and nutrient concentration of studied species. The height growth of trees was greater in the Scots pine stand, but the tree aboveground biomass was slightly larger in the lodgepole pine stand. The aboveground biomass allocation to the compartments did not differ significantly between species. The vertical distribution of compartments showed that 43.2% of the Scots pine needles were located in the middle layer of the crown, while 58.5% of the lodgepole pine needles were in the lowest layer of the crown. The largest share of the shoots and stem of both species was allocated to the lowest layer of the crown. For both species, the highest NPK concentrations were found in the needles and the lowest in the stems. On the basis of the present study results, it can be concluded that the early growth of Scots pine and lodgepole pine on oil shale post-mining landscapes is similar.

  20. Construction of Allometric Relationships to Predict Growth Parameters, Stem Biomass and Carbon of Eucalyptus grandis Growing in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMCUP Subasinghe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available             Enhancement of carbon storage through the establishment of man-made forests has been considered as a mitigation option to reduce increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Therefore the present study was carried out to estimate the biomass and carbon storages of the main stem of Eucalyptus grandis using allometric relationships using the plantations of Nuwara Eliya and Badulla districts in Sri Lanka. Tree diameter and total height were measured for the samples trees and stem volume was estimated using a previously built individual model for the same species. Stem biomass was estimated using core samples and carbon was determined using Walkley-Black method. Finally the biomass values were converted separately to the carbon values. Non-liner regression analysis was employed for the construction of models which had age as the explanatory variable. Linear regression was used in order to build the models to predict the above ground and stem biomass and carbon using volume as the explanatory variable. For both linear and non-linear types, the model quality was tested using R2 and fitted line plots. According to the results, stem biomass and carbon values at the 7th year were 110.8 kg and 68.7 kg respectively. Stem biomass and carbon values at the 40th year were 1,095.8 kg and 679.4 kg respectively. Carbon content at the age 20 was 62.0% from the stem biomass. Exponential models were proven to be better than the logistic models to predict the diameter, height, stem volume, biomass and carbon with age. R2 values and the fitted line plots indicated that the selected models are of high quality. Linear models built to predict the stem biomass and carbon using stem volume also showed the high accuracy of these models which had R2 values above 97.9%.

  1. Construction of allometric relationships to predict growth parameters, stem biomass and carbon of Eucalyptus grandis growing in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMCUP Subasinghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of carbon storage through the establishment of man-made forests has been considered as a mitigation option to reduce increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Therefore the present study was carried out to estimate the biomass and carbon storages of the main stem of Eucalyptus grandis using allometric relationships using the plantations of Nuwara Eliya and Badulla districts. Tree diameter and total were measured for the samples trees and stem volume was estimated using a previously built individual model for the same species. Stem biomass was estimated using core samples and carbon was determined using Walkley-Black method. Finally the biomass values were converted separately to the carbon values.   Non-liner regression analysis was employed for the construction of models which had age as the explanatory variable. Linear regression was used in order to build the models to predict the above ground and stem biomass and carbon using volume as the explanatory variable. For both linear and non-linear types, the model quality was tested using R2 and fitted line plots.   According to the results, stem biomass and carbon values at the 7th year were 110.8 kg and 68.7 kg respectively. Stem biomass and carbon values at the 40th year were 1,095.8 kg and 679.4 kg respectively. The carbon content at the age 20 was 62.0% from the stem biomass.   Exponential models were proven to be better than the logistic models to predict the diameter, height, stem volume, biomass and carbon with age. R2 values and the fitted line plots indicated that the selected models are of high quality. Linear models built to predict the stem biomass and carbon using stem volume also showed the high accuracy of these models which had R2 values above 97.9%.

  2. Spectroscopic descriptors for dynamic changes of soluble microbial products from activated sludge at different biomass growth phases under prolonged starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2017-10-15

    In this study, the spectroscopic indices of soluble microbial products (SMP) were explored using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to identify different distinctive biomass growth phases (i.e., exponential phase, pseudo-endogenous phase, and endogenous phase) and to describe the microbial activity of activated sludge in a batch type bioreactor under prolonged starvation. The optical descriptors, including UV absorption at 254 nm (UVA254), spectral slope, absorbance slope index (ASI), biological index (BIX), humification index (HIX), and the ratio of tryptophan-like to humic-like components (C1/C2), were examined to describe the dynamic changes in SMP. These indices were mostly associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of SMPs and specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR). Among those, ASI was the most strongly correlated with the SOUR data for the pseudo-endogenous and the endogenous periods. Although the three microbial phases were well discriminated using the spectral slope, BIX, and the C1/C2 ratio, the C1/C2 ratio can be suggested as the most preferable indicator as it can also trace the changes of the relative abundance of proteins to humic-like substances in SMPs. The suggested spectroscopic descriptors were reasonably explained by the general trends of decreased large-sized biopolymer fractions (e.g., proteins) and increased humic substrates (HS) with starvation time, which were detected by size exclusion chromatography. This study provides a novel insight into the strong potential of using optical descriptors to easily probe microbial status in biological treatment systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of sand burial on survival, growth, gas exchange and biomass allocation of Ulmus pumila seedlings in the Hunshandak Sandland, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, C Y; Zhang, J Z

    2004-10-01

    In the last decade, the number of young plants of Ulmus pumila in the Hunshandak Sandland has decreased sharply because of severe sand burial, and their ecological protective function has been weakened. In order to develop an understanding of the tolerance of U. pumila to sand burial and to suggest reasonable measures to protect the sparse-elm-grassland ecosystem, the effects of burial on the survival, growth, photosynthesis and biomass allocation in U. pumila were studied. Seedlings were buried at five different depths in pot experiments: no burial (control), partial burial (33 % and 67 % stem height), and complete burial (100 % and 133 % stem height). Growth analyses and measurements of photosynthesis were carried after the plants had been uncovered. All the plants survived partial burial, but about 30 % and 80 % of the seedlings died as a result of the 100 % and 133 % sand burial treatments, respectively. The numbers of newly produced leaves and branches, and the height of the stems of the seedlings in the 33 % and 67 % burial treatments during the period of the experiment were significantly greater than those in the control. Furthermore, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and water use efficiency were also elevated by the partial burial, but not affected by burial time. This might be attributed to the increased root length, which improved water acquisition. The biomass and biomass allocation of the seedlings were significantly changed by the burial treatments and burial times. The biomass was enhanced by partial burial but was reduced by complete burial at each burial time. However, the biomass allocation was not significantly changed by the 33 % and 67 % sand burial treatments 2 or 4 weeks following the burial. Ulmus pumila was shown to be tolerant to partial sand burial, but must be protected from complete burial.

  4. Tracing N, K, Mg and Ca released from decomposing biomass to new tree growth. Part I: A model system simulating harvest residue decomposition on conventionally harvested clearfell sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherall, A. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: aweatherall@uclan.ac.uk; Proe, M.F. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Craig, J. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Cameron, A.D. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St. Machar Drive AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); McKay, H.M. [Policy and Practice Division, Forestry Commission, 231 Corstorphine Road, Edinburgh EH12 7AT (United Kingdom); Midwood, A.J. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    It is necessary to assess the effects of removing nutrient-rich harvest residues (brash) from clearfell sites because there is a growing market for this brash as bioenergy. The aim of this study was to use stable isotope techniques in a model system to trace nutrients released by decomposing brash. Labelled biomass was obtained by growing Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) seedlings with a generous or poor nutrient supply containing elevated {sup 15}N, {sup 41}K, {sup 26}Mg, and {sup 44}Ca. This biomass was used in two subsequent studies. In this study (Part I of II), the above-ground biomass was harvested and placed on soil in a pot containing a newly planted seedling. Soils from two forests, Ae and Teindland, of contrasting nutritional status were used. A full destructive harvest was undertaken after one growing season. Enriched {sup 15}N, {sup 41}K, {sup 26}Mg, and {sup 44}Ca were recovered in the new seedlings. The percentage contribution from labelled biomass to new tree growth was small, but discernible. The N contribution from labelled biomass to new trees was greater in Ae soil, but the base cation contribution was greater in Teindland soil. Results are discussed with reference to the initial nutrient concentrations of each soil. The elevated {sup 15}N, {sup 41}K, {sup 26}Mg and {sup 44}Ca in new seedlings indicate that nutrients in brash can make a direct contribution to new tree growth. The success of this model system will provide guidance for the application of similar techniques in field experiments.

  5. Characterising willows for biomass and phytoremediation: growth, nitrogen and water use of 14 willow clones under different irrigation and fertilisation regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weih, Martin; Nordh, N.-E.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen clones of willow (Salix spp.) were characterised in terms of growth, nitrogen and water-use efficiency under different irrigation and fertilisation treatments. Cuttings of willow clones, some commercially introduced and others new material, were pot-grown outdoors in Central Sweden under four experimental treatments in a full-factorial design. The experiment covered the period from bud-break until leaf abscission and the experimental conditions included two irrigation and two fertilisation regimes. The growth of the clones was evaluated in terms of relative growth rate and total biomass production of whole plants and shoots. Nitrogen (N) economy was studied by means of N productivity, N accumulation and N losses by leaf abscission. Water economy was analysed with respect to intrinsic water-use efficiency (foliar carbon isotope ratio; δ 13 C) and the capacity of leaves to retain water (relative water content). Significant differences between clones were found in nearly all parameters measured and the clones varied in the responses to the experimental treatments (clone x factor interaction effects). Thus, clone ranking often changed depending on the experimental treatment. The results are discussed with respect to clone selection for different willow applications such as biomass production and phytoremediation, and willow growth performance under different water and nutrient availabilities. The growth-physiological characterisation of young willows in the short term (several months) is regarded as a suitable approach for pre-selection of promising clones prior to extensive field evaluation

  6. Growth and biomass production with enhanced {beta}-glucan and dietary fibre contents of Ganoderma australe ATHUM 4345 in a batch-stirred tank bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaspyridi, Lefki-Maria; Christakopoulos, Paul [BIOtechMASS Unit, Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Katapodis, Petros [BIOtechMASS Unit, Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biological Applications and Technologies, University of Ioannina, Ioannina (Greece); Gonou-Zagou, Zacharoula; Kapsanaki-Gotsi, Evangelia [Department of Ecology and Systematics, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    In this study we maximized biomass production by the basidiomycete Ganoderma australe ATHUM 4345, a species of pharmaceutical interest as it is a valuable source of nutraceuticals, including dietary fibers and glucans. We used the Biolog FF MicroPlate to screen 95 different carbon sources for growth monitoring. The pattern of substrate catabolism forms a substrate assimilation fingerprint, which is useful in selecting components for media optimization of maximum biomass production. Response surface methodology, based on the central composite design was applied to explore the optimum concentrations of carbon and nitrogen sources of culture medium in shake flask cultures. When the improved culture medium was tested in a 20-L stirred tank bioreactor, using 13.7 g/L glucose and 30.0 g/L yeast extract, high biomass yields (10.1{+-}0.4 g/L) and productivity of 0.09 g L{sup -1} h{sup -1} were obtained. The yield coefficients for total glucan and dietary fibers on biomass formed were 94.82{+-}6 and 341.15{+-}12.3 mg/g mycelium dry weight, respectively. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Production of biomass by Spirulina at different groundwater type. Case of Ouargla-Southeast Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggaï, Ali; Dadamoussa, Belkheir; Djaghoubi, Afaf; Bissati, Samia

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, Spirulina platensis was cultivated to estimate the biomass production with different groundwater type in Ouargla. Growth experiments were undertaken in flasks under shelter in outdoor condition. For this, the temperature, pH and salinity value was recorded between two days of growth. Biomass concentration in the culture media was calculated by measuring the DO625. The combination of the Mioplocen water with the nutriments gave the highest values of biomass concentration with avenge of 1.78 ±0.91g/l. All the three-type water supported the growth of Spirulina that appeared as good as a culture media.

  8. Effect of industrial and domestic ash from biomass combustion, and spent coffee grounds, on soil fertility and plant growth: experiments at field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, João Peres; Vicente, Estela Domingos; Gomes, Ana Paula; Nunes, Maria Isabel; Alves, Célia; Tarelho, Luís A C

    2017-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted at field conditions in order to evaluate the effect of application of ash from biomass combustion on some soil fertility characteristics and plant growth. Application of 7.5 Mg ha -1 industrial fly ash (IA), domestic ash (DA), and a 50:50 mix of domestic ash (DA) and spent coffee grounds (SCG) was made in different soil parcels. Lolium perenne seeds were sown and the grown biomass was harvested and quantified after 60 days. Soil samples from each parcel were also collected after that period and characterized. Both soil and grown biomass samples were analyzed for Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Al contents. Soil pH was determined before and after amendment. All applications rose significantly soil pH. Domestic ash, whether combined with coffee grounds or not, proved to be efficient at supplying available macronutrients Ca, Mg, K, and P to the soil and also reducing availability of Al (more than industrial ash). However, it inhibited plant growth, even more when combined with spent coffee grounds. As regards to elemental abundance in plant tissue, both domestic ash treatments reduced Ca and enhanced Al contents, unlike industrial ash, which proved less harmful for the load applied in the soil. Hence, it was possible to conclude that application load should be a limiting factor for this management option for the studied materials.

  9. Crop growth analysis and yield of a lignocellulosic biomass crop (Arundo donax L. in three marginal areas of Campania region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Impagliazzo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of energy resources from fossil fuels and global warming have pushed to consider the agro-energy as one of the renewable energy sources for mitigation of climate change. In this context, agro-energy based on cultivation of energy crops in marginal lands allows to reduce competition with food crops and marginal lands abandonment, producing incomes for farmers. The aim of this work is to improve the knowledge on a promising crop (Arundo donax L. for the production of bio-energy in marginal lands. Therefore, the behaviour of this crop was evaluated in three study areas of Campania region, under different energy inputs: two levels of nitrogen fertilisation, N100 and N50 in Sant’Angelo dei Lombardi (SA and Bellizzi (BL. In Acerra (AC site compost fertilisation was made to verify its effect on pollutant phytoextraction. In the last year, also crop growth analysis was done in the three sites. The results showed that giant reed confirms its adaptability to low fertility soils, allowing interesting biomass yield also in marginal lands. In more fertile environments, effect of fertilisation is not significant at least in the short term. Nevertheless, nitrogen uptake (65-130 kg N ha–1, also if lower than other highyielding crops, needs to be compensated with fertilisation to avoid depletion of soil nutrient reserves and to guarantee sustainability of this cropping system. Giant reed had a positive environmental impact, due to the improvement in soil fertility (soil organic matter and nitrogen increase and to the mitigation of climate change (C storage in the soil. In marginal soils of Southern Italy this crop confirms an increasing trend of yield during the first 3-4 years. High productivity levels of this crop are related to the extremely high duration of the vegetative period and thus of the photosynthetic activity (from March to November in the Mediterranean area. These last are well expressed by the leaf area duration index, which is

  10. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-07-29

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  11. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Safafar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids, tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  12. Calculation of vapour bubble growth on the lower generatrix of horizontal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chajka, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The known models of vapour bubble growth are compared with experimental data. Cinematographic study of vapour formation during water boiling was carried out with elements of horizontal tubes of copper 10, 16, 24, 34 and 70 mm in diameter under the pressure of 100 kPa and specific thermal loadings of 20 and 40 kW/m 2 . According to the experimental data the main volume of vapour phase is occupied by vapour bubbles from the lower part of the horizontal tube. Five stages of vapour bubble growth on the lower generatrix of the horizontal tube: nucleation, growth to the point of breaking off from nucleate centre, the breaking off from the nucleate centre, the tube surface flowing around during floating up, the breaking off from the tube surface, were singled out. The shape of vapour volume varied during the whole period of the bubble growth and it was mainly determined by the horizontal tube diameter. The change of vapour bubble radius in time is the function of the horizontal tube diameter. Comparison of the experimental data with the known models of vapour bubble growth has shown, that every stage of vapour bubble growth on the lower generatrix of the tube is determined by the complex of thermal and hydrodynamic conditions, the effect of which depends on the horizontal tube diameter

  13. Feasibility of various carbon sources and plant materials in enhancing the growth and biomass productivity of the freshwater microalgae Monoraphidium griffithii NS16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Willy

    2015-11-01

    In order to assess the feasibility of various carbon sources and plant materials in increasing the growth rate and biomass productivity of Monoraphidium griffithii, ten carbon sources as well as six plant materials were tested in mixotrophic cultures with or without aeration. It was found that glucose, fructose, maltose, sodium acetate and mannitol were potential carbon sources for growth enhancement of M. griffithii. Supplementation of culture medium with these carbon sources resulted in approximately 1-4-fold increase in cell density compared to control in a small scale culture. In a larger scale mixotrophic culture with aeration, 0.05% mannitol and 0.1% fructose resulted in a decent 1-1.5-fold increase in final cell density, approximately 2-fold increase in growth rate and 0.5-1-fold increase in dry biomass weight. Findings from this study suggests that glucose, fructose, maltose and mannitol were potential organic carbon sources for mixotrophic culture of M. griffithii. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Leaf area index, biomass carbon and growth rate of radiata pine genetic types and relationships with LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter N. Beets; Stephen Reutebuch; Mark O. Kimberley; Graeme R. Oliver; Stephen H. Pearce; Robert J. McGaughey

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between discrete-return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and radiata pine leaf area index (LAI), stem volume, above ground carbon, and carbon sequestration were developed using 10 plots with directly measured biomass and leaf area data, and 36 plots with modelled carbon data. The plots included a range of genetic types established on north- and...

  15. Experimental definition of technological modes of growth of biomass of a microalga Chlorella with the raised contents Lipids agricultural animals

    OpenAIRE

    Dvoretsky, D.; Peshkova, E.; Temnov, M.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of Chrorella vulgaris microalgae (strain IFR No. C-111) as a source of raw materials for third-generation biodiesel fuel production is justified. Experimental research has been conducted which allowed to develop techniques and modified broth for the cultivation of Chrorella vulgaris (strain IFR No. C-111) biomass rich in lipids.

  16. Artificial neural network-based model for the prediction of optimal growth and culture conditions for maximum biomass accumulation in multiple shoot cultures of Centella asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Archana; Prakash, Om; Mehrotra, Shakti; Khan, Feroz; Mathur, Ajay Kumar; Mathur, Archana

    2017-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN)-based modelling approach is used to determine the synergistic effect of five major components of growth medium (Mg, Cu, Zn, nitrate and sucrose) on improved in vitro biomass yield in multiple shoot cultures of Centella asiatica. The back propagation neural network (BPNN) was employed to predict optimal biomass accumulation in terms of growth index over a defined culture duration of 35 days. The four variable concentrations of five media components, i.e. MgSO 4 (0, 0.75, 1.5, 3.0 mM), ZnSO 4 (0, 15, 30, 60 μM), CuSO 4 (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 μM), NO 3 (20, 30, 40, 60 mM) and sucrose (1, 3, 5, 7 %, w/v) were taken as inputs for the ANN model. The designed model was evaluated by performing three different sets of validation experiments that indicated a greater similarity between the target and predicted dataset. The results of the modelling experiment suggested that 1.5 mM Mg, 30 μM Zn, 0.1 μM Cu, 40 mM NO 3 and 6 % (w/v) sucrose were the respective optimal concentrations of the tested medium components for achieving maximum growth index of 1654.46 with high centelloside yield (62.37 mg DW/culture) in the cultured multiple shoots. This study can facilitate the generation of higher biomass of uniform, clean, good quality C. asiatica herb that can efficiently be utilized by pharmaceutical industries.

  17. Calculating second derivatives of population growth rates for ecology and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shyu, E.; Caswell, H.

    2014-01-01

    Second derivatives of the population growth rate measure the curvature of its response to demographic, physiological or environmental parameters. The second derivatives quantify the response of sensitivity results to perturbations, provide a classification of types of selection and provide one way

  18. Growth and content of Spirulina platensis biomass chlorophyll cultivated at different values of light intensity and temperature using different nitrogen sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Dalva Godoy Danesi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of light intensity and temperature in S. platensis cultivation with potassium nitrate or urea as nitrogen source were investigated, as well as the biomass chlorophyll contents of this cyanobacteria, through the Response Surface Methodology. Experiments were performed at temperatures from 25 to 34.5ºC and light intensities from 15 to 69 µmol photons m-2 s-1, in mineral medium. In cultivations with both sources of nitrogen, KNO3 and urea, statistic evaluation through multiple regression, no interactions of such independent variables were detected in the results of the dependent variables maximum cell concentration, chlorophyll biomass contents, cell and chlorophyll productivities, as well as in the nitrogen-cell conversion factor. In cultivation performed with both sources of nitrogen, it was possible to obtain satisfactory adjustments to relate the dependent variables to the independent variables. The best results were achieved at temperature of 30ºC, at light intensity of 60 µmol photons m-2s-1, for cell growth, with cell productivity of approximately 95 mg L-1 d-1 in cultivations with urea. For the chlorophyll biomass content, the most adequate light intensity was 24 µmol photons m-2 s-1.

  19. Restoration of areas degraded by alluvial sand mining: use of soil microbiological activity and plant biomass growth to assess evolution of restored riparian vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venson, Graziela R; Marenzi, Rosemeri C; Almeida, Tito César M; Deschamps-Schmidt, Alexandre; Testolin, Renan C; Rörig, Leonardo R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2017-03-01

    River or alluvial sand mining is causing a variety of environmental problems in the Itajaí-açú river basin in Santa Catarina State (south of Brazil). When this type of commercial activity degrades areas around rivers, environmental restoration programs need to be executed. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess the evolution of a restored riparian forest based on data on the soil microbial activity and plant biomass growth. A reference site and three sites with soil degradation were studied over a 3-year period. Five campaigns were performed to determine the hydrolysis of the soil enzyme fluorescein diacetate (FDA), and the biomass productivity was determined at the end of the studied period. The variation in the enzyme activity for the different campaigns at each site was low, but this parameter did differ significantly according to the site. Well-managed sites showed the highest biomass productivity, and this, in turn, showed a strong positive correlation with soil enzyme activity. In conclusion, soil enzyme activity could form the basis for monitoring and the early prediction of the success of vegetal restoration programs, since responses at the higher level of biological organization take longer, inhibiting the assessment of the project within an acceptable time frame.

  20. Establishment, Growth and Biomass yield of three Grass species on a degraded Ultisol and their effect on soil loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Erosion is a cause for concern; this is because of its effects on the soil used for both agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Experiments were carried out to check the establishment, growth and biomass field of 3 tropical plants and their effects on soil loss during 2007 planting season. The treatments comprised 3 grasses viz. Azonopus compressus. Panicum maximum and Andropogon gayanus. The grasses were laid our in the field using a randomized complete block design replicated 4 times. Bare soil was used as the control. The parameters tested were plant height, leaf area index, root density, root establishment and the amount of soil loss using erosion pins. The result showed that Andropogon gayanus has an edge over Panicum maximum and Axonopus compressus with reference to plant height, root establishment, root density and leaf area index. Andropogon gayanus had a higher plant height from 3,6,9 and 12WAP with plant heights of 3.30cm, 3.63cm,3.93cm and 4.30cm representing 15.7%, 19.3% and 28.8% respectively. It was followed by P. maximum while A. compressus maintained the lowest plant height from 3,6,9 and 12 WAP with plant height of 2.83cm, 3.05cm, 3.20cm and 3.45cm respectively. In terms of root density, A. compressus did not have much root density which was 0.02t/ha, also at 12WAP, P. maximum did not have much root density which was 0.06t/ha though it was higher than A. compressus. The trend was the same for A. gayanus whose root density was 0.75t/ha. In terms of leaf area index (LAI, it was shown that at 3WAP and 6WAP, A. compressus had the lowest leaf area index of 58.25 and 65.75 respectively. Also at 9WAP and 12WAP A. compressus had 72.28 and 75.08t/ha respectively. At 3WAP and 6WAP P.maximum had a high leaf area index of 66.60 and 77.25 respectively. A. gayanus at 3WAP and 6WAP had 87.73 gayanus at 3WAP and 6WAP had 87.73 and 90.80 for 9WAP and 12WAP respectively. A. compressus protected the soil, reducing soil loss as a total of 9

  1. Endophyte-assisted promotion of biomass production and metal-uptake of energy crop sweet sorghum by plant-growth-promoting endophyte Bacillus sp. SLS18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shenglian; Xu, Taoying; Chen, Liang [Hunan Univ., Changsha (China). College of Environmental Science and Engineering] [and others

    2012-02-15

    The effects of Bacillus sp. SLS18, a plant-growth-promoting endophyte, on the biomass production and Mn/Cd uptake of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), Phytolacca acinosa Roxb., and Solanum nigrum L. were investigated. SLS18 displayed multiple heavy metals and antibiotics resistances. The strain also exhibited the capacity of producing indole-3-acetic acid, siderophores, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. In pot experiments, SLS18 could not only infect plants effectively but also significantly increase the biomass of the three tested plants in the presence of Mn/Cd. The promoting effect order of SLS18 on the biomass of the tested plants was sweet sorghum > P. acinosa > S. nigrum L. In the presence of Mn (2,000 mg kg{sup -1}) and Cd (50 mg kg{sup -1}) in vermiculite, the total Mn/Cd uptakes in the aerial parts of sweet sorghum, P. acinosa, and S. nigrum L. were increased by 65.2%/40.0%, 55.2%/31.1%, and 18.6%/25.6%, respectively, compared to the uninoculated controls. This demonstrates that the symbiont of SLS18 and sweet sorghum has the potential of improving sweet sorghum biomass production and its total metal uptake on heavy metal-polluted marginal land. It offers the potential that heavy metal-polluted marginal land could be utilized in planting sweet sorghum as biofuel feedstock for ethanol production, which not only gives a promising phytoremediation strategy but also eases the competition for limited fertile farmland between energy crops and food crops. (orig.)

  2. Endophyte-assisted promotion of biomass production and metal-uptake of energy crop sweet sorghum by plant-growth-promoting endophyte Bacillus sp. SLS18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shenglian; Xu, Taoying; Chen, Liang; Chen, Jueliang; Rao, Chan; Xiao, Xiao; Wan, Yong; Zeng, Guangming; Long, Fei; Liu, Chengbin; Liu, Yutang

    2012-02-01

    The effects of Bacillus sp. SLS18, a plant-growth-promoting endophyte, on the biomass production and Mn/Cd uptake of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), Phytolacca acinosa Roxb., and Solanum nigrum L. were investigated. SLS18 displayed multiple heavy metals and antibiotics resistances. The strain also exhibited the capacity of producing indole-3-acetic acid, siderophores, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. In pot experiments, SLS18 could not only infect plants effectively but also significantly increase the biomass of the three tested plants in the presence of Mn/Cd. The promoting effect order of SLS18 on the biomass of the tested plants was sweet sorghum > P. acinosa > S. nigrum L. In the presence of Mn (2,000 mg kg(-1)) and Cd (50 mg kg(-1)) in vermiculite, the total Mn/Cd uptakes in the aerial parts of sweet sorghum, P. acinosa, and S. nigrum L. were increased by 65.2%/40.0%, 55.2%/31.1%, and 18.6%/25.6%, respectively, compared to the uninoculated controls. This demonstrates that the symbiont of SLS18 and sweet sorghum has the potential of improving sweet sorghum biomass production and its total metal uptake on heavy metal-polluted marginal land. It offers the potential that heavy metal-polluted marginal land could be utilized in planting sweet sorghum as biofuel feedstock for ethanol production, which not only gives a promising phytoremediation strategy but also eases the competition for limited fertile farmland between energy crops and food crops.

  3. Growth, biomass production and photosynthesis of Cenchrus ciliaris L. under Acacia tortilis (Forssk.) Hayne based silvopastoral systems in semi arid tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A K; Tiwari, H S; Bhatt, R K

    2010-11-01

    The growth, biomass production and photosynthesis of Cenchrus ciliaris was studied under the canopies of 17 yr old Acacia tortilis trees in semi arid tropical environment. On an average the full grown canopy of A. tortilis at the spacing of 4 x 4 m allowed 55% of total Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) which in turn increased Relative Humidity (RH) and reduced under canopy temperature to -1.75 degrees C over the open air temperature. C. ciliaris attained higher height under the shade of A. tortilis. The tiller production and leaf area index decreased marginally under the shade of tree canopies as compared to the open grown grasses. C. ciliaris accumulated higher chlorophyll a and b under the shade of tree canopies indicating its shade adaptation potential. The assimilatory functions such as rate of photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, photosynthetic water use efficiency (PN/TR) and carboxylation efficiency (PN/CINT) decreased under the tree canopies due to low availability of PAR. The total biomass production in term of fresh and dry weight decreased under the tree canopies. On average of 2 yr C. ciliaris had produced 12.78 t ha(-1) green and 3.72 -t ha(-1) dry biomass under the tree canopies of A. tortilis. The dry matter yield reduced to 38% under the tree canopies over the open grown grasses. The A. tortilis + C. ciliaris maintained higher soil moisture, organic carbon content and available N P K for sustainable biomass production for the longer period. The higher accumulation of crude protein, starch, sugar and nitrogen in leaves and stem of C. ciliaris indicates that this grass species also maintained its quality under A. tortilis based silvopastoral system. The photosynthesis and dry matter accumulation are closely associated with available PAR indicating that for sustainable production of this grass species in the silvopasture systems for longer period about 55% or more PAR is required.

  4. The effects of different sewage sludge amendment rates on the heavy metal bioaccumulation, growth and biomass of cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ebrahem M; Alrumman, Sulaiman A; El-Bebany, Ahmed F; Hesham, Abd El-Latif; Taher, Mostafa A; Fawy, Khaled F

    2017-07-01

    When sewage sludge is incorrectly applied, it may adversely impact agro-system productivity. Thus, this study addresses the reaction of Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber) to different amendment rates (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 g kg -1 ) of sewage sludge in a greenhouse pot experiment, in which the plant growth, heavy metal uptake and biomass were evaluated. A randomized complete block design with six treatments and six replications was used as the experimental design. The soil electrical conductivity, organic matter and Cr, Fe, Zn and Ni concentrations increased, but the soil pH decreased in response to the sewage sludge applications. As approved by the Council of European Communities, all of the heavy metal concentrations in the sewage sludge were less than the permitted limit for applying sewage sludge to land. Generally, applications of sewage sludge of up to 40 g kg -1 resulted in a considerable increase in all of the morphometric parameters and biomass of cucumbers in contrast to plants grown on the control soil. Nevertheless, the cucumber shoot height; root length; number of leaves, internodes and fruits; leaf area; absolute growth rate and biomass decreased in response to 50 g kg -1 of sewage sludge. All of the heavy metal concentrations (except the Cu, Zn and Ni in the roots, Mn in the fruits and Pb in the stems) in different cucumber tissues increased with increasing sewage sludge application rates. However, all of the heavy metal concentrations (except the Cr and Fe in the roots, Fe in the leaves and Cu in the fruits) were within the normal range and did not reach phytotoxic levels. A characteristic of these cucumbers was that all of the heavy metals had a bioaccumulation factor sewage sludge used in this study could be considered for use as a fertilizer in cucumber production systems in Saudi Arabia and can also serve as a substitute method of sewage sludge disposal. Graphical Abstract The effects of different sewage sludge amendment rates on the heavy

  5. Biomass and lipid production from Nannochloropsis oculata growth in raceway ponds operated in sequential batch mode under greenhouse conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Oropeza, Aarón; Fernández-Linares, Luis

    2017-11-01

    The effect of sequential batch cultures of the marine microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata on lipid and biomass production was studied in 200-L raceway ponds for 167 days (nine harvesting cycles) during winter and spring seasons under greenhouse conditions. The highest biomass concentration and productivity were 1.2 g/L and 49.8 mg/L/day on days 73 (5th cycle) and 167 (9th cycle), respectively. The overall interval of lipid production was between 131 and 530 mg/L. Despite the daily and seasonal variations of light irradiance (0-1099 μmol photon/m 2  s), greenhouse temperature (2.1-50.7 °C), and culture temperature (12.5-31.4 °C), ANOVA analysis showed no statistical difference (p value > 0.01) on the fatty acid methyl ester (FAMES) composition over the nine harvesting cycles evaluated. The most abundant FAMES were palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0) and palmitoleic (C16:1∆9) acids with 37.1, 28.6, and 8.4 %, respectively. The sequential batch cultures of N. oculata in raceway ponds showed an increasing biomass production in each new cycle while keeping the quality of the fatty acid mixture under daily and seasonal variations of light irradiance and temperature.

  6. Biomass, gas exchange, and nutrient contents in upland rice plants affected by application forms of microorganism growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascente, Adriano Stephan; de Filippi, Marta Cristina Corsi; Lanna, Anna Cristina; de Souza, Alan Carlos Alves; da Silva Lobo, Valácia Lemes; da Silva, Gisele Barata

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms are considered a genetic resource with great potential for achieving sustainable development of agricultural areas. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of microorganism application forms on the production of biomass, gas exchange, and nutrient content in upland rice. The experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions in a completely randomized design in a factorial 7 × 3 + 1, with four replications. The treatments consisted of combining seven microorganisms with three application forms (microbiolized seed; microbiolized seed + soil drenched with a microorganism suspension at 7 and 15 days after sowing (DAS); and microbiolized seed + plant sprayed with a microorganism suspension at 7 and 15 DAS) and a control (water). Treatments with Serratia sp. (BRM32114), Bacillus sp. (BRM32110 and BRM32109), and Trichoderma asperellum pool provided, on average, the highest photosynthetic rate values and dry matter biomass of rice shoots. Plants treated with Burkolderia sp. (BRM32113), Serratia sp. (BRM32114), and Pseudomonas sp. (BRM32111 and BRM32112) led to the greatest nutrient uptake by rice shoots. Serratia sp. (BRM 32114) was the most effective for promoting an increase in the photosynthetic rate, and for the greatest accumulation of nutrients and dry matter at 84 DAS, in rice shoots, which differed from the control treatment. The use of microorganisms can bring numerous benefits of rice, such as improving physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake, biomass production, and grain yield.

  7. Effects of soil type and light on height growth, biomass partitioning, and nitrogen dynamics on 22 species of tropical dry forest tree seedlings: Comparisons between legumes and nonlegumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Martin, Christina M; Gei, Maria G; Bergstrom, Ellie; Becklund, Kristen K; Becknell, Justin M; Waring, Bonnie G; Werden, Leland K; Powers, Jennifer S

    2017-03-01

    The seedling stage is particularly vulnerable to resource limitation, with potential consequences for community composition. We investigated how light and soil variation affected early growth, biomass partitioning, morphology, and physiology of 22 tree species common in tropical dry forest, including eight legumes. Our hypothesis was that legume seedlings are better at taking advantage of increased resource availability, which contributes to their successful regeneration in tropical dry forests. We grew seedlings in a full-factorial design under two light levels in two soil types that differed in nutrient concentrations and soil moisture. We measured height biweekly and, at final harvest, biomass partitioning, internode segments, leaf carbon, nitrogen, δ 13 C, and δ 15 N. Legumes initially grew taller and maintained that height advantage over time under all experimental conditions. Legumes also had the highest final total biomass and water-use efficiency in the high-light and high-resource soil. For nitrogen-fixing legumes, the amount of nitrogen derived from fixation was highest in the richer soil. Although seed mass tended to be larger in legumes, seed size alone did not account for all the differences between legumes and nonlegumes. Both belowground and aboveground resources were limiting to early seedling growth and function. Legumes may have a different regeneration niche, in that they germinate rapidly and grow taller than other species immediately after germination, maximizing their performance when light and belowground resources are readily available, and potentially permitting them to take advantage of high light, nutrient, and water availability at the beginning of the wet season. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  8. Dose-response regressions for algal growth and similar continuous endpoints: Calculation of effective concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik R.; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Nyholm, Niels

    2009-01-01

    We derive equations for the effective concentration giving 10% inhibition (EC10) with 95% confidence limits for probit (log-normal), Weibull, and logistic dose -responsemodels on the basis of experimentally derived median effective concentrations (EC50s) and the curve slope at the central point (50......% inhibition). For illustration, data from closed, freshwater algal assays are analyzed using the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata with growth rate as the response parameter. Dose-response regressions for four test chemicals (tetraethylammonium bromide, musculamine, benzonitrile, and 4...

