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Sample records for biomagnetism

  1. Biomagnetism an interdisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, Gian-Luca; Kaufman, Lloyd; Modena, Ivo

    1983-01-01

    Biomagnetism is the study of magnetic fields that originate in biological systems. This is a relatively new discipline that has attracted considerable interest throughout the scientific commu- ty. The study of biomagnetic fields requires the use of techniques and concepts drawn from widely disparate scientific disciplines. To make these techniques and concepts available to a wide spectrum of the scientific community, a NATO Advanced study Institute on B- magnetism was held near Frascati at Grottaferrata, Italy, in S- tember 1982. This volume is based on the lectures delivered by scholars representing many different scientific areas, ranging from solid state physics to psychology. It attempts to preserve the - herent development of concepts drawn from physiology, psychology, biology, physics, medicine, occupational health and geology that was evident during the Institute. The reader will quickly become aware that the progress in biomagnetism over the past decade was due principally to the efforts of interdisci...

  2. Multichannel instrumentation for biomagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of recent developments of multichannel instrumentation for Biomagnetism is presented. The main factors affecting the design, with different source configuration, is examined. Problems related to the SQUID sensors, the detection coils and the cryogenic aspects are examined. The existing large array multichannel systems and of those one that will be ready in the near future are described. (orig.)

  3. Biomagnetism using SQUIDs: status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternickel, Karsten [CardioMag Imaging, Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Braginski, Alex I [Research Center Juelich, ISG-2, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Biomagnetism involves the measurement and analysis of very weak local magnetic fields of living organisms and various organs in humans. Such fields can be of physiological origin or due to magnetic impurities or markers. This paper reviews existing and prospective applications of biomagnetism in clinical research and medical diagnostics. Currently, such applications require sensitive magnetic SQUID sensors and amplifiers. The practicality of biomagnetic methods depends especially on techniques for suppressing the dominant environmental electromagnetic noise, and on suitable nearly real-time data processing and interpretation methods. Of the many biomagnetic methods and applications, only the functional studies of the human brain (magnetoencephalography) and liver susceptometry are in clinical use, while functional diagnostics of the human heart (magnetocardiography) approaches the threshold of clinical acceptance. Particularly promising for the future is the ongoing research into low-field magnetic resonance anatomical imaging using SQUIDs.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: SQUID systems for biomagnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzella, Vittorio; Della Penna, Stefania; DelGratta, Cosimo; Luca Romani, Gian

    2001-07-01

    This review paper illustrates the different SQUID based systems used for biomagnetic imaging. The review is divided into nine sections. The first three sections are introductory: section 1 is a short overview of the topic; section 2 summarizes how the biomagnetic fields are generated and what are the basic mathematical models for the field sources; section 3 illustrates the principles of operation of the SQUID device. Sections 4-8 are specifically devoted to the description of the different systems used for biomagnetic measurements: section 4 discusses the different types of detection coils; section 5 illustrates the SQUID sensors specifically designed for biomagnetic applications together with the necessary driving electronics, with special emphasis on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) SQUIDs, since HTS devices are still in a developing stage; section 6 illustrates the different noise reduction techniques; section 7 describes the different multichannel sensors presently operating; and, finally, section 8 gives a hint of what kind of physiological and/or clinical information may be gathered by the biomagnetic technique. Section 9 suggests some future trends for the biomagnetic technique.

  5. Biomagnetics and bioimaging for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shoogo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)]. E-mail: ueno@medes.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Sekino, Masaki [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    This paper reviews medical applications of the recently developed techniques in biomagnetics and bioimaging such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging, cancer therapy based on magnetic stimulation, and magnetic control of cell orientation and cell growth. These techniques are leading medicine and biology into a new horizon through the novel applications of magnetism.

  6. Performances of compact integrated superconducting magnetometers for biomagnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Rombetto, S.; Nappi, C.; Russo, M.

