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Sample records for biomass fired grate

  1. Grate Firing of Biomass: Measurements, Validation and Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    , they are not yet totally problem-free. More efforts are required to further improve and optimize biomass grate-firing technology. This part of the project focuses on the CFD modelling of two industrial biomass grate-fired furnaces (AVV2 & EV3). The grate fired furnace is an overfeed stoker and can be interpreted...

  2. Grate-firing of biomass for heat and power production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    , modelling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are discussed in detail. The literature survey and discussions are primarily pertaining to grate-fired boilers burning biomass, though these issues are more or less general. Other technologies (e.g., fluidized bed combustion or suspension...

  3. Numerical simulation of a biomass fired grate boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of the thermal flow in the combustion furnace of a biomass-fired grate boiler provides crucial insight into the boiler's performance. Quite a few factors play important roles in a general CFD analysis, such as grid, models, discretization scheme and so on....... For a grate boiler, the modeling the interaction of the fuel bed and the gas phase above the bed is also essential. Much effort can be found in literature on developing bed models whose results are introduced into CFD simulations of freeboard as inlet conditions. This paper presents a CFD analysis...... of the largest biomass-fired grate boiler in Denmark. The focus of this paper is to study how significantly an accurate bed model can affect overall CFD results, i.e., how necessarily it is to develop an accurate bed model in terms of the reliability of CFD results. The ultimate purpose of the study is to obtain...

  4. Mathematical modeling and experimental study of biomass combustion in a thermal 108 MW grate-fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren K.

    2008-01-01

    on the basis of the sensitivity analysis and the measurements. The baseline results show an overall acceptable agreement with the measured data and the site observations, indicating the baseline model is applicable in optimization of the boiler and design of new grate boilers. However, at a few measuring...... computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for an industrial biomass-fired grate boiler, which can be used for diagnosis and optimization of the grate boiler as well as design of new grate boilers. First, based on the design conditions, a thorough sensitivity analysis is done to evaluate the relative importance...... of different factors in CFD analysis of the grate boiler. In a late stage, a two-day measuring campaign is carried out to measure the gas temperatures and gas concentrations in the boiler using a fiber optic probe connected to a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. A baseline model is then defined...

  5. Biomass co-firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized-bed combus......Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized......-bed combustion (FBC) systems, and grate-firing systems, which are employed in about 50%, 40% and 10% of all the co-firing plants, respectively. Their basic principles, process technologies, advantages, and limitations are presented, followed by a brief comparison of these technologies when applied to biomass co...

  6. Modeling of sulfation of potassium chloride by ferric sulfate addition during grate-firing of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Jespersen, Jacob Boll; Aho, Martti;

    2013-01-01

    Potassium chloride, KCl, formed from critical ash-forming elements released during combustion may lead to severe ash deposition and corrosion problems in biomass-fired boilers. Ferric sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 is an effective additive, which produces sulfur oxides (SO2 and SO3) to convert KCl to the les...

  7. Ash transformation and deposit build-up during biomass suspension and grate firing: Full-scale experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    of this study was to investigate ash transformation and deposition behavior in two biomass-fired boilers, firing wheat straw and/or wood. The influence of strawfiring technology (grate and suspension) on the ash transformation, deposit formation rate and deposit characteristics has been investigated. Bulk...... on similar levels. This was observed even though the concentration of fly ash in the flue gas was significantly higher during straw suspension firing. The influence of co-combustion of wood with straw on deposit formation rate, probe heat uptake and deposit characteristicswas also investigated during...... suspension firing conditions. Data from 35% straw suspension firing with wood showed a deposit formation rate of 33 g/m2/h for the first 12 h. The deposit formation rate increased to 41 g/m2/h with 100% strawfiring. The probe heat uptake reduction up to 40 h of exposure time was 3.0, 7.3, 8.4 and 16.5 kW/m2...

  8. Hygroscopic behaviour of aerosol particles emitted from biomass fired grate boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics; Pagels, Joakim; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Bioenergy Technology

    2005-02-01

    This study focuses on the hygroscopic properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles emitted from two small-scale district heating combustion plants (1 and 1.5 MW) burning two types of biomass fuels (moist forest residue and pellets). The hygroscopic particle diameter growth was measured when taken from a dehydrated to a humidified state for particle diameters between 30-350 nm (dry size) using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA). Particles of a certain dry size all showed similar hygroscopic growth and the average diameter growth at RH=90% for 110/100 nm particles was 1.68 in the 1 MW boiler, and 1.52 in the 1.5 MW boiler. These growth factors are considerably higher in comparison to other combustion aerosol particles such as diesel exhaust, and are the result of the efficient combustion and the high concentration of alkali species in the fuel. The observed water uptake could be explained using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule and a chemical composition of only potassium salts, taken from an Ion Chromatography analysis of filter sample (KCl, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). Agglomerated particles collapsed and became more spherical when initially exposed to a moderately high relative humidity. When diluting with hot particle-free air, the fractal-like structures remained intact until humidified in the HTDMA. A method is presented to by which to estimate the fractal dimension of the agglomerated combustion aerosol and correct the measured mobility diameter hygroscopic growth to the more useful property volume growth. The fractal dimension was estimated to be {approx}2.5.

  9. Numerical modelling of a straw-fired grate boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a 33 MW straw-fired grate boiler. Combustion on the grate plays akey-role in the analysis of these boilers and in this work a stand-alone code was used to provide inlet conditions for the CFD analysis. Modelpredictions were...... compared with available gas temperature and species concentration measurements showing good agreement. Combustionof biomass in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively high amounts of unburnt carbon in the fly ash.Based on the CFD analysis, it is suggested that poor...

  10. Characterizing and modeling of an 88 MW grate-fired boiler burning wheat straw: Experience and lessons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Clausen, Sønnik

    2012-01-01

    an acceptable agreement. The discrepancies are analyzed from different aspects. The lessons learned and experience gained from this and other case studies are summarized and discussed in detail, which can facilitate the modeling validation effort as well as improve grate-firing technology. Some of the addressed......Grate-firing is one of the main technologies currently used for biomass combustion for heat and power production. However, grate-firing is yet to be further developed, towards a better technology for biomass combustion, particularly towards higher efficiency, lower emissions, and better reliability...... and availability. To better understand grate-firing of biomass and to establish a reliable but relatively simple Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling methodology for industrial applications, biomass combustion in a number of different grate boilers has been measured and modeled. As one of the case studies...

  11. Modeling and experiments of biomass combustion in a large-scale grate boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    and experiments are both done for the grate boiler. The comparison between them shows an overall acceptable agreement in tendency. However at some measuring ports, big discrepancies between the modeling and the experiments are observed, mainly because the modeling-based boundary conditions (BCs) could differ...... is exposed to preheated inlet air while the top of the bed resides within the furnace. Mathematical modeling is an efficient way to understand and improve the operation and design of combustion systems. Compared to modeling of pulverized fuel furnaces, CFD modeling of biomass-fired grate furnaces...... is inherently more difficult due to the complexity of the solid biomass fuel bed on the grate, the turbulent reacting flow in the combustion chamber and the intensive interaction between them. This paper presents the CFD validation efforts for a modern large-scale biomass-fired grate boiler. Modeling...

  12. Design of 500kW grate fired test facility using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Jørgensen, K.

    2005-01-01

    A 500kW vibrating grate fired test facility for solid biomass fuels has been designed using numerical models including CFD. The CFD modelling has focussed on the nozzle layout and flowpatterns in the lower part of the furnace, and the results have established confidence in the chosen design...

  13. Engineering bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison between two numerical models describing the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. Both models consider the incoming biomass as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed...... of the syngas predicted by the two models is equal to about 7%. The application to different types of biomass shows that the difference in the predictions increases as the carbon content grows. The phenomenological model, in fact, generally considers higher conversion rates of this element to volatiles...

  14. Bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2013-01-01

    to describe the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. In this work both models consider the incoming solid fuel as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed is treated as a 0D system, but the thermo......Because of the complexity to describe and solve thermo-chemical processes occurring in a fuel bed in grate-fired boiler, it is often necessary to simplify the process and use modeling techniques based on overall mass, energy and species conservation. A comparison between two numerical models......-chemical processes are divided in two successive sections: drying and conversion (which includes pyrolysis, gasification and combustion). The second model is an empirical 1D approach. The two models need input data such as composition, temperature and feeding rate of biomass and primary air. Temperature, species...

  15. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the second of two papers, describing probe measurements of deposit buildup and removal (shedding), conducted in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, firing straw and wood. Investigations of deposit buildup and shedding have been made by use of an advanced online deposit probe and a s...

  16. Combustion characteristics and NO formation for biomass blends in a 35-ton-per-hour travelling grate utility boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqi; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ruiyang; Wang, Zhenwang; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Guangbo

    2009-04-01

    Measurements were taken for a 35-ton-per-hour biomass-fired travelling grate boiler. Local mean concentrations of O(2), CO, SO(2) and NO gas species and gas temperatures were determined in the region above the grate. For a 28-ton-per-hour load, the mass ratios of biomass fly ash and boiler slag were 42% and 58%, the boiler efficiency was 81.56%, and the concentrations of NO(x) and SO(2) at 6% O(2) were 257 and 84 mg/m(3). For an 18-ton-per-hour load, the fuel burning zone was nearer to the inlet than it was for the 28-ton-per-hour load, and the contents of CO and NO in the fuel burning zone above the grate were lower.

  17. Development of generalised model for grate combustion of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Sørensen, Henrik

    , it is recommended to return to either a walking column approach or even some other, relatively simple method of prediction, and combine this with a form of randomness, to mimic the chaotic motion evident from full scale operation of grate fired plants. It is believed that such an approach will be a significant...... is big enough to represent real, full scale conditions, and yet small enough to be operational in terms of parameter studies of different nature. Apart from full SRO data, measurements (gas sampling, velocity, temperature, particle sampling) can be taken through a heated, water-cooled probe...

  18. Co-firing of Coal with Biomass and Waste in Full-scale Suspension-fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Johansen, Kim; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2013-01-01

    The energy policy in Denmark has for many years focused on lowering the net CO2 emission from heat and power production by replacing fossil fuels by renewable resources. This has been done by developing dedicated grate-fired boilers for biomass and waste fuels but also by developing coal-based su......The energy policy in Denmark has for many years focused on lowering the net CO2 emission from heat and power production by replacing fossil fuels by renewable resources. This has been done by developing dedicated grate-fired boilers for biomass and waste fuels but also by developing coal......-based suspension-fired boilers to accept still higher fractions of biomass or waste material as fuels. This last development has been challenging of many reasons, including pre-treatment of fuels, and solving potential emission and operational problems during the simultaneous development of supercritical steam...... an overview of research activities, aiming at increasing biomass shares during co-firing in suspension, conducted in close collaboration with the Danish power industry. The research has lead to an improved understanding of the alternative fuels interaction with coal in the boiler chamber. Further, the applied...

  19. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Muhammad Shafique; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    , followed the same trends. Ash transformation was investigated by bulk ash analysis of the fuel, fly, and bottom ash during straw and/or wood suspension firing. Bulk ash analysis of fly ashes showed that the contents of volatile elements (K, Cl, S) were slightly greater than in the fuel ash, while Ca and Si...... in the analysis of the data. The first is the integral deposit formation rate (IDF-rate) found by dividing the integral mass change over integral time intervals (of order several hours) by the time interval. The IDF-rate is similar to deposit formation rates based on total deposit mass uptake divided by probe...... smoothing the derivatives to remove excessive noise. The DDF-rate was influenced by flue gas temperature and straw share, while changes in probe surface temperature had no significant influence. The IDF-rate, qualitatively related to the ratio between the time-integrated DDF-rate and the integration time...

  20. Advanced modelling and testing of a 13 MWth waste wood-fired grate boiler with recycled flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko;

    2016-01-01

    Numerical modelling is widely used in industry for detailed understanding of the combustion process and for appropriate design and optimization of biomass/waste-fired boilers. This paper presents a numerical study of a 13 MWth waste wood-fired grate boiler, based on the coupled in-bed fuel...... conversion modelling and freeboard combustion modelling methodology. A 1D model is developed for the conversion of the waste wood in the fuel bed on the grate, providing the appropriate grate inlet condition for the 3D simulation of the freeboard region. Since part of the flue gas is recycled into the boiler...... as an innovative attempt to improve the boiler performance, a refined weighted-sum-of-grey-gases-model of greater accuracy is developed to better address the impacts of the elevated CO2 and H2O vapour concentrations on radiative heat transfer in the boiler. The impacts of full buoyancy on the turbulent flow...

  1. GASIFICATION BASED BIOMASS CO-FIRING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babul Patel; Kevin McQuigg; Robert Toerne; John Bick

    2003-01-01

    Biomass gasification offers a practical way to use this widespread fuel source for co-firing traditional large utility boilers. The gasification process converts biomass into a low Btu producer gas that can be used as a supplemental fuel in an existing utility boiler. This strategy of co-firing is compatible with a variety of conventional boilers including natural gas and oil fired boilers, pulverized coal fired conventional and cyclone boilers. Gasification has the potential to address all problems associated with the other types of co-firing with minimum modifications to the existing boiler systems. Gasification can also utilize biomass sources that have been previously unsuitable due to size or processing requirements, facilitating a wider selection of biomass as fuel and providing opportunity in reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere through the commercialization of this technology. This study evaluated two plants: Wester Kentucky Energy Corporation's (WKE's) Reid Plant and TXU Energy's Monticello Plant for technical and economical feasibility. These plants were selected for their proximity to large supply of poultry litter in the area. The Reid plant is located in Henderson County in southwest Kentucky, with a large poultry processing facility nearby. Within a fifty-mile radius of the Reid plant, there are large-scale poultry farms that generate over 75,000 tons/year of poultry litter. The local poultry farmers are actively seeking environmentally more benign alternatives to the current use of the litter as landfill or as a farm spread as fertilizer. The Monticello plant is located in Titus County, TX near the town of Pittsburgh, TX, where again a large poultry processor and poultry farmers in the area generate over 110,000 tons/year of poultry litter. Disposal of this litter in the area is also a concern. This project offers a model opportunity to demonstrate the feasibility of biomass co-firing and at the same time eliminate

  2. Biomass Burning Emissions from Fire Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the emission source strengths of different (particulate and gaseous) atmospheric constituents is one of the principal ingredients upon which the modeling and forecasting of their distribution and impacts depend. Biomass burning emissions are complex and difficult to quantify. However, satellite remote sensing is providing us tremendous opportunities to measure the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP), which has a direct relationship with the rates of biomass consumption and emissions of major smoke constituents. In this presentation, we will show how the satellite measurement of FRP is facilitating the quantitative characterization of biomass burning and smoke emission rates, and the implications of this unique capability for improving our understanding of smoke impacts on air quality, weather, and climate. We will also discuss some of the challenges and uncertainties associated with satellite measurement of FRP and how they are being addressed.

  3. Biomass Co-Firing in Suspension-Fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Hvid, Søren Lovmand; Baxter, Larry

    The objective of the project is to investigate critical issues associated with cofiring with low-NOx burners and cofiring in advanced suspension-fired plants with for example high-temperature steam cycles. Experience has been gained using biofuels for cofiring in older power plant units. However...... modelling tool adapted to accommodate biomass cofiring combustion features. The CFD tool will be able to predict deposit accumulation, particle conversion, fly ash composition, temperatures, velocities, and composition of furnace gases, etc. The computer model will primarily be used in the development...... of advanced cofired combustion and potentially gasification systems and secondarily to resolve immediate and critical issues associated with cofired systems. Another essential issue is the assessment of fuel flexibility in cofired plants to help keep biomass use competitive compared to other renewable...

  4. Materials Problems and Solutions in Biomass Fired Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Hede; Montgomery, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    Due to Denmark’s pledge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, biomass is utilised increasingly as a fuel for generating energy. Extensive research and demonstration projects especially in the area of material performance for biomass fired boilers have been undertaken to make biomass a viable fuel....... With both 10 and 20% straw, no chlorine corrosion was seen. This paper will describe the results from in situ investigations undertaken in Denmark on high temperature corrosion in biomass fired plants. Results from 100% straw-firing, woodchip and co-firing of straw with fossil fuels are summarised...

  5. Selective Logging, Fire, and Biomass in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    Biomass and rates of disturbance are major factors in determining the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, and neither of them is well known for most of the earth's surface. Satellite data over large areas are beginning to be used systematically to measure rates of two of the most important types of disturbance, deforestation and reforestation, but these are not the only types of disturbance that affect carbon storage. Other examples include selective logging and fire. In northern mid-latitude forests, logging and subsequent regrowth of forests have, in recent decades, contributed more to the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere than any other type of land use. In the tropics logging is also becoming increasingly important. According to the FAO/UNEP assessment of tropical forests, about 25% of total area of productive forests have been logged one or more times in the 60-80 years before 1980. The fraction must be considerably greater at present. Thus, deforestation by itself accounts for only a portion of the emissions carbon from land. Furthermore, as rates of deforestation become more accurately measured with satellites, uncertainty in biomass will become the major factor accounting for the remaining uncertainty in estimates of carbon flux. An approach is needed for determining the biomass of terrestrial ecosystems. 3 Selective logging is increasingly important in Amazonia, yet it has not been included in region-wide, satellite-based assessments of land-cover change, in part because it is not as striking as deforestation. Nevertheless, logging affects terrestrial carbon storage both directly and indirectly. Besides the losses of carbon directly associated with selective logging, logging also increases the likelihood of fire.

  6. Development of generalised model for grate combustion of biomass. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, L.

    2007-02-15

    This project has been divided into two main parts, one of which has focused on modelling and one on designing and constructing a grate fired biomass test rig. The modelling effort has been defined due to a need for improved knowledge of the transport and conversion processes within the bed layer for two reasons: 1) to improve emission understanding and reduction measures and 2) to improve boundary conditions for CFD-based furnace modelling. The selected approach has been based on a diffusion coefficient formulation, where conservation equations for the concentration of fuel are solved in a spatially resolved grid, much in the same manner as in a finite volume CFD code. Within this porous layer of fuel, gas flows according to the Ergun equation. The diffusion coefficient links the properties of the fuel to the grate type and vibration mode, and is determined for each combination of fuel, grate and vibration mode. In this work, 3 grates have been tested as well as 4) types of fuel, drinking straw, wood beads, straw pellets and wood pellets. Although much useful information and knowledge has been obtained on transport processes in fuel layers, the model has proved to be less than perfect, and the recommendation is not to continue along this path. New visual data on the motion of straw on vibrating grates indicate that a diffusion governed motion does not very well represent the transport. Furthermore, it is very difficult to obtain the diffusion coefficient in other places than the surface layer of the grate, and it is not likely that this is representative for the motion within the layer. Finally, as the model complexity grows, model turnover time increases to a level where it is comparable to that of the full furnace model. In order to proceed and address the goals of the first paragraph, it is recommended to return to either a walking column approach or even some other, relatively simple method of prediction, and combine this with a form of randomness, to mimic the

  7. Materials Problems and Solutions in Biomass fired plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Hede; Montgomery, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    Owing to Denmark's pledge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, biomass is being increasingly utilised as a fuel for generating energy. Extensive research and development projects, especially in the area of material performance for biomass fired boilers, have been undertaken to make biomass a viable...... plants. With both 10 and 20% straw, no chlorine corrosion was seen. The present paper will describe the results from in situ investigations undertaken in Denmark on high temperature corrosion in biomass fired plants. Results from 100% straw firing, woodchip and cofiring of straw with fossil fuels...

  8. Technical and Economic Aspects of Biomass Co-Firing in Coal-Fired Boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzikuć M.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of the potential of using biomass and coal co-firing in the Polish electro energetic system and shows the benefits resulting from an increase of biomass amount in electricity production in one of the largest Polish power stations. The paper discusses the most often used technologies for biomass co-firing and the potential of using biomass in electricity production in Poland. It also emphasises the fact that biomass co-firing allows a reduction of greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere and helps decrease consumption of energy resources. The article also emphasises the economic meaning of increasing the share of renewable energy resources in energy balance, including biomass, due to costs related to greenhouse gases emissions charges. Finally, conclusions from using biomass and coal co-firing in electricity production are presented

  9. Co-firing of biomass with coal: constraints and role of biomass pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewska, A.K.; Veringa, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Peteves, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    This report aims at introducing the aspects of co-firing of biomass with coal. The main focus is given to problems and constraints related to utilizing biomass together with coal for power generation, and the potential of biomass pre-treatment in mitigating these constraints. The work is based on a

  10. Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi) biomass distribution, fire regime and post-fire recovery in northeastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, L. T.; Beck, P. S. A.; Loranty, M. M.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Goetz, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    Climate change and land-use activities are increasing fire activity across much of the Siberian boreal forest, yet the climate feedbacks from forest disturbances remain difficult to quantify due to limited information on forest biomass distribution, disturbance regimes and post-disturbance ecosystem recovery. Our primary objective here was to analyse post-fire accumulation of Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi Mayr.) aboveground biomass for a 100 000 km2 area of open forest in far northeastern Siberia. In addition to examining effects of fire size and topography on post-fire larch aboveground biomass, we assessed regional fire rotation and density, as well as performance of burned area maps generated from MODIS satellite imagery. Using Landsat imagery, we mapped 116 fire scar perimeters that dated c. 1966-2007. We then mapped larch aboveground biomass by linking field biomass measurements to tree shadows mapped synergistically from WorldView-1 and Landsat 5 satellite imagery. Larch aboveground biomass tended to be low during early succession (≤ 25 yr, 271 ± 26 g m-2, n = 66 [mean ± SE]) and decreased with increasing elevation and northwardly aspect. Larch aboveground biomass tended to be higher during mid-succession (33-38 yr, 746 ± 100 g m-2, n = 32), though was highly variable. The high variability was not associated with topography and potentially reflected differences in post-fire density of tree regrowth. Neither fire size nor latitude were significant predictors of post-fire larch aboveground biomass. Fire activity was considerably higher in the Kolyma Mountains (fire rotation = 110 yr, fire density = 1.0 ± 1.0 fires yr-1 × 104 km-2) than along the forest-tundra border (fire rotation = 792 yr, fire density = 0.3 ± 0.3 fires yr-1 × 104 km-2). The MODIS burned area maps underestimated the total area burned in this region from 2000-2007 by 40%. Tree shadows mapped jointly using high and medium resolution satellite imagery were strongly associated (r2 ≈ 0

  11. Residual Ash Formation during Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Through 50+ years, high quality research has been conducted in order to characterize ash and deposit formation in utility boilers fired with coal, biomass and waste fractions. The basic mechanism of fly ash formation in suspension fired coal boilers is well described, documented and may even...... be modeled relatively precisely. Concerning fly ash formation from biomass or waste fractions, the situation is not nearly as good. Lots of data are available from campaigns where different ash fractions, including sometimes also in-situ ash, have been collected and analyzed chemically and for particle size...... distribution. Thus, there is a good flair of the chemistry of fly ash formed in plants fired with biomass or waste fractions, either alone, or in conjunction with coal. But data on dedicated studies of the physical size development of fly ash, are almost non-existing for biomasses and waste fractions...

  12. Carbon and Aerosol Emissions from Biomass Fires in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, W. M.; Flores Garnica, G.; Baker, S. P.; Urbanski, S. P.

    2009-12-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of many atmospheric greenhouse gases and photochemically reactive trace gases. There are limited data available on the spatial and temporal extent of biomass fires and associated trace gas and aerosol emissions in Mexico. Biomass burning is a unique source of these gases and aerosols, in comparison to industrial and biogenic sources, because the locations of fires vary considerably both daily and seasonally and depend on human activities and meteorological conditions. In Mexico, the fire season starts in January and about two-thirds of the fires occur in April and May. The amount of trace gases and aerosols emitted by fires spatially and temporally is a major uncertainty in quantifying the impact of fire emissions on regional atmospheric chemical composition. To quantify emissions, it is necessary to know the type of vegetation, the burned area, the amount of biomass burned, and the emission factor of each compound for each ecosystem. In this study biomass burning experiments were conducted in Mexico to measure trace gas emissions from 24 experimental fires and wildfires in semiarid, temperate, and tropical ecosystems from 2005 to 2007. A range of representative vegetation types were selected for ground-based experimental burns to characterize fire emissions from representative Mexico fuels. A third of the country was surveyed each year, beginning in the north. The fire experiments in the first year were conducted in Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas states in pine forest, oak forest, grass, and chaparral. The second-year fire experiments were conducted on pine forest, oak forest, shrub, agricultural, grass, and herbaceous fuels in Jalisco, Puebla, and Oaxaca states in central Mexico. The third-year experiments were conducted in pine-oak forests of Chiapas, coastal grass, and low subtropical forest on the Yucatan peninsula. FASS (Fire Atmosphere Sampling System) towers were deployed for the experimental fires. Each FASS

  13. Short review on the origin and countermeasure of biomass slagging in grate furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming eZhu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing demand for energy consumption, biomass has been more and more important as a new type of clean renewable energy source. Biomass direct firing is the most mature and promising utilization method to date, while it allows a timely solution to slagging problems. Alkali metal elements in the biomass fuel and the ash fusion behavior, as the two major origins contributing to slagging during biomass combustion, are analyzed in this paper. The slag presents various layered structures affected by the different compositions of ash particles. Besides, the high-temperature molten material which provides a supporting effect on the skeletal structure in biomass ash was proposed to evaluate the ash fusion characteristics. In addition, numerous solutions to biomass slagging, such as additives, fuel pretreatment and biomass co-firing, were also discussed.

  14. Use of numerical modeling in design for co-firing biomass in wall-fired burners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2004-01-01

    Co-firing biomass with coal or gas in the existing units has gained increasing interest in the recent past to increase the production of environmentally friendly, renewable green power. This paper presents design considerations for co-firing biomass with natural gas in wall-fired burners by use...... of numerical modeling. The models currently used to predict solid fuel combustion rely on a spherical particle shape assumption, which may deviate a lot from reality for big biomass particles. A sphere gives a minimum in terms of the surface-area-to-volume ratio, which impacts significantly both motion....... To better model the reaction of biomass particles, the actual particle surface area available and the average oxygen mass flux at particle surface are considered, both of which are shape factor-dependent. (2) The non-spherical biomass particles are simplified as equal-volume spheres, without any...

  15. A review: Fly ash and deposit formation in PF fired biomass boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Wu, Hao;

    2016-01-01

    In recent years suspension fired boilers have been increasingly used for biomass based heat and power production in several countries. This has included co-firing of coal and straw, up to 100% firing of wood or straw and the use of additives to remedy problems with biomass firing. In parallel...... in biomass suspension fired boilers is provided. Furthermore the influence of co-firing and use of additives on ash chemistry, deposit properties and boiler operation is discussed....

  16. Potential of Co-firing of Woody Biomass in Coal Fired Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yosuke; Kato, Takeyoshi; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    Taking the distributing woody biomass supply into account, this paper assesses the potential of a co-firing of woody biomass in utility's coal power plant from the both energy-saving and economical view points. Sawmill wastes, trimming wastes from fruit farms and streets, and thinning residues from forests in Aichi Prefecture are taken into account. Even though transportation energy is required, almost all of woody biomass can be more efficiently used in co-firing with coal than in a small-scale fuel cell system with gasification as a distributed utilization. When the capital cost of fuel cell system with 25% of total efficiency, including preprocess, gasification and power generation, is higher than 170× 103yen/kW, almost all of thinning residues can be more economically used in co-firing. The cost of woody biomass used in co-firing is also compared with the transaction cost of renewable power in the current RPS scheme. The result suggests the co-firing of woody biomass in coal fired power plant can be feasible measure for effective utilization of woody biomass.

  17. Biomass burning emissions estimated with a global fire assimilation system based on observed fire radiative power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, J.W.; Heil, A.; Andreae, M.O.; Benedetti, A.; Chubarova, N.; Jones, L.; Morcrette, J.J.; Razinger, M.; Schultz, M.G.; Suttie, M.; Werf, van der G.R.

    2012-01-01

    The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFASv1.0) calculates biomass burning emissions by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from the MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. It corrects for gaps in the observations, which are mostly due to cloud cover, and filters spu

  18. Biomass fuelled indirect fired micro turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchard, D.

    2005-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project to further develop and improve a system based on the Bowman TG50 50kWe turbine and a C3(S) combustor with a high temperature heat exchanger for the production of electricity from biomass. Details are given of the specific aims of the project, the manufacture of a new larger biomass combustor, the development of startup and shutdown procedures, waste heat recuperation, adaption of a PC-based mathematical model, and capital equipment costs. The significant levels of carbon emission savings and the commercial prospects of the biomass generator gas turbine combined heat and power (CHP) system are considered, and recommendations are presented.

  19. Estimating biomass consumed from fire using MODIS FRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellicott, Evan; Vermote, Eric; Giglio, Louis; Roberts, Gareth

    2009-07-01

    Biomass burning is an important global phenomenon impacting atmospheric composition. Application of satellite based measures of fire radiative energy (FRE) has been shown to be effective for estimating biomass consumed, which can then be used to estimate gas and aerosol emissions. However, application of FRE has been limited in both temporal and spatial scale. In this paper we offer a methodology to estimate FRE globally for 2001-2007 at monthly time steps using MODIS. Accuracy assessment shows that our FRE estimates are precise (R2 = 0.85), but may be underestimated. Global estimates of FRE show that Africa and South America dominate biomass burning, accounting for nearly 70% of the annual FRE generated. Applying FRE-based combustion factors to Africa yields an annual average biomass burned of 716-881 Tg of dry matter (DM). Comparison with the GFEDv2 biomass burned estimates shows large annual differences suggesting significant uncertainty remains in emission estimates.

  20. Co-firing of coal with biomass and waste in full-scale suspension-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Johansen, Kim; Frandsen, Flemming J.; Jensen, Peter A.; Jensen, Anker D. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The energy policy in Denmark has for many years focused on lowering the net CO{sub 2} emission from heat and power production by replacing fossil fuels by renewable resources. This has been done by developing dedicated grate-fired boilers for biomass and waste fuels but also by developing coal-based suspension-fired boilers to accept still higher fractions of biomass or waste material as fuels. This last development has been challenging of many reasons, including pre-treatment of fuels, and solving potential emission and operational problems during the simultaneous development of supercritical steam cycles with steam temperatures close to 600 C, providing power efficiencies close to 50% (Hein KRG, Sustainable energy supply and environment protection - strategies, resources and technologies. In: Gupta R, Wall T, Hupa M, Wigley F, Tillman D, Frandsen FJ (eds) Proceedings of international conference on impact of fuel quality on power production and the environment, Banff Conference Centre, Banff, Alberta, Canada, 29 Sept-4 Oct, 2008). For 25 years the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control) Research Centre at DTU Chemical Engineering, has attained a leading role in research, supporting power producing industry, plant owners and boiler manufacturers to optimize design and operation and minimize cost and environmental impact using alternative fuels in suspension fired boilers. Our contribution has been made via a combination of full-scale measuring campaigns, pilot-scale studies, lab-scale measurements and modeling tools. The research conducted has addressed many issues important for co-firing, i.e. fuel processing, ash induced boiler deposit formation and corrosion, boiler chamber fuel conversion and emission formation, influence on flue gas cleaning equipment and the utilization of residual products. This chapter provides an overview of research activities, aiming at increasing biomass shares during co-firing in suspension, conducted in close collaboration with

  1. Combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis of cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agu, R.C.; Amadife, A.E.; Ude, C.M.; Onyia, A.; Ogu, E.O. [Enugu State Univ. of Science and Technology (Nigeria). Faculty of Applied Natural Sciences; Okafor, M.; Ezejiofor, E. [Nnamdi Azikiwe Univ., Awka (Nigeria). Dept. of Applied Microbiology

    1997-12-31

    The effect of combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis (various concentrations) on cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production was investigated. At high concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1--5 M), hydrolysis of the CGW biomass was achieved but with excessive charring or dehydration reaction. At lower acid concentrations, hydrolysis of CGW biomass was also achieved with 0.3--0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, while partial hydrolysis was obtained below 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (the lowest acid concentration that hydrolyzed CGW biomass) at 120 C and 1 atm pressure for 30 min. A 60% process efficiency was achieved with 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in hydrolyzing the cellulose and lignin materials present in the CGW biomass. High acid concentration is therefore not required for CGW biomass hydrolysis. The low acid concentration required for CGW biomass hydrolysis, as well as the minimal cost required for detoxification of CGW biomass because of low hydrogen cyanide content of CGW biomass would seem to make this process very economical. From three liters of the CGW biomass hydrolysate obtained from hydrolysis with 0.3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, ethanol yield was 3.5 (v/v%) after yeast fermentation. However, although the process resulted in gainful utilization of CGW biomass, additional costs would be required to effectively dispose new by-products generated from CGW biomass processing.

  2. Biomass co-firing under oxy-fuel conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez, L.; Yin, Chungen; Riaza, J.

    2014-01-01

    to have favourable synergy effects in all the cases: it significantly improves the burnout and remarkably lowers NOx emissions. The reduced peak temperatures during co-firing can also help to mitigate deposition formation in real furnaces. Co-firing CO2-neutral biomass with coals under oxy-fuel conditions...... can achieve a below-zero CO2 emission if the released CO2 is captured and sequestered. The model-predicted burnout and gaseous emissions were compared against the experimental results. A very good agreement was observed, the differences in a range of ± 5–10% of the experimental values, which indicates...

  3. Towards a generic, reliable CFD modelling methodology for waste-fired grate boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko;

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used in industry for detailed understanding of the combustion process and for appropriate design and optimization of Waste–to–Energy (WtE) plants. In this paper, CFD modelling of waste wood combustion in a 13 MW grate-fired boiler in a WtE plant...... is presented. To reduce the risk of slagging, optimize the temperature control and enhance turbulent mixing, part of the flue gas is recycled into the grate boiler. In the simulation, a 1D in–house bed model is developed to simulate the conversion of the waste wood in the fuel bed on the grate, which provides...... of the increased CO2 and H2O vapour concentrations on radiative heat transfer in the boiler. The impacts of full buoyancy on turbulence are also investigated. As a validation effort, the temperature profiles at different ports inside the furnace are measured and the experimental values are compared with the CFD...

  4. The behavior of ash species in suspension fired biomass boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt

    technology a long range of research studies have been conducted, to improve our understanding of the influence and behavior of biomass ash species in suspension fired boilers. The fuel ash plays a key role with respect tooptimal boiler operation and influences phenomena’s as boiler chamber deposit formation......, corrosion of steam coils, deactivation of SCR catalysts and utilization of residual products. Abroad range of research tools as probe measurements on power plants, entrain flow reactorstudies and deposit modelling have been used to gain an improved understanding of ash transformation and ash deposit...... to generate ash particles typically in the size range of 50 to 200 μm on biomass suspension fired power plant boilers. A fragmentation rate of fuel particles of 3 have been used to describe both the residual ash formation process in laboratory entrained flow reactors and in full scale boilers.A range...

  5. Studies of gas flow in grate fired boilers. Studier av gasstroemning i rosteldade pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Jan (Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)); Tryman, R. (FOA, Tumba (SE))

    1991-01-22

    As a first step towards understanding the gas flow in a grate fired boiler, the isothermal flow in a water model has been studied. Laser-Doppler velocimetry of mean velocities and turbulence was performed in two coordinate directions at about 230 points. The FLUENT program was used for numerical calculations of the flow in the model, and an acceptable agreement with the measurements was achieved. (L.E.).

  6. Danish Experiences with Deposit Probe Measurements in Grate and Pulverized Fuel Biomass Power Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    Several measuring campaigns with focus on deposition behavior have been conducted at full-scale power plants firing biomass in Denmark. These campaigns have been reviewed in this work. The focus is the obtained experiences on deposit formation, shedding and chemistry. When comparing results from ...

  7. Particle Formation in Moving Grate Boilers Fired with Wood Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Bioenergy Technology; Pagels, Joalum; Szpila, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Swietlicki, Erik [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2005-07-01

    In this work the size resolved elemental particle concentration from five district heating moving grate boilers operating on different woody biofuels have been analysed in order to investigate the general formation mechanism in this kind of boiler. Aerosol particles were characterised in the five boilers operating on forest residues, pellets, or saw dust. The aerosol particles were sampled downstream of the multicyclone using a dilution system in order to decrease temperature and humidity. The proposed mechanism for formation of the fine mode is homogenous chemical reactions to form potassium sulphate, which nucleates to form the fine particle mode at high temperatures. The concentration profile of zinc indicates that zinc-containing species in some cases may form particles by gas-to particle conversion prior to the nucleation of potassium sulphate. As the flue gas temperature decrease below 650 C potassium chloride will condense on the surfaces of the previously formed particles. The proposed mechanism for inception of the coarse particle mode was fragmentation/dispersion of refractory material from the burning char or from the residual ash in the bed. The ratios of the potentially volatile elements potassium, sulphur and chlorine, were similar in the fine and the coarse mode, indicating the material had the same origin in both modes. The presence of the volatile components may be explained by non-complete vaporisation, chemical surface reactions, re-entrainment of deposited particles, and coagulation with the fine particle mode.

  8. Volumetric combustion of torrefied biomass for large percentage biomass co-firing up to 100% fuel switch

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The co-firing of biomass and coal plays an important role in increasing the biomass power capacity and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The challenges of the large percentage biomass co-firing (over 20% on energy basis) in existing pulverized coal boilers are keeping the same steam parameters and having a high boiler efficiency and a stable operating. The primary goal of this thesis is to develop a combustion concept for coal-fired boilers to enablea large percentage of biomass co-fir...

  9. SEM Investigation of Superheater Deposits from Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming; Hansen, Jørn;

    2004-01-01

    are adopted to minimize deposit problems at the two boilers. At Masnedø the final superheater steam temperature is 520 °C, no soot blowing of the superheaters is applied and a relatively large superheater area is used. At Ensted, an external wood-fired superheater is used in order to obtain a final steam...... temperature of 542 °C, while the steam exit temperature of the straw-fired boiler is 470 °C. The mature Masnedø deposit had a thickness of 2 to 15 centimeters and consisted of three distinct main layers. The thick intermediate layer was depleted in chlorine but rich in Si, K, and Ca. This Masnedø intermediate......Straw is used as fuel in relatively small-scale combined heat and power producing (CHP) grate boilers in Denmark. The large content of potassium and chlorine in straw greatly increases the deposit formation and corrosion of the superheater coils, compared to boilers firing coal. In this study...

  10. Thermodynamic Analyses of Biomass Gasification Integrated Externally Fired, Post-Firing and Dual-Fuel Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Soltani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the results are reported of the energy and exergy analyses of three biomass-related processes for electricity generation: the biomass gasification integrated externally fired combined cycle, the biomass gasification integrated dual-fuel combined cycle, and the biomass gasification integrated post-firing combined cycle. The energy efficiency for the biomass gasification integrated post-firing combined cycle is 3% to 6% points higher than for the other cycles. Although the efficiency of the externally fired biomass combined cycle is the lowest, it has an advantage in that it only uses biomass. The energy and exergy efficiencies are maximized for the three configurations at particular values of compressor pressure ratios, and increase with gas turbine inlet temperature. As pressure ratio increases, the mass of air per mass of steam decreases for the biomass gasification integrated post-firing combined cycle, but the pressure ratio has little influence on the ratio of mass of air per mass of steam for the other cycles. The gas turbine exergy efficiency is the highest for the three configurations. The combustion chamber for the dual-fuel cycle exhibits the highest exergy efficiency and that for the post-firing cycle the lowest. Another benefit of the biomass gasification integrated externally fired combined cycle is that it exhibits the highest air preheater and heat recovery steam generator exergy efficiencies.

  11. Numerical study of co-firing pulverized coal and biomass inside a cement calciner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulčić, Hrvoje; von Berg, Eberhard; Vujanović, Milan; Duić, Neven

    2014-07-01

    The use of waste wood biomass as fuel is increasingly gaining significance in the cement industry. The combustion of biomass and particularly co-firing of biomass and coal in existing pulverized-fuel burners still faces significant challenges. One possibility for the ex ante control and investigation of the co-firing process are computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The purpose of this paper is to present a numerical analysis of co-firing pulverized coal and biomass in a cement calciner. Numerical models of pulverized coal and biomass combustion were developed and implemented into a commercial CFD code FIRE, which was then used for the analysis. Three-dimensional geometry of a real industrial cement calciner was used for the analysis. Three different co-firing cases were analysed. The results obtained from this study can be used for assessing different co-firing cases, and for improving the understanding of the co-firing process inside the calculated calciner.

  12. The global Cretaceous-Tertiary fire: Biomass or fossil carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Iain; Guenther, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The global soot layer at the K-T boundary indicates a major fire triggered by meteorite impact. However, it is not clear whether the principal fuel was biomass or fossil carbon. Forests are favored by delta value of C-13, which is close to the average for trees, but the total amount of elemental C is approximately 10 percent of the present living carbon, and thus requires very efficient conversion to soot. The PAH was analyzed at Woodside Creek, in the hope of finding a diagnostic molecular marker. A promising candidate is 1-methyl-7-isopropyl phenanthrene (retene,), which is probably derived by low temperature degradation of abietic acid. Unlike other PAH that form by pyrosynthesis at higher temperatures, retene has retained the characteristic side chains of its parent molecule. A total of 11 PAH compounds were identified in the boundary clay. Retene is present in substantial abundance. The identification was confirmed by analysis of a retene standard. Retene is characteristic of the combustion of resinous higher plants. Its formation depends on both temperature and oxygen access, and is apparently highest in oxygen-poor fires. Such fires would also produce soot more efficiently which may explain the high soot abundance. The relatively high level of coronene is not typical of a wood combustion source, however, though it can be produced during high temperature pyrolysis of methane, and presumably other H, C-containing materials. This would require large, hot, low O2 zones, which may occur only in very large fires. The presence of retene indicates that biomass was a significant fuel source for the soot at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. The total amount of elemental C produced requires a greater than 3 percent soot yield, which is higher than typically observed for wildfires. However, retene and presumably coronene imply limited access of O2 and hence high soot yield.

  13. Gas turbines: gas cleaning requirements for biomass-fired systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Oakey

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest in the development of renewable energy technologies has been hencouraged by the introduction of legislative measures in Europe to reduce CO2 emissions from power generation in response to the potential threat of global warming. Of these technologies, biomass-firing represents a high priority because of the modest risk involved and the availability of waste biomass in many countries. Options based on farmed biomass are also under development. This paper reviews the challenges facing these technologies if they are to be cost competitive while delivering the supposed environmental benefits. In particular, it focuses on the use of biomass in gasification-based systems using gas turbines to deliver increased efficiencies. Results from recent studies in a European programme are presented. For these technologies to be successful, an optimal balance has to be achieved between the high cost of cleaning fuel gases, the reliability of the gas turbine and the fuel flexibility of the overall system. Such optimisation is necessary on a case-by-case basis, as local considerations can play a significant part.

  14. Combating corrosion in biomass and waste fired plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Pamela [Vattenfall AB, Stockholm (Sweden). Research and Development; Hjoernhede, Anders [Vattenfall AB, Gothenburg (Sweden). Power Consultant

    2010-07-01

    Many biomass- or waste-fired plants have problems with high temperature corrosion especially if the steam temperature is greater than 500 C. An increase in the combustion of waste fuels means that an increasing number of boilers have had problems. Therefore, there is great interest in reducing the costs associated with high temperature corrosion and at the same time there exists a desire to improve the electrical efficiency of a plant by the use of higher steam temperatures. Assuming that the fuel is well-mixed and that there is good combustion control, there are in addition a number of other measures which can be used to reduce superheater corrosion in biomass and waste fired plants, and these are described in this paper. These include the use of fuel additives, specifically sulphur-containing ones; design aspects like placing superheaters in less corrosive positions in a boiler, using tube shielding, a wider pitch between the tubes; operational considerations such as more controlled soot-blowing and the use of better materials. (orig.)

  15. Deactivation of SCR catalysts in biomass fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Kjærgaard

    and test new alkali resistant catalyst formulations, coatings and/or improved means of operation which can extend the life-time of SCR catalysts in biomass fired power plants. Plate-type V2O5-(WO3)/TiO2 SCR catalysts have been exposed to KCl and K2SO4 aerosols in a bench-scale reactor at 150, 300 or 350 °C...... for up to 600 hours. The activity of fresh and exposed catalysts was measured in the temperature range 250-400 °C in a laboratory-scale reactor. All samples exposed for more than 240 hours proved to have deactivated significantly, however, catalysts exposed at 150 °C showed higher remaining activity...... the deactivation rate, decreases if the particle size of the incoming aerosol is increased.The results obtained in this work indicate that the life-time of SCR catalysts used in biomass fired power plants can be improved by ensuring a high conversion of KCl to K2SO4 aerosols, by reducing the operating temperature...

  16. Comparative life cycle assessment of biomass co-firing plants with carbon capture and storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, Wouter; Meerman, Hans; Talaei, Alireza; Ramírez, Andrea; Faaij, André

    2014-01-01

    Combining co-firing biomass and carbon capture and storage (CCS) in power plants offers attractive potential for net removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. In this study, the impact of co-firing biomass (wood pellets and straw pellets) on the emission profile of power plants with carbo

  17. How does fire intensity and frequency affect miombo woodland tree populations and biomass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Casey M; Williams, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Miombo woodlands are the largest savanna in the world and dominate southern Africa. They are strongly influenced by anthropogenic fires and support the livelihoods of over 100 million people. Managing the fire regime of these flammable systems is difficult, but crucial for sustaining biodiversity, ecosystem services, and carbon stocks. Fire intensity is more easily manipulated than fire frequency, because suppression is expensive and ineffective. However, there are important issues relating fire intensity to impacts on woody vegetation that need to be understood to inform management approaches. Such impacts include the links between fire intensity, tree top-kill, resprouting, and regrowth rates. Here we present results from a fire experiment in Mozambican miombo; the results of a 50-year fire experiment in Zimbabwean miombo; and observations of forest structure at a dry-forest site in Mozambique. We synthesize these data with a process-based gap model of stem growth, regeneration, and mortality; this model explicitly considers the effect of different frequencies and intensities of fire. We use the model, tested against the field data, to explore the sensitivity of woodland tree populations and biomass to fire intensity and frequency. The fire experiments show that large (> 5 cm dbh) stems are vulnerable to fire, with top-kill rates of up to 12% in intense fires. In contrast to idealized physical representations of tree mortality, stems of > 10 cm dbh did not gain further protection from fire with increasing dbh. Resprouting was very common and not obviously linked to fire intensity. The modeling showed that miombo tree populations and biomass are very sensitive to fire intensity, offering opportunities for effective management. At any achievable fire return interval (fires are required to maintain observed biomass. Model predictions and field experiments show that no tree biomass can be sustained under annual fires.

  18. BENEFIT COST FOR BIOMASS CO-FIRING IN ELECTRICITY GENERATION: CASE OF UTAH, U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Keun Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Policy making regarding biomass co-firing is difficult. The article provides a benefit-cost analysis for decision makers to facilitate policy making process to implement efficient biomass co-firing policy. The additional cost is the sum of cost of the biomass procurement and biomass transportation. Co-benefits are sales of greenhouse gas emission credits and health benefit from reducing harmful air pollutants, especially particulate matter. The benefit-cost analysis is constructed for semi-arid U.S. region, Utah, where biomass supply is limited. Results show that biomass co-firing is not economically feasible in Utah but would be feasible when co-benefits are considered. Benefit-cost ratio is critically dependent upon biomass and carbon credit prices. The procedure to build the benefit-cost ratio can be applied for any region with other scenarios suggested in this study.

  19. Operating Experience from two new Biomass Fired FBC-Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolhar-Nordenkampf, M.; Tschanun, I.; Kaiser, S. [Austrian Energy and Environment AG, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-15

    The use of renewable fuels in industrial power plants is rising continuously. The driving forces are the Kyoto protocol for CO{sub 2} reduction resulting in government support for green power electricity, substitution of imported primary energy and multi-fuel concepts together with RDF. Biomass fuel exists in various forms, traditionally as wood, bark, harvesting residues sewage sludge and organic waste. A favourable combustion technology is Austrian Energy's 'ECOFLUID' bubbling fluidized bed. Advantageous is the principle of a substoichiometric bed operation which allows bed temperature control in the range between 650 deg C - 850 deg C. Therefore, also fuel with low ash melting temperature can be burned. The applied staged combustion concept results in a homogenous temperature profile in the furnace and first pass of the boiler and thus low NO{sub x} emission. One new plant, owned by Energie AG in Timelkam/Austria has been commissioned in winter 2005. The main fuel of this 57 t/h boiler is bark, wood residues and waste wood up to 30% of the total thermal capacity. Grinding dust and saw dust can be co-fired, too. Optionally, sludge and animal wastes can be fired. The boiler is designed for 42 barg at live steam temperature of 440 deg C. The other new 30 MW{sub th} plant, owned by M-real Hallein AG in Hallein/Austria has been commissioned in winter 2005, too. The boiler is fired with wood chips, bark, rejects and other paper mill residues and furthermore it is able to burn the sludge of the mills own waste water treatment plant. Beside the boiler works as a post combustion system for exhaust gases from a 1 MW Biogas Otto-Engine, or alternatively it is able to burn the biogas directly. The boiler is designed for 61 barg at live steam temperature of 450 deg C.

  20. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Bellmann; O. Creutzenberg; H. Ernst; H. Muhle [Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m{sup 3}. The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 {mu}m. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellmann, B; Creutzenberg, O; Ernst, H; Muhle, H, E-mail: bernd.bellmann@item.fraunhofer.d [Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Nikolai-Fuchs-Str.1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-02-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m{sup 3}. The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 mum. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide.

  2. Rat inhalation test with particles from biomass combustion and biomass co-firing exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann, B.; Creutzenberg, O.; Ernst, H.; Muhle, H.

    2009-02-01

    The health effects of 6 different fly ash samples from biomass combustion plants (bark, wood chips, waste wood, and straw), and co-firing plants (coal, co-firing of coal and sawdust) were investigated in a 28-day nose-only inhalation study with Wistar WU rats. Respirable fractions of carbon black (Printex 90) and of titanium dioxide (Bayertitan T) were used as reference materials for positive and negative controls. The exposure was done 6 hours per day, 5 days per week at an aerosol concentration of 16 mg/m3. The MMAD of all fly ash samples and reference materials in the inhalation unit were in the range from 1.5 to 3 μm. The investigations focused predominantly on the analysis of inflammatory effects in the lungs of rats using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology. Different parameters (percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), interleukin-8 and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung tissue) indicating inflammatory effects in the lung, showed a statistically significant increase in the groups exposed to carbon black (positive control), C1 (coal) and C1+BM4 (co-firing of coal and sawdust) fly ashes. Additionally, for the same groups a statistically significant increase of cell proliferation in the lung epithelium was detected. No significant effects were detected in the animal groups exposed to BM1 (bark), BM2 (wood chips), BM3 (waste wood), BM6 (straw) or titanium dioxide.

  3. Biomass burning emissions estimated with a global fire assimilation system based on observed fire radiative power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Kaiser

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFASv1.0 calculates biomass burning emissions by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP observations from the MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. It corrects for gaps in the observations, which are mostly due to cloud cover, and filters spurious FRP observations of volcanoes, gas flares and other industrial activity. The combustion rate is subsequently calculated with land cover-specific conversion factors. Emission factors for 40 gas-phase and aerosol trace species have been compiled from a literature survey. The corresponding daily emissions have been calculated on a global 0.5° × 0.5° grid from 2003 to the present. General consistency with the Global Fire Emission Database version 3.1 (GFED3.1 within its accuracy is achieved while maintaining the advantages of an FRP-based approach: GFASv1.0 makes use of the quantitative information on the combustion rate that is contained in the observations, and it detects fires in real time at high spatial and temporal resolution. GFASv1.0 indicates omission errors in GFED3.1 due to undetected small fires. It also exhibits slightly longer fire seasons in South America and North Africa and a slightly shorter fire season in Southeast Asia. GFASv1.0 has already been used for atmospheric reactive gas simulations in an independent study, which found good agreement with atmospheric observations. We have performed simulations of the atmospheric aerosol distribution with and without the assimilation of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD. They indicate that the emissions of particulate matter need to be boosted with a factor of 2–4 to reproduce the global distribution of organic matter and black carbon. This discrepancy is also evident in the comparison of previously published top-down and bottom-up estimates. For the time being, a global enhancement of the particulate matter emissions by 3.4 is recommended. Validation with independent AOD and PM10

  4. Recommendations for conversions of grate fired boilers to fluidising beds; Anvisningar foer konvertering av rosterpannor till fluidiserad baeddteknik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Lars; Ingman, Rolf [AaF Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    This report gives advice and recommendations for retrofitting of grate fired boilers to fluidising beds. Nine plants have been visited and experiences from these conversion projects have been gathered and analysed. Among the important points planning, fuel specification, heat balance calculations and clarifying of delivery limits can be mentioned. It is also important not to underestimate the need for education of the operational staff.

  5. Energy Analysis of a Biomass Co-firing Based Pulverized Coal Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The results are reported of an energy analysis of a biomass/coal co-firing based power generation system, carried out to investigate the impacts of biomass co-firing on system performance. The power generation system is a typical pulverized coal-fired steam cycle unit, in which four biomass fuels (rice husk, pine sawdust, chicken litter, and refuse derived fuel and two coals (bituminous coal and lignite are considered. Key system performance parameters are evaluated for various fuel combinations and co-firing ratios, using a system model and numerical simulation. The results indicate that plant energy efficiency decreases with increase of biomass proportion in the fuel mixture, and that the extent of the decrease depends on specific properties of the coal and biomass types.

  6. Additive for reducing operational problems in waste fired grate boilers; Additiv foer att minska driftproblem vid rostfoerbraenning av avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllenhammar, Marianne; Herstad Svaerd, Solvie; Davidsson, Kent; Hermansson, Sven; Liske, Jesper; Larsson, Erik; Jonsson, Torbjoern; Zhao, Dongmei

    2013-09-01

    The combustion of waste implies a risk for deposits and corrosion in different parts of the combustion facility. In recent years, research and tests have been performed in order to find ways to mitigate these problems in waste-fired plants. Most waste-fired plants in Sweden are grates whereas most of the research has been carried out in fluidized bed plants. The purpose of this project is to examine whether co-firing of sewage sludge and waste can reduce deposition and corrosion also in grate-fired boilers as has been shown in fludised beds. The objective is to determine the deposit growth and its composition as well as describing the initial corrosion attack. Representing sulphur-rich waste, elementary sulphur is also added to the waste and thereby compared with sludge as an additive. The target groups for this project are plant owners, researchers, consultants and authorities. Tests were performed in a 15 MWth waste-fired boiler with moving grate at Gaerstadverket, Tekniska Verken (Linkoeping). The boiler produces saturated steam of 17 bars and 207 deg C, and the normal fuel mixture contains of household and industry waste. The results show that co-firing with as heigh as 20 weight-% SLF (25 energy-%) was possible from an operational point of view, but the deposit rate increased especially at the two warmest positions. Generally the deposit rate was highest in the position closest to the boiler and decreased further downstream. During the tests a lot higher amount of SLF than normal was used (recommended mix is 5-10 % of SLF) this to be able to see effects of the different measures. Up to 23 weight-% of the rather moist sewage sludge was possible to fire when co-firing waste and SLF, without addition of oil. By adding sludge the deposit rate decreased but the increase upon adding SLF to ordinary waste was not totally eliminated. In the tests 'Avfall and SLF' the deposits were rich in chlorine. High concentrations of metal chlorides were found in the

  7. Alkali-activation potential of biomass-coal co-fired fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Shearer, C.R.; Provis, J.L.; Bernal, S.A.; Kurtis, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Co-fired fly ash, derived from the co-combustion of coal and biomass, is examined as a potential precursor for geopolymers. Compared to a coal fly ash, two co-fired fly ashes have a lower vitreous content and higher carbon content, primarily due to differing combustion processing variables. As a result, binders produced with these co-fired fly ashes have reduced reaction potential. Nevertheless, compressive strengths are generally highest for all ashes activated with solutions with a molar ra...