  9. Responses of Gmelina arborea, a tropical deciduous tree species, to elevated atmospheric CO2: growth, biomass productivity and carbon sequestration efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasineni, Girish K; Guha, Anirban; Reddy, Attipalli R

    2011-10-01

    The photosynthetic response of trees to rising CO(2) concentrations largely depends on source-sink relations, in addition to differences in responsiveness by species, genotype, and functional group. Previous studies on elevated CO(2) responses in trees have either doubled the gas concentration (>700 μmol mol(-1)) or used single large addition of CO(2) (500-600 μmol mol(-1)). In this study, Gmelina arborea, a fast growing tropical deciduous tree species, was selected to determine the photosynthetic efficiency, growth response and overall source-sink relations under near elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration (460 μmol mol(-1)). Net photosynthetic rate of Gmelina was ~30% higher in plants grown in elevated CO(2) compared with ambient CO(2)-grown plants. The elevated CO(2) concentration also had significant effect on photochemical and biochemical capacities evidenced by changes in F(V)/F(M), ABS/CSm, ET(0)/CSm and RuBPcase activity. The study also revealed that elevated CO(2) conditions significantly increased absolute growth rate, above ground biomass and carbon sequestration potential in Gmelina which sequestered ~2100 g tree(-1) carbon after 120 days of treatment when compared to ambient CO(2)-grown plants. Our data indicate that young Gmelina could accumulate significant biomass and escape acclimatory down-regulation of photosynthesis due to high source-sink capacity even with an increase of 100 μmo lmol(-1) CO(2). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomass burning in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, V.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the direct biomass burning practices in India. The review pertains to fire practices in forest, agricultural fields, grasslands, households, and industry. In forest land, extent of controlled burning for regeneration and fire prevention is estimated based on the forest statistics. The biomass burned annually due to accidental fires and for shifting cultivation is quantified based on a few earlier studies. In the case of household and small-scale industries, the biomass burned is quantified by extrapolating past data on energy consumption. In addition to wood and crop residues, the use of dungcakes and charcoal is also accounted for in calculating the total amount of biofuels burned annually. Wherever possible, regional and seasonal variations in the biomass burning practices are highlighted. This exercise has led to improve the current estimates of biomass burned annually in India. The factors influencing the impact of National Programme on Improved Cookstoves (NPIC) in reducing the greenhouse gas emissions are discussed

  11. Tree biomass in the North Central Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard K. Raile; Pamela J. Jakes

    1982-01-01

    Methods for calculating tree biomass are outlined, and the biomass on commercial forest land is estimated for 11 north-central states. Tree biomass in the North Central Region totals 3.6 billion tons, or 50 tons per commercial forest acre. For all species, total tree biomass is concentrated in growing-stock boles.

  12. Studies and calculations of transverse emittance growth in high-energy proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.; Jackson, G.

    1989-03-01

    In the operation of proton-antiproton colliders, an important goal is to maximize the integrated luminosity. During such operations in the Fermilab Tevatron, the transverse beam emittances were observed to grow unexpectedly quickly, thus causing a serious reduction of the luminosity. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. A formula for the emittance growth rate, due to random dipole kicks, is derived. In the experiment, RF phase noise of known amplitude was deliberately injected into the Tevatron to kick the beam randomly, via dispersion at the RF cavities. Theory and experiment are found to agree reasonably well. We also briefly discuss the problem of quadrupole kicks. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. 2D HYDRA Calculations of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Growth and Feedthrough in Cylindrical Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Matthew; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT), along with the azimuthal current-carrying modes (sausage, kink, etc). ``Feedthrough'' of these instabilities has a strong influence on the integrity of the liner/fuel interface in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept (MagLIF). The linearized ideal MHD equations can be solved to quantify these effects, including the presence of an effective gravity and an axial magnetic field. We investigate the potential of this field to mitigate feedthrough, due to MRT growth from various initial surface finishes (seeded, rough), throughout the implosion using our analytic results and the LLNL code, HYDRA. We will present both low and high convergence cases. Lastly, we illustrate the effect shock compression can have on feedthrough in seeded liners for various fill gases (cold and pre-heated) and magnetic field configurations. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. Measuring laves phase particle size and thermodynamic calculating its growth and coarsening behavior in P92 steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Bing-Yin; Zhou, Rong-Can; Fan, Chang-Xin

    2010-01-01

    The growth of Laves phase particles in three kinds of P92 steels were investigated. Laves phase particles can be easily separated and distinguished from the matrix and other particles by atom number contrast using comparisons of the backscatter electrons (BSE) images and the secondary electrons (SE......) images in scanning electron microscope (SEM). The smaller Laves phase particle size results in higher creep strength and longer creep exposure time at the same conditions. DICTRA software was used to model the growth and coarsening behavior of Laves phase in the three P92 steels. Good agreements were...... attained between measurements in SEM and modeling by DICTRA. Ostwald ripening should be used for the coarsening calculation of Laves phase in P92 steels for time longer than 20000 h and 50000 h at 650°C and 600°C, respectively. © 2010 Chin. Soc. for Elec. Eng....

  15. Measuring laves phase particle size and thermodynamic calculating its growth and coarsening behavior in P92 steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Bing-Yin; Zhou, Rong-Can; Fan, Chang-Xin

    2010-01-01

    The growth of Laves phase particles in three kinds of P92 steels were investigated. Laves phase particles can be easily separated and distinguished from the matrix and other particles by atom number contrast using comparisons of the backscatter electrons (BSE) images and the secondary electrons (...... attained between measurements in SEM and modeling by DICTRA. Ostwald ripening should be used for the coarsening calculation of Laves phase in P92 steels for time longer than 20000 h and 50000 h at 650°C and 600°C, respectively. © 2010 Chin. Soc. for Elec. Eng....

  16. Variation in Seed Quality, Seedling Growth and Biomass Allocation of One-year-old Siberian Larch ( Larix sibirica Ledeb. Seedlings Grown in Different Conditions from Diverse Seed Sources of Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyam-Osor Batkhuu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation of degraded forests in Mongolia showed very low success and the total area reforested successfully represents only 5% of the total forest lost. One of the reasons for such poor results may be low quality of planting stock due to the poor quality of seeds. The objectives of this study were to determine seed source variation in seed quality, to examine their growth and biomass allocation in one-year-old seedlings of Siberian larch from diverse seed sources, and to select the most promising seed sources for reforestation of degraded forest lands in Mongolia. Siberian larch seedlings from eight geographically different seed sources were grown at an open nursery and in greenhouse nursery conditions, and seedlings were subjected to growth and biomass allocation measurements at the end of the fi rst growing season. It was found that there were signi fi cant differences in seed quality, growth and biomass allocation among the seed sources in both growth conditions. Overall, Sources No.3 (Tuul river and No.4 (Mungun showed the best growth performances and biomass accumulation at open nursery and greenhouse nursery conditions, respectively. Source No.1 (Ovorkhangai had the lowest performances in both growth conditions for all measured variables. On the other hand, seedlings grown in the greenhouse nursery conditions had more intensive growth and accumulated more biomass compared to seedlings grown in open nursery conditions. However, the proportion of biomass of the roots at open nursery grown seedlings was higher than that of greenhouse grown seedlings, which may indicate a more promising survival rate after fi eld transplanting.

  17. Biomass pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  18. Solid biomass barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    The primary energy production from solid biomass in the European Union reached 79.3 Mtoe in 2010 which implies a growth rate of 8% between 2009 and 2010. The trend, which was driven deeper by Europe's particularly cold winter of 2009-2010, demonstrates that the economic down-turn failed to weaken the member states' efforts to structure the solid biomass sector. Heat consumption rose sharply: the volume of heat sold by heating networks increased by 18% and reached 6.7 Mtoe and if we consider the total heat consumption (it means with and without recovery via heating networks) the figure is 66 Mtoe in 2010, which amounts to 10.1% growth. The growth of electricity production continued through 2010 (8.3% up on 2009) and rose to 67 TWh but at a slower pace than in 2009 (when it rose by 11.3% on 2008). The situation of the main producer countries: Sweden, Finland, Germany and France is reviewed. It appears that cogeneration unit manufacturers and biomass power plant constructors are the main beneficiaries of the current biomass energy sector boom. There is a trend to replace coal-fired plants that are either obsolete or near their end of life with biomass or multi-fuel plants. These opportunities will enable the industry to develop and further exploit new technologies such as gasification, pyrolysis and torrefaction which will enable biomass to be turned into bio-coal. (A.C.)

  19. Discrimination between acute and chronic decline of Central European forests using map algebra of the growth condition and forest biomass fuzzy sets: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samec, Pavel; Caha, Jan; Zapletal, Miloš; Tuček, Pavel; Cudlín, Pavel; Kučera, Miloš

    2017-12-01

    Forest decline is either caused by damage or else by vulnerability due to unfavourable growth conditions or due to unnatural silvicultural systems. Here, we assess forest decline in the Czech Republic (Central Europe) using fuzzy functions, fuzzy sets and fuzzy rating of ecosystem properties over a 1×1km grid. The model was divided into fuzzy functions of the abiotic predictors of growth conditions (F pred including temperature, precipitation, acid deposition, soil data and relative site insolation) and forest biomass receptors (F rec including remote sensing data, density and volume of aboveground biomass, and surface humus chemical data). Fuzzy functions were designed at the limits of unfavourable, undetermined or favourable effects on the forest ecosystem health status. Fuzzy sets were distinguished through similarity in a particular membership of the properties at the limits of the forest status margins. Fuzzy rating was obtained from the least difference of F pred -F rec . Unfavourable F pred within unfavourable F rec indicated chronic damage, favourable F pred within unfavourable F rec indicated acute damage, and unfavourable F pred within favourable F rec indicated vulnerability. The model in the 1×1km grid was validated through spatial intersection with a point field of uniform forest stands. Favourable status was characterised by soil base saturation (BS)>50%, BCC/Al>1, C org >1%, MgO>6g/kg, and nitrogen depositionfuzzy model used suggests that improvement in forest health will depend on decreasing environmental load and restoration concordance between growth conditions and tree species composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Drought induced changes in growth, leaf gas exchange and biomass production in Albizia lebbeck and Cassia siamea seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, S Gnaana; Paliwal, Kailash

    2011-03-01

    Diurnal trends in net photosynthesis rate (P(N)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), water use efficiency (WUE) and biomass were compared in six-month-old seedlings of Albizia lebbeck and Cassia siamea, under different levels of drought stress. The potted plants were subjected to four varying drought treatment by withholding watering for 7 (D1), 14(D2) and 25 (D3) days. The fourth group (C) was watered daily and treated as unstressed (control). Species differed significantly (p Higher P(N) of 11.6 +/- 0.05 in control followed by 4.35 +/- 0.4 in D1 and 2.83 +/- 0.18 micromol m(-2) s(-1) in D2 was observed in A. lebbeck. A significant (p Higher WUE was observed in C. siamea (D2, 7.1 +/- 0.18 micromol m(-2) s(-1); D3, 8.39 +/- 0.11 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) than A. lebbeck, (control, 7.58 +/- 0.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and D3, 8.12 +/- 0.15 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). The chlorophyll and relative water content (RWC) was more in A. lebbeck than C. siamea. Maximum biomass was produced by A. lebbeckthan C. siamea. From the study, one could conclude that A. lebbeckis better than C. siamea in adopting suitable resource management strategy and be best suited for the plantation programs in the semi-arid dry lands.

  1. The effects of cadmium pulse dosing on physiological traits and growth of the submerged macrophyte Vallisneria spinulosa and phytoplankton biomass: a mesocosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Cao, Yu; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhao; Jeppesen, Erik; Wang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Pulse inputs of heavy metals are expected to increase with a higher frequency of extreme climate events (heavy rain), leading to stronger erosion of contaminated and fertilized farmland soils to freshwaters, with potentially adverse effects on lake ecosystems. We conducted a 5-month mesocosm study to elucidate the responses of the submerged macrophyte Vallisneria spinulosa and phytoplankton to four different doses of cadmium (Cd): 0 (control), 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g m -2 (CK, I, II, and III, respectively) under mesotrophic conditions. We found that total phosphorus concentrations were larger in the three Cd pulse treatments, whereas total nitrogen concentrations did not differ among the four treatments. The contents of chlorophyll a and soluble sugar in macrophyte leaves decreased in III, and total biomass, ramet number, plant height, and total stolon length of macrophytes were lower in both II and III. In contrast, abundances of the three main phytoplankton taxa-Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Bacillariophyta-did not differ among treatments. Total phytoplankton biomass was, however, marginally lower in CK than in the Cd treatments. We conclude that exposure to strong Cd pulses led to significantly reduced growth of macrophytes, while no obvious effect appeared for phytoplankton.

  2. The influence from fuel properties on deposit growth in biomass fired boilers; Braensleegenskapernas inverkan paa benaegenheten till paaslag i biobraensleeldade pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graens, Hilde [ENA Kraft AB, Enkoeping (Sweden); Larfeldt, J. [TPS Termiska processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Experiences from laboratory scale investigations on deposit formation are reported in literature. Few investigations have been performed in large scale especially in grate fired boilers. The insufficient understanding of deposit formation mechanisms explains the lack of methods for deposit reduction. Two most important parameters for deposit prediction in biomass fired grate boilers is the combustion situation in the furnace and the fuel characteristics. The situation in the furnace follows from the operation of the boiler and the air supply, load and fluctuations. Important fuel characteristics are particle size distribution and moisture content. During the season 98/99 a sudden growth of deposits on the furnace walls and superheaters was detected in Ena Krafts boiler for heat and power production. This project aims at finding early indications from the operational system or from the fuel characteristics on such deposit growth in Ena Kraft boiler. Samples of fuel and ash were collected during 99/00 together with data from the operational system. The deposit growth were studied from a camera situated in the furnace and measured using a deposit probe. The probe indicated a deposit growth in the range of 4-20 mg/h. Correlations between the measured deposit growth and the boiler load and the furnace temperature were found. An increase in deposit growth can be explained by variations in fuel composition, particle size distribution, changing air distribution in furnace, vibrations of the grate and load changes. An evaluation of the most important factor/factors for deposit growth is possible only for cases of severe deposit growth, which unfortunately never occurred during this project. Procedures for collecting data has been developed during the project and it has been shown that: (1) the deposit probe is an accurate instrument for detecting deposit growth, (2) aerodynamic classification of the fuel particle distribution is appropriate for boilers with spreader feeding

  3. Effect of long-term salinity on the growth and biomass of two non-secretors mangrove plants Rhizophora apiculata and Ceriops tagal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Nuryawan, A.; Yunasfi; Putri, L. A. P.; Baba, S.

    2018-02-01

    The present study describes the effect of long-term salinity on morphological character and biomass content of two non-secretors mangrove plants Rhizophora apiculata and Ceriops tagal. Two mangrove seedlings were grown for six months in 0%, 0.5%, 1.5%, 2.0% and 3.0% salt concentration. The growth of R. apiculata was significantly enhanced by salt with maximal stimulus at 1.5% (equal to 50% natural seawater), and this increase appeared to be attenuated by increasing the salinity concentration above 1.5%. By contrast, the growth of C. tagal thrived up to 0.5% salt concentration. Our findings, therefore, suggested that within the range of treatments used, 1.5% and 0.5%, respectively were the optimal salinity of R. apiculata and C. tagal for growth. The highest leaf area of C. tagal was obtained at 1.5% salinity concentrations and, on the other hand, R. apiculata showed much greater extent. The wet and dry weight of the two seedlings was changed in the same manner as the height of plants upon salt treatment. Our results indicated that R. apiculata was more salt tolerant than C. tagal, which may provide valuable information for mangrove rehabilitation in North Sumatra, Indonesia.

  4. Growth, biomass allocation and photosynthetic responses are related to intensity of root severance and soil moisture conditions in the plantation tree Cunninghamia lanceolata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tingfa; Duan, Baoli; Zhang, Sheng; Korpelainen, Helena; Niinemets, Ülo; Li, Chunyang

    2016-07-01

    We employed the warm temperate conifer Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook. as a model of plantation forest species to investigate ecophysiological responses to root treatments (control (0%), and ∼25, 50 or 75% of the initial root mass) under well-watered and water-limited conditions. Our results indicated that total root dry mass accumulation was negatively associated with the severity of root pruning, but there was evidence of multiple compensatory responses. The plants exhibited higher instantaneous and long-term (assessed by carbon isotope composition, δ(13)C) water-use efficiency in pruning treatments, especially under low water availability. Root pruning also increased the fine root/total root mass ratio, specific root length and fine root vitality in both water availability treatments. As a result of the compensatory responses, under well-watered conditions, height, stem dry mass accumulation, leaf/fine root biomass ratio (L/FR), transpiration rate, photosynthetic capacity and photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (EN) were the highest under 25% pruning. Yet, all these traits except L/FR and foliage nitrogen content were severely reduced under 75% pruning. Drought negatively affected growth and leaf gas exchange rates, and there was a greater negative effect on growth, water potential, gas exchange and EN when >25% of total root biomass was removed. The stem/aboveground mass ratio was the highest under 25% pruning in both watering conditions. These results indicate that the responses to root severance are related to the excision intensity and soil moisture content. A moderate root pruning proved to be an effective means to improve stem dry mass accumulation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Absolute Quantification of Individual Biomass Concentrations in a Methanogenic Coculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junicke, H.; Abbas, B.; Oentoro, J.; Van Loosdrecht, M.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of individual biomass concentrations is a crucial step towards an improved understanding of anaerobic digestion processes and mixed microbial conversions in general. The knowledge of individual biomass concentrations allows for the calculation of biomass specific conversion rates

  6. Growth of Quailbush in Acidic, Metalliferous Desert Mine Tailings: Effect of Azospirillum brasilense Sp6 on Biomass Production and Rhizosphere Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Bashan, Luz E.; Hernandez, Juan-Pablo; Nelson, Karis N.; Bashan, Yoav

    2010-01-01

    Mine tailing deposits in semiarid and arid environments frequently remain devoid of vegetation due to the toxicity of the substrate and the absence of a diverse soil microbial community capable of supporting seed germination and plant growth. The contribution of the plant growth promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense Sp6 to the growth of quailbush in compost-amended, moderately acidic, high-metal content mine tailings using an irrigation-based reclamation strategy was examined along with its influence on the rhizosphere bacterial community. Sp6 inoculation resulted in a significant (2.2-fold) increase in plant biomass production. The data suggest that the inoculum successfully colonized the root surface and persisted throughout the 60-day experiment in both the rhizosphere, as demonstrated by excision and sequencing of the appropriate denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band, and the rhizoplane, as indicated by fluorescent in situ hybridization of root surfaces. Changes in rhizosphere community structure in response to Sp6 inoculation were evaluated after 15, 30, and 60 days using DGGE analysis of 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction amplicons. A comparison of DGGE profiles using canonical correspondence analysis revealed a significant treatment effect (Sp6-inoculated vs. uninoculated plants vs. unplanted) on bacterial community structure at 15, 30, and 60 days (p<0.05). These data indicate that in an extremely stressed environment such as acid mine tailings, an inoculated plant growth promoting bacterium not only can persist and stimulate plant growth but also can directly or indirectly influence rhizobacterial community development. PMID:20632001

  7. Effects of simulated root herbivory and fertilizer application on growth and biomass allocation in the clonal perennialSolidago canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B; Miao, S L; Bazzaz, F A

    1990-08-01

    Compensatory growth in response to simulated belowground herbivory was studied in the old-field clonal perennialSolidago canadensis. We grew rootpruned plants and plants with intact root systems in soil with or without fertilizer. For individual current shoots (aerial shoot with rhizome and roots) and for whole clones the following predictions were tested: a) root removal is compensated by increased root growth, b) fertilizer application leads to increased allocation to aboveground plant organs and increased leaf turnover, c) effects of fertilizer application are reduced in rootpruned plants. When most roots (90%) were removed current shoots quickly restored equilibrium between above-and belowground parts by compensatory belowground growth whereas the whole clone responded with reduced aboveground growth. This suggests that parts of a clone which are shared by actively growing shoots act as a buffer that can be used as source of material for compensatory growth in response to herbivory. Current shoots increased aboveground mass and whole clones reduced belowground mass in response to fertilizer application, both leading to increased allocation to aboverground parts. Also with fertilizer application both root-pruned and not root-pruned plants increased leaf and shoot turnover. Unfertilized plants, whether rootpruned or not, showed practically no aboveground growth and very little leaf and shoot turnover. Effects of root removal were as severe or more severe under conditions of high as under conditions of low nutrients, suggesting that negative effects of belowground herbivory are not ameliorated by abundant nutrients. Root removal may negate some effects of fertilizer application on the growth of current shoots and whole clones.

  8. The biomass file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    As biomass represents the main source of renewable energy to reach the 23 per cent objective in terms of energy consumption by 2020, a first article gives a synthetic overview of its definition, its origins, its possible uses, its share in the French energy mix, its role by 2020, strengths and weaknesses for its development, the growth potential of its market, and its implications in terms of employment. A second article outlines the assets of biomass, indicates the share of some crops in biomass energy production, and discusses the development of new resources and the possible energy valorisation of various by-products. Interviews about biomass market and development perspectives are proposed with representatives of institutions, energy industries and professional bodies concerned with biomass development and production. Other articles comments the slow development of biomass-based cogeneration, the coming into operation of a demonstration biomass roasting installation in Pau (France), the development potential of biogas in France, the project of bio natural gas vehicles in Lille, and the large development of biogas in Germany

  9. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass displays improved growth and fermentative ability in high solids concentrations and in the presence of inhibitory compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Gary M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Softwoods are the dominant source of lignocellulosic biomass in the northern hemisphere, and have been investigated worldwide as a renewable substrate for cellulosic ethanol production. One challenge to using softwoods, which is particularly acute with pine, is that the pretreatment process produces inhibitory compounds detrimental to the growth and metabolic activity of fermenting organisms. To overcome the challenge of bioconversion in the presence of inhibitory compounds, especially at high solids loading, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was subjected to evolutionary engineering and adaptation for fermentation of pretreated pine wood (Pinus taeda. Results An industrial strain of Saccharomyces, XR122N, was evolved using pretreated pine; the resulting daughter strain, AJP50, produced ethanol much more rapidly than its parent in fermentations of pretreated pine. Adaptation, by preculturing of the industrial yeast XR122N and the evolved strains in 7% dry weight per volume (w/v pretreated pine solids prior to inoculation into higher solids concentrations, improved fermentation performance of all strains compared with direct inoculation into high solids. Growth comparisons between XR122N and AJP50 in model hydrolysate media containing inhibitory compounds found in pretreated biomass showed that AJP50 exited lag phase faster under all conditions tested. This was due, in part, to the ability of AJP50 to rapidly convert furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural to their less toxic alcohol derivatives, and to recover from reactive oxygen species damage more quickly than XR122N. Under industrially relevant conditions of 17.5% w/v pretreated pine solids loading, additional evolutionary engineering was required to decrease the pronounced lag phase. Using a combination of adaptation by inoculation first into a solids loading of 7% w/v for 24 hours, followed by a 10% v/v inoculum (approximately equivalent to 1 g/L dry cell weight into 17

  10. Growth and enzymatic activity of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, a mutualistic fungus isolated from the leaf-cutting ant Atta mexicana, on cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigueras, G; Paredes-Hernández, D; Revah, S; Valenzuela, J; Olivares-Hernández, R; Le Borgne, S

    2017-08-01

    A mutualistic fungus of the leaf-cutting ant Atta mexicana was isolated and identified as Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. This isolate had a close phylogenetic relationship with L. gongylophorus fungi cultivated by other leaf-cutting ants as determined by ITS sequencing. A subcolony started with ~500 A. mexicana workers could process 2 g day -1 of plant material and generate a 135 cm 3 fungus garden in 160 days. The presence of gongylidia structures of ~35 μm was observed on the tip of the hyphae. The fungus could grow without ants on semi-solid cultures with α-cellulose and microcrystalline cellulose and in solid-state cultures with grass and sugarcane bagasse, as sole sources of carbon. The maximum CO 2 production rate on grass (V max  = 17·5 mg CO 2  L g -1  day -1 ) was three times higher than on sugarcane bagasse (V max  = 6·6 mg CO 2  L g -1 day -1 ). Recoveries of 32·9 mg glucose  g biomass -1 and 12·3 mg glucose  g biomass -1 were obtained from the fungal biomass and the fungus garden, respectively. Endoglucanase activity was detected on carboxymethylcellulose agar plates. This is the first study reporting the growth of L. gongylophorus from A. mexicana on cellulose and plant material. According to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the growth of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, isolated from the colony of the ant Atta mexicana, on semisolid medium with cellulose and solid-state cultures with lignocellulosic materials. The maximum CO 2 production rate on grass was three times higher than on sugarcane bagasse. Endoglucanase activity was detected and it was possible to recover glucose from the fungal gongylidia. The cellulolytic activity could be used to process lignocellulosic residues and obtain sugar or valuable products, but more work is needed in this direction. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Do chestnut, northern red, and white oak germinant seedlings respond similarly to light treatments? Growth and biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne Rebbeck; Kurt Gottschalk; Amy. Scherzer

    2011-01-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedling growth has been extensively studied. White oak (Quercus alba L.) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.), however, are far less investigated despite their importance among upland oak species in eastern North American forests. We characterized white and chestnut oak...

  12. Economic liquid growth medium development for high-rate production of cellular biomass and lactic acid of Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharof, Myrto-Panagiota; Lovitt, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    L.lactis importance in the alimentary and pharmaceutical industry as a lactic acid and nisin production strain has been wellestablished. However for its growth, nutrient media such as M17 and Man de Rogosa Sharp (MRS) are used, which are not suitable for use in large quantities due to the high preparation cost and content of nitrogen sources of beef extract andpeptone from poultry that are not environmentally friendly and have possible health risks. For its intensive propagation and high rate...

  13. INFLUENCE OF SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENT CONCENTRATION ON THE SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC BIOMASS ESTIMATION DURING SUBMERGED GROWTH OF Mycobacterium bovis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the surface-active agent Tween 80 (polyoxyethylene 20 sorbitan monoleate on the dispersed growth of Mycobacterium bovis - BCG - was studied. The slopes of the bacterial dry mass / absorbance curves, were significantly reduced, by the increase of the Tween 80 concentration in the medium. Such an influence was probably due to the effect Tween 80 had on the average size of bacterial clumps during the culture carried out in a bench fermenter

  14. Effects of pH on biomass, maximum specific growth rate and extracellular enzyme production by three species of cutaneous propionibacteria grown in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, J; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1983-05-01

    Three cutaneous propionibacteria, Propionibacterium acnes, Propionibacterium avidum and Propionibacterium granulosum, were grown in chemostats using semi-synthetic medium at various pH values. Growth occurred between pH 4.5 and 7.5 for P. acnes and pH 5.0 and 8.0 for P. avidum and P. granulosum. The highest mumax was at pH 6.0 for the three species. Maximum biomass production was obtained at pH 6.0 for P. acnes and P. avidum and at pH 7.5 for P. granulosum. Extracellular enzyme production occurred over the entire pH growth range when denaturation of the enzymes was taken into account. However, detectable activity of the enzymes was found in a narrower range of pH due to the denaturation of the enzymes at low or high pH values. The highest production of enzymes occurred at pH values between 5.0 and 6.0, apart from the production of hyaluronate lyase of P. granulosum (pH 6.0 to 7.0) and the proteinase of P. acnes and P. avidum (pH 5.0 to 7.5). Propionibacterium acnes produced a lipase, hyaluronate lyase, phosphatase and proteinase activity. Propionibacterium avidum produced a lipase and proteinase activity. Propionibacterium granulosum produced a lipase and hyaluronate lyase.

  15. Biomass resource assessment for China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jingjing; Zhou Aiming [Energy Research Institute of State Planning and Development Commission (China)

    1999-07-01

    This paper calculated and assessed the biomass resource availability in China, especially straw and stalk, domestic animal excreta and municipal solid waste. The assessment showed that biomass energy will be a rich and sustainable resource in China, important for developing the social economy and improving the environment in the future. (author)

  16. Available forest biomass for new energetic and industrial prospects. Part 1: analysis and synthesis of existing studies compiled at the international level. Part 2: volume calculations. Part 3: economic part. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by new energetic constraints and the interest of biomass, the authors report a bibliographical survey of studies concerning the evaluation of the available forest biomass. They comment the geographical and time distribution of the identified and compiled studies. They analyse their different topics. Then, they discuss the various field hypotheses, discuss and comments various resource assessment methodologies. They comment the resource the French forest can be, present a synthesis of the available resource at the regional level according to the different studies. They propose a review of some technical-economical aspects (costs, energy cost, price evolutions, improvement of the wood-energy mobilization). The second part proposes a whole set of volume calculations for different forest types (clusters or plantations of trees, copses, sawmills products), for industry and household consumption. It discusses the available volumes with respect to accessibility, additional available volumes, and possible improvements. The third part analyses, comments and discusses the wood market and wood energetic uses, and the possible supply curves for wood energetic uses by 2016

  17. Tracing N, K, Mg and Ca released from decomposing biomass to new tree growth. Part II: A model system simulating root decomposition on clearfell sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherall, A. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: aweatherall@uclan.ac.uk; Proe, M.F. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Craig, J. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Cameron, A.D. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St. Machar Drive AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); McKay, H.M. [Policy and Practice Division, Forestry Commission, 231 Corstorphine Road, Edinburgh EH12 7AT (United Kingdom); Midwood, A.J. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    The decomposing roots of harvested trees are a potential source of nutrients for new trees on both conventional and whole-tree harvested clearfell sites. Roots contain significant reservoirs of nutrients, but little is known about the magnitude and rate of their release. The aim of this study was to use stable isotope techniques in a model system to trace nutrients released by decomposing roots. Labelled biomass was obtained by growing Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) seedlings with a generous or poor nutrient supply containing elevated {sup 15}N, {sup 41}K, {sup 26}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Labelled trees were re-potted in sand and in two contrasting soils types to remove them from the enriched isotope supply. After re-potting, the labelled above-ground biomass was harvested, removed and used in a separate study described previously (Part I of II). In the study described here (Part II of II), new Sitka spruce seedlings were planted alongside the labelled root systems. A full destructive harvest was undertaken after one growing season. Enriched {sup 15}N, {sup 41}K, {sup 26}Mg, and {sup 44}Ca were recovered in the new seedlings in both sand and soils. The elevated amounts of {sup 15}N, {sup 41}K, {sup 26}Mg and {sup 44}Ca recovered in new seedlings indicate that nutrients released from decomposing roots can make a direct contribution to the growth of new trees on restock sites. The success of this model system will provide guidance for the application of similar techniques in field experiments.

  18. A new generic plant growth model framework (PMF): Simulating distributed dynamic interaction of biomass production and its interaction with water and nutrients fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multsch, Sebastian; Kraft, Philipp; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2010-05-01

    Today, crop models have a widespread application in natural sciences, because plant growth interacts and modifies the environment. Transport processes involve water and nutrient uptake from the saturated and unsaturated zone in the pedosphere. Turnover processes include the conversion of dead root biomass into organic matter. Transpiration and the interception of radiation influence the energy exchange between atmosphere and biosphere. But many more feedback mechanisms might be of interest, including erosion, soil compaction or trace gas exchanges. Most of the existing crop models have a closed structure and do not provide interfaces or code design elements for easy data transfer or process exchange with other models during runtime. Changes in the model structure, the inclusion of alternative process descriptions or the implementation of additional functionalities requires a lot of coding. The same is true if models are being upscaled from field to landscape or catchment scale. We therefore conclude that future integrated model developments would benefit from a model structure that has the following requirements: replaceability, expandability and independency. In addition to these requirements we also propose the interactivity of models, which means that models that are being coupled are highly interacting and depending on each other, i.e. the model should be open for influences from other independent models and react on influences directly. Hence, a model which consists of building blocks seems to be reasonable. The aim of the study is the presentation of the new crop model type, the plant growth model framework, PMF. The software concept refers to an object-oriented approach, which is developed with the Unified Modeling Language (UML). The model is implemented with Python, a high level object-oriented programming language. The integration of the models with a setup code enables the data transfer on the computer memory level and direct exchange of information

  19. Promotion of growth and Cu accumulation of bio-energy crop (Zea mays) by bacteria: implications for energy plant biomass production and phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiafang; Sun, Leni; Huang, Zhi; He, Linyan; Zhang, Wenhui; Chen, Zhaojin

    2012-07-30

    Three metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting bacteria (Burkholderia sp. GL12, Bacillus megaterium JL35 and Sphingomonas sp. YM22) were evaluated for their potential to solubilize Cu(2) (OH)(2)CO(3) in solution culture and their plant growth promotion and Cu uptake in maize (Zea mays, an energy crop) grown in a natural highly Cu-contaminated soil. The impacts of the bacteria on the Cu availability and the bacterial community in rhizosphere soils of maize were also investigated. Inductively coupled-plasma optical emission spectrometer analysis showed variable amounts of water-soluble Cu (ranging from 20.5 to 227 mgL(-1)) released by the bacteria from Cu(2) (OH)(2)CO(3) in solution culture. Inoculation with the bacteria was found to significantly increase root (ranging from 48% to 83%) and above-ground tissue (ranging from 33% to 56%) dry weights of maize compared to the uninoculated controls. Increases in Cu contents of roots and above-ground tissues varied from 69% to 107% and from 16% to 86% in the bacterial-inoculated plants compared to the uninoculated controls, respectively. Inoculation with the bacteria was also found to significantly increase the water-extractive Cu concentrations (ranging from 63 to 94%) in the rhizosphere soils of the maize plants compared to the uninoculated controls in pot experiments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses showed that the bacteria could colonize the rhizosphere soils and significantly change the bacterial community compositions in the rhizosphere soils. These results suggest that the metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting bacteria may be exploited for promoting the maize (energy crop) biomass production and Cu phytoremediation in a natural highly Cu-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High-performance liquid chromatographic quantification of plumbagin from transformed rhizoclones of Plumbago zeylanica L.: inter-clonal variation in biomass growth and plumbagin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Pranati; Sharma, Mukesh; Behera, Sailesh N; Thirunavoukkarasu, Manikkannan; Chand, Pradeep K

    2015-02-01

    An optimized protocol for induction and establishment of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy root cultures of Plumbago zeylanica L. was developed through selection of suitable explant type and the bacterial strain. The infection of internodal explants from an in vivo plant and leaves of in vitro origin with the A4 strain resulted in the emergence of hairy roots at a transformation frequency of 86.33 and 42.33 %, respectively. Independent transformed root somaclones (rhizoclones) capable of sustained growth were maintained under a low illumination in auxin-free agar-solidified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium through subcultures at periodic intervals. The presence of pRi T L-DNA rolB or rolC genes and pRi T R-DNA mas2 gene in the transformed rhizoclone genome was ascertained by PCR amplification. Concentrations and type of carbon source, auxin and media strength were optimized for root biomass growth. Five independent rhizoclones each from A4- and LBA9402-transformed root lines were studied for their plumbagin accumulation at different growth phases, using HPLC analysis. The potential for plumbagin biosynthesis was expressed in all the tested rhizoclones, although distinct inter-clonal variations were noted. It was evident that maturation of hairy roots was more important for plumbagin accumulation; slow-growing and early-maturing rhizoclones accumulated more plumbagin compared to fast-growing and late-maturing rhizoclones. A4-induced rhizoclone HRA2B5 was identified as the most superior clone with a higher plumbagin yield potential in comparison with other tested hairy root clones, in vitro-grown non-transformed roots and in vivo roots of naturally occurring P. zeylanica.

  1. Biomass Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, Steve [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunecky, Roman [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lin, Chien-Yuan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Amore, Antonella [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wei, Hui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chen, Xiaowen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tucker, Melvin P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Czernik, Stefan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sluiter, Amie D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Min [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Magrini, Kimberly A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Himmel, Michael E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sheehan, John [Formerly NREL; Dayton, David C. [Formerly NREL; Bozell, Joseph J. [Formerly NREL; Adney, William S. [Formerly NREL; Aden, Andy [Formerly NREL; Hames, Bonnie [Formerly NREL; Thomas, Steven R. [Formerly NREL; Bain, Richard L. [Formerly NREL

    2017-08-02

    Biomass constitutes all the plant matter found on our planet, and is produced directly by photosynthesis, the fundamental engine of life on earth. It is the photosynthetic capability of plants to utilize carbon dioxide from the atmosphere that leads to its designation as a 'carbon neutral' fuel, meaning that it does not introduce new carbon into the atmosphere. This article discusses the life cycle assessments of biomass use and the magnitude of energy captured by photosynthesis in the form of biomass on the planet to appraise approaches to tap this energy to meet the ever-growing demand for energy.

  2. Biomass energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasztor, J.; Kristoferson, L.

    1992-01-01

    Bioenergy systems can provide an energy supply that is environmentally sound and sustainable, although, like all energy systems, they have an environmental impact. The impact often depends more on the way the whole system is managed than on the fuel or on the conversion technology. The authors first describe traditional biomass systems: combustion and deforestation; health impact; charcoal conversion; and agricultural residues. A discussion of modern biomass systems follows: biogas; producer gas; alcohol fuels; modern wood fuel resources; and modern biomass combustion. The issue of bioenergy and the environment (land use; air pollution; water; socioeconomic impacts) and a discussion of sustainable bioenergy use complete the paper. 53 refs., 9 figs., 14 tabs

  3. Methanol from biomass and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    For Hawaii in the near term, the only liquid fuels indigenous sources will be those that can be made from biomass, and of these, methanol is the most promising. In addition, hydrogen produced by electrolysis can be used to markedly increase the yield of biomass methanol. This paper calculates cost of producing methanol by an integrated system including a geothermal electricity facility plus a plant producing methanol by gasifying biomass and adding hydrogen produced by electrolysis. Other studies cover methanol from biomass without added hydrogen and methanol from biomass by steam and carbon dioxide reforming. Methanol is made in a two-step process: the first is the gasification of biomass by partial oxidation with pure oxygen to produce carbon oxides and hydrogen, and the second is the reaction of gases to form methanol. Geothermal steam is used to generate the electricity used for the electrolysis to produce the added hydrogen

  4. The over-step coalescence of carbon atoms on copper surface in the CVD growth of graphene: density functional calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ways in which carbon atoms coalesce over the steps on copper (111 surface are ascertained by density functional theory (DFT calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD growth of graphene. Two strategies, (1 by putting carbon atoms on and under the steps separately and (2 by importing additional carbon atoms between the ones separated by the steps, have been attempted to investigate if an over-step coalescence of carbon atoms could take place. Based on analyses about the optimized configurations and adsorption energies of carbon atoms nearby the steps, as well as the energy evolution curve of the system throughout the geometry optimizations process, we determined the main way in which graphene grows over the steps continuously: the carbon atoms, adsorbed additionally on the locations between the already existing ones which are separated by the steps, link them (these carbon atoms separated by the steps together. The direct over-step coalescence of the carbon atoms separated by the steps is very difficult, although the energy barrier preventing their coalescence can be weakened by importing carbon atoms on and under the steps gradually. Our results imply potential applications in directing the fabrication of graphene with particular structure by controlling the surface topography of copper substrate.

  5. Biomass [updated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Biomass resources and conversion technologies are diverse. Substantial biomass resources exist including woody crops, herbaceous perennials and annuals, forest resources, agricultural residues, and algae. Conversion processes available include fermentation, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, combustion, and transesterification. Bioderived products include liquid fuels (e.g. ethanol, biodiesel, and gasoline and diesel substitutes), gases, electricity, biochemical, and wood pellets. At present the major sources of biomass-derived liquid fuels are from first generation biofuels; ethanol from maize and sugar cane (89 billion L in 2013) and biodiesel from vegetable oils and fats (24 billion liters in 2011). For other than traditional uses, policy in the forms of mandates, targets, subsidies, and greenhouse gas emission targets has largely been driving biomass utilization. Second generation biofuels have been slow to take off.

  6. Global change induced biomass growth offsets carbon released via increased forest fire and respiration of the central Canadian boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsamo, Alemu; Chen, Jing M.; Colombo, Stephen J.; Ter-Mikaelian, Michael T.; Chen, Jiaxin

    2017-05-01

    Northern boreal forests are sensitive to many effects of global change. This is of particular concern due to the proportionally greater climate change projected for the area in which these forests occur. One of the sensitive areas is the Far North of Ontario (FNO), consisting of one of the world's largest remaining tracts of unmanaged boreal forest, the world's third largest area of wetland, and the most southerly area of tundra. We studied past, present, and potential future carbon (C) balance of FNO forests using the Integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Model and the Canadian Regional Climate Model with stand-replacing fire disturbance. The forced simulations of past (1901-2004) C balances indicated that vegetation C stock remained stable, while soil C stock gradually declined (-0.07 t C ha-1 yr-1, p climate growth-enhancing effects of global change will outweigh C loss through increased ecosystem respiration, disturbance, and changes in forest age class structure resulting in an increase in total FNO ecosystem C stock by mid-21st century. However, the projected simulations also indicated that the relative sizes of forest C stocks will change, with relatively less in the soil and more in vegetation, increasing fuel loads and making the entire ecosystem susceptible to forest fire and insect disturbances.

  7. Biomass Deconstruction and Recalcitrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Heng

    reflections of plant species, tissue or organ types, genetic traits and environment. Effects of cultivar type, anatomical distribution, chemical composition, fertilizer level and growth year have been observed during in vitro and in vivo trials. A similar approach is here taken to further investigate: 1). How...... as an important parameter affecting the bio-degradability during enzymatic saccharification. The leaf fraction (leaf blade and sheath), which contributes up to 50 % of the whole wheat straw on a weight basis, is more degradable than the stem fraction via a biochemical process. Water was used to assess...... level of different biomasses. The knowledge on wheat straw biomass gained from this thesis work may be translated to more focused plant breeding research for 2G ethanol production, and the Copenhagen HTS platform is an ideal tool for screening large biomass sample set. The success of lignocellulosic...

  8. Clean energy for development and economic growth: Biomass and other renewable options to meet energy and development needs in poor nations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilley, Art; Pandey, Bikash; Karstad, Elsen; Owen, Matthew; Bailis, Robert; Ribot, Jesse; Masera, Omar; Diaz, Rodolpho; Benallou, Abdelahanine; Lahbabi, Abdelmourhit

    2012-10-01

    The document explores the linkages between renewable energy, poverty alleviation, sustainable development, and climate change in developing countries. In particular, the paper places emphasis on biomass-based energy systems. Biomass energy has a number of unique attributes that make it particularly suitable to climate change mitigation and community development applications.

  9. Biomass IGCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, K.; Keraenen, H. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Enviropower Inc. is developing a modern power plant concept based on pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC). The process is capable of maximising the electricity production with a variety of solid fuels - different biomass and coal types - mixed or separately. The development work is conducted on many levels. These and demonstration efforts are highlighted in this article. The feasibility of a pressurised gasification based processes compared to competing technologies in different applications is discussed. The potential of power production from biomass is also reviewed. (orig.) 4 refs.

  10. Modelling tree biomasses in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repola, J.

    2013-06-01

    Biomass equations for above- and below-ground tree components of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L), Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) and birch (Betula pendula Roth and Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were compiled using empirical material from a total of 102 stands. These stands (44 Scots pine, 34 Norway spruce and 24 birch stands) were located mainly on mineral soil sites representing a large part of Finland. The biomass models were based on data measured from 1648 sample trees, comprising 908 pine, 613 spruce and 127 birch trees. Biomass equations were derived for the total above-ground biomass and for the individual tree components: stem wood, stem bark, living and dead branches, needles, stump, and roots, as dependent variables. Three multivariate models with different numbers of independent variables for above-ground biomass and one for below-ground biomass were constructed. Variables that are normally measured in forest inventories were used as independent variables. The simplest model formulations, multivariate models (1) were mainly based on tree diameter and height as independent variables. In more elaborated multivariate models, (2) and (3), additional commonly measured tree variables such as age, crown length, bark thickness and radial growth rate were added. Tree biomass modelling includes consecutive phases, which cause unreliability in the prediction of biomass. First, biomasses of sample trees should be determined reliably to decrease the statistical errors caused by sub-sampling. In this study, methods to improve the accuracy of stem biomass estimates of the sample trees were developed. In addition, the reliability of the method applied to estimate sample-tree crown biomass was tested, and no systematic error was detected. Second, the whole information content of data should be utilized in order to achieve reliable parameter estimates and applicable and flexible model structure. In the modelling approach, the basic assumption was that the biomasses of

  11. Part III: Comparing observed growth of selected test organisms in food irradiation studies with growth predictions calculated by ComBase softwares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Andrassy, E.; Meszaros, L.; Beczner, J.; Polyak-Feher, K.; Gaal, O.; Lebovics, V.K.; Lugasi, A.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of intensive predictive microbiological modelling activities, several computer programs and softwares became available recently for facilitating microbiological risk assessment. Among these tools, the establishment of the ComBase, an international database and its predictive modelling softwares of the Pathogen Modelling Program (PMP) set up by the USDA Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmore, PA, and the Food Micromodel/Growth Predictor by the United Kingdom's Institute of Food Research, Norwich, are most important. The authors have used the PMP 6.1 software version of ComBase as a preliminary trial to compare observed growth of selected test organisms in relation to their food irradiation work during recent years within the FAO/IAEA Coordinated Food Irradiation Research Projects (D6.10.23 and D6.20.07) with the predicted growth on the basis of growth models available in ComBase for the same species as those of the authors' test organisms. The results of challenge tests with Listeria monocytogenes inoculum in untreated or irradiated experimental batches of semi-prepared breaded turkey meat steaks (cordon bleu), sliced tomato, sliced watermelon, sliced cantaloupe and sous vide processed mixed vegetables, as well as Staphylococcus aureus inoculum of a pasta product, tortellini, were compared with their respective growth models under relevant environmental conditions. This comparison showed good fits in the case of non-irradiated and high moisture food samples, but growth of radiation survivors lagged behind the predicted values. (author)

  12. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  13. Pilot-scale continuous recycling of growth medium for the mass culture of a halotolerant Tetraselmis sp. in raceway ponds under increasing salinity: a novel protocol for commercial microalgal biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fon Sing, S; Isdepsky, A; Borowitzka, M A; Lewis, D M

    2014-06-01

    The opportunity to recycle microalgal culture medium for further cultivation is often hampered by salinity increases from evaporation and fouling by dissolved and particulate matter. In this study, the impact of culture re-use after electro-flocculation of seawater-based medium on growth and biomass productivity of the halotolerant green algal strain Tetraselmis sp., MUR 233, was investigated in pilot-scale open raceway ponds over 5months. Despite a salinity increase from 5.5% to 12% (w/v) NaCl, Tetraselmis MUR 233 grown on naturally DOC-enriched recycled medium produced 48-160% more ash free dry weight (AFDW) biomass daily per unit pond area than when grown on non-recycled medium. A peak productivity of 37.5±3.1gAFDWm(-2)d(-1) was reached in the recycled medium upon transition from ∼14% to ∼7% NaCl. The combination of high biomass-yielding mixotrophic growth under high salinity has been proven to be a successful sustainable cultivation strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimation of Viable Biomass In Wastewater And Activated Sludge By Determination of ATP, Oxygen Utilization Rate And FDA Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Poul-Erik; Eriksen, T.; Jensen, B.K.

    1992-01-01

    ATP content, oxygen utilization rate (OUR) and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis were tested for the ability to express the amount of viable biomass in wastewater and activated sludge. The relationship between biomass and these activity parameters was established in growth cultures made...... with biomass, while FDA hydrolysis in the sludge failed to show any such correlation. Conversion factors of 3 mg ATP/g dw, 300 mg O2/h g dw and 0.4 A/h (mg dw/ml) for ATP, OUR and FDA methods, respectively, were calculated. When the methods were applied for in situ determinations in four different wastewater...... plants, it was found that ATP content and respiration rate estimated viable biomass to range from 81 to 293 mg dw/g SS for raw wastewater and from 67 to 187 mg dw/g SS for activated sludge with a rather weak correlation between ATP and respiration measurements. The FDA hydrolysis estimated viable biomass...

  15. Changes In Growth Culture FDA Activity Under Changing Growth Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Per Elberg; Eriksen, Thomas Juul; Jensen, Bjørn K.

    1992-01-01

    of the bacteria. The FDA activity/ATP ratio was calculated for different concentrations of autoclaved sludge. A faster decay rate of ATP relative to FDA hydrolysis activity was observed, thus causing changes in the ratio. Furthermore, comparison between values obtained from pure cultures and different soils......The FDA hydrolysis capacities and bacterial biomass concentrations (estimated by determination of ATP content) of growth cultures prepared from activated sludge and wastewater, were measured to find out whether the FDA activity would reflect bacterial biomass under different physiological states...

  16. Biomass of elephant grass and leucaena for bioenergy production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Sales

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomass production of elephant grass and leucaena in Paraná state, Brazil, for the generation of renewable energy. Two field studies were conducted in the municipality of Ibiporã (23° S, 51° 01?W. In the first study, the dry matter accumulation curves were calculated, with sampling at 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 days after cultivation. The second study was conducted in a randomized complete block design with split plots. The total aboveground biomass production of elephant grass and leucaena was estimated in the main plot. Cutting times of 60 and 120 days after cultivation were evaluated in the subplots. The productivity of dry matter (kg.ha-1 was estimated using the biomass data. In addition, the potential production of energy from the burning of elephant grass biomass, and the potential production of total aboveground biomass and energy of elephant grass (in Paraná was estimated using an agrometeorological model. Elephant grass can be potentially used as an alternative energy source. Leucaena has slow initial growth, and it must therefore be evaluated over a longer period in order to determine its potential. Simulation analyses of the capability of power generation, conducted based on the annual dry matter production, revealed that elephant grass could be an important source of renewable energy in the state of Paraná.

  17. The impact of tree age on biomass growth and carbon accumulation capacity: A retrospective analysis using tree ring data of three tropical tree species grown in natural forests of Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl, Michael; Neupane, Prem R; Lotfiomran, Neda

    2017-01-01

    The world's forests play a pivotal role in the mitigation of global climate change. By photosynthesis they remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store carbon in their biomass. While old trees are generally acknowledged for a long carbon residence time, there is no consensus on their contribution to carbon accumulation due to a lack of long-term individual tree data. Tree ring analyses, which use anatomical differences in the annual formation of wood for dating growth zones, are a retrospective approach that provides growth patterns of individual trees over their entire lifetime. We developed time series of diameter growth and related annual carbon accumulation for 61 trees of the species Cedrela odorata L. (Meliacea), Hymenaea courbaril L. (Fabacea) and Goupia glabra Aubl. (Goupiacea). The trees grew in unmanaged tropical wet-forests of Suriname and reached ages from 84 to 255 years. Most of the trees show positive trends of diameter growth and carbon accumulation over time. For some trees we observed fluctuating growth-periods of lower growth alternate with periods of increased growth. In the last quarter of their lifetime trees accumulate on average between 39 percent (C. odorata) and 50 percent (G. glabra) of their final carbon stock. This suggests that old-growth trees in tropical forests do not only contribute to carbon stocks by long carbon resistance times, but maintain high rates of carbon accumulation at later stages of their life time.

  18. The impact of tree age on biomass growth and carbon accumulation capacity: A retrospective analysis using tree ring data of three tropical tree species grown in natural forests of Suriname.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köhl

    Full Text Available The world's forests play a pivotal role in the mitigation of global climate change. By photosynthesis they remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store carbon in their biomass. While old trees are generally acknowledged for a long carbon residence time, there is no consensus on their contribution to carbon accumulation due to a lack of long-term individual tree data. Tree ring analyses, which use anatomical differences in the annual formation of wood for dating growth zones, are a retrospective approach that provides growth patterns of individual trees over their entire lifetime. We developed time series of diameter growth and related annual carbon accumulation for 61 trees of the species Cedrela odorata L. (Meliacea, Hymenaea courbaril L. (Fabacea and Goupia glabra Aubl. (Goupiacea. The trees grew in unmanaged tropical wet-forests of Suriname and reached ages from 84 to 255 years. Most of the trees show positive trends of diameter growth and carbon accumulation over time. For some trees we observed fluctuating growth-periods of lower growth alternate with periods of increased growth. In the last quarter of their lifetime trees accumulate on average between 39 percent (C. odorata and 50 percent (G. glabra of their final carbon stock. This suggests that old-growth trees in tropical forests do not only contribute to carbon stocks by long carbon resistance times, but maintain high rates of carbon accumulation at later stages of their life time.

  19. Investigations on the growth kinetics of Laves phase precipitates in 12% Cr creep-resistant steels: Experimental and DICTRA calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat, O.; Garcia, J.; Rojas, D.; Carrasco, C.; Inden, G.

    2010-01-01

    The growth kinetics of Laves phase precipitates (type Fe 2 W) in the early stage of creep (650 deg. C for 10,000 h) in two 12% Cr ferrite-martensitic steels has been investigated. In one alloy the Laves phase formed on tempering, while in the second alloy the Laves phase precipitated during creep. Kinetic simulations were performed using the software DICTRA. The particle size of the Laves phase was measured on transmission electron microscopy samples. The equilibrium phase fraction of the Laves phase was reached in the first thousand hours. Simulations of particle growth showed good agreement with the experimental results. Competitive growth between M 23 C 6 and the Laves phase showed that M 23 C 6 carbides reached their equilibrium after 12 days, whereas the Laves phase reached equilibrium after 3 months. Simulations of the influence of the interfacial energy and addition of Co, Cu and Si on Laves phase precipitation are presented.

  20. Pitfalls and possibilities in the analysis of biomass allocation patterns in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik ePoorter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants can differentially allocate biomass to leaves, stems, roots and reproduction, and follow ontogenetic trajectories that interact with the prevailing climate. Various methodological tools exist to analyse the resulting allocation patterns, based either on the calculation of biomass ratios or fractions of different organs at a given point in time, or on a so-called allometric analysis of biomass data sampled across species or over an experimental growth period. We discuss the weak and strong points of each of these methods. Although both approaches have useful features, we suggest that often a plot of biomass fractions against total plant size, either across species or in the comparison of treatment effects, combines the best of both worlds.

  1. The FEM based calculation of crack-tip strain rate for determining the crack growth rate of 304 stainless steel in BWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, P.-C.

    2001-01-01

    This research calculates the crack growth rate (CGR) of the cooling pipe in the nuclear power plant. The crack is caused by the tension left in welding as well as by the coolant chemicals. There is, by far, no satisfactory deterministic model that can predict the crack growth rate. Although Macdonald's CEFM model is more close to a deterministic one, it requires accurate calculation of the crack-tip strain rate before the crack growth rate can be obtained by using Faraday's equation. The empirical equation used by the CEFM model for estimating the crack-tip strain rate is a drawback in making it a totally deterministic model. This research is set to make up this critical defect by applying non-linear finite element method to calculate the crack-tip strain rate. According to the metallic property, there is a plastic zone forming around the crack-tip. This research found when applying finite element method, the number of the elements (namely the mesh density) in the vicinity of the crack-tip has significant effects on the crack-tip strain obtained. Therefore, this research pioneered by using different mesh density in the vicinity of the crack-tip for the calculation of the crack-tip strain, the convergence of which is used for selecting the appropriate mesh density. The selected mesh density is then used to determine the dimension of the plastic zone, in which the crack-tip strain rate can be calculated. When the FEM results are compared with the experimental data, the nonlinear finite element method combined with CEFM shows a very satisfactory prediction capability

  2. Managed Sustainable Development Classification Of Resources And Goods amp Services Calculating Sustainable Growth Rate And The Sustainable Development Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Saxena

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Macro-level manmade problems can often be best solved by understanding and manipulating the economics behind it. The world today is facing genuine problems of scarcity of resources and environmental amp ecological issues in view of intergenerational equity. The paper proposes a new approach of identification and classification of i Resources and ii Goods and services in the context of sustainable development. Every economy has ambitious economic growth aspirations which are often found conflicting with the commitments on natural resource conservation and climate change obligations. The proposed methodology is a reconciliation of the aspired economic growth of a region and the conservation of the resources and nature. The paper employs contribution of different types of goods and services in the gross domestic product GDP of a region to analyze sustainability of development. The important parameters that the paper establishes are Sustainability Ratio R Sustainable Growth Rate SG and the Sustainable Development Index SI. These parameters can be used to compare the sustainable development level of different regions. Ensuring natural resource and environmental sustainability will eventually ensure economic sustainability. The paper considers resource depletion concerns as well as the environmental pollutants biological risks carbon footprint warhead proliferation et cetera thereby ensuring all round sustainability from survival to economic end. The sustainability analysis is done for long periods such as 50 years 100 years et cetera. The index shows how sustainable the development of an economy is and how sustainability it is growing. The presently much revered GDP growth numbers are directionless it does not tell the type of growth an economy essentially has. The direction should be sustainability which the paper stresses upon. An illustration of sustainability analysis of India is also done. Such indices can help identifying sustainably developing

  3. An empirical, integrated forest biomass monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Robert E.; Ohmann, Janet; Gregory, Matt; Roberts, Heather; Yang, Zhiqiang; Bell, David M.; Kane, Van; Hughes, M. Joseph; Cohen, Warren B.; Powell, Scott; Neeti, Neeti; Larrue, Tara; Hooper, Sam; Kane, Jonathan; Miller, David L.; Perkins, James; Braaten, Justin; Seidl, Rupert

    2018-02-01

    The fate of live forest biomass is largely controlled by growth and disturbance processes, both natural and anthropogenic. Thus, biomass monitoring strategies must characterize both the biomass of the forests at a given point in time and the dynamic processes that change it. Here, we describe and test an empirical monitoring system designed to meet those needs. Our system uses a mix of field data, statistical modeling, remotely-sensed time-series imagery, and small-footprint lidar data to build and evaluate maps of forest biomass. It ascribes biomass change to specific change agents, and attempts to capture the impact of uncertainty in methodology. We find that: • A common image framework for biomass estimation and for change detection allows for consistent comparison of both state and change processes controlling biomass dynamics. • Regional estimates of total biomass agree well with those from plot data alone. • The system tracks biomass densities up to 450–500 Mg ha‑1 with little bias, but begins underestimating true biomass as densities increase further. • Scale considerations are important. Estimates at the 30 m grain size are noisy, but agreement at broad scales is good. Further investigation to determine the appropriate scales is underway. • Uncertainty from methodological choices is evident, but much smaller than uncertainty based on choice of allometric equation used to estimate biomass from tree data. • In this forest-dominated study area, growth and loss processes largely balance in most years, with loss processes dominated by human removal through harvest. In years with substantial fire activity, however, overall biomass loss greatly outpaces growth. Taken together, our methods represent a unique combination of elements foundational to an operational landscape-scale forest biomass monitoring program.

  4. Above- and Below-ground Biomass, Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange, and Soil Respiration in a Poplar Populus deltoides Bartr.) stand : Changes after 3 years of Growth under Elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Grieve, K.; Bil, K.; Kudeyarov, V.; Handley, L.; Murthy, R.

    2003-12-01

    Stands of cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) trees were grown as a coppiced system under ambient (40 Pa), twice ambient (80 Pa), and three times ambient (120 Pa) partial pressure CO2 for the past three years in the Intensively-managed Forest Mesocosm (IFM) of the Biosphere 2 Center. Over three years Net Ecosystem CO2 exchange (NECE) was measured continuously and in the third year, nine whole trees were harvested from each CO2 treatment over the growing season. Both above- and below-ground parameters were measured. Three years of growth under elevated CO2 showed the expected stimulation in foliar biomass (8.7, 11.9, and 13.1 kg for the 40, 80, and 120 Pa treatments, respectively). Rates of NECE also followed an expected increase with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, with maximum CO2 uptake rates reaching 10.5, 15.6, and 19.6 μ moles m-2 s-1 in the 40, 80, and 120 Pa treatments, respectively. However, above ground woody biomass and root biomass were not much stimulated beyond 80 Pa CO2. Wood/foliage and above/below ground biomass ratios reflect this decline. Under conditions of non-limiting nutrients and water, we found consistent increases in the above/below ground biomass ratio and wood to foliage biomass ratios in the 80 compared to the 40 Pa pCO2. Woody biomass production and the above/below ground biomass ratio were lower under the 120 Pa than any other treatment. Although biomass production did not change appreciably between 80 and 120 Pa CO2 treatments, both substrate induced and in-situ soil respiration values are also significantly higher in the 120Pa treatment, though no differences were present prior to CO2 treatments (Murthy et al. 2003). The unique closed-system operation of the IFM allowed for measures of soil CO2 efflux to be measured at both the soil collar and stand scales using a box model that takes into account all inputs and outputs from the stand. In-situ soil respiration rates increased significantly with increased atmospheric CO2

  5. Investigations on the growth kinetics of Laves phase precipitates in 12% Cr creep-resistant steels: Experimental and DICTRA calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, O. [Max Planck Institute fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)] [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepcion (Chile); Garcia, J., E-mail: jose.garcia@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Rojas, D. [Max Planck Institute fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Carrasco, C. [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepcion (Chile); Inden, G. [Max Planck Institute fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The growth kinetics of Laves phase precipitates (type Fe{sub 2}W) in the early stage of creep (650 deg. C for 10,000 h) in two 12% Cr ferrite-martensitic steels has been investigated. In one alloy the Laves phase formed on tempering, while in the second alloy the Laves phase precipitated during creep. Kinetic simulations were performed using the software DICTRA. The particle size of the Laves phase was measured on transmission electron microscopy samples. The equilibrium phase fraction of the Laves phase was reached in the first thousand hours. Simulations of particle growth showed good agreement with the experimental results. Competitive growth between M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the Laves phase showed that M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides reached their equilibrium after 12 days, whereas the Laves phase reached equilibrium after 3 months. Simulations of the influence of the interfacial energy and addition of Co, Cu and Si on Laves phase precipitation are presented.

  6. Shorea robusta: A sustainable biomass feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kumar Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The biomass feedstock needs to be available in a manner that is sustainable as well as renewable. However, obtaining reliable and cost effective supplies of biomass feedstock produced in a sustainable manner can prove to be difficult. Traditional biomass, mainly in the form of fallen leaves, fuel wood or dried dung, has long been the renewable and sustainable energy source for cooking and heating. Present study accounts for the biomass of fallen leaves of Shorea robusta, also known as sal, sakhua or shala tree, in the campus of BIT Mesra (Ranchi. These leaves are being gathered and burnt rather than being sold commercially. They contain water to varying degrees which affects their energy content. Hence, measurement of moisture content is critical for its biomass assessment. The leaves were collected, weighed, oven dried at 100oC until constant weight, then dry sample was reweighed to calculate the moisture content that has been driven off. By subtraction of moisture content from the initial weight of leaves, biomass was calculated. Using Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC the heat content of the leaves was calculated and the elemental analysis of leaf was done by CHNSO elemental analyser. Further, total biomass and carbon content of Sal tree was calculated using allometric equations so as to make a comparison to the biomass stored in dried fallen leaves

  7. Phonon thermal conductivity of scandium nitride for thermoelectrics from first-principles calculations and thin-film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdsongpanya, Sit; Hellman, Olle; Sun, Bo; Koh, Yee Kan; Lu, Jun; Van Nong, Ngo; Simak, Sergei I.; Alling, Björn; Eklund, Per

    2017-11-01

    The knowledge of lattice thermal conductivity of materials under realistic conditions is vitally important since many modern technologies require either high or low thermal conductivity. Here, we propose a theoretical model for determining lattice thermal conductivity, which takes into account the effect of microstructure. It is based on ab initio description that includes the temperature dependence of the interatomic force constants and treats anharmonic lattice vibrations. We choose ScN as a model system, comparing the computational predictions to the experimental data by time-domain thermoreflectance. Our experimental results show a trend of reduction in lattice thermal conductivity with decreasing domain size predicted by the theoretical model. These results suggest a possibility to control thermal conductivity by microstructural tailoring and provide a predictive tool for the effect of the microstructure on the lattice thermal conductivity of materials based on ab initio calculations.

  8. Biomass torrefaction mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2016-05-17

    A biomass torrefaction system includes a mill which receives a raw biomass feedstock and operates at temperatures above 400 F (204 C) to generate a dusty flue gas which contains a milled biomass product.

  9. Chemicals Derived from Biomass Thermolysis and Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaidle, Joshua A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Talmadge, Michael S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nimlos, Mark R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bratis, Adam D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-07-14

    The United States has the potential to sustainably produce over 1 billion dry tons of nonfood biomass per year by 2030. While conversion of this biomass into fuels has garnished significant attention, these renewable feedstocks can also be converted into valuable chemicals. Analogous to petroleum refining, the coproduction of fuels and chemicals from biomass enables more complete utilization of the feedstock and supports the growth of a bio-economy by improving biorefinery economics. This chapter provides an overview of biomass thermolysis and gasification technologies, highlights existing and future chemical production opportunities, and elaborates on specific challenges associated with product separation and purification.

  10. The impact of fluctuations and correlations in droplet growth by collision-coalescence revisited - Part 1: Numerical calculation of post-gel droplet size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Lester; Raga, Graciela B.

    2017-06-01

    The impact of stochastic fluctuations in cloud droplet growth is a matter of broad interest, since stochastic effects are one of the possible explanations of how cloud droplets cross the size gap and form the raindrop embryos that trigger warm rain development in cumulus clouds. Most theoretical studies on this topic rely on the use of the kinetic collection equation, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. However, the kinetic collection equation is a deterministic equation with no stochastic fluctuations. Moreover, the traditional calculations using the kinetic collection equation are not valid when the system undergoes a transition from a continuous distribution to a distribution plus a runaway raindrop embryo (known as the sol-gel transition). On the other hand, the stochastic simulation algorithm, although intrinsically stochastic, fails to adequately reproduce the large end of the droplet size distribution due to the huge number of realizations required. Therefore, the full stochastic description of cloud droplet growth must be obtained from the solution of the master equation for stochastic coalescence. In this study the master equation is used to calculate the evolution of the droplet size distribution after the sol-gel transition. These calculations show that after the formation of the raindrop embryo, the expected droplet mass distribution strongly differs from the results obtained with the kinetic collection equation. Furthermore, the low-mass bins and bins from the gel fraction are strongly anticorrelated in the vicinity of the critical time, this being one of the possible explanations for the differences between the kinetic and stochastic approaches after the sol-gel transition. Calculations performed within the stochastic framework provide insight into the inability of explicit microphysics cloud models to explain the droplet spectral broadening observed in small, warm clouds.

  11. Changes In Growth Culture FDA Activity Under Changing Growth Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Per Elberg; Eriksen, Thomas Juul; Jensen, Bjørn K.

    1992-01-01

    The FDA hydrolysis capacities and bacterial biomass concentrations (estimated by determination of ATP content) of growth cultures prepared from activated sludge and wastewater, were measured to find out whether the FDA activity would reflect bacterial biomass under different physiological states...... of the bacteria. The FDA activity/ATP ratio was calculated for different concentrations of autoclaved sludge. A faster decay rate of ATP relative to FDA hydrolysis activity was observed, thus causing changes in the ratio. Furthermore, comparison between values obtained from pure cultures and different soils...... revealed differences up to two orders of magnitude of the ratio. Based on these results it was concluded that the FDA activity should not be applied for measurements of viable biomass in environments in which different physiological conditions occur....

  12. A Spatial Model of the Biomass to Energy Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    by location. This paper aims to contribute to the development of a biomass to energy evaluation and mapping system, using geographical information systems (GIS). A GIS-based in-forest residue model considers forest growth and choice of harvest method. Data from a sawmill survey is used to assess sawmill resi......-dues. For both sources the costs of road transportation have been modelled using spatial cost allocation. As emphasis has been on using public data, the model is still a rough es-timate, which could be improved using forest industry data and refined algorithms. As a first result, the cost distribution...... and the costs of accumulated amounts of wood residues can now be calculated almost instantly for each location in the country. It is assumed that this approach will facilitate the assessment of future biomass markets....

  13. Influência da biomassa inicial sobre o crescimento e a produtividade de peixes em sistema de policultivo Effects of initial biomass on fish growth and fishery productivity in polyculture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zélia Maria Pimentel Nunes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Analisou-se o crescimento dos peixes, a composição das espécies e a produtividade de quatro policultivos (P75, P78, P87 e P207, visando melhorar o manejo e a produtividade pesqueira dos pequenos açudes (0,1-5,0ha do Semi-Árido brasileiro. Simulou-se as condições desses açudes em viveiros com 120 e 5.000 m² de área, sem renovação de água, utilizando moderada quantidade de adubo e fertilizante. A biomassa inicial variou de 75 a 207kg ha-1, sendo formada por: tilápia do Nilo (Oreochromis niloticus, curimatã pacu (Prochilodus argenteus, carpa comum (Cyprinus carpio, tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum e tucunaré (Cichla ocellaris. Os peixes apresentaram baixo crescimento (The analysed species composition, fish growth, and productivity of four polycultures (P75, P78, P87, and P207 with the objective to improve the small reservoir (0.1-5 ha fishery management and productivity in the Brazilian semiarid region were conducted a experiment. To mimic reservoir conditions, we used 120 and 5,000m² ponds and evaporation and infiltration water loss was replaced. In addition, manure and fertilizers were used only moderately. The initial biomass of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, 'tambaqui' Colossoma macropomum, 'curimatã pacu' Prochilodus argenteus, common carp Cyprinus carpio, and 'tucunaré' Cichla ocellaris ranged from 75 to 207kg ha-1. The fish showed low growth rates (<0.01g g-1 d-1 after 75 days of culture (P78 and P87. Tambaqui, tilapia, and curimatã growth decreased after 53 days (P75. In moderate biomass, tambaqui grew less than carp and curimatã did (P207. Tilapia productivity reached 720kg ha-1yr-1 (P78 and fell to 220kg ha-1yr-1 because of the reproductive process (P75 and P207. The carp productivity of 1,600kg.ha-1yr-1 was higher than those of the other fish (P87. The 75kg.ha-1 biomass level (60:30:4:3:3% of tilapia, tambaqui, carp, curimatã, and tucunaré, respectively optimized fish growth and productivity. The use of

  14. Demographic drivers of tree biomass change during secondary succession in northeastern Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendaal, Danae M A; Chazdon, Robin L

    2015-03-01

    Second-growth tropical forests are an important global carbon sink. As current knowledge on biomass accumulation during secondary succession is heavily based on chronosequence studies, direct estimates of annual rates of biomass accumulation in monitored stands are largely unavailable. We evaluated the contributions of tree diameter increment, recruitment, and mortality to annual tree biomass change during succession for three groups of tree species: second-growth (SG) specialists, generalists, and old-growth (OG) specialists. We monitored six second-growth tropical forests that varied in stand age and two old-growth forests in northeastern Costa Rica. We monitored these over a period of 8 to 16 years. To assess rates of biomass change during secondary succession, we compared standing biomass and biomass dynamics between second-growth forest stages and old-growth forest, and evaluated the effect of stand age on standing biomass and biomass dynamics in second-growth forests. Standing tree biomass increased with stand age during succession, whereas the rate of biomass change decreased. Biomass change was largely driven by tree diameter increment and mortality, with a minor contribution from recruitment. The relative importance of these demographic drivers shifted over succession. Biomass gain due to tree diameter increment decreased with stand age, whereas biomass loss due to mortality increased. In the age range of our second-growth forests, 10-41 years, SG specialists dominated tree biomass in second-growth forests. SG specialists, and to a lesser extent generalists, also dominated stand-level biomass increase due to tree diameter increment, whereas SG specialists largely accounted for decreases in biomass due to mortality. Our results indicate that tree growth is largely driving biomass dynamics early in succession, whereas both growth and mortality are important later in succession. Biomass dynamics are largely accounted for by a few SG specialists and one

  15. A mathematical model for transporting the biomass to biomass based power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jagtar [Mechanical Engineering Department, SLIET Longowal, District Sangrur, Punjab (India); Panesar, B.S. [Project Professional, SCS Engineers, 11260 Roger Bacon Drive, 300, Virginia 20190 (United States); Sharma, S.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, NIT Kurukshetra, Haryana (India)

    2010-04-15

    In Punjab, million of tons of agricultural biomass are being generated every year, but it is spatially scattered. The spatial distribution of this resource and the associated costs on collection and transportation are the major bottleneck in the success of biomass energy-conversion facilities. This paper deals with the mathematical model for collection and transporting the biomass from fields to biomass based power plant. The unit transport cost was calculated by using this model. Four systems of transport were conceptualized for two transport modes (tractor with wagon and truck). Three types of agricultural biomass (loose, baled and briquetted) were considered for transport analysis. For all modes of transport, it was observed that unit cost of transport decreases with increase in distance. The transport cost was least for briquetted biomass as compared to loose and baled biomass. (author)

  16. Experimental measurement of the biomass of Olea europaea L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The C stock evaluation methodology made in this research and the calculation of biomass expansion factor can be considered as the first scientific contribution in estimating productivity, CO2 sequestration, carbon stocks and yield of olive groves. Key words: Biomass, biomass expansion factor, Intergovernmental Panel on ...