  8. Characterization and Quantification of Deposits Buildup and Removal in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of biomass as wood or straw in large suspension­fired boilers is an efficient method to reduce the use of fossil fuels consumption and to reduce the net CO2 formation. However, the presence of chlorine and alkali metals in biomass (straw) generate ash with a low melting point and indu...

  9. Post-Fire Changes in Forest Biomass Retrieved by Airborne LiDAR in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Yumie Sato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fire is one of the main factors directly impacting Amazonian forest biomass and dynamics. Because of Amazonia’s large geographical extent, remote sensing techniques are required for comprehensively assessing forest fire impacts at the landscape level. In this context, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR stands out as a technology capable of retrieving direct measurements of vegetation vertical arrangement, which can be directly associated with aboveground biomass. This work aims, for the first time, to quantify post-fire changes in forest canopy height and biomass using airborne LiDAR in western Amazonia. For this, the present study evaluated four areas located in the state of Acre, called Rio Branco, Humaitá, Bonal and Talismã. Rio Branco and Humaitá burned in 2005 and Bonal and Talismã burned in 2010. In these areas, we inventoried a total of 25 plots (0.25 ha each in 2014. Humaitá and Talismã are located in an open forest with bamboo and Bonal and Rio Branco are located in a dense forest. Our results showed that even ten years after the fire event, there was no complete recovery of the height and biomass of the burned areas (p < 0.05. The percentage difference in height between control and burned sites was 2.23% for Rio Branco, 9.26% for Humaitá, 10.03% for Talismã and 20.25% for Bonal. All burned sites had significantly lower biomass values than control sites. In Rio Branco (ten years after fire, Humaitá (nine years after fire, Bonal (four years after fire and Talismã (five years after fire biomass was 6.71%, 13.66%, 17.89% and 22.69% lower than control sites, respectively. The total amount of biomass lost for the studied sites was 16,706.3 Mg, with an average loss of 4176.6 Mg for sites burned in 2005 and 2890 Mg for sites burned in 2010, with an average loss of 3615 Mg. Fire impact associated with tree mortality was clearly detected using LiDAR data up to ten years after the fire event. This study indicates that fire disturbance

  10. The fire warning system of identical fiber Bragg grating and its application in petrochemical tank and tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ciming; Jiang, Desheng; Liao, Shenghui; Cheng, Hongbo

    2006-01-01

    A new fire warning system based on the technique of multiplexing of Identical Fiber Bragg Grating (IFBG) and its application in petrochemical tank and tower are presented in this paper. Sensors of IFBG can largely increase the multiplexing number of sensors and can reduce the cost of demodulation. The number of multiplexed FBG in the IFBG array has come to 100. The new fire warning system has been applied in some petrochemical tank and tower, such as Sinopec Zhenhai Refining and Chemical Company Limited, and has obtained a very good effect.

  11. Quantification of fuel moisture effects on biomass consumed derived from fire radiative energy retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alistair M. S.; Tinkham, Wade T.; Roy, David P.; Boschetti, Luigi; Kremens, Robert L.; Kumar, Sanath S.; Sparks, Aaron M.; Falkowski, Michael J.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite based fire radiant energy retrievals are widely applied to assess biomass consumed and emissions at regional to global scales. A known potential source of uncertainty in biomass burning estimates arises from fuel moisture but this impact has not been quantified in previous studies. Controlled fire laboratory experiments are used in this study to examine the biomass consumed and the radiant energy release (Fire Radiative Energy, FRE, (MJ)) for western white pine needle fuels burned with water content (WC, unitless) from 0.01 to 0.14. Results indicate a significant relationship: FRE per kilogram of fuel consumed = -5.32 WC + 3.025 (r2 = 0.83, n = 24, P FRE and fuel consumed can lead to systematic biases. A methodological framework to derive a revised formula that enables the estimation of biomass consumed from FRE, which explicitly takes into account fuel water content, is presented.

  12. Three-dimensional computer simulation for combustion and NO{sub x} emission in a grate fired boiler at Baeckhamars, Sweden. Technical report[(Baeckhammars Bruk)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Wei [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Metallurgy

    2000-05-01

    This report describes the fundament of mathematical modeling for the grate fired boilers in Part A, and presents the results from the numerical simulations for the flow pattern, combustion and NO{sub x} emission in the Baeckhammars grate fired boiler in Part B. The simulated boiler is equipped with a new secondary air supply system called Ecotube. The objective of this project is to develop and experimentally verify tools for computer simulations of solid biomass fuel combustion processes in a grate fired boiler. The work focuses on the numerical simulation using CFD technique and development of a NO{sub x} post processor. The unstructured mesh technique also has been used to discretize the boiler. An unstructured grid with total 284399 tetrahedral cells describes the three dimensional geometry and is used for flow field and combustion simulations. In order to simulate the combustion process in the boiler, a simplified grate bed model -- black-box bed model is used, which is based on the balance analysis of mass and energy on the grate bed and needless to consider any detailed and very difficult dynamic processes which have not been valuable by mathematical modeling on the grate bed yet. Therefore, it is quite convenient for industrial applications. In this work, both the cyanide route and the ammonia route for modeling the fuel containing nitrogen NO{sub x} are developed, and the former has been used to predict the NO generation in Baeckhammars bark boiler. Two 3D cases corresponding to 15 MW and 11 MW output thermal power respectively are simulated in detail. Results show that a new air supply system called Ecotube gives a considerably more uniform velocity, temperature and concentration distribution from the secondary air tubes to the upper part of the furnace. The upper furnace works almost as a 'plug flow reactor' which gives sufficient residence time for CO conversion and low NO{sub x} emission. The calculations of flow and mixing patterns in the

  13. Comparison of the energy and environmental performances of nine biomass/coal co-firing pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Ruhul; Kumar, Amit

    2012-11-01

    Life cycle energy and environmental performances of nine different biomass/coal co-firing pathways to power generation were compared. Agricultural residue (AR), forest residue (FR), and whole trees (WT) as feedstock were analyzed for direct (DC) and parallel co-firing (PC) in various forms (e.g., chip, bale and pellet). Biomass co-firing rate lies in the range of 7.53-20.45% (energy basis; rest of the energy comes from coal) for the co-firing pathways, depending on type of feedstock and densification. Net energy ratios (NER) for FR-, WT-, and AR-based co-firing pathways were 0.39-0.42, 0.39-0.41, and 0.37-0.38, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were 957-1004, 967-1014, and 1065-1083 kg CO(2eq)/MWh, acid rain precursor (ARP) emissions were 5.16-5.39, 5.18-5.41, and 5.77-5.93 kgSO(2eq)/MWh, and ground level ozone precursor (GOP) emissions were 1.79-1.89, 1.82-1.93, and 1.88-1.91 kg (NO(x)+VOC)/MWh, respectively. Biomass/coal co-firing life cycle results evaluated in this study are relevant for any jurisdiction around the world.

  14. Measurement of Electrical Conductivity for a Biomass Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mal Heron

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A controlled fire burner was constructed where various natural vegetation species could be used as fuel. The burner was equipped with thermocouples to measure fuel surface temperature and used as a cavity for microwaves with a laboratory quality 2- port vector network analyzer to determine electrical conductivity from S-parameters. Electrical conductivity for vegetation material flames is important for numerical prediction of flashover in high voltage power transmission faults research. Vegetation fires that burn under high voltage transmission lines reduce flashover voltage by increasing air electrical conductivity and temperature. Analyzer determined electrical conductivity ranged from 0.0058 - 0.0079 mho/m for a fire with a maximum temperature of 1240 K.

  15. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels; Montgomery, Melanie; Hede Larsen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. To avoid such high corrosion rates, woodchip...... has also been utilised as a fuel. Combustion of woodchip results in a smaller amount of ash, and potassium and chlorine are present in lesser amounts. However, significant corrosion rates were still seen. A case study of a woodchip fired boiler is described. The corrosion mechanisms in both straw...

  16. Physical characterization of biomass fuels prepared for suspension firing in utility boilers for CFD modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lasse; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    shapes. The sample is subdivided by straw type, and coherent size, type and mass distribution parameters are reported for the entire sample. This type of data is necessary in order to use CFD reliably as a design and retrofit tool for co-firing biomass with fossil fuels, as the combustion processes...

  17. High temperature corrosion under conditions simulating biomass firing: depth-resolved phase identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    Both cross-sectional and plan view, ‘top-down’ characterization methods were employed , for a depth-resolved characterization of corrosion products resulting from high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions simulating biomass firing. Samples of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG...

  18. Effect of Water Vapor on High-Temperature Corrosion under Conditions Mimicking Biomass Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming;

    2015-01-01

    The variable flue gas composition in biomass-fired plants, among other parameters, contributes to the complexityof high-temperature corrosion of materials. Systematic parameter studies are thus necessary to understand the underlyingcorrosion mechanisms. This paper investigates the effect of water...

  19. Corrosion and Materials Performance in biomass fired and co-fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, OH; Biede, O

    2003-01-01

    not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. In woodchip boilers, a similar corrosion rate and corrosion mechanism has on some occasions been observed. Co-firing of straw (10....... Results from 100% straw-firing, woodchip and co-firing of straw with coal will be reported. The corrosion mechanisms observed are summarized and the corrosion rates for 18-8 type stainless steels are compared....

  20. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore to combat chloride corrosion problems co-firing of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken...... appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 hours using 0-20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel of 10% straw + coal. After three years exposure in this environment......, the internal sulphidation is much more significant than that revealed in the demonstration project. Avedøre 2 main boiler is fuelled with wood pellets + heavy fuel oil + gas. Some reaction products due to the presence of vanadium compounds in the heavy oil were detected, i.e. iron vanadates. However, the most...

  1. Numerical modelling of a stoker furnace operated under indirect co-firing of biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litka Rafał

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the CFD analysis presented in this paper is the process of biomass indirect co-firing carried out in a system composed of a stoker-fired furnace coupled with a gasification reactor. The installation is characterised by its compact structure, which makes it possible to minimise heat losses to the environment and enhance the physical enthalpy of the oxidising agent – flue gases – having a favourable chemical composition with oxygen and water vapour. The test results provided tools for modelling of biomass thermal processing using a non-standard oxidiser in the form of flue gases. The obtained models were used to optimise the indirect co-combustion process to reduce emissions. An overall effect of co-combustion of gas from biomass gasification in the stoker furnace is the substantial reduction in NO emissions by about 22%.

  2. Experimental analysis of a combustion reactor under co-firing coal with biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Fabyo Luiz; Bazzo, Edson; Oliveira Junior, Amir Antonio Martins de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). LabCET], e-mail: ebazzo@emc.ufsc.br; Bzuneck, Marcelo [Tractebel Energia S.A., Complexo Termeletrico Jorge Lacerda, Capivari de Baixo, SC (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelob@tractebelenergia.com.br

    2010-07-01

    Mitigation of greenhouse gases emission is one of the most important issues in energy engineering. Biomass is a potential renewable source but with limited use in large scale energy production because of the relative smaller availability as compared to fossil fuels, mainly to coal. Besides, the costs concerning transportation must be well analysed to determine its economic viability. An alternative for the use of biomass as a primary source of energy is the co-firing, that is the possibility of using two or more types of fuels combined in the combustion process. Biomass can be co-fired with coal in a fraction between 10 to 25% in mass basis (or 4 to 10% in heat-input basis) without seriously impacting the heat release characteristics of most boilers. Another advantage of cofiring, besides the significant reductions in fossil CO{sub 2} emissions, is the reduced emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}. As a result, co-firing is becoming attractive for power companies worldwide. This paper presents results of some experimental analysis on co-firing coal with rice straw in a combustion reactor. The influence of biomass thermal share in ash composition is also discussed, showing that alkali and earth alkaline compounds play the most important role on the fouling and slagging behavior when co-firing. Some fusibility correlations that can assist in the elucidation of these behavior are presented and discussed, and then applied to the present study. Results show that for a biomass thermal share up to 20%, significant changes are not expected in fouling and slagging behavior of ash. (author)

  3. Exploiting the power law distribution properties of satellite fire radiative power retrievals: A method to estimate fire radiative energy and biomass burned from sparse satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. S.; Roy, D. P.; Boschetti, L.; Kremens, R.

    2011-10-01

    Instantaneous estimates of the power released by fire (fire radiative power, FRP) are available with satellite active fire detection products. The temporal integral of FRP provides an estimate of the fire radiative energy (FRE) that is related linearly to the amount of biomass burned needed by the atmospheric emissions modeling community. The FRE, however, is sensitive to satellite temporal and spatial FRP undersampling due to infrequent satellite overpasses, cloud and smoke obscuration, and failure to detect cool and/or small fires. Satellite FRPs derived over individual burned areas and fires have been observed to exhibit power law distributions. This property is exploited to develop a new way to derive FRE, as the product of the fire duration and the expected FRP value derived from the FRP power law probability distribution function. The method is demonstrated and validated by the use of FRP data measured with a dual-band radiometer over prescribed fires in the United States and by the use of FRP data retrieved from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) active-fire detections over Brazilian deforestation and Australian savanna fires. The biomass burned derived using the conventional FRP temporal integration and power law FRE estimation methods is compared with biomass burned measurements (prescribed fires) and available fuel load information reported in the literature (Australian and Brazilian fires). The results indicate that the FRE power law derivation method may provide more reliable burned biomass estimates under sparse satellite FRP sampling conditions and correct for satellite active-fire detection omission errors if the FRP power law distribution parameters and the fire duration are known.

  4. Fire and man - reconstructing Holocene biomass burning in the central European lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Elisabeth; Słowiński, Michał; Feurdean, Angelica; Dräger, Nadine; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Pieńczewska, Anna; Theuerkauf, Martin; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Fire is an important earth surface process that interacts with climate and vegetation and influences global biogeochemical cycles and carbon budget. Moreover, fire is tightly connected to the evolution and distributions of human beings. Especially in the humid vegetation zones that naturally do not inflame easily, fire has been the major tool to convert forests to arable land. In the central European lowlands, naturally dominated by broad-leaved forests, palaeofires were strongly related to human impact during at least the last 6000 years. Hence, the detection of past biomass burning in the sedimentological record points to human activity. Charcoal (black carbon) is the classical and widely-used proxy to reconstruct past fire histories. Abundant sedimentary charcoal records exist around the globe, and many are included in the Global Charcoal Database (GCD, www.gpwg.org). Molecular fire markers, on the other hand, are now being developed as new proxies to detect past biomass burning. This study reviews classical and "new" fire-proxies in peat and lake sediments that allow to reconstruct the signals of human impact on a regional scale in the central European lowlands with high temporal resolution. Furthermore, the charcoal records from the GCD and other sources covering the central European lowlands and adjacent areas were integrated in a spatial synthesis to document the current state-of-knowledge on regional Holocene fire history. We show preliminary charcoal data from the annually-laminated sediments of lakes Tiefer See (northeastern Germany) and Czechowskie (northern Poland). Links to reconstructed local and European-wide vegetation successions will be provided, as in times with dry climate and the dominance of a certain fire-prone vegetation cover (e.g., Pinus spec.), wildfires might have played a further important role. However, the interpretation of charcoal records is not always straightforward. Hence, we also discuss the potentials of other palaeofire

  5. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been...... corrosion mechanisms appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 h using 0–20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel mix of 10% strawþcoal. Based on results from a 3 years exposure...... in this environment, the internal sulphidation is much more significant than that revealed in the demonstration project. Avedøre 2 main boiler is fuelled with wood pelletsþheavy fuel oilþgas. Some reaction products resulting from the presence of vanadium compounds in the heavy oil were detected, i.e. iron vanadates...

  6. Fire in Ice: Glacial-Interglacial biomass burning in the NEEM ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zennaro, Piero; Kehrwald, Natalie; Zangrando, Roberta; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Earth is an intrinsically flammable planet. Fire is a key Earth system process with a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles, affecting carbon cycle mechanisms, land-surface properties, atmospheric chemistry, aerosols and human activities. However, human activities may have also altered biomass burning for thousands of years, thus influencing the climate system. We analyse the specific marker levoglucosan to reconstruct past fire events in ice cores. Levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) is an organic compound that can be only released during the pyrolysis of cellulose at temperatures > 300°C. Levoglucosan is a major fire product in the fine fraction of woody vegetation combustion, can be transported over regional to global distances, and is deposited on the Greenland ice sheet. The NEEM, Greenland ice core (77 27'N, 51 3'W, 2454 masl) documents past fire activity changes from the present back to the penultimate interglacial, the Eemian. Here we present a fire activity reconstruction from both North American and Eurasian sources over the last 120,000 yrs based on levoglucosan signatures in the NEEM ice core. Biomass burning significantly increased over the boreal Northern Hemisphere since the last glacial, resulting in a maximum between 1.5 and 3.5 kyr BP yet decreasing from ~2 kyr BP until the present. Major climate parameters alone cannot explain the observed trend and thus it is not possible to rule out the hypothesis of early anthropogenic influences on fire activity. Over millennial timescales, temperature influences Arctic ice sheet extension and vegetation distribution at Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and may have altered the distance between NEEM and available fuel loads. During the last Glacial, the combination of dry and cold climate conditions, together with low boreal insolation and decreased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may have also limited the production of available biomass. Diminished boreal forest extension and the southward

  7. Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

    2012-06-01

    There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40

  8. Logistics, Costs, and GHG Impacts of Utility-Scale Co-Firing with 20% Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichol, Corrie Ian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This study analyzes the possibility that biopower in the U.S. is a cost-competitive option to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In 2009, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted in the United States was equivalent to 5,618 million metric tons CO2, up 5.6% from 1990 (EPA 2011). Coal-fired power generation accounted for 1,748 million metric tons of this total. Intuitively, life-cycle CO2 emissions in the power sector could be reduced by substituting renewable biomass for coal. If just 20% of the coal combusted in 2009 had been replaced with biomass, CO2 emissions would have been reduced by 350 million metric tons, or about 6% of net annual GHG emission. This would have required approximately 225 million tons of dry biomass. Such an ambitious fuel substitution would require development of a biomass feedstock production and supply system tantamount to coal. This material would need to meet stringent specifications to ensure reliable conveyance to boiler burners, efficient combustion, and no adverse impact on heat transfer surfaces and flue gas cleanup operations. Therefore, this report addresses the potential cost/benefit tradeoffs of co-firing 20% specification-qualified biomass (on an energy content basis) in large U.S. coal-fired power plants. The dependence and sensitivity of feedstock cost on source of material, location, supply distance, and demand pressure was established. Subsequently, the dependence of levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) on feedstock costs, power plant feed system retrofit, and impact on boiler performance was determined. Overall life-cycle assessment (LCA) of greenhouse gas emissions saving were next evaluated and compared to wind and solar energy to benchmark the leading alternatives for meeting renewable portfolio standards (or RPS).

  9. Assessment of fire emission inventories during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriel; Siqueira, Ricardo; Rosário, Nilton E.; Longo, Karla L.; Freitas, Saulo R.; Cardozo, Francielle S.; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Wooster, Martin J.

    2016-06-01

    Fires associated with land use and land cover changes release large amounts of aerosols and trace gases into the atmosphere. Although several inventories of biomass burning emissions cover Brazil, there are still considerable uncertainties and differences among them. While most fire emission inventories utilize the parameters of burned area, vegetation fuel load, emission factors, and other parameters to estimate the biomass burned and its associated emissions, several more recent inventories apply an alternative method based on fire radiative power (FRP) observations to estimate the amount of biomass burned and the corresponding emissions of trace gases and aerosols. The Brazilian Biomass Burning Emission Model (3BEM) and the Fire Inventory from NCAR (FINN) are examples of the first, while the Brazilian Biomass Burning Emission Model with FRP assimilation (3BEM_FRP) and the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are examples of the latter. These four biomass burning emission inventories were used during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field campaign. This paper analyzes and inter-compared them, focusing on eight regions in Brazil and the time period of 1 September-31 October 2012. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT550 nm) derived from measurements made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) operating on board the Terra and Aqua satellites is also applied to assess the inventories' consistency. The daily area-averaged pyrogenic carbon monoxide (CO) emission estimates exhibit significant linear correlations (r, p > 0.05 level, Student t test) between 3BEM and FINN and between 3BEM_ FRP and GFAS, with values of 0.86 and 0.85, respectively. These results indicate that emission estimates in this region derived via similar methods tend to agree with one other. However, they differ more from the estimates derived via the alternative approach. The evaluation of MODIS AOT550 nm indicates that model simulation driven by 3BEM and FINN

  10. Tree diversity, composition, forest structure and aboveground biomass dynamics after single and repeated fire in a Bornean rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slik, J W Ferry; Bernard, Caroline S; Van Beek, Marloes; Breman, Floris C; Eichhorn, Karl A O

    2008-12-01

    Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent decades, however, tropical forest fires occur more frequently and at larger spatial scales than they used to. We studied forest structure, tree species diversity, tree species composition, and aboveground biomass during the first 7 years since fire in unburned, once burned and twice burned forest of eastern Borneo to determine the rate of recovery of these forests. We paid special attention to changes in the tree species composition during burned forest regeneration because we expect the long-term recovery of aboveground biomass and ecosystem functions in burned forests to largely depend on the successful regeneration of the pre-fire, heavy-wood, species composition. We found that forest structure (canopy openness, leaf area index, herb cover, and stem density) is strongly affected by fire but shows quick recovery. However, species composition shows no or limited recovery and aboveground biomass, which is greatly reduced by fire, continues to be low or decline up to 7 years after fire. Consequently, large amounts of the C released to the atmosphere by fire will not be recaptured by the burned forest ecosystem in the near future. We also observed that repeated fire, with an inter-fire interval of 15 years, does not necessarily lead to a huge deterioration in the regeneration potential of tropical forest. We conclude that burned forests are valuable and should be conserved and that long-term monitoring programs in secondary forests are necessary to determine their recovery rates, especially in relation to aboveground biomass accumulation.

  11. Effect of biomass on burnouts of Turkish lignites during co-firing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Dept., 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Co-firing of some low quality Turkish lignites with woody shells of sunflower seed was investigated via non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis method. For this purpose, Yozgat-Sorgun, Erzurum-Askale, Tuncbilek, Gediz, and Afsin-Elbistan lignites were selected, and burnouts of these lignites were compared with those of their blends. Biomass was blended as much as 10 and 20 wt.% of the lignites, and heating was performed up to 900 C at a heating rate of 40 C/min under dry air flow of 40 mL/min. This study revealed that the same biomass species may have different influences on the burnout yields of the lignites. Burnouts of Erzurum-Askale lignite increased at any temperature with the increasing ratio of biomass in the blend, whereas burnout yields of other lignites decreased to some extent. Nevertheless, the blends of Turkish lignites with sunflower seed shell did not behave in very different way, and it can be concluded that they are compatible in terms of burnouts for co-combustion in a combustion system. Although the presence of biomass in the lignite blends caused to some decreases in the final burnouts, the carbon dioxide neutral nature of biomass should be taken into account, and co-combustion is preferable for waste-to-energy-management. (author)

  12. Hybrid Combined Cycles with Biomass and Waste Fired Bottoming Cycle - a Literature Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Miroslav P.

    2002-02-01

    Biomass is one of the main natural resources in Sweden. The present low-CO{sub 2} emission characteristics of the Swedish electricity production system (hydro and nuclear) can be retained only by expansion of biofuel applications for energy purposes. Domestic Swedish biomass resources are vast and renewable, but not infinite. They must be utilized as efficiently as possible, in order to make sure that they meet the conditions for sustainability in the future. Application of efficient power generation cycles at low costs is essential for meeting this challenge. This applies also to municipal solid waste incineration with energy extraction, which should be preferred to its dumping in landfills. Hybrid dual-fuel combined cycle units are a simple and affordable way to increase the electric efficiency of biofuel energy utilization, without big investments, uncertainties or loss of reliability arising from complicated technologies. Configurations of such power cycles are very flexible and reliable. Their potential for high electric efficiency in condensing mode, high total efficiency in combined heat and power mode and unrivalled load flexibility is explored in this project. The present report is a literature study that concentrates on certain biomass utilization technologies, in particular the design and performance of hybrid combined cycle power units of various configurations, with gas turbines and internal combustion engines as topping cycles. An overview of published literature and general development trends on the relevant topic is presented. The study is extended to encompass a short overview of biomass utilization as an energy source (focusing on Sweden), history of combined cycles development with reference especially to combined cycles with supplementary firing and coal-fired hybrid combined cycles, repowering of old steam units into hybrid ones and combined cycles for internal combustion engines. The hybrid combined cycle concept for municipal solid waste

  13. Global Characterization of Biomass-Burning Patterns using Satellite Measurements of Fire Radiative Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles; Giglio, Louis; Wooster, Martin J.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing is the most practical means of measuring energy release from large open-air biomass burning. Satellite measurement of fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP) enables distinction between fires of different strengths. Based on a 1-km resolution fire data acquired globally by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites from 2000 to 2006, instanteaneous FRP values ranged between 0.02 MW and 1866 MW, with global daily means ranging between 20 and 40 MW. Regionally, at the Aqua-MODIS afternoon overpass, the mean FRP values for Alaska, Western US, Western Australia, Quebec and the rest of Canada are significantly higher than these global means, with Quebec having the overall highest value of 85 MW. Analysis of regional mean FRP per unit area of land (FRP flux) shows that a peak fire season in certain regions, fires can be responsible for up to 0.2 W/m(sup 2) at peak time of day. Zambia has the highest regional monthly mean FRP flux of approximately 0.045 W/m(sup 2) at peak time of day and season, while the Middle East has the lowest value of approximately 0.0005 W/m(sup 2). A simple scheme based on FRP has been devised to classify fires into five categories, to facilitate fire rating by strength, similar to earthquakes and hurricanes. The scheme uses MODIS measurements of FRP at 1-km resolution as follows: catagory 1 (less than 100 MW), category 2 (100 to less than 500 MW), category 3 (500 to less than 1000 MW), category 4 (1000 to less than 1500 MW), catagory 5 (greater than or equal to 1500 MW). In most regions of the world, over 90% of fires fall into category 1, while only less than 1% fall into each of categories 3 to 5, although these proportions may differ significantly from day to day and by season. The frequency of occurence of the larger fires is region specific, and could not be explained by ecosystem type alone. Time-series analysis of the propertions of higher category

  14. Ozone Tendency in Biomass Burning Plumes: Influence of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Emissions Downwind of Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, D.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    Forest fires emit pollutants that can influence downwind surface concentrations of ozone, with potential implications for exceeding air quality regulations. The influence of emissions from biogenic and anthropogenic sources that are mixed into a biomass burning plume as it travels downwind is not well understood. Using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry transport model and a novel method to track the centre of biomass burning plumes, we identify the chemical reactions that determine ozone production and loss along the plume trajectory. Using a series of sensitivity runs, we quantify the role of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions on the importance of individual chemical reactions. We illustrate the method using data collected during the BORTAS aircraft campaign over eastern Canada during summer 2011. We focus on two contrasting plume trajectories originating from the same multi-day fire in Ontario. The first plume trajectory on 16th July 2011 travels eastward from the fire and eventually mixes with anthropogenic emissions travelling up the east coast of the United States before outflow over the North Atlantic. The second plume trajectory we follow is three days later and travels eastward with a strong northeast component away from large anthropogenic sources. Both trajectories are influenced by downwind biogenic emissions. We generate a chemical reaction narrative for each plume trajectory, allowing is to quantify how mixing pyrogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic emissions influences downwind ozone photochemistry.

  15. High temperature corrosion during biomass firing: improved understanding by depth resolved characterisation of corrosion products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG), widely utilised as a superheater tube material in Danish power stations, was investigated to verify the corrosion mechanisms related to biomass firing. KCl coated samples were exposed isothermally to 560 degrees C...... changes within the near surface region (covering both the deposit and the steel surface). Such cross-section analysis was further complemented by plan view investigations (additionally involving X-ray diffraction) combined with removal of the corrosion products. Improved insights into the nature...... of the corrosion products as a function of distance from the deposit surface were revealed through this comprehensive characterisation. Corrosion attack during simulated straw-firing conditions was observed to occur through both active oxidation and sulphidation mechanisms....

  16. Suppression of dust explosions and ignition spots in biomass-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Rautalin, A.

    1995-12-31

    Dust explosion characteristics of forest residue dust both at normal pressure and at elevated initial pressure have been determined in previous studies. These indices give a good base for evaluating the usability of suppression systems to obtain a sufficient level of peritoneal safety in biomass fuel handling equipment. The objectives of this project were to evaluate the usability of suppression systems and to demonstrate dust explosion suppression at elevated initial pressure. Suppression tests at 1 - 20 bar pressure will be carried out in co-operation with CTDD of British Coal, Kiddy Fire Protection and Health and Safety Executive. The tests with coal and biomass dust are scheduled to be started in March 1996 in Great Britain. In the second task of the project, self-ignition properties of forest residue dust and straw dust have been measured in a flow-through system simulating slow drying of the fuel

  17. Suppression of dust explosions and ignition spots in biomass- fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Rautalin, A. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    Dust explosion characteristics of forest residue dust both at normal pressure and at elevated initial pressure have been determined in previous studies. These indices give a good base for evaluating the usability of suppression systems to obtain a sufficient level of operational safety in biomass fuel handling equipment. The objectives of this project were to evaluate the usability of suppression systems and to demonstrate dust explosion suppression at elevated initial pressure. Suppression tests at 1 - 20 bar pressure will be carried out in co-operation with CTDD of British Coal, Kiddy Fire Protection and Health and Safety Executive. The tests with coal and biomass dust are scheduled to be started in March 1996 in Great Britain. In the second task of the project, self-ignition properties of forest residue dust and straw dust have been measured in a flow-through system simulating slow drying of the fuel

  18. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-09-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to

  19. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash

  20. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  1. Analysis of Indirectly Fired Gas Turbine for Wet Biomass Fuels Based on commercial micro gas turbine data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Qvale, Einar Bjørn

    2002-01-01

    fueled by dry biomass assuming negligible pressure loss in the heat exchanger and the combustion chamber, the IFGT fueled with wet biomass (Wet IFGT) assuming no pressure losses, and finally both the Simple and the Wet IFGT incorporating typical data for pressure losses of commercially available micro......The results of a study of a novel gas turbine configuration is being presented. In this power plant, an Indirectly Fired Gas Turbine (IFGT), is being fueled with very wet biomass. The exhaust gas is being used to dry the biomass, but instead of striving to recover as much as possible of the thermal...

  2. Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds from coal-, coal gangue-, and biomass-fired power plants in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yulong; Yang, Chao; Peng, Lin; Li, Rumei; Bai, Huiling

    2016-10-01

    Face the large electricity demand, thermal power generation still derives the main way of electricity supply in China, account for 78.19% of total electricity production in 2013. Three types of thermal power plants, including coal-fired power plant, coal gangue-fired power plant and biomass-fired power plant, were chosen to survey the source profile, chemical reactivity and emission factor of VOCs during the thermal power generation. The most abundant compounds generated during coal- and coal gangue-fired power generation were 1-Butene, Styrene, n-Hexane and Ethylene, while biomass-fired power generation were Propene, 1-Butenen, Ethyne and Ethylene. The ratios of B/T during thermal power generation in this study was 0.8-2.6, which could be consider as the characteristics of coal and biomass burning. The field tested VOCs emission factor from coal-, coal gangue- and biomass-fired power plant was determined to be 0.88, 0.38 and 3.49 g/GJ, or showed as 0.023, 0.005 and 0.057 g/kg, with the amount of VOCs emission was 44.07, 0.08, 0.45 Gg in 2013, respectively. The statistical results of previous emission inventory, which calculated the VOCs emission used previous emission factor, may overestimate the emission amount of VOCs from thermal power generation in China.

  3. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising

  4. The influence of vegetation, fire spread and fire behaviour on biomass burning and trace gas emissions: results from a process-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thonicke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A process-based fire regime model (SPITFIRE has been developed, coupled with ecosystem dynamics in the LPJ Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, and used to explore spatial and temporal patterns of fire regimes and the current impact of fire on the terrestrial carbon cycle and associated emissions of trace atmospheric constituents. The model estimates an average release of 2.24 Pg C yr−1 as CO2 from biomass burning during the 1980s and 1990s. Comparison with observed active fire counts shows that the model reproduces where fire occurs and can mimic broad geographic patterns in the peak fire season, although the predicted peak is 1–2 months late in some regions. Modelled fire season length is generally overestimated by about one month, but shows a realistic pattern of differences among biomes. Comparisons with remotely sensed burnt-area products indicate that the model reproduces broad geographic patterns of annual fractional burnt area over most regions, including the boreal forest, although interannual variability in the boreal zone is underestimated. Overall SPITFIRE produces realistic simulations of spatial and temporal patterns of fire under modern conditions and of the current impact of fire on the terrestrial carbon cycle and associated emissions of trace greenhouse gases and aerosols.

  5. Development of a modeling approach to predict ash formation during co-firing of coal and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doshi, V. [School of Engineering, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Vuthaluru, H.B. [Curtin University of Technology, Kent Street, Bentley 6104, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Korbee, R. [HRL Technology, Ipswich, Queensland (Australia); Kiel, J.H.A. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    The scope of this paper includes the development of a modelling approach to predict the ash release behaviour and chemical composition of inorganics during co-firing of coal and biomass. In the present work, an advanced analytical method was developed and introduced to determine the speciation of biomass using pH extraction analysis. Biomass samples considered for the study include wood chips, wood bark and straw. The speciation data was used as an input to the chemical speciation model to predict the behaviour and release of ash. It was found that the main gaseous species formed during the combustion of biomass are KCl, NaCl, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Calculations of gas-to-particle formation were also carried out to determine the chemical composition of coal and biomass during cooling which takes place in the boiler. It was found that the heterogeneous condensation occurring on heat exchange surfaces of boilers is much more than homogeneous condensation. Preliminary studies of interaction between coal and biomass during ash formation process showed that Al, Si and S elements in coal may have a 'buffering' effect on biomass alkali metals, thus reducing the release of alkali-gases which act as precursors to ash deposition and corrosion during co-firing. The results obtained in this work are considered to be valuable and form the basis for accurately determining the ash deposition during co-firing. (author)

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies of the gas flow in grate-fired boilers; Studier av gasstroemning i rosteldade pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Jan; Tryman, R. [National Defense Research Establishment, Tumba (SE)

    1990-12-19

    In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the gas flow characteristics of a real boiler, the isothermal flow in a perspex water model of a 12 MW grate-fired boiler has been studied. Comparison between measured and calculated cold flow velocities were made. The model dimensions were 0.24 m width, 0.5 m length and 0.7 m height. The width of the boiler relative to other dimensions were such that the general flow pattern in the study has been treated as two-dimensional. Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV) measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity profiles including turbulent velocity components were carried out. Measurements were performed in about 230 positions. Numerical calculations were carried out with the fluid flow simulation program FLUENT. Two different grid sizes were used and the k-epsilon turbulence model as well as the Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) have been applied. Standard values of the model constants were used. Comparison between measured and calculated data show acceptable agreement. The mean velocities are qualitatively very well and quantitatively quite well predicted, meaning for example that the extent of the recirculation zones in the upper part of the boiler is quite correctly given by the calculations. For the turbulence quantities, the qualitative agreement is good, although quite large quantitative discrepancies exist. The results are, in the opinion of the authors, positive enough to motivate further efforts directed towards the modelling of the gas flow in the real boiler.

  7. Detailed investigation of Cl-corrosion initiated by deposits formed in biomass-fired boilers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, Flemming J.; Lith, S. van

    2009-10-15

    The aim was to investigate deposit-induced Cl-corrosion under well-controlled laboratory conditions, simulating the conditions in biomass-fired boilers. This has been done by exposing pieces of superheater tubes, covered by synthetic salts, at temperatures and gas mixtures simulating biomass-fired conditions. The corroded specimens have been studied in detail using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), in order to determine the corrosion rate, and to investigate the chemistry and morphology of the corrosive attack. The project has been divided into four activities: A1: Relationship between the Cl-concentration in the deposit, and the corrosion rate. A2: Influence of cation type (K+ and Na+) on the mobility of Cl in the deposit. A3: Influence of metal temperature on the corrosion rate. A4: Critical evaluation of the existing experience for minimizing corrosion in full-scale boilers firing totally or partly with biomass. (LN)

  8. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-05-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

  9. Appraisal of biomass combustion biomarkers to track the paleo-occurrence of forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Ruiz, P.; Cao, M.; Rosell Mele, A.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires influence many aspects of the Earth system, including ecosystem distribution, biodiversity, the carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry and climate. The challenge is disentangling the various controls of fire, partly because of their diversity, and also because fire was impossible to observe and analyse as a global phenomenon until the satellite era. The study of ancient climates can be helpful to understand the natural drivers of wildfires. However, the reconstruction of wildfires is limited by the nature of the proxies available, chiefly charcoal, which only represents a portion of the carbon combustion continuum. In here we evaluate the application molecular combustion biomarkers. For this purpose we have compiled an extensive collection of soils and lacustrine sediments representative of the humid to arid environments, which encompass the wide range of climates and ecosystems within the Iberian peninsula. We have measured the abundance of a monosaccharide anhydride (MA) biomarker called levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as general plant biomarkers such as n-alkanes. To discern between biogenic and/or anthropogenic combustion sources and the nature of fires we have investigated the use of levoglucosan, retene (PAH generated during combustion of conifer trees) and PAHs ratios such as phenantrane/anthracene and fluoranthene/pyrene. Charcoal (>150 microns) has also been measured in the lake samples to contribute in the assessment of local vs. regions fire signals. The final objective is to constrain the use of the molecular proxies as quantitative biomass combustion paleoproxies. The data obtained has been mapped and compared to the documented occurrence of wildfires in Spain over the last two decades, and mesoescale patterns of atmospheric circulation and particle transport. Results show that the occurrence of levoglucosan and PAHs is widespread in modern soils and sediments in Iberia. Chemical

  10. Quantifying Post-Fire Forest Biomass Recovery in Northeastern Siberia using Hierarchical Multi-Sensor Satellite Imagery and Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, L.; Beck, P. S.; Loranty, M. M.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Goetz, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Russian forests are the largest vegetation carbon pool outside of the tropics, with larch dominating northeastern Siberia where extreme temperatures, permafrost and wildfire currently limit persistence of other tree species. These ecosystems have experienced rapid climate warming over the past century and model simulations suggest that they will undergo profound changes by the end of the century if warming continues. Understanding the responses of these unique deciduous-conifer ecosystems to current and future climate is important given the potential changes in disturbance regimes and other climate feedbacks. The climate implications of changes in fire severity and return interval, as predicted under a warmer and drier climate, are not well understood given the trade-off between storage of C in forest biomass and post-fire surface albedo. We examined forest biomass recovery across a burn chronosequence near Cherskii, Sakha Republic, in far northeastern Siberia. We used high-quality Landsat imagery to date and map fires that occurred between 1972 and 2009, then complemented this data set using tree ring measurements to map older fires. A three stage approach was taken to map current biomass distribution. First, tree shadows were mapped from 50 cm panchromatic WorldView 1 imagery covering a portion of the region. Secondly, the tree shadow map was aggregated to 30 m resolution and used to train a regression-tree model that ingested mosaiced Landsat data. The model output correlated with allometry-based field estimates of biomass, allowing us to transform the model output to a map of regional aboveground biomass using a regression model. When combined with the fire history data, the new biomass map revealed a chronosequence of forest regrowth and carbon sequestration in aboveground biomass after fire. We discuss the potential for future carbon emissions from fires in northeastern Siberia, as well as carbon sequestration during recovery based on the observed biomass

  11. Corrosion Testing of Thermal Spray Coatings in a Biomass Co-Firing Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale use of biomass and recycled fuel is increasing in energy production due to climate and energy targets. A 40% cut in greenhouse gas emission compared to 1990 levels and at least a 27% share of renewable energy consumption are set in EU Energy Strategy 2030. Burning fuels with high content of corrosive species such as chlorine and heavy metals causes deterioration of boiler components, shortened lifetime, limited availability of a plant and hence higher maintenance and investment costs and lower thermal and economic efficiency. Coatings can be applied to protect the critical boiler components against high temperature corrosion. In this study, five thermal spray coatings were tested in an actual biomass co-firing boiler for 1300 h with a measurement probe. The coatings were analyzed after the exposure by metallographic means and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (SEM/EDX. The deposits formed on the specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence. At 550 °C, the coatings showed excellent corrosion performance compared to reference material ferritic steel T92. At 750 °C, tube material A263 together with NiCr and NiCrTi had the highest corrosion resistance. To conclude, thermal spray coatings can offer substantial corrosion protection in biomass and recycled fuel burning power plants.

  12. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  13. Co-firing biomass and coal-progress in CFD modelling capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Yin, Chungen

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of user defined FLUENT™ sub models to improve the modelling capabilities in the area of large biomass particle motion and conversion. Focus is put on a model that includes the influence from particle size and shape on the reactivity by resolving intra-particle...... particle conversion patterns. The improved model will impact the simulation capabilities of biomass fired boilers in the areas of thermal conditions, NOx formation and particle deposition behaviour.......This paper discusses the development of user defined FLUENT™ sub models to improve the modelling capabilities in the area of large biomass particle motion and conversion. Focus is put on a model that includes the influence from particle size and shape on the reactivity by resolving intra-particle...... gradients. The advanced reaction model predicts moisture and volatiles release characteristics that differ significantly from those found from a 0-dimensional model partly due to the processes occurring in parallel rather than sequentially. This is demonstrated for a test case that illustrates single...

  14. Simulation of emission performance and combustion efficiency in biomass fired circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, Afsin [Nigde University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    In this study, the combustion efficiency and the emission performance of biomass fired CFBs are tested via a previously published 2D model [Gungor A. Two-dimensional biomass combustion modeling of CFB. Fuel 2008; 87: 1453-1468.] against two published comprehensive data sets. The model efficiently simulates the outcome with respect to the excess air values, which is the main parameter that is verified. The combustion efficiency of OC changes between 82.25 and 98.66% as the excess air increases from 10 to 116% with the maximum error of about 8.59%. The rice husk combustion efficiency changes between 98.05 and 97.56% as the bed operational velocity increases from 1.2 to 1.5 m s{sup -1} with the maximum error of about 7.60%. CO and NO{sub x} emissions increase with increasing bed operational velocity. Increasing excess air results in slightly higher levels of NO{sub x} emission. A significant amount of combustion occurs in the upper zone due to the high volatile content of the biomass fuels. (author)

  15. Trapezoidal Numerical Integration of Fire Radiative Power (FRP) Provides More Reliable Estimation of Fire Radiative Energy (FRE) and so Biomass Consumption Than Conventional Estimation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyachandran, S. K.; Roy, D. P.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) [MW] is a measure of the rate of biomass combustion and can be retrieved from ground based and satellite observations using middle infra-red measurements. The temporal integral of FRP is the Fire Radiative Energy (FRE) [MJ] and is related linearly to the total biomass consumption and so pyrogenic emissions. Satellite derived biomass consumption and emissions estimates have been derived conventionally by computing the summed total FRP, or the average FRP (arithmetic average of FRP retrievals), over spatial geographic grids for fixed time periods. These two methods are prone to estimation bias, especially under irregular sampling conditions such as provided by polar-orbiting satellites, because the FRP can vary rapidly in space and time as a function of the fire behavior. Linear temporal integration of FRP taking into account when the FRP values were observed and using the trapezoidal rule for numerical integration has been suggested as an alternate FRE estimation method. In this study FRP data measured rapidly with a dual-band radiometer over eight prescribed fires are used to compute eight FRE values using the sum, mean and trapezoidal estimation approaches under a variety of simulated irregular sampling conditions. The estimated values are compared to biomass consumed measurements for each of the eight fires to provide insights into which method provides more accurate and precise biomass consumption estimates. The three methods are also applied to continental MODIS FRP data to study their differences using polar orbiting satellite data. The research findings indicate that trapezoidal FRP numerical integration provides the most reliable estimator.

  16. The influence from fuel properties on deposit growth in biomass fired boilers; Braensleegenskapernas inverkan paa benaegenheten till paaslag i biobraensleeldade pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graens, Hilde [ENA Kraft AB, Enkoeping (Sweden); Larfeldt, J. [TPS Termiska processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Experiences from laboratory scale investigations on deposit formation are reported in literature. Few investigations have been performed in large scale especially in grate fired boilers. The insufficient understanding of deposit formation mechanisms explains the lack of methods for deposit reduction. Two most important parameters for deposit prediction in biomass fired grate boilers is the combustion situation in the furnace and the fuel characteristics. The situation in the furnace follows from the operation of the boiler and the air supply, load and fluctuations. Important fuel characteristics are particle size distribution and moisture content. During the season 98/99 a sudden growth of deposits on the furnace walls and superheaters was detected in Ena Krafts boiler for heat and power production. This project aims at finding early indications from the operational system or from the fuel characteristics on such deposit growth in Ena Kraft boiler. Samples of fuel and ash were collected during 99/00 together with data from the operational system. The deposit growth were studied from a camera situated in the furnace and measured using a deposit probe. The probe indicated a deposit growth in the range of 4-20 mg/h. Correlations between the measured deposit growth and the boiler load and the furnace temperature were found. An increase in deposit growth can be explained by variations in fuel composition, particle size distribution, changing air distribution in furnace, vibrations of the grate and load changes. An evaluation of the most important factor/factors for deposit growth is possible only for cases of severe deposit growth, which unfortunately never occurred during this project. Procedures for collecting data has been developed during the project and it has been shown that: (1) the deposit probe is an accurate instrument for detecting deposit growth, (2) aerodynamic classification of the fuel particle distribution is appropriate for boilers with spreader feeding

  17. Pre-oxidation and its effect on reducing high-temperature corrosion of superheater tubes during biomass firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kvisgaard, M.; Montgomery, Melanie;

    2016-01-01

    Superheater tubes in biomass-fired power plants experience high corrosion rates due to condensation of corrosive alkali chloride-rich deposits. To explore the possibility of reducing the corrosion attack by the formation of an initial protective oxide layer, the corrosion resistance of pre-oxidis...

  18. The influence of vegetation, fire spread and fire behaviour on biomass burning and trace gas emissions: results from a process-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thonicke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A process-based fire regime model (SPITFIRE has been developed, coupled with ecosystem dynamics in the LPJ Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, and used to explore fire regimes and the current impact of fire on the terrestrial carbon cycle and associated emissions of trace atmospheric constituents. The model estimates an average release of 2.24 Pg C yr−1 as CO2 from biomass burning during the 1980s and 1990s. Comparison with observed active fire counts shows that the model reproduces where fire occurs and can mimic broad geographic patterns in the peak fire season, although the predicted peak is 1–2 months late in some regions. Modelled fire season length is generally overestimated by about one month, but shows a realistic pattern of differences among biomes. Comparisons with remotely sensed burnt-area products indicate that the model reproduces broad geographic patterns of annual fractional burnt area over most regions, including the boreal forest, although interannual variability in the boreal zone is underestimated.

  19. Fly Ash Formation during Suspension-Firing of Biomass. Effects of Residence Time and Fuel-Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work was to generate comprehensive data on the formation of residual fly ash during the initial stages of suspension-firing of biomass. Combustion experiments were carried out with pulverized biomass fuels (two straw fuels and two wood fuels), in an entrained flow reactor...... at 1200-1400 °C, simulating full-scale suspension-firing of biomass. By the use of a movable, cooled and quenched gas/particle sampling probe, samples were collected at different positions along the vertical axis in the reactor, corresponding to gas residence times ranging from 0.25 – 2.0s. The collected...... particles were subjected to various analyses, including char burnout level, particle size distribution, elemental composition, and particle morphology and composition. Furthermore, the transient release, i.e. the vaporization of the flame-volatile inorganic elements K, Cl and S, from the burning fuel...

  20. Retrieval of fire radiative power and biomass combustion using the Korean geostationary meteorological satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. S.; Lee, Y. W.

    2013-10-01

    Global warming induced by greenhouse gases is increasing wildfire frequencies and scale. Since wildfire again releases greenhouse gases(GHGs) into the air, the vicious cycle is repeated. Satellite remote sensing is a useful tool for detecting wildfire. However, estimating the GHGs emission from wildfire has not been challenged yet. Wildfires are estimated to be responsible for, on average, around 30% of global total CO emissions, 10% of methane emissions, 38% of tropospheric ozone, and over 86% of black carbon. So we need to quantify the emitted gases by biomass combustions, which can be measured by the FRP (fire radiative power) derived from the spectral characteristics of satellite sensors. This paper described the algorithm for retrieval of FRP using COMS(Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite), the Korean geostationary meteorological satellite. The FRP of wildfire is retrieved by single waveband methods suitable to COMS channels. The retrieval of FRP is dependent on the emissivity of each bandwidth. So, we used MODIS NDVI through a spatio-temporal calibration for the emissivity calculations. We made sure that the FRP in wildfire pixel is much higher than its spatially and temporally neighboring pixels. For future work, we should quantify the relationships between FRP and the biomass combustion according to fuel types.

  1. Study of a 30 MW bubbling fluidized bed combustor based on co-firing biomass and coal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hemant Kumar; S K Mohapatra; Ravi Inder Singh

    2015-06-01

    Today’s power generation sources are largely dependent on fossil fuels due to which the future sustainable development has become a challenge. A significant amount of the pollutant emissions such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide from the power sector is related to the use of fossil fuels for power generation. As the demand for electricity is growing rapidly, emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants from this sector can be expected to increase unless other alternatives are made available. Among the energy sources that can substitute fossil fuels, biomass fuels appear as one of the options with a high worldwide potential. In the Punjab region of India, Fluidized-bed combustion technology is being used for converting biomass into thermal energy and power generation in various small scale units. The investigation of biomass-based plant through experimental activities and numerical simulation is the scope of this study. The investigations were done at Captive Power Plant (CPP), Ambuja Cement Limited, a project of Holcim, District Ropar, India. During experimental investigations, the study of bed temperatures and steam temperatures at different zones has been done for coal fired and biomass fired combustors with 30% share. No clear effects of co-firing on boiler performance are observed. However, the operational behavior of the boiler in terms of bed temperature and stack emissions shows a different trend. During simulation, the contours of temperature have been obtained for both the boilers and the trends are found in agreement with real process.

  2. Oxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California Lightning Series fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Lelia N.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2010-11-01

    Submicron particles were collected from June to September 2008 in La Jolla, California to investigate the composition and sources of atmospheric aerosol in an anthropogenically-influenced coastal site. Factor analysis of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements revealed that the two largest sources of submicron organic mass (OM) at the sampling site were (1) fossil fuel combustion associated with ship and diesel truck emissions near the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and (2) aged smoke from large wildfires burning in central and northern California. During non-fire periods, fossil fuel combustion contributed up to 95% of FTIR OM, correlated to sulfur, and consisted mostly of alkane (86%) and carboxylic acid groups (9%). During fire periods, biomass burning contributed up to 74% of FTIR OM, consisted mostly of alkane (48%), ketone (25%), and carboxylic acid groups (17%), and correlated to AMS-derived factors resembling brush fire smoke, wood smoldering and flaming particles, and biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The two AMS-derived biomass burning factors were identified as oxygenated and hydrocarbon biomass burning aerosol on the basis of spectral similarities to smoldering and flaming smoke particles, respectively. In addition, the ratio of oxygenated to hydrocarbon biomass burning OM shows a clear diurnal trend with an afternoon peak, consistent with photochemical oxidation. Back trajectory analysis indicates that 2-4-day old forest fire emissions include substantial ketone groups, which have both lower O/C and lower m/ z 44/OM fraction than carboxylic acid groups. Air masses with more than 4-day old emissions have higher carboxylic acid/ketone group ratios, showing that atmospheric processing of these ketone-containing organic aerosol particles results in increased m/ z 44 and O/C. These observations may provide functionally-specific evidence for the type of chemical processing that is responsible for

  3. Ignition and combustion phenomena on a moving grate: with application to the thermal conversion of biomass and municipal solid waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijderveen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Combustion can be defined as a fast oxidation process of a solid, gaseous or liquid fuel at elevated temperatures. In any combustion process, ignition plays an essential role. Not only to initiate the combustion process, but also to maintain it. Especially in solid fuel combustion on a grate, where

  4. Closed-loop biomass co-firing in a laboratory reactor and in a full-scale boiler.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Bryan M. (University of California, Davis, CA); Williams, Robert B. (University of California, Davis, CA); Turn, Scott Q. (Hawaii Natural Energy Institute.); Jakeway, Lee A. (Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company); Blevins, Linda Gail

    2004-05-01

    Co-firing tests were conducted in a pilot-scale reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and in a boiler at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar factory at Puunene, Hawaii. Combustion tests were performed in the Sandia Multi-Fuel Combustor using Australian coal, whole fiber cane including tops and leaves processed at three different levels (milled only, milled and leached, and milled followed by leaching and subsequent milling), and fiber cane stripped of its tops and leaves and heavily processed through subsequent milling, leaching, and milling cycles. Testing was performed for pure fuels and for biomass co-firing with the coal at levels of 30% and 70% by mass. The laboratory tests revealed the following information: (1) The biomass fuels convert their native nitrogen into NO more efficiently than coal because of higher volatile content and more reactive nitrogen complexes. (2) Adding coal to whole fiber cane to reduce its tendency to form deposits should not adversely affect NO emissions. ( 3 ) Stripped cane does not offer a NO advantage over whole cane when co-fired with coal. During the field test, Sandia measured 0 2 , C02, CO, SO2, and NO concentrations in the stack and gas velocities near the superheater. Gas concentrations and velocities fluctuated more during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The mean 0 2 concentration was lower and the mean C02 concentration was higher during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. When normalized to a constant exhaust 0 2 concentration, mean CO concentration was higher and mean NO concentration was lower for biomass co-firing than for coal. The SO2 concentration tracked the use of Bunker C fuel oil. When normalized by the amount of boiler energy input, the amounts of NO and SO2 formed were lower during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The difference between NOx trends in the lab and in the field are most likely a result of less effective heat and mass transfer in the boiler. Particles were

  5. Increased electricity production from straw by co-firing with woody biomass; Oekad elproduktion med halm genom sameldning med traedbraenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedman, Henry; Nordgren, Daniel; Bostroem, Dan; Oehman, Marcus; Padban, Nader

    2011-01-15

    The use of straw in pulverised fuel-fired boiler is great technical challenge, especially when it comes to dealing with problems from slagging and fouling. Introduction of straw in the fuel mix of Swedish boilers will most likely be done by co-firing of woody biomass with straw, and this can provide a means to reduce the (well-documented) problems with fouling and slagging from straw. The project will focus on the faith of alkali metals (K and Na) as well as studies on the slagging and fouling propensity in pulverised fuel-fired boilers when straw is co-fired with woody biomass. A total of 5 different fuel mixtures has been fired in a 150 kW pilot-scale pulverised fuel-fired burner: (i) straw 100 %, (ii) straw/bark 50/50 %, (iii) straw/bark 75/25 % (iv) straw/wood 75/25 % (v) straw/wood 50/50 % (wt-%). The adding of woody biomass to straw has in all of the above-mentioned cases had some positive effect. In general, in all of the ash deposits, an increase in the concentration of Calcium (Ca) has been observed as well as a decrease in the concentrations of Potassium (K) and Silicon (Si). These general trends should be considered as a positive when combustion of straw is considered. Out of all ash deposits collected in the furnace, the characteristics of the bottom ash displayed the largest (positive) change and visual inspections and chemical analysis of the bottom ash showed that the ash had become more porous and contained more Calcium as more woody biomass was introduced in the fuel mix. The deposit build-up rate on the air cooled probes was reduced when more woody biomass was co-fired with straw. The reduction was highest in the trial where 50% woody biomass was used and the most apparent changes in composition could be seen in Calcium (increase) and Potassium (decrease). Danish experiences from introducing straw in pulverised fuel-fired boiler indicate that extra soot-blowers should be considered at the furnace walls and in connection to screen-tubes (if any

  6. Importance of transboundary transport of biomass burning emissions to regional air quality in Southeast Asia during a high fire event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouizerats, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Balasubramanian, R.; Betha, R.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke from biomass and peat burning has a notable impact on ambient air quality and climate in the Southeast Asia (SEA) region. We modeled a large fire-induced haze episode in 2006 stemming mostly from Indonesia using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem). We focused on the evolution of the fire plume composition and its interaction with the urbanized area of the city state of Singapore, and on comparisons of modeled and measured aerosol and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. Two simulations were run with WRF-Chem using the complex volatility basis set (VBS) scheme to reproduce primary and secondary aerosol evolution and concentration. The first simulation referred to as WRF-FIRE included anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning emissions from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED3) while the second simulation referred to as WRF-NOFIRE was run without emissions from biomass burning. To test model performance, we used three independent data sets for comparison including airborne measurements of particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10) in Singapore, CO measurements in Sumatra, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) column observations from four satellite-based sensors. We found reasonable agreement between the model runs and both ground-based measurements of CO and PM10. The comparison with AOD was less favorable and indicated the model underestimated AOD, although the degree of mismatch varied between different satellite data sets. During our study period, forest and peat fires in Sumatra were the main cause of enhanced aerosol concentrations from regional transport over Singapore. Analysis of the biomass burning plume showed high concentrations of primary organic aerosols (POA) with values up to 600 μg m-3 over the fire locations. The concentration of POA remained quite stable within the plume between the main burning region and Singapore while the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration

  7. Recovery of aboveground plant biomass and productivity after fire in mesic and dry black spruce forests of interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, M.C.; Treseder, K.K.; Manies, K.L.; Harden, J.W.; Schuur, E.A.G.; Vogel, J.G.; Randerson, J.T.; Chapin, F. S.