  17. Effects of biomass-generated producer gas constituents on cell growth, product distribution and hydrogenase activity of Clostridium carboxidivorans P7T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Asma; Cateni, Bruno G.; Huhnke, Raymond L.; Lewis, Randy S.

    2006-01-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that biomass-generated producer gas can be converted to ethanol and acetic acid using a microbial catalyst Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 T . Results showed that the producer gas (1) induced cell dormancy, (2) inhibited H 2 consumption, and (3) affected the acetic acid/ethanol product distribution. Results of this work showed that tars were the likely cause of cell dormancy and product redistribution and that the addition of a 0.025μm filter in the gas cleanup negated the effects of tars. C. carboxidivorans P7 T can adapt to the tars (i.e. grow) only after prolonged exposure. Nitric oxide, present in the producer gas at 150ppm, is an inhibitor of the hydrogenase enzyme involved in H 2 consumption. We conclude that significant conditioning of the producer gas will be required for the successful coupling of biomass-generated producer gas with fermentation to produce ethanol and acetic acid. (author)

  18. Analysis of integrated animal-fish production system under subtropical hill agro ecosystem in India: growth performance of animals, total biomass production and monetary benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, A; Pathak, K A; Bujarbaruah, K M; Vinod, K

    2009-03-01

    The present study assessed the benefits of integration of animals with fish production in optimizing the bio mass production from unit land in subtropical hill agro ecosystem. Hampshire pigs and Khaki Campbell ducks were integrated with composite fish culture. The pig and duck excreta were directly allowed into the pond and no supplementary feed was given to fish during the period of study. The average levels of N, P and K in dried pig and duck manure were 0.9, 0.7 and 0.6 per cent and 1.3, 0.6 and 0.5 per cent, respectively. The average body weight of pig and duck at 11 months age was 90 and 1.74 kg with an average daily weight gain of 333.33 and 6.44 g, respectively. The fish production in pig-fish and duck-fish systems were 2209 and 2964 kg/ha, respectively while the fish productivity in control pond was only 820 kg/ha. The total biomass (animal and fish) production was higher (pfeeding system compared to the traditional system, however the input/output ratio was 1:1.2 and 1:1.55 for commercial and traditional systems, respectively. It was inferred that the total biomass production per unit land was high (pfish were integrated together.

  19. Rheology of concentrated biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.R. Samaniuk; J. Wang; T.W. Root; C.T. Scott; D.J. Klingenberg

    2011-01-01

    Economic processing of lignocellulosic biomass requires handling the biomass at high solids concentration. This creates challenges because concentrated biomass behaves as a Bingham-like material with large yield stresses. Here we employ torque rheometry to measure the rheological properties of concentrated lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover). Yield stresses obtained...

  20. Biomass treatment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, III; Melvin P.; Lyons, Robert C.

    2010-10-26

    A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

  1. Methods for pretreating biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir; Sousa, Leonardo

    2017-05-09

    A method for pretreating biomass is provided, which includes, in a reactor, allowing gaseous ammonia to condense on the biomass and react with water present in the biomass to produce pretreated biomass, wherein reactivity of polysaccharides in the biomass is increased during subsequent biological conversion as compared to the reactivity of polysaccharides in biomass which has not been pretreated. A method for pretreating biomass with a liquid ammonia and recovering the liquid ammonia is also provided. Related systems which include a biochemical or biofuel production facility are also disclosed.

  2. Durability of Biomass Briquettes

    OpenAIRE

    Kaķītis, A.; Nulle, I.

    2006-01-01

    The main resources for biomass agro-ecotechnologies are cereal straw residues, energy crops and emergent vegetation from wetlands. The herbaceous biomass is a material of low density (20 – 60kg/m3) therefore new mobile equipment and technologies for biomass comminution and densification have to be worked out. To guarantee the quality of biomass briquettes in the handling and usage process, sufficient durability of briquettes should be provided. National Standards of biomass briquettes should ...

  3. Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorter, Lourens; Bongers, Frans; Aide, T. Mitchell; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M.; Balvanera, Patricia; Becknell, Justin M.; Boukili, Vanessa; Brancalion, Pedro H. S.; Broadbent, Eben N.; Chazdon, Robin L.; Craven, Dylan; de Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S.; Cabral, George A. L.; de Jong, Ben H. J.; Denslow, Julie S.; Dent, Daisy H.; Dewalt, Saara J.; Dupuy, Juan M.; Durán, Sandra M.; Espírito-Santo, Mario M.; Fandino, María C.; César, Ricardo G.; Hall, Jefferson S.; Hernandez-Stefanoni, José Luis; Jakovac, Catarina C.; Junqueira, André B.; Kennard, Deborah; Letcher, Susan G.; Licona, Juan-Carlos; Lohbeck, Madelon; Marín-Spiotta, Erika; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Massoca, Paulo; Meave, Jorge A.; Mesquita, Rita; Mora, Francisco; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Muscarella, Robert; Nunes, Yule R. F.; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana; de Oliveira, Alexandre A.; Orihuela-Belmonte, Edith; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pérez-García, Eduardo A.; Piotto, Daniel; Powers, Jennifer S.; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Jorge; Romero-Pérez, I. Eunice; Ruíz, Jorge; Saldarriaga, Juan G.; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Schwartz, Naomi B.; Steininger, Marc K.; Swenson, Nathan G.; Toledo, Marisol; Uriarte, Maria; van Breugel, Michiel; van der Wal, Hans; Veloso, Maria D. M.; Vester, Hans F. M.; Vicentini, Alberto; Vieira, Ima C. G.; Bentos, Tony Vizcarra; Williamson, G. Bruce; Rozendaal, Danaë M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major environmental gradients in the Neotropics. The studied secondary forests are highly productive and resilient. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years was on average 122 megagrams per hectare (Mg ha-1), corresponding to a net carbon uptake of 3.05 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, 11 times the uptake rate of old-growth forests. Aboveground biomass stocks took a median time of 66 years to recover to 90% of old-growth values. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years varied 11.3-fold (from 20 to 225 Mg ha-1) across sites, and this recovery increased with water availability (higher local rainfall and lower climatic water deficit). We present a biomass recovery map of Latin America, which illustrates geographical and climatic variation in carbon sequestration potential during forest regrowth. The map will support policies to minimize forest loss in areas where biomass resilience is naturally low (such as seasonally dry forest regions) and promote forest regeneration and restoration in humid tropical lowland areas with high biomass resilience.

  4. Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorter, Lourens; Bongers, Frans; Aide, T Mitchell; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M; Balvanera, Patricia; Becknell, Justin M; Boukili, Vanessa; Brancalion, Pedro H S; Broadbent, Eben N; Chazdon, Robin L; Craven, Dylan; de Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S; Cabral, George A L; de Jong, Ben H J; Denslow, Julie S; Dent, Daisy H; DeWalt, Saara J; Dupuy, Juan M; Durán, Sandra M; Espírito-Santo, Mario M; Fandino, María C; César, Ricardo G; Hall, Jefferson S; Hernandez-Stefanoni, José Luis; Jakovac, Catarina C; Junqueira, André B; Kennard, Deborah; Letcher, Susan G; Licona, Juan-Carlos; Lohbeck, Madelon; Marín-Spiotta, Erika; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Massoca, Paulo; Meave, Jorge A; Mesquita, Rita; Mora, Francisco; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Muscarella, Robert; Nunes, Yule R F; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana; de Oliveira, Alexandre A; Orihuela-Belmonte, Edith; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pérez-García, Eduardo A; Piotto, Daniel; Powers, Jennifer S; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Jorge; Romero-Pérez, I Eunice; Ruíz, Jorge; Saldarriaga, Juan G; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Schwartz, Naomi B; Steininger, Marc K; Swenson, Nathan G; Toledo, Marisol; Uriarte, Maria; van Breugel, Michiel; van der Wal, Hans; Veloso, Maria D M; Vester, Hans F M; Vicentini, Alberto; Vieira, Ima C G; Bentos, Tony Vizcarra; Williamson, G Bruce; Rozendaal, Danaë M A

    2016-02-11

    Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major environmental gradients in the Neotropics. The studied secondary forests are highly productive and resilient. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years was on average 122 megagrams per hectare (Mg ha(-1)), corresponding to a net carbon uptake of 3.05 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1), 11 times the uptake rate of old-growth forests. Aboveground biomass stocks took a median time of 66 years to recover to 90% of old-growth values. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years varied 11.3-fold (from 20 to 225 Mg ha(-1)) across sites, and this recovery increased with water availability (higher local rainfall and lower climatic water deficit). We present a biomass recovery map of Latin America, which illustrates geographical and climatic variation in carbon sequestration potential during forest regrowth. The map will support policies to minimize forest loss in areas where biomass resilience is naturally low (such as seasonally dry forest regions) and promote forest regeneration and restoration in humid tropical lowland areas with high biomass resilience.

  5. Biomass conversion and expansion factors in Douglas-fir stands of different planting density: variation according to individual growth and prediction equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marziliano, P.A.; Menguzzato, G.; Scuderi, A.; Scalise, C.; Coletta, V.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of study: We built biomass expansion factors (BCEFs) from Douglas-fir felled trees planted with different planting densities to evaluate the differences according tree size and planting density. Area of study: The Douglas-fir plantation under study is located on the northern coastal chain of Calabria (Tyrrhenian side) south Italy. Materials and methods: We derived tree level BCEFs, relative to crown (BCEFc), to stem (BCEFst = basic density, BD) and total above-ground (BCEFt) from destructive measurements carried out in a Douglas-fir plantation where four study plots were selected according to different planting densities (from 833 to 2500 trees per hectare). The measured BCEFs were regressed against diameter at breast height and total height, planting density, site productivity (SP) and their interactions to test the variation of BCEFs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Tukey comparison test were used to test differences in BCEFt, BCEFc and in BD between plots with different planting density. Main results: BCEFs decreased with increasing total height and DBH, but large dispersion measures were obtained for any of the compartments in the analysis. An increasing trend with planting density was found for all the analyzed BCEFs, but together with planting density, BCEFs also resulted dependent upon site productivity. BCEFt average values ranged between 1.40 Mg m-3 in planting density with 833 trees/ha (PD833) to 2.09 Mg m-3 in planting density with 2500 trees/ha (PD2500), which are in the range of IPCC prescribed values for Douglas-fir trees. Research highlights: Our results showed that the application of BCEF to estimate forest biomass in stands with different planting densities should explicitly account for the effect of planting density and site productivity.

  6. Adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) by dead Avena fatua biomass and the effect of these metals on their growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areco, María Mar; Saleh-Medina, Leila; Trinelli, María Alcira; Marco-Brown, Jose Luis; Dos Santos Afonso, María

    2013-10-01

    The biosorption of copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and lead(II) from aqueous solutions by dead Avena fatua biomass and the effect of these metals on the growth of this wild oat were investigated. Pseudo-first- and second-order and intra-particle diffusion models were applied to describe the kinetic data and to evaluate the rate constants. The adsorption kinetics of all the metals follows a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption capacity was determined, and the Freundlich and Langmuir models were applied. The experimental data obtained for all the metals are best described by the Langmuir model. A. fatua was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and zeta potential. The results obtained evidence the presence of Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) or Pb(II) on the surface of the weed. The growth of A. fatua was affected by the presence of all metals. The decrease in the growth rate with increasing metal concentration was more noticeable for zinc. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomass a fast growing energy resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Ulf

    2003-01-01

    Biomass as an energy resource is as versatile as the biodiversity suggests. The global net primary production, NPP, describes the annual growth of biomass on land and in the seas. This paper focuses on biomass grown on land. A recent estimate for the NPP on land is 120 billion tons of dry matter. How much of this biomass are available for energy purposes? The potential contribution of wood fuel and energy plants from sustainable production is limited to some 5% of NPP, i.e. 6 Bt. One third of the potential is energy forests and energy plantations which at present are not economic. One third is used in rural areas as traditional fuel. The remaining third would be available for modern biomass energy conversion. Biomass is assigned an expanding role as a new resource in the world's energy balance. The EU has set a target of doubling the share of renewable energy sources by 2010. For biomass the target is even more ambitious. The challenge for biomass utilization lies in improving the technology for traditional usage and expanding the role into other areas like power production and transportation fuel. Various technologies for biomass utilization are available among those are combustion, gasification, and liquefaction. Researchers have a grand vision in which the chemical elements in the hydrocarbon molecules of biomass are separated and reformed to yield new tailored fuels and form the basis for a new world economy. The vision of a new energy system based on fresh and fossilized biomass to be engineered into an environmentally friendly and sustainable fuel is a conceivable technical reality. One reason for replacing exhaustible fossil fuels with biomass is to reduce carbon emissions. The most efficient carbon dioxide emission reduction comes from replacing brown coal in a steam-electric unit, due to the efficiency of the thermal cycle and the high carbon intensity of the coal. The smallest emission reduction comes from substituting natural gas. (BA)

  8. Biomass press kit; Dossier Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandes, C.; Dupin, L.

    2010-06-15

    This dossier presents some examples of French factories equipped with methanation and biogas production facilities, a good mean to save energy but which still encounters many financial and technical difficulties: high investments, safety constraints. A first article presents the vinasse depollution plant of Revico company which uses Cognac distillation effluents to generate heat and electricity. A second article treats of the valorization of forestry wastes. Forests represent 28% of the French territory (15 million Ha) but only 60% of the biologic growth is exploited. The main problem is the important dividing up of the French forests with a multitude of private owners and a difficult access to plots. (J.S.)

  9. Ecosystems and biomass energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trossero, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Biomass, particularly fuelwood and charcoal, is one of the main sources of fuel to meet the energy needs of traditional, commercial and industrial activities in developing countries. While it satisfies only about 14% of the world's primary energy needs, in some countries it satisfies up to 80% of those needs. As a result of population growth, urbanization, economic reforms, restructuring and new development targets in most of these countries, new forms of energy and a more intensive use of energy are expected for the years ahead. This additional demand for energy will be met mainly by hydroelectricity, coal and fossil fuels. However, where biomass is available or can be planted, bio fuels can be converted into new forms of energy (electricity and power) and energy carriers (liquid and gaseous fuels) to meet not only the energy needs of the modem sectors but also to maintain a sustainable supply to traditional users. In fact, FAO estimates that biomass could provide nearly three times more energy than it does without affecting the current supply of other commodities and goods such as food, fodder, fuel, timber and non-wood fuel products. The benefits derived from the utilization of biomass as a source of energy are twofold: (a) the task of supplying bio fuels can help to attract new investment, create new employment and income opportunities in rural areas, raise the value of natural resources and preserve the environment and (b) new forms of energy and energy carriers could foster increased production and productivity at the rural and community level, particularly in remote areas where conventional fuels are not easily available at affordable prices. Bioenergy can be easily developed in modular and decentralized schemes and offers many advantages. It could be an inexpensive source of energy, even at present energy prices, and it requires less capital investment for its implementation than alternative solutions. However, there are many disadvantages, too. For

  10. Biomass Deconstruction and Recalcitrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Heng

    reflections of plant species, tissue or organ types, genetic traits and environment. Effects of cultivar type, anatomical distribution, chemical composition, fertilizer level and growth year have been observed during in vitro and in vivo trials. A similar approach is here taken to further investigate: 1). How......This thesis is about the use of an agricultural residue as a feedstock for fermentable sugars to be used for second generation (2G) bioethanol. The main focus of this thesis work is upon the recalcitrance of different anatomical fractions of wheat straw. Biomass recalcitrance is a collective...... recalcitrance or degradability varies between leaf and stem as found in different wheat cultivars. 2). Chemical, physical and structural differences between wheat straw leaf and stem which may be responsible for observed differences in their bio-degradability. As a tool to assess the variation...

  11. Living and Dead Aboveground Biomass in Mediterranean Forests: Evidence of Old-Growth Traits in a Quercus pubescens Willd. s.l. Stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Badalamenti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, human impact has deeply simplified most of the forest ecosystems of the Mediterranean Basin. Here, forests have seldom had the chance to naturally develop a complex and multilayered structure, to host large and old trees and rich biological communities, approaching old-growth conditions. Also for this reason, limited information is currently available about Mediterranean old-growth forests, particularly with regard to deadwood. The main aim of this work is to help fill this critical knowledge gap. In Sicily (Italy, we identified a Quercus pubescens forest that seemed to show some typical old-growth features. Total living volume (360 m3 ha−1 and basal area (34 m2 ha−1 were, respectively, about 6 and 3 times higher than the averages recorded in the regional forest inventory for this forest type. Deadwood was particularly abundant, exceeding the threshold of 30 m3 ha−1, mainly represented by lying dead elements. Dead to live wood ratio reached 9%, a value close to the threshold of 10% considered for Mediterranean old-growth forests. As the investigated forest showed some typical old-growth traits, it deserves to be fully protected and could be a permanent monitoring area for studying deadwood and stand dynamics in mature Mediterranean stands.

  12. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the

  13. Electricity and heat production by biomass cogeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marčič, Simon; Marčič, Milan

    2017-07-01

    In Slovenia, approximately 2 % of electricity is generated using cogeneration systems. Industrial and district heating networks ensure the growth of such technology. Today, many existing systems are outdated, providing myriad opportunities for reconstruction. One concept for the development of households and industry envisages the construction of several small biomass units and the application of natural gas as a fuel with a relatively extensive distribution network. This concept has good development potential in Slovenia. Forests cover 56 % of the surface area in Slovenia, which has, as a result, a lot of waste wood to be turned into biomass. Biomass is an important fuel in Slovenia. Biomass is gasified in a gasifier, and the wood gas obtained is used to power the gas engine. This paper describes a biomass cogeneration system as the first of this type in Slovenia, located in Ruše.

  14. Forest biomass variation in Southernmost Brazil: the impact of Araucaria trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Milena Fermina; Souza, Alexandre F

    2014-03-01

    A variety of environmental and biotic factors determine vegetation growth and affect plant biomass accumulation. From temperature to species composition, aboveground biomass storage in forest ecosystems is influenced by a number of variables and usually presents a high spatial variability. With this focus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the variables affecting live aboveground forest biomass (AGB) in Subtropical Moist Forests of Southern Brazil, and to analyze the spatial distribution of biomass estimates. Data from a forest inventory performed in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil, was used in the present study. Thirty-eight 1-ha plots were sampled and all trees with DBH > or = 9.5cm were included for biomass estimation. Values for aboveground biomass were obtained using published allometric equations. Environmental and biotic variables (elevation, rainfall, temperature, soils, stem density and species diversity) were obtained from the literature or calculated from the dataset. For the total dataset, mean AGB was 195.2 Mg/ha. Estimates differed between Broadleaf and Mixed Coniferous-Broadleaf forests: mean AGB was lower in Broadleaf Forests (AGB(BF)=118.9 Mg/ha) when compared to Mixed Forests (AGB(MF)=250.3 Mg/ha). There was a high spatial and local variability in our dataset, even within forest types. This condition is normal in tropical forests and is usually attributed to the presence of large trees. The explanatory multiple regressions were influenced mainly by elevation and explained 50.7% of the variation in AGB. Stem density, diversity and organic matter also influenced biomass variation. The results from our study showed a positive relationship between aboveground biomass and elevation. Therefore, higher values of AGB are located at higher elevations and subjected to cooler temperatures and wetter climate. There seems to be an important contribution of the coniferous species Araucaria angustifolia in Mixed Forest plots, as it presented

  15. The importance of crown dimensions to improve tropical tree biomass estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rosa C; Phillips, Oliver L; Baker, Timothy R

    2014-06-01

    Tropical forests play a vital role in the global carbon cycle, but the amount of carbon they contain and its spatial distribution remain uncertain. Recent studies suggest that once tree height is accounted for in biomass calculations, in addition to diameter and wood density, carbon stock estimates are reduced in many areas. However, it is possible that larger crown sizes might offset the reduction in biomass estimates in some forests where tree heights are lower because even comparatively short trees develop large, well-lit crowns in or above the forest canopy. While current allometric models and theory focus on diameter, wood density, and height, the influence of crown size and structure has not been well studied. To test the extent to which accounting for crown parameters can improve biomass estimates, we harvested and weighed 51 trees (11-169 cm diameter) in southwestern Amazonia where no direct biomass measurements have been made. The trees in our study had nearly half of total aboveground biomass in the branches (44% +/- 2% [mean +/- SE]), demonstrating the importance of accounting for tree crowns. Consistent with our predictions, key pantropical equations that include height, but do not account for crown dimensions, underestimated the sum total biomass of all 51 trees by 11% to 14%, primarily due to substantial underestimates of many of the largest trees. In our models, including crown radius greatly improves performance and reduces error, especially for the largest trees. In addition, over the full data set, crown radius explained more variation in aboveground biomass (10.5%) than height (6.0%). Crown form is also important: Trees with a monopodial architectural type are estimated to have 21-44% less mass than trees with other growth patterns. Our analysis suggests that accounting for crown allometry would substantially improve the accuracy of tropical estimates of tree biomass and its distribution in primary and degraded forests.

  16. Method and a Mobile Unit for Collecting Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A method for collecting biomass, such as straw, and for producing a pyrolysis liquid, such as oil or tar, from the biomass, comprises the step of collecting the biomass from a growth site, e.g. a field, by means of a mobile unit. The biomass is continuously fed into a pyrolysis apparatus (200......) accommodated by the mobile unit, as the mobile unit is moved across the growth site. While the biomass is processed in the pyrolysis apparatus, further biomass is simultaneously being collected. The pyrolysis apparatus may be a flash pyrolysis or fast pyrolysis apparatus relying on centrifugal forces...... for forcing biomass towards a reactive surface in a pyrolysis reactor. The mobile unit may be self-propelled....

  17. Increased growth and root Cu accumulation of Sorghum sudanense by endophytic Enterobacter sp. K3-2: Implications for Sorghum sudanense biomass production and phytostabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Wang, Qi; Wang, Lu; He, Lin-Yan; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-02-01

    Endophytic bacterial strain K3-2 was isolated from the roots of Sorghum sudanense (an bioenergy plant) grown in a Cu mine wasteland soils and characterized. Strain K3-2 was identified as Enterobacter sp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain K3-2 exhibited Cu resistance and produced 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), siderophores, and arginine decarboxylase. Pot experiments showed that strain K3-2 significantly increased the dry weight and root Cu accumulation of Sorghum sudanense grown in the Cu mine wasteland soils. Furthermore, increase in total Cu uptake (ranging from 49% to 95%) of the bacterial inoculated-Sorghum sudanense was observed compared to the control. Notably, most of Cu (83-86%) was accumulated in the roots of Sorghum sudanense. Furthermore, inoculation with strain K3-2 was found to significantly increase Cu bioconcentration factors and the proportions of IAA- and siderophore-producing bacteria in the root interiors and rhizosphere soils of Sorghum sudanense compared with the control. Significant decrease in the available Cu content was also observed in the rhizosphere soils of the bacterial-inoculated Sorghum sudanense. The results suggest that the endophytic bacterial strain K3-2 may be exploited for promoting Sorghum sudanense biomass production and Cu phytostabilization in the Cu mining wasteland soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z.; Møller, Per

    2016-01-01

    of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scaleusing a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large...

  19. Estimating aboveground tree biomass on forest land in the Pacific Northwest: a comparison of approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoping Zhou; Miles A. Hemstrom

    2009-01-01

    Live tree biomass estimates are essential for carbon accounting, bioenergy feasibility studies, and other analyses. Several models are currently used for estimating tree biomass. Each of these incorporates different calculation methods that may significantly impact the estimates of total aboveground tree biomass, merchantable biomass, and carbon pools. Consequently,...

  20. Zooplankton biomass and indices of feeding and metabolism in island-generated eddies around Gran Canaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-León, S.; Almeida, C.; Gómez, M.; Torres, S.; Montero, I.; Portillo-Hahnefeld, A.

    2001-08-01

    Zooplankton biomass and indices of grazing (gut fluorescence), respiration (electron transfer system, ETS), ammonia excretion (glutamate dehydrogenase, GDH) and growth (aspartate transcarbamylase, ATC) were studied around the island of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands) during the so-called "late winter bloom". Four size classes (100-200, 200-500, 500-1000 and >1000 μm) were studied to assess the contribution of each size fraction to the mesoscale plankton distribution around the island. Cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies were observed downstream the island transporting and entraining water rich in chlorophyll. Zooplankton biomass showed a high variability around the island but it was dramatically lower in the core of the cyclonic eddy induced by the island, probably due to the divergent effect produced by the physical structure. A filament of relatively cold-water was also found reaching the island from the upwelling area off northwest Africa. High zooplankton biomass was observed in association with the filament water and in the vicinity of the anticyclonic eddy shed by the island. Specific gut content showed higher values in the boundaries of the cyclonic structures, while ETS and GDH activities where higher windward of the island, in both the cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies depending on the size fraction considered. With the restrictions of using those indices, control of primary production by grazing was 11-22% and up to 41% of the calculated ingestion from the indices of metabolism and growth could be supported by nonpigmented food. Calculated excretion rates could support about 8% of primary production. The low impact of zooplankton on autotrophic production, the low values of the index of growth and the distribution of biomass in relation to the presence of eddies downstream of Gran Canaria suggest that accumulation was the causative mechanism for the presence of high zooplankton biomass leeward of the island.

  1. Estimation of tropical forest height and biomass dynamics using lidar remote sensing at La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubayah, R. O.; Sheldon, S. L.; Clark, D. B.; Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Hurtt, G. C.; Chazdon, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of an experiment to measure forest structure and biomass dynamics over the tropical forests of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica using a medium resolution lidar. Our main objective was to observe changes in forest canopy height, related height metrics, and biomass, and from these map sources and sinks of carbon across the landscape. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) measured canopy structure over La Selva in 1998 and again in 2005. Changes in waveform metrics were related to field-derived changes in estimated aboveground biomass from a series of old growth and secondary forest plots. Pairwise comparisons of nearly coincident lidar footprints between years showed canopy top height changes that coincided with expected changes based on land cover types. Old growth forests had a net loss in height of -0.33 m, while secondary forests had net gain of 2.08 m. Multiple linear regression was used to relate lidar metrics with biomass changes for combined old growth and secondary forest plots, giving an r2 of 0.65 and an RSE of 10.5 Mg/ha, but both parametric and bootstrapped confidence intervals were wide, suggesting weaker model performance. The plot level relationships were then used to map biomass changes across La Selva using LVIS at a 1 ha scale. The spatial patterns of biomass changes matched expected patterns given the distribution of land cover types at La Selva, with secondary forests showing a gain of 25 Mg/ha and old growth forests showing little change (2 Mg/ha). Prediction intervals were calculated to assess uncertainty for each 1 ha cell to ascertain whether the data and methods used could confidently estimate the sign (source or sink) of the biomass changes. The resulting map showed most of the old growth areas as neutral (no net biomass change), with widely scattered and isolated sources and sinks. Secondary forests in contrast were mostly sinks or neutral, but were never sources. By quantifying both the

  2. Bioremediation potential, growth and biomass yield of the green seaweed, Ulva lactuca in an integrated marine aquaculture system at the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia at different stocking densities and effluent flow rates

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hafedh, Yousef S.

    2014-03-19

    Growth, production and biofiltration rates of seaweed, Ulva lactuca were investigated at two stocking densities (3 kg and 6 kg m-2) and two effluent flow rates (5.4 and 10.8 m3 day-1) to optimize an integrated mariculture system at Saudi Red Sea coast. effluents from fish-rearing tank, stocked with 200 kg fish (Oreochromis spilurus), fed to six seaweed tanks via sedimentation tank. Fish growth (weight gain 1.75 g fish day-1), net production (NP, 10.16 kg m-3) and survival (94.24%) were within acceptable limits. Ulva showed significantly higher (F = 62.62, d.f. 3, 35; P < 0.0001) specific growth rates at lower density compared with higher density and under high flow versus low flow (SGR = 5.78% vs. 2.55% at lower flow and 10.60% vs. 6.26% at higher flow). Biomass yield of Ulva at low- and high-stocking densities (111.11 and 83.2 g wet wt m-2 day-1, respectively) at low flow and (267.44 and 244.19 g wet wt m-2 day-1, respectively) at high flow show that high flow rate and lower density favoured growth. Removal rates of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) (0.26-0.31 g m-2 day-1) and phosphate phosphorus (0.32-0.41 g m-2 day-1) by U. lactuca were not significantly different (F = 1.9, d.f. 3, 59; P = 0.1394 for TAN and F = 0.29, d.f. 3, 59; P = 0.8324 for phosphates) at both the flow rates and stocking densities. Results show that the effluent flow rate has significant impact over the performance of the seaweed than stocking density.

  3. Bioenergy Project Development and Biomass Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Modern biomass, and the resulting useful forms of bioenergy produced from it, are anticipated by many advocates to provide a significant contribution to the global primary energy supply of many IEA member countries during the coming decades. For non-member countries, particularly those wishing to achieve economic growth as well as meet the goals for sustainable development, the deployment of modern bioenergy projects and the growing international trade in biomass-based energy carriers offer potential opportunities.

  4. Pretreated densified biomass products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

    2014-03-18

    A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

  5. Synthesis, growth, physicochemical properties and DFT calculations of 2-naphthol substituted Mannich base 1-(morpholino(phenyl) methyl) naphthalen-2-ol: A non linear optical single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis Raj, A.; Jeeva, M.; Shankar, M.; Venkatesa Prabhu, G.; Vimalan, M.; Vetha Potheher, I.

    2017-11-01

    2-Naphthol substituted Mannich base 1-morpholino(phenyl)methyl)naphthalen-2-ol (MPMN), a potential NLO active organic single crystal was developed using acetonitrile as a solvent by slow evaporation method. The experimental and theoretical analysis made towards the exploitation in the field of electro-optic and NLO applications. The cubic structure with non-centrosymmetric space group Cc was confirmed and cell dimensions of the grown crystal were obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The formation of the Csbnd Nsbnd C vibrational band at 1115 cm-1 in Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) analysis confirms the formation of MPMN compound. The placement of protons and carbons of MPMN were identified from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR) analysis. The wide optical absorption window and the lower cutoff wavelength of MPMN show the suitability of the material for the various laser related applications. The presence of dislocations and growth pattern of crystal were analyzed using chemical etching technique. The Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) of MPMN was found to be 1.57 times greater than the standard KDP crystal. The laser damage threshold was measured by using Nd: YAG laser beam passed through the sample and it was found to be 1.006 GW/cm2. The electronic structure of the molecular system and the optical properties were also studied from quantum chemical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and reported for the first time.

  6. Growth and biomass allocation of the C4 grasses Brachiaria brizantha and B. humidicola under shade Crescimento e alocação de biomassa nas gramíneas C4 Brachiaria brizantha e B. humidicola sob sombreamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOACYR BERNARDINO DIAS-FILHO

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth and biomass allocation responses of the tropical forage grasses Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu and B. humidicola were compared for plants grown outdoors, in pots, in full sunlight and those shaded to 30% of full sunlight over a 30day period. The objective was to evaluate the acclimation capacity of these species to low light. Both species were able to quickly develop phenotypic adjustments in response to low light. Specific leaf area and leaf area ratio were higher for low-light plants during the entire experimental period. Low-light plants allocated significantly less biomass to root and more to leaf tissue than high-light plants. However, the biomass allocation pattern to culms was different for the two species under low light: it increased in B. brizantha, but decreased in B. humidicola, probably as a reflection of the growth habits of these species. Relative growth rate and tillering were higher in high-light plants. Leaf elongation rate was significantly increased on both species under low light; however, the difference between treatments was higher in B. brizantha. These results are discussed in relation to the pasture management implications.O crescimento e a alocação de biomassa das gramíneas forrageiras tropicais Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu e B. humidicola foram comparados, em plantas cultivadas em vasos, a pleno sol e a 70% de interceptação da luz solar, durante um período de 30 dias. O objetivo foi avaliar a capacidade de aclimatação dessas espécies ao sombreamento. Ambas as espécies mostraram-se capazes de desenvolver rapidamente ajustes fenotípicos em resposta ao sombreamento. A área foliar específica e a razão de área foliar foram maiores durante todo o período experimental, nas plantas cultivadas à sombra. As plantas sombreadas alocaram significativamente menos biomassa nas raízes e mais nas folhas do que as plantas cultivadas à sombra. No entanto, a alocação de biomassa no colmo foi

  7. Yield-per-Recruit and Relative Mean Biomass Estimates, and their Management Consequences, to the Penaeus Indicus Fishery in the Gulf of Masirah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. M. Siddeek

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The von Bertalanffy growth parameters estimated based on the 1990/91 carapace length data of Penaeus indicus  from the Gulf of Masirah, Oman were used to calculate total mortality, yield-per-recruit ( i.e. average weight of a shrimp from a cohort under a given fishing pattern , and relative mean biomass ( i.e. exploited cohort biomass over un-exploited cohort biomass for the population sampled. The instantaneous total mortality coefficient value indicated under exploitation in 1990/91. When different fishing seasons scenarios were considered with the current total mortality level but with a range of natural mortality values, high yield, per recruit and relative mean biomass values were shown for October-April and November-April fishing seasons. The fishing season is currently late August to end of April. Thus, a one to two-month delay in the fishing season appears to be beneficial to this fishery.

  8. Biomass valorization; La valorisation de la biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, M. [Groupe d' Analyse Thematique (France)

    2006-09-15

    Biomass is the photosynthesis product of carbon dioxide and water, made by the solar energy capture by plants (CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + solar energy hydrocarbons). It is this carbon which, at the end of the cycle, after fossilization, gives petroleum, gas and coal. But before being in this state, the biomass deposits are diversified and available all over the world. (O.M.)

  9. Growth, biomass allocation and photosynthesis of Rolandra fruticosa (asteraceae in response to shade Crescimento, alocação de biomassa e fotossíntese de Rolandra fruticosa (asteraceae em resposta ao sombreamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr B. Dias-Filho

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of shade on growth, biomass allocation patterns and photosynthetic response was examined for Rolandra fruticosa (L. Kuntze, a common perennial weed shrub in cultivated pastures and agricultural areas of Brazilian Amazonia, for plants grown in full sunlight and those shaded to 30 % of full sunlight over a 34-d period. Specific leaf area and leaf area ratio were higher for shade plants during all the experimental period. Shade plants allocated significantly less biomass to root tissue than sun plants and relative growth rate was higher in sun plants. Sun leaves had significantly higher dark respiration and light saturated rates of photosynthesis than shade leaves. The apparent quantum efficiency was higher for shade leaves, while light compensation point was higher for sun leaves. These results are discussed in relation to their ecological and weed management implications.Estudou-se o efeito do sombreamento nocrescimento, alocação de carbono e respostas fotossintéticas de Rolandra fruticosa (L. Kuntze, uma planta daninha de porte arbustivo, comum em áreas de pastagem e agrícolas da Amazônia Brasileira, submetida a condições de pleno sol e a 70 % de interceptação da luz solar, durante 34 dias. A área foliar específica e a razão de área foliar foram maiores nas plantas sombreadas durante todo o período experimental. Plantas sombreadas alocaram menor quantidade de biomassa para as raízes, quando comparadas às plantas de sol e a taxa de crescimento relativo foi maior para as plantas de sol. A respiração no escuro e a taxa de fotossíntese máxima foram maiores para as folhas de plantas não sombreadas. A eficiência quântica aparente foi maior para as folhas de plantas sombreadas, enquanto que o ponto de compensação de luz foi maior para folhas a pleno sol. Esses resultados são discutidos com relação as suas importâncias ecológica e de manejo.