    2008-01-01

    Plant biomass accumulation and productivity are important determinants of ecosystem carbon (C) balance during post-fire succession. In boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) forests near Delta Junction, Alaska, we quantified aboveground plant biomass and net primary productivity (ANPP) for 4 years after a 1999 wildfire in a well-drained (dry) site, and also across a dry and a moderately well-drained (mesic) chronosequence of sites that varied in time since fire (2 to ???116 years). Four years after fire, total biomass at the 1999 burn site had increased exponentially to 160 ?? 21 g m-2 (mean ?? 1SE) and vascular ANPP had recovered to 138 ?? 32 g m-2 y -1, which was not different than that of a nearby unburned stand (160 ?? 48 g m-2 y-1) that had similar pre-fire stand structure and understory composition. Production in the young site was dominated by re-sprouting graminoids, whereas production in the unburned site was dominated by black spruce. On the dry and mesic chronosequences, total biomass pools, including overstory and understory vascular and non-vascular plants, and lichens, increased logarithmically (dry) or linearly (mesic) with increasing site age, reaching a maximum of 2469 ?? 180 (dry) and 4008 ?? 233 g m-2 (mesic) in mature stands. Biomass differences were primarily due to higher tree density in the mesic sites because mass per tree was similar between sites. ANPP of vascular and non-vascular plants increased linearly over time in the mesic chronosequence to 335 ?? 68 g m-2 y -1 in the mature site, but in the dry chronosequence it peaked at 410 ?? 43 g m-2 y-1 in a 15-year-old stand dominated by deciduous trees and shrubs. Key factors regulating biomass accumulation and production in these ecosystems appear to be the abundance and composition of re-sprouting species early in succession, the abundance of deciduous trees and shrubs in intermediate aged stands, and the density of black spruce across all stand ages. A better understanding of the controls

  8. The 1985 Biomass Burning Season in South America: Satellite Remote Sensing of Fires, Smoke, and Regional Radiative Energy Budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Min; Berendes, Todd A.; Welch, Ronald M.; Yang, Shi-Keng

    1998-01-01

    Using satellite imagery, more than five million square kilometers of the forest and cerrado regions over South America are extensively studied to monitor fires and smoke during the 1985 biomass burning season. The results are characterized for four major ecosystems, namely: (1) tropical rain forest, (2) tropical broadleaf seasonal, (3) savannah/grass and seasonal woods (SGW), and (4) mild/warm/hot grass/shrub (MGS). The spatial and temporal distribution of fires are examined from two different methods using the multispectral Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Local Area Coverage data. Using collocated measurements from the instantaneous scanner Earth Radiation Budget Experiment data, the direct regional radiative forcing of biomass burning aerosols is computed. The results show that more than 70% of the fires occur in the MGS and SGW ecosystems due to agricultural practices. The smoke generated from biomass burning has negative instantaneous net radiative forcing values for all four major ecosystems within South America. The smoke found directly over the fires has mean net radiative forcing values ranging from -25.6 to -33.9 W m(exp -2). These results confirm that the regional net radiative impact of biomass burning is one of cooling. The spectral and broadband properties for clear-sky and smoke regions are also presented that could be used as input and/or validation for other studies attempting to model the impact of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere system. These results have important applications for future instruments from the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. Specifically, the combination of the Visible Infrared Scanner and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and the combination of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and CERES instruments from the EOS morning crossing mission could provide reliable estimates of the direct radiative forcing of aerosols on a global scale

  9. Trace elements partitioning during co-firing biomass with lignite in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogebakan, Zuhal [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: zuhalgogebakan@hotmail.com; Selcuk, Nevin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: selcuk@metu.edu.tr

    2009-03-15

    This study describes the partitioning of 18 trace elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, Zn) and 9 major and minor elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Si, Ti) during co-firing of olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue with high sulfur and ash content lignite in 0.3 MW{sub t} Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor (ABFBC) test rig with limestone addition. Concentrations of trace elements in coal, biomass, limestone, bottom ash, cyclone ash and filter ash were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission and mass spectroscopy (ICP-OES and ICP-MS). Partitioning of major and minor elements are influenced by the ash split between the bottom ash and fly ash and that the major proportion of most of the trace elements (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Tl, V and Zn) are recovered in fly ash when firing lignite only. Co-firing lignite with biomass enhances partitioning of these elements to fly ash. Co-firing also shifts the partitioning of Cd, P, Sb and Sn from bottom to fly ash.

  10. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  11. Renew, reduce or become more efficient? The climate contribution of biomass co-combustion in a coal-fired power plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Jan H.; Benders, Rene M. J.; Moll, Henri C.; Pierie, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Within this paper, biomass supply chains, with different shares of biomass co-combustion in coal fired power plants, are analysed on energy efficiency, energy consumption, renewable energy production, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and compared with the performance of a 100% coal supply chain sc

  12. Experimental Investigation into the Combustion Characteristics on the Co-firing of Biomass with Coal as a Function of Particle Size and Blending Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lkhagvadorj, Sh; Kim, Sang In; Lim, Ho; Kim, Seung Mo; Jeon, Chung Hwan [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byoung Hwa [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Co-firing of biomass with coal is a promising combustion technology in a coal-fired power plant. However, it still requires verifications to apply co-firing in an actual boiler. In this study, data from the Thermogravimetric analyzer(TGA) and Drop tube furnace(DTF) were used to obtain the combustion characteristics of biomass when co-firing with coal. The combustion characteristics were verified using experimental results including reactivity from the TGA and Unburned carbon(UBC) data from the DTF. The experiment also analyzed with the variation of the biomass blending ratio and biomass particle size. It was determined that increasing the biomass blending ratio resulted in incomplete chemical reactions due to insufficient oxygen levels because of the rapid initial combustion characteristics of the biomass. Thus, the optimum blending condition of the biomass based on the results of this study was found to be 5 while oxygen enrichment reduced the increase of UBC that occurred during combustion of blended biomass and coal.

  13. Burnout model of a grate-firing waste incinerator for complete simulation of the combustion space; Abbrandmodell einer Muellrostfeuerung fuer eine vollstaendige Feuerraumsimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruell, F.; Kremer, H.; Wirtz, S. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl Energieanlagentechnik

    1998-09-01

    In the past few decades, grate firing has become an established technology for incineration of residual waste and other materials of the domestic waste type. Process control is difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of the waste which is also subject to seasonal and regional variations. In addition, the waste composition may change significantly as a result of recycling as required by new laws. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den letzten Jahrzehnten hat sich die Rostfeuerung fuer die thermische Entsorgung von Restmuell und hausmuellaehnlichem Gewerbemuell bewaehrt. Die Prozessfuehrung bzw. die Feuerfuehrung solcher Anlagen wird insbesondere durch die starke Heterogenitaet des Muells erschwert, der zusaetzlich jahreszeitlichen und regionalen Schwankungen unterliegt. Zudem kann es in der Zusammensetzung der einzelnen Abfallarten durch die Entnahme von Wertstoffen infolge der Umsetzung von gesetzlichen Vorschriften und Gesetzen - wie Abfallgesetz und Kreislaufwirtschaftsgesetz - zu signifikanten Verschiebungen kommen. (orig.)

  14. Cleaning of biomass derived product gas for engine applications and for co-firing in PC-boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E.; Staahlberg, P.; Laatikainen-Luntama, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies] [and others

    1997-10-01

    The conventional fluidized-bed combustion has become commercially available also to relatively small scale (5 MWe), but this technology has rather low power-to-heat ratio and consequently it`s potential is limited to applications where district or process heat is the main product. Thus, there seems to be a real need to develop more efficient methods for small-scale power production from biomass. Gasification diesel power plant is one alternative for the small-scale power production, which has clearly higher power-to-heat ratio than can be reached in conventional steam cycles. The main technical problem in this process is the gas cleaning from condensable tars. In addition to the diesel-power plants, there are several other interesting applications for atmospheric-pressure clean gas technology. One alternative for cost-effective biomass utilization is co-firing of biomass derived product gas in existing pulverized coal fired boilers (or other types of boilers and furnaces). The aim of the project is to develop dry gas cleaning methods for gasification-diesel power plants and for other atmospheric-pressure applications of biomass and waste gasification. The technical objectives of the project are as follows: To develop and test catalytic gas cleaning methods for engine. To study the removal of problematic ash species of (CFE) gasification with regard to co-combustion of the product gas in PC boilers. To evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of different small-scale power plant concepts based on fixed-bed updraft and circulating fluidized- bed gasification of biomass and waste. (orig.)

  15. The evolution of biomass-burning aerosol size distributions due to coagulation: dependence on fire and meteorological details and parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kimiko M.; Laing, James R.; Stevens, Robin G.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols have a significant effect on global and regional aerosol climate forcings. To model the magnitude of these effects accurately requires knowledge of the size distribution of the emitted and evolving aerosol particles. Current biomass-burning inventories do not include size distributions, and global and regional models generally assume a fixed size distribution from all biomass-burning emissions. However, biomass-burning size distributions evolve in the plume due to coagulation and net organic aerosol (OA) evaporation or formation, and the plume processes occur on spacial scales smaller than global/regional-model grid boxes. The extent of this size-distribution evolution is dependent on a variety of factors relating to the emission source and atmospheric conditions. Therefore, accurately accounting for biomass-burning aerosol size in global models requires an effective aerosol size distribution that accounts for this sub-grid evolution and can be derived from available emission-inventory and meteorological parameters. In this paper, we perform a detailed investigation of the effects of coagulation on the aerosol size distribution in biomass-burning plumes. We compare the effect of coagulation to that of OA evaporation and formation. We develop coagulation-only parameterizations for effective biomass-burning size distributions using the SAM-TOMAS large-eddy simulation plume model. For the most-sophisticated parameterization, we use the Gaussian Emulation Machine for Sensitivity Analysis (GEM-SA) to build a parameterization of the aged size distribution based on the SAM-TOMAS output and seven inputs: emission median dry diameter, emission distribution modal width, mass emissions flux, fire area, mean boundary-layer wind speed, plume mixing depth, and time/distance since emission. This parameterization was tested against an independent set of SAM-TOMAS simulations and yields R2 values of 0.83 and 0.89 for Dpm and modal width, respectively. The

  16. Evaluation of ash deposits during experimental investigation of co-firing of Bosnian coal with wooden biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smajevic, Izet; Kazagic, Anes [JP Elektroprivreda BiH d.d., Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Sarajevo Univ. (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The paper is addressed to the development and use different criteria for evaluation of ash deposits collected during experimental co-firing of Bosnian coals with wooden biomass. Spruce saw dust was used for the co-firing tests with the Kakanj brown coal and with a lignite blend consisted of the Dubrave lignite and the Sikulje lignite. The coal/biomass mixtures at 93:7 %w and at 80:20 %w were tested. Experimental lab-scale facility PF entrained flow reactor is used for the co-firing tests. The reactor allows examination of fouling/slagging behaviors and emissions at various and infinitely variable process temperature which can be set at will in the range from ambient to 1560 C. Ash deposits are collected on two non-cooled ceramic probes and one water-cooled metal surface. Six different criteria are developed and used to evaluate behavior of the ash deposits on the probes: ash deposit shape, state and structure, which are analyzed visually - photographically and optically by a microscope, rate of adhesion and ash deposit strength, analyzed by physic acting to the ash deposits, and finally deposition rate, determined as a mass of the deposit divided by the collecting area and the time of collecting. Furthermore, chemical composition analysis and AFT of the ash deposits were also done to provide additional information on the deposits. (orig.)

  17. Transboundary Transport of Biomass Burning Emissions in Southeast Asia and Contribution to Local Air Quality During the 2006 Fire Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouizerats, B.; van der Werf, G.; Balasubramanian, R.; Betha, R.

    2014-12-01

    Smoke from biomass and peat burning has a notable impact on ambient air quality and climate in the Southeast Asia (SEA) region. We modeled the largest fire-induced haze episode in the past decade (2006) that originated in Indonesia using WRF-Chem. Our study addressed 3 research questions: (1) Can the WRF-Chem model reproduce observations of both aerosol and CO concentrations in this complex region? (2) What is the evolution in the chemical composition of the aerosol fire plume during its atmospheric transport? and (3) What is the relative contribution of these fires to air quality in the urbanized area of the city-state of Singapore? To test model performance, we used three independent datasets for comparison (PM10 in Singapore, CO measurements in Sumatra, and AOD column observations from 4 satellite-based sensors). We found reasonable agreement of the model runs with ground-based measurements of both CO and PM10. However, the comparison with AOD was less favorable and indicated the model underestimated AOD. In the past, modeling studies using only AOD as a constraint have often boosted fire emissions to get a better agreement with observations. In our case, this approach would seriously deteriorate the difference with ground-based observations. Finally, our results show that about 21% of the total mass loading of ambient PM10 during the July-October study period in Singapore was due to the influence of biomass and peat burning in Sumatra, with an increased contribution during high burning periods. The composition of this biomass burning plume was largely dominated by primary organic carbon. In total, our model results indicated that during 35 days aerosol concentrations in Singapore were above the threshold of 50 μg m-3 day-1 (WHO threshold). During 17 days this deterioration was due to Indonesian fires, based on the difference between the simulations with and without fires. Local air pollution in combination with recirculation of air masses was probably the main

  18. EPICA Dome C ice core fire record demonstrates a major biomass burning increase over the past 500 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrwald, Natalie; Power, Mitchell; Zennaro, Piero; McWethy, David; Whitlock, Cathy; Zangrando, Roberta; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    Natural factors and human activity influence fire variability including changes in temperature and precipitation, increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, altering ignitions, vegetation cover and fuel availability. Ice cores archive chemical signatures of both past climate and fire activity, and understanding this interaction is increasingly important in a warming climate. The specific molecular marker levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-ß-D-glucopyranose) can only be produced by burning woody tissue at temperatures greater than 300°C. Levoglucosan is present in the fine fraction of smoke plumes, is transported distances of thousands of kilometers, is deposited on glacier surfaces, and is detectable in both polar and mountain ice cores providing an unambiguous fire history. Here, we present a high-resolution 10,000-year levoglucosan record in the EPICA Dome C (75°06'S, 123°21'E, 3233 masl) ice core and implications for determining natural and human-caused fire variability. A recent provocative hypothesis by Ruddiman suggests that humans may have had a significant impact on the Earth's climate thousands of years ago through carbon and methane emissions originating from biomass burning associated with early agriculture. This hypothesis is centered on the observation that atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane levels recorded in ice cores increased irrespective of insolation changes beginning 7,000 to 5,000 years before present. The EDC levoglucosan record does not demonstrate augmented fire activity at 5000 and/or 7000 years ago in the Southern Hemisphere. We are currently determining Holocene levoglucosan concentrations in the NEEM, Greenland (77°27' N; 51°3'W, 2454 masl) ice core to provide a Northern Hemisphere comparison at 5000 and/or 7000 years ago. The highest EDC Holocene fire activity occurs during the past 500 years. Mean levoglucosan concentrations between 500 to 10,000 BP are approximately 50 ppt, but rise to 300 ppt at present. This substantial increase is

  19. Fire in the Vegetation and Peatlands of Borneo, 1997-2007: Patterns, Drivers and Emissions from Biomass Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spessa, Allan; Weber, Ulrich; Langner, Andreas; Siegert, Florian; Heil, Angelika

    2010-05-01

    correlations are noticeably much weaker or absent in Sarawak and Sabah, and central Borneo, where little or no deforestation was observed. Emissions from biomass burning reflect fire activity, and that fires in the carbon-rich peats of southern Kalimantan dominate the emissions profile during the El Nino years of 1997-98, 2002, 2004 and 2006. Previous work in southern Amazon forests demonstrates that recurrent fires promote a change from tree-dominated to grass-dominated ecosystems which, in turn, promotes even more fires. We show that recurrent fire and deforestation are also linked as part of a similar positive feedback process in Kalimantan. Our results support the detailed field work undertaken in 1997-98 in East Kalimantan, and reinforce these findings across time and space. Emissions from fires in Kalimantan peatlands represent a serious perturbation in terms of forcing from trace gases and aerosols on regional and global climate. Several global and regional climate modelling studies have reported that equatorial SE Asia, including Borneo, will experience reduced rainfall in future decades. At the same time, demands for establishing pulp paper and palm oil plantations to replace native rainforests, especially on peatlands where tenure conflicts among land owners tend to be minimal, is forecast to increase. These joint scenarios imply even more fires and emissions in future. It is critical therefore that present efforts to mitigate emissions through reduced deforestation programs in the region works, otherwise the consequences will be disastrous.

  20. Assessment of the most adequate pre-treatments and woody biomass sources intended for direct co-firing in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Saloni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in replacing coal with woody biomass in co-firing plants for electrical power. A variety of pre-treatments can be used to make biomass more suitable for co-firing. This research presents a model that evaluates the delivered costs of various pre-treated biomass sources, electricity production costs, and constraints, and calculates a least cost mix. Results of the scenario presented indicate that wood chips are the most economical co-firing option for delivering biomass to direct-fired boilers. Apart from potential feeding and processing issues, the wood-chips options of forest residues present the lowest cost of electricity production for small-scale co-firing applications. From the options that will ensure minimum processing issues in the co-firing cycle, wood pellets from southern yellow pine represent the most economical choice. Based on coal displacement from the facility, torrefied wood pellets from southern yellow pine is a preferred option as compared to other choices evaluated. An alternative to torrefied wood pellets from southern yellow pine is dark torrefied Eucalyptus benthamii, providing similar electricity production costs while reducing coal utilization.

  1. Investigations on torrefied biomass for co-combustion in pulverised coal-fired furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alobaid, Falah; Busch, Jan-Peter; Stroehle, Jochen; Epple, Bernd [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. for Energy Systems and Technology

    2012-07-01

    The torrefaction process is a thermal treatment of raw biomass during the absence of oxygen at a temperature range between 200 to 300 C and at a residence time of 15 to 90 minutes under atmospheric pressure. Here, the released water and low calorific volatile components reduce the mass by approximately 30 % while the energy content of torrefied biomass decreases by about 10 %. Compared to raw biomass, torrefied biomass is easier to grind and has a high energy density similar to coal. The Institute for Energy Systems and Technology (EST) at the Technische Universitaet Darmstadt is currently researching the torrefaction process of biomass. The proposed model will be validated towards the measurements in the frame of a CFD simulation program. (orig.)

  2. CFD modeling of small biomass-fired boilers, second stage; CFD-modellering av mindre biobraenslepannor, etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loennermark, A. [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Leckner, B. [Chalmers Univ. of Techn., Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of the project is to study how the design of the gas combustion chamber in a small boiler for biomass affects the emissions and how computer simulations can be used to decrease harmful emissions. The aim of the first part of the project was to investigate how phenomena and processes, important for the combustion, depend on various parameters. Within the frame of that part the temperature distribution, the flow pattern and the mixing processes have been studied. In the second part the combustion and the different reactions have been studied. A number of well-equipped combustion experiments in a small biomass-fired boiler have also been conducted to obtain better information about the boundary conditions. The results have been used to verify the simulations. The gas combustion chamber of a modern boiler using down draught firing has been simulated by using two Computational Fluid Dynamics codes, SOFIE and FLUENT. The results from the simulations show that with literature values for the reaction parameters, the reaction rates are controlled by mixing. This means that the reactions are fast and all the CO and the hydrocarbons were consumed. By varying the activation energy, it is possible to reach data that are more comparable with experimental data. The effects of the bowl in the gas combustion chamber on the combustion and mixing are discussed. The effects of the temperature and the radiation are also presented.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: BIOMASS CO-FIRING IN INDUSTRIAL BOILERS--UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA operates the Environmental and Sustainable Technology Evaluation (ESTE) program to facilitate the deployment of innovative technologies through performance verification and information dissemination. This ESTE project involved evaluation of co-firing common woody bio...

  4. Ash Deposit Formation and Removal in a Straw and Wood Suspension-Fired Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    Utilization of biomass on large suspension-fired boilers is a potentially efficient method to reduce net CO2 emissions and reduce the consumption of fossil fuels. However, ash deposit formation on heat transfer surfaces may cuase operational problems and in severe cases lead to boiler stop...... and manual cleaning. Most studies on ash deposition and removal has been done on biomass grate boilers, while only limited data is available from biomass suspension-firing. The aim of this study was to investigate deposit mass uptake, heat uptake reduction, deposit characteristics, and deposit removal...... scale experimental studies conducted by CHEC indicated that there was not a big difference regarding final deposit mass uptake during straw suspension-firing and combustion on grate. The shedding (deposit removal) events were investigated when the nearby plant sootblower was shutdown. It was identified...

  5. Predicting the Effects of Woody Encroachment on Mammal Communities, Grazing Biomass and Fire Frequency in African Savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Izak P J; Prins, Herbert H T

    2015-01-01

    With grasslands and savannas covering 20% of the world's land surface, accounting for 30-35% of worldwide Net Primary Productivity and supporting hundreds of millions of people, predicting changes in tree/grass systems is priority. Inappropriate land management and rising atmospheric CO2 levels result in increased woody cover in savannas. Although woody encroachment occurs world-wide, Africa's tourism and livestock grazing industries may be particularly vulnerable. Forecasts of responses of African wildlife and available grazing biomass to increases in woody cover are thus urgently needed. These predictions are hard to make due to non-linear responses and poorly understood feedback mechanisms between woody cover and other ecological responders, problems further amplified by the lack of long-term and large-scale datasets. We propose that a space-for-time analysis along an existing woody cover gradient overcomes some of these forecasting problems. Here we show, using an existing woody cover gradient (0-65%) across the Kruger National Park, South Africa, that increased woody cover is associated with (i) changed herbivore assemblage composition, (ii) reduced grass biomass, and (iii) reduced fire frequency. Furthermore, although increased woody cover is associated with reduced livestock production, we found indigenous herbivore biomass (excluding elephants) remains unchanged between 20-65% woody cover. This is due to a significant reorganization in the herbivore assemblage composition, mostly as a result of meso-grazers being substituted by browsers at increasing woody cover. Our results suggest that woody encroachment will have cascading consequences for Africa's grazing systems, fire regimes and iconic wildlife. These effects will pose challenges and require adaptation of livelihoods and industries dependent on conditions currently prevailing.

  6. Predicting the Effects of Woody Encroachment on Mammal Communities, Grazing Biomass and Fire Frequency in African Savannas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izak P J Smit

    Full Text Available With grasslands and savannas covering 20% of the world's land surface, accounting for 30-35% of worldwide Net Primary Productivity and supporting hundreds of millions of people, predicting changes in tree/grass systems is priority. Inappropriate land management and rising atmospheric CO2 levels result in increased woody cover in savannas. Although woody encroachment occurs world-wide, Africa's tourism and livestock grazing industries may be particularly vulnerable. Forecasts of responses of African wildlife and available grazing biomass to increases in woody cover are thus urgently needed. These predictions are hard to make due to non-linear responses and poorly understood feedback mechanisms between woody cover and other ecological responders, problems further amplified by the lack of long-term and large-scale datasets. We propose that a space-for-time analysis along an existing woody cover gradient overcomes some of these forecasting problems. Here we show, using an existing woody cover gradient (0-65% across the Kruger National Park, South Africa, that increased woody cover is associated with (i changed herbivore assemblage composition, (ii reduced grass biomass, and (iii reduced fire frequency. Furthermore, although increased woody cover is associated with reduced livestock production, we found indigenous herbivore biomass (excluding elephants remains unchanged between 20-65% woody cover. This is due to a significant reorganization in the herbivore assemblage composition, mostly as a result of meso-grazers being substituted by browsers at increasing woody cover. Our results suggest that woody encroachment will have cascading consequences for Africa's grazing systems, fire regimes and iconic wildlife. These effects will pose challenges and require adaptation of livelihoods and industries dependent on conditions currently prevailing.

  7. Sustainable sources of biomass for bioremediation of heavy metals in waste water derived from coal-fired power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Richard J; Paul, Nicholas A; Hu, Yi; de Nys, Rocky

    2012-01-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals using dried algal biomass has been extensively described but rarely implemented. We contend this is because available algal biomass is a valuable product with a ready market. Therefore, we considered an alternative and practical approach to algal bioremediation in which algae were cultured directly in the waste water stream. We cultured three species of algae with and without nutrient addition in water that was contaminated with heavy metals from an Ash Dam associated with coal-fired power generation and tested metal uptake and bioremediation potential. All species achieved high concentrations of heavy metals (to 8% dry mass). Two key elements, V and As, reached concentrations in the biomass of 1543 mg.kg(-1) DW and 137 mg.kg(-1) DW. Growth rates were reduced by more than half in neat Ash Dam water than when nutrients were supplied in excess. Growth rate and bioconcentration were positively correlated for most elements, but some elements (e.g. Cd, Zn) were concentrated more when growth rates were lower, indicating the potential to tailor bioremediation depending on the pollutant. The cosmopolitan nature of the macroalgae studied, and their ability to grow and concentrate a suite of heavy metals from industrial wastes, highlights a clear benefit in the practical application of waste water bioremediation.

  8. Sustainable sources of biomass for bioremediation of heavy metals in waste water derived from coal-fired power generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Saunders

    Full Text Available Biosorption of heavy metals using dried algal biomass has been extensively described but rarely implemented. We contend this is because available algal biomass is a valuable product with a ready market. Therefore, we considered an alternative and practical approach to algal bioremediation in which algae were cultured directly in the waste water stream. We cultured three species of algae with and without nutrient addition in water that was contaminated with heavy metals from an Ash Dam associated with coal-fired power generation and tested metal uptake and bioremediation potential. All species achieved high concentrations of heavy metals (to 8% dry mass. Two key elements, V and As, reached concentrations in the biomass of 1543 mg.kg(-1 DW and 137 mg.kg(-1 DW. Growth rates were reduced by more than half in neat Ash Dam water than when nutrients were supplied in excess. Growth rate and bioconcentration were positively correlated for most elements, but some elements (e.g. Cd, Zn were concentrated more when growth rates were lower, indicating the potential to tailor bioremediation depending on the pollutant. The cosmopolitan nature of the macroalgae studied, and their ability to grow and concentrate a suite of heavy metals from industrial wastes, highlights a clear benefit in the practical application of waste water bioremediation.

  9. Chemical and physical properties of cyclone fly ash from the grate-fired boiler incinerating forest residues at a small municipal district heating plant (6MW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöykiö, R; Rönkkömäki, H; Nurmesniemi, H; Perämäki, P; Popov, K; Välimäki, I; Tuomi, T

    2009-03-15

    In Finland, the new limit values for maximal allowable heavy metal concentrations for materials used as an earth construction agent came into force in July 2006. These limit values are applied if ash is utilized, e.g. in roads, cycling paths, pavements, car parks, sport fields, etc. In this study we have determined the most important chemical and physical properties of the cyclone fly ash originating from the grate-fired boiler incinerating forest residues (i.e. wood chips, sawdust and bark) at a small municipal district heating plant (6 MW), Northern Finland. This study clearly shows that elements are enriched in cyclone fly ash, since the total element concentrations in the cyclone fly ash were within 0.2-10 times higher than those in the bottom ash. The total concentrations of Cd (25 mg kg(-1); d.w.), Zn (3630 mg kg(-1); d.w.), Ba (4260 mg kg(-1); d.w.) and Hg (1.7 mg kg(-1); d.w.) exceeded the limit values, and therefore the cyclone fly ash cannot be used as an earth construction agent. According to the leached amounts of Cr (38 mg kg(-1); d.w.), Zn (51 mg kg(-1); d.w.) and sulphate (50,000 mg kg(-1); d.w.), the cyclone fly ash is classified as a hazardous waste, and it has to be deposited in a hazardous waste landfill.

  10. Laboratory Investigations of Ni-Al Coatings Exposed to Conditions Simulating Biomass Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Duoli; Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2016-01-01

    Fireside corrosion is a key problem when using biomass fuels in power plants. A possible solution is to apply corrosion resistant coatings. The present paper studies the corrosion and interdiffusion behaviour of a Ni-Al diffusion coating on austenitic stainless steel (TP347H). Ni-Al coatings were...... prepared by electrolytic deposition of nickel followed by pack aluminizing performed at 650˚C. A uniform and dense Ni-Al coating with an outer layer of Ni2Al3 and an inner Ni layer was formed. Samples were exposed to 560°C for 168h in an atmosphere simulating biomass combustion. This resulted in localized...

  11. Probe Measurements of Ash Deposit Formation Rate and Shedding in a Biomass Suspension-Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share...

  12. Ash transformation and deposition behavior during co-firing biomass with sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Liang; Wu, Hao; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    to sewage sludge addition. However, the ash deposition propensity decreased significantly. In addition, the content of water soluble K and Cl in the deposits reduced as a result of sewage sludge addition. The results from present work suggest co-firing of sewage sludge could alleviate deposit formation...

  13. The domestication of fire: the relationship between biomass fuel, fossil fuel and burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertyn, R; Rode, H; Millar, A J W; Peck, M D

    2012-09-01

    Primitive man's discovery and use of fire had a tremendous impact on modern development. It changed lifestyles, and brought with it new fuel sources and cooking methods. It also introduced devastation, injury, pain, disfigurement, and loss of life, and the need to continuously develop management, training and prevention programs.

  14. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part I Straw firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, A; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plants. Straw has the advantage that it is a "carbon dioxide neutral fuel" and therefore environmentally acceptable. Straw combustion is associated with corrosion problems which are not encountered in coal...

  15. Modeling of ferric sulfate decomposition and sulfation of potassium chloride during grate‐firing of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Jespersen, Jacob Boll; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Ferric sulfate is used as an additive in biomass combustion to convert the released potassium chloride to the less harmful potassium sulfate. The decomposition of ferric sulfate is studied in a fast heating rate thermogravimetric analyzer and a volumetric reaction model is proposed to describe th...

  16. Influence of Prescribed Fire on Ecosystem Biomass, Carbon, and Nitrogen in a Pinyon Juniper Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyon and juniper woodland encroachment associated with climate change and land use history in the Great Basin is thought to provide offsets for carbon emissions. However, the largest pools of carbon in arid landscapes are typically found in soils, and aboveground biomass cannot be considered long ...

  17. Occupational exposure to gases, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds in biomass-fired power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumpponen, M; Rönkkömäki, H; Pasanen, P; Laitinen, J

    2013-01-01

    The combustion of fuels produces air pollutants in the form of gases, organic compounds, and particulate matter. However, although the environmental aspect of these agents has been examined, workers' exposure to them is still a neglected issue. The purpose of this study was to measure maintenance and ash removal workers' multiple exposures to gases, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during their work tasks in biomass-fired power plants. Our hygienic measurements revealed that carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, ammonia and sulfur dioxide were the most common gases that the workers were exposed to during their tasks. Their average concentrations were 0.45 ppm, 0.06 ppm, 0.11 ppm and 0.42 ppm, respectively. Phenanthrene and naphthalene were the most prominent PAHs. At the same sampling points, the most commonly found VOCs were aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons and turpentines. The calculated total PAH concentrations were less than 7% of benzo[a]pyrene's eight-hour occupational exposure limit, and the total VOC concentrations were below the Finnish reference value for the normal industrial level in all measured work tasks. The most evident health effect caused by multiple exposures to gases was upper respiratory track irritation, followed by the disruption of oxygen transport, and finally central nervous system disorders. We recommend powered air respirators with ABEK+P3 cartridges and carbon monoxide gas detectors as the minimum requirement for those working inside biomass-fired power plant boilers, and compressed air breathing apparatus as the best form of protection.

  18. Optimisation of the outburning of ash in grate-fired boilers by means of IR-sensors. Demonstration of the applicability of the method; Optimering av askutbraenning vid rosteldade anlaeggningar med hjaelp av IR-sensorer. Demonstration av teknikens tillaempbarhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudling, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-11-01

    The objective of the project was to demonstrate if it is possible by means of a continuous measurement of the fuel-bed temperature along the grate with infrared pyrometers, to optimise the burnout of the ash on the grate by controlling the air-supply. The tests were carried out at a refuse-fuel grate-fired boiler at Hoegdalen, Stockholm. To monitor the temperature of the fuel-bed, 5 pyrometers were installed. The signals from the pyrometers were connected to a PLC, by which the air dampers for the air-supply of the grate could be controlled. To avoiding 'long fire' with bad burnout the distribution of the air was changed when an increase in temperature was detected in the final burnout zone of the grate Results: * By using a slim encapsulation of the infrared sensor, it was possible to obtain such small dimensions of the pyrometer that it could be installed in the fin-wall between the water tubes., * By choosing a suitable installation point for the pyrometer and a good control of the flow and quality of the rinsing air it was possible to obtain a high availability for the pyrometers., * When an increase of the bed-temperature in the last roller zone, from the 500-600 deg C to the 600-700 deg C was detected, the amount of unburned residue in the ash increased from 2-5 % to 5-10 %. By monitoring the temperature of the fuel-bed in the burnout zone of the grate by means of IR-pyrometry, it was possible to indicate operation conditions with a poor burnout. Tests carried out with automatic control of the air supply to the burnout zone based on measured bed temperatures by IR-pyrometry were carried out. The distribution of the burnout air was performed in a manner that when an increase in bed temperature in the burnout zone was detected the amount of air to the last zone was increased and vice versa. During these tests the amount of unburned matter in the ash removed from the grate was 3.5 %, which shall be compared to 4.3 % which was obtained with manual

  19. Investigation of ash deposition in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor co-firing biomass with lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogebakan, Z.; Gogebakan, Y.; Selcuk, N.; Seliuk, E. [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-01-15

    This study presents the results from investigation of ash deposition characteristics of a high ash and sulfur content lignite co-fired with three types of biomass (olive residue, 49 wt%; hazelnut shell, 42 wt%; and cotton residue, 41 wt%) in 0.3 MWt Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig. Deposit samples were collected on all air-cooled probe at a temperature of 500{degree}C. Samples were analyzed by SEM/EDX and XRD methods. The results reveal that co-firing lignite with olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue show low deposition rates. High concentrations of silicon, calcium, sulfur, iron, and aluminum were found in deposit samples. No chlorine was detected in deposits. Calcium sulfate and potassium sulfate were detected as major and minor components of the deposits, respectively. High sulfur and alumina-silicate content of lignite resulted in formation of alkali sulfates instead of alkali chlorides. Therefore, fuel blends under consideration can be denoted to have low-fouling propensity.

  20. Investigation of ash deposition in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor co-firing biomass with lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogebakan, Zuhal; Gogebakan, Yusuf; Selçuk, Nevin; Selçuk, Ekrem

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the results from investigation of ash deposition characteristics of a high ash and sulfur content lignite co-fired with three types of biomass (olive residue, 49 wt%; hazelnut shell, 42 wt%; and cotton residue, 41 wt%) in 0.3 MW(t) Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig. Deposit samples were collected on an air-cooled probe at a temperature of 500 degrees C. Samples were analyzed by SEM/EDX and XRD methods. The results reveal that co-firing lignite with olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue show low deposition rates. High concentrations of silicon, calcium, sulfur, iron, and aluminum were found in deposit samples. No chlorine was detected in deposits. Calcium sulfate and potassium sulfate were detected as major and minor components of the deposits, respectively. High sulfur and alumina-silicate content of lignite resulted in formation of alkali sulfates instead of alkali chlorides. Therefore, fuel blends under consideration can be denoted to have low-fouling propensity.

  1. Superheater corrosion in biomass-fired power plants: Investigation of Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Carlsen, B; Biede, O

    2002-01-01

    condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. A test superheater was built into the straw......-fired Masnedø combined heat and power (CHP) plant to investigate corrosion at temperatures higher than that of the actual plant. The highest steam temperature investigated was 570°C. Various alloys of 12-22% chromium content were welded into this test loop. Their corrosion rates were similar and increased...... which had a similar composition to the tubes did not incur this type of corrosion. It is suggested that high temperature galvanic corrosion occurs due to the formation of molten chloride mixtures which serve as the electrolyte....

  2. Deposition and High-Temperature Corrosion in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Hanne Philbert

    This thesis describes the fate of potassium, chlorine, and sulfur in regard to deposition and corrosion problems in straw-fired boilers. Full-scale deposition studies at Rudkøbing CHP, Kyndby Power Station and Masnedø CHP revealed that straw may form massive deposits in the convective pass...... has only been detected in insignificant amounts in mature deposits in straw-fired boilers formed over months of operation.The corrosion of superheater tubes is closely connected to the material which are deposited on the surface and deposits containing potassium chloride can cause severe high......-temperature corrosion at elevated metal temperatures. Lab-scale corrosion experiments, where metal test elements were covered with synthetic potassium salts and real deposits and exposed to a simulated flue gas containing HCl(g) and SO2(g), provided information about the corrosion rate and corrosion mechanisms...

  3. ALTENER - Biomass event in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The publication contains the lectures held in the Biomass event in Finland. The event was divided into two sessions: Fuel production and handling, and Co-combustion and gasification sessions. Both sessions consisted of lectures and the business forum during which the companies involved in the research presented themselves and their research and their equipment. The fuel production and handling session consisted of following lectures and business presentations: AFB-NETT - business opportunities for European biomass industry; Wood waste in Europe; Wood fuel production technologies in EU- countries; new drying method for wood waste; Pellet - the best package for biofuel - a view from the Swedish pelletmarket; First biomass plant in Portugal with forest residue fuel; and the business forum of presentations: Swedish experiences of willow growing; Biomass handling technology; Chipset 536 C Harvester; KIC International. The Co-combustion and gasification session consisted of following lectures and presentations: Gasification technology - overview; Overview of co-combustion technology in Europe; Modern biomass combustion technology; Wood waste, peat and sludge combustion in Enso Kemi mills and UPM-Kymmene Rauma paper mill; Enhanced CFB combustion of wood chips, wood waste and straw in Vaexjoe in Sweden and Grenaa CHP plant in Denmark; Co-combustion of wood waste; Biomass gasification projects in India and Finland; Biomass CFB gasifier connected to a 350 MW{sub t}h steam boiler fired with coal and natural gas - THERMIE demonstration project in Lahti (FI); Biomass gasification for energy production, Noord Holland plant in Netherlands and Arbre Energy (UK); Gasification of biomass in fixed bed gasifiers, Wet cleaning and condensing heat recovery of flue gases; Combustion of wet biomass by underfeed grate boiler; Research on biomass and waste for energy; Engineering and consulting on energy (saving) projects; and Research and development on combustion of solid fuels

  4. Injection in the lower stratosphere of biomass fire emissions followed by long-range transport: a MOZAIC case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Cammas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a stratospheric injection by deep convection of biomass fire emissions over North America (Alaska, Yukon and Northwest Territories on 24 June 2004 and its long-range transport over the eastern coast of the United States and the eastern Atlantic. The case study is based on airborne MOZAIC observations of ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and water vapour during the crossing of the southernmost tip of an upper level trough over the Eastern Atlantic on 30 June and on a vertical profile over Washington DC on 30 June, and on lidar observations of aerosol backscattering at Madison (University of Wisconsin on 28 June. Attribution of the observed CO plumes to the boreal fires is achieved by backward simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART. A simulation with the Meso-NH model for the source region shows that a boundary layer tracer, mimicking the boreal forest fire smoke, is lofted into the lowermost stratosphere (2–5 pvu layer during the diurnal convective cycle at isentropic levels (above 335 K corresponding to those of the downstream MOZAIC observations. It is shown that the order of magnitude of the time needed by the parameterized convective detrainment flux to fill the volume of a model mesh (20 km horizontal, 500 m vertical above the tropopause with pure boundary layer air would be about 7.5 h, i.e. a time period compatible with the convective diurnal cycle. Over the area of interest, the maximum instantaneous detrainment fluxes deposited about 15 to 20% of the initial boundary layer tracer concentration at 335 K. According to the 275-ppbv carbon monoxide maximum mixing ratio observed by MOZAIC over Eastern Atlantic, such detrainment fluxes would be associated with a 1.4–1.8 ppmv carbon monoxide mixing ratio in the boundary layer over the source region.

  5. Injection in the lower stratosphere of biomass fire emissions followed by long-range transport: a MOZAIC case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Cammas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a stratospheric injection by deep convection of biomass fire emissions over North America (Alaska, Yukon and Northwest Territories on 24 June 2004 and its long-range transport over the eastern coast of the United States and the eastern Atlantic. The case study is done using MOZAIC observations of ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides (NOx+PAN and water vapour during the crossing of the southernmost tip of an upper level trough over the Eastern Atlantic on 30 June 03:00 UTC and 10:00 UTC and in a vertical profile over Washington DC on 30 June 17:00 UTC, and by lidar observations of aerosol backscattering at Madison (University of Wisconsin on 28 June. Attribution of the plumes to the boreal fires is achieved by backward simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART. A simulation with the Meso-NH model for the source region shows that a boundary layer tracer, mimicking the boreal forest fire smoke, is lofted into the lowermost stratosphere (2–5 pvu layer during the diurnal convective cycle. The isentropic levels (above 335 K correspond to those of the downstream MOZAIC observations. The parameterized convective detrainment flux is intense enough to fill the volume of a model mesh (20 km horizontal, 500 m vertical above the tropopause with pure boundary layer air in a time period compatible with the convective diurnal cycle, i.e. about 5 h. The maximum instantaneous detrainment fluxes deposited about 15–20% of the initial boundary layer tracer concentration at 335 K, which according to the 275-ppbv carbon monoxide maximum mixing ratio observed by MOZAIC over eastern Atlantic, would be associated with a 1.4–1.8 ppmv carbon monoxide mixing ratio in the boundary layer over the source region.

  6. Mechanistic Model for Ash Deposit Formation in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers. Part 2: Model Verification by Use of Full Scale Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    describes particle sticking or rebound by a combination of the description of (visco)elsatic particles impacting a solid surface and particle capture by a viscous surface. The model is used to predict deposit formation rates measured during tests conducted with probes in full-scale suspension-fired biomass...... of some physical parameters related to the description of surface capture are suggested. Based on these examinations of the model ability to describe observed deposit formation rates, the proposed model can be regarded as a promising tool for description of deposit formation in full-scale biomass......A model for deposit formation in suspension firing of biomass has been developed. The model describes deposit build-up by diffusion and subsequent condensation of vapors, thermoforesis of aerosols, convective diffusion of small particles, impaction of large particles and reaction. The model...

  7. Biomass uptake and fire as controls on groundwater solute evolution on a southeast Australian granite: aboriginal land management hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Dean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of groundwater and surface water is often considered to be dominated by water–rock interactions, particularly weathering; however, it has been increasingly realised that plant uptake can deplete groundwater and surface water of nutrient elements. Here we show, using geochemical mass balance techniques that at our study site in Southwest Victoria, Australia, water–rock interactions do not control the hydrochemistry. Instead the chemical species provided by rainfall are depleted by plant biomass uptake and exported, predominantly through fire. Regular landscape burning by Aboriginal land users is hypothesized to have caused the depletion of chemical species in groundwater for at least the past 20 000 yr by accelerating the export of elements that would otherwise have been stored within the local biomass. These findings are likely to be representative of southeast Australia, as well as similar climatic regions elsewhere in the globe, and contrast with Northern Hemisphere studies of groundwater and surface water chemistry, where water–rock interactions are the dominant hydrochemical control.

  8. Fire protection countermeasures of project of biomass cogeneration%生物质热电联产项目消防对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏丹; 付永涛

    2012-01-01

    The production process and main fire disaster of straw direct combustion power generation were introduced with the example of biomass cogeneration project. The fire protection measures were put forward from the accept of production process, fire protection layout, fire separation, evacuation, au to fire extinguishing facility and fire monitoring, accord to the process characteristics and fire protection requirement, to enhance the fire safely level of combined heal and power genera-lion project.%以某生物质秸秆直接燃烧热电联产工程为例,介绍秸秆直接燃烧发电的生产工艺及主要火灾危险.针对其工艺特点和消防需求,从生产过程、消防布局、防火分隔、疏散、自动灭火设施、火灾监控等方面提出消防安全对策,提高热电联产项目的消防安全水平.

  9. Occupational exposure at a contemplated Belarussian power plant fired with contaminated biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Fogh, C.L.; Roed, Jørn

    1999-01-01

    To meet the current demand in Belarus for remediation of the vast forest areas that were contaminated by the Chernobyl accident and at the same time establish a much needed energy production, applying contaminated forest biomass as fuel in special power plants is being considered. This paper...... focuses on the radiation doses that may be received by workers at such a power plant. By Monte Carlo modelling based on a Danish biofuel power plant design it was found that the highest dose rates within the power plant would be those to people standing near the fly ash silo, bottom ash containers and so...

  10. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B.

    1980-09-01

    All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  11. Detection of Biomass Fires and Tracking of Plumes in Southeast Brazil with S-Band Radars and TITAN Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Gerhard; Saraiva, Ernandes A.; Gomes, Ana M.; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Ramires, Thiago

    2013-04-01

    The S-band radars of the Meteorological Research Institute (IPMet) in Bauru and Presidente Prudente are situated within major sugar cane producing regions in the State of São Paulo, where the sugar cane is harvested from April until November, generally by burning sectors of the plantations prior to manual harvesting, resulting in large quantities of aerosols being emitted into the atmosphere, not only negatively affecting local towns, but also regions much further away. In the absence of rain during the dry winter season, the actual fires and subsequent plumes can be observed by IPMet's S-band Doppler radars within their 240 km quantitative ranges, deploying a special scanning cycle which was configured to provide a better vertical resolution up to the anticipated detectable top of the plumes (10 elevations from 10,0° down to 0,3°; resolution of 250 m in range and 1° in azimuth; 7,5 min per volume scan). During August 2010, a one-month multi-disciplinary pilot study was executed with two-fold objectives in two separate regions of the Bauru radar range: to verify the onset of the actual fire and quantify the combustion process and to characterize the effects of those emissions on the atmosphere. The TITAN (Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis and Nowcasting) Software was deployed to determine the intensity of the initial fire (based on radar reflectivity in dBZ), and subsequently the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the smoke plume and the velocity of dispersion. The thresholds used for tracking the smoke envelopes were 10 dBZ with a minimum volume of 2 km3, but the position and extent of already diluted plumes could be identified up to 100-150 km range at -6 dBZ. Samples of the biomass material were collected to characterize and quantify the fuel mass before and after burning, which could be related to the fire intensity and subsequent aerosol density of the smoke plume (experimental site ca 50 km east of Bauru). At another remote site (Ourinhos

  12. Occupational Exposure at a Contemplated Belarussian Power Plant Fired with Contaminated Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.G.; Fogh, C.L.; Roed, J

    1999-07-01

    To meet the current demand in Belarus for remediation of the vast forest areas that were contaminated by the Chernobyl accident and at the same time establish a much needed energy production, applying contaminated forest biomass as fuel in special power plants is being considered. This paper focuses on the radiation doses that may be received by workers at such a power plant. By Monte Carlo modelling based on a Danish biofuel power plant design it was found that the highest dose rates within the power plant would be those to people standing near the fly ash silo, bottom ash containers and so-called 'big bags' filled with fly ash waste. Inhalation doses were estimated to be low. External doses received while working at the power plant do not appear to be highly significant compared with the doses from environmental contamination in the area where the power plant is expected to be constructed. (author)

  13. Emissions of SO2, NO and N2O in a circulating fluidized bed combustor during co-firing coal and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-jun; Yang, Xue-min; Zhang, Lei; Ding, Tong-li; Song, Wen-li; Lin, Wei-gang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental investigations of the emissions of SO2, NO and N20 in a bench scale circulating fluidized bed combustor for coal combustion and co-firing coal and biomass. The thermal capacity of the combustor is 30 kW. The setup is electrically heated during startup. The influence of the excess air, the degree of the air staging, the biomass share and the feeding position of the fuels on the emissions of SO2, NO and N2O were studied. The results showed that an increase in the biomass shares resulted in an increase of the CO concentration in the flue gas, probably due to the high volatile content of the biomass. In co-firing, the emission of SO2 increased with increasing biomass share slightly, however, non-linear increase relationship between SO2 emission and fuel sulfur content was observed. Air staging significantly decreased the NO emission without raising the SO2 level. Although the change of the fuel feeding position from riser to downer resulted in a decrease in the NO emission level, no obvious change was observed for the SO2 level. Taking the coal feeding position R as a reference, the relative NO emission could significantly decrease during co-firing coal and biomass when feeding fuel at position D and keeping the first stage stoichiometry greater than 0.95. The possible mechanisms of the sulfur and nitrogen chemistry at these conditions were discussed and the ways of simultaneous reduction of SO2, NO and N20 were proposed.

  14. Emissions of SO2,NO and N2O in a circulating fluidized bed combustor during co-firing coal and biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jian-jun; YANG Xue-min; ZHANG Lei; DING Tong-li; SONG Wen-li; LIN Wei-gang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental investigations of the emissions of SO2, NO and N2O in a bench scale circulating fluidized bed combustor for coal combustion and co-firing coal and biomass. The thermal capacity of the combustor is 30 kW. The setup is electrically heated during startup. The influence of the excess air, the degree of the air staging, the biomass share and the feeding position of the fuels on the emissions of SO2, NO and N2O are studied. The results show that an increase in the biomass shares results in an increase of the CO concentration in the flue gas, probably due to the high volatile content of the biomass. In co-firing, the emission of SO2 increased with the increasing biomass share slightly however, non-linear increase relationship between SO2 emission and fuel sulfur content is observed. Air staging decreases the NO emission significantly without raising the SO2 level. Though change the fuel feeding position from riser to downer results in a decrease in the NO emission level, no obvious change is observed for the SO2 level. Taking the coal feeding position R as a reference, the relative NO emission can significantly decrease during co-firing coal and biomass when feeding fuel at position D and keeping the first stage stoichiometry greater than 0.95. The possible mechanisms of the sulfur and nitrogen chemistry at these conditions are discussed and the ways of simultaneous reduction of SO2, NO and N2O are proposed.

  15. Fireside Corrosion Behavior of HVOF and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings in Advanced Coal/Biomass Co-Fired Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T.; Dudziak, T.; Simms, N. J.; Nicholls, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a systematic evaluation of coatings for advanced fossil fuel plants and addresses fireside corrosion in coal/biomass-derived flue gases. A selection of four candidate coatings: alloy 625, NiCr, FeCrAl and NiCrAlY were deposited onto superheaters/reheaters alloy (T91) using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spraying. A series of laboratory-based fireside corrosion exposures were carried out on these coated samples in furnaces under controlled atmosphere for 1000 h at 650 °C. The tests were carried out using the "deposit-recoat" test method to simulate the environment that was anticipated from air-firing 20 wt.% cereal co-product mixed with a UK coal. The exposures were carried out using a deposit containing Na2SO4, K2SO4, and Fe2O3 to produce alkali-iron tri-sulfates, which had been identified as the principal cause of fireside corrosion on superheaters/reheaters in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The exposed samples were examined in an ESEM with EDX analysis to characterize the damage. Pre- and post-exposure dimensional metrologies were used to quantify the metal damage in terms of metal loss distributions. The thermally sprayed coatings suffered significant corrosion attack from a combination of aggressive combustion gases and deposit mixtures. In this study, all the four plasma-sprayed coatings studied performed better than the HVOF-sprayed coatings because of a lower level of porosity. NiCr was found to be the best performing coating material with a median metal loss of ~87 μm (HVOF sprayed) and ~13 μm (plasma sprayed). In general, the median metal damage for coatings had the following ranking (in the descending order: most to the least damage): NiCrAlY > alloy 625 > FeCrAl > NiCr.

  16. International seminar on biomass and fossil fuels co-firing in power plants and heating plants in Europe; Seminaire international sur la cocombustion de biomasse et d'energies fossiles dans les centrales electriques et les chaufferies en Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The aim of the European commission which has fixed to 12% the share of renewable energies in the total energy consumption up to 2010, is to develop the biomass sector. Co-firing is a solution that allows to increase significantly the use of biomass because it does not require important investments. Today, about 150 power plants in Europe use co-firing. An Altener project named 'Cofiring' has ben settled in order to bring together and analyze the European experience in this domain and to sustain and rationalize the design of future projects. The conclusions of this study, coordinated by VTT Energy and which involves CARMEN (Germany), CBE (Portugal), the Danish centre for landscape and planning, ITEBE (France), KOBA (Italy), SLU (Sweden), and EVA (Austria), were presented during this international seminar. (J.S.)