  10. Developing business in emerging biomass energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyszewski, J.

    2005-01-01

    Global market trends for forest products were reviewed in this PowerPoint presentation. The status of biomass energy products in relation to climate change and renewable energy portfolio standards was also examined. It was noted that China has increased investment in processing capacity and has increased imports of raw logs. India has doubled its imports of raw logs. Details of major tropical log producers and consumers were presented. Details of the biomass industry in the United States were presented, as well as data on fuel use at biomass energy plants and biomass energy capacity. An overview of biomass energy in the Russian far east and Siberia was presented, as well as details of activities and opportunities in Brazil and Indonesia. An economic analysis for small dry kilns was presented. Issues concerning boiler capacity in Russian companies for 2001-2005 were discussed. A case study of a biomass project from Congo was presented. It was noted that projects that replace fossil fuels can obtain revenues from the sale of carbon benefits, and that biomass energy offers the most attractive current option for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the atmosphere. Details of a district heating project in Siberia were presented, and it was noted that in remote regions, costs for heat and power from biomass can be lower than costs from diesel and coal. It was concluded that there will be significant growth for biomass energy systems in the developing world, and that climate change will be an increasingly important element in advancing biomass energy. tabs., figs

  11. Family Differences in Aboveground Biomass Allocation in Loblolly Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott D. Roberts

    2002-01-01

    The proportion of tree growth allocated to stemwood is an important economic component of growth efficiency. Differences in growth efficiency between species, or between families within species, may therefore be related to how growth is proportionally allocated between the stem and other aboveground biomass components. This study examines genetically related...

  12. Northeastern states sharpen biomass focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    Wood energy use in the northeastern region of the USA currently replaces an estimated annual equivalent of 45--50 million barrels of oil. Including municipal wastes and recovered methane emissions for regional landfills, total biomass contribution to the energy economy is over 70 million barrels of oil equivalent annually. A reasonable consensus suggests wood alone could replace the equivalent of over 300 million barrels of oil each year on a sustainable basis over the next two decades. Beyond energy security, over 60,000 total jobs are now provided in the region by the wood energy industry. Over 375,000 total jobs could be generated by the wood energy industry, about 65,000 in the harvesting, transportation, and end-use operations of the wood energy industry. Biomass producers must be committed to sustainable development by necessity. Sound forest management practices that keep residual stand damage from wood harvesting to a minimum can create positive impacts on the region's forest. When combined with a balanced energy policy, the conditional use of wood energy can play a modest, but significant, role in reducing air emissions. Depletion of traditional energy resources creates open-quotes bubbleclose quotes benefits which will be exhausted after a generation. Sustainable development of biomass can create inexhaustible wealth for generations, and does not pose the risk of sudden ecological disruption. While the choice between policy options is not mutually exclusive, the interrelationship between energy security, economic growth and environmental quality clearly favors biomass. The environmental benefits and the economic growth impacts of biobased products produced by the northeastern states are considerable. The 11 states located in the northeastern USA should intensify their efforts to work with industry and investors to expand markets for industrial biobased products, either produced from local feedstocks or manufactured by companies operating in the region

  13. Gasification of Woody Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jianjun; Saayman, Jean; Grace, John R; Ellis, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Interest in biomass to produce heat, power, liquid fuels, hydrogen, and value-added chemicals with reduced greenhouse gas emissions is increasing worldwide. Gasification is becoming a promising technology for biomass utilization with a positive environmental impact. This review focuses specifically on woody biomass gasification and recent advances in the field. The physical properties, chemical structure, and composition of biomass greatly affect gasification performance, pretreatment, and handling. Primary and secondary catalysts are of key importance to improve the conversion and cracking of tars, and lime-enhanced gasification advantageously combines CO2 capture with gasification. These topics are covered here, including the reaction mechanisms and biomass characterization. Experimental research and industrial experience are investigated to elucidate concepts, processes, and characteristics of woody biomass gasification and to identify challenges.

  14. Aspects of using biomass as energy source for power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Tîrtea Raluca-Nicoleta; Mărculescu Cosmin

    2017-01-01

    Biomass represents an important source of renewable energy in Romania with about 64% of the whole available green energy. Being a priority for the energy sector worldwide, in our country the development stage is poor compared to solar and wind energy. Biomass power plants offer great horizontal economy development, local and regional economic growth with benefic effects on life standard. The paper presents an analysis on biomass to power conversion solutions compared to fossil fuels using two...

  15. Biomass to energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the biomass to energy. It explains the biomass principle, the possibility of biomass to energy conversion, the first generation of biofuels (bio ethanol, ETBE, bio diesel, flex fuel) and their advantages and limitations, the european regulatory framework and policy with the evolutions and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  16. Process for treating biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Timothy J.; Teymouri, Farzaneh

    2018-04-10

    This invention is directed to a process for treating biomass. The biomass is treated with a biomass swelling agent within the vessel to swell or rupture at least a portion of the biomass. A portion of the swelling agent is removed from a first end of the vessel following the treatment. Then steam is introduced into a second end of the vessel different from the first end to further remove swelling agent from the vessel in such a manner that the swelling agent exits the vessel at a relatively low water content.

  17. Process for treating biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Timothy J.; Teymouri, Farzaneh

    2015-08-11

    This invention is directed to a process for treating biomass. The biomass is treated with a biomass swelling agent within the vessel to swell or rupture at least a portion of the biomass. A portion of the swelling agent is removed from a first end of the vessel following the treatment. Then steam is introduced into a second end of the vessel different from the first end to further remove swelling agent from the vessel in such a manner that the swelling agent exits the vessel at a relatively low water content.

  18. Energy production from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestebroer, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the task group 'Energy Production from Biomass', initiated by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, was to identify bottlenecks in the development of biomass for energy production. The bottlenecks were identified by means of a process analysis of clean biomass fuels to the production of electricity and/or heat. The subjects in the process analysis are the potential availability of biomass, logistics, processing techniques, energy use, environmental effects, economic impact, and stimulation measures. Three categories of biomass are distinguished: organic residual matter, imported biomass, and energy crops, cultivated in the Netherlands. With regard to the processing techniques attention is paid to co-firing of clean biomass in existing electric power plants (co-firing in a coal-fired power plant or co-firing of fuel gas from biomass in a coal-fired or natural gas-fired power plant), and the combustion or gasification of clean biomass in special stand-alone installations. 5 figs., 13 tabs., 28 refs

  19. Biomass resources in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiangco, V.M.; Sethi, P.S. [California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The biomass resources in California which have potential for energy conversion were assessed and characterized through the project funded by the California Energy Commission and the US Department of Energy`s Western Regional Biomass Energy Program (WRBEP). The results indicate that there is an abundance of biomass resources as yet untouched by the industry due to technical, economic, and environmental problems, and other barriers. These biomass resources include residues from field and seed crops, fruit and nut crops, vegetable crops, and nursery crops; food processing wastes; forest slash; energy crops; lumber mill waste; urban wood waste; urban yard waste; livestock manure; and chaparral. The estimated total potential of these biomass resource is approximately 47 million bone dry tons (BDT), which is equivalent to 780 billion MJ (740 trillion Btu). About 7 million BDT (132 billion MJ or 124 trillion Btu) of biomass residue was used for generating electricity by 66 direct combustion facilities with gross capacity of about 800 MW. This tonnage accounts for only about 15% of the total biomass resource potential identified in this study. The barriers interfering with the biomass utilization both in the on-site harvesting, collection, storage, handling, transportation, and conversion to energy are identified. The question whether these barriers present significant impact to biomass {open_quotes}availability{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}sustainability{close_quotes} remains to be answered.

  20. Fuel Pellets from Biomass. Processing, Bonding, Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang

    The depletion of fossil fuels and the need to reduce green house gas emissions has resulted in a strong growth of biomass utilization for heat and power production. Attempts to overcome the poor handling properties of biomass, i.e. its low bulk density and inhomogeneous structure, have resulted...

  1. Effect of diverse ecological conditions on biomass production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kangaroo grass native to Australia is known as the best grass to grow on different environmental and soil conditions. Biomass production of any grass is the key factor to estimate that if the grass could fulfill the animal requirements. Biomass production of kangaroo grass was estimated in this study at three growth stages on ...

  2. Biomass Resources Distribution in the Terrestrial Ecosystem of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data and the multiple linear regression model were used to estimate distribution of biomass resources in 2010. The establishment of models, developed using different vegetation biomass sample data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, leaf area index (LAI, meteorological data, coordinates, terrain data, and statistical data. Results based on a cross-validation approach show that the model can explain 95.6% of the variance in biomass, with a relative estimation error of 67 g·m−2 for a range of biomass between 0–73,875 g·m−2. Spatial statistic results were consistent with the practical condition in most cases. The above- and below-ground biomass (ABGB of China was estimated to be 31.1 Pg (1 Pg = 1015 g in 2010. The forest ecosystem has the largest total biomass, which represents about 70% of the whole terrestrial ecosystem. The desert ecosystem has minimum biomass value. The Belowground Endowment (BRE varied differently in spatial distribution, with the high values occurring in the southeast and northeast. The low values were primarily distributed in north and northwest regions, where it is mostly desert and few plants. Biomass per capita indicates the availability of natural resources per capita. Tibet had the maximum biomass per capita (807 tone in 2010. Shanghai and Tianjin had the minimum biomass per capita, less than 500 kg. Shanghai, Tianjin, Guangzhou, Beijing, and Hainan had negative growth of biomass per capita.

  3. Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Declination is calculated using the current International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model. Declination is calculated using the current World Magnetic Model...

  4. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of

  5. World wide biomass resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faaij, A.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    In a wide variety of scenarios, policy strategies, and studies that address the future world energy demand and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, biomass is considered to play a major role as renewable energy carrier. Over the past decades, the modern use of biomass has increased

  6. Energetische Verwertung von Biomasse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoransky, Richard; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Bollin, Elmar; Oehler, Helmut; Schelling, Udo

    Etwa 0,1% der Solarenergie wandeln sich durch Photosynthese aus dem Kohlendioxid der Luft in Biomasse um. Die Biomassen sind als Festbrennstoff nutzbar oder zu gasförmigen Brennstoffen weiterverarbeitbar. Zwei Arten von Biomassen sind zu unterscheiden: Anfallende Biomasse

  7. Optimization of biomass and dihydroorotase (DHOase) production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth conditions which maintains DHOase overproduction by Saccharomyces cerevisiae MNJ3 (pMNJ1) and allow sufficient biomass production to ensure DHoase's purification were investigated. We used as basal medium the Yeast Carbon Base (YCB; Difco), especially designed for studies of nitrogen metabolism in ...

  8. A regression-adjusted approach can estimate competing biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating above-ground herbaceous and woody biomass on competition research plots. On a set of destructively-sampled plots, an ocular estimate of biomass by vegetative component is first made, after which vegetation is clipped, dried, and weighed. Linear regressions are then calculated for each component between estimated and actual weights...

  9. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Rudolf, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass with the aim of describing the current status of the technology. Hydrothermal liquefaction is a medium-temperature, high-pressure thermochemical process, which produces a liquid product, often called bio-oil or bi-crude. During...... the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the macromolecules of the biomass are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive and can recombine into larger ones. During this process, a substantial part of the oxygen in the biomass is removed...... by dehydration or decarboxylation. The chemical properties of bio-oil are highly dependent of the biomass substrate composition. Biomass constitutes of various components such as protein; carbohydrates, lignin and fat, and each of them produce distinct spectra of compounds during hydrothermal liquefaction...

  10. Rheology of concentrated biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniuk, J. R.; Wang, J.; Root, T. W.; Scott, C. T.; Klingenberg, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Economic processing of lignocellulosic biomass requires handling the biomass at high solids concentration. This creates challenges because concentrated biomass behaves as a Bingham-like material with large yield stresses. Here we employ torque rheometry to measure the rheological properties of concentrated lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover). Yield stresses obtained using torque rheometry agree with those obtained using other rheometric methods, but torque rheometry can be used at much larger solids concentration (weight fractions of insoluble solids greater than 0.2). Yield stresses decrease with severity of hydrolysis, decrease when water-soluble polymers are added (for nonhydrolyzed biomass), and increase with particle length. Experimental results are qualitatively consistent with those obtained from particle-level simulations.

  11. Remarks on energetic biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, Paul; Pelletier, Georges

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a study of energy biomass by considering its three main sources (forest, agriculture and wastes) and three energy needs (heat, fuel for transports, electricity) in the French national context. After having recalled the various uses of biomass (animal feeding, energy production, materials, chemical products), the authors discuss the characteristics of biomass with respect to other energy sources. Then, they analyse and discuss the various energy needs which biomass could satisfy: heat production (in industry, in the residential and office building sector), fuel for transports, electricity production. They assess and discuss the possible biomass production of its three main sources: forest, agriculture, and wastes (household, agricultural and industrial wastes). They also discuss the opportunities for biogas production and for second generation bio-fuel production

  12. MICROALGAE BIOMASS PRODUCTION BASED ON WASTEWATER FROM DAIRY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Dębowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of culturing high-oil algae biomass based on wastewater from dairy processing plants. The experiments were conducted in laboratory scale with tubular photobioreactor using. The best technological properties were demonstrated for eluates from an anaerobic reactor treating dairy wastewater. The use of a substrate of this type yielded algae biomass concentration at a level of 3490 mg d.m./dm3, with the mean rate of algae biomass growth at 176 mg d.m./dm3∙d. The mean content of oil in the proliferated biomass of algae approximated 20%.

  13. Design of biomass district heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallios, Ioannis; Tsoutsos, Theocharis; Papadakis, George

    2009-01-01

    The biomass exploitation takes advantage of the agricultural, forest, and manure residues and in extent, urban and industrial wastes, which under controlled burning conditions, can generate heat and electricity, with limited environmental impacts. Biomass can - significantly - contribute in the energy supplying system, if the engineers will adopt the necessary design changes to the traditional systems and become more familiar with the design details of the biomass heating systems. The aim of this paper is to present a methodology of the design of biomass district heating systems taking into consideration the optimum design of building structure and urban settlement around the plant. The essential energy parameters are presented for the size calculations of a biomass burning-district heating system, as well as for the environmental (i.e. Greenhouse Gas Emissions) and economic evaluation (i.e. selectivity and viability of the relevant investment). Emphasis has been placed upon the technical parameters of the biomass system, the economic details of the boiler, the heating distribution network, the heat exchanger and the Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  14. Design of biomass district heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallios, Ioannis [Energy Applications Mgr., METRON Ltd Engineering Company (Greece); Tsoutsos, Theocharis [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Chania (Greece); Papadakis, George [Department of Natural Resources and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens (Greece)

    2009-04-15

    The biomass exploitation takes advantage of the agricultural, forest, and manure residues and in extent, urban and industrial wastes, which under controlled burning conditions, can generate heat and electricity, with limited environmental impacts. Biomass can - significantly - contribute in the energy supplying system, if the engineers will adopt the necessary design changes to the traditional systems and become more familiar with the design details of the biomass heating systems. The aim of this paper is to present a methodology of the design of biomass district heating systems taking into consideration the optimum design of building structure and urban settlement around the plant. The essential energy parameters are presented for the size calculations of a biomass burning-district heating system, as well as for the environmental (i.e. Greenhouse Gas Emissions) and economic evaluation (i.e. selectivity and viability of the relevant investment). Emphasis has been placed upon the technical parameters of the biomass system, the economic details of the boiler, the heating distribution network, the heat exchanger and the Greenhouse Gas Emissions. (author)

  15. Biomass CHP Catalog of Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report reviews the technical and economic characterization of biomass resources, biomass preparation, energy conversion technologies, power production systems, and complete integrated CHP systems.

  16. Automated growth rate determination in high-throughput microbioreactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerich, Johannes; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco

    2017-11-25

    The calculation of growth rates provides basic metric for biological fitness and is standard task when using microbioreactors (MBRs) in microbial phenotyping. MBRs easily produce huge data at high frequency from parallelized high-throughput cultivations with online monitoring of biomass formation at high temporal resolution. Resulting high-density data need to be processed efficiently to accelerate experimental throughput. A MATLAB code is presented that detects the exponential growth phase from multiple microbial cultivations in an iterative procedure based on several criteria, according to the model of exponential growth. These were obtained with Corynebacterium glutamicum showing single exponential growth phase and Escherichia coli exhibiting diauxic growth with exponential phase followed by retarded growth. The procedure reproducibly detects the correct biomass data subset for growth rate calculation. The procedure was applied on data set detached from growth phenotyping of library of genome reduced C. glutamicum strains and results agree with previously reported results where manual effort was needed to pre-process the data. Thus, the automated and standardized method enables a fair comparison of strain mutants for biological fitness evaluation. The code is easily parallelized and greatly facilitates experimental throughout in biological fitness testing from strain screenings conducted with MBR systems.

  17. Phytoplankton composition and biomass across the southern Indian Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Louise; Henriksen, Peter; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton composition and biomass was investigated across the southern Indian Ocean. Phytoplankton composition was determined from pigment analysis with subsequent calculations of group contributions to total chlorophyll a (Chl a) using CHEMTAX and, in addition, by examination in the microscope...

  18. Modeling of biomass pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samo, S.R.; Memon, A.S.; Akhund, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The fuels used in industry and power sector for the last two decades have become expensive. As a result renewable energy source have been emerging increasingly important, of these, biomass appears to be the most applicable in the near future. The pyrolysis of biomass plays a key role amongst the three major and important process generally encountered in a gas producer, namely, pyrolysis, combustion and reduction of combustion products. Each biomass has its own pyrolysis characteristics and this important parameters must be known for the proper design and efficient operation of a gasification system. Thermogravimetric analysis has been widely used to study the devolatilization of solid fuels, such as biomass. It provides the weight loss history of a sample heated at a predetermined rate as a function of time and temperature. This paper presents the experimental results of modelling the weight loss curves of the main biomass components i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Thermogravimetric analysis of main components of biomass showed that pyrolysis is first order reaction. Furthermore pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloe can be regarded as taking place in two stages, for while lignin pyrolysis is a single stage process. This paper also describes the Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) technique to predict the weight retained during pyrolysis at any temperature, for number of biomass species, such as cotton stalk, bagasse ad graoundnut shell. (author)

  19. Kinetic analysis and mathematical modeling of growth and lactic acid production of Lactobacillus casei var. rhamnosus in milk whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M M; Aguirre-Ezkauriatza, E J; Ramírez-Medrano, A; Rodríguez-Sánchez, A

    2010-12-01

    Lactobacillus casei is a lactic acid bacterium (LAB) that colonizes diverse ecological niches and that has found broad commercial application. The aim of this study was to characterize the kinetics of biomass production, lactic acid production, and substrate consumption of Lactobacillus casei var. rhamnosus cultured in deproteinized milk whey. Batch culture experiments were performed in an instrumented, 2-L, stirred tank bioreactor using different inoculum concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 g/L) and lactose levels (35 to 70 g/L). The time series of experimental data corresponding to biomass growth, lactose consumption, and lactic acid formation were differentiated to calculate the corresponding kinetic rates. Strong exponentially dependent product inhibition effects were evident at low lactic acid concentrations, and lactic acid production rate was partially associated with biomass growth. A mathematical model is presented that reproduces the experimental lactose, biomass, and lactic acid concentration profiles. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Economics of multifunctional biomass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignaciuk, A.

    2006-01-01

    for the Bioelectricity sector. The main questions that are dealt within this chapter are: to what extent the multi-product crops increase the potential of bioelectricity production and how do they affect the prices of agricultural commodities. These questions are analyzed in the general equilibrium framework. This line of analysis is chosen because it allows comprising the bottom-up information about multi-productivity with the general setting of the whole economy in an applied computable general equilibrium (AGE) framework. This is important since energy policy responses influence main economic sectors and via feedback effects they influence the whole economy. The impact of climate policies on land use allocation, sectoral production and consumption levels and prices of land, food, electricity and other commodities, including the multiproductivity of crops is assessed. Moreover, this chapter provides an analysis to what extent competition for land can be reduced by using multi-product crops. In Chapter 5, the general equilibrium framework is further explored. The phytoremediation characteristics of willow plantations and forestry, thanks to which contaminated land can be cleaned up, are analyzed. The potentials of additional land for biomass production, which is currently not used due to its poor productivity characteristics or due to its high contamination with heavy metals, are calculated. Such land cannot be used for food production, therefore the analysis of the effects of an increased land quantity for biomass production is performed and an assessment of its impact on the environment and on the economy is done. Moreover, this chapter deals with the question to what extent the competition issues for land can be resolved by using the multifunctional characteristics of biomass and forestry crops. Chapter 6 deals with material substitution and resource cascading. Two different chemicals are dealt with, that are currently produced using fossil fuels; (1) nylon and (2

  1. Microbial biodiesel production from oil palm biomass hydrolysate using marine Rhodococcus sp. YHY01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Kim, Junyoung; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Hyun Joong; Jeon, Jong-Min; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Yun-Gon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2017-06-01

    The effect of various biomass derived inhibitors (i.e. furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin, 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (4-HB) and acetate) was investigated for fatty acid accumulation in Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01. Rhodococcus sp. YHY01 was able to utilize acetate, vanillin, and 4-HB for biomass production and fatty acid accumulation. The IC 50 value for furfural (3.1mM), HMF (3.2mM), vanillin (2.0mM), 4-HB (2.7mM) and acetate (3.7mM) was calculated. HMF and vanillin affect fatty acid composition and increase saturated fatty acid content. Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01 cultured with empty fruit bunch hydrolysate (EFBH) as the main carbon source resulted in enhanced biomass (20%) and fatty acid productivity (37%), in compression to glucose as a carbon source. Overall, this study showed the beneficial effects of inhibitory molecules on growth and fatty acid production, and support the idea of biomass hydrolysate utilization for biodiesel production by avoiding complex efforts to remove inhibitory compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomass and Volume Yield in Mature Hybrid Poplar Plantations on Temperate Abandoned Farmland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Truax

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed clone-specific allometric relationships, with the objective of calculating volume and biomass production after 13 years in 8 poplar plantations, located across an environmental gradient, and composed of 5 unrelated hybrid poplar clones. Allometry was found to be very similar for clones MxB-915311, NxM-3729 and DNxM-915508, all having P. maximoviczii parentage. Clones DxN-3570 and TxD-3230 also had a similar allometry; for a given DBH they have a lower stem volume, stem biomass and branch biomass than P. maximoviczii hybrids. Strong Site × Clone interactions were observed for volume and woody biomass growth, with DxN and TxD hybrids only productive on low elevation fertile sites, whereas P. maximovizcii hybrids were also very productive on higher elevation sites with moderate to high soil fertility. At the site level (5 clones mean, yield reached 27.5 and 22.7 m3/ha/yr. on the two best sites (high fertility and low elevation, confirming the great potential of southern Québec (Canada for poplar culture. The productivity gap between the most and least productive sites has widened from year 8 to year 13, highlighting the need for high quality abandoned farmland site selection in terms of climate and soil fertility. Although clone selection could optimize yield across the studied environmental gradient, it cannot fully compensate for inadequate site selection.

  3. Electricity from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, B.

    1998-11-01

    Electricity from biomass assesses the potential of biomass electricity for displacing other more polluting power sources and providing a relatively clean and ecologically friendly source of energy; discusses its environmental and economic effects, while analysing political and institutional initiatives and constraints; evaluates key factors, such as energy efficiency, economics, decentralisation and political repurcussions; considers the processes and technologies employed to produce electricity from biomass; and discusses the full range of incentives offered to producers and potential producers and the far-reaching implications it could have for industry, society and the environment. (author)

  4. Biomass in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapron, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    This document provides, first, an overview of biomass industry in Germany: energy consumption and renewable energy production, the French and German electricity mix, the 2003-2013 evolution of renewable electricity production and the 2020 forecasts, the biomass power plants, plantations, biofuels production and consumption in Germany. Then, the legal framework of biofuels development in Germany is addressed (financial incentives, tariffs, direct electricity selling). Next, a focus is made on biogas production both in France and in Germany (facilities, resources). Finally, the French-German cooperation in the biomass industry and the research actors are presented

  5. Interpretation of the vacancy-ordering controlled growth morphology of Hg5In2Te8 precipitates in Hg3In2Te6 single crystals by TEM observation and crystallographic calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jie; Fu, Li; Liu, Hongwei; Ringer, S.P.; Liu, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The growth morphology and detailed crystallography of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 precipitates in Hg 3 In 2 Te 6 matrix to has been interpreted by means of transmission electron microscopy and invariant element deformation model. Three crystallographic equivalent variants of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 precipitates in Hg 3 In 2 Te 6 matrix were found to have different growth directions and habit planes. Such growth morphology is fully attributed to the lattice shrinkage induced by vacancy ordering under high temperature in Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 . Through near coincident site lattice and invariant strain calculation, the morphology and crystallographic features of the precipitate has been successfully interpreted. - Highlights: • The growth morphology of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 precipitates in Hg 3 In 2 Te 6 was observed by TEM. • Near-CSL calculation show 0.7577% lattice shrinkage of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 at high temperature. • All the involved factors have inverse relationship with the move speed of interface. • The calculated crystallography features of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 agree well with the TEM results. - Abstract: Generally, the crystal growth morphology in liquid or vapor was controlled by chemical potential, while that in solid solute was restricted by 3D strain matching between matrix and secondary phase. It is already known that the growth and evolution of the morphology of secondary phase during the solid phase transformation are highly determined by the variation of interface energy induced by lattice mismatch. In this work, the growth morphology and crystallography of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 precipitates in Hg 3 In 2 Te 6 matrix were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the growth of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 precipitates displayed an unusual growth morphology which contain three crystallographically equivalent variants with different growth directions in Hg 3 In 2 Te 6 matrix, suggesting a slight lattice constant variation of Hg 5 In 2 Te 8 precipitate

  6. Bolus calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    Matching meal insulin to carbohydrate intake, blood glucose, and activity level is recommended in type 1 diabetes management. Calculating an appropriate insulin bolus size several times per day is, however, challenging and resource demanding. Accordingly, there is a need for bolus calculators to support patients in insulin treatment decisions. Currently, bolus calculators are available integrated in insulin pumps, as stand-alone devices and in the form of software applications that can be downloaded to, for example, smartphones. Functionality and complexity of bolus calculators vary greatly, and the few handfuls of published bolus calculator studies are heterogeneous with regard to study design, intervention, duration, and outcome measures. Furthermore, many factors unrelated to the specific device affect outcomes from bolus calculator use and therefore bolus calculator study comparisons should be conducted cautiously. Despite these reservations, there seems to be increasing evidence that bolus calculators may improve glycemic control and treatment satisfaction in patients who use the devices actively and as intended. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. Sustainable Elastomers from Renewable Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongkai; Yuan, Liang; Tang, Chuanbing

    2017-07-18

    Sustainable elastomers have undergone explosive growth in recent years, partly due to the resurgence of biobased materials prepared from renewable natural resources. However, mounting challenges still prevail: How can the chemical compositions and macromolecular architectures of sustainable polymers be controlled and broadened? How can their processability and recyclability be enabled? How can they compete with petroleum-based counterparts in both cost and performance? Molecular-biomass-derived polymers, such as polymyrcene, polymenthide, and poly(ε-decalactone), have been employed for constructing thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). Plant oils are widely used for fabricating thermoset elastomers. We use abundant biomass, such as plant oils, cellulose, rosin acids, and lignin, to develop elastomers covering a wide range of structure-property relationships in the hope of delivering better performance. In this Account, recent progress in preparing monomers and TPEs from biomass is first reviewed. ABA triblock copolymer TPEs were obtained with a soft middle block containing a soybean-oil-based monomer and hard outer blocks containing styrene. In addition, a combination of biobased monomers from rosin acids and soybean oil was formulated to prepare triblock copolymer TPEs. Together with the above-mentioned approaches based on block copolymers, multigraft copolymers with a soft backbone and rigid side chains are recognized as the first-generation and second-generation TPEs, respectively. It has been recently demonstrated that multigraft copolymers with a rigid backbone and elastic side chains can also be used as a novel architecture of TPEs. Natural polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, are utilized as a stiff, macromolecular backbone. Cellulose/lignin graft copolymers with side chains containing a copolymer of methyl methacrylate and butyl acrylate exhibited excellent elastic properties. Cellulose graft copolymers with biomass-derived polymers as side chains were

  8. Timber volume and aboveground live tree biomass estimations for landscape analyses in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoping Zhou; Miles A. Hemstrom

    2010-01-01

    Timber availability, aboveground tree biomass, and changes in aboveground carbon pools are important consequences of landscape management. There are several models available for calculating tree volume and aboveground tree biomass pools. This paper documents species-specific regional equations for tree volume and aboveground live tree biomass estimation that might be...

  9. Biomass_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Biomass data found in this data set are broken into four regions of the Northeast US Continental Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem: Gulf of Maine, Georges Bank,...

  10. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Hoffmann, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most abundant sources of renewable energy, and will be an important part of a more sustainable future energy system. In addition to direct combustion, there is growing attention on conversion of biomass into liquid en-ergy carriers. These conversion methods are divided...... into biochemical/biotechnical methods and thermochemical methods; such as direct combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction etc. This chapter will focus on hydrothermal liquefaction, where high pressures and intermediate temperatures together with the presence of water are used to convert biomass...... into liquid biofuels, with the aim of describing the current status and development challenges of the technology. During the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the biomass macromolecules are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive...

  11. Biomass: a growing role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junginger, M.; Faaij, A.; Rosillo-Calle, F.; Woods, J.

    2006-01-01

    In 2006, an article in the journal Renewable Energy World discussed the sustainability of biofuels, their potential to contribute to the global energy demand, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and their impact on biodiversity and land use. The essence of the present paper is to contribute to the aforesaid discussion under the sub-headings of (a) biomass production potentials and the importance of technological development and crops to satisfy this potential; (b) critical aspects for the development of biomass on a large scale for energy production; (c) overview of current developments to ensure the environmentally-friendliness of biomass through the development of safeguards and (d) sustainable international bioenergy trade as a driver to develop the potential of biomass. (author)

  12. 2007 Biomass Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Biomass Program is actively working with public and private partners to meet production and technology needs. With the corn ethanol market growing steadily, researchers are unlocking the potential of non-food biomass sources, such as switchgrass and forest and agricultural residues. In this way, the Program is helping to ensure that cost-effective technologies will be ready to support production goals for advanced biofuels.

  13. Intensive biomass harvesting in forests - what about the carbon balance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Bjoern; Johansson, Maj-Britt

    1998-08-01

    The use of biofuels is considered to be CO 2 -neutral. This means that the use of forest biomass for fuel does not add more CO 2 to the atmosphere than what has been taken up over a stand age by photosynthesis. However, the biomass that may be harvested only contains part of the CO 2 immobilized through fixation during the growth of the forest stand. A fraction of the produced biomass will always decompose on and in the soil, in part producing humus and in part CO 2 . To this fraction belongs the litter formed during the period of stand growth, e.g. the annual foliar litterfall. The decomposition of both foliar litter and green needles have been shown to follow an asymptotic function, meaning that the decomposition approaches a limit value. This means that recalcitrant remains are left. The decomposition of felling residues have been assumed to follow the same function. The obvious question is how the amount of humus is affected by removal of felling residues. In an investigation of humus storage in five stands of Norway spruce in south Sweden limit values were estimated for the decomposition of local spruce needle litter giving a variation from 63 to 85 per cent. With the use of these limit values and the amount of litterfall the accumulation of humus was estimated. These calculations showed that there is a growth of the humus layer in the period of stand growth. The rate of humus accumulation varied among the stands and on the average a theoretical humus accumulation of about 42 tons per hectare was estimated for a stand age of 60 years. This amount of already accumulated humus is not affected by harvests of remains from thinnings or clearcuts. If, on the other hand the felling residues are not removed that means that the amount of humus should increase. Experiments with soil scarification showed that for litter buried under plowed-up mineral soil the decomposition went further than in soil not scarified. The estimated limit value was on the average about 40 per

  14. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  15. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  16. MEMS Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  17. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  18. Switchgrass a valuable biomass crop for energy

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The demand of renewable energies is growing steadily both from policy and from industry which seeks environmentally friendly feed stocks. The recent policies enacted by the EU, USA and other industrialized countries foresee an increased interest in the cultivation of energy crops; there is clear evidence that switchgrass is one of the most promising biomass crop for energy production and bio-based economy and compounds. Switchgrass: A Valuable Biomass Crop for Energy provides a comprehensive guide to  switchgrass in terms of agricultural practices, potential use and markets, and environmental and social benefits. Considering this potential energy source from its biology, breed and crop physiology to its growth and management to the economical, social and environmental impacts, Switchgrass: A Valuable Biomass Crop for Energy brings together chapters from a range of experts in the field, including a foreword from Kenneth P. Vogel, to collect and present the environmental benefits and characteristics of this a ...

  19. Biomass energy: Another driver of land acquisitions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotula, Lorenzo; Finnegan, Lynn; MacQueen, Duncan

    2011-08-15

    As governments in the global North look to diversify their economies away from fossil fuel and mitigate climate change, plans for biomass energy are growing fast. These are fuelling a sharp rise in the demand for wood, which, for some countries, could outstrip domestic supply capacity by as much as 600 per cent. It is becoming clear that although these countries will initially look to tap the temperate woodlands of developed countries, there are significant growth rate advantages that may lead them to turn to the tropics and sub-tropics to fill their biomass gap in the near future. Already there is evidence of foreign investors acquiring land in Africa, South America and Southeast Asia to establish tree plantations for biomass energy. If left unchecked, these trends could increase pressures on land access and food security in some of the world's poorest countries and communities.