  17. Wood Pellet-Fired Biomass Boiler Project at the Ketchikan Federal Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomberlin, Gregg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Biomass boiler systems have existed for many years, but the technology has advanced in recent decades and can now provide automated and efficient operation for a relatively modest investment. Key advances in system monitoring and control allow for lower operating costs, since the control systems run all aspects of the boiler, including feed, load reduction and even tube cleaning. These advances have made such systems economical on a small scale in situations where inexpensive fuels like natural gas are not available. This creates an opportunity for building operators in remote, cold-climate locations to reduce the use of expensive fuels for heating buildings. GSA Region 10 installed the system at the federal building in Ketchikan, Alaska and submitted the project to the Green Proving Ground (GPG) program. GSA's GPG program contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the installation and the technology. The system serves as a demonstration to assess actual system efficiencies, as well as operating characteristics and financial benefits. In addition to installation and operational issues, the project team/researchers examined other issues, including fuel transportation costs, building energy savings, and overall economics.

  18. Historic global biomass burning emissions based on merging satellite observations with proxies and fire models (1750–2015)

    OpenAIRE

    Marle, Margreet J. E.; Kloster, Silvia; Magi, Brian I.; Marlon, Jennifer R.; Daniau, Anne-Laure; Field, Robert D.; Arneth, Almut; Forrest, Matthew; Hantson, Stijn; Kehrwald, Natalie M.; Knorr, Wolfgang; Lasslop, Gitta; Li,Fang; Mangeon, Stéphane; Yue, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Fires have influenced atmospheric composition and climate since the rise of vascular plants, and satellite data has shown the overall global extent of fires. Our knowledge of historic fire emissions has progressively improved over the past decades due mostly to the development of new proxies and the improvement of fire models. Currently there is a suite of proxies including sedimentary charcoal records, measurements of fire-emitted trace gases and black carbon stored in ice and firn, and visi...

  19. Determination of Optimized Parameters for the Flexible Operation of a Biomass-Fueled, Microscale Externally Fired Gas Turbine (EFGT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathhar Bdour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomass as a source of renewable energy is a promising solution for current problems in energy supply. Olive waste is considered as an interesting option, especially for Mediterranean countries. Within this paper, a microscale externally fired gas turbine (EFGT technology is presented as a decentralized power plant, within the range of 15 kWth, based on olive residues. It was modeled by Aspen Plus 8.6 software to provide a sufficient technical study for such a plant. Optimized parameters for pressure ratio and turbine air-mass flow have been mapped for several loads to provide information for process control. For all cases, mechanical output, efficiency curves, and back-work ratio have been calculated. Using this information, typical plant sizes and an example of power production are discussed. Additionally, achievable energy production from olive waste is estimated on the basis of this data. The results of this study show that such a plant has an electrical efficiency of 5%–17%. This variation is due to the examination being performed under several combustion temperatures, actual load, heat exchanger temperatures, and heat transfer efficiency. A cost estimation of the discussed system showed an estimated capital cost of 33,800 to 65,300 € for a 15 kWth system.

  20. Biomass burning impact on PM 2.5 over the southeastern US during 2007: integrating chemically speciated FRM filter measurements, MODIS fire counts and PMF analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Weber

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Archived Federal Reference Method (FRM Teflon filters used by state regulatory agencies for measuring PM2.5 mass were acquired from 15 sites throughout the southeastern US and analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, water-soluble ions and carbohydrates to investigate biomass burning contributions to fine aerosol mass. Based on over 900 filters that spanned all of 2007, levoglucosan and K+ were studied in conjunction with MODIS Aqua fire count data to compare their performances as biomass burning tracers. Levoglucosan concentrations exhibited a distinct seasonal variation with large enhancement in winter and spring and a minimum in summer, and were well correlated with fire counts, except in winter when residential wood burning contributions were significant. In contrast, K+ concentrations had no apparent seasonal trend and poor correlation with fire counts. Levoglucosan and K+ only correlated well in winter (r2=0.59 when biomass burning emissions were highest, whereas in other seasons they were not correlated due to the presence of other K+ sources. Levoglucosan also exhibited larger spatial variability than K+. Both species were higher in urban than rural sites (mean 44% higher for levoglucosan and 86% for K+. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF was applied to analyze PM2.5 sources and four factors were resolved: biomass burning, refractory material, secondary light absorbing WSOC and secondary sulfate/WSOC. The biomass burning source contributed 13% to PM2.5 mass annually, 27% in winter, and less than 2% in summer, consistent with other souce apportionment studies based on levoglucosan, but lower in summer compared to studies based on K+.

  1. First Characterization of Biomass Burning Smoke from Cooking Fires, Peat, Crop Residue and Other Fuels By High Resolution PTR-TOF Mass Spectrometry and FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C.; Veres, P. R.; Williams, J.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is a major influence on Earth's atmosphere, but for many fire-types the emissions have only been measured for a few species. For all types of BB, progress has been limited by a lack of information on the emissions of semi-volatile organic gases that are precursors for secondary aerosol and ozone. During the Fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4), the BB emissions from 158 laboratory fires were quantified by ~40 scientists for an assortment of globally relevant fuels including rarely sampled sources such as US and Asian crop residue; Indonesian and extratropical peat; and cooking fires in traditional and advanced stoves. In this work, we present the primary emissions of gas-phase non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) measured using an advanced Proton-Transfer-Reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) in tandem with measurements of other major emissions by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. We developed a composition and mass dependent sensitivity and best assignments for many observed peaks. The known and tentatively assigned peaks together account for ~80-96% of total observed NMOC mass. Much of the NMOC mass is rarely measured or previously unmeasured high molecular mass compounds including ringed aromatic hydrocarbons, phenolic compounds, and furans, which are all secondary organic aerosol precursors. Large air quality benefits are demonstrated for more advanced cooking technologies. This work produced globally relevant emission ratios and emission factors to better represent biomass burning in current atmospheric models.

  2. 生物质直燃发电机组性能测试与(火用)分析%PERFORMANCE TEST AND EXERGY ANALYSIS FOR BIOMASS DIRECTLY FIRED POWER GENERAOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晋宏师; 顾春伟

    2012-01-01

    Based on one 30MW biomass directly fired power plant with high temperature and pressure, the test on the biomass specially fired 130T/h boiler with water cooled vibrating grate was carried out under 6 different work conditions, the thermal efficiency was calculated and it was found that the main reason for efficiency deviation was higher temperature of flue gas and bad quality of the fuel. The 30MW condensed steam turbine was tested, the heat consumption was calculated and it was found that the more high heat consumption was mainly because of higher back pressure. The thermal efficiency of whole plant was calculated and it was shown that the efficiency rose when the unit output rate rose. The exergy analysis of real thermal cycle was carried out, and it was found that the exergy loss of heat transfer between flue gas and water with different temperature and combustion process were the most important factors.%以设计燃料为棉花秸秆的某30MW高温高压生物质直燃发电项目作为研究对象,在6个不同工况下,对额定蒸发量为130t/h的生物质燃烧专用水冷振动炉排锅炉进行测试,对锅炉热效率进行计算,发现锅炉热效率小于设计值的主要原因是排烟温度偏高和燃料成分差异.对30MW纯凝汽式汽轮机进行测试,对汽轮机热耗进行计算,发现汽轮机热耗小于设计值的主要原因是背压偏高.对全厂热效率进行计算,发现随着功率的增加,热效率呈增加趋势.对热力循环过程进行(火用)分析,发现在锅炉内的温差换热和燃烧环节(火用)损失最大.

  3. Tree diversity, composition, forest structure and aboveground biomass dynamics after single and repeated fire in a Bornean rain forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slik, J.W.F.; Bernard, C.S.; Beek, van M.; Breman, F.C.; Eichhorn, K.A.O.

    2008-01-01

    Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent

  4. Atmospheric CH4 and CO2 enhancements and biomass burning emission ratios derived from satellite observations of the 2015 Indonesian fire plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert J.; Boesch, Hartmut; Wooster, Martin J.; Moore, David P.; Webb, Alex J.; Gaveau, David; Murdiyarso, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The 2015-2016 strong El Niño event has had a dramatic impact on the amount of Indonesian biomass burning, with the El Niño-driven drought further desiccating the already-drier-than-normal landscapes that are the result of decades of peatland draining, widespread deforestation, anthropogenically driven forest degradation and previous large fire events. It is expected that the 2015-2016 Indonesian fires will have emitted globally significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere, as did previous El Niño-driven fires in the region. The form which the carbon released from the combustion of the vegetation and peat soils takes has a strong bearing on its atmospheric chemistry and climatological impacts. Typically, burning in tropical forests and especially in peatlands is expected to involve a much higher proportion of smouldering combustion than the more flaming-characterised fires that occur in fine-fuel-dominated environments such as grasslands, consequently producing significantly more CH4 (and CO) per unit of fuel burned. However, currently there have been no aircraft campaigns sampling Indonesian fire plumes, and very few ground-based field campaigns (none during El Niño), so our understanding of the large-scale chemical composition of these extremely significant fire plumes is surprisingly poor compared to, for example, those of southern Africa or the Amazon.Here, for the first time, we use satellite observations of CH4 and CO2 from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) made in large-scale plumes from the 2015 El Niño-driven Indonesian fires to probe aspects of their chemical composition. We demonstrate significant modifications in the concentration of these species in the regional atmosphere around Indonesia, due to the fire emissions.Using CO and fire radiative power (FRP) data from the Copernicus Atmosphere Service, we identify fire-affected GOSAT soundings and show that peaks in fire activity are followed by subsequent large

  5. Operation related on-line measurements of low temperature fire side corrosion during co-combustion of biomass and oil; Driftrelaterad direktmaetning av laagtemperaturkorrosion i en braensleeldad kraftvaermeanlaeggning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Thomas [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-05-01

    A number of combustion plants have experienced corrosion attack on air preheaters and economisers when fired with biomass fuels. In certain plants the problems are great and reconstruction has been performed so that exposed components can be exchanged during operation. The electrochemical techniques offer on-line measurements of the changes in corrosion rate in the low temperature region in a waste incinerator. The purpose with this study was to evaluate the technique in a biomass fired boiler where the corrosion rate is considerable lower compared to a waste incinerator. Experiments were performed at the Haesselby plant, boiler 3, which was fired with pure biomass as well as a mixture of biomass and oil during the test period. It was found that the electrochemical technique is a useful tool for on-line measurements of the changes in corrosion rate in biomass fired utilities. Since the corrosion rate in the low temperature region is dependent on the boiler construction, electrochemical measurements give valuable information on the corrosion rate during optimisation of the fuel mixture, SNCR and temperature or the low temperature components. This is of special importance when introducing new fuels or fuel mixtures. Soot blowing is of prime importance for the total corrosion. During a few minutes an individual soot blower can initiate such a high corrosion rate that it represents the total corrosion. The material temperature is another important parameter. Above a certain temperature the corrosion rate is negligible. During co-combustion this temperature was found to be in the region 65-85 deg C. The influence of the SNCR with ammonia, with respect to corrosion, is dependent on the fuel mixture used. In utilities where acidic combustion products are formed, ammonia has a neutralising effect e.g. in Hoegdalen. At the Haesselby plant this neutralising effect was not found. During cocombustion with oil the ammonia forms ammoniahydrosulphate which increases the corrosion

  6. A New Agro/Forestry Residues Co-Firing Model in a Large Pulverized Coal Furnace: Technical and Economic Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shien Hui

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the existing biomass co-firing technologies and the known innate drawbacks of dedicated biomass firing, including slagging, corrosion and the dependence on fuel, a new model of agro/forestry residue pellets/shreds and coal co-fired in a large Pulverized Coal (PC furnace was proposed, and the corresponding technical and economic assessments were performed by co-firing testing in a 300 MW PC furnace and discounted cash flow technique. The developed model is more dependent on injection co-firing and combined with co-milling co-firing. Co-firing not only reduces CO2 emission, but also does not significantly affect the fly ash use in cement industry, construction industry and agriculture. Moreover, economic assessments show that in comparison with dedicated firing in grate furnace, agro/forestry residues and coal co-firing in a large PC furnace is highly economic. Otherwise, when the co-firing ratio was below 5 wt%, the boiler co-firing efficiency was 0.05%–0.31% higher than that of dedicated PC combustion, and boiler efficiencies were about 0.2% higher with agro/forestry residues co-firing in the bottom and top burner systems than that in a middle burner system.

  7. CFD simulation of wood chip combustion on a grate using an Euler-Euler approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, D.; Schnell, U.; Scheffknecht, G.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increase of computational power, it is nowadays common practice to use CFD calculations for various kinds of firing systems in order to understand the internal physical phenomena and to optimise the overall process. Within the last years, biomass combustion for energy purposes has gained rising popularity. On an industrial scale, mainly grate firing systems are used for this purpose. Generally, such systems consist of a dense-packed fuel bed on the grate and the freeboard region above, where in the field of numerical modelling, it is common practice to use different sub-models for both zones. To avoid this, the objective of this paper is the presentation of a numerical model including a detailed three-dimensional description of the fuel bed and the freeboard region within the same CFD code. Because of the implementation as an Eulerian multiphase model, both zones are fully coupled in terms of flow and heat transfer, and appropriate models for the treatment of turbulence, radiation, and global reactions are presented. The model results are validated against detailed measurements of temperature and gaseous species close to the bed surface and within the radiative section of a 240 kW grate firing test facility.

  8. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: method evaluation of volatile organic compound emissions measured by PTR-MS, FTIR, and GC from tropical biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Karl

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile Organic Compound (VOC emissions from fires in tropical forest fuels were quantified using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and gas chromatography (GC coupled to PTRMS (GC-PTR-MS. We investigated VOC emissions from 19 controlled laboratory fires at the USFS (United States Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory and 16 fires during an intensive airborne field campaign during the peak of the burning season in Brazil in 2004. The VOC emissions were dominated by oxygenated VOCs (OVOC (OVOC/NMHC ~4:1, NMHC: non-methane hydrocarbons The specificity of the PTR-MS instrument, which measures the mass to charge ratio of VOCs ionized by H3O+ ions, was validated by gas chromatography and by intercomparing in-situ measurements with those obtained from an open path FTIR instrument. Emission ratios for methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, crotonaldehyde, acrylonitrile and pyrrole were measured in the field for the first time. Our measurements show a higher contribution of OVOCs than previously assumed for modeling purposes. Comparison of fresh (<15 min and aged (>1 h–1 d smoke suggests altered emission ratios due to gas phase chemistry for acetone but not for acetaldehyde and methanol. Emission ratios for numerous, important, reactive VOCs with respect to acetonitrile (a biomass burning tracer are presented.

  9. Improved biomass and lipid production in a mixotrophic culture of Chlorella sp. KR-1 with addition of coal-fired flue-gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Kim, Bohwa; Choi, Eunji; Lee, Kyubock; Park, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jin-Suk; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2014-11-01

    Industrial CO2-rich flue-gases, owing to their eco-toxicity, have yet to be practically exploited for microalgal biomass and lipid production. In this study, various autotrophic and mixotrophic culture modes for an oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1 were compared for the use in actual coal-fired flue-gas. Among the mixotrophic conditions tested, the fed-batch feedings of glucose and the supply of air in dark cycles showed the highest biomass (561 mg/L d) and fatty-acid methyl-ester (168 mg/L d) productivities. This growth condition also resulted in the maximal population of microalgae and the minimal population and types of KR-1-associated-bacterial species as confirmed by particle-volume-distribution and denaturing-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses. Furthermore, microalgal lipid produced was assessed, based on its fatty acid profile, to meet key biodiesel standards such as saponification, iodine, and cetane numbers.

  10. Characterization of biomass burning smoke from cooking fires, peat, crop residue and other fuels with high resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C. E.; Veres, P. R.; Williams, J.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2014-08-01

    We deployed a high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) to measure biomass burning emissions from peat, crop-residue, cooking fires, and many other fire types during the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4) laboratory campaign. A combination of gas standards calibrations and composition sensitive, mass dependent calibration curves were applied to quantify gas-phase non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) observed in the complex mixture of fire emissions. We used several approaches to assign best identities to most major "exact masses" including many high molecular mass species. Using these methods approximately 80-96% of the total NMOC mass detected by PTR-TOF-MS and FTIR was positively or tentatively identified for major fuel types. We report data for many rarely measured or previously unmeasured emissions in several compound classes including aromatic hydrocarbons, phenolic compounds, and furans; many of which are suspected secondary organic aerosol precursors. A large set of new emission factors (EFs) for a range of globally significant biomass fuels is presented. Measurements show that oxygenated NMOCs accounted for the largest fraction of emissions of all compound classes. In a brief study of various traditional and advanced cooking methods, the EFs for these emissions groups were greatest for open 3-stone cooking in comparison to their more advanced counterparts. Several little-studied nitrogen-containing organic compounds were detected from many fuel types that together accounted for 0.1-8.7% of the fuel nitrogen and some may play a role in new particle formation.

  11. Characterization of biomass burning emissions from cooking fires, peat, crop residue, and other fuels with high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C. E.; Veres, P. R.; Williams, J.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We deployed a high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) to measure biomass-burning emissions from peat, crop residue, cooking fires, and many other fire types during the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4) laboratory campaign. A combination of gas standard calibrations and composition sensitive, mass-dependent calibration curves was applied to quantify gas-phase non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) observed in the complex mixture of fire emissions. We used several approaches to assign the best identities to most major "exact masses", including many high molecular mass species. Using these methods, approximately 80-96% of the total NMOC mass detected by the PTR-TOF-MS and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was positively or tentatively identified for major fuel types. We report data for many rarely measured or previously unmeasured emissions in several compound classes including aromatic hydrocarbons, phenolic compounds, and furans; many of these are suspected secondary organic aerosol precursors. A large set of new emission factors (EFs) for a range of globally significant biomass fuels is presented. Measurements show that oxygenated NMOCs accounted for the largest fraction of emissions of all compound classes. In a brief study of various traditional and advanced cooking methods, the EFs for these emissions groups were greatest for open three-stone cooking in comparison to their more advanced counterparts. Several little-studied nitrogen-containing organic compounds were detected from many fuel types, that together accounted for 0.1-8.7% of the fuel nitrogen, and some may play a role in new particle formation.

  12. Integrated Active Fire Retrievals and Biomass Burning Emissions Using Complementary Near-Coincident Ground, Airborne and Spaceborne Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellicott, Evan; Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Ottmar, Roger D.; Clements, Craig; Hall, Dianne; Ambrosia, Vincent; Kremens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ground, airborne and spaceborne data were collected for a 450 ha prescribed fire implemented on 18 October 2011 at the Henry W. Coe State Park in California. The integration of various data elements allowed near coincident active fire retrievals to be estimated. The Autonomous Modular Sensor-Wildfire (AMS) airborne multispectral imaging system was used as a bridge between ground and spaceborne data sets providing high quality reference information to support satellite fire retrieval error analyses and fire emissions estimates. We found excellent agreement between peak fire radiant heat flux data (less than 1% error) derived from near-coincident ground radiometers and AMS. Both MODIS and GOES imager active fire products were negatively influenced by the presence of thick smoke, which was misclassified as cloud by their algorithms, leading to the omission of fire pixels beneath the smoke, and resulting in the underestimation of their retrieved fire radiative power (FRP) values for the burn plot, compared to the reference airborne data. Agreement between airborne and spaceborne FRP data improved significantly after correction for omission errors and atmospheric attenuation, resulting in as low as 5 difference between AquaMODIS and AMS. Use of in situ fuel and fire energy estimates in combination with a collection of AMS, MODIS, and GOES FRP retrievals provided a fuel consumption factor of 0.261 kg per MJ, total energy release of 14.5 x 10(exp 6) MJ, and total fuel consumption of 3.8 x 10(exp 6) kg. Fire emissions were calculated using two separate techniques, resulting in as low as 15 difference for various species

  13. Fundamental mechanisms for conversion of volatiles in biomass and waste combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Hindiyarti, L.; Marshall, P.; Livbjerg, H.; Dagaut, P.; Jensen, Anker; Frandsen, Flemming

    2007-03-15

    This project deals with the volatile oxidation chemistry in biomass and waste fired systems, emphasizing reactions important for pollutants emissions (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, HCl, aerosols). The project aims to extend existing models and databases with a number of chemical subsystems that are presently not well understood, but are particularly important in connection with combustion of biomass and waste. The project is divided into 3 tasks. Task 1: Conversion of chlorine, sulfur and alkali gas phase components in combustion of biomass. Task 2: Formation mechanisms for NO{sub x} in the freeboard of grate combustion of biomass. Task 3: Oxidation mechanisms for oxygenated hydrocarbons in the volatiles from pyrolysis of biomass. (au)

  14. An Overview: Experimental Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols during EFEU[EFEU - Impact of vegetation fires on composition and circulation of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massling, A.; Iinuma, Y.; Zeromskiene, K.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A. [Leibniz-Inst. for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig (Germany); Schmid, O.; Dusek, U.; Helas, G.; Chand, D.; Parmar, R.S.; Andreae, M.O. [Max Planck Inst. for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany). Biogeochemistry Dept.

    2005-07-01

    Vegetation fires are a significant source for atmospheric trace gases and aerosol particles on local, regional, and global scales. Vast fires regularly occur in the tropics as well as in the mid latitudes and boreal regions. Fire emissions and their reaction products are transported by convection into the free troposphere and therefore affect the energy budget of the atmosphere by direct and indirect radiation effects. Up to now there is only limited information on the physical and chemical properties of biomass burning aerosols which are partly responsible for the large uncertainties in quantifying the climatic impact of aerosols generally. Especially, the microphysical properties of the emitted aerosol particles have received little attention to date. This work gives detailed information of the methodology applied to experimentally characterize the physical and chemical properties of fresh (age: <10 minutes) biomass burning aerosols from various biomass fuels. In general, the chemical analysis of the samples show equal results for different fuel types. Submicrometer particles were mainly composed of organic carbon rather than by inorganic ions. Consequently, the hygroscopicity measurements performed at 85 % at various diameters show only slightly hygroscopic behaviour (about 5 to 15 % diameter growth) of the examined smoke particles. Furthermore, our observations show that the humidification growth in scattering properties of the fresh aerosols is relatively low (<15%) compared to ambient aerosols in natural vegetations fires. These results go along with relatively low CCN efficiencies (the ratio of CCN to total particle number concentration). The CCN efficiency from typical wood smoke particles gradually increased with particle size at a given S and particles of 250 nm or larger are normally completely activated at S = 0.2%. It was found that changes in aerosol properties were strongly dependent on the burning conditions. These conditions were characterized by

  15. A better understanding of biomass co-firing by developing an advanced non-spherical particle tracking model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Kær, Søren Knudsen;

    2004-01-01

    -area-to-volume ratio and thus experiences a totally different motion and reaction as a non-spherical particle. Therefore, an advanced non-spherical particle-tracking model is developed to calculate the motion and reaction of nonspherical biomass particles. The biomass particles are assumed as solid or hollow cylinders......-gradient force. Since the drag and lift forces are both shape factor- and orientation-dependent, coupled particle rotation equations are resolved to update particle orientation. In the reaction of biomass particles, the actual particle surface area available and the average oxygen mass flux at particle surface...

  16. A Research on Structure Design of Small Biomass Direct-fired Stove%小型生物质直燃炉结构设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石毅新; 蒋蘋; 彭才望

    2015-01-01

    At present,the biomass-fire stove is still with so much problems, such as the low combustion efficiency and excessive generation of tar during the combustion , buring thin layer with high the combustion efficiency , serves as the main buring mode of the small biomass-fire stove which greatly increase combustion efficiency and effectively reduce the generation of tar and dust and it applys screw conveyor to feed the hearth continuously to keep it burning stably and continuously. Which plays a positive role in handling the waste of biomass fuel waste and environmental pollution successfully in rural areas and offers a thought for the sustainable energy development under the new situation.%基于目前现有生物质燃烧炉的燃烧效率低,且燃烧过程中焦油生成过多等问题。以高效率燃烧方式的薄层燃烧为该小型生物质直燃炉的主要燃烧方式,大大提高燃烧效率的同时,有效较低焦油与烟尘的产生,并且采用螺杆输送装置对炉膛进行持续供料,实现稳定的不间断燃烧,为成功解决农村生物质燃料浪费及环境污染起到积极作用,为新形势下的能源可持续发展提供思路。

  17. Aerial biomass and possible co² emissions after a fire; case of the forest “La Primavera”, Jalisco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Antonio Domínguez Calleros

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Area of protection of Flora and Fauna “La Primavera” (APFFLP is one of the more important protected areas in the western of the Country, and constantly suffers large damage caused by fire, such as the one happened in 2005 when approximately 11,439 ha were affected, equivalent to 37.5% of the total area. This study was conducted in an área affected by fire, where the main goals were: to estimate the timber volume, biomass, carbon and CO2 of Pinus oocarpa and Quercus spp species, which have a larger significant value in the ecology of the area. A network of 56 sampling sites was measured; these were 500 m2 circular sites (radius 12.61 m, spaced every 100 m. At each site, just dead trees (either cut or standing with at least 7 cm of diameter at breast height (DBH were measured, taking the basal area as the main parameter. From the data, allometric models were generated to estimate the volume, depending on the measurement of DBH. The determination coefficient R2 for Pinus oocarpa was 0.87995 being the exponential regression model the one with the best fit; The valuation of the biomass was 40,43 T/ha, that multiplied by the fraction of the carbon recommended for the species studied in this region is equivalent to 20,2 T/ha, giving a value of 74,1 T/ha of CO2. In the case of Quercus spp it showed a R of 0.87571, being the linear regression model the best adjusted, with an average of 26.5 T/ha of biomass, meaning a carbon estimation of 13.24 T/ha equivalent to a total of 48.62 T/ha of CO2 if it were emitted into theatmosphere.

  18. Material problems related to large scale firing of biomass. Steam oxidation of TP 347H FG and X20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Hansson, A.

    2009-07-01

    TP 347 H and X20 is often used as construction material in biomass-fired boilers. The corrosion rate of the alloys is affected by the metal temperature. In this project, the oxidation behaviour of TP 347H FG and X20 is studied by field-testing, laboratory exposures, and thermodynamic/kinetic modelling. The long term oxidation behaviour of TP 347H FG at ultra supercritical steam conditions was assessed by exposing the steel in 4 test superheater loops in a coal-fired power plant. The steel was exposed for 7720, 22985, 29588, and 57554 h at metal temperatures between 499 and 650 deg. C. In the laboratory furnace, the oxidation behaviour of TP 347H FG, TP 347H CG, and X20 was studied in water vapour containing environments (8 or 46%) in the temperature range 500-700 deg. C. Air, Ar and Ar+7% H{sub 2} were used as carrier gas. The microstructure of the oxide layer and the subjacent alloy was investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), reflective light microscopy (RLM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with electron diffraction (ED) and EDS. Double-layered oxides developed during steam oxidation of TP 347H FG both during field-testing and during laboratory exposures. TEM investigation suggested that the interior of the alloy grain was oxidised internally, forming particles of metallic Ni/Fe and Fe-Cr spinel. A FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer developed along the former alloy grain boundaries. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} developed in between this layer and the alloy during field-testing, and its formation was promoted by higher temperature. The morphology of the inner layer for the samples oxidised below and above approx. 585 deg. C looked very different in SEM (field-testing). It is suggested that more Cr is incorporated into the oxide layer at higher temperature, gradually transforming the morphology of the inner oxide layer. The alloy beneath the oxide layer was depleted in Cr

  19. Material problems related to large scale firing of biomass. Steam oxidation of TP 347H FG and X20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Hansson, A.

    2009-07-01

    TP 347 H and X20 is often used as construction material in biomass-fired boilers. The corrosion rate of the alloys is affected by the metal temperature. In this project, the oxidation behaviour of TP 347H FG and X20 is studied by field-testing, laboratory exposures, and thermodynamic/kinetic modelling. The long term oxidation behaviour of TP 347H FG at ultra supercritical steam conditions was assessed by exposing the steel in 4 test superheater loops in a coal-fired power plant. The steel was exposed for 7720, 22985, 29588, and 57554 h at metal temperatures between 499 and 650 deg. C. In the laboratory furnace, the oxidation behaviour of TP 347H FG, TP 347H CG, and X20 was studied in water vapour containing environments (8 or 46%) in the temperature range 500-700 deg. C. Air, Ar and Ar+7% H{sub 2} were used as carrier gas. The microstructure of the oxide layer and the subjacent alloy was investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), reflective light microscopy (RLM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with electron diffraction (ED) and EDS. Double-layered oxides developed during steam oxidation of TP 347H FG both during field-testing and during laboratory exposures. TEM investigation suggested that the interior of the alloy grain was oxidised internally, forming particles of metallic Ni/Fe and Fe-Cr spinel. A FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer developed along the former alloy grain boundaries. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} developed in between this layer and the alloy during field-testing, and its formation was promoted by higher temperature. The morphology of the inner layer for the samples oxidised below and above approx. 585 deg. C looked very different in SEM (field-testing). It is suggested that more Cr is incorporated into the oxide layer at higher temperature, gradually transforming the morphology of the inner oxide layer. The alloy beneath the oxide layer was depleted in Cr

  20. Decreased PCDD/F formation when co-firing a waste fuel and biomass in a CFB boiler by addition of sulphates or municipal sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Åmand, Lars-Erik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Gothenburg (Sweden); Kassman, Håkan, E-mail: hakan.kassman@vattenfall.com [Vattenfall Research and Development AB, Nyköping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Two strategies to reduce PCDD/F formation when co-firing solid recovered fuel (SRF) and biomass. • They were co-combustion with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and addition of ammonium sulphate. • PCDD/Fs were significantly reduced for a biomass rich in chlorine when adding ammonium sulphate. • MSS had a suppressing effect on PCDD/F formation during co-combustion with SRF. • A link is presented between gaseous alkali chlorides, chlorine in deposits and PCDD/F formation. - Abstract: Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are formed during waste incineration and in waste-to-energy boilers. Incomplete combustion, too short residence times at low combustion temperatures (<700 °C), incineration of electronic waste and plastic waste containing chlorine are all factors influencing the formation of PCDD/Fs in boilers. The impact of chlorine and catalysing metals (such as copper and iron) in the fuel on PCDD/F formation was studied in a 12 MW{sub th} circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. The PCDD/F concentrations in the raw gas after the convection pass of the boiler and in the fly ashes were compared. The fuel types were a so-called clean biomass with low content of chlorine, biomass with enhanced content of chlorine from supply of PVC, and solid recovered fuel (SRF) which is a waste fuel containing higher concentrations of both chlorine, and catalysing metals. The PCDD/F formation increased for the biomass with enhanced chlorine content and it was significantly reduced in the raw gas as well as in the fly ashes by injection of ammonium sulphate. A link, the alkali chloride track, is demonstrated between the level of alkali chlorides in the gas phase, the chlorine content in the deposits in the convection pass and finally the PCDD/F formation. The formation of PCDD/Fs was also significantly reduced during co-combustion of SRF with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) compared to when SRF was fired without MSS

  1. Decreased PCDD/F formation when co-firing a waste fuel and biomass in a CFB boiler by addition of sulphates or municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åmand, Lars-Erik; Kassman, Håkan

    2013-08-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are formed during waste incineration and in waste-to-energy boilers. Incomplete combustion, too short residence times at low combustion temperatures (boilers. The impact of chlorine and catalysing metals (such as copper and iron) in the fuel on PCDD/F formation was studied in a 12 MW(th) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. The PCDD/F concentrations in the raw gas after the convection pass of the boiler and in the fly ashes were compared. The fuel types were a so-called clean biomass with low content of chlorine, biomass with enhanced content of chlorine from supply of PVC, and solid recovered fuel (SRF) which is a waste fuel containing higher concentrations of both chlorine, and catalysing metals. The PCDD/F formation increased for the biomass with enhanced chlorine content and it was significantly reduced in the raw gas as well as in the fly ashes by injection of ammonium sulphate. A link, the alkali chloride track, is demonstrated between the level of alkali chlorides in the gas phase, the chlorine content in the deposits in the convection pass and finally the PCDD/F formation. The formation of PCDD/Fs was also significantly reduced during co-combustion of SRF with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) compared to when SRF was fired without MSS as additional fuel.

  2. Fire Radiative Power (FRP)-based Emission Factors of PM2.5, CO and NOX for Remote Sensing of Biomass Burning Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandana Gamalathge, T. D.; Chen, L. W. A.

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale biomass burning such as forest fires represents an important and yet uncertain source of air pollutants and greenhouse gases on a global scale. Due to the highly accidental nature of forest fires, satellite remote sensing could be a promising method to develop regional and global fire emission inventories on a real-time basis. Reliable fire radiative power (FRP)-based fuel consumption and emission factors are critical in this approach. In an attempt to obtain the information, laboratory combustion experiments were conducted to simultaneously monitor FRP, fuel consumption, and emissions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), carbon monoxide (CO), and reactive nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2). FRP were quantified using temperature-resolved values from a thermal imager instead of conventionally used average temperature, as the former provides more realistic estimates. For dry Ponderosa pine branches, a common fuel in the Sierra Nevada, a strong correlation (r2 ~ 0.8) between FRP and the mass reduction rate (MRR) was found. This led to a radiative energy yield (REY) of 8.5 ± 1.2 MJ/kg, assuming blackbody radiation and a flame emissivity of 0.5. Mass-based emission factors were determined with the carbon balance approach. Considering the ratio of mass-based emission factors and the REY, FRP-based emission factors: PM2.5: 11 g/MJ, CO: 8.0 g/MJ, NO: 0.33 g/MJ, and NO2: 0.07 g/MJ were quantified. The application of this approach to other fuel types and uncertainties in the measurements will be discussed.

  3. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part II Co-firing of straw and coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    superheaters. A range of austenitic and ferritic steels was exposed in the steam temperature range of 520-580°C. The flue gas temperature ranged from 925-1100°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed by precision measurement of material loss and measurement of oxide thickness. Corrosion rates are lower than...... and potassium sulphate. These components give rise to varying degrees of accelerated corrosion. This paper concerns co-firing of straw with coal to reduce the corrosion rate from straw to an acceptable level. A field investigation at Midtkraft Studstrup suspension-fired power plant in Denmark has been...... undertaken where coal has been co-fired with 10% straw and 20% straw (% energy basis) for up to approx. 3000 hours. Two types of exposure were undertaken to investigate corrosion: a) the exposure of metal rings on water/air cooled probes, and b) the exposure of a range of materials built into the existing...

  4. Co-firing Bosnian coals with woody biomass: Experimental studies on a laboratory-scale furnace and 110 MWe power unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajevic Izet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of research into cofiring two Bosnian cola types, brown coal and lignite, with woody biomass, in this case spruce sawdust. The aim of the research was to find the optimal blend of coal and sawdust that may be substituted for 100% coal in large coal-fired power stations in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Two groups of experimental tests were performed in this study: laboratory testing of co-firing and trial runs on a large-scale plant based on the laboratory research results. A laboratory experiment was carried out in an electrically heated and entrained pulverized-fuel flow furnace. Coal-sawdust blends of 93:7% by weight and 80:20% by weight were tested. Co-firing trials were conducted over a range of the following process variables: process temperature, excess air ratio and air distribution. Neither of the two coal-sawdust blends used produced any significant ash-related problems provided the blend volume was 7% by weight sawdust and the process temperature did not exceed 1250ºC. It was observed that in addition to the nitrogen content in the co-fired blend, the volatile content and particle size distribution of the mixture also influenced the level of NOx emissions. The brown coal-sawdust blend generated a further reduction of SO2 due to the higher sulphur capture rate than for coal alone. Based on and following the laboratory research findings, a trial run was carried out in a large-scale utility - the Kakanj power station, Unit 5 (110 MWe, using two mixtures; one in which 5%/wt and one in which 7%/wt of brown coal was replaced with sawdust. Compared to a reference firing process with 100% coal, these co-firing trials produced a more intensive redistribution of the alkaline components in the slag in the melting chamber, with a consequential beneficial effect on the deposition of ash on the superheater surfaces of the boiler. The outcome of the tests confirms the feasibility of using 7%wt of sawdust in combination

  5. Estimating aboveground forest biomass carbon and fire consumption in the U.S. Utah High Plateaus using data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program, Landsat, and LANDFIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Liu, S.; Zhu, Z.; Vogelmann, J.; Li, Z.; Ohlen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have been increasing and greatly affecting global climate and socio-economic systems. Actively growing forests are generally considered to be a major carbon sink, but forest wildfires lead to large releases of biomass carbon into the atmosphere. Aboveground forest biomass carbon (AFBC), an important ecological indicator, and fireinduced carbon emissions at regional scales are highly relevant to forest sustainable management and climate change. It is challenging to accurately estimate the spatial distribution of AFBC across large areas because of the spatial heterogeneity of forest cover types and canopy structure. In this study, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data, Landsat, and Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Project (LANDFIRE) data were integrated in a regression tree model for estimating AFBC at a 30-m resolution in the Utah High Plateaus. AFBC were calculated from 225 FIA field plots and used as the dependent variable in the model. Of these plots, 10% were held out for model evaluation with stratified random sampling, and the other 90% were used as training data to develop the regression tree model. Independent variable layers included Landsat imagery and the derived spectral indicators, digital elevation model (DEM) data and derivatives, biophysical gradient data, existing vegetation cover type and vegetation structure. The cross-validation correlation coefficient (r value) was 0.81 for the training model. Independent validation using withheld plot data was similar with r value of 0.82. This validated regression tree model was applied to map AFBC in the Utah High Plateaus and then combined with burn severity information to estimate loss of AFBC in the Longston fire of Zion National Park in 2001. The final dataset represented 24 forest cover types for a 4 million ha forested area. We estimated a total of 353 Tg AFBC with an average of 87 MgC/ha in the Utah High

  6. Microwave Limb Sounder observations of biomass-burning products from the Australian bush fires of February 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Pumphrey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The large bush fires which occurred in southeast Australia in February 2009 were unusually destructive. However, they were also unusual in the amounts of various combustion products which were injected directly into the stratosphere. We report the observations by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS instrument on the Aura satellite of some of these combustion products. The highest quality observations are of CO; these clearly show a large region of enhanced mixing ratios to the north of New Zealand which remains in that region for about ten days before drifting westwards and finally dissipating over the Atlantic about a month after the fire. Back trajectories run from the points where MLS observes enhanced CO pass close to the site of the fire. The MLS observations of CH3CN and HCN resemble those of CO except for their poorer vertical resolution and more limited vertical range. An apparent enhancement in ClO is also observed by MLS, but detailed analysis of the measured radiances reveals this feature to be a signature of CH3OH, which is not currently retrieved by the MLS data processing system. The fires of February 2009 are the only event of this type and magnitude in the 6-yr MLS record.

  7. Microwave Limb Sounder observations of biomass-burning products from the Australian bush fires of February 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Pumphrey

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The large bush fires which occurred in southeast Australia in February 2009 were unusually destructive. However, they were also unusual in the amounts of various combustion products which were injected directly into the stratosphere. We report the observations by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS instrument on the Aura satellite of some of these combustion products. The highest quality observations are of CO; these clearly show a large region of enhanced mixing ratios to the north of New Zealand which remains in that region for about ten days before drifting westwards and finally dissipating over the Atlantic about a month after the fire. The region of enhanced CO ascends from the tropopause to 46 hPa during this period. Back trajectories run from the points where MLS observes enhanced CO pass close to the site of the fire. The MLS observations of CH3CN and HCN resemble those of CO except for their poorer vertical resolution and more limited vertical range. An apparent enhancement in ClO is also observed by MLS, but detailed analysis of the measured radiances reveals this feature to be a signature of CH3OH, which is not currently retrieved by the MLS data processing system. The fires of February 2009 are the only event of this type and magnitude in the 7-yr MLS record.

  8. Physical and combustion characteristics of biomass particles prepared by different milling processes for suspension firing in utility boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    close to suspension-fired boilers. The ignition, devolatilization and burnout times of the milled particles under different combustion conditions are analysed. A one-dimensional transient model, properly accounting for the particle-ambient flow interaction and appropriately addressing the key sub...

  9. Cleaning of biomass derived product gas for engine applications and for co-firing in PC-boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E.; Staahlberg, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-01

    The main constituents rendering the engine use of gas produced from biomass are the tar content of the gases (condensing hydrocarbons), which cause problems for pipings, nozzles, and control of combustion. Purification methods, based on catalytic cracking of tars are investigated in the research in order to eliminate these problems. The target of the project is to demonstrate the developed gasification/gas purification process with engine test using PDU-scale equipment. Impurities of biomasses and biomass wastes (alkalis, chlorine, heavy metals), and the ash melting properties restrict in many cases the combined utilisation of biomasses and coal in power plant boilers. The second main task of this research is to investigate the removal of the problematic gas and ash components from the product gas. The sufficient degree of purification should be achieved by as simple and as cheap purification methods as possible. The main tasks of the first year of the project were (a) determination of the dimensioning characteristics of ambient pressure PDU scale cell-catalyst reactor (tests with laboratory-scale equipment), designing and construction of the reactor, (b) to investigate the operation of a cell-catalyst in purification of pre-cracked down-draft gasification gas, (c) acquisition of dimensioning data for dolomite-cracker based on fluidized bed principle, and (d) gasification of the Dutch building demolition waste and Danish straw, and the purification tests with the gases

  10. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN from biomass burning events in Canada using I− reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere. A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO and acetonitrile (CH3CN was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume-defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6-sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A normalised excess mixing ratio (NEMR of 3.68 ± 0.149 pptv ppbv−1 was calculated, which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011. The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work, the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N yr−1.

  11. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN from biomass burning events in Canada using I reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere.

    A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO and acetonitrile (CH3CN was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6 sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A Normalised Excess Mixing Ratio (NEMR of 3.76 ± 0.022 pptv ppbv−1 was calculated which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011. The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N yr−1.

  12. Experiences from measurements on combined solar heating and biomass-fired boilers; Erfaringer fra maalinger paa kombinerede solvarme- og biobraendselsanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overgaard, L.L.; Ellehauge, K.; Saebye, A.

    2000-05-01

    The 12 inspected Danish systems represent both well-designed and well-functioning small Solar and Biomass systems as well as poor system designs. Some of the faults experienced were oversized and undersized components and insufficient insulation. Also, there were several examples of stop-gab solutions resulting in very complicated systems with a lot of piping connections, great heat losses and a great risk of making operation mistakes. Monitoring of three of the systems over a period of almost a year have shown great differences with regard to operation conditions, heat losses from installations, solar contributions, solar gains as well as number of days the biomass boilers can be turned of each year. In general the solar gains of the three systems were not very large. Generally, there is a need for better overall solutions with components adjusted to the actual demands and boundary conditions. As a part of the project such a new system with one storage tank only has been developed - inspired by already gained experience. The work carried out in this project is the first step on the way to better Solar and Biomass system designs in Denmark, but there is still a lot of work to be done. (EHS)

  13. Flame investigations of coal and biomass combustion with a 35 MW DS {sup registered} burner and modification for indirect firing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, Tanja; Leisse, Alfons; Niesbach, Juergen; Kuhr, Christian; Koczorowski, Hans-Joachim [Hitachi Power Europe GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Based on experimental flame investigations the capability of a DS {sup registered} burner to operate in a wide load range with different fuels was verified. A DS {sup registered} burner with a thermal capacity of 35 MW was installed in a combustion test facility in order to perform in-flame ash sampling and detailed measurements of temperatures, flue gas species as well as convective and radioactive heat fluxes. Moreover the DS {sup registered} burner was modified to DS {sup registered} T burner for the use of dense phase fuel conveying for indirect firing systems including the oxyfuel process. (orig.)

  14. Fine particulate matter associated with monsoonal effect and the responses of biomass fire hotspots in the tropical environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Khan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The health implications of PM2.5 in tropical regions of Southeast Asia are significant as PM2.5 can pose serious health concerns. PM2.5 is strongly influenced by the monsoon. We quantitatively characterize the health risks posed to human populations by selected heavy metals in PM2.5. Monsoonal effects as well as factors influencing the sources of PM2.5 were also determined. Apportionment analysis of PM2.5 was undertaken using US EPA positive matrix factorization (PMF 5.0 and a mass closure model. Overall, 48 % of the samples exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO 24 h guideline. The mass closure model identified four sources of PM2.5: (a mineral matter (MIN (35 %, (b secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA (11 %, (c sea salt (SS (7 %, (d trace elements (TE (2 % and (e undefined (UD (45 %. PMF 5.0 identified five potential sources and motor vehicle emissions and biomass burning were dominant followed by marine and sulfate aerosol, coal burning, nitrate aerosol, and mineral and road dust. The non-carcinogenic risk level for four selected metals (Pb, As, Cd and Ni in PM2.5 and in the identified major sources by PMF > 5.0, with respect to inhalation follows the order of PM2.5 > coal burning > motor vehicle emissions/biomass burning > mineral/road dust. The lifetime cancer risk follows the order of As > Ni > Pb > Cd for mineral/road dust, coal burning and overall of PM2.5 concentration and As > Pb > Ni > Cd for motor vehicle/biomass burning. Overall, the associated cancer risk posed by the exposure of toxic metals in PM2.5 is three to four in 1 000 000 people in this location.

  15. Comparative Studies on Comprehensive Economic Cost of Wood-based Biomass-fired and Coal-fired Cogeneration Plant%林木生物质热电联产与燃煤热电项目的全成本经济评价比较分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏珣; 马中; 贾敬敦; 金书秦

    2012-01-01

    将环境成本纳入核算,建立了全成本经济评价模型.应用该模型,比较生物质与燃煤热电厂的经济、环境表现,分析制约生物质能在农村地区发展的因素以及二者的发展潜力.比较分析发现:目前阶段,生物质热电联产由于原材料和进口设备价格较高,经济成本仍居高不下,但其环境效益显著,全成本经济评价结果优于燃煤热电联产;生物质直燃供热比发电的经济效益和环境效益均更突出.随着化石能源的储量不断减少,市场会自发的加大对生物质能的投资,通过技术进步缩小与传统能源的成本差距.要加速生物质能发展的进程,需要在原料供应、技术研发、市场培育等方面给予政策扶持.%This paper established a comprehensive economic cost model involving the environmental cost. The economic and environmental performance of biomass-fired and coal-fired cogeneration plant was compared using this model. The reasons which make the biomass energy less competitive in the market, and the development potential of biomass-fired and coal-fired were analized. It is concluded that the economic cost of biomass energy is still too high, due to the expensive material and imported equipment, which make the biomass energy less competitive in the market, while the environmental benefit is still remarkable. Comprehensive economic cost of biomass was superior to coal-fired cogeneration. The biomass combustion heating is more cost and environmental effective than biomass combustion generation at the present. With the decrease of fossil fuel reserve, investments will spontaneous pour into technology development of biomass energy driven by the market, in order to cut down the cost; and the policy support which including raw material supply, technology research and development and market cultivation will accelerate the technology progress of biomass energy.

  16. Development of Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for the Biomass Fired Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sang Cho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study makes use of this distinction to analyze the exhaust gas concentration and fuel of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB boiler that mainly uses wood biomass, and to develop the emission factors of Methane (CH4, Nitrous oxide (N2O. The fuels used as energy sources in the subject working sites are Wood Chip Fuel (WCF, RDF and Refused Plastic Fuel (RPF of which heating values are 11.9 TJ/Gg, 17.1 TJ/Gg, and 31.2 TJ/Gg, respectively. The average concentrations of CH4 and N2O were measured to be 2.78 ppm and 7.68 ppm, respectively. The analyzed values and data collected from the field survey were used to calculate the emission factor of CH4 and N2O exhausted from the CFB boiler. As a result, the emission factors of CH4 and N2O are 1.4 kg/TJ (0.9–1.9 kg/TJ and 4.0 kg/TJ (2.9–5.3 kg/TJ within a 95% confidence interval. Biomass combined with the combustion technology for the CFB boiler proved to be more effective in reducing the N2O emission, compared to the emission factor of the CFB boiler using fossil fuel.

  17. Development of methane and nitrous oxide emission factors for the biomass fired circulating fluidized bed combustion power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chang-Sang; Sa, Jae-Hwan; Lim, Ki-Kyo; Youk, Tae-Mi; Kim, Seung-Jin; Lee, Seul-Ki; Jeon, Eui-Chan

    2012-01-01

    This study makes use of this distinction to analyze the exhaust gas concentration and fuel of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler that mainly uses wood biomass, and to develop the emission factors of Methane (CH(4)), Nitrous oxide (N(2)O). The fuels used as energy sources in the subject working sites are Wood Chip Fuel (WCF), RDF and Refused Plastic Fuel (RPF) of which heating values are 11.9 TJ/Gg, 17.1 TJ/Gg, and 31.2 TJ/Gg, respectively. The average concentrations of CH(4) and N(2)O were measured to be 2.78 ppm and 7.68 ppm, respectively. The analyzed values and data collected from the field survey were used to calculate the emission factor of CH(4) and N(2)O exhausted from the CFB boiler. As a result, the emission factors of CH(4) and N(2)O are 1.4 kg/TJ (0.9-1.9 kg/TJ) and 4.0 kg/TJ (2.9-5.3 kg/TJ) within a 95% confidence interval. Biomass combined with the combustion technology for the CFB boiler proved to be more effective in reducing the N(2)O emission, compared to the emission factor of the CFB boiler using fossil fuel.

  18. High temperature corrosion in biomass- and waste fired boilers. A status report; Kunskapslaeget betraeffande hoegtemperaturkorrosion i aangpannor foer biobraensle och avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, P.; Ifwer, K.; Staalenheim, A.; Montgomery, M.; Hoegberg, J.; Hjoernhede, A.

    2006-12-15

    Many biomass- or waste-fired plants have problems with high temperature corrosion on the furnace walls or at the superheaters, especially if the steam temperature is greater than 500 deg C. An increase in the combustion of waste fuels means that an increasing number of boilers have had problems. Therefore, there is great interest from plant owners to reduce the costs associated with high temperature corrosion. At the same time there exists a considerable driving force towards improving the electrical efficiency of a plant by the use of more advanced steam data. The purpose of the work presented here was to answer three main questions: What can be done to reduce high temperature corrosion with current fuel blends and steam temperatures? How can more waste fuels be burnt without an increased risk for corrosion? What needs to be done to reach higher steam temperatures in the future? The level of knowledge of high temperature corrosion in biomass- and waste-fired boilers has been described and summarised. The following measures are recommended to reduce corrosion in existing plant: Make sure that the fuel is well mixed and improve fuel feeding to obtain a more even spread of the fuel over the cross-section of the boiler. Use combustion technology methods to stabilize the oxygen content of the flue gases near the membrane walls and other heat transfer surfaces. Experiment with additives and/or supplementary fuels which contain sulphur in some form, for example peat. Reduce the flue gas temperature at the superheaters. Review soot-blowing procedures or protect heat transfer surfaces from soot blowers. Evaluate coated membrane wall panels in parts of the furnace that experience the worst corrosion. Test more highly alloyed steels suitable for superheaters and when replacing a superheater change to a more highly alloyed steel. For the future, the following should be considered: The role of sulphur needs to be investigated more and other additives should be investigated

  19. Investigating the links between ozone and organic aerosol chemistry in a biomass burning plume from a prescribed fire in California chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Lonsdale, C. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Akagi, S. K.; Coe, H.; Craven, J. S.; Fischer, E. V.; McMeeking, G. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Soni, T.; Taylor, J. W.; Weise, D. R.; Wold, C. E.

    2015-06-01

    Within minutes after emission, complex photochemistry in biomass burning smoke plumes can cause large changes in the concentrations of ozone (O3) and organic aerosol (OA). Being able to understand and simulate this rapid chemical evolution under a wide variety of conditions is a critical part of forecasting the impact of these fires on air quality, atmospheric composition, and climate. Here we use version 2.1 of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP) to simulate the evolution of O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) within a young biomass burning smoke plume from the Williams prescribed fire in chaparral, which was sampled over California in November 2009. We demonstrate the use of a method for simultaneously accounting for the impact of the unidentified intermediate volatility, semi-volatile, and extremely low volatility organic compounds (here collectively called "SVOCs") on the formation of OA (using the Volatility Basis Set - VBS) and O3 (using the concept of mechanistic reactivity). We show that this method can successfully simulate the observations of O3, OA, NOx, ethylene (C2H4), and OH to within measurement uncertainty using reasonable assumptions about the average chemistry of the unidentified SVOCs. These assumptions were (1) a reaction rate constant with OH of ~ 10-11 cm3 s-1; (2) a significant fraction (up to ~ 50 %) of the RO2 + NO reaction resulted in fragmentation, rather than functionalization, of the parent SVOC; (3) ~ 1.1 molecules of O3 were formed for every molecule of SVOC that reacted; (4) ~ 60 % of the OH that reacted with the unidentified non-methane organic compounds (NMOC) was regenerated as HO2; and (5) that ~ 50 % of the NO that reacted with the SVOC peroxy radicals was lost, presumably to organic nitrate formation. Additional evidence for the fragmentation pathway is provided by the observed rate of formation of acetic acid (CH3COOH), which is consistent with our assumed fragmentation rate. However, the model overestimates peroxyacetyl

  20. Study on the associated removal of pollutants from coal-firing flue gas using biomass activated carbon pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cuiping; Yuan, Wanli [Qingdao Univ., Shandong (China). Electrical and Mechanical Engineering College; Qi, Haiying [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A pilot-scale multi-layer system was developed for the adsorption of SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}/Hg from flue gas (real flue gases of an heating boiler house) at various operating conditions, including operating temperature and activated carbon materials. Excellent SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}/Hg removal efficiency was achieved with the multi-layer design with carbons pellets. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency achieved with the first layer adsorption bed clearly decreased as the operating temperature was increased due to the decrease of physisorption performance. The NO{sub x} removal efficiency measured at the second layer adsorption bed was very higher when the particle carbon impregnated with NH{sub 3}. The higher amounts of Hg absorbed by cotton-seed-skin activated carbon (CSAC) were mainly contributed by chlorinated congeners content. The simultaneously removal of SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}/Hg was optimization characterized with different carbon layer functions. Overall, The alkali function group and chloride content in CSAC impelled not only the outstanding physisorption but also better chemisorptions. The system for simultaneously removal of multi-pollutant-gas with biomass activated carbon pellets in multi-layer reactor was achieved and the removal results indicated was strongly depended on the activated carbon material and operating temperature.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A VALIDATED MODEL FOR USE IN MINIMIZING NOx EMISSIONS AND MAXIMIZING CARBON UTILIZATION WHEN CO-FIRING BIOMASS WITH COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Felix; P. Vann Bush

    2002-01-31

    This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT40895. A statement of the project objectives is included in the Introduction of this report. One additional biomass co-firing test burn was conducted during this quarter. In this test (Test 9), up to 20% by weight dry hardwood sawdust and switchgrass was injected through the center of the single-register burner with Jacobs Ranch coal. Jacobs Ranch coal is a low-sulfur Powder River Basin coal ({approx} 0.5% S). The results from Test 9 as well as for Test 8 (conducted late last quarter) are presented in this quarterly report. Significant progress has been made in implementing a modeling approach to combine reaction times and temperature distributions from computational fluid dynamic models of the pilot-scale combustion furnace with char burnout and chemical reaction kinetics to predict NO{sub x} emissions and unburned carbon levels in the furnace exhaust. Additional results of CFD modeling efforts have been received and preparations are under way for continued pilot-scale combustion experiments with the dual-register burner. Finally, a project review was held at NETL in Pittsburgh, on November 13, 2001.

  2. Biomass energy in the making; La biomasse: une energie en devenir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2008-07-01

    countries that produce large volumes of organic waste, including waste from the paper and agro-food industries, household refuse, and biogas from the fermentation of treatment plant sludge. At the top of the list: the United States, which generated 56 TWh of bio-power in 2005, and Brazil, which favors bagasse from sugar cane and biogas from distillery effluents. The electrical efficiency of a small biomass plant is 30% at best (35% with the best available technologies), whereas coal-fired plants achieve about 45% efficiency and combined-cycle gas-fired plants hit the 55% mark. A problem is the varying composition of straw, wood or waste fueling the boiler, calling for robust, adaptable burners, grates and fluidized beds. Either that, or the fuel has to be converted to produce standardized fuel such as wood pellets or dried sludge, which only ups the price of the fuel even more. Converting forest waste into wood chips, for example, costs 40 to 50 euros per MWh of heat, whereas unprocessed sawmill residue costs 10 to 20 euros for the same MWh. Another obstacle to developing biomass for power generation is the problem of collecting the raw materials from far and wide. In addition to solid biomass, biogas can be used to recycle liquid or wet waste that is difficult to transport. Biogas is produced by the digestion of wet biomass in an oxygen-deprived environment. Biogas contains 40% to 70% methane. The methane can then be used to fuel a gas-fired plant. This is one of the best configurations there is, since the biomass comes directly from the final waste. It's a good illustration of the 'waste to wealth' concept, which consists of recycling waste to produce energy.

  3. Experience with the operation and fuel supply of the biomass firing plant of the Trocknungsgenossenschaft Lengenfeld eG, a drying cooperative society; Erfahrungen mit Betrieb und Brennstoffbereitstellung der Biomassefeuerung der Trocknungsgenossenschaft Lengenfeld eG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, H. [Buero fuer Agraroekonomische Gutachten, Expertisen und Projektstudien, Langenbach (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The pilot project of the conversion of the green forage drying plant Lengenfeld to biomass firing could not be realized without problems. But the experience until now shows that it is in principle possible. The farmers involved are devoted to the project. For them the cultivation of biomass is an alternative to the abandonment of fields. The present low oil price sets limits to the positive income effect. The aim is an increase of the biomass share in heating energy supply to about 80%. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Umstellung der Gruenfuttertrocknung Lengenfeld auf Biomassefeuerung ist als Pilotprojekt nicht ohne Probleme moeglich gewesen. Die bisherigen Erfahrungen zeigen jedoch die grundsaetzliche Praktikabilitaet. Die beteiligten Landwirte sind engagiert bei der Sache und schaetzen die Produktionsmoeglichkeit als Alternative zur Flaechenstillegung. Der derzeit niedrige Oelpreis setzt der positiven Einkommenswirkung jedoch enge Grenzen. Eine Erhoehung des Biomasseanteils an der Heizenergieversorgung auf etwa 80% ist das Ziel. (orig.)

  4. Investigating the links between ozone and organic aerosol chemistry in a biomass burning plume from a prescribed fire in California chaparral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Alvarado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Within minutes after emission, rapid, complex photochemistry within a biomass burning smoke plume can cause large changes in the concentrations of ozone (O3 and organic aerosol (OA. Being able to understand and simulate this rapid chemical evolution under a wide variety of conditions is a critical part of forecasting the impact of these fires on air quality, atmospheric composition, and climate. Here we use version 2.1 of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP to simulate the evolution of O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA within a young biomass burning smoke plume from the Williams prescribed burn in chaparral, which was sampled over California in November 2009. We demonstrate the use of a method for simultaneously accounting for the impact of the unidentified semi-volatile to extremely low volatility organic compounds (here collectively called "SVOCs" on the formation of OA (using the Volatility Basis Set and O3 (using the concept of mechanistic reactivity. We show that this method can successfully simulate the observations of O3, OA, PAN, NOx, and C2H4 to within measurement uncertainty using reasonable assumptions about the chemistry of the unidentified SVOCs. These assumptions were: (1 a~reaction rate constant with OH of ~10−11cm3s−1, (2 a significant fraction (~50% of the RO2 + NO reaction resulted in fragmentation, rather than functionalization, of the parent SVOC, (3 ~1.1 molecules of O3 were formed for every molecule of SVOC that reacted, (4 ~60% of the OH that reacted with the unidentified SVOCs was regenerated as HO2, and (5 that ~50% of the NO that reacted with the SVOC peroxy radicals was lost, presumably to organic nitrate formation. Additional evidence for the fragmentation pathway is provided by the observed rate of formation of acetic acid, which is consistent with our assumed fragmentation rate. This method could provide a way for classifying different smoke plume observations in terms of the average chemistry of their SVOCs

  5. Comparison of the impact of fire, floods, and large herbivore grazing on the 3-D structure and biomass of Mopane Woodland in Kruger National Park using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A.; Washington-Allen, R. A.; Bruton, R.; Swemmer, A.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted a study to look at the impact of large herbivore grazing exclusion, fire, and flooding on the three dimensional (3-D) structure and biomass of Mopane woodlands using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS). The study was conducted at the 42-ha Letaba exclosure that is located on the northern shore of the Letaba River in the northern part of Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. The study entailed comparison of 4 X 30-m diameter paired plots, with 4 treatment (no grazing) plots within the exclosure and 4 control plots outside. Additionally, the northern 4 plots are in upland savanna vegetation on a gravelly loam stream terrace that had been burned in 2010. The southern 4 plots are in riparian woodlands on sandy loam soils that had been flooded in 2007. TLS data was collected at 4-cm spacing with 30-m range at 4 scans per plot. Scans were registered and a 3-D virtual environment was created for each plot from which canopy cover, plant density, and vegetation height were manually measured and biomass was derived. We used discriminant analysis to test the hypothesis that 4 structurally distinct groups would be detected, i.e., burned ungrazed savanna, burned grazed savanna, flooded ungrazed riparian, and a flooded grazed riparian group. We found that point density of grass and trees across plots correlated significantly with plot biomass. We predicted that exclosure biomass would be greater than biomass outside the exclosure and that upland biomass height and density in the canopy, shrub, and herbaceous layers within the exclosure compared to outside. However, though biomass was distinct, structural features were not in the upland pairs.

  6. Towards a better understanding of biomass suspension co-firing impacts via investigating a coal flame and a biomass flame in a swirl-stabilized burner flow reactor under same conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the combustion characteristics of firing pure coal and firing pure wheat straw in a 150 kW swirl-stabilized burner flow reactor under nearly same conditions. The results indicate very different combustion characteristics between the coal flame and straw flame. In the straw...... char....

  7. Thermodynamic Analysis of Supplementary-Fired Gas Turbine Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Qvale, Einar Bjørn

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possibilities for improving the efficiency of an indirectly biomass-fired gas turbine (IBFGT) by supplementary direct gas-firing. The supplementary firing may be based on natural gas, biogas, or pyrolysis gas. {The interest in this cycle arise from a recent......: Integration between an IFGT and pyrolysis of the biofuel which will result in a highly efficient utilization of the biomass, and integration between external biomass firing, internal biomass firing and internal natural gas firing. The marginal efficiency of the natural gas is in this case found...... for the indirectly fired gas turbine (IFGT) and for the supplementary-fired IFGT. Both results show that the combination of external firing and internal firing have the potential of reducing or solving some problems with the use of biomass both in the recuperated and the indirectly fired gas turbine: The former...

  8. History of grating images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Fujio

    2001-06-01

    Toppan Printing Co., Ltd. originated the name of 'grating image'. It means an image that consists of diffraction grating dots that look similar to the halftone dots of conventional printing. We proposed this new display method using simple gratings in order to enhance the visual effects when illumination is made by a fluorescent lamp. We considered the use of simple gratings as elemental dots, and used a number of elemental dots to display a 2D image. This method produces an effect something like the halftone dots of printing. The grating image technology grows from its starting to become able to produce 3D images and a 3D-video system using an electron beam grating-writing system.

  9. Study into the status of co-combustion of sewage sludge, biomass and household refuse in coal-fired power stations. Final report; Untersuchungen zum Stand der Mitverbrennung von Klaerschlamm, Hausmuell und Biomasse in Kohlekraftwerken. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, K.R.G.; Spliethoff, H.; Scheurer, W. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen; Seifert, H.; Richers, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer technische Chemie - Thermische Abfallbehandlung

    2000-03-01

    The co-combustion of wastes in power stations is an additional option for the thermal treatment of certain waste materials and thus for complying with the specifications of the German TA-Siedlungsabfall (technical directive on disposal of municipal solid waste). The present investigation compiles the status of knowledge about co-combustion of sewage sludge, biomass and selected waste materials in coal-fired power stations. The results are meant to provide extensive assistance to evaluate the processes and thus to contribute to sort out uncertainties, both on the part of power plant operators and of the authorities. Based on the information acquired, the report shall point out the gaps in knowledge, the further need for research and development and the need for action conerning the authorities. By enquiries at disposal enterprises, power station operators as well as authorities, the literature work was completed and a comprehensive view of the current situation in Germany elaborated. The report points out the legal conditions of co-combustion and supplementary fuel potentials, presents the process engineering of co-combustion, and examines the obstacles encountered during the technical conversion, the environmental questions, and the potential for co-combustion of the above materials in existing power stations. The electrical power sector is subject to strong changes due to the liberalisation of the energy market. The pressure on costs has increased and the periods available for planning are shorter. On the one hand, this arouses an increased interest in co-combustion of waste materials because of possible additional payments for the wastes. On the other hand, however, initiatives in this respect are counteracted by high investments costs necessary for the introduction of co-combustion with the existing high environmental standards. What is more, the competitive situation reduces the exchange of experience between the power station operators. Co-combustion of sewage

  10. The effect of cleaning on materials wastage in biomass and waste fired power plants; Sotningens inverkan paa materialfoerluster foer bio- och avfallseldade pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjoernhede, Anders; Henderson, Pamela

    2006-03-15

    The reason for this study is the relatively large material loss caused by soot blowing of heat exchange surface in waste- and biomass fired boilers. The material losses depend on the method of cleaning: Normally soot blowing with a relatively high pressure is used in order to remove deposits on super heater tubes. However, this also damages the tube material. Earlier theories state that the material losses are caused by erosion or rather erosion-corrosion of the tube surface. There is a clear evidence for the existence for this type of damage, but it is often caused by badly adjusted soot blowing equipment. However, even well adjusted equipment causes accelerated metal loss, albeit lower than with badly adjusted soot blowers. This type of material loss is caused by the removal of the outer molten deposit layer. This outer layer of deposit actually acts as a barrier to corrosive species diffusing inwards towards the oxide and uncorroded metal. There is a lamellar oxide under this deposit, which is especially protective if it contains Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3} or Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The lamellar oxide is damaged by the defects produced by the soot blowing and the diffusion of corrosive species into the metal tube. Since molybdenum probably through molybdenum oxide seems to reduce metal losses due to soot blowing, alloys containing molybdenum should be used. The addition of sulphur, or sulphur compounds like ammonium sulphate reduces the deposit growth rate by about 50%. This means that the soot blowing frequency and therefore metal losses are reduced. There is also an indication that certain metals or alloys reduce the tendency for deposits to stick to tubes. Coating with pure nickel is one example of this, but as nickel is sensitive to soot blowing it is not possible to use nickel in areas affected by soot blowing. A common way of reducing metal losses is to mount tube shields on the most affected tubes. These shields are changed regularly. Normally expensive

  11. Grating image technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Fujio

    1995-07-01

    The word 'grating image' was first named by Toppan Printing Company, Ltd. It means that an image consists of grating dots. In 1988, we presented this new technology at the Optical Security Systems Symposium, in Switzerland. Then it was improved and applied in display application. Recently, it was further applied in 3D video systems. In this report, the development history and the recent situations of grating image technology are described.

  12. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Wooster

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gases releases from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and an infrared lamp separated by 150–250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find, for example, that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.001 μmol mol−1 (~10 ppbv can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. We focus analysis on five key compounds whose production is preferential during the pyrolysis (CH2O, flaming (CO2 and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3 fire phases. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires in general show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the residual smouldering combustion stage can differ substantially (e.g., ERCH4/CO2 up to ~7 times higher than for the flaming stages. The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy, thus allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and the "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. The derived "fire averaged" emission ratios are dominated by the headfire contribution, since

  13. Materials for higher steam temperatures (up to 600 deg C) in biomass and waste fired plant. A review of present knowledge; Material foer hoegre aangtemperaturer (upp till 600 grader C) i bio- och avfallseldade anlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staalenheim, Annika; Henderson, Pamela

    2011-02-15

    A goal for the Swedish power industry is to build a demonstration biomass-fired plant with 600 deg C steam data in 2015. Vaermeforsk also has a goal to identify materials that can be used in such a plant. This project involves a survey of present knowledge and published articles concerning materials that are suitable for use in biomass and wastefired plants with steam data up to 600 deg C. The information has been gathered from plants presently in operation, and from field tests previously performed with probes. Plants firing only household waste are excluded. The components considered are waterwalls/furnace walls (affected because of higher steam pressures) and superheaters. Fireside corrosion and steam-side oxidation are dealt with. Candidate materials (or coatings) are suggested and areas for further research have been identified. The purpose of this project is to give state-of-the-art information on what materials could be used in biomass and waste-fired plant to reach a maximum steam temperature of 600 deg C. This report is aimed at suppliers of boilers and materials, energy utility companies and others involved in building new plant with higher steam data. In accordance with the goals of this project: - Materials suitable for use at higher steam temperatures (up to 600 deg C steam) in wood-based biomass and waste-fired plant have been identified. Austenitic stainless steels HR3C, TP 347 HFG and AC66 all have adequate strength, steam-side oxidation and fireside corrosion resistance for use as superheaters. AC66 and HR3C have better steam-side oxidation resistance than TP 347 HFG , but TP 347 HFG has better fireside corrosion resistance. It is recommended that TP 347 HFG be shot-peened on the inside to improve the oxidation resistance if in service with steam temperatures above 580 deg C. - Furnace walls coated with Ni-based alloys or a mixture of Ni- alloy and ceramic show good corrosion resistance at lower temperatures and should be evaluated at higher

  14. Nickel- and iron-based HVOF thermal spray coatings for high temperature corrosion protection in biomass-fired power plant boilers

    OpenAIRE

    Oksa, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Biomass burning for production of electricity and heat has been increasing due to legislation in Europe. Growing awareness of environmental problems has led to strict restrictions on greenhouse emissions in the energy sector, and increased demand for higher use of renewable energy sources and carbon-neutral fuels, such as biomass. There are over 1000 biomass boilers in Europe, and the number is increasing. These plants often face serious problems due to high temperature corrosion. Fouling and...

  15. 林火对兴安落叶松根生物量及碳氮养分浓度的影响%Impacts of forest fire on root biomass, carbon and nitrogen concentration of Larix gmelinii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楚旭; 邸雪颖; 杨光

    2013-01-01

    With Larix gmelinii forests as test objects in Tahe Forestry Bureau on Great Xing'an Mountains, northeastern China, taking the investigation of forests burned at different time, their roots were sampled to analyze the change of root biomass, C and N nutrient concentration and C/N value after the fire. The results showed that: 1 ) One week after fire, live root biomass of low intensity and moderate intensity burning trees were only 80% and 36% of control trees, fine root biomass of < 1 mm diameter were 60% and 19% of control trees, respectively; 2) Three months after fire, fine roots of low intensity burning trees had came to a certain degree of recovery, fine roots of moderate intensity burning trees was significantly lower than the recovery degree of low intensity one. Two years after fire, there was no significant difference between the root biomass of low intensity burning tree and control, and there was no significant difference between fine root biomass of < 1 mm diameter of moderate intensity burning trees and control; 3 ) Fire reduced tree root nutrient concentrations of carbon and nitrogen, low intensity burning decreased the value of C/N, however, moderate intensity burning increased the value of C/N. Forest fire had a significant impact on tree roots. After roots of trees were burned, their physical activity and living environment were also changed and many factors will affect the recovery of roots.%以大兴安岭塔河林业局兴安落叶松林为研究对象,对不同时间火烧迹地进行调查,采用挖掘法获取土壤根系样品,研究火后落叶松根生物量,C、N养分浓度及C/N值变化.结果表明:1)火烧后1周,受低强度和中等强度火烧树木的活根生物量仅是对照树木的80%和36%,<1 mm细根生物量则分别是对照的60%和19%.2)火烧后3个月,受低强度火烧树木细根得到了一定程度的恢复,受中等强度火烧树木根恢复程度明显低于受低强度火烧树木;火后2年,前

  16. Bragg gratings in Topas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, C.; Webb, D.J.; Kalli, K.

    We report for the first time fibre Bragg grating inscription in microstructured optical fibre fabricated from Topas® cyclic olefin copolymer. The temperature sensitivity of the grating was studied revealing a positive Bragg wavelength shift of approximately 0.8 nmK-1,the largest sensitivity yet...

  17. An elastomeric grating coupler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocabas, A.; Ay, F.; Dana, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel nondestructive and reversible method for coupling free space light to planar optical waveguides. In this method, an elastomeric grating is used to produce an effective refractive index modulation on the surface of the optical waveguide. The external elastomeric grating binds to

  18. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Wooster

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gas release from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and an IR source separated by 150–250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find for example that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.01 μmol mol−1 [10 ppbv] can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. Though FTIR spectroscopy can detect dozens of different chemical species present in vegetation fire smoke, we focus our analysis on five key combustion products released preferentially during the pyrolysis (CH2O, flaming (CO2 and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3 processes. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion (RSC stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires often show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the RSC stage can differ substantially. The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy (FRE, allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. These "fire averaged" metrics are dominated by the headfire contribution, since the FRE data indicate that the vast majority

  19. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, M. J.; Freeborn, P. H.; Archibald, S.; Oppenheimer, C.; Roberts, G. J.; Smith, T. E. L.; Govender, N.; Burton, M.; Palumbo, I.

    2011-11-01

    Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gas release from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and an IR source separated by 150-250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find for example that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.01 μmol mol-1 [10 ppbv] can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. Though FTIR spectroscopy can detect dozens of different chemical species present in vegetation fire smoke, we focus our analysis on five key combustion products released preferentially during the pyrolysis (CH2O), flaming (CO2) and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3) processes. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion (RSC) stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires often show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the RSC stage can differ substantially. The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy (FRE), allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. These "fire averaged" metrics are dominated by the headfire contribution, since the FRE data indicate that the vast majority of the fuel is burned in this stage. Our fire averaged emission ratios and factors

  20. Materials for Waste Incinerators and Biomass Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rademakers, P.; Grossmann, G.; Karlsson, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the projects of the sub-package on waste incineration and biomass firing carried out within COST 501 Round III, Work Package 13.......This paper reviews the projects of the sub-package on waste incineration and biomass firing carried out within COST 501 Round III, Work Package 13....

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A VALIDATED MODEL FOR USE IN MINIMIZING NOx EMISSIONS AND MAXIMIZING CARBON UTILIZATION WHEN CO-FIRING BIOMASS WITH COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Felix; P. Vann Bush; Stephen Niksa

    2003-04-30

    In full-scale boilers, the effect of biomass cofiring on NO{sub x} and unburned carbon (UBC) emissions has been found to be site-specific. Few sets of field data are comparable and no consistent database of information exists upon which cofiring fuel choice or injection system design can be based to assure that NOX emissions will be minimized and UBC be reduced. This report presents the results of a comprehensive project that generated an extensive set of pilot-scale test data that were used to validate a new predictive model for the cofiring of biomass and coal. All testing was performed at the 3.6 MMBtu/hr (1.75 MW{sub t}) Southern Company Services/Southern Research Institute Combustion Research Facility where a variety of burner configurations, coals, biomasses, and biomass injection schemes were utilized to generate a database of consistent, scalable, experimental results (422 separate test conditions). This database was then used to validate a new model for predicting NO{sub x} and UBC emissions from the cofiring of biomass and coal. This model is based on an Advanced Post-Processing (APP) technique that generates an equivalent network of idealized reactor elements from a conventional CFD simulation. The APP reactor network is a computational environment that allows for the incorporation of all relevant chemical reaction mechanisms and provides a new tool to quantify NOx and UBC emissions for any cofired combination of coal and biomass.

  2. Undergraduate Research Experiences in Support of Dryland Monitoring: Field and Satellite Remote Sensing of Change in Savanna Structure, Biomass, and Carbon after Prescribed Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington-Allen, R. A.; Twidwell, D. L., Jr.; Mendieta, V. P.; Delgado, A.; Redman, B.; Trollope, W. S.; Trollope, L.; Govender, N.; Smit, I.; Popescu, S. C.; de Bruno Austin, C.; Reeves, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    The status and trend of degradation in the world’s Drylands, that support over 1.2 billion people, is unknown because monitoring & assessment has not occurred on a globally consistent basis and skilled personnel with a cultivated interest in natural resource science and management are lacking. A major monitoring dataset is the 37-year Landsat data archive that has been released free to the world, but this dataset requires persons who understand how to process and interpret this and similar datasets applicable to the desertification problem. The College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (COALS) at Texas A&M University (TAMU) has an initiative to provide undergraduates with both international and research experiences. The lead author used start-up money, USFS project funds for livestock footprint studies in the US, and seed money from COALS to 1) develop academic mentor contacts in Mozambique, Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, and Tunisia to prepare a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (NSF-REU) Site proposal and 2) launch a pilot REU for two TAMU undergraduate students. Mr. Delgado and Mr. Redman received lidar processing and visualization, field survey training on global positioning systems (GPS), terrestrial LIDAR, and ground penetrating radar technologies and conducted carbon change studies by collecting pre- and post-fire laser scans on experimental burn (EPB) sites in Texas and South Africa. Mr. Redman also developed GIS databases of Landsat timeseries for these EPBs and others in southern Africa. Mr. Delgado participated in the Savanna Fire Ignition Research Experiment (SavFIRE) in Kruger National Park (KNP) by collected laser scan data on 3 EPBs. He also received mentoring from Dr. Winston Trollope, a prominent fire ecologist, and Mr. Chris Austin both of Working with Fire International and Navashni Govender, KNP’s Fire Ecologist. He also was an active participant in a NASA sponsored workshop on remote sensing of global

  3. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    The ash behavior during suspension firing of 12 alternative solid biofuels, such as pectin waste, mash from a beer brewery, or waste from cigarette production have been studied and compared to wood and straw ash behavior. Laboratory suspension firing tests were performed on an entrained flow...... analysis into three main groups depending upon their ash content of silica, alkali metal, and calcium and magnesium. To further detail the biomass classification, the relative molar ratio of Cl, S, and P to alkali were included. The study has led to knowledge on biomass fuel ash composition influence...... on ash transformation, ash deposit flux, and deposit chlorine content when biomass fuels are applied for suspension combustion....

  4. Gratings in polymeric waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishakov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Kocabas, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2007-04-01

    Laser-induced formation of polymer Bragg grating filters for Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) applications is discussed. Acrylate monomers halogenated with both fluorine and chlorine, which possess absorption losses less than 0.25 dB/cm and wide choice of refractive indices (from 1.3 to 1.5) in the 1.5 μm telecom wavelength region were used. The monomers are highly intermixable thus permitting to adjust the refractive index of the composition within +/-0.0001. Moreover they are photocurable under UV exposure and exhibit high contrast in polymerization. These properties make halogenated acrylates very promising for fabricating polymeric waveguides and photonic circuits. Single-mode polymer waveguides were fabricated on silicon wafers using resistless contact lithography. Submicron index gratings have been written in polymer waveguides using holographic exposure with He-Cd laser beam (325 nm) through a phase mask. Both uniform and apodized gratings have been fabricated. The gratings are stable and are not erased by uniform UV exposure. The waveguide gratings possess narrowband reflection spectra in the 1.5 μm wavelength region of 0.4 nm width, nearly rectangular shape of the stopband and reflectivity R > 99%. The fabricated Bragg grating filters can be used for multiplexing/demultiplexing optical signals in high-speed DWDM optical fiber networks.

  5. Plasma coatings against corrosion and abrasion on pipes and panels at coal-fired power plants, biomass- and waste incinerating plants; Plasmaspritzschichten gegen Korrosion und Verschleiss auf Dampferzeugerrohren in Kohlekraftwerken, Biomasse- und Muellheizkraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balting, U. [Ingenieurbuero co.balt, Emmerich (Germany); Haeuser, B. [Haeuser und Co. GmbH, Duisburg (Germany); Weber, T. [Wall Colmonoy Ltd., Swansea (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    In today's steam generators which are applied in conventionally fired coal power plants, as well as in waste incineration plants, wear and corrosion are of major concern. These problems are successfully combated by enhancing the steam parameters. Applied material solutions lead to higher plant efficiencies. Protective layers on heat exchanger surfaces which proved to be successful are deposited by APS (atmospheric plasma spraying). (orig.)

  6. Fire and the distribution and uncertainty of carbon sequestered as above-ground tree biomass in Yosemite and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, James A.; Matchett, John R.; Tarnay, Leland W.; Smith, Douglas F.; Becker, Kendall M.L.; Furniss, Tucker J.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2017-01-01

    Fire is one of the principal agents changing forest carbon stocks and landscape level distributions of carbon, but few studies have addressed how accurate carbon accounting of fire-killed trees is or can be. We used a large number of forested plots (1646), detailed selection of species-specific and location-specific allometric equations, vegetation type maps with high levels of accuracy, and Monte Carlo simulation to model the amount and uncertainty of aboveground tree carbon present in tree species (hereafter, carbon) within Yosemite and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. We estimated aboveground carbon in trees within Yosemite National Park to be 25 Tg of carbon (C) (confidence interval (CI): 23–27 Tg C), and in Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Park to be 20 Tg C (CI: 18–21 Tg C). Low-severity and moderate-severity fire had little or no effect on the amount of carbon sequestered in trees at the landscape scale, and high-severity fire did not immediately consume much carbon. Although many of our data inputs were more accurate than those used in similar studies in other locations, the total uncertainty of carbon estimates was still greater than ±10%, mostly due to potential uncertainties in landscape-scale vegetation type mismatches and trees larger than the ranges of existing allometric equations. If carbon inventories are to be meaningfully used in policy, there is an urgent need for more accurate landscape classification methods, improvement in allometric equations for tree species, and better understanding of the uncertainties inherent in existing carbon accounting methods.

  7. The formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjerrild Zeuthen, J.

    2007-05-15

    This thesis describes the formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. The formation of aerosol particles is investigated by studying condensation of alkali salts from synthetic flue gasses in a laboratory tubular furnace. In this so-called laminar flow aerosol condenser-furnace gaseous alkali chlorides are mixed with sulphur dioxide, water vapour and oxygen. At high temperatures the alkali chloride reacts with sulphur dioxide to form alkali sulphate. During subsequent cooling of the synthetic flue gas the chlorides and sulphates condense either as deposits on walls or on other particles or directly from the gas phase by homogenous nucleation. A previously developed computer code for simulation of one-component nucleation of particles in a cylindrical laminar flow is extended to include a homogeneous gas phase reaction to produce gaseous alkali sulphate. The formation of aerosol particles during full-scale combustion of wheat straw is investigated in a 100 MW grate-fired boiler. Finally, aerosols from incineration of waste are investigated during full-scale combustion of municipal waste in a 22 MW grate-fired unit. (BA)

  8. Regulation possibilities of biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzdalenko, Vera; Gedrovics, Martins; Zake, Maija; Barmina, Inesa

    2012-11-01

    The focus of the recent experimental research is to analyze the regulation possibilities of biomass combustion. Three possibilities were chosen as part of this research: a) biomass cofiring with propane, b) swirling flow with re-circulation zone, and c) use of a permanent magnet. The aim of the research is to provide stable, controllable and effective biomass combustion with minimum emissions. The special pilot device was created where biomass can be combusted separately and co-fired with propane. Wood pellets were used during the experiments.

  9. Experimental Study on NOx Reduction in a Coal-fired Boiler by Reburning Biomass Syngas with Tar%含焦油生物质气再燃还原燃煤锅炉NOx的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷仁豪; 罗永浩; 刘春元; 张睿智; 曹阳

    2012-01-01

    A test rig, consisting of a 10 kW updraft biomass gasifier and a 20 kW pulverized-coal drop tube furnace, was established to investigate the technology of NOx reduction in a coal-fired boiler by reburning biomass syngas with tar under different reburning conditions. Results show that the tar produced in gasification process will crack into hydrocarbon radicals with high heat value, which have a positive effect on NOx reduction. Higher efficiency of NO, reduction may be obtained at lower excess air coefficients and higher reburning temperatures, and in the experiment, the data may get above 80%. The application of bi omass syngas reburning technology may help to handle the tough problem of tar disposal, raise conversion rate of biomass energy, and simultaneously reduce NOx emission from coal-fired boilers.%搭建了10kW上吸式生物质气化炉和20kW煤粉沉降炉组成的生物质气化再燃试验系统,分析了不同再燃条件下含焦油生物质气再燃还原燃煤锅炉NOx的特性.结果表明:气化过程中产生的焦油在再燃过程中会裂解生成高热值的烃类气体,这些烃类气体还原NOx的效果明显;当过量空气系数较小、再燃温度较高时,NOx的还原效率较高,试验中最高还原效率超过80%;采用生物质气化再燃的方式既可以解决焦油难处理的问题,又可以提高生物质能量的转化效率,同时可高效降低燃煤锅炉NOx的排放量.

  10. Circular Fibonacci gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nan; Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2011-11-01

    We introduce circular Fibonacci gratings (CFGs) that combine the concept of circular gratings and Fibonacci structures. Theoretical analysis shows that the diffraction pattern of CFGs is composed of fractal distributions of impulse rings. Numerical simulations are performed with two-dimensional fast Fourier transform to reveal the fractal behavior of the diffraction rings. Experimental results are also presented and agree well with the numerical results. The fractal nature of the diffraction field should be of great theoretical interest, and shows potential to be further developed into practical applications, such as in laser measurement with wideband illumination.

  11. Integral Method for Gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Maystre, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The chapter contains a detailed presentation of the surface integral theory for modelling light diffraction by surface-relief diffraction gratings having a one-dimensional periodicity. Several different approaches are presented, leading either to a single integral equation, or to a system of coupled integral equations. Special attention is paid to the singularities of the kernels, and to different techniques to accelerate the convergence of the numerical computations. The theory is applied to gratings having different profiles with or without edges, to real metal and dielectrics, and to perfectly conducting substrates.

  12. An elastomeric grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Ay, Feridun; Dâna, Aykutlu; Aydinli, Atilla

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel nondestructive and reversible method for coupling free space light to planar optical waveguides. In this method, an elastomeric grating is used to produce an effective refractive index modulation on the surface of the optical waveguide. The external elastomeric grating binds to the surface of the waveguide with van der Waals forces and makes conformal contact without any applied pressure. As a demonstration of the feasibility of the approach, we use it to measure the refractive index of a silicon oxynitride film. This technique is nondestructive, reversible, low cost and can easily be applied to the characterization of optical materials for integrated optics.

  13. Ultra-High Temperature Gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Canning; Somnath Bandyopadhyay; Michael Stevenson; Kevin Cook

    2008-01-01

    Regenerated gratings seeded by type-Ⅰ gratings are shown to withstand temperatures beyond 1000 ℃. The method of regeneration offers a new approach to increasing temperature resistance of stable fibre Bragg and other gratings. These ultra-high temperature (UHT) gratings extend the applicability of silicate based components to high temperature applications such as monitoring of smelters and vehicle and aircraft engines to high power fibre lasers.

  14. Fire Perimeters

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2003. Some fires...

  15. Fire History

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2002. Some fires...

  16. 2D and 3D Eulerian Simulations of the Dynamics and Gas and Aerosol Chemistry of a Young Biomass Burning Smoke Plume from a Savannah Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Prinn, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth of aerosol particles and production of ozone in young smoke plumes is the result of a complex interaction between the mean flow in the smoke plume, turbulent diffusion, gas-phase oxidation, coagulation, and mass transfer between phases. Models allow us to separate the effects of these processes and predict their impact on the global environment. We present the results of two and three-dimensional Eulerian simulations of the dynamics and chemistry of the smoke plume formed by the Timbavati savannah fire studied during SAFARI 2000 (Hobbs et al., 2003, JGR, doi:10.1029/2002JD002352). The dynamical model is an extension of an Eulerian cloud-resolving model that has previously been used to study the role of deep convective clouds on tropospheric chemistry (Wang and Prinn, 2000, JGR, 105(D17) 22,269-22,297). The model includes a source of sensible heat, gases, and particles at the surface to simulate the savannah fire. The new gas and aerosol chemistry model includes heterogeneous chemistry, kinetic mass transfer, coagulation and the formation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol. Photolysis rates are calculated based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation within the plume, including the scattering and absorption of radiation by the smoke aerosols. Our preliminary 2D Eulerian results using standard chemistry and UV fluxes show that the model can simulate the lower but not the higher levels of O3 observed. Also, the simulated 2D O3 field shows a wave-like pattern in the downwind direction, even though the emissions from the fire are held constant. This suggests that plume heterogeneity in the downwind direction may account for some of the observed variability in O3. We will present results of runs incorporating higher resolution calculation of photolysis rates, heterogeneous HONO formation, and gas phase reactions involving the uncharacterized organic compounds observed in the gas phase of the Timbavati plume in order to better simulate these

  17. Microscale modelling of ambient air concentrations resulting from the increased combustion of biomass firing systems within the 1{sup st} Ordinance for the Implementation of the Federal Immission Control Act (1. BImSchV); Modellrechnungen zu den Immissionsbelastungen bei einer verstaerkten Verfeuerung von Biomasse in Feuerungsanlagen der 1. BImSchV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, Guenter; Struschka, Michael; Juschka, Winfried; Carrasco, Maria; Ang, Keng Been; Hu, Lupin [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen (IVD); Baechlin, Wolfgang; Soergel, Christine [Ingenieurbuero Lohmeyer GmbH und Co. KG, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    By means of a detailed emissions modelling with subsequent highly resolved ambient air pollutant dispersion modelling an assessment method has been developed. This method is a tool for city planners to assess the effects of an increased usage of biomass in heating firings on the air quality situation in different residential areas. Emission simulations have been carried out for the combustion of wood pellets, log wood, wood chips and grain residues as well as for natural gas and heating oil. The emissions depend on the ambient temperature, the building and user specific heat demand and on the operation conditions of the firing. For the operation conditions different emission factors have been set for nominal and partial load as well as for unsteady conditions like boiler start or for shutdown of the firing. The following firings have been considered for burning the above mentioned fuels: Central heating boilers, decentralised heating networks with pellet and wood chip boilers, single stoves for additional heating and grain residue furnaces. Dependent on the ambient temperature for different regions of Germany and for a reference year of the Deutsche Wetterdienst annual emission time series with 1h resolution have been calculated for the different firing fuel combinations. Using these modelled emission data dispersion modelling was carried out for different meteorological and building specific frame conditions. A rural and an urban model area have been investigated. The emissions time series which were calculated for the individual buildings with 1h time resolution were spatially allocated and each single chimney was simulated as point source. For modelling the flow field coined by the building structure the flow model MISKAM has been applied. For dispersion simulation the model AUSTAL2000 has been used. Simulations have been carried out with three different wind and dispersion class distributions typical for many regions of Germany. A further parameter variation

  18. Transfer characteristics of heavy metals under biomass waste and plastics waste co-firing conditions%生物质与塑料类垃圾混烧过程的重金属迁移特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢明超; 马晓茜; 曾广博

    2015-01-01

    To study the weight loss rate and transfer behavior of heavy metals (Pb,Cu,Zn)under biomass wastes and plastic wastes co-firing conditions,experiments about seven components (wood,paper,rubber,recycled PE,re-cycled PP,recycled PS and recycled PVC)were conducted on a tube furnace and a atomic absorption spectropho-tometer.The results show that,co-combustion of biomass and plastic wastes causes a decrease in weight loss rate of the samples,especially the paper.When the sample is burned alone,the volatilization rate of Pb can reach over 85%at 900 ℃,that of Cu in four plastic wastes can reach over 85% at 1 000 ℃,and that of Zn rises significantly at high temperatures.Pb can be captured in bottom ash when the paper is co-fired with the plastics except the PVC.Cu can be captured in bottom ash when the wood and paper are co-fired with the PVC and the rubber.Zn can be captured in bottom ash when the wood is co-fired with the plastics except the rubber or the paper with the PS.%为了研究生物质与塑料类垃圾混烧对失重率和重金属 Pb,Cu,Zn 迁移特性的影响,利用管式炉和原子吸收分光光度计对木、纸、橡胶、再生 PE、再生 PP、再生 PS 和再生 PVC 7种组分进行燃烧试验。结果表明:1)生物质与塑料类垃圾混烧会不同程度地降低样品失重率,纸比木降幅更明显;2)单样燃烧时,900℃下 Pb 的挥发率可达85%以上,1000℃下4种塑料中 Cu的挥发率可达85%以上,高温阶段 Zn 的挥发率明显上升;3)纸与除 PVC 外的塑料混烧可以使 Pb 固定在底灰中;4)木、纸分别与 PVC 和橡胶混烧,可以使 Cu 固定在底灰中;5)木与除橡胶外的塑料混烧、纸与 PS 混烧,均可使 Zn 固定在底灰中。

  19. Biomass CFB gasifier connected to a 350 MW{sub t}h steam boiler fired with coal and natural gas - THERMIE demonstration project in Lahti in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palonen, J. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Varkaus (Finland). Varkaus Global New Products

    1997-12-31

    Laempoevoima Oy`s Kymijaervi power plant gasification project is to demonstrate the direct gasification of wet biofuel and the use of hot, raw and very low-calorific gas directly in the existing coal-fired boiler. The gasification of biofuels and co-combustion of gases in the existing coal-fired boiler offers many advantages such as: recycling of CO{sub 2}, decreased SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, efficient way to utilize biofuels and recycled refuse fuels, low investment and operation costs, and utilization of the existing power plant capacity. Furthermore, only small modifications are required in the boiler, possible disturbances in the gasifier do not shut down the power plant. (author)

  20. Estimation of carbon emissions from crown fires in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, O.; Bilgili, E.

    2009-04-01

    Forest biomass consumption is an important index for carbon cycling. Forest fire represents one of the important sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to biomass burning processes. Forest fire contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration therefore, role of forest fires in the global carbon cycle has received increasing interest. Various methods were used to estimation of carbon emission. IPCC methodology is commonly used for the calculation of GHG amounts released at forest fire in Europe especially on a national basis. Many European countries have done many studies relation to estimation of carbon emissions from forest fires. However, carbon emissions from forest fires were not estimated in Turkey. The objective of this paper was to estimate carbon emission from forest fires from 1997 to 2006 in three forest district directorate of Turkey. We have used IPCC methodology for estimation of carbon emission form forest fire in Turkey. The emission calculations associated with forest fires were carried out using the IPCC methodology for estimating emissions from biomass burning. According to IPCC methodology, the annual carbon release of gas is the product of parameters: Annual biomass loss by burning (kt), fraction of biomass oxidized on-site, carbon content (CC), emission ratio, N/C ratio. A set of forest fire data during 1997-2006 obtained from the Turkish Ministry of Environment and Forestry-General Directorate of Forestry Service. Fuel biomass and fuel consumption data were provided from experimental fires and biomass studies in Turkey. The highest carbon emission amount was CO2 gas. A wide range in carbon emissions of 0.37-94.85 Gg was caused by variability in pre-fire fuel characteristics (fuel size, distribution, fuel moisture and total load), fire type, fire season and fire weather, which affected fuel moisture and fire behavior. Keywords: Carbon emissions, Forest fire, Fuel consumption, IPCC, Turkey

  1. Thermodynamic Analysis of Supplementary-Fired Gas Turbine Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Qvale, Einar Bjørn

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possibilities for improving the efficiency of an indi-rectly biomass-fired gas turbine (IBFGT) by supplementary direct gas-firing. The supple-mentary firing may be based on natural gas, biogas or pyrolysis gas. Intuitively, sup-plementary firing is expected...... for the recu-perated gas turbine. Instead, other process changes may be considered in order to obtain a high marginal efficiency on natural gas. Two possibilities are discussed: Integration between an IFGT and pyrolysis of the biofuel which will result in a highly efficient utilization of the biomass...... for the indirectly fired gas turbine (IFGT) and for the supplementary-fired IFGT. These results show that the combination of external firing and internal firing have the potential of reducing or solving some problems associated with the use of biomass both in the recuperated and the indirectly fired gas turbine...

  2. Development of METHANE de-NOX Reburn Process for Wood Waste and Biomass Fired Stoker Boilers - Final Report - METHANE de-NOX Reburn Technology Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rabovitser; B. Bryan; S. Wohadlo; S. Nester; J. Vaught; M. Tartan (Gas Technology Institute); R. Glickert (ESA Environmental Solutions)

    2007-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of the METHANE de-NOX® (MdN) Reburn process in the Forest Products Industry (FPI) to provide more efficient use of wood and sludge waste (biosolids) combustion for both energy generation and emissions reduction (specifically from nitrogen oxides (NOx)) and to promote the transfer of the technology to the wide range of wood waste-fired stoker boilers populating the FPI. This document, MdN Reburn Commercial Technology Manual, was prepared to be a resource to promote technology transfer and commercialization activities of MdN in the industry and to assist potential users understand its application and installation requirements. The Manual includes a compilation of MdN commercial design data from four different stoker boiler designs that were baseline tested as part of the development effort. Design information in the Manual include boiler CFD model studies, process design protocols, engineering data sheets and commercial installation drawings. Each design package is unique and implemented in a manner to meet specific mill requirements.

  3. Release of K, Cl, and S during combustion and co-combustion with wood of high-chlorine biomass in bench and pilot scale fuel beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Joakim Myung; Aho, Martti; Paakkinen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the release of critical ash-forming elements from combustion of biomass are typically conducted with small sample masses under well controlled conditions. In biomass combustion on a grate, secondary recapture and release reactions in the fuel-bed may affect the overall release...... and partitioning of these elements. Earlier work by the authors on the release of K, Cl, and S from a high-chlorine biomass (corn stover) in a lab-scale setup is, in the present work, supplemented with novel results from a bench-scale fixed bed reactor and a 100kW moving grate pilot facility. The results from...... the bench-scale reactor indicate that S and K release are not significantly affected by secondary reactions, while Cl is partly recaptured by secondary reactions in the char. A linear increase in K-release was observed from 50% at 906°C to almost 80wt.% at 1234°C when firing only corn stover. A similar...

  4. Biomass combustion gas turbine CHP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchard, D.

    2002-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a project to develop a small scale biomass combustor generating system using a biomass combustor and a micro-gas turbine indirectly fired via a high temperature heat exchanger. Details are given of the specification of commercially available micro-turbines, the manufacture of a biomass converter, the development of a mathematical model to predict the compatibility of the combustor and the heat exchanger with various compressors and turbines, and the utilisation of waste heat for the turbine exhaust.

  5. Boiler conversions for biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinni, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Boiler conversions from grate- and oil-fired boilers to bubbling fluidized bed combustion have been most common in pulp and paper industry. Water treatment sludge combustion, need for additional capacity and tightened emission limits have been the driving forces for the conversion. To accomplish a boiler conversion for biofuel, the lower part of the boiler is replaced with a fluidized bed bottom and new fuel, ash and air systems are added. The Imatran Voima Rauhalahti pulverized-peat-fired boiler was converted to bubbling fluidized bed firing in 1993. In the conversion the boiler capacity was increased by 10 % to 295 MWth and NO{sub x} emissions dropped. In the Kymmene Kuusankoski boiler, the reason for conversion was the combustion of high chlorine content biosludge. The emissions have been under general European limits. During the next years, the emission limits will tighten and the boilers will be designed for most complete combustion and compounds, which can be removed from flue gases, will be taken care of after the boiler. (orig.) 3 refs.

  6. Biomass pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  7. Low crosstalk Arrayed Waveguide Grating with Cascaded Waveguide Grating Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Yang; Liu Yuan; Gao Dingshan, E-mail: dsgao@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-02-01

    We propose a highly compact and low crosstalk arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) with cascaded waveguide grating (CWGF). The side lobes of the silicon nanowire AWG, which are normally introduced by fabrication errors, can be effectively suppressed by the CWGF. And the crosstalk can be improved about 15dB.

  8. Switchable Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Carl Johan

    2003-01-01

    The subject of this ph.d. thesis was the development of an electrically switchable Bragg grating made in an optical waveguide using thermal poling to be applied within optical telecommunication systems. The planar waveguides used in this thesis were fabricated at the Micro- and Nanotechnology....... This result is very useful in the production of telecommunication devices since polarization independence of the second-order nonlinearity is wanted. In order to increase the second-order nonlinearity, it was found that the introduction of a high refractive index trapping layer was favorable. During...

  9. Biomass recalcitrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felby, Claus

    2009-01-01

    , enzymatic hydrolysis, and product fermentation options. Biomass Recalcitrance is essential reading for researchers, process chemists and engineers working in biomass conversion, also plant scientists working in cell wall biology and plant biotechnology. This book examines the connection between biomass...... - this collective resistance is known as "biomass recalcitrance." Breakthrough technologies are needed to overcome barriers to developing cost-effective processes for converting biomass to fuels and chemicals. This book examines the connection between biomass structure, ultrastructure, and composition......, to resistance to enzymatic deconstruction, with the aim of discovering new cost-effective technologies for biorefineries. It contains chapters on topics extending from the highest levels of biorefinery design and biomass life-cycle analysis, to detailed aspects of plant cell wall structure, chemical treatments...

  10. Stretchable diffraction gratings for spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonov, A.N.; Grabarnik, S.; Vdovine, G.V

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using transparent stretchable diffraction gratings for spectrometric applications. The gratings were fabricated by replication of a triangular-groove master into a transparent viscoelastic. The sample length, and hence the spatial period, can be reversibly cha

  11. Picosecond Holographic-Grating Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duppen, K.

    1987-01-01

    Interfering light waves produce an optical interference pattern in any medium that interacts with light. This modulation of some physical parameter of the system acts as a classical holographic grating for optical radiation. When such a grating is produced through interaction of pulsed light waves w

  12. Slow plasmons in grating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-03-01

    Recent research on surface plasmon polaritons and their applications have brought forward a wealth of information and continues to be of interest to many. In this report, we concentrate on propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their interaction with matter. Using grating based metallic structures, it is possible to control the electrodynamics of propagating SPPs. Biharmonic gratings loaded with periodic Si stripes allow excitation of SPPs that are localized inside the band gap with grating coupling. The cavity state is formed due to periodic effective index modulation obtained by one harmonic of the grating and loaded Si stripes. More complicated grating structures such as metallic Moiré surfaces have also been shown to form a localized state inside the band gap when excited with Kretschmann configuration.

  13. Biomass power for rural development. Revised design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, Edward

    1999-10-03

    The retrofit of Dunkirk Steam Station to fire biomass fuels is an important part of the Consortium's goal--demonstrating the viability of commercial scale willow energy crop production and conversion to power. The goal for th biomass facilities at Dunkirk is to reliably cofire a combination of wood wastes and willow biomass with coal at approximately 20% by heat input.

  14. Extreme Silica Optical Fibre Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Cook

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A regenerated optical fibre Bragg grating that survives temperature cycling up to 1,295°C is demonstrated. A model based on seeded crystallisation or amorphisation is proposed.

  15. MEMS Bragg grating force sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We present modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of a new type of all-optical frequency modulated MEMS force sensor based on a mechanically amplified double clamped waveguide beam structure with integrated Bragg grating. The sensor is ideally suited for force measurements in harsh...... environments and for remote and distributed sensing and has a measured sensitivity of -14 nm/N, which is several times higher than what is obtained in conventional fiber Bragg grating force sensors. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  16. Hollow-core grating fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillé, R.; Tajalli, P.; Roy, P.; Ahmadi-kandjani, S.; Kucharski, S.; Ortyl, E.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new type of hollow-core fiber where the propagation is ensured by a photoinduced self-pattern acting as a surface relief grating (SRG). The SRG is written by launching a suitable laser beam with proper polarization in a capillary glass fiber with the inner surface previously coated with an azopolymer thin film. Such a grating acts as a wavelength/angle dependant reflective mirror and enhances the confinement and the propagation of the light.

  17. Energy production from marine biomass (Ulva lactuca)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaisen, L.; Daugbjerg Jensen, P.; Svane Bech, K. [Danish Technological Institute (DTI), Taastrup (Denmark)] [and others

    2011-11-15

    In this project, methods for producing liquid, gaseous and solid biofuel from the marine macroalgae Ulva lactuca has been studied. To get an understanding of the growth conditions of Ulva lactuca, laboratory scale growth experiments describing N, P, and CO{sub 2} uptake and possible N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} production are carried out. The macroalgae have been converted to bioethanol and methane (biogas) in laboratory processes. Further the potential of using the algae as a solid combustible biofuel is studied. Harvest and conditioning procedures are described together with the potential of integrating macroalgae production at a power plant. The overall conclusions are: 1. Annual yield of Ulva lactuca is 4-5 times land-based energy crops. 2. Potential for increased growth rate when bubbling with flue gas is up to 20%. 3. Ethanol/butanol can be produced from pretreated Ulva of C6 and - for butanol - also C5 sugars. Fermentation inhibitors can possibly be removed by mechanical pressing. The ethanol production is 0,14 gram pr gram dry Ulva lactuca. The butanol production is lower. 4. Methane yields of Ulva are at a level between cow manure and energy crops. 5. Fast pyrolysis produces algae oil which contains 78 % of the energy content of the biomass. 6. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of Ulva lactuca is feasible and a methane rich gas can be obtained. 7. Thermal conversion of Ulva is possible with special equipment as low temperature gasification and grate firing. 8. Co-firing of Ulva with coal in power plants is limited due to high ash content. 9. Production of Ulva only for energy purposes at power plants is too costly. 10. N{sub 2}O emission has been observed in lab scale, but not in pilot scale production. 11. Analyses of ash from Ulva lactuca indicates it as a source for high value fertilizers. 12. Co-digestion of Ulva lactuca together with cattle manure did not alter the overall fertilization value of the digested cattle manure alone. (LN)

  18. Model based control of grate combustion; Modellbaserad roststyrning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broden, Henrik; Kjellstroem, Bjoern; Niklasson, Fredrik; Boecher Poulsen, Kristian

    2006-12-15

    temperature did not appear to allow more rapid process control than measurements of output power and oxygen in the exhaust. Measurements of the bed height gave better control for disturbances of the fuel flow but not for disturbances of the fuel moisture. The conclusion is uncertain since the model is not sufficiently validated and gives unreasonable results for the bed height at the end of the grate. Too long time intervals for collection of data, in particular for fuel moisture, and uncertainties in measured air flows are the main reasons for shortcomings in the validation. The preliminary conclusion is that measurements of grate temperatures do not provide information that can be used for more rapid control of grate firing for disturbances caused by variations in fuel moisture and fuel flow. Measurements of bed heights may allow better control. The objectives of the project have been partly reached.

  19. Numerical Study on Biomass Gas Reburning in a 600 MW Supercritical Coal-fired Boiler%600MW超临界燃煤锅炉生物质气体再燃的数值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙俊威; 阎维平; 赵文娟; 李皓宇; 林继浩

    2012-01-01

    Numerical software FLUENT has been used to simulate the reburning condition of gasified gas of cornstalk,rice straw and wheat straw at 600 ℃ in a 600 MW supercritical coal-fired boiler with whirl burners in front and back wall cross collocation,so as to study how the category and flow rate of reburning gas influence the in-furnace combustion,outlet gas temperature and the production of NO,CO2 and CO.Results show that the maximum denitrification rate of gasified gas of wheat straw,cornstalk and rice straw is respectively 41%,40% and 38%,indicating a decreasing order of denitrification rate.With the increase of reburning gas flow rate,the emission concentration of both CO2 and NO reduces,but the outlet gas temperature and CO concentration rise.The reburning of biomass gas can effectively reduce the emission concentration of NO,and it hardly interrupts boiler's normal operation.%利用FLUENT数值软件对某电厂600 MW超临界前后墙对冲旋流燃煤锅炉进行了600℃时玉米秆气化气、稻秆气化气和小麦秆气化气再燃的数值模拟,研究了不同生物质气化气、再燃量对炉内燃烧、炉膛出口烟气温度及NO、CO2、CO生成的影响.结果表明:小麦秆气、玉米秆气、稻秆气的最大脱氮率分别是41%、40%、38%;随着生物质气体再燃量的增加炉膛出口CO2、NO排放浓度降低,温度和CO浓度升高;生物质气体再燃能有效降低NO排放浓度,而且对锅炉的正常运行影响较小;麦秆气、玉米秆气和稻秆气的脱氮率依次降低.

  20. Effects of fire on soil nitrogen dynamics and microbial biomass in savannas of Central Brazil Efeitos do fogo na dinâmica do nitrogênio no solo e biomassa microbiana em área de Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bielefeld Nardoto

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effects of fire on net N mineralization and soil microbial biomass in burned and unburned cerrado stricto sensu sites. The study was carried out from April 1998 to April 2000. The pH values were significantly higher in the burned site while soil moisture content was significantly higher in the unburned site (PO objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o efeito do fogo sobre as taxas de mineralização líquida de N e biomassa microbiana do solo em áreas de cerrado stricto sensu. O estudo foi realizado entre abril de 1998 e abril de 2000. O pH foi maior na área queimada enquanto o teor de umidade do solo foi maior na área sem queima (P<0,05. A razão C/N do solo foi de 22/1. A concentração de N nítrico disponível ficou entre 1,5 e 2,8 mg kg-1 de matéria seca enquanto a de N amoniacal variou entre 3 e 34 mg kg-1 de matéria seca na área queimada e entre 3 e 22 mg kg-1 de matéria seca na área sem queima. A concentração de N amoniacal aumentou significativamente após o fogo (P<0,05. Pequenos acúmulos de N nítrico no solo ocorreram somente durante curto período na estação chuvosa. A biomassa microbiana teve seu pico máximo em novembro de 1998, chegando a 850 mg kg-1 de C no solo da área queimada. Os dados indicam que o pico da atividade microbiana ocorreu no início das chuvas, com um período inicial de imobilização seguido de mineralização líquida. Ambas as áreas apresentaram um mesmo padrão de mineralização/imobilização, mas com menor produção anual de N mineral na área queimada (14,7 kg ha-1 por ano na área sem queima e 3,8 kg ha-1 por ano na área queimada, um ano após a queima.