  20. Hygroscopic properties of levoglucosan and related organic compounds characteristic to biomass burning aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2004-11-01

    Biomass burning, which is characterized by pyrolysis as well as vaporization and condensation of biomass constituents, is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosols. In this study, hygroscopic properties of five organic compounds (levoglucosan, D-glucose, and vanillic, syringic, and 4-hydroxybenozoic acids), which are major pyrolysis products of wood, were measured using a tandem differential mobility analyzer. Levoglucosan, which is typically the most abundant species in wood burning aerosols, showed a significant hygroscopic growth for particles with a diameter of 100 nm. No efflorescence was observed under the measured relative humidity, and a supersaturated condition of levoglucosan-water particles was observed. The growth factors of levoglucosan are 1.08, 1.18, 1.23, and 1.38 at relative humidity (RH) of 60, 80, 85, and 90%, respectively. The measured hygroscopic curves are in general consistent with those estimated from ideal solution theory and Uniquac Functional-Group Activity Coefficient (UNIFAC) and Conductor-Like Screening Model for Real Solvent (COSMO-RS) methods. Significant hygroscopic growth was also observed for D-glucose, whose growth factor is quite similar to that of levoglucosan. However, three model pyrolysis products of lignin (i.e., vanillic-, syringic-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids) did not show any hygroscopic growth under the RH conditions up to 95%. On the basis of the organic composition of wood burning aerosols, the water absorption attributed to levoglucosan in wood burning aerosols is calculated to be up to 30% of the organic mass at 90% RH. This study demonstrates that oxygenated organics emitted from biomass burning could significantly enhance the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  1. Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skelton, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

  2. Green Gasification Technology for Wet Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Chong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The world now is facing two energy related threats which are lack of sustainable, secure and affordable energy supplies and the environmental damage acquired in producing and consuming ever-increasing amount of energy. In the first decade of the twenty-first century, increasing energy prices reminds us that an affordable energy plays an important role in economic growth and human development. To overcome the abovementioned problem, we cannot continue much longer to consume finite reserves of fossil fuels, the use of which contributes to global warming. Preferably, the world should move towards more sustainable energy sources such as wind energy, solar energy and biomass. However, the abovementioned challenges may not be met solely by introduction of sustainable energy forms. We also need to use energy more efficiently. Developing and introducing more efficient energy conversion technologies is therefore important, for fossil fuels as well as renewable fuels. This assignment addresses the question how biomass may be used more efficiently and economically than it is being used today. Wider use of biomass, a clean and renewable feedstock may extend the lifetime of our fossil fuels resources and alleviate global warming problems. Another advantage of using of biomass as a source of energy is to make developed countries less interdependent on oil-exporting countries, and thereby reduce political tension. Furthermore, the economies of agricultural regions growing energy crops benefit as new jobs are created. Keywords: energy, gasification, sustainable, wet biomass

  3. Biomass energy resource enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    The demand for energy in developing countries is expected to increase to at least three times its present level within the next 25 years. If this demand is to be met by fossil fuels, an additional 2 billion tonnes of crude oil or 3 billion tonnes of coal would be needed every year. This consumption pattern, if allowed to proceed, would add 10 billion tonnes of CO 2 , to the global atmosphere each year, with its attendant risk of global warming. Therefore, just for our survival, it is imperative to progressively replace fossil fuels by biomass energy resources and to enhance the efficiency of use of the latter. Biomass is not only environmentally benign but is also abundant. It is being photosynthesised at the rate of 200 billion tonnes of carbon every year, which is equivalent to 10 times the world's present demand for energy. Presently, biomass energy resources are highly under-utilised in developing countries; when they are used it is through combustion, which is inefficient and causes widespread environmental pollution with its associated health hazards. Owing to the low bulk density and high moisture content of biomass, which make it difficult to collect, transport and store, as well as its ash-related thermochemical properties, its biodegradability and seasonal availability, the industrial use of biomass is limited to small and (some) medium-scale industries, most of which are unable to afford efficient but often costly energy conversion systems. Considering these constraints and the need to enhance the use base, biomass energy technologies appropriate to developing countries have been identified. Technologies such as briquetting and densification to upgrade biomass fuels are being adopted as conventional measures in some developing countries. The biomass energy base can be enhanced only once these technologies have been shown to be viable under local conditions and with local raw materials, after which they will multiply on their own, as has been the case

  4. Seaweed and Biomass production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiradze, K. T.

    2016-02-01

    The Black Sea has a sensitive ecosystem, vulnerable to the potential impacts by climate, water quality, pollution and etc. Successfully restoring and sustaining healthy Black Sea aqua cultural farming will require concreted action by private sector, civil society, farmer organizations and other stakeholders. But to achieve agri-environmental goals at scale, well-organized policy goals, framework and strategy for Sea Agriculture Green energy, Algae Biomass, Sapropel Production, aquacultures farming are essential for Georgian Farmers. But we must recognizes the most sustainable and at least risky farming systems will be those that build in aqua cultural, environmental, and social management practices resilient to climate ch ange and other risks and shocks evident in Georgia and whole in a Black Sea Basin Countries. Black Sea has more than 600 kinds of seaweeds; these species contain biologically active substances also present in fish - vitamins and omega fatty acids. The task is to specify how Black Sea seaweeds can be used in preparing nutrition additives, medicines and cosmetic products. As elsewhere around the world, governments, civil society, and the private sector in Georgia should work together to develop and implement `Blue Economy' and Green Growth strategies to generate equitable, sustainable economic development through strengthening Sea Agriculture. We are very interested to develop Black Sea seaweed plantation ad farming for multiply purposes fo r livestock as food additives, for human as great natural source of iodine as much iodine are released by seaweeds into the atmosphere to facilitate the development of better models or aerosol formation and atmospheric chemistry. It is well known, that earth's oceans are thought to have absorbed about one quarter of the CO2 humans pumped into the atmosphere over the past 20 years. The flip side of this process is that, as they absorb co2, oceans also become more acidic with dramatic consequences for sea life

  5. Solid biomass barometer 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The winter of 2011 was exceptionally mild, even in Northern Europe, with unusually warm temperatures. As a result the demand for firewood and solid biomass fuel was low. The European Union's primary energy production from solid biomass contracted by 2.9% slipping to 78.8 Mtoe. The first 4 countries are Germany (11.690 Mtoe), France (9.223 Mtoe), Sweden (8.165 Mtoe) and Finland (7.476 Mtoe) and when the production is relative to the population the first 4 countries become: Finland (1.391 toe/inhab.), Sweden (0.867 toe/inhab.), Latvia (0.784 toe/inhab.) and Estonia (0.644 toe/inhab.). Solid biomass electricity production continued to grow, driven by the additional take-up of biomass co-firing, to reach 72.800 TWh at the end of 2011, it means +2.6% compared to 2010. The energy policy of various states concerning solid biomass is analyzed

  6. Root biomass, turnover and net primary productivity of a coffee agroforestry system in Costa Rica: effects of soil depth, shade trees, distance to row and coffee age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrenet, Elsa; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel; Charbonnier, Fabien; Pastor Pérez-Molina, Junior; Khac, Emmanuelle; Prieto, Iván; Stokes, Alexia; Roumet, Catherine; Rapidel, Bruno; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Vargas, Victor J.; Robelo, Diego; Barquero, Alejandra; Jourdan, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims In Costa Rica, coffee (Coffea arabica) plants are often grown in agroforests. However, it is not known if shade-inducing trees reduce coffee plant biomass through root competition, and hence alter overall net primary productivity (NPP). We estimated biomass and NPP at the stand level, taking into account deep roots and the position of plants with regard to trees. Methods Stem growth and root biomass, turnover and decomposition were measured in mixed coffee/tree (Erythrina poeppigiana) plantations. Growth ring width and number at the stem base were estimated along with stem basal area on a range of plant sizes. Root biomass and fine root density were measured in trenches to a depth of 4 m. To take into account the below-ground heterogeneity of the agroforestry system, fine root turnover was measured by sequential soil coring (to a depth of 30 cm) over 1 year and at different locations (in full sun or under trees and in rows/inter-rows). Allometric relationships were used to calculate NPP of perennial components, which was then scaled up to the stand level. Key Results Annual ring width at the stem base increased up to 2·5 mm yr−1 with plant age (over a 44-year period). Nearly all (92 %) coffee root biomass was located in the top 1·5 m, and only 8 % from 1·5 m to a depth of 4 m. Perennial woody root biomass was 16 t ha−1 and NPP of perennial roots was 1·3 t ha−1 yr−1. Fine root biomass (0–30 cm) was two-fold higher in the row compared with between rows. Fine root biomass was 2·29 t ha−1 (12 % of total root biomass) and NPP of fine roots was 2·96 t ha−1 yr−1 (69 % of total root NPP). Fine root turnover was 1·3 yr−1 and lifespan was 0·8 years. Conclusions Coffee root systems comprised 49 % of the total plant biomass; such a high ratio is possibly a consequence of shoot pruning. There was no significant effect of trees on coffee fine root biomass, suggesting that coffee root systems are very competitive in the

  7. Root biomass, turnover and net primary productivity of a coffee agroforestry system in Costa Rica: effects of soil depth, shade trees, distance to row and coffee age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrenet, Elsa; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel; Charbonnier, Fabien; Pastor Pérez-Molina, Junior; Khac, Emmanuelle; Prieto, Iván; Stokes, Alexia; Roumet, Catherine; Rapidel, Bruno; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Vargas, Victor J; Robelo, Diego; Barquero, Alejandra; Jourdan, Christophe

    2016-08-21

    In Costa Rica, coffee (Coffea arabica) plants are often grown in agroforests. However, it is not known if shade-inducing trees reduce coffee plant biomass through root competition, and hence alter overall net primary productivity (NPP). We estimated biomass and NPP at the stand level, taking into account deep roots and the position of plants with regard to trees. Stem growth and root biomass, turnover and decomposition were measured in mixed coffee/tree (Erythrina poeppigiana) plantations. Growth ring width and number at the stem base were estimated along with stem basal area on a range of plant sizes. Root biomass and fine root density were measured in trenches to a depth of 4 m. To take into account the below-ground heterogeneity of the agroforestry system, fine root turnover was measured by sequential soil coring (to a depth of 30 cm) over 1 year and at different locations (in full sun or under trees and in rows/inter-rows). Allometric relationships were used to calculate NPP of perennial components, which was then scaled up to the stand level. Annual ring width at the stem base increased up to 2·5 mm yr -1 with plant age (over a 44-year period). Nearly all (92 %) coffee root biomass was located in the top 1·5 m, and only 8 % from 1·5 m to a depth of 4 m. Perennial woody root biomass was 16 t ha -1 and NPP of perennial roots was 1·3 t ha -1 yr -1 Fine root biomass (0-30 cm) was two-fold higher in the row compared with between rows. Fine root biomass was 2·29 t ha -1 (12 % of total root biomass) and NPP of fine roots was 2·96 t ha -1 yr -1 (69 % of total root NPP). Fine root turnover was 1·3 yr -1 and lifespan was 0·8 years. Coffee root systems comprised 49 % of the total plant biomass; such a high ratio is possibly a consequence of shoot pruning. There was no significant effect of trees on coffee fine root biomass, suggesting that coffee root systems are very competitive in the topsoil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  8. Comment calculer le contenu énergétique des produits d'origine pétrolière et de leurs substituts d'origine charbonnière ou végétale How to Calculate the Energy Content of Products of Petroleum Origin and of Their Substitutes from Coal Or Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leprince P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le contenu énergétique des produits pétroliers issus du raffinage, des produits de vapocraquage de naphta et de quelques produits de la pétrochimie, a été calculé en prenant en considération, la dépense énergétique entre coproduits ou sous-produits d'une même transformation, les variantes de procédés et l'effet des divers modes de fourniture d'énergie nécessaire à la transformation considérée. The energy content of petroleum products coming from refining, of naphta steam-cracking products and of various petrochemical products is calculated by taking into consideration the energy expenditure between the coproducts or by products from the same transformation, the different processes and the effect of different ways in which to supply the energy required for the transformation being considered.

  9. Biomass ash utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristol, D.R.; Noel, D.J.; O`Brien, B. [HYDRA-CO Operations, Inc., Syracuse, NY (United States); Parker, B. [US Energy Corp., Fort Fairfield, ME (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper demonstrates that with careful analysis of ash from multiple biomass and waste wood fired power plants that most of the ash can serve a useful purpose. Some applications require higher levels of consistency than others. Examples of ash spreading for agricultural purposes as a lime supplement for soil enhancement in Maine and North Carolina, as well as a roadbase material in Maine are discussed. Use of ash as a horticultural additive is explored, as well as in composting as a filtering media and as cover material for landfills. The ash utilization is evaluated in a framework of environmental responsibility, regulations, handling and cost. Depending on the chemical and physical properties of the biomass derived fly ash and bottom ash, it can be used in one or more applications. Developing a program that utilizes ash produced in biomass facilities is environmentally and socially sound and can be financially attractive.

  10. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1991-11-01

    The management structure and program objectives for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) remain unchanged from previous years. Additional funding was provided by the Bonneville Power Administration Regional Biomass Program to continue the publication of articles in the Biologue. The Western Area Power Administration and the Council of Great Lakes Governors funded the project ''Characterization of Emissions from Burning Woodwaste''. A grant for the ninth year was received from DOE. The Northeast Regional Biomass Steering Committee selected the following four projects for funding for the next fiscal year. (1) Wood Waste Utilization Conference, (2) Performance Evaluation of Wood Systems in Commercial Facilities, (3) Wood Energy Market Utilization Training, (4) Update of the Facility Directory

  11. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from

  12. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  13. Biomass for bioenergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Niclas Scott

    sources of biomass for energy purposes in the European Union. Estimation of European biomass resources is associated with significant uncertainty, and it is not sure if the European Union can meet its 2020 energy policy targets with biomass produced in the EU, although some countries hold sway over...... a total production of residues from these six crops of ~3.7 billion tonnes dry matter annually. North and South America; Eastern, South-Eastern and Southern Asia and Eastern Europe each produce more than 200 million tonnes dry matter annually. The theoretical energy potential from the selected crop......, where bio-ethanol production is integrated with combined heat and power production may improve the energy balance with about 30 % point and reach energy efficiencies almost comparable to those seen for conversion of petroleum into gasoline. Minimisation of GHG emissions from bioenergy production...

  14. Background information for the SER Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth calculations. Sectors Industry, Agriculture and Horticulture; Achtergronddocument bij doorrekening Energieakkoord. Sectoren industrie en land- en tuinbouw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzels, W. [ECN Beleidsstudies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    On September 4, 2013, representatives of employers' associations, trade union federations, environmental organizations, the Dutch government and civil society have signed an Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth. ECN and PBL have been asked to evaluate this agreement. This report gives background information on the evaluation of the measures aimed at improving energy efficiency in industry and agriculture [Dutch] Op 4 september 2013 is het 'Energieakkoord voor duurzame groei' getekend. ECN en PBL zijn gevraagd het akkoord te beoordelen en door te rekenen. Dit rapport dient als achtergronddocument bij de doorrekening van de maatregelen gericht op energiebesparing in de industrie en land- en tuinbouw.

  15. Remote Characterization of Biomass Measurements: Case Study of Mangrove Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoyinbo, Temilola E.

    2010-01-01

    Accurately quantifying forest biomass is of crucial importance for climate change studies. By quantifying the amount of above and below ground biomass and consequently carbon stored in forest ecosystems, we are able to derive estimates of carbon sequestration, emission and storage and help close the carbon budget. Mangrove forests, in addition to providing habitat and nursery grounds for over 1300 animal species, are also an important sink of biomass. Although they only constitute about 3% of the total forested area globally, their carbon storage capacity -- in forested biomass and soil carbon -- is greater than that of tropical forests (Lucas et al, 2007). In addition, the amount of mangrove carbon -- in the form of litter and leaves exported into offshore areas is immense, resulting in over 10% of the ocean's dissolved organic carbon originating from mangroves (Dittmar et al, 2006) The measurement of forest above ground biomass is carried out on two major scales: on the plot scale, biomass can be measured using field measurements through allometric equation derivation and measurements of forest plots. On the larger scale, the field data are used to calibrate remotely sensed data to obtain stand-wide or even regional estimates of biomass. Currently, biomass can be calculated using average stand biomass values and optical data, such as aerial photography or satellite images (Landsat, Modis, Ikonos, SPOT, etc.). More recent studies have concentrated on deriving forest biomass values using radar (JERS, SIR-C, SRTM, Airsar) and/or lidar (ICEsat/GLAS, LVIS) active remote sensing to retrieve more accurate and detailed measurements of forest biomass. The implementation of a generation of new active sensors (UAVSar, DesdynI, Alos/Palsar, TerraX) has prompted the development of new tecm'liques of biomass estimation that use the combination of multiple sensors and datasets, to quantify past, current and future biomass stocks. Focusing on mangrove forest biomass estimation

  16. Demographic Drivers of Aboveground Biomass Dynamics During Secondary Succession in Neotropical Dry and Wet Forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, Danaë M.A.; Chazdon, Robin L.; Arreola-Villa, Felipe; Balvanera, Patricia; Bentos, Tony V.; Dupuy, Juan M.; Hernández-Stefanoni, J.L.; Jakovac, Catarina C.; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin E.; Lohbeck, Madelon; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Massoca, Paulo E.S.; Meave, Jorge A.; Mesquita, Rita C.G.; Mora, Francisco; Pérez-García, Eduardo A.; Romero-Pérez, I.E.; Saenz-Pedroza, Irving; Breugel, van Michiel; Williamson, G.B.; Bongers, Frans

    2017-01-01

    The magnitude of the carbon sink in second-growth forests is expected to vary with successional biomass dynamics resulting from tree growth, recruitment, and mortality, and with the effects of climate on these dynamics. We compare aboveground biomass dynamics of dry and wet Neotropical forests,

  17. The integration of nutrients, cyanobacterial biomass and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is an integrated evaluation of cyanobacterial growth and toxin production, from a reservoir through drinking water treatment - where biomass and toxin removal are achieved. Data is generated by a variety of methods: online instrumentation for chlorophyll, dissolved oxygen, temperature and pH; enzyme linked immune substrate (ELISA) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) methods for toxin analysis; microscopic methods for species identification; quantitative PCR methods for species identification; and bench-scale engineering studies for removal of toxins and biomass through drinking water treatment. This presentation is an integrated evaluation of cyanobacterial growth and toxin production, from a reservoir through drinking water treatment. The content will be useful for EPA regional office staff, state primacy personnel, state and local health personnel, drinking water treatment managers and consulting engineers.

  18. Biomass living energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Any energy source originating from organic matter is biomass, which even today is the basic source of energy for more than a quarter of humanity. Best known for its combustible properties, biomass is also used to produce biofuels. This information sheet provides also information on the electricity storage from micro-condensers to hydroelectric dams, how to save energy facing the increasing of oil prices and supply uncertainties, the renewable energies initiatives of Cork (Ireland) and the Switzerland european energy hub. (A.L.B.)

  19. Biomass stoves in dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo

    and analyzed in this session. Experimental results regarding the performance of biomass combustion stoves and the effects of real-life practices in terms of thermal efficiency, particulate and gaseous emissions will be addressed. This research is based on the development of a new testing approach that combines...... laboratory and field measurements established in the context of the implications of the upcoming eco-design directive. The communication will cover technical aspects concerning the operating performance of different types of biomass stoves and building envelopes, in order to map the ongoing opportunities...

  20. Chronic nitrogen deposition alters tree allometric relationships: implications for biomass production and carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Inés; Zak, Donald R; Burton, Andrew J; Pregitzer, Kurt S

    2016-04-01

    As increasing levels of nitrogen (N) deposition impact many terrestrial ecosystems, understanding the potential effects of higher N availability is critical for forecasting tree carbon allocation patterns and thus future forest productivity. Most regional estimates of forest biomass apply allometric equations, with parameters estimated from a limited number of studies, to forest inventory data (i.e., tree diameter). However most of these allometric equations cannot account for potential effects of increased N availability on biomass allocation patterns. Using 18 yr of tree diameter, height, and mortality data collected for a dominant tree species (Acer saccharum) in an atmospheric N deposition experiment, we evaluated how greater N availability affects allometric relationships in this species. After taking into account site and individual variability, our results reveal significant differences in allometric parameters between ambient and experimental N deposition treatments. Large trees under experimental N deposition reached greater heights at a given diameter; moreover, their estimated maximum height (mean ± standard deviation: 33.7 ± 0.38 m) was significantly higher than that estimated under the ambient condition (31.3 ± 0.31 m). Within small tree sizes (5-10 cm diameter) there was greater mortality under experimental N deposition, whereas the relative growth rates of small trees were greater under experimental N deposition. Calculations of stemwood biomass using our parameter estimates for the diameter-height relationship indicated the potential for significant biases in these estimates (~2.5%), with under predictions of stemwood biomass averaging 4 Mg/ha lower if ambient parameters were to be used to estimate stem biomass of trees in the experimental N deposition treatment. As atmospheric N deposition continues to increase into the future, ignoring changes in tree allometry will contribute to the uncertainty associated with aboveground carbon storage

  1. Method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb M.; Brown, Robert C.; Dalluge, Dustin Lee

    2015-08-18

    The present invention relates to a method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass containing alkali and/or alkaline earth metal (AAEM). The method comprises providing a lignocellulosic biomass containing AAEM; determining the amount of the AAEM present in the lignocellulosic biomass; identifying, based on said determining, the amount of a mineral acid sufficient to completely convert the AAEM in the lignocellulosic biomass to thermally-stable, catalytically-inert salts; and treating the lignocellulosic biomass with the identified amount of the mineral acid, wherein the treated lignocellulosic biomass contains thermally-stable, catalytically inert AAEM salts.

  2. Alcohol Fermentation and Biomass formation from xylose, glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerevisiae (LB-7) was the slowest in growth and utilization of xylose into biomass (economic conversion coefficient of 0.03), while K3 showed fastest utilization of xylose (coefficient 0.76). For the production of ethanol, the fastest growth and assimilation of glucose was recorded by Pa. tannophilus (P1) (coefficient 0.56) ...

  3. Co-pyrolysis characteristic of biomass and bituminous coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaidan; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Aibin; Wang, Li; Yu, Guangsuo

    2015-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of biomass and bituminous coal have been studied in this work. The temperature was up to 900°C with the heating rates of 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30°C/min. Rice straw, saw dust, microcrystalline cellulose, lignin and Shenfu bituminous coal were chosen as samples. Six different biomass ratios were used. The individual thermal behavior of each sample was obtained. The experimental weight fractions of the blended samples and the calculated values were compared. The results show that the weight fractions of the blended samples behave differently with calculated ones during the co-pyrolysis process. With the increasing biomass ratio, relative deviations between experimental weight fractions and calculated ones are larger. H/C molar ratio, heat transfer properties of biomass would affect to the interaction between biomass and coal. The maximum degradation rates are slower than the calculated ones. The activation energy distributions also changed by adding some biomass into coal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomass from the Brazilian raining forest; Biomassa das florestas amazonicas brasileiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fearnside, Philip M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This work summarizes the existing knowledge about biomass in the Brazilian area of the Amazon jungle and presents a calculation for the average total biomass in virgin forests. The results are presented. The results are higher than those presently accepted. The reasons for the discrepancy in the calculated and presently used value are presented and discussed 64 refs., 8 tabs.

  5. Biochar as a possible solution to shortcomings of traditional forest biomass utilization in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Egle; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka; Palviainen, Marjo; Köster, Kajar

    2017-04-01

    The removal of biomass is reducing C stocks in forests and implies a large removal of nitrogen. Current studies show more than 10% decreases in tree growth and biomass removal seems to be the reason. If some of harvested nutrients could be returned to the ecosystem, the observed reductions in growth might be avoided. The use of biochar has been proposed as a solution to shortcomings of forest biomass use. If the biochar is buried into the soil it will stay there for thousands of years, keeping the C out of the atmosphere, and nourishing the soil. Preferably the origin of the biochar used in forest ecosystems should be also the forest. However, for forest ecosystems studies are rare and it is not clear if biochar applications to the boreal forest would lead to larger biomass production or C neutrality. Furthermore it is not clear how much the source of biochar influences the nutrient content of the final product. We have tried to access and categorize the nutrient contents of biochar from different stocks with an emphasis on wood. We received samples of wood and produced biochar from biochar producers of Finland and one producer from Switzerland. Wooden feed stocks under analysis were birch, willow and spruce. Gained samples of biochar and feed stock have been analyzed for their nutrient contents. Nutrient differences in feed stocks and biochar have been accessed using production data collected from the producers and based on this the ratios between the mass of feed stock and the mass of biochar has been calculated. Data analysis are still in process, but our preliminary results showed that the temperature and time of pyrolysis were positively correlated with the contents of studied nutrients. Overall nutrient contents of biochar produced from spruce were much higher than ones observed in hardwoods.

  6. The Biomass mission: a step forward in quantifying forest biomass and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE Toan, T.

    2015-12-01

    The primary aim of the ESA BIOMASS mission is to determine, for the first time and in a consistent manner, the global distribution of above-ground forest biomass (AGB) in order to provide greatly improved quantification of the size and distribution of the terrestrial carbon pool, and improved estimates of terrestrial carbon fluxes. Specifically, BIOMASS will measure forest carbon stock, as well as forest height, from data provided by a single satellite giving a biomass map covering tropical, temperate and boreal forests at a resolution of around 200 m every 6 months throughout the five years of the mission. BIOMASS will use a long wavelength SAR (P-band) providing three mutually supporting measurement techniques, namely polarimetric SAR (PolSAR), polarimetric interferometric SAR (PolInSAR) and tomographic SAR (TomoSAR). The combination of these techniques will significantly reduce the uncertainties in biomass retrievals by yielding complementary information on biomass properties. Horizontal mapping: For a forest canopy, the P-band radar waves penetrate deep into the canopy, and their interaction with the structure of the forest will be exploited to map above ground biomass (AGB), as demonstrated from airborne data for temperate, boreal forests and tropical forest. Height mapping: By repeat revisits to the same location, the PolInSAR measurements will be used to estimate the height of scattering in the forest canopy. The long wavelength used by BIOMASS is crucial for the temporal coherence to be preserved over much longer timescales than at L-band, for example. 3D mapping: The P-band frequency used by BIOMASS is low enough to ensure penetration through the entire canopy, even in dense tropical forests. As a consequence, resolution of the vertical structure of the forest will be possible using tomographic methods from the multi-baseline acquisitions. This is the concept of SAR tomography, which will be implemented in the BIOMASS mission. The improvement in the

  7. Burnout calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.

    1980-01-01

    Reviewed is the effect of heat flux of different system parameters on critical density in order to give an initial view on the value of several parameters. A thorough analysis of different equations is carried out to calculate burnout is steam-water flows in uniformly heated tubes, annular, and rectangular channels and rod bundles. Effect of heat flux density distribution and flux twisting on burnout and storage determination according to burnout are commended [ru

  8. Biomass production and nutrient cycling in Eucalyptus short rotation energy forests in New Zealand. 1: biomass and nutrient accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, L.B.; Sims, R.E.H. [Massey University, Palmerston North (New Zealand). Institute of Technology and Engineering; Horne, D.J. [Massey University, Palmerston North (New Zealand). Institute of Natural Resources

    2002-12-01

    Accumulation of biomass and nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Mn) was measured during the first 3- year rotation of three Eucalyptus short rotation forest species (E. botryoides, E. globulus and E. ovata) irrigated with meatworks effluent compared with no irrigation. E. globulus had the highest biomass and nutrient accumulation either irrigated with effluent or without irrigation. After 3-year growth, E. globulus stands irrigated with effluent accumulated 72 oven dry t/ha of above-ground total biomass with a total of 651 kg N, 55 kg P, 393 kg K, 251 kg Ca, 35 kg Mg and 67 kg Mn. Effluent irrigation increased the accumulation of biomass, N, P, K and Mn, but tended to reduce the leaf area index and leaf biomass, and decreased the accumulation of Ca and Mg. (author)

  9. Biomass co-firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized-bed combus...

  10. Pyrolysis of chitin biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Yan; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The thermal degradation of chitin biomass with various molecular structures was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG), and the gaseous products were analyzed by connected mass spectroscopy (MS). The chemical structure and morphology of char residues collected at 750°C using the model...

  11. Biomass Conversion Factsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-05

    To efficiently convert algae, diverse types of cellulosic biomass, and emerging feedstocks into renewable fuels, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports research, development, and demonstration of technologies. This research will help ensure that these renewable fuels are compatible with today’s vehicles and infrastructure.

  12. Energy from aquatic biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aresta, M.; Dibenedetto, A.

    2009-01-01

    Aquatic biomass is considered as a second (or third) generation option for the production of bio fuels. The best utilization for energy purposes is not its direct combustion. Several technologies are available for the extraction of compounds that may find application for the production of gaseous fuels (biogas, dihydrogen) or liquid fuels (ethanol, bio oil, biodiesel). [it

  13. The UK biomass industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billins, P.

    1998-01-01

    A brief review is given of the development of the biomass industry in the UK. Topics covered include poultry litter generation of electricity, gasification plants fuelled by short-rotation coppice, on-farm anaerobic digestion and specialized combustion systems, e.g. straw, wood and other agricultural wastes. (UK)

  14. Biomass yield and biomass functions for plantation grown Nauclea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents biomass yield and functions for estimating total above ground biomass (TAGB), stem, branch and foliage biomass for even-aged plantations of Nauclea diderrichii (Opepe) in Nigeria. Data were obtained from 81 trees, harvested from stands of different ages. TAGB of Opepe ranged from 32.5 t ha-1 (5 ...

  15. Forest Biomass Mapping From Lidar and Radar Synergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoqing; Ranson, K. Jon; Guo, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Montesano, P.; Kimes, D.

    2011-01-01

    The use of lidar and radar instruments to measure forest structure attributes such as height and biomass at global scales is being considered for a future Earth Observation satellite mission, DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice). Large footprint lidar makes a direct measurement of the heights of scatterers in the illuminated footprint and can yield accurate information about the vertical profile of the canopy within lidar footprint samples. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is known to sense the canopy volume, especially at longer wavelengths and provides image data. Methods for biomass mapping by a combination of lidar sampling and radar mapping need to be developed. In this study, several issues in this respect were investigated using aircraft borne lidar and SAR data in Howland, Maine, USA. The stepwise regression selected the height indices rh50 and rh75 of the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data for predicting field measured biomass with a R(exp 2) of 0.71 and RMSE of 31.33 Mg/ha. The above-ground biomass map generated from this regression model was considered to represent the true biomass of the area and used as a reference map since no better biomass map exists for the area. Random samples were taken from the biomass map and the correlation between the sampled biomass and co-located SAR signature was studied. The best models were used to extend the biomass from lidar samples into all forested areas in the study area, which mimics a procedure that could be used for the future DESDYnI Mission. It was found that depending on the data types used (quad-pol or dual-pol) the SAR data can predict the lidar biomass samples with R2 of 0.63-0.71, RMSE of 32.0-28.2 Mg/ha up to biomass levels of 200-250 Mg/ha. The mean biomass of the study area calculated from the biomass maps generated by lidar- SAR synergy 63 was within 10% of the reference biomass map derived from LVIS data. The results from this study are preliminary, but do show the

  16. Research and evaluation of biomass resources/conversion/utilization systems. Biomass allocation model. Volume 1: Test and appendices A & B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, R. P.; Ahn, Y. K.; Chen, H. T.; Helm, R. W.; Nelson, E. T.; Shields, K. J.

    1981-08-01

    A biomass allocation model was developed to show the most profitable combination of biomass feedstocks, thermochemical conversion processes, and fuel products to serve the seasonal conditions in a regional market. This optimization model provides a tool for quickly calculating which of a large number of potential biomass missions is the most profitable mission. Other components of the system serve as a convenient storage and retrieval mechanism for biomass marketing and thermochemical conversion processing data. The system can be accessed through the use of a computer terminal, or it could be adapted to a microprocessor. A User's Manual for the system is included. Biomass derived fuels included in the data base are the following: medium Btu gas, low Btu gas, substitute natural gas, ammonia, methanol, electricity, gasoline, and fuel oil.

  17. Studying the melting behavior of coal, biomass, and coal/biomass ash using viscosity and heated stage XRD data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvelakis, Stelios; Folkedahl, B.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2006-01-01

    a high-temperature rotational viscometer and a hot stage XRD. The produced data were used to calculate the operating temperature of a pilot-scale entrained flow reactor during the cocombustion of biomass/ coal samples in order to ensure the slag flow and to avoid corrosion of the walls due to liquid slag...... unscheduled shutdowns, decreasing the availability and increasing the cost of the produced power. In addition, the fouling of the heat exchange surfaces reduces the system efficiency. In this work the melting and rheological properties of various biomass and biomass/ coal ash samples were studied by using....../metal interaction. Biomass ash proved to have significantly different melting behavior compared to that of the coal ash. Furthermore, the addition of biomass to coal ash led to lower viscosity and subsequently to higher stickiness of the produced ash particles. The melting behavior of the slag generated...

  18. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  19. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  20. Catalytic Gasification of Lignocellulosic Biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chodimella, Pramod; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Schlaf, Marcel; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Gasification of lignocellulosic biomass has attracted substantial current research interest. Various possible routes to convert biomass to fuels have been explored. In the present chapter, an overview of the gasification processes and their possible products are discussed. Gasification of solid

  1. Entrained Flow Gasification of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ke

    The present Ph. D. thesis describes experimental and modeling investigations on entrained flow gasification of biomass and an experimental investigation on entrained flow cogasification of biomass and coal. A review of the current knowledge of biomass entrained flow gasification is presented....... Biomass gasification experiments were performed in a laboratory-scale atmospheric pressure entrained flow reactor with the aim to investigate the effects of operating parameters and biomass types on syngas products. A wide range of operating parameters was involved: reactor temperature, steam/carbon ratio......, excess air ratio, oxygen concentration, feeder gas flow, and residence time. Wood, straw, and lignin were used as biomass fuels. In general, the carbon conversion was higher than 90 % in the biomass gasification experiments conducted at high temperatures (> 1200 °C). The biomass carbon...

  2. Biomass Feedstock National User Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Bioenergy research at the Biomass Feedstock National User Facility (BFNUF) is focused on creating commodity-scale feed-stocks from native biomass that meet the needs...

  3. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  4. Effects of end-product inhibition of Cellulomonas uda anaerobic growth on cellobiose chemostat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermoun, Z; Gaudin, C; Belaich, J P

    1988-01-01

    Cellulomonas uda was grown anaerobically in a chemostat with 3.33 and 11.41 mM cellobiose in the feed medium at dilution rates varying from 0.017 to 0.29/h. Unusual results obtained were analyzed by using curves simulating the steady-state biomass. This unusual behavior could be accounted for by a classical growth model taking end-product inhibition into account. Acetate has been identified to be the major inhibitor in the experimental conditions used. Parameters calculated from experimental observations gave theoretical curves of biomass production versus dilution rate which fitted the experimental points very well. PMID:3131311

  5. Growth Responses of Juvenile Red Drum Sciaenops ocellatus to Dietary Phenylalanine and Tyrosine Can Be Used to Calculate the Total Aromatic Amino Acid Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sergio; Halligan, Shelby; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2015-10-01

    A current priority in aquaculture is the replacement of fish meal with alternative feedstuffs to ensure the industry's sustainability. However, most alternative protein sources are deficient in at least 1 indispensable amino acid (IAA). Therefore, there is a critical need to establish refined estimates of IAA requirements of fish. The objectives of this study were to determine the total aromatic amino acid (TAAA) requirement (Phe + Tyr) and the Tyr replacement value for Phe in juvenile red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. The TAAA requirement was obtained by feeding juvenile red drum diets that contained incremental amounts of Phe (0.54, 0.84, 1.14, 1.44, 1.74, and 2.04 g/100 g dry diet) and a fixed concentration of Tyr. Because of the TAAA requirement obtained, a second feeding trial was conducted to determine the maximum Tyr replacement value for Phe when a control diet was prepared with an 80%:20% Phe-to-Tyr ratio (Phe:Tyr; 1.60 g Phe/100 g dry diet and 0.41 g Tyr/100 g), and 5 experimental diets were prepared by decreasing the inclusion of Phe and increasing the inclusion of Tyr (Phe:Tyr of 70%:30%, 60%:40%, 50%:50%, 40%:60%, and 30%:70%). Weight gain, the feed efficiency ratio, and the protein efficiency ratio increased 354%, 133%, and 134%, respectively, relative to that of fish fed the basal diet as the Phe concentration increased to 1.44 g/100 g of dry diet; at higher concentrations of Phe, no significant differences were found between treatments. Analysis of the weight gain data with a broken-line model estimated the TAAA requirement of red drum to be 2.10 g/100 g dry diet (1.69 g Phe + 0.41 g Tyr). The maximum Tyr replacement value for Phe was estimated at 40%:60% Phe:Tyr, because only fish fed the diet with a 30%:70% Phe:Tyr ratio had a significant reduction (42%) in growth performance. The TAAA requirement for maximum growth of juvenile red drum was estimated to be 2.10 ± 0.08 g/100 g dry diet. Moreover, Tyr can account for up to 60% of the TAAA requirement

  6. Physiological responses of two tropical weeds to shade: I. Growth and biomass allocation Respostas fisiológicas de duas plantas invasoras tropicais ao sombreamento: I. Crescimento e alocação de biomassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Bernardino Dias-Filho

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Ipomoea asarifolia (Desr. Roem. & Schultz (Convolvulaceae and Stachytarpheta cayennensis (Rich Vahl. (Verbenaceae, two weeds found in pastures and crop areas in Brazilian Amazonia, were grown in controlled environment cabinets under high (800-1000 µmol m-² s-¹ and low (200-350 µmol m-² s-¹ light regimes during a 40-day period. For both species leaf dry mass and leaf area per total plant dry mass, and leaf area per leaf dry mass were higher for low-light plants, whereas root mass per total plant dry mass was higher for high-light plants. High-light S. cayennensis allocated significantly more biomass to reproductive tissue than low-light plants, suggesting a probably lower ability of this species to maintain itself under shaded conditions. Relative growth rate (RGR in I. asarifolia was initially higher for high-light grown plants and after 20 days started decreasing, becoming similar to low-light plants at the last two harvests (at 30 and 40 days. In S. cayennensis, RGR was also higher for high-light plants; however, this trend was not significant at the first and last harvest dates (10 and 40 days. These results are discussed in relation to their ecological and weed management implications.Ipomoea asarifolia (Desr. Roem. & Schultz (Convolvulaceae e Stachytarpheta cayennensis (Rich Vahl. (Verbenaceae, duas plantas invasoras encontradas em pastagens e áreas agrícolas da Amazônia brasileira, foram cultivadas durante 40 dias, em câmaras de crescimento sob alto (800-1000 µmol m-² s-¹, "sol" e baixo (200-350 µmol m-² s-¹, "sombra" regime de luz. Em ambas as espécies a razão de massa e de área foliar por unidade de massa total da planta, e a área foliar por unidade de massa foliar foram maiores na sombra, enquanto a proporção de biomassa alocada para as raízes foi maior nas plantas ao sol. Em S. cayennensis a alocação de biomassa para tecido reprodutivo foi maior nas plantas ao sol, sugerindo uma provável menor habilidade dessa

  7. Aspects of using biomass as energy source for power generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tîrtea Raluca-Nicoleta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomass represents an important source of renewable energy in Romania with about 64% of the whole available green energy. Being a priority for the energy sector worldwide, in our country the development stage is poor compared to solar and wind energy. Biomass power plants offer great horizontal economy development, local and regional economic growth with benefic effects on life standard. The paper presents an analysis on biomass to power conversion solutions compared to fossil fuels using two main processes: combustion and gasification. Beside the heating value, which can be considerably higher for fossil fuels compared to biomass, a big difference between fossil fuels and biomass can be observed in the sulphur content. While the biomass sulphur content is between 0 and approximately 1%, the sulphur content of coal can reach 4%. Using coal in power plants requires important investments in installations of flue gas desulfurization. If limestone is used to reduce SO2 emissions, then additional carbon dioxide moles will be released during the production of CaO from CaCO3. Therefore, fossil fuels not only release a high amount of carbon dioxide through burning, but also through the caption of sulphur dioxide, while biomass is considered CO2 neutral. Biomass is in most of the cases represented by residues, so it is a free fuel compared to fossil fuels. The same power plant can be used even if biomass or fossil fuels is used as a feedstock with small differences. The biomass plant could need a drying system due to high moisture content of the biomass, while the coal plant will need a desulfurization installation of flue gas and additional money will be spent with fuel purchasing.