  1. The role of semi-volatile organic compounds in the mesoscale evolution of biomass burning aerosol: a modelling case study of the 2010 mega-fire event in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Konovalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry transport models (CTMs are an indispensable tool for studying and predicting atmospheric and climate effects associated with carbonaceous aerosol from open biomass burning (BB; this type of aerosol is known to contribute significantly to both global radiative forcing and to episodes of air pollution in regions affected by wildfires. Improving model performance requires systematic comparison of simulation results with measurements of BB aerosol and elucidating possible reasons for discrepancies between them, which, "by default", are frequently attributed in the literature to uncertainties in emission data. Based on published laboratory data regarding atmospheric evolution of BB aerosol and by using the volatility basis set (VBS approach to organic aerosol modeling along with a "conventional" approach, we examined the importance of taking gas-particle partitioning and oxidation of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs into account in simulations of the mesoscale evolution of smoke plumes from intense wildfires that occurred in western Russia in 2010. BB emissions of primary aerosol components were constrained with the PM10 and CO data from the air pollution monitoring network in the Moscow region. The results of the simulations performed with the CHIMERE CTM were evaluated by considering, in particular, the ratio of smoke-related enhancements in PM10 and CO concentrations (ΔPM10 and ΔCO measured in Finland (in the city of Kuopio, nearly 1000 km downstream of the fire emission sources. It is found that while the conventional approach (disregarding oxidation of SVOCs and assuming organic aerosol material to be non-volatile strongly underestimates values of ΔPM10/ΔCO observed in Kuopio (by almost a factor of two, the VBS approach is capable to bring the simulations to a reasonable agreement with the ground measurements both in Moscow and in Kuopio. Using the VBS instead of the conventional approach is also found to result in a major

  2. US Fire Administration Fire Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Fire Administration collects data from a variety of sources to provide information and analyses on the status and scope of the fire problem in the United...

  3. Biomass [updated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Biomass resources and conversion technologies are diverse. Substantial biomass resources exist including woody crops, herbaceous perennials and annuals, forest resources, agricultural residues, and algae. Conversion processes available include fermentation, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, combustion, and transesterification. Bioderived products include liquid fuels (e.g. ethanol, biodiesel, and gasoline and diesel substitutes), gases, electricity, biochemical, and wood pellets. At present the major sources of biomass-derived liquid fuels are from first generation biofuels; ethanol from maize and sugar cane (89 billion L in 2013) and biodiesel from vegetable oils and fats (24 billion liters in 2011). For other than traditional uses, policy in the forms of mandates, targets, subsidies, and greenhouse gas emission targets has largely been driving biomass utilization. Second generation biofuels have been slow to take off.

  4. A Path Forward for Low Carbon Power from Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D. Cuellar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The two major pathways for energy utilization from biomass are conversion to a liquid fuel (i.e., biofuels or conversion to electricity (i.e., biopower. In the United States (US, biomass policy has focused on biofuels. However, this paper will investigate three options for biopower: low co-firing (co-firing scenarios refer to combusting a given percentage of biomass with coal (5%–10% biomass, medium co-firing (15%–20% biomass, and dedicated biomass firing (100% biomass. We analyze the economic and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions impact of each of these options, with and without CO2 capture and storage (CCS. Our analysis shows that in the absence of land use change emissions, all biomass co-combustion scenarios result in a decrease in GHG emissions over coal generation alone. The two biggest barriers to biopower are concerns about carbon neutrality of biomass fuels and the high cost compared to today’s electricity prices. This paper recommends two policy actions. First, the need to define sustainability criteria and initiate a certification process so that biomass providers have a fixed set of guidelines to determine whether their feedstocks qualify as renewable energy sources. Second, the need for a consistent, predictable policy that provides the economic incentives to make biopower economically attractive.

  5. Ash transformation in suspension fired boilers co-firing coal and straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    In this literature report is provided a status for the present knowledge level on ash properties when co-firing coal and biomass. The fly ash formed in boilers using co-firing of coal and straw do have a large influence on ash deposit formation, boiler corrosion, fly ash utilization and operation...

  6. Efficient iterative technique for designing bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plougmann, Nikolai; Kristensen, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We present a new iterative method for designing Bragg gratings based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method of minimizing a chi-squared merit function. It is effective for designing both weak and strong gratings and is particularly well suited for unchirped gratings.......We present a new iterative method for designing Bragg gratings based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method of minimizing a chi-squared merit function. It is effective for designing both weak and strong gratings and is particularly well suited for unchirped gratings....

  7. Stratifying Tropical Fires by Land Cover: Insights into Amazonian Fires, Aerosol Loading, and Regional Deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenHoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes changes in the number of fires detected on forest, grass, and transition lands during the 2002-2009 biomass burning seasons using fire detection data and co-located land cover classifications from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the total number of detected fires correlates well with MODIS mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) from year to year, in accord with other studies. However, we also show that the ratio of forest to savanna fires varies substantially from year to year. Forest fires have trended downward, on average, since the beginning of 2006 despite a modest increase in 2007. Our study suggests that high particulate matter loading detected in 2007 was likely due to a large number of savanna/agricultural fires that year. Finally, we illustrate that the correlation between annual Brazilian deforestation estimates and MODIS fires is considerably higher when fires are stratified by MODIS-derived land cover classifications.

  8. Smouldering Subsurface Fires in the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Smouldering fires, the slow, low-temperature, flameless form of combustion, are an important phenomena in the Earth system. These fires propagate slowly through organic layers of the forest ground and are responsible for 50% or more of the total biomass consumed during wildfires. Only after the 2002 study of the 1997 extreme haze event in South-East Asia, the scientific community recognised the environmental and economic threats posed by subsurface fires. This was caused by the spread of vast biomass fires in Indonesia, burning below the surface for months during the El Niño climate event. It has been calculated that these fires released between 0.81 and 2.57 Gton of carbon gases (13-40% of global emissions). Large smouldering fires are rare events at the local scale but occur regularly at a global scale. Once ignited, they are particularly difficult to extinguish despite extensive rains or fire-fighting attempts and can persist for long periods of time (months, years) spreading over very extensive areas of forest and deep into the soil. Indeed, these are the oldest continuously burning fires on Earth. Earth scientists are interested in smouldering fires because they destroy large amounts of biomass and cause greater damage to the soil ecosystem than flaming fires do. Moreover, these fires cannot be detected with current satellite remote sensing technologies causing inconsistencies between emission inventories and model predictions. Organic soils sustain smouldering fire (hummus, duff, peat and coal) which total carbon pool exceeds that of the world's forests or the atmosphere. This have important implications for climate change. Warmer temperatures at high latitudes are resulting in unprecedented permafrost thaw that is leaving large soil carbon pools exposed to fires. Because the CO2 flux from peat fires has been measured to be about 3000 times larger that the natural degradation flux, permafrost thaw is a risk for greater carbon release by fire and subsequently

  9. Optical Fiber Grating based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis differenct optical fiber gratings are used for sensor purposes. If a fiber with a core concentricity error (CCE) is used, a directional dependent bend sensor can be produced. The CCE direction can be determined by means of diffraction. This makes it possible to produce long......-period gratings in a fiber with a CCE direction parallel or perpendicular to the writing direction. The maximal bending sensitivity is independent on the writing direction, but the detailed bending response is different in the two cases. A temperature and strain sensor, based on a long-period grating and two...... wavelength. It is shown that it is possible to tune and modulate a DFB fiber laser with both strain from a piezoelectric transducer and by temperature through resistive heating of a methal film. Both a chemical deposited silver layer and an electron-beam evaporation technique has been investigated, to find...

  10. Exploiting a Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald E. Bell

    2004-12-08

    The availability of compact transmission grating spectrometers now allows an attractive and economical alternative to the more familiar Czerny-Turner configuration for many high-temperature plasma applications. Higher throughput is obtained with short focal length refractive optics and stigmatic imaging. Many more spectra can be obtained with a single spectrometer since smaller, more densely packed optical input fibers can be used. Multiple input slits, along with a bandpass filter, can be used to maximize the number of spectra per detector, providing further economy. Curved slits can correct for the strong image curvature of the short focal length optics. Presented here are the governing grating equations for both standard and high-dispersion transmission gratings, defining dispersion, image curvature, and desired slit curvature, that can be used in the design of improved plasma diagnostics.

  11. Polymer optical fiber bragg grating sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Scott Wu; Andresen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings are reported. We have written fiber Bragg gratings for 1550 nm and 850 nm operations, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  12. High Efficiency Low Scatter Echelle Grating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high efficiency low scatter echelle grating will be developed using a novel technique of multiple diamond shaving cuts. The grating will have mirror surfaces on...

  13. Biomass for iron ore sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandi, M.; Martinez-Pacheco, M.; Fray, T.A.T. [Corus Research Development & Technology, Rotherham (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Within an integrated steelworks, iron ore sinter making is an energy intensive process. In recent years, biomass is becoming an attractive alternative source of energy to traditional fossil fuels such as coal. In this study, commercially available biomass materials suited to sinter making have been identified as an alternative source of fuel to coke breeze. Olive residues, sunflower husk pellets, almond shells, hazelnut shells and Bagasse pellets have been characterised and prepared for sintering. A laboratory sinter pot has been employed for studying sintering behaviour of biomass material. On average, the calorific values of selected biomass materials, on a dry basis, are about 65% of dry coke breeze. It was found that less of this energy would be available in sinter making due to the evaporation of some of the volatile matter ahead of the flame front. At a replacement rate of 25%, the crushed sunflower husk pellets showed the closest thermal profile to that of coke breeze alone in the size range of -0.8 to +0.6 mm. A specification of less than 1 mm has been recommended for the studied biomass materials when co-firing biomass with coke breeze for iron ore sintering.

  14. Biomass potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, D. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Biomass resources of the industrialised countries are enormous, if only a small fraction of set-aside fields were used for energy crops. Forest resources could also be utilised more efficiently than at present for large-scale energy production. The energy content of the annual net growth of the total wood biomass is estimated to be 180 million toe in Europe without the former USSR, and about 50 million toe of that in the EC area, in 1990. Presently, the harvesting methods of forest biomass for energy production are not yet generally competitive. Among the most promising methods are integrated harvesting methods, which supply both raw material to the industry and wood fuel for energy production. Several new methods for separate harvesting of energy wood are being developed in many countries. (orig.)

  15. Grating-Coupled Waveguide Cloaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Fu; QU Shao-Bo; XU Zhuo; MA Hua; WANG Cong-Min; XIA Song; WANG Xin-Hua; ZHOU Hang

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concept of a grating-coupled waveguide (GCW),a new strategy for realizing EM cloaking is presented.Using metallic grating,incident waves are firstly coupled into the effective waveguide and then decoupled into free space behind,enabling EM waves to pass around the obstacle.Phase compensation in the waveguide keeps the wave-front shape behind the obstacle unchanged.Circular,rectangular and triangular cloaks are presented to verify the robustness of the GCW cloaking.Electric field animations and radar cross section (RCS)comparisons convincingly demonstrate the cloaking effect.

  16. Fabrication of Polymer Optical Fibre (POF Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Luo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gratings inscribed in polymer optical fibre (POF have attracted remarkable interest for many potential applications due to their distinctive properties. This paper overviews the current state of fabrication of POF gratings since their first demonstration in 1999. In particular we summarize and discuss POF materials, POF photosensitivity, techniques and issues of fabricating POF gratings, as well as various types of POF gratings.

  17. A Composite Grating for Moire Interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    shown in Figure 7 in which two virtual reference gratings of frequencies 2400 and 600 lines/mm were used. This arrangement corresponds to a fringe...fields at the two virtual reference grating frequencies of 2400/600 lines/mm. The light paths of the two virtual reference gratings are controlled by...frequencies were selectively recorded. Figure 10 and 11 shows two moire fringe patterns for virtual reference grating frequencies of 2400 lines/mm and 600

  18. Biomass IGCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, K.; Keraenen, H. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Enviropower Inc. is developing a modern power plant concept based on pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC). The process is capable of maximising the electricity production with a variety of solid fuels - different biomass and coal types - mixed or separately. The development work is conducted on many levels. These and demonstration efforts are highlighted in this article. The feasibility of a pressurised gasification based processes compared to competing technologies in different applications is discussed. The potential of power production from biomass is also reviewed. (orig.) 4 refs.

  19. Estimating fire radiative power obscuration by tree canopies through laboratory experiments: Estimating fire radiative energy in a longleaf pine forest from airborne thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, William

    Remote sensing has been proven as a useful tool in characterizing the effects of fire on a landscape scale. The radiant energy released during biomass burning can be measured remotely, and is directly related to the rate biomass consumed from the fire. This is an important measurement as it can characterize fire effects on the ground along with provide important information about the amount of gases produced by the fire. One source of error associated with estimating the fire radiative energy (FRE) remotely is the obscuration of the signal by the forest canopy. We quantify the relationship between canopy cover and the amount of energy observed by a sensor rom laboratory experiments. A prescribed fire was conducted in northwestern Florida and a suite of pre-, active, and post-fire measurements were taken by an interdisciplinary team. From those data we measured the amount of biomass consumed by the fire FRE estimates.

  20. Hybrid grating reflectors: Origin of ultrabroad stopband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Gyeong Cheol; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Chung, Il-Sug

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid grating (HG) reflectors with a high-refractive-index cap layer added onto a high contrast grating (HCG) provide a high reflectance close to 100% over a broader wavelength range than HCGs. The combination of a cap layer and a grating layer brings a strong Fabry-Perot (FP) resonance as well...

  1. 3D Printed Terahertz Focusing Grating Couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David; Weidenbach, Marcel; Lehr, Jannik; Becker, Leonard; Beltrán-Mejía, Felipe; Busch, Stefan F.; Balzer, Jan C.; Koch, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We have designed, constructed and characterized a grating that focuses electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies out of a dielectric waveguide. A simple theoretical model predicts the focusing behaviour of these chirped gratings, along with numerical results that support our assumptions and improved the grating geometry. The leaky waveguide was 3D printed and characterized at 120 GHz demonstrating its potential for manipulating terahertz waves.

  2. New Perspectives on African Biomass Burning Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth; Wooster, Martin J.

    2007-09-01

    Biomass burning is a key Earth system process and, in particular a major element of the terrestrial carbon cycle and a globally significant source of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Smoke emitted during combustion affects air quality, atmospheric chemical composition, and Earth's radiation budget [Le Canut et al., 1996]. In terms of carbon emissions, vegetation fires are, globally and on average, believed to generate emissions equivalent to between perhaps one third and one half of those from fossil fuel combustion, and savanna fires are responsible for around 50% of the global vegetation fire carbon release [Williams et al., 2007].

  3. Does prescribed fire benefit wetland vegetation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, C.; Bounds, D.L.; Ruby, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fire on wetland vegetation in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States are poorly known, despite the historical use of fire by federal, state, and private landowners in the Chesapeake Bay Region. Prescribed fire is widely used by land managers to promote vegetation that is beneficial to migratory waterfowl, muskrats, and other native wildlife and to reduce competition from less desirable plant species. We compared vegetative response to two fire rotations, annual burns and 3-year burns, and two control sites, Control 1 and Control 2. We tested the effects of fire within six tidal marsh wetlands at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and Fishing Bay Wildlife Management Area in Maryland. We examined changes in total live biomass (all species), total stem density, litter, and changes in live biomass and stem density of four dominant wetland plant species (11 variables). Our results suggest that annual prescribed fires will decrease the accumulation of litter, increase the biomass and stem densities of some wetland plants generally considered less desirable for wildlife, and have little or no effect on other wetland plants previously thought to benefit from fire. ?? 2011 US Government.

  4. On fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    The title of this paper: “On fire”, refers to two (maybe three) aspects: firstly as a metaphor of having engagement in a community of practice according to Lave & Wenger (1991), and secondly it refers to the concrete element “fire” in the work of the fire fighters – and thirdly fire as a signifier...

  5. Fire Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  6. Running gratings in photoconductive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kukhtarev, N. V.; Kukhtareva, T.; Lyuksyutov, S. F.

    2005-01-01

    gratings at small-contrast approximation and also are applicable for the description of space-charge wave domains. We discuss spatial domain and subharmonic beam formation in bismuth silicon oxide (BSO) crystals in the framework of the small-contrast approximation of STPM. The experimental results...

  7. Emissions from Biomass Burning in the Yucatan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokelson, R.; Crounse, J. D.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Karl, T.; Urbanski, S.; Atlas, E.; Campos, T.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Weinheimer, A.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Holloway, J.; Weibring, P.; Flocke, F.; Zheng, W.; Toohey, D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Mauldin, L.; Fried, A.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    In March 2006 two instrumented aircraft made the first detailed field measurements of biomass burning (BB) emissions in the Northern Hemisphere tropics as part of the MILAGRO project. The aircraft were the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 and a University of Montana/US Forest Service Twin Otter. The initial emissions of up to 49 trace gas or particle species were measured from 20 deforestation and crop residue fires on the Yucatan peninsula. This included two trace gases useful as indicaters of BB (HCN and acetonitrile) and several rarely, or never before, measured species: OH, peroxyacetic acid, propanoic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methane sulfonic acid, and sulfuric acid. Crop residue fires emitted more organic acids and ammonia than deforestation fires, but the emissions from the main fire types were otherwise fairly similar. The Yucatan fires emitted unusually amounts of SO2 and particle chloride, likely due to a strong marine influence on the peninsula.

  8. Calculation of thermal noise in grating reflectors

    CERN Document Server

    Heinert, Daniel; Friedrich, Daniel; Hild, Stefan; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Leavey, Sean; Martin, Iain W; Nawrodt, Ronny; Tünnermann, Andreas; Vyatchanin, Sergey P; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Grating reflectors have been repeatedly discussed to improve the noise performance of metrological applications due to the reduction or absence of any coating material. So far, however, no quantitative estimate on the thermal noise of these reflective structures exists. In this work we present a theoretical calculation of a grating reflector's noise. We further apply it to a proposed 3rd generation gravitational wave detector. Depending on the grating geometry, the grating material and the temperature we obtain a thermal noise decrease by up to a factor of ten compared to conventional dielectric mirrors. Thus the use of grating reflectors can substantially improve the noise performance in metrological applications.

  9. Grating light modulator for projection display

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiyong Sun; Shanglian Huang; Jie Zhang; Zhihai Zhang; Yong Zhu

    2009-01-01

    A novel grating light modulator for projection display is introduced. It consists of an upper moveable grat-ing, a bottom mirror, and four supporting posts between them. The moveable grating and the bottom mir-ror compose a phase grating whose phase difference is controlled by the actuating voltage. When the phase difference is 2kπ, the grating light modulator will switch the incident light to zero-order diffraction; when the phase difference is (2k - 1)π, the grating light modulator will diffract light to first-order diffraction. A 16 × 16 modulator array is fabricated by the surface micromachining technology. The device works well when it is actuated by a voltage with 1-kHz frequency and 10-V amplitude. The fabricated grating light modulator can show blackness and brightness when controlled by the voltage. This modulator has potential applications in projection display system.

  10. Curved VPH gratings for novel spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, J. Christopher; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Dunlap, Bart H.

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings into astronomy over a decade ago opened new possibilities for instrument designers. In this paper we describe an extension of VPH grating technology that will have applications in astronomy and beyond: curved VPH gratings. These devices can disperse light while simultaneously correcting aberrations. We have designed and manufactured two different kinds of convex VPH grating prototypes for use in off-axis reflecting spectrographs. One type functions in transmission and the other in reflection, enabling Offnerstyle spectrographs with the high-efficiency and low-cost advantages of VPH gratings. We will discuss the design process and the tools required for modelling these gratings along with the recording layout and process steps required to fabricate them. We will present performance data for the first convex VPH grating produced for an astronomical spectrograph.

  11. Biomass fly ash in concrete: Mixture proportioning and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuangzhen Wang; Amber Miller; Emilio Llamazos; Fernando Fonseca; Larry Baxter [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (USA). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-03-15

    ASTM C 618 prohibits use of biomass fly ashes in concrete. This document compares the properties of biomass fly ashes from cofired (herbaceous with coal), pure wood combustion and blended (pure wood fly ash blended with coal fly ash) to those of coal fly ash in concrete. The results illustrate that with 25% replacement (wt%) of cement by fly ash, the compressive strength (one day to one year) and the flexure strength (at 56th day curing) of cofired and blended biomass fly ash concrete is statistically equal to that of two coal fly ash concrete in this investigation (at 95% confidence interval). This implies that biomass fly ash with co-firing concentration within the concentration interest to commercial coal-biomass co-firing operations at power plants and blended biomass fly ash within a certain blending ratio should be considered in concrete. 37 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Water vapor release from biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, R. S.; Welling, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Helas, G.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the emission of water vapor from biomass combustion. Concurrent measurements of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are used to scale the concentrations of water vapor found, and are referenced to carbon in the biomass. The investigated fuel types include hardwood (oak and African musasa), softwood (pine and spruce, partly with green needles), and African savanna grass. The session-averaged ratio of H2O to the sum of CO and CO2 in the emissions from 16 combustion experiments ranged from 1.2 to 3.7, indicating the presence of water that is not chemically bound. This non-bound biomass moisture content ranged from 33% in the dry African hardwood, musasa, to 220% in fresh pine branches with needles. The moisture content from fresh biomass contributes significantly to the water vapor in biomass burning emissions, and its influence on the behavior of fire plumes and pyro-cumulus clouds needs to be evaluated.

  13. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass Incineration Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Gotthjælp, K.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the project is to study the role of ash deposits in high temperature corrosion of superheater materials in biomass and refuse fire combined heat and power plants. The project has included the two main activities: a) A chemical characterisation of ash deposits collected from a major...

  14. COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

  15. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  16. A review on advances of torrefaction technologies for biomass processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Bimal; Sule, Idris; Dutta, Animesh [University of Guelph, School of Engineering, Guelph, ON (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    Torrefaction is a thermochemical pretreatment process at 200-300 C in an inert condition which transforms biomass into a relatively superior handling, milling, co-firing and clean renewable energy into solid biofuel. This increases the energy density, water resistance and grindability of biomass and makes it safe from biological degradation which ultimately makes easy and economical on transportation and storing of the torrefied products. Torrefied biomass is considered as improved version than the current wood pellet products and an environmentally friendly future alternative for coal. Torrefaction carries devolatilisation, depolymerization and carbonization of lignocellulose components and generates a brown to black solid biomass as a productive output with water, organics, lipids, alkalis, SiO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 4}. During this process, 70 % of the mass is retained as a solid product, and retains 90 % of the initial energy content. The torrefied product is then shaped into pellets or briquettes that pack much more energy density than regular wood pellets. These properties minimize on the difference in combustion characteristics between biomass and coal that bring a huge possibility of direct firing of biomass in an existing coal-fired plant. Researchers are trying to find a solution to fire/co-fire torrefied biomass instead of coal in an existing coal-fired based boiler with minimum modifications and expenditures. Currently available torrefied technologies are basically designed and tested for woody biomass so further research is required to address on utilization of the agricultural biomass with technically and economically viable. This review covers the torrefaction technologies, its' applications, current status and future recommendations for further study. (orig.)

  17. Effective grating theory for resonance domain surface-relief diffraction gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Michael A; Friesem, Asher A

    2005-06-01

    An effective grating model, which generalizes effective-medium theory to the case of resonance domain surface-relief gratings, is presented. In addition to the zero order, it takes into account the first diffraction order, which obeys the Bragg condition. Modeling the surface-relief grating as an effective grating with two diffraction orders provides closed-form analytical relationships between efficiency and grating parameters. The aspect ratio, the grating period, and the required incidence angle that would lead to high diffraction efficiencies are predicted for TE and TM polarization and verified by rigorous numerical calculations.

  18. Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | Register Home Our Sponsors Ages & Stages Ages & ... permit escape. If you live in an apartment building, never use an elevator during a fire. Use ...

  19. Fire safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Bjoerkman, J.; Hostikka, S.; Mangs, J. [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland); Huhtanen, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Palmen, H.; Salminen, A.; Turtola, A. [VTT Automation, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-07-01

    According to experience and probabilistic risk assessments, fires present a significant hazard in a nuclear power plant. Fires may be initial events for accidents or affect safety systems planned to prevent accidents and to mitigate their consequences. The project consists of theoretical work, experiments and simulations aiming to increase the fire safety at nuclear power plants. The project has four target areas: (1) to produce validated models for numerical simulation programmes, (2) to produce new information on the behavior of equipment in case of fire, (3) to study applicability of new active fire protecting systems in nuclear power plants, and (4) to obtain quantitative knowledge of ignitions induced by important electric devices in nuclear power plants. These topics have been solved mainly experimentally, but modelling at different level is used to interpret experimental data, and to allow easy generalisation and engineering use of the obtained data. Numerical fire simulation has concentrated in comparison of CFD modelling of room fires, and fire spreading on cables on experimental data. So far the success has been good to fair. A simple analytical and numerical model has been developed for fire effluents spreading beyond the room of origin in mechanically strongly ventilated compartments. For behaviour of equipment in fire several full scale and scaled down calorimetric experiments were carried out on electronic cabinets, as well as on horizontal and vertical cable trays. These were carried out to supply material for CFD numerical simulation code validation. Several analytical models were developed and validated against obtained experimental results to allow quick calculations for PSA estimates as well as inter- and extrapolations to slightly different objects. Response times of different commercial fire detectors were determined for different types of smoke, especially emanating from smoldering and flaming cables to facilitate selection of proper detector

  20. Fire disturbance and climate change: implications for Russian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Jacquelyn K.; Foster, Adrianna C.; Shugart, Herman H.; Hoffman-Hall, Amanda; Krylov, Alexander; Loboda, Tatiana; Ershov, Dmitry; Sochilova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Change in the Russian boreal forest has the capacity to alter global carbon and climate dynamics. Fire disturbance is an integral determinant of the forest’s composition and structure, and changing climate conditions are expected to create more frequent and severe fires. Using the individual tree-based forest gap model UVAFME, along with an updated fire disturbance module that tracks mortality based on tree-species and –size level effects, biomass and species dynamics are simulated across Russia for multiple scenarios: with and without fire, and with and without altered climate. Historical fire return intervals and percent of forest stand mortality are calculated for the Russian eco-regions and applied to 31 010 simulation points across Russia. Simulation results from the scenarios are compared to assess changes in biomass, composition, and stand structure after 600 years of successional change following bare-ground initiation. Simulations that include fire disturbance show an increase in biomass across the region compared to equivalent simulations without fire. Fire disturbance allows the deciduous needle-leaved conifer larch to maintain dominance across much of the region due to their high growth rate and fire tolerance relative to other species. Larch remain dominant under the scenario of altered climate conditions with fire disturbance. The distribution of age cohorts shifts for the scenario of altered climate with fire disturbance, displaying a bimodal distribution with a peak of 280-year-old trees and another of 100-year-old cohorts. In these simulations, fire disturbance acts to increase the turnover rate and patterns of biomass accumulation, though species and tree size are also important factors in determining mortality and competitive success. These results reinforce the importance of the inclusion of complex competition at the species level in evaluating forest response to fire and climate.

  1. Fire impacts on the cryosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrwald, N. M.; Zennaro, P.; Skiles, M.; Barbante, C.

    2015-12-01

    Continental-scale smog clouds and massive boreal smoke plumes deposit dark particles on glaciers, darkening their surfaces and altering surface albedo. These atmospheric brown clouds are primarily comprised of both fossil fuel and biomass burning combustion products. Here, we examine the biomass burning contribution to aerosols trapped in the cryosphere through investigating the specific molecular marker levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) in ice cores. Levoglucosan is only produced by cellulose combustion, and therefore is an ideal comparison for multi-proxy investigations incorporating other markers with multiple sources. Wildfire combustion products are a major component of dark aerosols deposited on the Greenland ice sheet during the 2012 melt event. Levoglucosan concentrations that demonstrate the biomass burning contribution are similar to black carbon concentrations that record both fossil fuel and biomass burning during this same event. This similarity is especially important as levoglucosan and black carbon trends differ during the industrial era in the NEEM, Greenland ice core, demonstrating different contributions of fossil fuel and biomass burning to the Greenland ice sheet. These differences are also present in the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core. Low-latitude ice cores such as Kilimanjaro, Tanzania and Muztag, Tibet demonstrate that climate is still the primary control over fire activity in these regions, even with increased modern biomass burning and the possible impacts of atmospheric brown clouds.

  2. The spectral combination characteristic of grating and the bi-grating diffraction imaging effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG WeiPing; HE XiaoRong

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a new property of grating,namely spectral combination,and on bi-grating diffraction imaging that is based on spectral combination.The spectral combination characteristic of a grating is the capability of combining multiple light beams of different wavelengths incident from specific angles into a single beam.The bi-grating diffraction imaging is the formation of the image of an object with two gratings: the first grating disperses the multi-color light beams from the object and the second combines the dispersed light beams to form the image.We gave the conditions necessary for obtaining the spectral combination.We also presented the equations that relate the two gratings' spatial frequencies,diffraction orders and positions necessary for obtaining the bi-grating diffraction imaging.

  3. A review on biomass as a fuel for boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidur, R.; Abelaziz, E.A.; Demirbas, A.; Hossain, M.S.; Mekhilef, S. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2011-06-15

    Currently, fossil fuels such as oil, coal and natural gas represent the prime energy sources in the world. However, it is anticipated that these sources of energy will deplete within the next 40-50 years. Moreover, the expected environmental damages such as the global warming, acid rain and urban smog due to the production of emissions from these sources have tempted the world to try to reduce carbon emissions by 80% and shift towards utilizing a variety of renewable energy resources (RES) which are less environmentally harmful such as solar, wind, biomass etc. in a sustainable way. Biomass is one of the earliest sources of energy with very specific properties. In this review, several aspects which are associated with burning biomass in boilers have been investigated such as composition of biomass, estimating the higher heating value of biomass, comparison between biomass and other fuels, combustion of biomass, co-firing of biomass and coal, impacts of biomass, economic and social analysis of biomass, transportation of biomass, densification of biomass, problems of biomass and future of biomass. It has been found that utilizing biomass in boilers offers many economical, social and environmental benefits such as financial net saving, conservation of fossil fuel resources, job opportunities creation and CO{sub 2} and NO emissions reduction. However, care should be taken to other environmental impacts of biomass such as land and water resources, soil erosion, loss of biodiversity and deforestation. Fouling, marketing, low heating value, storage and collections and handling are all associated problems when burning biomass in boilers. The future of biomass in boilers depends upon the development of the markets for fossil fuels and on policy decisions regarding the biomass market.

  4. CFD simulation of coal and straw co-firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Helle; Hvid, Søren L.; Larsen, Ejvind;

    This paper presents the results of a major R&D program with the objective to develop CFD based tools to assess the impact of biomass co-firing in suspension fired pulverized coal power plants. The models have been developed through a series of Danish research projects with the overall objective t...

  5. Extreme fire severity patterns in topographic, convective and wind-driven historical wildfires of Mediterranean pine forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Lecina-Diaz

    Full Text Available Crown fires associated with extreme fire severity are extremely difficult to control. We have assessed fire severity using differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR from Landsat imagery in 15 historical wildfires of Pinus halepensis Mill. We have considered a wide range of innovative topographic, fuel and fire behavior variables with the purposes of (1 determining the variables that influence fire severity patterns among fires (considering the 15 wildfires together and (2 ascertaining whether different variables affect extreme fire severity within the three fire types (topographic, convective and wind-driven fires. The among-fires analysis showed that fires in less arid climates and with steeper slopes had more extreme severity. In less arid conditions there was more crown fuel accumulation and closer forest structures, promoting high vertical and horizontal fuel continuity and extreme fire severity. The analyses carried out for each fire separately (within fires showed more extreme fire severity in areas in northern aspects, with steeper slopes, with high crown biomass and in climates with more water availability. In northern aspects solar radiation was lower and fuels had less water limitation to growth which, combined with steeper slopes, produced more extreme severity. In topographic fires there was more extreme severity in northern aspects with steeper slopes and in areas with more water availability and high crown biomass; in convection-dominated fires there was also more extreme fire severity in northern aspects with high biomass; while in wind-driven fires there was only a slight interaction between biomass and water availability. This latter pattern could be related to the fact that wind-driven fires spread with high wind speed, which could have minimized the effect of other variables. In the future, and as a consequence of climate change, new zones with high crown biomass accumulated in non-common drought areas will be available to burn

  6. Extreme fire severity patterns in topographic, convective and wind-driven historical wildfires of Mediterranean pine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecina-Diaz, Judit; Alvarez, Albert; Retana, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Crown fires associated with extreme fire severity are extremely difficult to control. We have assessed fire severity using differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) from Landsat imagery in 15 historical wildfires of Pinus halepensis Mill. We have considered a wide range of innovative topographic, fuel and fire behavior variables with the purposes of (1) determining the variables that influence fire severity patterns among fires (considering the 15 wildfires together) and (2) ascertaining whether different variables affect extreme fire severity within the three fire types (topographic, convective and wind-driven fires). The among-fires analysis showed that fires in less arid climates and with steeper slopes had more extreme severity. In less arid conditions there was more crown fuel accumulation and closer forest structures, promoting high vertical and horizontal fuel continuity and extreme fire severity. The analyses carried out for each fire separately (within fires) showed more extreme fire severity in areas in northern aspects, with steeper slopes, with high crown biomass and in climates with more water availability. In northern aspects solar radiation was lower and fuels had less water limitation to growth which, combined with steeper slopes, produced more extreme severity. In topographic fires there was more extreme severity in northern aspects with steeper slopes and in areas with more water availability and high crown biomass; in convection-dominated fires there was also more extreme fire severity in northern aspects with high biomass; while in wind-driven fires there was only a slight interaction between biomass and water availability. This latter pattern could be related to the fact that wind-driven fires spread with high wind speed, which could have minimized the effect of other variables. In the future, and as a consequence of climate change, new zones with high crown biomass accumulated in non-common drought areas will be available to burn as extreme

  7. Fuels and fire behavior dynamics on large-scale savanna fires in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, B. J.; van Wilgen, B. W.; Trollope, W. S. W.; McRae, D. J.; Mason, J. A.; Weirich, F.; Potgieter, A. L. F.

    1996-10-01

    Biomass characterization and fire behavior documentation were carried out on two large (>2000 ha) experimental fires conducted in arid savanna fuels in Kruger National Park in September 1992. Prefire fuel loads, fuel consumption, spread rates, flame zone characteristics, and in-fire and perimeter wind field dynamics were measured in order to determine overall energy release rates for each fire. Convection column dynamics were also measured in support of airborne trace gas and particulate measurements. Energy release rates varied significantly between the two fires, and this was strongly reflected in convection column development. The lower-intensity fire produced a weak, poorly defined smoke plume, while a well-developed column with a capping cumulus top developed during the higher intensity fire. Further experimental burning studies, in savannas with higher fuel loads, are recommended to further explore the fire behavior-convection column dynamics relationship investigated in this study.

  8. OxyFuel combustion of Coal and Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    investigations on the combustion of coal, biomass (straw), and blends of coal and straw in air and O2/CO2 mixtures. The experiments have been performed in semi-technical scale in a once-through 30 kWth swirl-stabilized flame. The work has focused on improving the fundamental knowledge on oxyfuel combustion...... the important aspects of ash and deposit formation during co-firing of coal and biomass and combustion of pure biomass in oxyfuel atmospheres in semi-technical scale. The presented work has lead to the identification of reference operating conditions which enables a direct comparison of combustion in air...... and oxyfuel atmospheres. Apart from slightly improved burnout and reduced emissions of NO during oxyfuel combustion these operating conditions yield similar combustion characteristics in both environments. Co-firing coal and biomass or combustion of pure biomass in an oxyfuel power plant could yield...

  9. ORC for electricity production in district heating plants. Experience of biomass fired boilers with electricity production based on ORC; ORC foer elproduktion i vaermeverk. Erfarenheter fraan biobraensleeldade pannor med ORC-baserad elproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Barbara

    2007-12-15

    The ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) technology is an option for the production of electricity in heat production plants with steam boilers. Traditionally, the ORC technology has been used mainly in geothermal applications. However, during the last five years, it has become of interest also in bioenergy plants with electricity production in the 0,5-2 MW{sub e} range. Among others in Austria and Germany a number of plants have been installed during the first decade of the 2100th century. Today (2007), about 70 biomass based ORC plants are in operation in Europe. About 30 more plants are under installation and commissioning. In total, around 100 plants will be operating in the near future. In today's biomass fuelled ORC type CHP plants, the ORC circuit is driven by the energy in the flue gases from a biomass fuelled furnace. Via a thermal oil boiler, the energy is transferred to the ORC circuit. The ORC circuit is connected to the district heating net for cooling. Due to the fact that the ORC circuit is connected to 300 deg C flue gas, as compared to the 1990's waste water based ORC plants, an electrical yield of nearly 20% net is obtained in the ORC circuit. The overall electrical yield based on biomass is almost 16%. In the report, operational experience from a number of plants is reported. The economic advantage of the technology is discussed. In conclusion, the ORC technology is more economical than conventional steam turbine technology in the 0,5-2 MW{sub e} range. The calculated investment for a 2 MW{sub e} ORC based CHP plant is 40 kSEK/kW{sub e}, which is considerably lower than for a conventional steam turbine based CHP plant

  10. Fire Research Enclosure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Simulates submarine fires, enclosed aircraft fires, and fires in enclosures at shore facilities .DESCRIPTION: FIRE I is a pressurizable, 324 cu m(11,400 cu...

  11. Fire Research Enclosure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Simulates submarine fires, enclosed aircraft fires, and fires in enclosures at shore facilities . DESCRIPTION: FIRE I is a pressurizable, 324 cu m(11,400...

  12. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Wedel, Stig;

    : 1) The influence of local boiler conditions on deposit formation in suspension fired boilers using wood or co-firing straw and wood, 2) quantification of deposit removal in biomass suspension firing boilers with regards both to natural shedding and soot blower induced shedding, 3) established...

  13. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.820 Fire pumps, fire mains... pump connected to a fixed piping system. This pump must be capable of delivering an effective stream...

  14. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps... be equipped with a self-priming, power driven fire pump connected to a fixed piping system. (1)...

  15. Biomass torrefaction mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2016-05-17

    A biomass torrefaction system includes a mill which receives a raw biomass feedstock and operates at temperatures above 400 F (204 C) to generate a dusty flue gas which contains a milled biomass product.

  16. New field-based agricultural biomass burning trace gas, PM2.5, and black carbon emission ratios and factors measured in situ at crop residue fires in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianran; Wooster, Martin J.; Green, David C.; Main, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Despite policy attempts to limit or prevent agricultural burning, its use to remove crop residues either immediately after harvest (e.g. field burning of wheat stubble) or after subsequent crop processing (e.g. "bonfires" of rice straw and rapeseed residues) appears to remain widespread across parts of China. Emission factors for these types of small but highly numerous fire are therefore required to fully assess their impact on atmospheric composition and air pollution. Here we describe the design and deployment of a new smoke measurement system for the close-range sampling of key gases and particles within smoke from crop residue fires, using it to assess instantaneous mixing ratios of CO and CO2 and mass concentrations of black carbon (BC) and PM2.5 from wheat stubble, rice straw, and rapeseed residue fires. Using data of our new smoke sampling system, we find a strong linear correlation between the PM2.5 mass and BC, with very high PM2.5 to BC emission ratios found in the smouldering phase (up to 80.7 mg m-3.(mg m-3)-1) compared to the flaming phase (2.0 mg m-3.(mg m-3)-1). We conclude that the contribution of BC to PM2.5 mass was as high as 50% in the flaming phase of some burns, whilst during smouldering it sometimes decreased to little over one percent. A linear mixing model is used to quantify the relative contribution of each combustion phase to the overall measured smoke composition, and we find that flaming combustion dominated the total emission of most species assessed. Using time series of trace gas concentrations from different fire cases, we calculated 'fire integrated' trace gas emission factors (EFs) for wheat, rice and rapeseed residue burns as 1739 ± 19 g kg-1, 1761 ± 30 g kg-1and 1704 ± 27 g kg-1 respectively for CO2, and 60 ± 12 g kg-1, 47 ± 19 g kg-1 and 82 ± 17 g kg-1 respectively for CO. Where comparisons were possible, our EFs agreed well with those derived via a simultaneously-deployed open path Fourier transform infrared (OP

  17. Fire Brigade

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    With effect from 15 April 2004, the Fire Brigade will no longer issue master keys on loan. Contractors' personnel requiring access to locked premises in order to carry out work must apply to the CERN staff member responsible for the contract concerned.

  18. The spectral combination characteristic of grating and the bi-grating diffraction imaging effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a new property of grating, namely spectral combination, and on bi-grating diffraction imaging that is based on spectral combination. The spectral combination characteristic of a grating is the capability of combining multiple light beams of different wavelengths incident from specific angles into a single beam. The bi-grating diffraction imaging is the formation of the image of an object with two gratings: the first grating disperses the multi-color light beams from the object and the second combines the dispersed light beams to form the image. We gave the conditions necessary for obtaining the spectral combination. We also presented the equations that relate the two gratings’ spatial frequencies, diffraction orders and positions necessary for obtaining the bi-grating diffraction imaging.

  19. Energy from Biomass for Conversion of Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolins, J.; Gravitis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Along with estimates of minimum energy required by steam explosion pre-treatment of biomass some general problems concerning biomass conversion into chemicals, materials, and fuels are discussed. The energy necessary for processing biomass by steam explosion auto-hydrolysis is compared with the heat content of wood and calculated in terms of the amount of saturated steam consumed per unit mass of the dry content of wood biomass. The fraction of processed biomass available for conversion after steam explosion pre-treatment is presented as function of the amount of steam consumed per unit mass of the dry content of wood. The estimates based on a simple model of energy flows show the energy required by steam explosion pre-treatment of biomass being within 10% of the heat content of biomass - a realistic amount demonstrating that energy for the process can be supplied from a reasonable proportion of biomass used as the source of energy for steam explosion pre-treatment.

  20. Use of biomass for clean and efficient production of heat and power. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Lans, R. van der; Frandsen, J.B.F.; Johnsson, J.E.; Jensen, A.; Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.

    2001-03-01

    The present EFP98 project is the second phase of a long-term, strategic research project, the aim of which is to facilitate the use of significant amounts of biomass in the production of power and heat. The project deals with combustion and emission issues related to the use of biomass, specifically combustion of straw on a grate and wet flue gas desulphurization. A mathematical model for combustion of straw on a grate is developed as a tool to improve the understanding of this process. The model includes heat transfer to and in the bed as well as pyrolysis and char oxidation. To verify the model and to obtain a better understanding of fixed-bed straw combustion, a number of bench-scale laboratory experiments have been conducted at TNO in Holland. Predicted combustion rates and bed temperatures were in fairly good agreement with experimental fixed-bed data. A parameter analysis has identified the sensitivity of modeling predictions towards important parameters in the model. Measuring programs on straw firing have been conducted at Enstedvaerket and Masnedoe. Measuring results include gas temperature and gas composition (O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO. SO{sub 2}, NO) from different positions in the boiler. Data from Masnedoe include also results from co-firing of straw with other biomass fuels (25-35%). The results indicate that co-firing in the quantities does not significantly affect emissions. Nitrogen oxides emissions from Masnedoevaerket were found to be significantly higher than those of Ensted. The work on wet flue gas desulphurization on aimed to provide the information necessary to optimize and further develop the process. The main focus was fuel and sorbent flexibility, use of the waste product from the semi-dry FGD process as a sorbent in wet FGD, and ways of optimizing the Wet FGD process with respect to a high degree of desulphurization, a low content of residual limestone in the gypsum and a continuous steady state operation of the FGD plant. Laboratory

  1. Biomass - Overview of Swiss Research Programme 2003; Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binggeli, D.; Guggisberg, B.

    2003-07-01

    This overview for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the results obtained in 2003 in various research projects worked on in Switzerland on the subject of biomass. In the biomass combustion area, subjects discussed include system optimisation for automatic firing, combustion particles, low-particle pellet furnaces, design and optimisation of wood-fired storage ovens, efficiency of filtering techniques and methane generation from wood. Also, an accredited testing centre for wood furnaces is mentioned and measurements made on an installation are presented. As far as the fermentation of biogenic wastes is concerned, biogas production from dairy-product wastes is described. Other projects discussed include a study on eco-balances of energy products, certification and marketing of biogas, evaluation of membranes, a measurement campaign for solar sludge-drying, the operation of a percolator installation for the treatment of bio-wastes, the effects of compost on the environment and the fermentation of coffee wastes. Also, statistics on biogas production in 2002 is looked at. Finally, a preliminary study on biofuels is presented.

  2. Grating droplets with a mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Dan; Le Helloco, Antoine; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Varanasi, Kripa

    2016-11-01

    A drop thrown against a mesh can pass through its holes if impacting with enough inertia. As a result, although part of the droplet may remain on one side of the sieve, the rest will end up grated through the other side. This inexpensive method to break up millimetric droplets into micrometric ones may be of particular interest in a wide variety of applications: enhancing evaporation of droplets launched from the top of an evaporative cooling tower or preventing drift of pesticides sprayed above crops by increasing their initial size and atomizing them at the very last moment with a mesh. In order to understand how much liquid will be grated we propose in this presentation to start first by studying a simpler situation: a drop impacting a plate pierced with a single off centered hole. The study of the role of natural parameters such as the radius drop and speed or the hole position, size and thickness allows us to discuss then the more general situation of a plate pierced with multiple holes: the mesh.

  3. Alignment free characterization of 2D gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Jørgensen, Jan Friis

    2015-01-01

    Fast characterization of 2-dimensional gratings is demonstrated using a Fourier lens optical system and a differential optimization algorithm. It is shown that both the grating specific parameters such as the basis vectors and the angle between them and the alignment of the sample, such as the rotation of the sample around the x-, y-, and z-axis, can be deduced from a single measurement. More specifically, the lattice vectors and the angle between them have been measured, while the corrections of the alignment parameters are used to improve the quality of the measurement, and hence reduce the measurement uncertainty. Alignment free characterization is demonstrated on both a 2D hexagonal grating with a period of 700 nm and a checkerboard grating with a pitch of 3000 nm. The method can also be used for both automatic alignment and in-line characterization of gratings.

  4. Reflectivity-modulated grating-mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The invention relates to vertical cavity lasers (VCL) incorporating a reflectivity-modulated grating mirror (1) for modulating the laser output. A cavity is formed by a bottom mirror (4), an active region (3), and an outcoupling top grating mirror (1) formed by a periodic refractive index grating...... to the oscillation axis. A modulated voltage (91) is applied in reverse bias between the n- and p-doped layers to modulate the refractive index of the electrooptic material layer (12) and thereby the reflectivity spectrum of the grating mirror (1). The reflectivity of the grating mirror (1) can be modulated between...... a reflectivity with little or no out coupling and a reflectivity with normal out coupling, wherein lasing in the VCL is supported at both the first and the second reflectivity. As the out coupling mirror modulates the output, the lasing does not need to be modulated, and the invention provides the advantage...

  5. Satellite remote-sensing technologies used in forest fire management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xiao-rui; Douglas J. Mcrae; SHU Li-fu; WANG Ming-yu; LI Hong

    2005-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing has become a primary data source for fire danger rating prediction, fuel and fire mapping, fire monitoring, and fire ecology research. This paper summarizes the research achievements in these research fields, and discusses the future trend in the use of satellite remote-sensing techniques in wildfire management. Fuel-type maps from remote-sensing data can now be produced at spatial and temporal scales quite adequate for operational fire management applications. US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellites are being used for fire detection worldwide due to their high temporal resolution and ability to detect fires in remote regions. Results can be quickly presented on many Websites providing a valuable service readily available to fire agency. As cost-effective tools, satellite remote-sensing techniques play an important role in fire mapping. Improved remote-sensing techniques have the potential to date older fire scars and provide estimates of burn severity. Satellite remote sensing is well suited to assessing the extent of biomass burning, a prerequisite for estimating emissions at regional and global scales, which are needed for better understanding the effects of fire on climate change. The types of satellites used in fire research are also discussed in the paper. Suggestions on what remote-sensing efforts should be completed in China to modernize fire management technology in this country are given.

  6. My Biomass, Your Biomass, Our Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US is pursuing an array of renewable energy sources to reduce reliance on imported fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass energy and biomass ethanol are key components in the pursuit. The need for biomass feedstock to produce sufficient ethanol to meet any of the numerous stat...

  7. High Temperature Corrosion on Biodust Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi

    The high content of alkali metals and chlorine in biomass gives rise to fouling/slagging and corrosion of heat exchange components, such as superheaters, in biomass fired power plants. Increasing the lifetime of these components, and in addition, preventing unwarranted plant shutdowns due...... to their failure, requires understanding of the complex corrosion mechanisms, as well as development of materials that are resistant to corrosion under biomass firing conditions, thereby motivating the current work. To understand the mechanisms of corrosion attack, comprehensive analysis of corrosion products...... was necessary. In the present work, two complementary methodologies based on analysis of cross sections and plan views were applied to achieve comprehensive characterization of corrosion products. The suitability of these methods for both laboratory scale and full scale corrosion investigations was demonstrated...

  8. Fire Symfonier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Svend Hvidtfelt

    2009-01-01

    sidste fire symfonier. Den er måske snarere at opfatte som et præludium til disse. At påstå, at symfonierne fra Holmboes side er planlagt til at være beslægtede, ville være at gå for vidt. Alene de 26 år, der skiller den 10. fra den 13., gør påstanden - i bedste fald - dubiøs. Når deres udformning...... udkrystallisering som i de sidste små 30 år af hans virke har afkastet disse fire variationer over en grundlæggende central holmboesk fornemmelse for form, melodi, klang og rytme. Denne oplevelse har fået mig til at udforske symfonierne, for at finde til bunds i dette holmboeske fællestræk, som jeg mener her står...

  9. Biomass treatment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, III; Melvin P.; Lyons, Robert C.

    2010-10-26

    A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

  10. 21 CFR 133.147 - Grated American cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grated American cheese food. 133.147 Section 133... Cheese and Related Products § 133.147 Grated American cheese food. (a)(1) Grated American cheese food is... granular mixture. (2) Grated American cheese food contains not less than 23 percent of milkfat,...

  11. Abrupt fire regime change may cause landscape-wide loss of mature obligate seeder forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, David M J S; Murphy, Brett P; Neyland, Dominic L J; Williamson, Grant J; Prior, Lynda D

    2014-03-01

    Obligate seeder trees requiring high-severity fires to regenerate may be vulnerable to population collapse if fire frequency increases abruptly. We tested this proposition using a long-lived obligate seeding forest tree, alpine ash (Eucalyptus delegatensis), in the Australian Alps. Since 2002, 85% of the Alps bioregion has been burnt by several very large fires, tracking the regional trend of more frequent extreme fire weather. High-severity fires removed 25% of aboveground tree biomass, and switched fuel arrays from low loads of herbaceous and litter fuels to high loads of flammable shrubs and juvenile trees, priming regenerating stands for subsequent fires. Single high-severity fires caused adult mortality and triggered mass regeneration, but a second fire in quick succession killed 97% of the regenerating alpine ash. Our results indicate that without interventions to reduce fire severity, interactions between flammability of regenerating stands and increased extreme fire weather will eliminate much of the remaining mature alpine ash forest.

  12. Relationships between annual plant productivity, nitrogen deposition and fire size in low-elevation California desert scrub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Leela E.; Matchett, John R.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Johns, Robert; Minnich, Richard A.; Allen, Edith B.

    2014-01-01

    Although precipitation is correlated with fire size in desert ecosystems and is typically used as an indirect surrogate for fine fuel load, a direct link between fine fuel biomass and fire size has not been established. In addition, nitrogen (N) deposition can affect fire risk through its fertilisation effect on fine fuel production. In this study, we examine the relationships between fire size and precipitation, N deposition and biomass with emphasis on identifying biomass and N deposition thresholds associated with fire spreading across the landscape. We used a 28-year fire record of 582 burns from low-elevation desert scrub to evaluate the relationship of precipitation, N deposition and biomass with the distribution of fire sizes using quantile regression. We found that models using annual biomass have similar predictive ability to those using precipitation and N deposition at the lower to intermediate portions of the fire size distribution. No distinct biomass threshold was found, although within the 99th percentile of the distribution fire size increased with greater than 125 g m–2 of winter fine fuel production. The study did not produce an N deposition threshold, but did validate the value of 125 g m–2 of fine fuel for spread of fires.

  13. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Mihailov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of their small size, passive nature, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and capability to directly measure physical parameters such as temperature and strain, fiber Bragg grating sensors have developed beyond a laboratory curiosity and are becoming a mainstream sensing technology. Recently, high temperature stable gratings based on regeneration techniques and femtosecond infrared laser processing have shown promise for use in extreme environments such as high temperature, pressure or ionizing radiation. Such gratings are ideally suited for energy production applications where there is a requirement for advanced energy system instrumentation and controls that are operable in harsh environments. This paper will present a review of some of the more recent developments.

  14. Large size metallic glass gratings by embossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Yi, J.; Zhao, D. Q.; Pan, M. X.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-09-01

    Bulk metallic glasses have excellent thermoforming ability in their wide supercooled liquid region. We show that large-size metallic glass grating (˜8 × 8 mm2) with fine periodicity and ultra smooth surface feature can be readily fabricated by hot embossing. The method for fabrication of gratings is proved to be much cheaper, and requires low pressure and short time (less than 30 s). The metallic glass gratings exhibit comparable optical properties such as rainbow-like spectrum when shone by fluorescent lamp light.

  15. [Effects of fire recurrence on fire behaviour in cork oak woodlands (Quercus suber L.) and Mediterranean shrublands over the last fifty years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Alice; Pimont, François; Curt, Thomas; Cassagne, Nathalie; Dupuy, Jean-Luc; Tatoni, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Past fire recurrence impacts the vegetation structure, and it is consequently hypothesized to alter its future fire behaviour. We examined the fire behaviour in shrubland-forest mosaics of southeastern France, which were organized along a range of fire frequency (0 to 3-4 fires along the past 50 years) and had different time intervals between fires. The mosaic was dominated by Quercus suber L. and Erica-Cistus shrubland communities. We described the vegetation structure through measurements of tree height, base of tree crown or shrub layer, mean diameter, cover, plant water content and bulk density. We used the physical model Firetec to simulate the fire behaviour. Fire intensity, fire spread, plant water content and biomass loss varied significantly according to fire recurrence and vegetation structure, mainly linked to the time since the last fire, then the number of fires. These results confirm that past fire recurrence affects future fire behaviour, with multi-layered vegetation (particularly high shrublands) producing more intense fires, contrary to submature Quercus woodlands that have not burnt since 1959 and that are unlikely to reburn. Further simulations, with more vegetation scenes according to shrub and canopy covers, will complete this study in order to discuss the fire propagation risk in heterogeneous vegetation, particularly in the Mediterranean area, with a view to a local management of these ecosystems.

  16. Influence of grating thickness in low-contrast subwavelength grating concentrating lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Yi, Ya Sha

    2016-07-01

    Conventional subwavelength grating concentrating lenses are designed based on calculated phase overlap, wherein the phase change is fixed by the grating thickness, bar-width, and airgap, and therefore the focus. We found that certain concentration effects can still be maintained by changing the grating thickness with the same bar-widths and airgap dimensions. Following that, we discovered the existence of the grating thickness threshold; light concentration intensity spikes upon exceeding this limit. However, the light concentration property does not change continuously with respect to a steady increase in grating thickness. This observation indicates that there exists a concentration mode self-interference effect along the light propagation direction inside the gratings. Our results may provide guidance in designing and fabricating microlenses in a potentially more easy and controllable manner. Such approaches can be utilized in various integrated nanophotonics applications ranging from optical cavities and read/write heads to concentrating photovoltaics.

  17. Fire Protection for Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Jane

    1972-01-01

    Reviews attack on fire safety in high rise buildings made by a group of experts representing the iron and steel industry at a recent conference. According to one expert, fire problems are people oriented, which calls for emphasis on fire prevention rather than reliance on fire suppression and for fire pretection to be built into a structure.…

  18. Comparison of the Hazard Mapping System (HMS) fire product to ground-based fire records in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuefei; Yu, Chao; Tian, Di; Ruminski, Mark; Robertson, Kevin; Waller, Lance A.; Liu, Yang

    2016-03-01

    Biomass burning has a significant and adverse impact on air quality, climate change, and various ecosystems. The Hazard Mapping System (HMS) detects fires using data from multiple satellite sensors in order to maximize its fire detection rate. However, to date, the detection rate of the HMS fire product for small fires has not been well studied, especially using ground-based fire records. This paper utilizes the 2011 fire information compiled from ground observations and burn authorizations in Georgia to assess the comprehensiveness of the HMS active fire product. The results show that detection rates of the hybrid HMS increase substantially by integrating multiple satellite instruments. The detection rate increases dramatically from 3% to 80% with an increase in fire size from less than 0.02 km2 to larger than 2 km2, resulting in detection of approximately 12% of all recorded fires which represent approximately 57% of the total area burned. The spatial pattern of detection rates reveals that grid cells with high detection rates are generally located in areas where large fires occur frequently. The seasonal analysis shows that overall detection rates in winter and spring (12% and 13%, respectively) are higher than those in summer and fall (3% and 6%, respectively), mainly because of higher percentages of large fires (>0.19 km2) that occurred in winter and spring. The land cover analysis shows that detection rates are 2-7 percentage points higher in land cover types that are prone to large fires such as forestland and shrub land.

  19. Impact of biomass burning on the atmosphere. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dignon, J.

    1994-04-01

    Fire has played an important part in biogeochemical cycling throughout much of the history of our plant. This report addresses the coupled evolution of our planet`s atmospheric composition and biomass burning. Special attention is paid to the chemical and climatic impacts of biomass burning on the atmosphere throughout the last century, specifically looking at the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Information from ice core measurements may be useful in understanding the history of fire and its historic affect on the composition of the atmosphere and climate.

  20. Fuel consumption and fire emissions estimates using Fire Radiative Power, burned area and statistical modelling on the fire event scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, Gernot; Leimbach, David; Guenther, Felix; Barradas, Carol; Hoffmann, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Fire Radiative Power (FRP) retrieved by infrared sensors, such as flown on several polar orbiting and geostationary satellites, has been shown to be proportional to fuel consumption rates in vegetation fires, and hence the total radiative energy released by a fire (Fire Radiative Energy, FRE) is proportional to the total amount of biomass burned. However, due to the sparse temporal coverage of polar orbiting and the coarse spatial resolution of geostationary sensors, it is difficult to estimate fuel consumption for single fire events. Here we explore an approach for estimating FRE through temporal integration of MODIS FRP retrievals over MODIS-derived burned areas. Temporal integration is aided by statistical modelling to estimate missing observations using a generalized additive model (GAM) and taking advantage of additional information such as land cover and a global dataset of the Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI), as well as diurnal and annual FRP fluctuation patterns. Based on results from study areas located in savannah regions of Southern and Eastern Africa and Brazil, we compare this method to estimates based on simple temporal integration of FRP retrievals over the fire lifetime, and estimate the potential variability of FRP integration results across a range of fire sizes. We compare FRE-based fuel consumption against a database of field experiments in similar landscapes. Results show that for larger fires, this method yields realistic estimates and is more robust when only a small number of observations is available than the simple temporal integration. Finally, we offer an outlook on the integration of data from other satellites, specifically FireBird, S-NPP VIIRS and Sentinel-3, as well as on using higher resolution burned area data sets derived from Landsat and similar sensors.

  1. Access Platforms for Offshore Wind Turbines Using Gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with forces generated by a stationary jet on different types of gratings and a solid plate. The force reduction factors for the different gratings compared to the solid plate mainly depend on the porosity of the gratings, but the geometry of the grating is also of some importance........ The derived reduction factors are expected to be applicable to design of offshore wind turbine access platforms with gratings where slamming also is an important factor....

  2. Long period fiber gratings induced by mechanical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Shahal, Shir; Duadi, Hamootal; Fridman, Moti

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple, and robust method for writing long period fiber gratings with low polarization dependent losses. Our method is based on utilizing mechanical vibrations of the tapered fiber while pooling it. Our method enables real-time tunability of the periodicity, efficiency and length of the grating. We also demonstrate complex grating by writing multiple gratings simultaneously. Finally, we utilized the formation of the gratings in different fiber diameters to investigate the Young's modulus of the fiber.

  3. Fire in ice: two millennia of boreal forest fire history from the Greenland NEEM ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zennaro, P.; Kehrwald, N.; McConnell, J. R.; Schüpbach, S.; Maselli, O. J.; Marlon, J.; Vallelonga, P.; Leuenberger, D.; Zangrando, R.; Spolaor, A.; Borrotti, M.; Barbaro, E.; Gambaro, A.; Barbante, C.

    2014-10-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of greenhouse gases and influences regional to global climate. Pre-industrial fire-history records from black carbon, charcoal and other proxies provide baseline estimates of biomass burning at local to global scales spanning millennia, and are thus useful to examine the role of fire in the carbon cycle and climate system. Here we use the specific biomarker levoglucosan together with black carbon and ammonium concentrations from the North Greenland Eemian (NEEM) ice cores (77.49° N, 51.2° W; 2480 m a.s.l) over the past 2000 years to infer changes in boreal fire activity. Increases in boreal fire activity over the periods 1000-1300 CE and decreases during 700-900 CE coincide with high-latitude NH temperature changes. Levoglucosan concentrations in the NEEM ice cores peak between 1500 and 1700 CE, and most levoglucosan spikes coincide with the most extensive central and northern Asian droughts of the past millennium. Many of these multi-annual droughts are caused by Asian monsoon failures, thus suggesting a connection between low- and high-latitude climate processes. North America is a primary source of biomass burning aerosols due to its relative proximity to the Greenland Ice Cap. During major fire events, however, isotopic analyses of dust, back trajectories and links with levoglucosan peaks and regional drought reconstructions suggest that Siberia is also an important source of pyrogenic aerosols to Greenland.

  4. Numerical investigation of ash deposition in straw-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    accumulation rates encountered during straw combustion in grate-fired boilers. The sub-models have been based on information about the combustion and deposition properties of straw gathered from the literature and combined into a single Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based analysis tool which can aid...... in the design phase of straw-fired boilers. Some of the primary model outputs include improved heat transfer rate predictions and detailed information about local deposit formation rates. This information is essential when boiler availability and efficiency is to be estimated. A stand-alone program has been...... developed to predict the combustion processes on the grate and the release rate of KCl vapor. These outputs form the boundary conditions for the CFD analysis. The bed model has been validated through comparison with experimental data obtained during batch combustion of straw. It was found that the heat...

  5. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky pr. 59, 119333 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  6. Theory of photorefractive dynamic grating formulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The photorefractive holographic recording and two-beam coupling are both dynamic grating formulation process. The interference light intensity of the two coherent beams induces a phase grating though photo-induced refractive index variation and the phase grating changing the intensities of the two beams through beam-coupling take place at the same time. By solving simultaneously the band transport equations and wave-coupled equations, and using the light intensity modulation as the main variable, the analytic solution is obtained, which is valid for any light intensity modulation and constant light excitation efficiency. Here all the mechanics of drift, diffusion and photovoltaic effect are considered. The result shows that the modulation of the dynamic grating varies more slowly compared with that of the linear modulation approximation.

  7. Eco-hydrology driven fire regime in savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursino, Nadia

    2014-08-21

    Fire is an important evolutionary force and ecosystem consumer that shapes savanna composition. However, ecologists have not comprehensively explained the functioning and maintenance of flammable savannas. A new minimal model accounting for the interdependence between soil saturation, biomass growth, fuel availability and fire has been used to predict the increasing tree density and fire frequency along a Mean Annual Rainfall (MAR) gradient for a typical savanna. Cyclic fire recurrence is reproduced using a predator prey approach in which fire is the "predator" and vegetation is the "prey". For the first time, fire frequency is not defined a priori but rather arises from the composition of vegetation, which determines fuel availability and water limitation. Soil aridity affects fuel production and fuel composition, thus indirectly affecting the ecosystem vulnerability to fire and fire frequency. The model demonstrates that two distinct eco-hydrological states correspond to different fire frequencies: (i) at low MAR, grass is abundant and the impact of fire on the environment is enhanced by the large fuel availability, (ii) at higher MAR, tree density progressively increases and provides less fuel for fire, leading to more frequent and less destructive fires, and (iii) the threshold MAR that determines the transition between the two states and the fire frequency at high MAR are affected by the vulnerability of trees to grass fire. The eco-hydrology-driven predator-prey model originally predicts that the transition between dry and wet savanna is characterized by a shift in wildfire frequency driven by major differences in soil moisture available for plants and savanna structure. The shift and the role of fire in conserving savanna ecosystems could not have been predicted if fire was considered as an external forcing rather than an intrinsic property of the ecosystem.

  8. Hydraulic Capacity of an ADA Compliant Street Drain Grate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, Steven A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bojanowski, Cezary [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Resurfacing of urban roads with concurrent repairs and replacement of sections of curb and sidewalk may require pedestrian ramps that are compliant with the American Disabilities Act (ADA), and when street drains are in close proximity to the walkway, ADA compliant street grates may also be required. The Minnesota Department of Transportation ADA Operations Unit identified a foundry with an available grate that meets ADA requirements. Argonne National Laboratory’s Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center used full scale three dimensional computational fluid dynamics to determine the performance of the ADA compliant grate and compared it to that of a standard vane grate. Analysis of a parametric set of cases was carried out, including variation in longitudinal, gutter, and cross street slopes and the water spread from the curb. The performance of the grates was characterized by the fraction of the total volume flow approaching the grate from the upstream that was captured by the grate and diverted into the catch basin. The fraction of the total flow entering over the grate from the side and the fraction of flow directly over a grate diverted into the catch basin were also quantities of interest that aid in understanding the differences in performance of the grates. The ADA compliant grate performance lagged that of the vane grate, increasingly so as upstream Reynolds number increased. The major factor leading to the performance difference between the two grates was the fraction of flow directly over the grates that is captured by the grates.

  9. Spatial heterodyne interferometry with polarization gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenov, Michael W; Miskiewicz, Matthew N; Escuti, Michael J; Dereniak, Eustace L

    2012-11-01

    The implementation of a polarization-based spatial heterodyne interferometer (SHI) is described. While a conventional SHI uses a Michelson interferometer and diffraction gratings, our SHI exploits mechanically robust Wollaston prisms and polarization gratings. A theoretical model for the polarization SHI is provided and validated with data from our proof of concept experiments. This device is expected to provide a compact monolithic sensor for subangstrom resolution spectroscopy in remote sensing, biomedical imaging, and machine vision applications.

  10. Sampled phase-shift fiber Bragg gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang(王旭); Chongxiu Yu(余重秀); Zhihui Yu(于志辉); Qiang Wu(吴强)

    2004-01-01

    A phase-shift fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with sampling is proposed to generate a multi-channel bandpass filter in the background of multi-channel stopbands. The sampled noire fiber gratings are analyzed by Fourier transform theory first, and then simulation and experiment are performed, the results show that transmission peaks are opened in every reflective channel, the spectrum shape of every channel is identical.It can be used to fabricate multi-wavelength distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser.

  11. Clean and efficient application of biomass for production of power and heat - Phase 3 in a long-term strategic research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Jensen, A.D.; Jensen, P.A.; Johnsson, J.E.; Dam-Johansen, K.

    2002-06-01

    This project contains activities on: Rheology of ashes from co-firing of coal and biomass; Investigation of ash and deposit formation in full-scale utility boilers; and Selective catalytic reduction: Deactivation under biomass combustion. A fly ash and deposit investigation was carried out as part of the SK Power Company test programme on co-firing of biomasses in a grate-fired boiler. The alternative biomasses (wood chips, olive stones and shea nuts) contain more K, S, and Cl, than wheat straw, and higher fly ash mass loading (mass of fly ash/volume of flue gas) was observed when co-firing alternative biomasses with wheat straw. Anyhow, no significant change in deposit structure when co-firing alkali-rich biomass was observed: KCl is glues residual ash particles together, independent of the feedstock mixture. Thus it can be concluded that co-firing of the actual biomasses in boilers designed for straw-firing, at the present shares is not problematic, from an ash formation and/or deposit build-up point-of-view. Anyhow the increase in ash mass loading in the flue gas, may cause increased build-up of particulate deposits in the convective pass of the boiler. Mature deposit samples from the Masnedoe and Ensted straw-fired boilers were investigated by SEM and EDX. Each deposit sample was classified into an inner, an intermediate, and an outer main layer. The outermost deposit layers at Masnedoe and Ensted looked chemically quite similar, even though they were of different colours. The intermediate layer at Ensted contained many Si- and Ca-rich particles glued together by melted KCI, while the intermediate deposit layers at Masnedoe were different. Since the straw fuels probably are similar, the differences observed in the deposit chemistry must be induced by the higher temperature of the Masnedoe deposit. An experimental method has been set up for viscosity determinations on ashes from co-firing with wheat straw. The method contains a pre-treatment of the ashes, where

  12. Clean and efficient application of biomass for production of power and heat - Phase 3 in a long-term strategic research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Jensen, A.D.; Jensen, P.A.; Johnsson, J.E.; Dam-Johansen, K.

    2002-06-01

    This project contains activities on: Rheology of ashes from co-firing of coal and biomass; Investigation of ash and deposit formation in full-scale utility boilers; and Selective catalytic reduction: Deactivation under biomass combustion. A fly ash and deposit investigation was carried out as part of the SK Power Company test programme on co-firing of biomasses in a grate-fired boiler. The alternative biomasses (wood chips, olive stones and shea nuts) contain more K, S, and Cl, than wheat straw, and higher fly ash mass loading (mass of fly ash/volume of flue gas) was observed when co-firing alternative biomasses with wheat straw. Anyhow, no significant change in deposit structure when co-firing alkali-rich biomass was observed: KCl is glues residual ash particles together, independent of the feedstock mixture. Thus it can be concluded that co-firing of the actual biomasses in boilers designed for straw-firing, at the present shares is not problematic, from an ash formation and/or deposit build-up point-of-view. Anyhow the increase in ash mass loading in the flue gas, may cause increased build-up of particulate deposits in the convective pass of the boiler. Mature deposit samples from the Masnedoe and Ensted straw-fired boilers were investigated by SEM and EDX. Each deposit sample was classified into an inner, an intermediate, and an outer main layer. The outermost deposit layers at Masnedoe and Ensted looked chemically quite similar, even though they were of different colours. The intermediate layer at Ensted contained many Si- and Ca-rich particles glued together by melted KCI, while the intermediate deposit layers at Masnedoe were different. Since the straw fuels probably are similar, the differences observed in the deposit chemistry must be induced by the higher temperature of the Masnedoe deposit. An experimental method has been set up for viscosity determinations on ashes from co-firing with wheat straw. The method contains a pre-treatment of the ashes, where

  13. Fire Ant Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching mandibles ... the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or legs ...

  14. Crown Fire Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  15. Fire safety at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over the smoke alarm as needed. Using a fire extinguisher can put out a small fire to keep it from getting out of control. Tips for use include: Keep fire extinguishers in handy locations, at least one on ...

  16. Fast pyrolysis of biomass at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna

    content affected the char yield stronger than the heating rates and differences in the plant cell wall compounds between 600 and 3000K s-1. The heat treatment temperature affected more the herbaceous biomass char yield compared with wood. The differences in the char yield for particle size fractions...... pyrolysis at high temperatures plays a significant role in the overall combustion process since the biomass type, the reaction kinetics and heat transfer rates during pyrolysis influence the volatile gas release. The solid residue yield and its properties in suspension firing, including particle size...... to investigate the effects of operating parameters and biomass types on yields of char and soot, their chemistry and morphology as well as their reactivity using thermogravimetric analysis. The experimental study was focused on the influence of a wide range of operating parameters including heat treatment...

  17. Hydrothermal pretreatment of biomass for pellet production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooyserkani, Z. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Clean Energy Research Centre, Biomass and Bioenergy Research Group

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed innovative technologies for the production of wood pellets using the hydrothermal pre-treatment of biomass. Conventional techniques use low-cost mill residues, such as saw dust and shavings, as feedstock to produce durable, low-ash pellets. However, mill residues are becoming less available as a result of fewer saw mills, increased pellet production, and increased competition for saw dust. Advanced techniques use mixed biomass such as logging residue as feedstock, creating pellets that are durable for handling and long-term storage, of a higher energy density for transport and mixing with coal for co-firing, and a choice feedstock for biofuels. Advanced pellet production uses steam explosion/pre-treatment in which biomass receives a short-term high-pressure steam treatment followed by sudden decompression. Mild torrefaction seems to have positive feedback, and steam-treated pellets are durable with superior hydrophobicity. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-05-01

    In summary, stoker-fired boilers that cofire or switch to biomass fuel may potentially have to deal with ash behavior issues such as production of different concentrations and quantities of fine particulate or aerosols and ash-fouling deposition. Stoker boiler operators that are considering switching to biomass and adding potential infrastructure to accommodate the switch may also at the same time be looking into upgrades that will allow for generating additional power for sale on the grid. This is the case for the feasibility study being done currently for a small (<1-MW) stoker facility at the North Dakota State Penitentiary, which is considering not only the incorporation of a lower-cost biomass fuel but also a refurbishing of the stoker boiler to burn slightly hotter with the ability to generate more power and sell excess energy on the grid. These types of fuel and boiler changes can greatly affect ash behavior issues.

  19. Spatial patterns of large natural fires in Sierra Nevada wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B.M.; Kelly, M.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Stephens, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of fire on vegetation vary based on the properties and amount of existing biomass (or fuel) in a forest stand, weather conditions, and topography. Identifying controls over the spatial patterning of fire-induced vegetation change, or fire severity, is critical in understanding fire as a landscape scale process. We use gridded estimates of fire severity, derived from Landsat ETM+ imagery, to identify the biotic and abiotic factors contributing to the observed spatial patterns of fire severity in two large natural fires. Regression tree analysis indicates the importance of weather, topography, and vegetation variables in explaining fire severity patterns between the two fires. Relative humidity explained the highest proportion of total sum of squares throughout the Hoover fire (Yosemite National Park, 2001). The lowest fire severity corresponded with increased relative humidity. For the Williams fire (Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks, 2003) dominant vegetation type explains the highest proportion of sum of squares. Dominant vegetation was also important in determining fire severity throughout the Hoover fire. In both fires, forest stands that were dominated by lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) burned at highest severity, while red fir (Abies magnifica) stands corresponded with the lowest fire severities. There was evidence in both fires that lower wind speed corresponded with higher fire severity, although the highest fire severity in the Williams fire occurred during increased wind speed. Additionally, in the vegetation types that were associated with lower severity, burn severity was lowest when the time since last fire was fewer than 11 and 17 years for the Williams and Hoover fires, respectively. Based on the factors and patterns identified, managers can anticipate the effects of management ignited and naturally ignited fires at the forest stand and the landscape levels. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  20. Improved estimates of boreal Fire Radiative Energy using high temporal resolution data and a modified active fire detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimates of biomass combusted during wildfires can be obtained from satellite observations of fire radiative power (FRP). Total fire radiative energy (FRE) is typically estimated by integrating instantaneous measurements of fire radiative power (FRP) at the time of orbital satellite overpass or geostationary observation. Remotely-sensed FRP products from orbital satellites are usually global in extent, requiring several thresholding and filtering operations to reduce the number of false fire detections. Some filters required for a global product may not be appropriate to fire detection in the boreal forest resulting in errors of omission and increased data processing times. We evaluate the effect of a boreal-specific active fire detection algorithm and estimates of FRP/FRE. Boreal fires are more likely to escape detection due to lower intensity smouldering combustion and sub canopy fires, therefore improvements in boreal fire detection could substantially reduce the uncertainty of emissions from biomass combustion in the region. High temporal resolution data from geostationary satellites have led to improvements in FRE estimation in tropical and temperate forests, but such a perspective is not possible for high latitude ecosystems given the equatorial orbit of geostationary observation. The increased density of overpasses in high latitudes from polar-orbiting satellites, however, may provide adequate temporal sampling for estimating FRE.

  1. Chemical challenges to structural materials in oxyfuel-cofiring of coal and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Mayoral

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-firing of solid fuels is one of the most relevant technological alternatives aiming at the CO2 capture in large-scale power plants. If oxy-firing is carried out in a fluidized bed reactor, the possibilities for application are extended to low-rank coals, difficult wastes, or biomass. The oxy-co-combustion of coal and biomass in circulating fluidized bed (CFB reactors would result in a negative balance for the CO2 emissions.

  2. 77 FR 9303 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ..., for example, biomass co-fired EGUs because their use is not yet commonplace, we believe this... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-Fuel-Fired Electric Utility, Industrial- Commercial-Institutional,...

  3. External benefits of biomass-e in Spain: an economic valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliño, Mario

    2010-03-01

    This article analyses the willingness to pay for a program that promotes the production of electricity from forest biomass, instead of that based on fossil fuels. The program decreases greenhouse gas emissions, reduces the pressure on non-renewable resources, lowers the risk of summer forest fires, creates employment in rural areas. Results from a choice experiment show that consumers are willing to pay a higher price for electricity in order to obtain the external benefits of the substitution. Respondents attach a higher value to programs that decrease the pressure of non-renewable resources and the risk of forest fires.

  4. Fire in ice: two millennia of Northern Hemisphere fire history from the Greenland NEEM ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zennaro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is a major source of greenhouse gases and influences regional to global climate. Pre-industrial fire-history records from black carbon, charcoal and other proxies provide baseline estimates of biomass burning at local to global scales, but there remains a need for broad-scale fire proxies that span millennia in order to understand the role of fire in the carbon cycle and climate system. We use the specific biomarker levoglucosan, and multi-source black carbon and ammonium concentrations to reconstruct fire activity from the North Greenland Eemian (NEEM ice cores (77.49° N; 51.2° W, 2480 m a.s.l. over the past 2000 years. Increases in boreal fire activity (1000–1300 CE and 1500–1700 CE over multi-decadal timescales coincide with the most extensive central and northern Asian droughts of the past two millennia. The NEEM biomass burning tracers coincide with temperature changes throughout much of the past 2000 years except for during the extreme droughts, when precipitation changes are the dominant factor. Many of these multi-annual droughts are caused by monsoon failures, thus suggesting a connection between low and high latitude climate processes. North America is a primary source of biomass burning aerosols due to its relative proximity to the NEEM camp. During major fire events, however, isotopic analyses of dust, back-trajectories and links with levoglucosan peaks and regional drought reconstructions suggest that Siberia is also an important source of pyrogenic aerosols to Greenland.

  5. The status and challenge of global fire modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, Stijn; Arneth, Almut; Harrison, Sandy P.; Kelley, Douglas I.; Prentice, I. Colin; Rabin, Sam S.; Archibald, Sally; Mouillot, Florent; Arnold, Steve R.; Artaxo, Paulo; Bachelet, Dominique; Ciais, Philippe; Forrest, Matthew; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Hickler, Thomas; Kaplan, Jed O.; Kloster, Silvia; Knorr, Wolfgang; Lasslop, Gitta; Li, Fang; Mangeon, Stephane; Melton, Joe R.; Meyn, Andrea; Sitch, Stephen; Spessa, Allan; van der Werf, Guido R.; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Yue, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Biomass burning impacts vegetation dynamics, biogeochemical cycling, atmospheric chemistry, and climate, with sometimes deleterious socio-economic impacts. Under future climate projections it is often expected that the risk of wildfires will increase. Our ability to predict the magnitude and geographic pattern of future fire impacts rests on our ability to model fire regimes, using either well-founded empirical relationships or process-based models with good predictive skill. While a large variety of models exist today, it is still unclear which type of model or degree of complexity is required to model fire adequately at regional to global scales. This is the central question underpinning the creation of the Fire Model Intercomparison Project (FireMIP), an international initiative to compare and evaluate existing global fire models against benchmark data sets for present-day and historical conditions. In this paper we review how fires have been represented in fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) and give an overview of the current state of the art in fire-regime modelling. We indicate which challenges still remain in global fire modelling and stress the need for a comprehensive model evaluation and outline what lessons may be learned from FireMIP.

  6. Analytical and numerical study on grating depth effects in grating coupled waveguide sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, R.; Wilcox, L.C.; Pedersen, H.C.;

    2005-01-01

    The in-coupling process for grating-coupled planar optical waveguide sensors is investigated in the case of TE waves. A simple analytical model based on the Rayleigh-Fourier-Kiselev method is applied to take into account the depth of the grating coupler, which is usually neglected in the modeling...

  7. Development and testing of a dedusting filter system for exhaust gases of domestic small firing systems for the combustion of biomass and waste materials; Entwicklung und Erprobung eines Abreinigungsfilters fuer das Abgas haeuslicher Kleinfeuerungsanlagen fuer die Verbrennung von Biomasse und Abfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleysa, Mohammadshayesh

    2012-07-01

    The author describes the development of a dedusting filter system which should be suitable for the dedusting of exhaust gases in domestic small firing installations with a power output of 40 kW. This filter system should undoubtedly enable the necessary capture efficiency. It should be implemented with little technical complexity as well as low maintenance and cost-effectivity. The dedusting filter system is tested in connection with a wood gasification boiler as well as a pellet incinerator. The quantities and parameters of smoke gas, the pressure losses, the precipitation capacity, the economic efficiency and the practical suitability of the dedusting filter system are investigated. Furthermore, the author determines the necessary factors for the design and dimensioning of dedusting filter systems.

  8. Estimation of Direct Carbon Emissions from Chinese Forest Fires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIANXiaorui; GAOChengde; SHULifu; WANGMingyu; YANGXiaohui

    2004-01-01

    Many studies indicated that the products of biosphere burning have short and long-term effects on the atmosphere. Vegetation burning can produce some gases which have significant influence on environment, including some greenhouse gases as CO2 and CH4, etc. Smoke aerosols produced from burning also influence global climate and atmospheric chemistry. The paper calculates the consumed biomass due to forest fires according to the statistics of forest fires from 1991 to 2000 and research results of biomass of Chinese forests. During the study period, forest fires burned average 5Tg-7Tg biomass each year and directly emitted 20.24 Tg-28.56 Tg carbon. In 1991-2000, average emission of carbon dioxide and CH4 account for 2.7%-3.9% and 3.3%-4.7% of the total emission of China (calculating with the data of 2000), respectively.

  9. Influence of Biomass Burning Aerosols on Southeast Asia Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-He; Bar-Or, Rotem; Wang, Chien

    2016-04-01

    Biomass burning activities in Southeast Asia have become a major concern of general public as well as governments in the region. This is because that aerosols emitted from such fires can cause long-lasting haze events under favorite weather conditions in downwind locations such as Singapore, degrading air quality and causing human health issues. In order to improve our understanding of the spatiotemporal coverage and influence of biomass burning aerosols in Southeast Asia, we have used the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with a smoke aerosol module to conduct multi-year simulations covering the period from 2002 to 2014, driven by the biomass burning emissions from the Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN) version 1.5. To attribute the aerosol influences over various target regions to specific fire locations, we have also partitioned aerosols emitted from five major fire regions of Southeast Asia in the simulations. Based on the simulation results, we have examined the influences of various meteorological regimes on the aerosol transport and wet removal. We find that the transport and scavenging of biomass burning aerosols are strongly modulated by the Southeast Asian monsoon wind field and precipitation. We also identified that in the past decade, smoke aerosols are responsible for a substantial fraction of low visibility events in the major metropolitan areas of the region: 35% in Bangkok, 25% in Kuala Lumpur, 16% in Singapore, and 22% in Jakarta. The fires in the Indochina peninsula account for the largest percentage of the total fire enhancement to PM2.5 in Bangkok (98.9%), and fires in Sumatra were the major contributor in Kuala Lumpur (49%), Singapore (39%), and Jakarta (48%).

  10. Energy from Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carioca, J. O. B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how biomass in the form of fuelwood, crop residues, and animal dung can be converted into fuels such as biogas and ethanol to replace or supplement fossil fuels. Argues for future decentralized, integrated biomass energy development. (TW)

  11. Experimental facility for analysis of biomass combustion characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljković Biljana M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present article is to present an experimental facility which was designed and built at the Faculty of Technical Sciences in order to study the combustion of different sorts of biomass and municipal solid waste. Despite its apparent simplicity, direct combustion is a complex process from a technological point of view. Conventional combustion equipment is not designed for burning agricultural residues. Devices for agricultural waste combustion are still in the development phase, which means that adequate design solution is presently not available at the world market. In order to construct a boiler and achieve optimal combustion conditions, it is necessary to develop a mathematical model for biomass combustion. Experimental facility can be used for the collection of data necessary for detailed modelling of real grate combustor of solid biomass fuels. Due to the complexity of the grate combustion process, its mathematical models and simulation software tools must be developed and verified using experimental data. This work highlights the properties required for the laboratory facility designed for the examination of biomass combustion and discusses design and operational issues.

  12. A novel single-order diffraction grating: Random position rectangle grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhua, Yang; Qiangqiang, Zhang; Jing, Wang; Quanping, Fan; Yuwei, Liu; Lai, Wei; Leifeng, Cao

    2016-05-01

    Spectral diagnosis of radiation from laser plasma interaction and monochromation of radiation source are hot and important topics recently. Grating is one of the primary optical elements to do this job. Although easy to fabricate, traditional diffraction grating suffers from multi-order diffraction contamination. On the other hand, sinusoidal amplitude grating has the nonharmonic diffraction property, but it is too difficult to fabricate, especially for x-ray application. A novel nonharmonic diffraction grating named random position rectangle grating (RPRG) is proposed in this paper. Theoretical analysis and experiment results show that the RPRG is both higher order diffraction suppressing and not difficult to fabricate. Additionally, it is highly efficient; its first order absolute theoretical diffraction efficiency reaches 4.1%. Our result shows that RPRG is a novel tool for radiation diagnosis and monochromation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11375160) and the National Science Instruments Major Project of China (Grant No. 2012YQ130125).

  13. Theoretical Investigation of Subwavelength Gratings and Vertical Cavity Lasers Employing Grating Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh, Alireza

    This thesis deals with theoretical investigations of a newly proposed grating structure, referred to as hybrid grating (HG) as well as vertical cavity lasers based on the grating reflectors. The HG consists of a near-subwavelength grating layer and an unpatterned high-refractive-index cap layer...... behind these reflector and resonator properties are studied thoroughly. A HG structure comprising a III-V cap layer with a gain material and a Si grating layer enables the realization of a compact vertical cavity laser integrated on Si platform, which has a superior thermal property and fabrication...... directions, which is analogous to electronic quantum wells in conduction or valence bands. Several interesting configurations of heterostructures have been investigated and their potential in fundamental physics study and applications are discussed. For numerical and theoretical studies, a three...

  14. SPECIFIC EMISSIONS FROM BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skopec

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with determining the specific emissions from the combustion of two kinds of biomass fuels in a small-scale boiler. The tested fuels were pellets made of wood and pellets made of rape plant straw. In order to evaluate the specific emissions, several combustion experiments were carried out using a commercial 25 kW pellet-fired boiler. The specific emissions of CO, SO2 and NOx were evaluated in relation to a unit of burned fuel, a unit of calorific value and a unit of produced heat. The specific emissions were compared with some data acquired from the reference literature, with relatively different results. The differences depend mainly on the procedure used for determining the values, and references provide no information about this. Although some of our experimental results may fit with one of the reference sources, they do not fit with the other. The reliability of the references is therefore disputable.

  15. Torrefaction of herbaceous biomass: A study of product, process and technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Y.V.

    2015-01-01

    Co-firing biomass with coal in pulverized fuel boilers is a readily implementable means for attaining renewable electricity generation targets. Even as utilities have gained considerable operational experience over the past years with co-firing small quantities (0-3% on energy basis) of assorted bio

  16. Production of peroxy nitrates in boreal biomass burning plumes over Canada during the BORTAS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Busilacchio

    2016-03-01

    during biomass burning is significant in the O3 budget. The implication of these observations is that fire emissions in some cases, for example boreal forest fires and in the conditions reported here, may influence more long-lived precursors of O3 than short-lived pollutants, which in turn can be transported and eventually diluted in a wide area.

  17. Pretreated densified biomass products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

    2014-03-18

    A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

  18. Biomass district energy in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maker, T. [Energy Efficiency Associates, Calais, VT (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The advantages of district heating plants, fueled by sustainably produced biomass are reviewed, and numerous successful examples in Canada and the United States are described. Canadian systems include the Trigen PEI system in Charlottetown, systems in the First Nations communities of Ouje-Bougoumou and Grassy Narrows, and systems serving public facilities in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. In the United States, District Energy St. Paul has recently announced a 25 MW CHP plant fired with municipal tree thinnings and other wood wastes. There are two large state office complexes in Vermont that have been fired with sawmill residues and whole-tree chips for the last 15 years. There are also mini-district heating systems serving small communities, or just a few buildings, that have been pioneered in Vermont, Prince Edward Island and elsewhere. Other systems described include biomass thermal energy plants developed in Vermont (`the Vermont Model`) to serve public schools, a 300 KW waste wood boiler developed by a PEI manufacturer and installed in several multi-building settings on farms and greenhouses, and the hand-fired high efficiency cordwood boiler produced by a Minnesota firm that have been used in a number of multi-building applications in native American villages in Alaska. It has been estimated that compared to building energy retrofits and efficiency improvements which might reduce fossil fuel consumption by 10 to 30 per cent, connecting buildings to a biomass-fired district energy system can reduce fossil fuel use and net CO{sub 2} emissions by as much as 80 to 90 per cent. 12 refs.

  19. Encoded cell grating array in anti-counterfeit technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongyu Chen; N. K. Bao; Po S. Chung

    2005-01-01

    @@ The dot matrix hologram (DMH) has been widely used in anti-counterfeiting label. With the same technology and cell array configuration, we can encode to the incidence beam. These codes can be some image matrix grating with different grating gap and different grating orientation. When the multi-level phase diffractive grating is etched, the incidence beam on the cell appears as an encoding image. When the encoded grating and DMH are used in the same label synchronously, the technology of multi-encoded grating array enhances the anti-counterfeit ability.

  20. Ash transformation in suspension fired boilers co-firing coal and straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    of flue gas cleaning equipment. This survey includes discussions on the inorganic constituents transformation during straw and coal combustion, alkali-ash and alkali sulfur reactions, a survey of power plant and test rig co-firing experiments, a discussion of equilibrium calculations, a discussion......In this literature report is provided a status for the present knowledge level on ash properties when co-firing coal and biomass. The fly ash formed in boilers using co-firing of coal and straw do have a large influence on ash deposit formation, boiler corrosion, fly ash utilization and operation...... of alkali getter experiments and a discussion of modeling of alkali reaction with kaolin. Presently there is still a need for a better understanding of especially the reaction of potassium with coal ash, thereby making better predictions of co-firing ash properties....

  1. Biomass Suspension Combustion: Effect of Two-Stage Combustion on NOx Emissions in a Laboratory-Scale Swirl Burner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Weigang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    result from the homogeneous reaction, by comparing the NO emissions when firing natural gas with NH3 addition and co-firing natural gas and biomass. The experimental results also show no significant increase of incomplete combustion of gas and char by applying optimized two-stage combustion.......A systematic study was performed in a suspension fired 20 kW laboratory-scale swirl burner test rig for combustion of biomass and co-combustion of natural gas and biomass. The main focus is put on the effect of two-stage combustion on the NO emission, as well as its effect on the incomplete...

  2. Fire-induced Carbon Emissions and Regrowth Uptake in Western U.S. Forests: Documenting Variation Across Forest Types, Fire Severity, and Climate Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Bardan; Williams, Christopher A.; Collatz, George James; Vanderhoof, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The forest area in the western United States that burns annually is increasing with warmer temperatures, more frequent droughts, and higher fuel densities. Studies that examine fire effects for regional carbon balances have tended to either focus on individual fires as examples or adopt generalizations without considering how forest type, fire severity, and regional climate influence carbon legacies. This study provides a more detailed characterization of fire effects and quantifies the full carbon impacts in relation to direct emissions, slow release of fire-killed biomass, and net carbon uptake from forest regrowth. We find important variations in fire-induced mortality and combustion across carbon pools (leaf, live wood, dead wood, litter, and duff) and across low- to high-severity classes. This corresponds to fire-induced direct emissions from 1984 to 2008 averaging 4 TgC/yr and biomass killed averaging 10.5 TgC/yr, with average burn area of 2723 sq km/yr across the western United States. These direct emission and biomass killed rates were 1.4 and 3.7 times higher, respectively, for high-severity fires than those for low-severity fires. The results show that forest regrowth varies greatly by forest type and with severity and that these factors impose a sustained carbon uptake legacy. The western U.S. fires between 1984 and 2008 imposed a net source of 12.3 TgC/yr in 2008, accounting for both direct fire emissions (9.5 TgC/yr) and heterotrophic decomposition of fire-killed biomass (6.1 TgC yr1) as well as contemporary regrowth sinks (3.3 TgC/yr). A sizeable trend exists toward increasing emissions as a larger area burns annually.

  3. Iridescence in Meat Caused by Surface Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kemal Yetisen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The photonic structure of cut muscle tissues reveals that the well-ordered gratings diffract light, producing iridescent colours. Cut fibrils protruding from the muscle surface create a two-dimensional periodic array, which diffract light at specific wavelengths upon illumination. However, this photonic effect misleads consumers in a negative way to relate the optical phenomenon with the quality of the product. Here we discuss the fundamentals of this optical phenomenon and demonstrate a methodology for quantitatively measuring iridescence caused by diffraction gratings of muscle tissue surface of pork (Sus scrofa domesticus using reflection spectrophotometry. Iridescence was discussed theoretically as a light phenomenon and spectral measurements were taken from the gratings and monitored in real time during controlled drying. The findings show that the intensity of diffraction diminishes as the surface grating was dried with an air flow at 50 °C for 2 min while the diffracted light wavelength was at 585 ± 9 nm. Our findings indicate that the diffraction may be caused by a blazed surface grating. The implications of the study include providing guidelines to minimise the iridescence by altering the surface microstructure, and in consequence, removing the optical effect.

  4. Arc-Induced Long Period Fiber Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Rego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long period fiber gratings produced by the electric arc technique have found an increasing interest by the scientific community due to their ease to fabricate, virtually enabling the inscription in any kind of fiber, low cost, and flexibility. In 2005 we have presented the first review on this subject. Since then, important achievements have been reached such as the identification of the mechanisms responsible for gratings formation, the type of symmetry, the conditions to increase fabrication reproducibility, and their inscription in the turning points with grating periods below 200 μm. Several interesting applications in the sensing area, including those sensors working in reflection, have been demonstrated and others are expected, namely, related to the monitoring of extreme temperatures, cryogenic and high temperatures, and high sensitivity refractometric sensors resulting from combining arc-induced gratings in the turning points and the deposition of thin films in the transition region. Therefore, due to its pertinence, in this paper we review the main achievements obtained concerning arc-induced long period fiber gratings, with special focus on the past ten years.

  5. Seasonal, interannual, and long-term variabilities in biomass burning activity over South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, P; Naja, M; Kumar, R; Chandola, H C

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal, interannual, and long-term variations in biomass burning activity and related emissions are not well studied over South Asia. In this regard, active fire location retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Terra, and tropospheric column NO2 from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) are used to understand the effects of biomass burning on the tropospheric pollution loadings over South Asia during 2003-2013. Biomass burning emission estimates from Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) and Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are also used to quantify uncertainties and regional discrepancies in the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and black carbon (BC) due to biomass burning in South Asia. In the Asian continent, the frequency of fire activity is highest over Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia and East Asia. The biomass burning activity in South Asia shows a distinct seasonal cycle that peaks during February-May with some differences among four (north, central, northeast, and south) regions in India. The annual biomass burning activity in north, central, and south regions shows an increasing tendency, particularly after 2008, while a decrease is seen in northeast region during 2003-2013. The increase in fire counts over the north and central regions contributes 24 % of the net enhancement in fire counts over South Asia. MODIS AOD and OMI tropospheric column NO2 retrievals are classified into high and low fire activity periods and show that biomass burning leads to significant enhancement in tropospheric pollution loading over both the cropland and forest regions. The enhancement is much higher (110-176 %) over the forest region compared to the cropland (34-62 %) region. Further efforts are required to understand the implications of biomass burning on the regional air quality and climate of South Asia.

  6. Water vapor release from biomass combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Parmar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the emission of water vapor from biomass combustion. Concurrent measurements of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are used to scale the concentrations of water vapor found, and are referenced to carbon in the biomass. The investigated fuel types include hardwood (oak and African musasa, softwood (pine and spruce, partly with green needles, and African savanna grass. The session-averaged ratio of H2O to the sum of CO and CO2 in the emissions from 16 combustion experiments ranged from 1.2 to 3.7, indicating the presence of water that is not chemically bound. This non-bound biomass moisture content ranged from 33% in the dry African hardwood, musasa, to 220% in fresh pine branches with needles. The moisture content from fresh biomass contributes significantly to the water vapor in biomass burning emissions, and its influence on the behavior of fire plumes and pyro-cumulus clouds needs to be evaluated.

  7. Investigation of Heat Generation from Biomass Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoharu Murasawa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available New biomass fuels are constantly being developed from renewable resources in an effort to counter global warming and to create a sustainable society based on recycling. Among these, biomass fuels manufactured from waste are prone to microbial fermentation, and are likely to cause fires and explosions if safety measures, including sufficient risk assessments and long-term storage, are not considered. In this study, we conducted a series of experiments on several types of newly developed biomass fuels, using combinations of various thermal- and gas-analysers, to identify the risks related to heat- and gas-generation. Since a method for the evaluation of the relative risks of biomass fuels is not yet established in Japan, we also such a method based on our experimental results. The present study found that in cases where safety measures are not thoroughly observed, biomass fuels manufactured from waste materials have a higher possibility of combusting spontaneously at the storage site due to microbial fermentation and heat generation.

  8. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  9. Experimental Investigation on NOx Reduction by Primary Measures in Biomass Combustion: Straw, Peat, Sewage Sludge, Forest Residues and Wood Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Skreiberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was carried out to study the NOx formation and reduction by primary measures for five types of biomass (straw, peat, sewage sludge, forest residues/Grot, and wood pellets and their mixtures. To minimize the NOx level in biomass-fired boilers, combustion experiments were performed in a laboratory scale multifuel fixed grate reactor using staged air combustion. Flue gas was extracted to measure final levels of CO, CO2, CxHy, O2, NO, NO2, N2O, and other species. The fuel gas compositions between the first and second stage were also monitored. The experiments showed good combustion quality with very low concentrations of unburnt species in the flue gas. Under optimum conditions, a NOx reduction of 50–80% was achieved, where the highest reduction represents the case with the highest fuel-N content. The NOx emission levels were very sensitive to the primary excess air ratio and an optimum value for primary excess air ratio was seen at about 0.9. Conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx showed great dependency on the initial fuel-N content, where the blend with the highest nitrogen content had lowest conversion rate. Between 1–25% of the fuel-N content is converted to NOx depending on the fuel blend and excess air ratio. Sewage sludge is suggested as a favorable fuel to be blended with straw. It resulted in a higher NOx reduction and low fuel-N conversion to NOx. Tops and branches did not show desirable NOx reduction and made the combustion also more unstable. N2O emissions were very low, typically below 5 ppm at 11% O2 in the dry flue gas, except for mixtures with high nitrogen content, where values up to 20 ppm were observed. The presented results are part of a larger study on problematic fuels, also considering ash content and corrosive compounds which have been discussed elsewhere.

  10. The effect of biomass on pollutant emission and burnout in co-combustion with coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruczek, H.; Raczka, P.; Tatarek, A. [Wroclaw Technical University, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2006-08-15

    This paper presents experimental and numerical results on the co-combustion of different types of biomass with hard and brown coal. The main aim of this work was to assess the impact of the cocombustion of biomass in brown and hard coal-fired systems on the combustion process itself and on the level of pollutant formation and its dependence on combustion temperature stoichiometry. The experimental results obtained have shown that in general biomass addition leads to decreased NO and SO{sub 2} emissions, except with the hard coal Bogdanka. In addition, the biomass has a beneficial effect on the burnout of the coal/biomass mixture. To help to account for this effect, the behaviour of coal and biomass, the coal/biomass mixture and of fuel-N was studied by thermal analysis, in nitrogen and in air. The results obtained have shown that gas phase interactions are dominant in the combustion of biomass/coal mixtures.

  11. Theoretical analysis on x-ray cylindrical grating interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Grating interferometer is a state of art x-ray imaging approach, which can simultaneously acquire information of x-ray attenuation, phase shift, and small angle scattering. This approach is very sensitive to micro-structural variation and offers superior contrast resolution for biological soft tissues. The present grating interferometer often uses flat gratings, with serious limitations in the field of view and the flux of photons. The use of curved gratings allows perpendicular incidence of x-rays on the gratings, and gives higher visibility over a larger field of view than a conventional interferometer with flat gratings. In the study, we present a rigorous theoretical analysis of the self-imaging of curved transmission gratings based on Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the self-imaging phenomenon of cylindrical grating interferometer. The theoretical results are in agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  12. Fire fatality study: demographics of fire victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillo, D J; Goode, R

    1996-03-01

    Injury or death caused by fire is frequent and largely preventable. This study was undertaken to define the populations, locations, times and behaviours associated with fatal fires. Seven hundred and twenty-seven fatalities occurring within the State of New Jersey, between the years 1985 and 1991, were examined retrospectively. Most deaths were attributed to a combination of smoke inhalation and burn injury. Five hundred and seventy-four fatalities occurred in residential fires. Smoking materials were the most common source of ignition for residential fires. More than half of the fatal residential fires started between the hours of 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Children and the elderly represented a disproportionate percentage of fire victims. Victims under the age of 11 years or over the age of 70 years constituted 22.1 per cent of the state population but 39.5 per cent of all fire fatalities. Fire-prevention efforts should target home fire safety, and should concentrate on children and the elderly. The development of fire-safe smoking materials should be encouraged.

  13. Sangac interferometer on the holographic bragg grating

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhonov, E A

    2015-01-01

    The ring interferometer with zero optical path difference known as Sagnac one is offered with a diffraction splitting of the entering light beam. As the beamsplitter, a transmission holographic Bragg grating is used. Conditions of normal operation of this interferometer achieve under the equal intensity of beam copies and the adjustable phase shift between them in its two interferometer shoulders. These conditions are met with the holographic grating, which provides the phase shift 180^0 on the central Bragg wavelength. Experimental approbation of the modified interferometer validates the expected results.

  14. Novel algorithm for synthesis of fiber gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo LV; Ming CHEN; Dan LU; Taorong GONG; Tangjun LI; Shuisheng JIAN

    2009-01-01

    A novel algorithm for the synthesis of fiber gratings is presented.For the first time we propose an effective optimal approach to construct a coupling coefficient function by employing 4th-order Runge-Kutta (R-K) analysis method for calculating the reflection spectra of fiber gratings.The numerical results show that with this proposed method, some required optical filters have been yielded with better features compared with other methods such as Gel'Fand-Levitan-Marchenko (GLM) algorithm.In addition, the performance of different interpolation functions particularly utilized in our algorithm, including linear-type, spline-type, and Hermit-type, are discussed in detail.

  15. Multiwavelength optical scatterometry of dielectric gratings

    KAUST Repository

    Yashina, Nataliya P.

    2012-08-01

    Modern scatterometry problems arising in the lithography production of periodic gratings are in the focus of the work. The performance capabilities of a novel theoretical and numerical modeling oriented to these problems are considered. The approach is based on rigorous solutions of 2-D initial boundary value problems of the gratings theory. The quintessence and advantage of the method is the possibility to perform an efficient analysis simultaneously and interactively both for steady state and transient processes of the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves by the infinite and compact periodic structures. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. Transmission grating stretcher for contrast enhancement of high power lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunxin; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Hawkes, Steve; Collier, John; Rajeev, P P

    2014-12-01

    We propose, for the first time, a transmission grating stretcher for high power lasers and demonstrate its superiority over conventional, reflective gold grating stretchers in terms of pulse temporal quality. We show that, compared to a conventional stretcher with the same stretching factor, the transmission-grating based stretcher yields more than an order of magnitude improvement in the contrast pedestal. We have also quantitatively characterized the roughness of the grating surfaces and estimated its impact on the contrast pedestal.

  17. Polymeric waveguide Bragg grating filter using soft lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Aydinli, Atilla

    2006-10-01

    We use the soft lithography technique to fabricate a polymeric waveguide Bragg grating filter. Master grating structure is patterned by e-beam lithography. Using an elastomeric stamp and capillary action, uniform grating structures with very thin residual layers are transferred to the UV curable polymer without the use of an imprint machine. The waveguide layer based on BCB optical polymer is fabricated by conventional optical lithography. This approach provides processing simplicity to fabricate Bragg grating filters.

  18. Impacts of Frequent Burning on Live Tree Carbon Biomass and Demography in Post-Harvest Regrowth Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Collins

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of forest ecosystems to increase carbon storage is a global concern. Fire frequency has the potential to shift considerably in the future. These shifts may alter demographic processes and growth of tree species, and consequently carbon storage in forests. Examination of the sensitivity of forest carbon to the potential upper and lower extremes of fire frequency will provide crucial insight into the magnitude of possible change in carbon stocks associated with shifts in fire frequency. This study examines how tree biomass and demography of a eucalypt forest regenerating after harvest is affected by two experimentally manipulated extremes in fire frequency (i.e., ~3 year fire intervals vs. unburnt sustained over a 23 year period. The rate of post-harvest biomass recovery of overstorey tree species, which constituted ~90% of total living tree biomass, was lower within frequently burnt plots than unburnt plots, resulting in approximately 20% lower biomass in frequently burnt plots by the end of the study. Significant differences in carbon biomass between the two extremes in frequency were only evident after >15–20 years of sustained treatment. Reduced growth rates and survivorship of smaller trees on the frequently burnt plots compared to unburnt plots appeared to be driving these patterns. The biomass of understorey trees, which constituted ~10% of total living tree biomass, was not affected by frequent burning. These findings suggest that future shifts toward more frequent fire will potentially result in considerable reductions in carbon sequestration across temperate forest ecosystems in Australia.

  19. Annual and diurnal african biomass burning temporal dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Roberts

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Africa is the single largest continental source of biomass burning emissions. Here we conduct the first analysis of one full year of geostationary active fire detections and fire radiative power data recorded over Africa at 15-min temporal interval and a 3 km sub-satellite spatial resolution by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI imaging radiometer onboard the Meteosat-8 satellite. We use these data to provide new insights into the rates and totals of open biomass burning over Africa, particularly into the extremely strong seasonal and diurnal cycles that exist across the continent. We estimate peak daily biomass combustion totals to be 9 and 6 million tonnes of fuel per day in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively, and total fuel consumption between February 2004 and January 2005 is estimated to be at least 855 million tonnes. Analysis is carried out with regard to fire pixel temporal persistence, and we note that the majority of African fires are detected only once in consecutive 15 min imaging slots. An investigation of the variability of the diurnal fire cycle is carried out with respect to 20 different land cover types, and whilst differences are noted between land covers, the fire diurnal cycle characteristics for most land cover type are very similar in both African hemispheres. We compare the Fire Radiative Power (FRP derived biomass combustion estimates to burned-areas, both at the scale of individual fires and over the entire continent at a 1-degree scale. Fuel consumption estimates are found to be less than 2 kg/m2 for all land cover types noted to be subject to significant fire activity, and for savanna grasslands where literature values are commonly reported the FRP-derived median fuel consumption estimate of 300 g/m2 is well within commonly quoted values. Meteosat-derived FRP data of the type presented here is now available freely to interested users continuously and in near

  20. Laser Trimming for Adjustment of Grating Offset in Phase-Shifted Fiber Grating Coupler for All-Optical Switching Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hirohisa; Yokota; Yutaka; Sasaki

    2003-01-01

    We theoretically investigated laser trimming to adjust grating offset in phase-shifted fiber grating coupler (FGC) for all-optical switching application. It was clarified that the trimming made the extinction ratio higher in all-optical FGC switch.

  1. Light scanner based on a viscoelastic stretchable grating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonov, A.N.; Akhzar-Mehr, O.; Vdovine, G.V.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new technique for light scanning by use of viscoelastic-based deformable phase diffraction gratings. Mechanical stretching of the grating permits control of its spatial period, and thus the orders of diffraction can be spatially deflected. In the experiments the viscoelastic gratings wi

  2. Fabrication of Dammann Gratings Inside Glasses by a Femtosecond Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAKAYA Takayuki; QIU Jian-Rong; ZHOU Chang-He; HIRAO Kazuyuki

    2004-01-01

    @@ Dammann grating is useful in information technology as an optical splitter. It is usually fabricated through complicated processes. Here we report on the direct fabrication of a 6 × 6 Dammann grating in a silica glass by an 800nm femtosecond laser. We also discuss the relationship between diffraction efficiency of 1 × 2 Dammann grating and laser irradiation conditions.

  3. Liquid filling of photonic crystal fibres for grating writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, John; Lægsgaard, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    liquid filling of photonic crystal fibres reduces the scattering from air–glass interfaces during Bragg grating writing in many layered photonic crystal fibres. Within experimental uncertainty, the grating index modulation of a grating written in germanium-doped photonic crystal fibre with 10 rings...

  4. Off-plane x-ray reflection grating fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Thomas J.; DeRoo, Casey T.; Marlowe, Hannah; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Miles, Drew M.; Tutt, James H.; Schultz, Ted B.

    2015-09-01

    Off-plane X-ray diffraction gratings with precision groove profiles at the submicron scale will be used in next generation X-ray spectrometers. Such gratings will be used on a current NASA suborbital rocket mission, the Off-plane Grating Rocket Experiment (OGRE), and have application for future grating missions. The fabrication of these gratings does not come without challenges. High performance off-plane gratings must be fabricated with precise radial grating patterns, optically at surfaces, and specific facet angles. Such gratings can be made using a series of common micro-fabrication techniques. The resulting process is highly customizable, making it useful for a variety of different mission architectures. In this paper, we detail the fabrication method used to produce high performance off-plane gratings and report the results of a preliminary qualification test of a grating fabricated in this manner. The grating was tested in the off-plane `Littrow' configuration, for which the grating is most efficient for a given diffraction order, and found to achieve 42% relative efficiency in the blaze order with respect to all diffracted light.