  8. Romania biomass energy. Country study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, M.; Easterly, J.L.; Mark, P.E.; Keller, A.

    1995-01-01

    The present report was prepared under contract to UNIDO to conduct a case study of biomass energy use and potential in Romania. The purpose of the case study is to provide a specific example of biomass energy issues and potential in the context of the economic transition under way in eastern Europe. The transition of Romania to a market economy is proceeding at a somewhat slower pace than in other countries of eastern Europe. Unfortunately, the former regime forced the use of biomass energy with inadequate technology and infrastructure, particularly in rural areas. The resulting poor performance thus severely damaged the reputation of biomass energy in Romania as a viable, reliable resource. Today, efforts to rejuvenate biomass energy and tap into its multiple benefits are proving challenging. Several sound biomass energy development strategies were identified through the case study, on the basis of estimates of availability and current use of biomass resources; suggestions for enhancing potential biomass energy resources; an overview of appropriate conversion technologies and markets for biomass in Romania; and estimates of the economic and environmental impacts of the utilization of biomass energy. Finally, optimal strategies for near-, medium- and long-term biomass energy development, as well as observations and recommendations concerning policy, legislative and institutional issues affecting the development of biomass energy in Romania are presented. The most promising near-term biomass energy options include the use of biomass in district heating systems; cofiring of biomass in existing coal-fired power plants or combined heat and power plants; and using co-generation systems in thriving industries to optimize the efficient use of biomass resources. Mid-term and long-term opportunities include improving the efficiency of wood stoves used for cooking and heating in rural areas; repairing the reputation of biogasification to take advantage of livestock wastes

  9. Multi-functional biomass systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dornburg, Veronika

    2004-01-01

    Biomass can play a role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions by substituting conventional materials and supplying biomass based fuels. Main reason for the low share of biomass applications in Europe is their often-high production costs, among others due to the relatively low availability of

  10. Biomass gasification in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Drift, A. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    This reports summarizes the activities, industries, and plants on biomass gasification in the Netherlands. Most of the initiatives somehow relate to waste streams, rather than clean biomass, which may seem logic for a densely populated country as the Netherlands. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest for the production of SNG (Substitute Natural Gas) from biomass, both from governments and industry.

  11. Biomass energy: Sustainable solution for greenhouse gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrul Islam, A. K. M.; Ahiduzzaman, M.

    2012-06-01

    Biomass is part of the carbon cycle. Carbon dioxide is produced after combustion of biomass. Over a relatively short timescale, carbon dioxide is renewed from atmosphere during next generation of new growth of green vegetation. Contribution of renewable energy including hydropower, solar, biomass and biofuel in total primary energy consumption in world is about 19%. Traditional biomass alone contributes about 13% of total primary energy consumption in the world. The number of traditional biomass energy users expected to rise from 2.5 billion in 2004 to 2.6 billion in 2015 and to 2.7 billion in 2030 for cooking in developing countries. Residential biomass demand in developing countries is projected to rise from 771 Mtoe in 2004 to 818 Mtoe in 2030. The main sources of biomass are wood residues, bagasse, rice husk, agro-residues, animal manure, municipal and industrial waste etc. Dedicated energy crops such as short-rotation coppice, grasses, sugar crops, starch crops and oil crops are gaining importance and market share as source of biomass energy. Global trade in biomass feedstocks and processed bioenergy carriers are growing rapidly. There are some drawbacks of biomass energy utilization compared to fossil fuels viz: heterogeneous and uneven composition, lower calorific value and quality deterioration due to uncontrolled biodegradation. Loose biomass also is not viable for transportation. Pelletization, briquetting, liquefaction and gasification of biomass energy are some options to solve these problems. Wood fuel production is very much steady and little bit increase in trend, however, the forest land is decreasing, means the deforestation is progressive. There is a big challenge for sustainability of biomass resource and environment. Biomass energy can be used to reduce greenhouse emissions. Woody biomass such as briquette and pellet from un-organized biomass waste and residues could be used for alternative to wood fuel, as a result, forest will be saved and

  12. Performance of STICS model to predict rainfed corn evapotranspiration and biomass evaluated for 6 years between 1995 and 2006 using daily aggregated eddy covariance fluxes and ancillary measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattey, Elizabeth; Jégo, Guillaume; Bourgeois, Gaétan

    2010-05-01

    Verifying the performance of process-based crop growth models to predict evapotranspiration and crop biomass is a key component of the adaptation of agricultural crop production to climate variations. STICS, developed by INRA, was part of the models selected by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to be implemented for environmental assessment studies on climate variations, because of its built-in ability to assimilate biophysical descriptors such as LAI derived from satellite imagery and its open architecture. The model prediction of shoot biomass was calibrated using destructive biomass measurements over one season, by adjusting six cultivar parameters and three generic plant parameters to define two grain corn cultivars adapted to the 1000-km long Mixedwood Plains ecozone. Its performance was then evaluated using a database of 40 years-sites of corn destructive biomass and yield. In this study we evaluate the temporal response of STICS evapotranspiration and biomass accumulation predictions against estimates using daily aggregated eddy covariance fluxes. The flux tower was located in an experimental farm south of Ottawa and measurements carried out over corn fields in 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2006. Daytime and nighttime fluxes were QC/QA and gap-filled separately. Soil respiration was partitioned to calculate the corn net daily CO2 uptake, which was converted into dry biomass. Out of the six growing seasons, three (1995, 1998, 2002) had water stress periods during corn grain filling. Year 2000 was cool and wet, while 1996 had heat and rainfall distributed evenly over the season and 2006 had a wet spring. STICS can predict evapotranspiration using either crop coefficients, when wind speed and air moisture are not available, or resistance. The first approach provided higher prediction for all the years than the resistance approach and the flux measurements. The dynamic of evapotranspiration prediction of STICS was very good for the growing seasons without

  13. Algal growth inhibition test results of 425 organic chemical substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Christensen, Anne Munch; Nyholm, Niels

    2018-01-01

    values were corrected accordingly. The model helped to identify substances, where the calculated water concentration was too uncertain. Substances covering a wide range of physical-chemical properties and different modes of action were tested. Median effect concentrations (EC50) lower than 1000 mg/L were......The toxicity towards the algal species Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata of 425 organic chemical substances was tested in a growth inhibition test. Precautions were taken to prevent loss of the compounds from the water phase and the test system (closed test system, low biomass, shorter test duration......, silanized glass) and to keep pH constant by applying a higher alkalinity. Chemical phase distribution was modelled taking ionization, volatilisation, and adsorption to glass and biomass into consideration. If the modelled water concentration was below 90% of the nominal concentration the calculated EC...

  14. Calculator calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McCarty, George

    1982-01-01

    How THIS BOOK DIFFERS This book is about the calculus. What distinguishes it, however, from other books is that it uses the pocket calculator to illustrate the theory. A computation that requires hours of labor when done by hand with tables is quite inappropriate as an example or exercise in a beginning calculus course. But that same computation can become a delicate illustration of the theory when the student does it in seconds on his calculator. t Furthermore, the student's own personal involvement and easy accomplishment give hi~ reassurance and en­ couragement. The machine is like a microscope, and its magnification is a hundred millionfold. We shall be interested in limits, and no stage of numerical approximation proves anything about the limit. However, the derivative of fex) = 67.SgX, for instance, acquires real meaning when a student first appreciates its values as numbers, as limits of 10 100 1000 t A quick example is 1.1 , 1.01 , 1.001 , •••• Another example is t = 0.1, 0.01, in the functio...

  15. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Pradeep K [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However

  16. Biomass torrefaction: A promising pretreatment technology for biomass utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ZhiWen; Wang, Mingfeng; Ren, Yongzhi; Jiang, Enchen; Jiang, Yang; Li, Weizhen

    2018-02-01

    Torrefaction is an emerging technology also called mild pyrolysis, which has been explored for the pretreatment of biomass to make the biomass more favorable for further utilization. Dry torrefaction (DT) is a pretreatment of biomass in the absence of oxygen under atmospheric pressure and in a temperature range of 200-300 degrees C, while wet torrrefaction (WT) is a method in hydrothermal or hot and high pressure water at the tempertures within 180-260 degrees C. Torrrefied biomass is hydrophobic, with lower moisture contents, increased energy density and higher heating value, which are more comparable to the characteristics of coal. With the improvement in the properties, torrefied biomass mainly has three potential applications: combustion or co-firing, pelletization and gasification. Generally, the torrefaction technology can accelerate the development of biomass utilization technology and finally realize the maximum applications of biomass energy.

  17. Biomass electric technologies: Status and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    At the present time, there axe approximately 6 gigawatts (GWe) of biomass-based, grid-connected electrical generation capacity in the United States. This capacity is primarily combustion-driven, steam-turbine technology, with the great majority of the plants of a 5-50 megawatt (MW) size and characterized by heat rates of 14,770-17,935 gigajoules per kilowatt-hour (GJ/kWh) (14,000-17,000 Btu/kWh or 18%-24% efficiency), and with installed capital costs of $1,300-$1,500/kW. Cost of electricity for existing plants is in the $0.065-$O.08/kWh range. Feedstocks are mainly waste materials; wood-fired systems account for 88% of the total biomass capacity, followed by agricultural waste (3%), landfill gas (8%), and anaerobic digesters (1%). A significant amount of remote, non-grid-connected, wood-fired capacity also exists in the paper and wood products industry. This chapter discusses biomass power technology status and presents the strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Power Program for advancing biomass electric technologies to 18 GWe by the year 2010, and to greater than 100 GWe by the year 2030. Future generation systems will be characterized by process efficiencies in the 35%-40% range, by installed capital costs of $770-$900/kW, by a cost of electricity in the $0.04-$O.05/kWh range, and by the use of dedicated fuel-supply systems. Technology options such as integrated gasification/gas-turbine systems, integrated pyrolysis/gas-turbine systems, and innovative direct-combustion systems are discussed, including present status and potential growth. This chapter also presents discussions of the U.S. utility sector and the role of biomass-based systems within the industry, the potential advantages of biomass in comparison to coal, and the potential environmental impact of biomass-based electricity generation

  18. Sustainable biomass production for energy in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, K.K.C.K.; Rathnasiri, P.G.; Sugathapala, A.G.T.

    2003-01-01

    The present study concentrates mainly on the estimation of land availability for biomass production and the estimation of sustainable biomass production potential for energy. The feasible surplus land area available for bioenergy plantation is estimated assuming two land availability scenarios (Scenarios 1 and 2) and three biomass demand scenarios (IBD Scenario, SBD Scenario and FBD Scenario). Scenario 1 assumes that 100% of the surplus area available in base year 1997 will be suitable for plantation without considering population growth and food production and that 75% of this surplus land is feasible for plantation. Scenario 2 assumes that future food requirement will grow by 20% and the potential surplus area will be reduced by that amount. The incremental biomass demand scenario (IBD Scenario) assumes that only the incremental demand for biomass in the year 2010 with respect to the base year 1997 has to be produced from new plantation. The sustainable biomass demand scenario (SBD Scenario) assumes that the total sustainable supply of biomass in 1997 is deducted from the future biomass demand in 2010 and only the balance is to be met by new plantation. The full biomass demand scenario (FBD Scenario) assumes that the entire projected biomass demand of the year 2010 needs to be produced from new plantation. The total feasible land area for the scenarios IBD-1, 1BD-2, SBD-1, SBD-2, FBD-1 and FBD-2 are approximately 0.96, 0.66, 0.80, 0.94, 0.60 and 0.30 Mha, respectively. Biomass production potential is estimated by selecting appropriate plant species, plantation spacing and productivity level. The results show that the total annual biomass production in the country could vary from 2 to 9.9 Mt. With the production option (i.e. 1.5 mx1.5 m spacing plantation with fertilizer application) giving the highest yield, the total biomass production for energy under IBD Scenario would be 9.9 Mt yr -1 for Scenario 1 and 6.7 Mt yr -1 for Scenario 2. Under SBD Scenario, the

  19. Sustainable biomass production for energy in Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, K.K.C.K.; Rathnasiri, P.G.; Sugathapala, A.G.T. [Moratuwa Univ., Moratuwa (Sri Lanka)

    2003-11-01

    The present study concentrates mainly on the estimation of land availability for biomass production and the estimation of sustainable biomass production potential for energy. The feasible surplus land area available for bioenergy plantation is estimated assuming two land availability scenarios (Scenarios 1 and 2) and three biomass demand scenarios (IBD Scenario, SBD Scenario and FBD Scenario). Scenario 1 assumes that 100% of the surplus area available in base year 1997 will be suitable for plantation without considering population growth and food production and that 75% of this surplus land is feasible for plantation. Scenario 2 assumes that future food requirement will grow by 20% and the potential surplus area will be reduced by that amount. The incremental biomass demand scenario (IBD Scenario) assumes that only the incremental demand for biomass in the year 2010 with respect to the base year 1997 has to be produced from new plantation. The sustainable biomass demand scenario (SBD Scenario) assumes that the total sustainable supply of biomass in 1997 is deducted from the future biomass demand in 2010 and only the balance is to be met by new plantation. The full biomass demand scenario (FBD Scenario) assumes that the entire projected biomass demand of the year 2010 needs to be produced from new plantation. The total feasible land area for the scenarios IBD-l, IBD-2, SBD-l, SBD-2, FBD-l and FBD-2 are approximately 0.96, 0.66, 0.80, 0.94, 0.60 and 0.30 Mha, respectively. Biomass production potential is estimated by selecting appropriate plant species, plantation spacing and productivity level. The results show that the total annual biomass production in the country could vary from 2 to 9.9 Mt. With the production option (i.e. 1.5 m x 1.5 m spacing plantation with fertilizer application) giving the highest yield, the total biomass production for energy under IBD Scenario would be 9.9 Mtyr{sup -l} for Scenario 1 and 6.7 Mtyr{sup -l} for Scenario 2. Under SBD Scenario

  20. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell O Khunjar

    Full Text Available The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  1. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunjar, Wendell O; Sahin, Asli; West, Alan C; Chandran, Kartik; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC) that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  2. Reliability Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kurt Erling

    1986-01-01

    Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either during the design process or during the operation time, with the purpose to improve the safety or the reliability. Due to plant complexity and safety...... and availability requirements, sophisticated tools, which are flexible and efficient, are needed. Such tools have been developed in the last 20 years and they have to be continuously refined to meet the growing requirements. Two different areas of application were analysed. In structural reliability probabilistic...... approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis of very...

  3. Solid biomass barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The European (EU 25) wish to substitute solid biomass origin energy consumption (principally wood and wood waste, but also straw, crop harvest residues, vegetal and animal waste) for a part of that of fossil fuel origin (petrol, gas and coal) is beginning to pay off. 58,7 million tons oil equivalent (Mtoe) of solid biomass was produced in 2005, i.e. a 3.1 Mtoe increase with respect to 2004. Production of primary energy coming from direct combustion of renewable municipal solid waste in incineration plants should also be added on to this figure. The 0,2 Mtoe increase in this production with respect to 2004 brings valorization of this type of waste up to 5,3 Mtoe in 2005. (author)

  4. BIOMASS newsletter. No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Carlos

    1999-06-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency Programme on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS) Newsletter has been launched with general objectives of providing an international focal point in the area of biosphere assessment modelling, developing methods for analysis of radionuclide transfer in the biosphere for use in radiological assessment, improving modelling methods, and developing international consensus on biosphere modelling philosophies, approaches and parameter values. The main themes included in the Newsletter include radioactive waste disposal (reference biosphere), environmental releases and biosphere processes

  5. BIOMASS newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Carlos

    1996-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency Programme on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS) Newsletter has been launched with general objectives of providing an international focal point in the area of biosphere assessment modelling, developing methods for analysis of radionuclide transfer in the biosphere for use in radiological assessment, improving modelling methods, and developing international consensus on biosphere modelling philosophies, approaches and parameter values. The main themes included in the Newsletter include radioactive waste disposal (reference biosphere), environmental releases and biosphere processes

  6. Biomass sustainability and certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanan, Krishna C; Bosch, Roeland A; Cornelissen, Rob; Philp, Jim C

    2013-07-01

    The major challenges for humanity include energy security, food security, climate change, and a growing world population. They are all linked together by an instinctive, and yet increasingly complex and evolving concept, that of sustainability. Industrial biotechnology is seen as part of the overall solution, principally to combat climate change and strengthen energy security. At its beating heart is a huge policy challenge - the sustainability of biomass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. BIOMASS newsletter. No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency Programme on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS) Newsletter has been launched with general objectives of providing an international focal point in the area of biosphere assessment modelling, developing methods for analysis of radionuclide transfer in the biosphere for use in radiological assessment, improving modelling methods, and developing international consensus on biosphere modelling philosophies, approaches and parameter values. The main themes included in the Newsletter include radioactive waste disposal (reference biosphere), environmental releases and biosphere processes

  8. BIOMASS newsletter. No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency Programme on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS) Newsletter has been launched with general objectives of providing an international focal point in the area of biosphere assessment modelling, developing methods for analysis of radionuclide transfer in the biosphere for use in radiological assessment, improving modelling methods, and developing international consensus on biosphere modelling philosophies, approaches and parameter values. The main themes included in the Newsletter include radioactive waste disposal (reference biosphere), environmental releases and biosphere processes

  9. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, D.

    2009-09-03

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of water and high energy consumption that it requires can be avoided. The main focus of this work was HTC process aiming at production of transportation fuel intermediates. For this study, a new experimental technique using quartz capillary batch reactors has been developed, allowing determination of the yields of gas, liquid and solid products, and their subsequent analysis. The study was performed using glucose, a biomass model compound, and complex feedstocks, wood and pyrolysis oil. Important HTC features have been studied such as, undesired char formation, deoxygenation, and mechanism and kinetics of formation of different lumped product classes. Special attention is also given to products of the initial glucose decomposition and the kinetics of their formation. Complete mass and elemental balances obtained in this work significantly complement the literature findings on the reaction mechanism of HTC. Two distinct mechanisms of char formation are identified and two mechanisms of deoxygenation (dehydration and decarboxylation) are discussed. The observed trends in the product formation rates and yields are used to obtain an engineering reaction model for decomposition of glucose, which can be adapted for the use with complex feedstocks. Finally, a bench scale continuous reactor setup for HTC is proposed and several features of the setup have been tested separately in cold-flow, such as, feeding of biomass water slurries with a piston autoclave and a lifting fluidized bed, heat transfer, fluid bed operation and state of mixing of liquid and solid phases in continuous operations.

  10. Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, E.; Viola, E.; Zimbardi, F.; Braccio, G.; Cuna, D.

    2001-01-01

    In this report are presented results achieved on the process optimisation of bioethanol production from wheat straw, carried out within the ENEA's project of biomass exploitation for renewable energy. The process consists of three main steps: 1) biomass pretreatment by means of steam explosion; 2) enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose fraction; 3) fermentation of glucose. To perform the hydrolysis step, two commercial enzymatic mixtures have been employed, mainly composed by β-glucosidase (cellobiase), endo-glucanase and exo-glucanase. The ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to ferment the glucose in he hydrolyzates. Hydrolysis yield of 97% has been obtained with steam exploded wheat straw treated at 220 0 C for 3 minutes and an enzyme to substrate ratio of 4%. It has been pointed out the necessity of washing with water the pretreated what straw, in order to remove the biomass degradation products, which have shown an inhibition effect on the yeast. At the best process conditions, a fermentation yield of 95% has been achieved. In the Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process, a global conversion of 92% has been obtained, which corresponds to the production of about 170 grams of ethanol per kilogram of exploded straw [it

  11. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  12. Changes in composition, structure and aboveground biomass over seventy-six years (1930-2006) in the Black Rock Forest, Hudson Highlands, southeastern New York state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, W.S.F. [Black Rock Forest Consortium, Cornwall, NY (United States); Griffin, K.L. [Colombia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Roth, H. [Barnard College, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science; Turnbull, M.H. [Canterbury Univ., Christchurch (New Zealand). School of Biological Sciences; Whitehead, D. [Landcare Research, Lincoln (New Zealand); Tissue, D.T. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    2008-04-15

    This study measured changes in tree species composition and structures over a period of 76 years in the Black Rock Forest in southeastern New York. The study used data from periodic forest inventories and long-term plots as well as species-specific allometric equations to estimate aboveground forest biomass (AGB) and carbon content. Sixteen long-term plots were monitored at various forest elevations. Density, basal area, and aboveground biomass were calculated. Allometric regression equations were used to estimate live aboveground tree biomass. Results of the review showed that paper birch, black spruce, and American elm species were extirpated from the forest between the early 1930s and the year 2000. Species that invaded the forest included white poplar, red mulberry, eastern cottonwood, and slippery elm. Red oak and chestnut oaks dominated the forest canopy. The forest understory changed over the period from mixed oak to red maple and black birch. Red oak canopy trees stored carbon at twice the rate of similar-sized canopy trees in the forest. A significant loss of live tree biomass was attributed to canopy tree mortality since 1999. It was concluded that insect outbreaks and droughts are important constraints on long-term biomass growth. 87 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  13. Remotely-sensed indicators of N-related biomass allocation in Schoenoplectus acutus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Jessica L.; Byrd, Kristin B.; Kelly, Maggi

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marshes depend on belowground biomass of roots and rhizomes to contribute to peat and soil organic carbon, accrete soil and alleviate flooding as sea level rises. For nutrient-limited plants, eutrophication has either reduced or stimulated belowground biomass depending on plant biomass allocation response to fertilization. Within a freshwater wetland impoundment receiving minimal sediments, we used experimental plots to explore growth models for a common freshwater macrophyte, Schoenoplectus acutus. We used N-addition and control plots (4 each) to test whether remotely sensed vegetation indices could predict leaf N concentration, root:shoot ratios and belowground biomass of S. acutus. Following 5 months of summer growth, we harvested whole plants, measured leaf N and total plant biomass of all above and belowground vegetation. Prior to harvest, we simulated measurement of plant spectral reflectance over 164 hyperspectral Hyperion satellite bands (350–2500 nm) with a portable spectroradiometer. N-addition did not alter whole plant, but reduced belowground biomass 36% and increased aboveground biomass 71%. We correlated leaf N concentration with known N-related spectral regions using all possible normalized difference (ND), simple band ratio (SR) and first order derivative ND (FDN) and SR (FDS) vegetation indices. FDN1235, 549 was most strongly correlated with leaf N concentration and also was related to belowground biomass, the first demonstration of spectral indices and belowground biomass relationships. While S. acutus exhibited balanced growth (reduced root:shoot ratio with respect to nutrient addition), our methods also might relate N-enrichment to biomass point estimates for plants with isometric root growth. For isometric growth, foliar N indices will scale equivalently with above and belowground biomass. Leaf N vegetation indices should aid in scaling-up field estimates of biomass and assist regional monitoring.

  14. Mathematical modeling and experimental validation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum microalgae growth rate with glycerol addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Keli Cristiane Correia; Ribeiro, Robert Luis Lara; Santos, Kassiana Ribeiro dos; Mariano, Andre Bellin [Mariano Center for Research and Development of Sustainable Energy (NPDEAS), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho [Departament of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Parana (UFPR) Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The Brazilian National Program for Bio fuel Production has been encouraging diversification of feedstock for biofuel production. One of the most promising alternatives is the use of microalgae biomass for biofuel production. The cultivation of microalgae is conducted in aquatic systems, therefore microalgae oil production does not compete with agricultural land. Microalgae have greater photosynthetic efficiency than higher plants and are efficient fixing CO{sub 2}. The challenge is to reduce production costs, which can be minimized by increasing productivity and oil biomass. Aiming to increase the production of microalgae biomass, mixotrophic cultivation, with the addition of glycerol has been shown to be very promising. During the production of biodiesel from microalgae there is availability of glycerol as a side product of the transesterification reaction, which could be used as organic carbon source for microalgae mixotrophic growth, resulting in increased biomass productivity. In this paper, to study the effect of glycerol in experimental conditions, the batch culture of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was performed in a 2-liter flask in a temperature and light intensity controlled room. During 16 days of cultivation, the number of cells per ml was counted periodically in a Neubauer chamber. The calculation of dry biomass in the control experiment (without glycerol) was performed every two days by vacuum filtration. In the dry biomass mixotrophic experiment with glycerol concentration of 1.5 M, the number of cells was assessed similarly in the 10{sup th} and 14{sup th} days of cultivation. Through a volume element methodology, a mathematical model was written to calculate the microalgae growth rate. It was used an equation that describes the influence of irradiation and concentration of nutrients in the growth of microalgae. A simulation time of 16 days was used in the computations, with initial concentration of 0.1 g l{sup -1}. In order to compare

  15. Potential of Biomass for Energy. Market Survey Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this market survey is to provide information about the biomass sector in Portugal, relevant to mainly small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) in the Netherlands that are interested to strengthen their position in that sector. Much knowledge could be gathered from conversations with the partners of Sunergy, the company responsible for this survey. Sunergy is producing bio-diesel, and considering further investments in the solid biomass sector, and therefore well familiar with the developments. Other interviews were held with representatives of the Government (DGGE), association of forestry owners (AFLOPS), a biomass trading SME (Sobioen), the leading environmental NGO (Quercus), and an association representing the paper- and pulp industry (CELPA). Chapter 1 is a general introduction on biomass. Chapter 2 gives the background of the Portuguese energy sector and the relative importance of renewable and biomass energies within this market. Some prospects for future developments of the different renewable sources are given. Portugal's energy sector is dominated by a small number of players, which are introduced. Also the current policies and incentives (subsidies) are presented. In Chapter 3 the focus is on the Portuguese biomass sector, presenting the current use of biomass in each of the subsectors: transport, electricity and heat, and an overview of the policy framework specifically for biomass. Chapter 4 is a literature review of the market for existing and potential biomass resources, including demand, supply and other characteristics. Chapter 5 synthesizes the previous chapters. Also an overview of key drivers and key constraints for growth of this sector is given, leading to conclusions regarding the opportunities for Dutch companies. Finally, further information on how to proceed once the interest for Portugal's biomass sector is vested is listed at the end of Chapter 5

  16. BIOMASS ALLOMETRY FOR TREE SPECIES OF NORTHWESTERN MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose de Jesus Navar Chaidez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Tree biomass plays a key role in sustainable forest management since it is the basis for estimating stocks and fluxes of several biogeochemical elements, the amount of energy stored in biomass, and other conventional goods and services. The most common mathematical model takes the form of the logarithmic equation where biomass is estimated as a function of diameter at breast height with the scaling coefficients a and B. In this study, I answered the following questions related with the allometric model: a Is it important to develop biomass equations at the species scale or at the site-specific scale?; b What is the least number of data required for fitting an allometric equation?; and c Is it possible to develop allometric equations with few or null biomass data without loosing accuracy in biomass estimation? I employed a biomass data source collected in northwestern Mexico for nine different forest species, collected in six different sites from southern Chihuahua to southern Durango, Mexico to answer these questions. Results showed that by fitting site-specific biomass equations there is a net gain of 5% and close to 20% in the coefficient of determination and the standard error, respectively in contrast to fitting an equation at the species level. The minimum number of observations needed is 60 harvested trees to calculate parameters with the least variance and with high consistency. I present two alternate restrictive methods of biomass estimation: a restricting the number of harvested trees to three to fit equations available in the scientific literature and b a non-destructive model to fit equations with the same level of accuracy that display conventional allometric models. Both methods estimate biomass within the confidence bounds imposed on the B coefficient of the conventional allometric model.

  17. Biomass to energy; La valorisation energetique de la biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the biomass to energy. It explains the biomass principle, the possibility of biomass to energy conversion, the first generation of biofuels (bio ethanol, ETBE, bio diesel, flex fuel) and their advantages and limitations, the european regulatory framework and policy with the evolutions and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  18. LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS AFTER EXPLOSIVE AUTOHYDROLYSIS AS SUBSTRATE TO BUTANOL OBTAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigunova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was investigation of the effect of the explosive autohydrolysis on lignocellulosic biomass (saving, switchgrass biomass for consequent use as a substrate to produce biofuels such as butanol. Butanol-producing strains, switchgrass Panicum virgatum L. biomass and its components after autohydrolysis were used in study. The thermobaric pressure pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass was carried out using specially designed equipment. The effect of explosive autohydrolysis on lignocellulosic biomass for further use in producing biofuels using microbial conversion was studied. Components of lignocellulosic biomass were fractionated after undergoing thermobaric treatment. The possibility of using different raw material components after using explosive autohydrolysis processing to produce biobutanol was found. Products of switchgrass biomass autohydrolysis were shown to need further purification before fermentation from furfural formed by thermobaric pretreatment and inhibiting the growth of microorganisms. The ability of strains of the genus Clostridium to use cellulose as a substrate for fermentation was proved. It was found that using explosive autohydrolysis pretreatment to savings allowed boosting the butanol accumulation by 2 times.

  19. Matching species and sites for biomass plantations in Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, V.D.; Takahashi, P.K.; Singh, D.; Khan, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods for matching species and sites for biomass plantations in Hawaii were utilized to estimate biomass yields and production costs for Eucalyptus grandis, Eucalyptus saligna, and Leucaena leucocephala. The 'analogous site' method matches the environmental conditions, including soil, rainfall, temperature, and insolation parameters, of well-characterized experimental biomass research sites which produce known yields of these species with similar land areas, or with those areas that can be made similar through soil amendments and improvement, where no field trials exist. The result is the identification of sites with biomass growth, yield, and cost performances which are analogous to the experimental site. The 'regression model' method relates known site-specific biomass productivity with environmental and soil conditions and management practices developed from sites featuring widely different and distinct environmental conditions. Equations then enable the prediction of biomass performance and production costs for each species at any location statewide. The analytical results, using a geographical information system database and the above methods, are presented in map form to expedite the site selection process which indicates expected biomass yield and cost for several fast-growing tropical hardwood species in Hawaii

  20. Atmospheric tar balls from biomass burning in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouji; Buseck, Peter R.

    2011-03-01

    Atmospheric tar balls (TBs) are spherical, organic aerosol particles that occur in smoke from biomass burning (BB). They absorb sunlight and thereby cause warming of the atmosphere. This study reports a transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of TBs from BB smoke samples collected within minutes to hours from emission in a tropical area of Mexico. Their spherical shapes as seen in both scanning electron microscope images and with electron tomography indicate that they were solid when collected. They consist of C and minor O, S, K, and N. The hygroscopic growth factor for our relatively fresh TBs is 1.09 ± 0.04 at a relative humidity of 100%. In samples 1.6 km from the fire, an average of ˜1 and 14%, respectively, of particles with aerodynamic diameter from 50 to 300 nm consisted of TBs. For the latter, more aged samples, the total volume was roughly double that of soot, and their total calculated light absorption at a wavelength of 550 nm was between 74 and 96% that of soot, with the exact amount depending on the size, shape, and coating of the soot. In general, the TBs that we analyzed were similar to those from North America, southern Africa, and Europe in terms of size, external mixing, relative freedom of inclusions, and composition. This and previous studies show that TBs result from a range of biomass fuels. Their distribution from various regions across the globe, combined with their optical properties, suggests they have important effects on regional and perhaps global climate.

  1. Assessment of potential biomass energy production in China towards 2030 and 2050

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a more detailed picture of potential biomass energy production in the Chinese energy system towards 2030 and 2050. Biomass for bioenergy feedstocks comes from five sources, which are agricultural crop residues, forest residues and industrial wood waste......, energy crops and woody crops, animal manure, and municipal solid waste. The potential biomass production is predicted based on the resource availability. In the process of identifying biomass resources production, assumptions are made regarding arable land, marginal land, crops yields, forest growth rate......, and meat consumption and waste production. Four scenarios were designed to describe the potential biomass energy production to elaborate the role of biomass energy in the Chinese energy system in 2030. The assessment shows that under certain restrictions on land availability, the maximum potential biomass...

  2. Calculating competition in thinned northern hardwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon A. Winsauer; James A. Mattson

    1992-01-01

    Describes four methods of calculating competition to individual trees and compares their effectiveness in explaining the 3-year growth response of northern hardwoods after various mechanized thinning practices.

  3. THE BREAKEVEN POINT GIVEN LIMIT COST USING BIOMASS CHP PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula VOICU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is a renewable source, non-fossil, from which can be obtained fuels, which can be used in power generation systems. The main difference of fossil fuels is the availability biomass in nature and that it is in continue "reproduction". The use its enable the use of materials that could be destined destruction, as a source of energy "renewable", though result with many ecological values. In this paper we will study, applying a calculation model in view optimal sizing of the cogeneration plant based on biomass, biomass cost limit for the net present value is zero. It will consider that in cogeneration systems and in heating peak systems using biomass. After applying the mathematical model for limit value of biomass cost will determine the nominal optimal coefficient of cogeneration, for which discounted net revenue value is zero. Optimal sizing of CHP plants based on using biomass will be given by optimum coefficient of cogeneration determined following the application of the proposed mathematical model.

  4. Biomass process handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Descriptions are given of 42 processes which use biomass to produce chemical products. Marketing and economic background, process description, flow sheets, costs, major equipment, and availability of technology are given for each of the 42 processes. Some of the chemicals discussed are: ethanol, ethylene, acetaldehyde, butanol, butadiene, acetone, citric acid, gluconates, itaconic acid, lactic acid, xanthan gum, sorbitol, starch polymers, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, glycerol, soap, azelaic acid, perlargonic acid, nylon-11, jojoba oil, furfural, furfural alcohol, tetrahydrofuran, cellulose polymers, products from pulping wastes, and methane. Processes include acid hydrolysis, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation, Purox process, and anaerobic digestion.

  5. Biomass Energy Generation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olthoff, Edward [Cedar Falls Utilities, Cedar Falls, IA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The Municipal Electric Utility of the City of Cedar Falls (dba Cedar Fals Utilities or CFU) received a congressionally directed grant funded through DOE-EERE to run three short (4 hour) duration test burns and one long (10 days) duration test burn to test the viability of renewable fuels in Streeter Station Boiler #6, a stoker coal fired electric generation unit. The long test burn was intended to test supply chain assumptions, optimize boiler combustion and assess the effects of a longer duration burn of biomass on the boiler.

  6. Plant diversity and functional groups affect Si and Ca pools in aboveground biomass of grassland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Jörg; Roscher, Christiane; Hillebrand, Helmut; Weigelt, Alexandra; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Anne; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity is an important driver of nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in aboveground plant biomass of grassland ecosystems, but plant diversity effects on other elements also important for plant growth are less understood. We tested whether plant species richness, functional group richness or the presence/absence of particular plant functional groups influences the Si and Ca concentrations (mmol g(-1)) and stocks (mmol m(-2)) in aboveground plant biomass in a large grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). In the experiment including 60 temperate grassland species, plant diversity was manipulated as sown species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16) and richness and identity of plant functional groups (1-4; grasses, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes). We found positive species richness effects on Si as well as Ca stocks that were attributable to increased biomass production. The presence of particular functional groups was the most important factor explaining variation in aboveground Si and Ca stocks (mmol m(-2)). Grass presence increased the Si stocks by 140 % and legume presence increased the Ca stock by 230 %. Both the presence of specific plant functional groups and species diversity altered Si and Ca stocks, whereas Si and Ca concentration were affected mostly by the presence of specific plant functional groups. However, we found a negative effect of species diversity on Si and Ca accumulation, by calculating the deviation between mixtures and mixture biomass proportions, but in monoculture concentrations. These changes may in turn affect ecosystem processes such as plant litter decomposition and nutrient cycling in grasslands.