  5. Measurement of Fire Radiative Energy from Space and Implications for Fire-Disaster Monitoring and Smoke Emissions Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP) from satellite provides a vital mechanism for distinguishing different strengths of fires. Analysis of 1-km resolution fire data, acquired globally by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites from 2000 to 2006, showed instantaneous FRP values ranging between 0.02 MW and 1866 MW, to which simple thresholds can be applied to categorize fires by strength, in a similar fashion as the strengths of earthquakes and hurricanes. Analysis of regional mean FRP per unit area of land (FRP flux) shows that at peak fire season in certain regions, fires can be responsible for up to 0.2 W/m2 at peak time of day. When considered as the active fire contribution to the direct surface radiative forcing (RF) in the different fire regions, this order of magnitude of FRF fluxes is non negligible. It has been determined experimentally that the amount of FRE released by a fire over the course of its duration is directly proportional to the amount of biomass consumed by it. Furthermore, at the satellite observation scale, the rate of release of FRE (i.e. FRP) is proportional to the rate of biomass consumption, and that of emission of smoke particulates and eventually also other smoke constituents. Therefore, current research efforts are geared toward deriving simple parameterizations that will facilitate direct input of FRP measurements in models, not only to improve the accuracy of burned-biomass and smoke emissions estimations, but also to reduce the hitherto practiced heavy reliance on multiple indirect parameters with indeterminate uncertainties.

  6. Strategies for the fusion of satellite fire radiative power with burned area data for fire radiative energy derivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschetti, Luigi; Roy, David P.

    2009-10-01

    Instantaneous estimates of the power released by a fire (Fire Radiative Power, FRP) are available with satellite active fire detection products. Integrating FRP in time provides an estimate of the total energy released (Fire Radiative Energy, FRE), which can be converted into burned biomass estimates needed by the atmospheric emissions modeling community. While straightforward in theory, the integration of FRP in time and space is affected by temporal and spatial undersampling imposed by the satellite sensing and orbit geometry, clouds, and active fire product omission errors. Combination of active fire FRP estimates with independently derived burned area maps provides the potential for improved and spatially explicit estimates of FRE and biomass burned. In the present work, strategies for the temporal interpolation of FRP data and for the spatial extrapolation of FRE across the burn are proposed and, as a study case, applied to an extensive grassland fire that burned for 40 days in northern Australia. The fusion of FRP estimates derived from MODIS Terra and Aqua active fire detections with the MODIS burned area product is considered, although other polar orbiting and geostationary satellite fire products could be used. Intercomparison of FRE estimated over the MODIS mapped burned area using Terra, Aqua, and Terra-Aqua combined FRP data highlights the sensitivity of FRE estimation to satellite sampling. Despite this sensitivity, FRE biomass burned estimates derived from MODIS burned area and Terra and Aqua FRP data are within 30% of regional literature estimates, suggesting that this fusion approach is a fruitful avenue for future research and validation.

  7. New fire diurnal cycle characterizations to improve fire radiative energy assessments made from low-Earth orbit satellites sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andela, N.; Kaiser, J. W.; van der Werf, G. R.; Wooster, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    errors, while generally overestimating FRE. Including information on the climatology of the fire diurnal cycle provided the most promising avenue to improve FRE estimations. This approach also improved the performance on relatively high spatiotemporal resolutions, although only when aggregating model results to coarser spatial and/or temporal scale good correlation was found with the full SEVIRI hourly reference dataset. In general model performance was best in areas of frequent fire and low errors of omission. We recommend the use of regionally varying fire diurnal cycle information within the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) used in the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Services, which will improve FRE estimates and may allow for further reconciliation of biomass burning emission estimates from different inventories.

  8. Synergistic evaluation of the biomass/coal blends for co-gasification purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gaqa, S Mamphweli, D Katwire, E Meyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 95% of electricity in South Africa is generated from coal, which is a fossil fuel that has detrimental environmental impacts. Eskom has started investigating the possibility of co-firing coal with biomass to improve their carbon footprint. However, co-firing utilizes approximately 80% of water and results in extensive environmental impacts. This research seeks to investigate the possibility of co-gasification of coal and biomass, which is a thermochemical process that uses about a third of the water required by a coal-fired power station, and results in much lower emissions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was conducted to investigate the existence of a synergy between coal and biomass during gasification. Various coal/biomass blends were investigated using TGA. The synergistic effect between the two feedstock as determined through TGA allowed the prediction of the gasification characteristics of the blends that most likely gave the highest conversion efficiency. Preliminary results suggested the existence of this synergy.

  9. Gasification of Woody Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jianjun; Saayman, Jean; Grace, John R; Ellis, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Interest in biomass to produce heat, power, liquid fuels, hydrogen, and value-added chemicals with reduced greenhouse gas emissions is increasing worldwide. Gasification is becoming a promising technology for biomass utilization with a positive environmental impact. This review focuses specifically on woody biomass gasification and recent advances in the field. The physical properties, chemical structure, and composition of biomass greatly affect gasification performance, pretreatment, and handling. Primary and secondary catalysts are of key importance to improve the conversion and cracking of tars, and lime-enhanced gasification advantageously combines CO2 capture with gasification. These topics are covered here, including the reaction mechanisms and biomass characterization. Experimental research and industrial experience are investigated to elucidate concepts, processes, and characteristics of woody biomass gasification and to identify challenges.

  10. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  11. JV 58-Effects of Biomass Combustion on SCR Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Joshua R. Strege; Donald P. McCollor; Jason D. Laumb; Lingbu Kong

    2006-08-31

    A portable slipstream selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactor was installed at a biomass cofired utility boiler to examine the rates and mechanisms of catalyst deactivation when exposed to biomass combustion products. The catalyst was found to deactivate at a much faster rate than typically found in a coal-fired boiler, although this may have been the result of high ash loading rather than a general property of biomass combustion. Deactivation was mainly the result of alkali and alkaline-earth sulfate formation and growth in catalyst pores, apparently caused by alkaline-earth ash deposition on or near the pore sites. The high proportion of biomass in the fuel contributed to elevated levels of alkali and alkaline-earth material in the ash when compared to coal ash, and these higher levels provided more opportunity for sulfate formation. Based on laboratory tests, neither catalyst material nor ammonia contributed measurably to ash mass gains via sulfation. A model constructed using both field and laboratory data was able to predict catalyst deactivation of catalysts under subbituminous coal firing but performed poorly at predicting catalyst deactivation under cofiring conditions. Because of the typically higher-than coal levels of alkali and alkaline-earth elements present in biomass fuels that are available for sulfation at typical SCR temperatures, the use of SCR technology and biomass cofiring needs to be carefully evaluated prior to implementation.

  12. Smart photogalvanic running-grating interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kukhtarev, N. V.; Kukhtareva, T.; Edwards, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Photogalvanic effect produces actuation of periodic motion of macroscopic LiNbO3 crystal. This effect was applied to the development of an all-optical moving-grating interferometer usable for optical trapping and transport of algae chlorella microorganisms diluted in water with a concentration of...

  13. Gratings in plasmonic V-groove waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Kristensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    We introduce visible light optical gratings to surface plasmon V-groove waveguides. Gradient e-beam dosage onto silicon stamp enables structuring V-grooves of varying depth. Nanoimprint lithography maintains a Λ=265 nm corrugation for gold surface devices....

  14. Speed enhancement in VCSELs employing grating mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, various approaches to improve the speed of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have been reported and demonstrated good improvement. In this paper, we propose and numerically investigate a new possibility of using high-index-contrast grating (HCG...

  15. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  16. Prescribed Fire, Soil, and Plants: Burn Effects and Interactions in the Central Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyon and juniper expansion into sagebrush ecosystems results in decreased cover and biomass of perennial grasses and forbs. We examine the effectiveness of spring prescribed fire on restoration of sagebrush ecosystems by documenting burn effects on soil nutrients, herbaceous aboveground biomass, a...

  17. Recurrent fires and environment shape the vegetation in Quercus suber L. woodlands and maquis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Alice; Curt, Thomas; Véla, Errol; Tatoni, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    The effects of fire recurrence on vegetation patterns in Quercus suber L. and Erica-Cistus communities in Mediterranean fire-prone ecosystems of south-eastern France were examined on stands belonging to 5 fire classes, corresponding to different numbers of fires (from 0 to 4) and time intervals between fires since 1959. A common pool of species was identified among the plots, which was typical of both open and closed maquis. Fire recurrence reduced the abundance of trees and herbs, whereas it increased the abundance of small shrubs. Richness differed significantly between the most contrasting classes of fire recurrence, with maximal values found in control plots and minimal values in plots that had burned recurrently and recently. Equitability indices did not vary significantly, in contrast to Shannon's diversity index which mostly correlated with richness. Forest ecosystems that have burnt once or twice in the last 50 years were resilient; that is to say they recovered a biomass and composition similar to that of the pre-fire state. However, after more than 3-4 fires, shrubland communities displayed lower species richness and diversity indices than unburned plots. The time since the last fire and the number of fires were the most explanatory fire variables, governing the structure of post-fire plant communities. However, environmental factors, such as slope or exposure, also made a significant contribution. Higher rates of fire recurrence can affect the persistence or expansion of shrublands in the future, as observed in other Mediterranean areas.

  18. A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity in a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Zeng, X. D.; Levis, S.

    2012-07-01

    A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity has been developed for global simulations in the framework of a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM) in an Earth System Model (ESM). Burned area in a grid cell is estimated by the product of fire counts and average burned area of a fire. The scheme comprises three parts: fire occurrence, fire spread, and fire impact. In the fire occurrence part, fire counts rather than fire occurrence probability are calculated in order to capture the observed high burned area fraction in areas of high fire frequency and realize parameter calibration based on MODIS fire counts product. In the fire spread part, post-fire region of a fire is assumed to be elliptical in shape. Mathematical properties of ellipses and some mathematical derivations are applied to improve the equation and assumptions of an existing fire spread parameterization. In the fire impact part, trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning are estimated, which offers an interface with atmospheric chemistry and aerosol models in ESMs. In addition, flexible time-step length makes the new fire parameterization easily applied to various DGVMs. Global performance of the new fire parameterization is assessed by using an improved version of the Community Land Model version 3 with the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM). Simulations are compared against the latest satellite-based Global Fire Emission Database version 3 (GFED3) for 1997-2004. Results show that simulated global totals and spatial patterns of burned area and fire carbon emissions, regional totals and spreads of burned area, global annual burned area fractions for various vegetation types, and interannual variability of burned area are reasonable, and closer to GFED3 than CLM-DGVM simulations with the commonly used Glob-FIRM fire parameterization and the old fire module of CLM-DGVM. Furthermore, average error of simulated trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning

  19. A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity in a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity has been developed for global simulations in the framework of a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM in an Earth System Model (ESM. Burned area in a grid cell is estimated by the product of fire counts and average burned area of a fire. The scheme comprises three parts: fire occurrence, fire spread, and fire impact. In the fire occurrence part, fire counts rather than fire occurrence probability are calculated in order to capture the observed high burned area fraction in areas of high fire frequency and realize parameter calibration based on MODIS fire counts product. In the fire spread part, post-fire region of a fire is assumed to be elliptical in shape. Mathematical properties of ellipses and some mathematical derivations are applied to improve the equation and assumptions of an existing fire spread parameterization. In the fire impact part, trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning are estimated, which offers an interface with atmospheric chemistry and aerosol models in ESMs. In addition, flexible time-step length makes the new fire parameterization easily applied to various DGVMs.

    Global performance of the new fire parameterization is assessed by using an improved version of the Community Land Model version 3 with the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM. Simulations are compared against the latest satellite-based Global Fire Emission Database version 3 (GFED3 for 1997–2004. Results show that simulated global totals and spatial patterns of burned area and fire carbon emissions, regional totals and spreads of burned area, global annual burned area fractions for various vegetation types, and interannual variability of burned area are reasonable, and closer to GFED3 than CLM-DGVM simulations with the commonly used Glob-FIRM fire parameterization and the old fire module of CLM-DGVM. Furthermore, average error of simulated trace gas and aerosol

  20. The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire measurements and synthesis of campaign data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokelson, R. J.; Christian, T. J.; Karl, T. G.; Guenther, A.

    2008-07-01

    As part of the Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment (TROFFEE), tropical forest fuels were burned in a large, biomass-fire simulation facility and the smoke was characterized with open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), gas chromatography (GC), GC/PTR-MS, and filter sampling of the particles. In most cases, about one-third of the fuel chlorine ended up in the particles and about one-half remained in the ash. About 50% of the mass of non-methane organic compounds (NMOC) emitted by these fires could be identified with the available instrumentation. The lab fire emission factors (EF, g compound emitted per kg dry fuel burned) were coupled with EF obtained during the TROFFEE airborne and ground-based field campaigns. This revealed several types of EF dependence on parameters such as the ratio of flaming to smoldering combustion and fuel characteristics. The synthesis of data from the different TROFFEE platforms was also used to derive EF for all the measured species for both primary deforestation fires and pasture maintenance fires the two main types of biomass burning in the Amazon. Many of the EF are larger than those in widely-used earlier work. This is mostly due to the inclusion of newly-available, large EF for the initially-unlofted smoldering emissions from residual logs in pastures and the assumption that these emissions make a significant contribution (~40%) to the total emissions from pasture fires. The TROFFEE EF for particles with aerodynamic diameter sugar cane burning, which may help estimate the air quality impacts of burning this major crop, which is often grown in densely populated areas.

  1. The effects of fire severity on macroinvertebrate detritivores and leaf litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Sebastian; Murphy, Nick; Gibb, Heloise

    2015-01-01

    High severity wildfire events are a feature of forests globally and are likely to be more prevalent with climate change. As a disturbance process, fire has the potential to change important ecological functions, such as decomposition, through its impact on biodiversity. Despite the recognised importance of decomposition in terms of fuel loads and energy flow, little is known about the post-fire effects of fire severity on decomposition by litter-dwelling macroinvertebrate detritivores. We tested the hypotheses that: 1) increasing fire severity is associated with decreased rates of leaf litter decomposition by macroinvertebrate detritivores; and 2) the abundance and biomass of macroinvertebrate detritivores decreases with increasing fire severity, while body size increases. We used a litterbag experiment at long-unburnt, ground-burnt and crown-burnt sites (n = 7 for all treatments) to test the effect of fire severity on: a) macroinvertebrate-driven break-down of litter fuel loads; and b) the size and abundance of macroinvertebrate detritivores three years after fire. Microhabitat conditions differed among fire severity classes. Macroinvertebrate exclusion reduced litter decomposition by 34.7%. Macroinvertebrate detritivores were larger and less abundant following higher severity fires, possibly as a result of fire-induced changes in habitat structure. Opposing effects of fire severity on macroinvertebrate abundance and body size resulted in both similar detritivore biomass and, most interestingly, no differences in leaf litter decomposition under different fire severities. This suggests that the diversity of macroinvertebrates enhances functional resilience of litter decomposition to fire and that litter-breakdown is not inhibited within three years following a high severity fire in this forest type and where recolonisation sources are readily available. We found no support for the hypothesis that high severity fires reduce litter decomposition and therefore

  2. Process for treating biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Timothy J; Teymouri, Farzaneh

    2015-11-04

    This invention is directed to a process for treating biomass. The biomass is treated with a biomass swelling agent within the vessel to swell or rupture at least a portion of the biomass. A portion of the swelling agent is removed from a first end of the vessel following the treatment. Then steam is introduced into a second end of the vessel different from the first end to further remove swelling agent from the vessel in such a manner that the swelling agent exits the vessel at a relatively low water content.

  3. A study of air pollution from biomass combustion with reference to the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvis, M.R.I.; Tadulan, E.L. [Portsmouth Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Tariq, A.S. [Natural Resources Inst., Chatham (United Kingdom). Agro-processing Group

    1995-12-31

    The forestry sector plays an important role in the Philippine economy and provides lumber, fuel wood and other wood based products for export and domestic consumption. In the interval 1987-1991 the national energy mix was imported energy 64 %, conventional energy (coal, hydro, geothermal) 22 % and non-conventional sources 14 %. Data released by the Bureau of Forest Development showed that collection from public forest amounted to 198,000 m{sup 3}. Charcoal production was 42,368 m{sup 3} for the same year. Fuelwood quantities of 5x10{sup 6} m{sup 3} were made available for boiler plants in 1982. The National Electrification Administration has established 13,694 ha of Leucaena Leucocephala plantations throughout the country to fuel a number of dendrothermal plants. Unfortunately many dendrothermal plants have been removed from service due to technical and management problems. Koffa reported that wood fuel consumption between 1980 and 2000 will be an average of 48 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} for rural and urban household. Industrial charcoal for the chemical and metal industries was projected to have a demand of 616,000 m{sup 3} of wood. The purpose of this presentation is to present results on the combustion and emission performance of two distinct styles of thermal plant which may be employed to utilize biomass. Particular attention is given to NO{sub x} emissions. One combustion unit has the characteristics of a fixed grate, batch fired air heater and the other unit that of a continuous feed suspension burner using sawdust fuel. Both units were designed and tested at the Natural Resources Institute Laboratories and have nominal thermal ratings of 350 and 500-1000 kW respectively

  4. Fiber-bragg grating-loop ringdown method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuji

    2008-01-29

    A device comprising a fiber grating loop ringdown (FGLRD) system of analysis is disclosed. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) or Long-Period grating (LPG) written in a section of single mode fused silica fiber is incorporated into a fiber loop. By utilizing the wing areas of the gratings' bandwidth as a wavelength dependent attenuator of the light transmission, a fiber grating loop ringdown concept is formed. One aspect of the present invention is temperature sensing, which has been demonstrated using the disclosed device. Temperature measurements in the areas of accuracy, stability, high temperature, and dynamic range are also described.

  5. Field analysis of two-dimensional integrated optical gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsboom, P.-P.; Frankena, H. J.

    1995-05-01

    A rigorous technique to determine the field scattered by a two-dimensional rectangular grating made up of many corrugations was developed. In this method, the grating was deemed as a sequence of two types of waveguide sections, alternatingly connected by step discontinuities. A matrix was derived that described the entire rectangular grating by integrating the separate steps and waveguide sections. With the proposed technique, several configuration were analyzed. The obtained results showed good consistency with the consequences of previous studies. Furthermore, to examine the numerical stability of the proposed method, the length of the grating was increased and obtained results for a grating with 100 periods.

  6. Field analysis of two-dimensional focusing grating couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsboom, P.-P.; Frankena, H. J.

    1995-05-01

    A different technique was developed by which several two-dimensional dielectric optical gratings, consisting 100 or more corrugations, were treated in a numerical reliable approach. The numerical examples that were presented were restricted to gratings made up of sequences of waveguide sections symmetric about the x = 0 plane. The newly developed method was effectively used to investigate the field produced by a two-dimensional focusing grating coupler. Focal-region fields were determined for three symmetrical gratings with 19, 50, and 124 corrugations. For focusing grating coupler with limited length, high-frequency intensity variations were noted in the focal region.

  7. Metrology measurements for large-aperture VPH gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jessica R.; Gers, Luke; Heijmans, Jeroen

    2013-09-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph (HERMES) for the Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO) uses four large aperture, high angle of incidence volume phase holographic gratings (VPHG) for high resolution `Galactic archaeology' spectroscopy. The large clear aperture, the high diffraction efficiency, the line frequency homogeneity, and mosaic alignment made manufacturing and testing challenging. We developed new metrology systems at the AAO to verify the performance of these VPH gratings. The measured diffraction efficiencies and line frequency of the VPH gratings received so far meet the vendor's provided data. The wavefront quality for the Blue VPH grating is good but the Green and Red VPH gratings need to be post polishing.

  8. Fundamental limit of light trapping in grating structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zongfu

    2010-08-11

    We use a rigorous electromagnetic approach to analyze the fundamental limit of light-trapping enhancement in grating structures. This limit can exceed the bulk limit of 4n 2, but has significant angular dependency. We explicitly show that 2D gratings provide more enhancement than 1D gratings. We also show the effects of the grating profile’s symmetry on the absorption enhancement limit. Numerical simulations are applied to support the theory. Our findings provide general guidance for the design of grating structures for light-trapping solar cells.

  9. Developing a Global, Short-Term Fire Weather Forecasting Tool Using NWP Input Meteorology and Satellite Fire Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. A.; Hyer, E. J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    In order to meet the emerging need for better estimates of biomass burning emissions in air quality and climate models, a statistical model is developed to characterize the effect of a given set of meteorological conditions on the following day's fire activity, including ignition and spread potential. Preliminary tests are conducted within several spatial domains of the North American boreal forest by investigating a wide range of meteorological information, including operational fire weather forecasting indices, such as the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System (CFFDRS). However, rather than using local noon surface station data, the six components of the CFFDRS are modified to use inputs from the North America Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Navy's Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System Model (NOGAPS). The Initial Spread Index (ISI) and the Fire Weather Index (FWI) are shown to be the most relevant components of the CFFDRS for short-term changes in fire activity. However, both components are found to be highly sensitive to variations in relative humidity and wind speed input data. Several variables related to fire ignition from dry lighting, such as instability and the synoptic pattern, are also incorporated. Cases of fire ignition, growth, decay, and extinction are stratified using satellite fire observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and compared to the available suite of meteorological information. These comparisons reveal that combinations of meteorological variables, such as the FWI, ISI, and additional indices developed for this study, produce the greatest separability between major fire growth and decay cases, which are defined by the observed change in fire counts and fire radiative power. This information is used to derive statistical relationships affecting the short-term changes in fire activity and subsequently applied to other

  10. Fuel gas from biomass - utilisation concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, C.; Vierrath, H. [Lurgi Envirotherm GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents an overview on the Lurgi-Circulating Fluidized Bed technology (CFB). CFB units are state of the art and have proven their capability of converting biomass, waste of coal into power and/or steam. CFB reactors are in commercial operation for reduction processes and for combustion and gasification of solid fuels. In this paper reduction processes are not considered. The fact, that world-wide over 80 CFB combustion plants using Lurgi technology are commercially operating proves that this technology is well accepted. Lurgi's CFB gasification technology is at present applied in two industrial plants. It is the key process for our advanced biomass or waste utilisation plants. The subject paper will focus on CFB fuel gas production for combined cycle plants (IGCC) and for co-firing into existing boiler plants. (orig.)

  11. Smoking and Home Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Working with the Media Fire Protection Technology Smoking fire safety outreach materials As a member of ... Electronic Cigarette Explosions and Fires: The 2015 Experience Smoking fire safety messages to share It is important ...

  12. A survey of state clean energy fund support for biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, Garrett; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-08-20

    This survey reviews efforts by CESA member clean energy funds to promote the use of biomass as a renewable energy source. For each fund, details are provided regarding biomass eligibility for support, specific programs offering support to biomass projects, and examples of supported biomass projects (if available). For the purposes of this survey, biomass is defined to include bio-product gasification, combustion, co-firing, biofuel production, and the combustion of landfill gas, though not all of the programs reviewed here take so wide a definition. Programs offered by non-CESA member funds fall outside the scope of this survey. To date, three funds--the California Energy Commission, Wisconsin Focus on Energy, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority--have offered programs targeted specifically at the use of biomass as a renewable energy source. We begin by reviewing efforts in these three funds, and then proceed to cover programs in other funds that have provided support to biomass projects when the opportunity has arisen, but otherwise do not differentially target biomass relative to other renewable technologies.

  13. Fire Stations - 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Stations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  14. Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rorty, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober......Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober...

  15. Coal fires in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Yao(车遥); HUANG Wen-hui(黄文辉); ZHANG Ai-yun(张爱云)

    2004-01-01

    Coal fires have a very long history in China; the oldest coal fires have being burning for many million years. Up to now more than 56 coal fires spots were distinguished. They mainly locate in West-North of China, North of China and East-North of China. About millions of tons of coal have been burned in fires every year. Xinjiang Autonomy is the most serious region in coal fires as it has 38 coal fires spots and about 6.85 million tons of coal was burned every year. Coal fires in China ignited by wildfires, spontaneous combustion and human being during mining activities. These fires have released about 0.9 million tons of gasses (including CO, CO2, SO2, NO2 CH4, CO2, H2S etc.) into the atmosphere every year, most of which are brought to the east by wind and resulting more heavier air pollution in northern China.

  16. Campus Fire Safety Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Reviews information on recent college and university dormitory fire fatalities, and highlights five examples of building features reported to be major contributing factors in residence-hall fires. Explains how public awareness and expectations are affecting school dormitory safety. (GR)

  17. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  18. Fire Stations - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Station Locations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed at or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  19. Fires and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Fires and Food Safety Fire! Few words can strike such terror. Residential ...

  20. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiere, James

    discipline. It covers thermo chemistry including mixtures and chemical reactions; Introduces combustion to the fire protection student; Discusses premixed flames and spontaneous ignition; Presents conservation laws for control volumes, including the effects of fire; Describes the theoretical bases...... analyses. Fire phenomena encompass everything about the scientific principles behind fire behaviour. Combining the principles of chemistry, physics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of fire phenomena, this book integrates the subject into a clear...... for empirical aspects of the subject of fire; Analyses ignition of liquids and the importance of evaporation including heat and mass transfer; Features the stages of fire in compartments, and the role of scale modelling in fire. The book is written by Prof. James G. Quintiere from University of Maryland...

  1. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  2. FIRE CHARACTERISTICS FOR ADVANCED MODELLING OF FIRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Dvořák

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the material and fire properties of solid flammable/combustible materials /substances /products, which are used as inputs for the computer numerical fire models. At the same time it gives the test standards for their determination.

  3. Urban Fire Risk Clustering Method Based on Fire Statistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Lizhi; REN Aizhu

    2008-01-01

    Fire statistics and fire analysis have become important ways for us to understand the law of fire,prevent the occurrence of fire, and improve the ability to control fire. According to existing fire statistics, the weighted fire risk calculating method characterized by the number of fire occurrence, direct economic losses,and fire casualties was put forward. On the basis of this method, meanwhile having improved K-mean clus-tering arithmetic, this paper established fire dsk K-mean clustering model, which could better resolve the automatic classifying problems towards fire risk. Fire risk cluster should be classified by the absolute dis-tance of the target instead of the relative distance in the traditional cluster arithmetic. Finally, for applying the established model, this paper carded out fire risk clustering on fire statistics from January 2000 to December 2004 of Shenyang in China. This research would provide technical support for urban fire management.

  4. Estimating aboveground biomass of broadleaved woody plants in the understory of Florida Keys pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, J.P.; Ross, M.S.; Koptur, S.; Snyder, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Species-specific allometric equations that provide estimates of biomass from measured plant attributes are currently unavailable for shrubs common to South Florida pine rocklands, where fire plays an important part in shaping the structure and function of ecosystems. We developed equations to estimate total aboveground biomass and fine fuel of 10 common hardwood species in the shrub layer of pine forests of the lower Florida Keys. Many equations that related biomass categories to crown area and height were significant (p aboveground shrub biomass and shrub fine fuel increased with time since last fire, but the relationships were non-linear. The relative proportion of biomass constituted by the major species also varied with stand age. Estimates based on mixed-species regressions differed slightly from estimates based on species-specific models, but the former could provide useful approximations in similar forests where species-specific regressions are not yet available. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Release of Corrosive Species above the Grate in a Waste Boiler and the Implication for Improved Electrical Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøjer, Martin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2010-01-01

    A relatively low electrical efficiency of 20−25% is obtained in typical west European waste boilers. Ash species released from the grate combustion zone form boiler deposits with high concentrations of Cl, Na, K, Zn, Pb, and S that cause corrosion of superheater tubes at high temperature. The sup......A relatively low electrical efficiency of 20−25% is obtained in typical west European waste boilers. Ash species released from the grate combustion zone form boiler deposits with high concentrations of Cl, Na, K, Zn, Pb, and S that cause corrosion of superheater tubes at high temperature....... The superheater steam temperature has to be limited to around 425 °C, and thereby, the electrical efficiency remains low compared to wood or coal-fired boilers. If a separate part of the flue gas from the grate has a low content of corrosive species, it may be used to superheat steam to a higher temperature......, and thereby, the electrical efficiency of the plant can be increased. In this study, the local temperature, the gas concentrations of CO, CO2, and O2, and the release of the volatile elements Cl, S, Na, K, Pb, Zn, Cu, and Sn were measured above the grate in a waste boiler to investigate if a selected fraction...

  6. Intermediate coupling between aboveground and belowground biomass maximises the persistence of grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Simon; Higgins, Steven I

    2013-01-01

    Aboveground and belowground biomass compartments of vegetation fulfil different functions and they are coupled by complex interactions. These compartments exchange water, carbon and nutrients and the belowground biomass compartment has the capacity to buffer vegetation dynamics when aboveground biomass is removed by disturbances such as herbivory or fire. However, despite their importance, root-shoot interactions are often ignored in more heuristic vegetation models. Here, we present a simple two-compartment grassland model that couples aboveground and belowground biomass. In this model, the growth of belowground biomass is influenced by aboveground biomass and the growth of aboveground biomass is influenced by belowground biomass. We used the model to explore how the dynamics of a grassland ecosystem are influenced by fire and grazing. We show that the grassland system is most persistent at intermediate levels of aboveground-belowground coupling. In this situation, the system can sustain more extreme fire or grazing regimes than in the case of strong coupling. In contrast, the productivity of the system is maximised at high levels of coupling. Our analysis suggests that the yield of a grassland ecosystem is maximised when coupling is strong, however, the intensity of disturbance that can be sustained increases dramatically when coupling is intermediate. Hence, the model predicts that intermediate coupling should be selected for as it maximises the chances of persistence in disturbance driven ecosystems.

  7. First order Bragg grating filters in silicon on insulator waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Peter Michael

    2008-08-01

    The subject of this project is the design; analysis, fabrication and characterisation of first order Bragg Grating optical filters in Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) planar waveguides. It is envisaged that this work will result in the possibility of Bragg Grating filters for use in Silicon Photonics. It is the purpose of the work to create as far as is possible flat surface waveguides so as to facilitate Thermo-Optic tuning and also the incorporation into rib-waveguide Silicon Photonics. The spectral response of the shallow Bragg Gratings was modelled using Coupled Mode Theory (CMT) by way of RSoft Gratingmod TM. Also the effect of having a Bragg Grating with alternate layers of refractive index of 1.5 and 3.5 was simulated in order to verify that Silica and Silicon layered Bragg Gratings could be viable. A series of Bragg Gratings were patterned on 1.5 micron SOI at Philips in Eindhoven, Holland to investigate the variation of grating parameters with a) the period of the gratings b) the mark to space ratio of the gratings and c) the length of the region converted to Bragg Gratings (i.e. the number of grating period repetitions). One set of gratings were thermally oxidised at Philips in Eindhoven and another set were ion implanted with Oxygen ions at the Ion Beam Facility, University of Surrey, England. The gratings were tested and found to give transmission minima at approximately 1540 nanometres and both methods of creating flat surfaces were found to give similar minima. Atomic Force Microscopy was applied to the grating area of the as-implanted samples in the Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, which were found to have surface undulations in the order of 60 nanometres.

  8. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  9. Fire as Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  10. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  11. World wide biomass resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faaij, A.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    In a wide variety of scenarios, policy strategies, and studies that address the future world energy demand and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, biomass is considered to play a major role as renewable energy carrier. Over the past decades, the modern use of biomass has increased rapidly in

  12. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezevic, Dragan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of wat

  13. Energetische Verwertung von Biomasse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoransky, Richard; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Bollin, Elmar; Oehler, Helmut; Schelling, Udo

    Etwa 0,1% der Solarenergie wandeln sich durch Photosynthese aus dem Kohlendioxid der Luft in Biomasse um. Die Biomassen sind als Festbrennstoff nutzbar oder zu gasförmigen Brennstoffen weiterverarbeitbar. Zwei Arten von Biomassen sind zu unterscheiden: Anfallende Biomasse

  14. Bulk chemicals from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the current robust forces driving sustainable production, and available biomass conversion technologies, biomass-based routes are expected to make a significant impact on the production of bulk chemicals within 10 years, and a huge impact within 20-30 years. In the Port of Rotterdam there is a

  15. COFIRING OF BIOMASS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip N. Hutton

    2002-01-01

    A project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory was completed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center to explore the potential for cofiring biomass at the University of North Dakota (UND). The results demonstrate how 25% sunflower hulls can be cofired with subbituminous coal and provide a 20% return on investment or 5-year payback for the modifications required to enable firing biomass. Significant outcomes of the study are as follows. A complete resource assessment presented all biomass options to UND within a 100-mile radius. Among the most promising options in order of preference were sunflower hulls, wood residues, and turkey manure. The firing of up to 28% sunflower hulls by weight was completed at the university's steam plant to identify plant modifications that would be necessary to enable cofiring sunflower hulls. The results indicated investments in a new equipment could be less than $408,711. Data collected from test burns, which were not optimized for biomass firing, resulted in a 15% reduction in sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions, no increase in opacity, and slightly better boiler efficiency. Fouling and clinkering potential were not evaluated; however, no noticeable detrimental effects occurred during testing. As a result of this study, UND has the potential to achieve a cost savings of approximately $100,000 per year from a $1,500,000 annual fossil fuel budget by implementing the cofiring of 25% sunflower hulls.

  16. Challenges of Biomass in a Development Model Based on Renewable Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadros, F.; González-González, A.; Ruiz-Celma, A.; López-Rodríguez, F.; García-Sanz-Calcedo, J.; García, J. A.; Mena, A.

    Although fire has been known to mankind for about 500,000 years, the implementation of biomass energy in the world has barely changed since then, having been used mainly for heat production. To this end, an estimated global consumption of biomass accounts for 10.6% of total world consumption of primary energy. However, the use of biomass as transportation fuel or for generation of electricity is not displayed in the annual world, European, or national statistics, as if its contribution to primary energy consumption was insignificant. What is the reason behind this? Why is the development of biomass only limited to its thermal use? Why is the production of biomass for electricity and transportation purposes not increasing? And what is then happening to biomass? The present article addresses issues that, in our view, limit the incursion of biomass in current energy systems and provides some answers to solve them.

  17. Combustion behavior of different kinds of torrefied biomass and their blends with lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toptas, Asli; Yildirim, Yeliz; Duman, Gozde; Yanik, Jale

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the combustion behavior of different kinds of torrefied biomass (lignocellulosic and animal wastes) and their blends with lignite was investigated via non-isothermal thermogravimetric method under air atmosphere. For comparison, combustion characteristics of raw biomasses were also determined. Torrefaction process improved the reactivity of char combustion step of biomasses. Characteristic combustion parameters for blends showed non-additivity behavior. It was found that the mixture of torrefied biomasses and lignite at a ratio of 1:1 had a lower ignition and burnout temperature than the coal-only sample. Although no interactions were observed between the lignite and torrefied biomass at initial step of combustion, a certain degree of interaction between the components occurred at char combustion step. Kinetic parameters of combustion were calculated by using the Coats Redfern model. Overall, this study showed that poultry litters can be used as a substitute fuel in coal/biomass co-firing systems by blending with lignocellulosic biomass.

  18. Impact of torrefaction on the grindability and fuel characteristics of forest biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanphanich, Manunya; Mani, Sudhagar

    2011-01-01

    Thermal pretreatment or torrefaction of biomass under anoxic condition can produce an energy dense and consistent quality solid biomass fuel for combustion and co-firing applications. This paper investigates the fuel characteristics and grindability of pine chips and logging residues torrefied at temperatures ranging from 225 °C to 300 °C and 30 min residence time. Grinding performance of torrefied biomass evaluated by determining energy required for grinding, particle size distribution and average particle size were compared with raw biomass and coal. Specific energy required for grinding of torrefied biomass decreased significantly with increase in torrefaction temperatures. The grinding energy of torrefied biomass was reduced to as low as 24 kW h/t at 300 °C torrefaction temperature. The gross calorific value of torrefied chips increased with increase in torrefaction temperature. Torrefaction of biomass clearly showed the improved fuel characteristics and grinding properties closer to coal.

  19. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor M.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Damoe, Anne J.

    2013-01-01

    Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes was invest......Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes...... the final Cd concentration was below 2.0. mg Cd/kg DM in at least one experiment done with each ash. This was obtained within 2 weeks of remediation and at liquid to solid (L/S) ratios of L/S 16 for the pre-washed straw ash and L/S 8 for the straw, co-firing and wood ash. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  20. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Rudolf, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass with the aim of describing the current status of the technology. Hydrothermal liquefaction is a medium-temperature, high-pressure thermochemical process, which produces a liquid product, often called bio-oil or bi-crude. During...... the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the macromolecules of the biomass are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive and can recombine into larger ones. During this process, a substantial part of the oxygen in the biomass is removed...... by dehydration or decarboxylation. The chemical properties of bio-oil are highly dependent of the biomass substrate composition. Biomass constitutes of various components such as protein; carbohydrates, lignin and fat, and each of them produce distinct spectra of compounds during hydrothermal liquefaction...

  1. Termisk forgasning af biomasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2005-01-01

    The title of this Ph.D. thesis is: Thermal Gasification of Biomass. Compilation of activities in the ”Biomass Gasification Group” at Technical University of Denmark (DTU). This thesis gives a presentation of selected activities in the Biomass Gasification Group at DTU. The activities are related...... to thermal gasification of biomass. Focus is on gasification for decentralised cogeneration of heat and power, and on related research on fundamental processes. In order to insure continuity of the presentation the other activities in the group, have also been described. The group was started in the late...... nineteen eighties. Originally, the main aim was to collect and transfer knowledge about gasification of straw. Very quickly it became clear, that knowledge was insufficient and the available technology, in most cases, unsuitable for converting the Danish biomass. The need for such technology...

  2. Emissions from biomass burning in the Yucatan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Yokelson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In March 2006 two instrumented aircraft made the first detailed field measurements of biomass burning (BB emissions in the Northern Hemisphere tropics as part of the MILAGRO project. The aircraft were the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 and a University of Montana/US Forest Service Twin Otter. The initial emissions of up to 49 trace gas or particle species were measured from 20 deforestation and crop residue fires on the Yucatan peninsula. This included two trace gases useful as indicators of BB (HCN and acetonitrile and several rarely, or never before, measured species: OH, peroxyacetic acid, propanoic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methane sulfonic acid, and sulfuric acid. Crop residue fires emitted more organic acids and ammonia than deforestation fires, but the emissions from the main fire types were otherwise fairly similar. The Yucatan fires emitted unusually high amounts of SO2 and particle chloride, likely due to a strong marine influence on this peninsula. As smoke from one fire aged, the ratio ΔO3/ΔCO increased to ~15% in <~1 h similar to the fast net production of O3 in BB plumes observed earlier in Africa. The rapid change in O3 occurs at a finer spatial scale than is employed in global models and is also faster than predicted by micro-scale models. Fast increases in PAN, H2O2, and two organic acids were also observed. The amount of secondary organic acid is larger than the amount of known precursors. Rapid secondary formation of organic and inorganic aerosol was observed with the ratio ΔPM2.5/ΔCO more than doubling in ~1.4±0.7 h. The OH measurements revealed high initial levels (>1×107 molecules/cm3 that were likely caused in part by high initial HONO (~10% of NOy. Thus, more research is needed to understand critical post emission processes for the second-largest trace gas source on Earth. It is estimated that

  3. Emissions from biomass burning in the Yucatan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yokelson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In March 2006 two instrumented aircraft made the first detailed field measurements of biomass burning (BB emissions in the Northern Hemisphere tropics as part of the MILAGRO project. The aircraft were the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 and a University of Montana/US Forest Service Twin Otter. The initial emissions of up to 49 trace gas or particle species were measured from 20 deforestation and crop residue fires on the Yucatan peninsula. This included two trace gases useful as indicators of BB (HCN and acetonitrile and several rarely, or never before, measured species: OH, peroxyacetic acid, propanoic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methane sulfonic acid, and sulfuric acid. Crop residue fires emitted more organic acids and ammonia than deforestation fires, but the emissions from the main fire types were otherwise fairly similar. The Yucatan fires emitted unusually high amounts of SO2 and particle chloride, likely due to a strong marine influence on this peninsula. As smoke from one fire aged, the ratio ΔO3/ΔCO increased to ~15% in <~1 h similar to the fast net production of O3 in BB plumes observed earlier in Africa. The rapid change in O3 occurs at a finer spatial scale than is employed in global models and is also faster than predicted by micro-scale models. Fast increases in PAN, H2O2, and two organic acids were also observed. The amount of secondary organic acid is larger than the amount of known precursors. Rapid secondary formation of organic and inorganic aerosol was observed with the ratio ΔPM2.5/ΔCO more than doubling in ~1.4±0.7 h. The OH measurements revealed high initial OH levels >1×107 molecules/cm3. Thus, more research is needed to understand critical post emission processes for the second-largest trace gas source on Earth. It is estimated that ~44 Tg of biomass burned in the Yucatan in the spring of 2006

  4. Brazil Fire Characterization and Burn Area Estimation Using the Airborne Infrared Disaster Assessment (AIRDAS) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, J. A.; Riggan, P. J.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Lockwood, R. N.; Pereira, J. A.; Higgins, R. G.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Remotely sensed estimations of regional and global emissions from biomass combustion have been used to characterize fire behavior, determine fire intensity, and estimate burn area. Highly temporal, low resolution satellite data have been used to calculate estimates of fire numbers and area burned. These estimates of fire activity and burned area have differed dramatically, resulting in a wide range of predictions on the ecological and environmental impacts of fires. As part of the Brazil/United States Fire Initiative, an aircraft campaign was initiated in 1992 and continued in 1994. This multi-aircraft campaign was designed to assist in the characterization of fire activity, document fire intensity and determine area burned over prescribed, agricultural and wildland fires in the savanna and forests of central Brazil. Using a unique, multispectral scanner (AIRDAS), designed specifically for fire characterization, a variety of fires and burned areas were flown with a high spatial and high thermal resolution scanner. The system was used to measure flame front size, rate of spread, ratio of smoldering to flaming fronts and fire intensity. In addition, long transects were flown to determine the size of burned areas within the cerrado and transitional ecosystems. The authors anticipate that the fire activity and burned area estimates reported here will lead to enhanced information for precise regional trace gas prediction.

  5. Fire Protection Program Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  6. Biomass based energy. A review on raw materials and processing methods; Energie aus Biomasse. Eine Uebersicht ueber Rohstoffe und Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woellauer, P.

    2007-07-01

    The book reviews the variety of biogenic raw materials and the technologically important biomass conversion techniques. The chapter on the different kinds of biomass includes a) wood from forestry, landscape culturing and saw mills, bark and old wood; b) plants (corn, miscanthus, cannabis, wheat, rye, sugar beets, grass, rape, etc.), residuals and wastes (straw, liquid manure, slaughthouse wastes, kitchen wastes, sewage sludge, others). The chapter on biomass conversion processing discusses combustion, oxidation in spercritical water, gasification and reforming, fermentation, extrusion or extraction, and downstream processes. The chapter on biomass based electricity and mechanical energy includes refrigeration engineering, direct utilization: Otto engines, Diesel engines, microgas turbine fuel cells, and heat processing: Striling engine, vapour turbine, ORC turbine, externally fired gas turbine, and the Kalina process.

  7. Remotely Sensed Fire Type Classification of the Brazilian Tropical Moist Forest Biome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation fires in the Brazilian Tropical Moist Forest Biome can be broadly classified into three types: i) Deforestation fires, lit to aid deforestation by burning of slashed, piled and dried forest biomass, ii) Maintenance fires, lit on agricultural fields or pasture areas to maintain and clear woody material and to rehabilitate degraded pasture areas, iii) Forest fires, associated with escaped anthropogenic fires or, less frequently, caused by lightning. Information on the incidence and spatial distribution of fire types is important as they have widely varying atmospheric emissions and ecological impacts. Satellite remote sensing offers a practical means of monitoring fires over areas as extensive as the Brazilian Tropical Moist Forest Biome which spans almost 4 million square kilometers. To date, fire type has been inferred based on the geographic context and proximity of satellite active fire detections relative to thematic land cover classes, roads, and forest edges, or by empirical consideration of the active fire detection frequency. In this paper a classification methodology is presented that demonstrates a way to classify the fire type of MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) active fire detections. Training and validation fire type data are defined conservatively for MODIS active fire detections using a land cover transition matrix that labels MODIS active fires by consideration of the PRODES 120m land cover for the previous year and the year of fire detection. The training data are used with a random forest classifier and remotely sensed predictor variables including the number of MODIS Aqua and Terra satellite detections, the maximum and median Fire Radiative Power (FRP) [MW km-2], the scaling parameter of the FRP power law distribution, the number of day and night detections, and the fire surrounding "background" surface brightness temperature [K]. In addition, the total rainfall over periods from 1 to 24 months prior to fire

  8. A hydroclimatic model of global fire patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Satellite-based earth observation is providing an increasingly accurate picture of global fire patterns. The highest fire activity is observed in seasonally dry (sub-)tropical environments of South America, Africa and Australia, but fires occur with varying frequency, intensity and seasonality in almost all biomes on Earth. The particular combination of these fire characteristics, or fire regime, is known to emerge from the combined influences of climate, vegetation, terrain and land use, but has so far proven difficult to reproduce by global models. Uncertainty about the biophysical drivers and constraints that underlie current global fire patterns is propagated in model predictions of how ecosystems, fire regimes and biogeochemical cycles may respond to projected future climates. Here, I present a hydroclimatic model of global fire patterns that predicts the mean annual burned area fraction (F) of 0.25° x 0.25° grid cells as a function of the climatic water balance. Following Bradstock's four-switch model, long-term fire activity levels were assumed to be controlled by fuel productivity rates and the likelihood that the extant fuel is dry enough to burn. The frequency of ignitions and favourable fire weather were assumed to be non-limiting at long time scales. Fundamentally, fuel productivity and fuel dryness are a function of the local water and energy budgets available for the production and desiccation of plant biomass. The climatic water balance summarizes the simultaneous availability of biologically usable energy and water at a site, and may therefore be expected to explain a significant proportion of global variation in F. To capture the effect of the climatic water balance on fire activity I focused on the upper quantiles of F, i.e. the maximum level of fire activity for a given climatic water balance. Analysing GFED4 data for annual burned area together with gridded climate data, I found that nearly 80% of the global variation in the 0.99 quantile of F

  9. Electromagnetically induced grating with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Sobia; Ziauddin, Qamar, Shahid; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We present a scheme to realize electromagnetically induced grating in an ensemble of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms, which act as superatoms due to the dipole blockade mechanism. The ensemble of three-level cold Rydberg-dressed (87Rb) atoms follows a cascade configuration where a strong standing-wave control field and a weak probe pulse are employed. The diffraction intensity is influenced by the strength of the probe intensity, the control field strength, and the van der Waals (vdW) interaction. It is noticed that relatively large first-order diffraction can be obtained for low-input intensity with a small vdW shift and a strong control field. The scheme can be considered as an amicable solution to realize the atomic grating at the microscopic level, which can provide background- and dark-current-free diffraction.

  10. Strong Optical Confinement between Flat Dielectric Gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingjing; Fiorentino, Marco; Beausoleil, Raymond G

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel type of optical micro-cavity based on a Fabry-Perot resonance between parallel high contrast gratings with non-periodic patterns. Tight lateral confinement is obtained via the phase front distortion properties of these gratings. In such cavities, energy stored in the optical field resides primarily in free space, therefore is readily accessible to particles (atoms, molecules, nanocrystals, etc.) for sensing, trapping, or spectroscopic applications. We describe the physics of these resonators, and propose a design method based on stochastic optimization. We present numerical simulations of two and three dimensional cavities that have diffraction-limited mode volumes with quality factors in the range of $10^4$--$10^6$. The cavity has a purely planar geometry and can be fabricated in silicon for near-infrared applications using standard CMOS processes. These ideas can be extended to the visible domain using commonly available III-V materials.

  11. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional ‘‘walking......-column’’ approach and includes the energy equations for both the fuel and the gas accounting for heat transfer between the two phases. The model gives important insight into the combustion process and provides inlet conditions for a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the freeboard. The model predictions...... indicate the existence of two distinct combustion modes. Combustion air temperature and mass flow-rate are the two parameters determining the mode. There is a significant difference in reaction rates (ignition velocity) and temperature levels between the two modes. Model predictions were compared...

  12. 3D measurement using circular gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    3D measurement using methods of structured light are well known in the industry. Most such systems use some variation of straight lines, either as simple lines or with some form of encoding. This geometry assumes the lines will be projected from one side and viewed from another to generate the profile information. But what about applications where a wide triangulation angle may not be practical, particularly at longer standoff distances. This paper explores the use of circular grating patterns projected from a center point to achieve 3D information. Originally suggested by John Caulfield around 1990, the method had some interesting potential, particularly if combined with alternate means of measurement from traditional triangulation including depth from focus methods. The possible advantages of a central reference point in the projected pattern may offer some different capabilities not as easily attained with a linear grating pattern. This paper will explore the pros and cons of the method and present some examples of possible applications.

  13. Stationary Light Pulses without Bragg Gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yen-Wei; Peters, Thorsten; Liao, Wen-Te; Cho, Hung-Wen; Guan, Pei-Chen; Yu, Ite A

    2008-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of the stationary light pulse (SLP) was identified as a band gap being created by a Bragg grating formed by two counter-propagating coupling fields of similar wavelength. Here we present a more general view of the formation of SLPs, namely several balanced four-wave mixing processes sharing the same ground-state coherence. Utilizing this new concept we report the first experimental observation of a bichromatic SLP at wavelengths for which no Bragg grating can be established. We also demonstrate the production of a SLP directly from a propagating light pulse without prior storage. Being easily controlled externally makes SLPs a very versatile tool for low-light-level nonlinear optics and quantum information manipulation.

  14. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  15. Diffusion of solid fuelon a vibrating grate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabelström, Hanna Katarina

    is simplified and the computational time shortened. The vibrations are affecting the transport and mixing of the fuel and incorporated into the model through the diffusion coefficient in the conservation equation of the solid phase. Experimental work has been carried out with the aim to study the behaviour......This work is part of a long term project of developing a bed model, describing the combustion process of straw on a vibrating grate. For a vibrating grate, the mixing and transportation of the fuel are of great significance and the work presented in this report investigates how the effect...... of vibrations can be incorporated into a numerical model. The chosen model approach has been to separate the gas and solid phases into two independent models related to each other through the bed porosity. By treating the bed as a porous media and using Ergun's equation for the gas flow, the numerical work...

  16. 130-nm tunable grating-mirror VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity configurat......We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity...... configuration instead of the extended cavity configuration can bring 130-nm tuning range around 1330-nm wavelength. The air-coupled cavity is known to reduce the quantum confinement factor in VCSELs, increasing threshold. In our air-coupled cavity HCG VCSEL case, the very short power penetration length...

  17. Estimating Fire Radiative Energy From MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellicott, E. A.; Vermote, E. F.; Giglio, L.; Roberts, G.

    2008-12-01

    An alternative approach to biomass burning emission estimates has emerged from remote sensing science in which the fire intensity measured during combustion serves as a proxy for emissions released. The rate of energy emitted is referred to as the fire radiative power, or FRP. Integrating FRP over the lifespan of the fire event provides the total fire radiative energy (FRE) released, which in turn is directly proportional to the total fire emissions. We present an approach to estimate FRE from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) 8-day, 0.5° climate modeling grid (CMG) FRP observations. An important characteristic of the radiative energy emitted from fires is the temporal trajectory which describes how the fire intensity behaves over the span of seconds, minutes, hours, days, and even seasons. To characterize the fire diurnal cycle we first examined FRP retrievals from Africa using the European Space Agency's geostationary Meteosat SEVIRI sensor. SEVIRI's temporal sampling resolution (15-minute) provides the capability to integrate FRP observations and calculate FRE. We also included diurnal cycle probability density functions (PDFs) from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) sensor to expand our investigation area beyond Africa. A modified Gaussian function was shown to provide a simple and accurate representation of the observed diurnal cycles. Aqua and Terra MODIS 30-day gridded FRP observations were then used to parameterize the Gaussian function based on the ratio between the morning (Terra) and afternoon (Aqua) MODIS FRP values. Our contention is that the variation in the Terra/Aqua ratio can serve as a proxy for the diurnal cycle trajectory. The relationship between the Terra/Aqua ratio and Gaussian function parameters was established for multiple regions within the tropics. In addition, we supplemented the diurnal cycle parameterization with MODIS FRP retrievals at high latitudes. High latitude FRP retrievals were chosen because of

  18. Ash chemistry aspects of straw and coal-straw co-firing in utility boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.; Nielsen, H.P.; Hansen, L.A.; Hansen, P.F.B.; Andersen, K.H.; Soerensen, H.S.

    1998-12-01

    Deposits formed in straw-fired grate-boilers showed significant amounts of KCl ( 40 - 80 % (w/w)) and KCl-coated Ca-Si-rich particles. CFB co-firing of straw and coal caused deposits in the convective pass containing predominantly K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (50 - 60 % (w/w)) with small amounts of KCl close to the metal surface. In pulverized coal-straw co-fired boilers, deposits almost free of KCl were found. Most of the potassium in these deposits is derived from K-Al-Si-rich fly ash particles and the rest occurs as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The presence of K-Al-Si-rich fly ash particles indicates that solid residue quality and reuse of fly ash in cement and concrete production rather than deposit formation may be of concern when utilizing straw in pulverized fuel boilers. This paper provides a review of Danish experiences with high-temperature ash deposit formation in the following full-scale utility boilers: Slagelse CHP (31 MW{sub th}), Haslev CHP (23 MW{sub th}) and Rudkoebing CHP (10.7 MW{sub th}), all straw-fired grate-boilers; Grenaa CHP (80 MW{sub th}), a coal-straw co-fired Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler; and the Midtkraft-Studstrup Power Station, Unit l (380 MW{sub th}), a coal-straw co-fired pf-boiler. (au)

  19. A novel plant-fungal mutualism associated with fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Melissa; Newcombe, George; Dixon, Linley; Castlebury, Lisa; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Bromus tectorum, or cheatgrass, is native to Eurasia and widely invasive in western North America. By late spring, this annual plant has dispersed its seed and died; its aboveground biomass then becomes fine fuel that burns as frequently as once every 3-5 y in its invaded range. Cheatgrass has proven to be better adapted to fire there than many competing plants, but the contribution of its fungal symbionts to this adaptation had not previously been studied. In sampling cheatgrass endophytes, many fire-associated fungi were found, including Morchella in three western states (New Mexico, Idaho, and Washington). In greenhouse experiments, a New Mexico isolate of Morchella increased both the biomass and fecundity of its local cheatgrass population, thus simultaneously increasing both the probability of fire and survival of that event, via more fuel and a greater, belowground seed bank, respectively. Re-isolation efforts proved that Morchella could infect cheatgrass roots in a non-mycorrhizal manner and then grow up into aboveground tissues. The same Morchella isolate also increased survival of seed exposed to heat typical of that which develops in the seed bank during a cheatgrass fire. Phylogenetic analysis of Eurasian and North American Morchella revealed that this fire-associated mutualism was evolutionarily novel, in that cheatgrass isolates belonged to two phylogenetically distinct species, or phylotypes, designated Mel-6 and Mel-12 whose evolutionary origin appears to be within western North America. Mutualisms with fire-associated fungi may be contributing to the cheatgrass invasion of western North America.

  20. Detailed Investigations of Load Coefficients on Grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Rasmussen, Michael R.; Frigaard, Peter

    In this report is presented the results of model tests carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, aalborg University (AAU) on behalf of DONG Energy A/S and Vattenfall A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was to investigate the load coefficient on different grates and a solid plate for designi...... offshore windmill access platforms against run-up generated forces with special attention to the influence of air entrainment and the angle of attack....