  7. Biomass for energy versus food and feed, land use analyses and water supply

    OpenAIRE

    Ladanai, Svetlana; Vinterbäck, Johan

    2010-01-01

    The global growth in energy demand continues, but the way of meeting rising energy needs is not sustainable. The use of biomass energy is a widely accepted strategy towards sustainable development that sees the fastest rate with the most of increase in power generation followed by strong rises in the consumption of biofuels for transport. Agriculture, forestry and wood energy sector are the leading sources of biomass for bioenergy. However, to be acceptable, biomass feedstock must be produced...

  8. Predictive modeling of biomass production by Chlorella vulgaris in a draft-tube airlift photobioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mansouri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the growth rate of Chlorella vulgaris for CO2 biofixation and biomass production. Six mathematical growth models (Logistic, Gompertz, modified Gompertz, Baranyi, Morgan and Richards were used to evaluate the biomass productivity in continuous processes and to predict the following parameters of cell growth: lag phase duration (λ, maximum specific growth rate (μmax, and maximum cell concentration (Xmax. The low root-mean-square error (RMSE and high regression coefficients (R2 indicated that the models employed were well fitted to the experiment data and it could be regarded as enough to describe biomass production. Using statistical and physiological significance criteria, the Baranyi model was considered the most appropriate for quantifying biomass growth. The biological variables of this model are as follows: μmax=0.0309 h−1, λ=100 h, and Xmax=1.82 g/L.

  9. Energy Recovery from Contaminated Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Moskalík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on thermal gasification methods of contaminated biomass in an atmospheric fluidized bed, especially biomass contaminated by undesirable substances in its primary use. For the experiments, chipboard waste was chosen as a representative sample of contaminated biomass. In the experiments, samples of gas and tar were taken for a better description of the process of gasifying chipboard waste. Gas and tar samples also provide information about the properties of the gas that is produced.

  10. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    analysis into three main groups depending upon their ash content of silica, alkali metal, and calcium and magnesium. To further detail the biomass classification, the relative molar ratio of Cl, S, and P to alkali were included. The study has led to knowledge on biomass fuel ash composition influence...... on ash transformation, ash deposit flux, and deposit chlorine content when biomass fuels are applied for suspension combustion....

  11. Biomass in Latin America -- overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the interest of the Organization of American States as a participant in this hemispheric conference on biomass, provides an introduction to the Latin American experience in biomass energy through open-quotes snapshotsclose quotes of various country activities, and concludes with a discussion of four conditions that form strong incentives for new north/south and south/north ventures in the biomass energy and chemical arena in this hemisphere

  12. Emission Trading System in the SER Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth. Macro-economic calculation by means of WorldScan; ETS in het SER Energieakkoord. Macro-economische doorrekening met WorldScan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, C. [Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving PBL, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    The Dutch National Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth aims at strengthening the European system for emissions trading by a more strict emission ceiling. Also, the agreement aims at guarantee the competitiveness of global energy intensive businesses by adjusting the allocation method for emission rights. In the calculations for the energy agreement this is reflected in the adjustment of the ETS pricing path. In this memo the calculations with the equilibrium model WordlScan are described and presented [Dutch] Het Nationaal Energieakkoord voor Duurzame Groei zet in op een versterking van het Europees systeem voor emissiehandel (ETS) door aanscherpen van het emissieplafond. Verder wil het akkoord de concurrentiepositie van het mondiaal opererende energie-intensieve bedrijfsleven borgen door aanpassing van de allocatiemethode voor emissierechten. In de doorrekening van het Energieakkoord is deze inzet tot uitdrukking gebracht in een aanpassing van het ETS-prijspad. Deze notitie beschrijft de berekeningen met het algemeen evenwichtsmodel WorldScan waar deze aanpassing van het ETS-prijspad op is gebaseerd.

  13. Estimating Swedish biomass energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, J.; Lundqvist, U.

    1999-01-01

    Biomass is suggested to supply an increasing amount of energy in Sweden. There have been several studies estimating the potential supply of biomass energy, including that of the Swedish Energy Commission in 1995. The Energy Commission based its estimates of biomass supply on five other analyses which presented a wide variation in estimated future supply, in large part due to differing assumptions regarding important factors. In this paper, these studies are assessed, and the estimated potential biomass energy supplies are discusses regarding prices, technical progress and energy policy. The supply of logging residues depends on the demand for wood products and is limited by ecological, technological, and economic restrictions. The supply of stemwood from early thinning for energy and of straw from cereal and oil seed production is mainly dependent upon economic considerations. One major factor for the supply of willow and reed canary grass is the size of arable land projected to be not needed for food and fodder production. Future supply of biomass energy depends on energy prices and technical progress, both of which are driven by energy policy priorities. Biomass energy has to compete with other energy sources as well as with alternative uses of biomass such as forest products and food production. Technical progress may decrease the costs of biomass energy and thus increase the competitiveness. Economic instruments, including carbon taxes and subsidies, and allocation of research and development resources, are driven by energy policy goals and can change the competitiveness of biomass energy

  14. Communal biomass conversion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Coordinating Committee set up by the Danish government in 1986 were given the responsibility of investigating the potentials for biomass conversion plants in Denmark, especially in relation to agricultural, environmental and energy aspects. The results of the Committee's plan of management for this project are presented. This main report covers 13 background reports which deal with special aspects in detail. The report describes the overall plan of management, the demonstration and follow-up programme and the individual biogas demonstration plants. Information gained from these investigations is presented. The current general status, (with emphasis on the technical and economical aspects) and the prospects for the future are discussed. The interest other countries have shown in Danish activities within the field of biogas production is described, and the possibilities for Danish export of technology and know-how in this relation are discussed. It is claimed that Denmark is the first country that has instigated a coordinated development programme for biomass conversion plants. (AB) 24 refs

  15. Alternative biomass sources for thermal energy generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensen, Torge; Müller, Sönke; Dresen, Boris; Büscher, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    of Bottrop-Kirchhellen in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. This region consists of nature reserves, forests, farmland and a few villages. To present a qualitative comparison between simulated and true biomass volume, we conducted field work by mapping the spatial extent of the desired biomass occurrences in the area. First results indicate a qualitative match of about 75%. Our research highlights the small-scale biomass features that have not been incorporated in previous biomass estimates. With the regular trimming and the accompanied raw material that becomes available, a new sector of thermal energy generation can be outlined. An automated quantification using satellite and GIS data will allow a regular monitoring of the vegetation growth and an assessment of the transport routes and costs as well as the location of the prospective power plants. In the endeavour of creating a sustainable energy supply, these biomass units should not be neglected, especially since the usage of the traditional units is limited due to competing interests in food production and nature conservation.

  16. Modified Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model for Biomass Gasification: A Study of the Influence of Operating Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; Bruno, Juan Carlos; Coronas, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for biomass gasification processes developed in the equation solver program Engineering Equation Solver (EES) with an implemented user-friendly interface. It is based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and includes some modifications to be adapted......, and oxygen enrichment] on producer gas. The model predicts the behavior of different kinds of biomass and becomes a useful tool to simulate the biomass gasification process by allowing its integration in complete energy supply systems, such as co-generation plants....

  17. Root diseases, climate change and biomass productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, G.R.; Cruickshank, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tree growth and yield in eastern boreal spruce fir forests are both greatly affected by root and butt rots. These pests are also prevalent in western coniferous species and boreal-sub-boreal forests. Infections are difficult to detect, but reduced growth, tree mortality, wind throw and scaled butt cull contribute to considerable forest gaps. Harvesting and stand tending practices in second growth stands are creating conditions for increased incidence. Tree stress is one of the major factors affecting the spread of root disease. It is expected that climate change will create abnormal stress conditions that will further compound the incidence of root disease. A comparison was made between natural and managed stands, including harvesting and stand practices such as commercial thinning. Studies of Douglas-fir forests in British Columbia were presented, with results indicating that managed forests contain one third to one half less carbon biomass than unmanaged forests. It was concluded that root diseases must be recognized and taken into account in order to refine and improve biomass estimates, prevent overestimation of wood supply models and avoid potential wood fibre losses. 40 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Nitrogen cycling in an integrated biomass for energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorhead, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate N cycling in three components of an integrated biomass for energy system, i.e. water hyacinth production, anaerobic digestion in hyacinth biomass, and recycling of digester effluent and sludge. Plants assimilated 50 to 90% of added N in hyacinth production systems. Up to 28% of the total plant N was contained in hyacinth detritus. Nitrogen loading as plant detritus into hyacinth ponds was 92 to 148 kg N ha -1 yr -1 . Net mineralization of plant organic 15 N during anaerobic digestion was 35 and 70% for water hyacinth plants with low and high N content, respectively. Approximately 20% of the 15 N was recovered in the digested sludge while the remaining 15 N was recovered in the effluent. Water hyacinth growth in digester effluents was affected by electrical conductivity and 15 NH 4 + -N concentration. Addition of water hyacinth biomass to soil resulted in decomposition of 39 to 50% of added C for fresh plant biomass and 19 to 23% of added C for digested biomass sludge. Only 8% of added 15 N in digested sludges was mineralized to 15 NO 3 - -N despite differences in initial N content. In contrast, 3 and 33% of added 15 N in fresh biomass with low and high N content, respectively, was recovered as 15 NO 3 - -N. Total 15 N recovery after anaerobic digestion ranged from 70 to 100% of the initial plant biomass 15 N. Total N recovery by sludge and effluent recycling in the integrated biomass for energy system was 48 to 60% of the initial plant biomass 15 N

  19. Vegetal and animal biomass; Les biomasses vegetales et animales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combarnous, M. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Lab. Energetique et Phenomenes de Transfert, UMR CNRS ENSAM, 33 - Talence (France)

    2005-07-01

    This presentation concerns all types of biomass of the earth and the seas and the relative implicit consumptions. After an evaluation of the food needs of the human being, the author discusses the solar energy conversion, the energetic flux devoted to the agriculture production, the food chain and the biomass. (A.L.B.)

  20. Biomass and biomass change in lodgepole pine stands in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Monserud; Shongming Huang; Yuqing Yang

    2006-01-01

    We describe methods and results for broad-scale estimation and mapping of forest biomass for the Canadian province of Alberta. Differences over successive decades provided an estimate of biomass change. Over 1500 permanent sample plots (PSP) were analyzed from across the range of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm...

  1. Energy production from biomass (Part 1): Overview of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendry, Peter

    2002-05-01

    The use of renewable energy sources is becoming increasingly necessary, if we are to achieve the changes required to address the impacts of global warming. Biomass is the most common form of renewable energy, widely used in the third world but until recently, less so in the Western world. Latterly much attention has been focused on identifying suitable biomass species, which can provide high-energy outputs, to replace conventional fossil fuel energy sources. The type of biomass required is largely determined by the energy conversion process and the form in which the energy is required. In the first of three papers, the background to biomass production (in a European climate) and plant properties is examined. In the second paper, energy conversion technologies are reviewed, with emphasis on the production of a gaseous fuel to supplement the gas derived from the landfilling of organic wastes (landfill gas) and used in gas engines to generate electricity. The potential of a restored landfill site to act as a biomass source, providing fuel to supplement landfill gas-fuelled power stations, is examined, together with a comparison of the economics of power production from purpose-grown biomass versus waste-biomass. The third paper considers particular gasification technologies and their potential for biomass gasification.

  2. Detailed modelling of biomass pyrolysis: biomass structure and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugony, F.; Migliavacca, G.; Faravelli, T.; Ranzi, E.

    2007-01-01

    The research routes followed in the field of numerical modelling development for biomass devolatilization are here summarised. In this first paper a wide introduction concerning the description of the chemical nature of the main classes of compounds which constitute biomasses is reported, it is the starting point for the subsequent description of the developed models, described in the companion paper [it

  3. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and ... Calories College Alcohol Policies Interactive Body Calculators Alcohol Calorie Calculator Alcohol Cost Calculator Alcohol BAC Calculator Alcohol ...

  4. Biomass energy development in California: Accomplishments and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    The recent and rapid growth of biomass power development in California has created the largest contiguous biomass fueled electrical generating capacity in U.S. This growth has been fostered by resource availability, federal (PURPA) incentives, and the entrepeneurial response of independent power producers. California's environment has benefited from reduced air emissions, wildfire suppression, landfill reduction and the sequestering of carbon. The state has benefited economically through capital investment, employment for several thousand, and the generation of over $100 million in state and local tax revenues. Along with the benefits have come serious challenges brought about largely due to changes in the utility and regulatory environment. These changes threaten the continued existence and economic viability of the developed biomass power industry in California and threatens to establish national precedents. Specific issues are identified and recommended actions are presented

  5. System and process for biomass treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

    2013-08-20

    A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

  6. ALTENER - Biomass event in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The publication contains the lectures held in the Biomass event in Finland. The event was divided into two sessions: Fuel production and handling, and Co-combustion and gasification sessions. Both sessions consisted of lectures and the business forum during which the companies involved in the research presented themselves and their research and their equipment. The fuel production and handling session consisted of following lectures and business presentations: AFB-NETT - business opportunities for European biomass industry; Wood waste in Europe; Wood fuel production technologies in EU- countries; new drying method for wood waste; Pellet - the best package for biofuel - a view from the Swedish pelletmarket; First biomass plant in Portugal with forest residue fuel; and the business forum of presentations: Swedish experiences of willow growing; Biomass handling technology; Chipset 536 C Harvester; KIC International. The Co-combustion and gasification session consisted of following lectures and presentations: Gasification technology - overview; Overview of co-combustion technology in Europe; Modern biomass combustion technology; Wood waste, peat and sludge combustion in Enso Kemi mills and UPM-Kymmene Rauma paper mill; Enhanced CFB combustion of wood chips, wood waste and straw in Vaexjoe in Sweden and Grenaa CHP plant in Denmark; Co-combustion of wood waste; Biomass gasification projects in India and Finland; Biomass CFB gasifier connected to a 350 MW{sub t}h steam boiler fired with coal and natural gas - THERMIE demonstration project in Lahti (FI); Biomass gasification for energy production, Noord Holland plant in Netherlands and Arbre Energy (UK); Gasification of biomass in fixed bed gasifiers, Wet cleaning and condensing heat recovery of flue gases; Combustion of wet biomass by underfeed grate boiler; Research on biomass and waste for energy; Engineering and consulting on energy (saving) projects; and Research and development on combustion of solid fuels

  7. Perceptions of Agriculture Teachers Regarding Education about Biomass Production in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guang; Martin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of biorenewable energy, biomass production has become an important segment in the agriculture industry (Iowa Energy Center, 2013). A great workforce will be needed for this burgeoning biomass energy industry (Iowa Workforce Development, n. d.). Instructional topics in agricultural education should take the form of problems and…

  8. A method to estimate the biomass of Spirulina platensis cultivated on a solid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizer, Lúcia Helena; Moraes, Iracema de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method to estimate the biomass of Spirulina cultivated on solid medium with sugarcane bagasse as a support, in view of the difficulty in determining biomass concentrations in bioprocesses, particularly those conducted in semi-solid or solid media. The genus Spirulina of the family Oscillatoriaceae comprises the group of multicellular filamentous cyanobacteria (blue-green microalgae). Spirulina is used as fish feed in aquaculture, as a food supplement, a source of vitamins, pigments, antioxidants and fatty acids. Therefore, its growth parameters are extremely important in studies of the development and optimization of bioprocesses. For studies of biomass growth, Spirulina platensis was cultured on solid medium using sugarcane bagasse as a support. The biomass thus produced was estimated by determining the protein content of the material grown during the process, based on the ratio of dry weight to protein content obtained in the surface growth experiments. The protein content of the biomass grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on surface medium was examined daily to check the influence of culture time on the protein content of the biomass. The biomass showed an average protein content of 42.2%. This methodology enabled the concentration of biomass adhering to the sugarcane bagasse to be estimated from the indirect measurement of the protein content associated with cell growth.

  9. The influence of water stress on biomass and N accumulation, N partitioning between above and below ground parts and on N rhizodeposition during reproductive growth of pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahieu, S.; Germont, Florent; Aveline, A.

    2009-01-01

    rhizodeposition by a pea (Pisum sativum L.) when influenced by water stress. In a controlled environment, pea plants were exposed to a severe drought or not stressed, either at flowering or during pod filling. N rhizodeposition was measured using the split root method and plants were harvested at the end...... of flowering (59 days after sowing, DAS 59), at the end of the drought period applied during pod filling (DAS 74) and at maturity (DAS 101). Water stress strongly affected pea dry weight and N accumulation. In both stressed treatments, nodule biomass and N content were reduced by about 65% in the absence...... in rhizodeposits represented around 30% of the total BGN and increased to around 60% at maturity though BGN decreased from around 20 to 13% of the total plant N between DAS 74 and maturity. The results suggest that water stress has no specific effect on N partitioning between above and below ground parts....

  10. Digital Biomass Accumulation Using High-Throughput Plant Phenotype Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Md Matiur; Ahsan, Md Asif; Gillani, Zeeshan; Chen, Ming

    2017-09-01

    Biomass is an important phenotypic trait in functional ecology and growth analysis. The typical methods for measuring biomass are destructive, and they require numerous individuals to be cultivated for repeated measurements. With the advent of image-based high-throughput plant phenotyping facilities, non-destructive biomass measuring methods have attempted to overcome this problem. Thus, the estimation of plant biomass of individual plants from their digital images is becoming more important. In this paper, we propose an approach to biomass estimation based on image derived phenotypic traits. Several image-based biomass studies state that the estimation of plant biomass is only a linear function of the projected plant area in images. However, we modeled the plant volume as a function of plant area, plant compactness, and plant age to generalize the linear biomass model. The obtained results confirm the proposed model and can explain most of the observed variance during image-derived biomass estimation. Moreover, a small difference was observed between actual and estimated digital biomass, which indicates that our proposed approach can be used to estimate digital biomass accurately.

  11. The use of real-time PCR to study Penicillium chrysogenum growth kinetics on solid food at different water activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquiza, J M R Apollo; Hunter, Jean

    2014-09-18

    Fungal growth on solid foods can make them unfit for human consumption, but certain specialty foods require fungi to produce their characteristic properties. In either case, a reliable way of measuring biomass is needed to study how various factors (e.g. water activity) affect fungal growth rates on these substrates. Biochemical markers such as chitin, glucosamine or ergosterol have been used to estimate fungal growth, but they cannot distinguish between individual species in mixed culture. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) protocol specific for a target fungal species was used to quantify its DNA while growing on solid food. The measured amount of DNA was then related to the biomass present using an experimentally determined DNA-to-biomass ratio. The highly sensitive rt-PCR biomass assay was found to have a wide range, able to quantify the target DNA within a six orders-of-magnitude difference. The method was used to monitor germination and growth of Penicillium chrysogenum spores on a model porous food (cooked wheat flour) at 25°C and different water activities of 0.973, 0.936, and 0.843. No growth was observed at 0.843, but lag, exponential and stationary phases were identified in the growth curves for the higher water activities. The calculated specific growth rates (μ) during the exponential phase were almost identical, at 0.075/h and 0.076/h for aw=0.973 and 0.936, respectively. The specificity of the method was demonstrated by measuring the biomass of P. chrysogenum while growing together with Aspergillus niger on solid media at aw=0.973. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Introduction to energy balance of biomass production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanares, P.

    1997-01-01

    During last years, energy crops have been envisaged as an interesting alternative to biomass residues utilization as renewable energy source. In this work, main parameters used in calculating the energy balance of an energy crop are analyzed. The approach consists of determining energy equivalents for the different inputs and outputs of the process, thus obtaining energy ratios of the system, useful to determine if the energy balance is positive, that is, if the system generates energy. Energy costs for inputs and assessment approaches for energy crop yields (output) are provided. Finally, as a way of illustration, energy balances of some representative energy crops are shown. (Author) 15 refs

  13. Slow growth rates of Amazonian trees: Consequences for carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Simone; Trumbore, Susan; Camargo, Plinio B.; Selhorst, Diogo; Chambers, Jeffrey Q.; Higuchi, Niro; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Quantifying age structure and tree growth rate of Amazonian forests is essential for understanding their role in the carbon cycle. Here, we use radiocarbon dating and direct measurement of diameter increment to document unexpectedly slow growth rates for trees from three locations spanning the Brazilian Amazon basin. Central Amazon trees, averaging only ≈1mm/year diameter increment, grow half as fast as those from areas with more seasonal rainfall to the east and west. Slow growth rates mean that trees can attain great ages; across our sites we estimate 17-50% of trees with diameter >10 cm have ages exceeding 300 years. Whereas a few emergent trees that make up a large portion of the biomass grow faster, small trees that are more abundant grow slowly and attain ages of hundreds of years. The mean age of carbon in living trees (60-110 years) is within the range of or slightly longer than the mean residence time calculated from C inventory divided by annual C allocation to wood growth (40-100 years). Faster C turnover is observed in stands with overall higher rates of diameter increment and a larger fraction of the biomass in large, fast-growing trees. As a consequence, forests can recover biomass relatively quickly after disturbance, whereas recovering species composition may take many centuries. Carbon cycle models that apply a single turnover time for carbon in forest biomass do not account for variations in life strategy and therefore may overestimate the carbon sequestration potential of Amazon forests. PMID:16339903

  14. Biomass development of soil bioengineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Emilio; von der Thannen, Magdalena; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2017-04-01

    Soil bioengineering is a traditional construction technique focusing on living plants as construction material. Therefore, the development of plants, used in soil bioengineering constructions, plays a key role in their ecological and technical performance. Diverse constructions with the purpose of river bank stabilization have been studied in order to find out the long term vegetation development and suitability. The documented and analysed biomass records collected in the field are directly connected to the different parameters and site factors such as altitude, orientation, construction type, surrounding vegetation and distance to river bank. Consequently, the influence of the different parameters on biomass development can be presented. The study addresses the biomass calculation along with the suitability understanding of the most relevant plant species integrated in soil bioengineering constructions as well as the dominating vegetation at the end of the succession. Soil bioengineering constructions are believed to be more eco-efficient than conventional constructions. Thereby, the study provides worthwhile information demonstrating the ecological viability of these measures and their positive mitigation effects on carbon neutral construction style.

  15. Biomass plantations - energy farming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, S.

    1981-02-01

    Mounting oil import bills in India are restricting her development programmes by forcing the cutting down of the import of other essential items. But the countries of the tropics have abundant sunlight and vast tracts of arable wastelands. Energy farming is proposed in the shape of energy plantations through forestry or energy cropping through agricultural media, to provide power fuels for transport and the industries and also to provide fuelwoods for the domestic sector. Short rotation cultivation is discussed and results are given of two main species that are being tried, ipil-ipil and Casuarina. Evaluations are made on the use of various crops such as sugar cane, cassava and kenaf as fuel crops together with hydrocarbon plants and aquatic biomass. (Refs. 20)

  16. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  17. Woody biomass logistics [Chapter 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Keefe; Nathaniel Anderson; John Hogland; Ken Muhlenfeld

    2014-01-01

    The economics of using woody biomass as a fuel or feedstock for bioenergy applications is often driven by logistical considerations. Depending on the source of the woody biomass, the acquisition cost of the material is often quite low, sometimes near zero. However, the cost of harvesting, collection, processing, storage, and transportation from the harvest site to end...

  18. Forest biomass-based energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaki R. R. Alavalapati; Pankaj Lal; Andres Susaeta; Robert C. Abt; David N. Wear

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsHarvesting woody biomass for use as bioenergy is projected to range from 170 million to 336 million green tons by 2050, an increase of 54 to 113 percent over current levels.Consumption projections for forest biomass-based energy, which are based on Energy Information Administration projections, have a high level of...

  19. Forest biomass sustainability and availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.E. Skog; John Stanturf

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides a synthesis of information on potential supply of forest biomass given needs for sustainable development of forestry. Sustainability includes maintenance of water supply, biodiversity, and carbon storage as well as timber products, community development, and recreation. Biomass removals can reduce fire hazard and insect and disease attack, restore...

  20. Refining fast pyrolysis of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil produced from biomass is a promising renewable alternative to crude oil. Such pyrolysis oil has transportation, storage, and processing benefits, none of which are offered by the bulky, inhomogeneous solid biomass from which it originates. However, pyrolysis oil has both a different

  1. Seagrass Biomass and Productivity in Seaweed and Non-Seaweed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seagrass beds are often subjected to stress resulting from natural and human activities. In this study, the shoot density, biomass and growth characteristics of Thalassia hemprichii and Enhalus acoroides were measured to assess the impact of seaweed farming activities on seagrass meadows at Marumbi, Chwaka Bay and ...

  2. Production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae biomass in papaya extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts of papaya fruit were used as substrate for single cell protein (SCP) production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 500 g of papaya fruit was extracted with different volumes of sterile distilled water. Extraction with 200 mL of sterile distilled water sustained highest cell growth. Biochemical analysis of dry biomass ...

  3. Optimization of sub-merged culture conditions for biomass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the series of complex sugars and sugar alcohols, mannitol supported the highest biomass yield with mycelial dry weight of 130.0 mg/30 cm3, followed closely by dextrin with 123.3 mg/30cm3 while the least value was obtained with arabitol. Tryptophan and alanine enhanced moderate vegetative growth with values, which ...

  4. The characteristics of biomass production, lipid accumulation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glucose was the optimal carbon source for mixotrophic cultivation of C. vulgaris and the effects of glucose content on the alga growth under mixotrophic conditions were considerable because lower glucose content (1 g/l) promoted the production of biomass and photosynthetic pigments; higher glucose contents (>5 g/l) ...

  5. Modeling population dynamics and woody biomass of Alaska coastal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy L. Peterson; Jingjing Liang; Tara M. Barrett

    2014-01-01

    Alaska coastal forest, 6.2 million ha in size, has been managed in the past mainly through clearcutting. Declining harvest and dwindling commercial forest resources over the past 2 decades have led to increased interest in management of young-growth stands and utilization of woody biomass for bioenergy. However, existing models to support these new management systems...

  6. Modeling loblolly pine aboveground live biomass in a mature pine-hardwood stand: a cautionary tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. C. Bragg

    2011-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in forests is a growing area of interest for researchers and land managers. Calculating the quantity of carbon stored in forest biomass seems to be a straightforward task, but it is highly dependent on the function(s) used to construct the stand. For instance, there are a number of possible equations to predict aboveground live biomass for loblolly...

  7. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two...... stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, Tm, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion...... characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates....

  8. Biomass in Switzerland. Energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggisberg, B.

    2006-01-01

    In the long term, biomass could be used for energy production in a three times more intensive way, compared to current figures. A major contribution would be delivered to Switzerland's energy supply. Numerous biomass conversion technologies do exist, for the production of heat, power or vehicle fuel. However, the implementation of such a large-scale utilisation of biomass requires a couple of strategic decisions in order to improve the framework conditions for biomass development and precisely target the supporting measures applicable to both research and pilot plants. In short, a clear and efficient strategy is necessary in what regards biomass, that will be used for the definition of a future catalogue of measures. (author)

  9. Biomass as a modern fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.O.; House, J.

    1994-01-01

    Case studies are presented for several developed and developing countries. Constraints involved in modernising biomass energy and the potential for turning them into entrepreneurial opportunities are discussed. It is concluded that the long term impacts of biomass programmes and projects depend mainly on ensuring sustainability, flexibility and replicability while taking account of local conditions and providing multiple benefits. Implementation of biomass projects requires governmental policy initiatives that will internalise the external economic, social and environmental costs of conventional fuel sources so that biomass fuels can become competitive on a ''level playing field''. Policies are also required to encourage R and D and commercialisation of biomass energy programs in close co-ordination with the private sector. (author)

  10. Effects of planting density on the Biomass partitioning of intensively managed loblolly pine stands on the Piedmont and upper Coastal plain of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney E. Will; Nikhil Narahari; Robert O. Teskey; Barry D. Shiver; Matthew Wosotowsky

    2006-01-01

    Increased planting density enhances overall stand growth by increasing resource capture and use. However, planting density also may affect the proportion of biomass partitioned to stem growth, a main factor controlling stand growth and yield. During the fourth growing season, we determined the biomass partitioned to leaf, branch, stem, and fine root (> 0.5mm) of...

  11. Energy from biomass. Teaching material; Energie aus Biomasse. Ein Lehrmaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    The textbook discusses the available options for power and heat generation from biomass as well as the limits of biomass-based power supply. The main obstacle apart from the high cost is a lack of knowledge, which the book intends to remedy. It addresses students of agriculture, forestry, environmental engineering, heating systems engineering and apprentice chimney sweepers, but it will also be useful to all other interested readers. [German] Biomasse kann aufgrund seiner vielfaeltigen Erscheinungs- und Umwandlungsformen sowohl als Brennstoff zur Waerme- und Stromgewinnung oder als Treibstoff eingesetzt werden. Die energetische Nutzung von Biomasse birgt zudem nicht zu verachtende Vorteile. Zum einen wegen des Beitrags zum Klimaschutz aufgrund der CO{sub 2}-Neutralitaet oder einfach, weil Biomasse immer wieder nachwaechst und von fossilen Ressourcen unabhaengig macht. All den bisher erschlossenen Moeglichkeiten der energetischen Nutzung von Biomasse moechte dieses Lehrbuch Rechnung tragen. Es zeigt aber auch die Grenzen auf, die mit der Energieversorgung durch Bioenergie einhergehen. Hohe Kosten und ein erhebliches Informationsdefizit behinderten bisher eine verstaerkte Nutzung dieses Energietraeges. Letzterem soll dieses Lehrbuch entgegenwirken. Das vorliegende Lehrbuch wurde fuer die Aus- und Weiterbildung erstellt. Es richtet sich vor allem an angehende Land- und Forstwirte, Umwelttechniker, Heizungsbauer und Schornsteinfeger, ist aber auch fuer all diejenigen interessant, die das Thema ''Energie aus Biomasse'' verstehen und ueberblicken moechten. (orig.)

  12. Software for computing plant biomass—BIOPAK users guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Means; Heather A. Hansen; Greg J. Koerper; Paul B Alaback; Mark W. Klopsch

    1994-01-01

    BIOPAK is a menu-driven package of computer programs for IBM-compatible personal computers that calculates the biomass, area, height, length, or volume of plant components (leaves, branches, stem, crown, and roots). The routines were written in FoxPro, Fortran, and C.BIOPAK was created to facilitate linking of a diverse array of vegetation datasets with the...

  13. Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, Melvin [Lakewood, CO; Elander, Richard [Evergreen, CO; Hennessey, Susan M [Avondale, PA

    2011-04-26

    Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

  14. Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions

    OpenAIRE

    Barnosky, Anthony D.

    2008-01-01

    Earth's most recent major extinction episode, the Quaternary Megafauna Extinction, claimed two-thirds of mammal genera and one-half of species that weighed >44 kg between ≈50,000 and 3,000 years ago. Estimates of megafauna biomass (including humans as a megafauna species) for before, during, and after the extinction episode suggest that growth of human biomass largely matched the loss of non-human megafauna biomass until ≈12,000 years ago. Then, total megafauna biomass crashed, because many n...

  15. LBA-ECO LC-14 Root Biomass and Phenology, km 67 Site, Para, Brazil: 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains biomass estimates for coarse roots measured on the forest floor and measurements of fine root growth down to 2-m depth at the km 67 Rainfall...

  16. Quantitative assessment of microalgae biomass and lipid stability post cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerine eNapan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Processing of microalgal biomass to biofuels and other products requires the removal of the culture from a well-controlled growth system to a containment or preprocessing step at non-ideal growth conditions, such as darkness, minimal gas exchange, and fluctuating temperatures. The conditions and the length of time between harvest and processing will impact microalgal metabolism resulting in biomass and lipid degradation. This study experimentally investigates the impact of time and temperature on Nannochloropsis salina harvested from outdoor plate photobioreactors. The impact of three temperatures, 4°, 40° or 70°C, on biomass and lipid content (as fatty acid methyl esters of the harvested microalgae was evaluated over a 156 hour time period. Results show that for N. salina, time and temperature are key factors that negatively impact biomass and lipid yields. The temperature of 70°C resulted in the highest degradation with the overall biofuel potential reduced by 30% over 156 hours. Short time periods, 24 hours, and low temperatures are shown to have little effect on the harvested biomass.

  17. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  18. Repeat, Low Altitude Measurements of Vegetation Status and Biomass Using Manned Aerial and UAS Imagery in a Piñon-Juniper Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Lippitt, C.; Loerch, A.; Litvak, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the above ground biomass of vegetation is a critical component of any ecological monitoring campaign. Traditionally, biomass of vegetation was measured with allometric-based approach. However, it is also time-consuming, labor-intensive, and extremely expensive to conduct over large scales and consequently is cost-prohibitive at the landscape scale. Furthermore, in semi-arid ecosystems characterized by vegetation with inconsistent growth morphologies (e.g., piñon-juniper woodlands), even ground-based conventional allometric approaches are often challenging to execute consistently across individuals and through time, increasing the difficulty of the required measurements and consequently the accuracy of the resulting products. To constrain the uncertainty associated with these campaigns, and to expand the extent of our measurement capability, we made repeat measurements of vegetation biomass in a semi-arid piñon-juniper woodland using structure-from-motion (SfM) techniques. We used high-spatial resolution overlapping aerial images and high-accuracy ground control points collected from both manned aircraft and multi-rotor UAS platforms, to generate digital surface model (DSM) for our experimental region. We extracted high-precision canopy volumes from the DSM and compared these to the vegetation allometric data, s to generate high precision canopy volume models. We used these models to predict the drivers of allometric equations for Pinus edulis and Juniperous monosperma (canopy height, diameter at breast height, and root collar diameter). Using this approach, we successfully accounted for the carbon stocks in standing live and standing dead vegetation across a 9 ha region, which contained 12.6 Mg / ha of standing dead biomass, with good agreement to our field plots. Here we present the initial results from an object oriented workflow which aims to automate the biomass estimation process of tree crown delineation and volume calculation, and partition

  19. Energy Efficiency of Biogas Produced from Different Biomass Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Shahida; Nazri, A H

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia has different sources of biomass like palm oil waste, agricultural waste, cow dung, sewage waste and landfill sites, which can be used to produce biogas and as a source of energy. Depending on the type of biomass, the biogas produced can have different calorific value. At the same time the energy, being used to produce biogas is dependent on transportation distance, means of transportation, conversion techniques and for handling of raw materials and digested residues. An energy systems analysis approach based on literature is applied to calculate the energy efficiency of biogas produced from biomass. Basically, the methodology is comprised of collecting data, proposing locations and estimating the energy input needed to produce biogas and output obtained from the generated biogas. The study showed that palm oil and municipal solid waste is two potential sources of biomass. The energy efficiency of biogas produced from palm oil residues and municipal solid wastes is 1.70 and 3.33 respectively. Municipal solid wastes have the higher energy efficiency due to less transportation distance and electricity consumption. Despite the inherent uncertainties in the calculations, it can be concluded that the energy potential to use biomass for biogas production is a promising alternative.

  20. Biomass and Neutral Lipid Production in Geothermal Microalgal Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Faye Bywaters

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, technologies have been developed that offer the possibility of using algal biomass as feedstocks to energy producing systems- in addition to oil-derived fuels (Bird et al., 2011;Bird et al., 2012. Growing native mixed microalgal consortia for biomass in association with geothermal resources has the potential to mitigate negative impacts of seasonally low temperatures on biomass production systems as well as mitigate some of the challenges associated with growing unialgal strains. We assessed community composition, growth rates, biomass and neutral lipid production of microalgal consortia obtained from geothermal hot springs in the Great Basin/Nevada area that were cultured under different thermal and light conditions. Biomass production rates ranged from 368 to 3246 mg C L-1 d-1. The neutral lipid production in these consortia with and without shifts to lower temperatures and additions of bicarbonate (both environmental parameters that have been shown to enhance neutral lipid production ranged from zero to 38.74 mg free fatty acids and triacylglycerols L-1 d-1, the upper value was approximately 6% of the biomass produced. The higher lipid values were most likely due to the presence of Achnanthidium sp. Palmitic and stearic acids were the dominant free fatty acids. The S/U ratio (the saturated to unsaturated FA ratio decreased for cultures shifted from their original temperature to 15°C. Biomass production was within the upper limits of those reported for individual strains, and production of neutral lipids was increased with secondary treatment – all results demonstrate a potential of culturing and manipulating resultant microalgal consortia for biomass-based energy production and perhaps even for biofuels.