    2008-10-01

    In the present paper, performances of compact fully integrated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers, recently developed, have been investigated in view of their employment in large multichannel systems for biomagnetic imaging. The analysis has been focused on SQUID sensors having a pickup loop side length of 3 and 4 mm based on a design aimed to maximize the magnetic flux transferred from the detection coil to the SQUID in comparison with a magnetometer with 9 mm side length having a suitable sensitivity for biomagnetic applications. The performance study has been consisted in the computation of the magnetic responses to a current dipole which is the most fundamental approach used in biomagnetism. The results have shown that the dipole current sensitivity of 4 mm long side compact magnetometers is suitable for application in multichannel systems for magnetoencephalography and magnetocardiography.

  7. Proceedings of the biomagnetic effects workshop. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for six of the eight chapters contained in these proceedings. The other two chapters contain introductory material (Chapter 1) dealing with the rationale for the work shop, and a summary (Chapter 8) of the major objectives that were accomplished at the workshop relative to the current status of awareness in the field of biomagnetic effects. (ERB)

  8. Study of the Gastric Emptying in Humans: Biomagnetic Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, E.; Córdova, T.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Sosa, M.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2006-09-01

    Biomagnetic studies of the gastrointestinal system can be carried out in two ways. Recording the magnetic field produced by the myenteric nervous system or created by any oral contrast mean as magnetic tracers or markers. In the first case, a SQUID magnetometer is demanded while a fluxgate magnetometer is enough in the second case. In this work, a magnetic marker was ingested by 8 healthy volunteers, in three gastric volume conditions, to measure the luminal content volume effect in the gastric emptying and to perform the quantification of the peristaltic frequencies in gastric and duodenum tract segments. The average emptying times for low luminal content, relative to the emptying time when the intake was the highest, were 43.6 ± 15.6 % and 77.3 ± 47.0 %. These results show that the biomagnetic technique is a powerful modality to estimate the effects of the gastric volume in the gastric emptying and a way to record the peristaltic frequencies.

  9. Interpreting Biomagnetic Fields of Planar Wave Fronts in Cardiac Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Koch, Hans

    2005-01-01

    The recent results of Holzer and co-workers reveal the existence of net currents that flow along the front of a planar wave propagating through cardiac tissue. This is an important contribution toward the better understanding of the physics of biomagnetic fields. However, although the authors claim their results reveal particular bidomain properties, we show in this short letter that the results allow multiple interpretations. For instance, cardiac anisotropy by itself may also explain the ex...

  10. 11-channel multipurpose biomagnetic system for operation in unshielded environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress toward the realization of a medium size multipurpose biomagnetic system is described. Eleven second-order gradiometers are coupled with as many dc-SQUIDs manifactured in our laboratory. The geometry of the detecting coils consists of seven sensors arranged in a straight line and four sensors placed around the center. By means of this configuration it is possible to scan the chest or the abdomen with the seven aligned sensors, to measure the head with the seven central sensors whereas the whole system can provide significant information for ''single shot'' cardiomagnetic measurements in clinical studies. (orig.)

  11. Numerical investigation of biomagnetic fluids in circular ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzirakis, K; Papaharilaou, Y; Giordano, D; Ekaterinaris, J

    2014-03-01

    A mathematical model for the description of biomagnetic fluid flow exposed to a magnetic field that accounts for both electric and magnetic properties of the biofluid is presented. This is achieved by adding the Lorentz and magnetization forces in the Navier-Stokes equations. To demonstrate the effects of magnetic fields, we consider the case of laminar, incompressible, viscous, the steady flow of a Newtonian biomagnetic fluid (i) between two parallel plates; and (ii) through a straight rigid tube with a 60% in diameter, 84% on area, axisymmetric stenosis. Two external magnetic fields were investigated: one produced by an infinite wire carrying constant current, and a dipole-like field. We show, numerically and analytically, that the wire produces an irrotational force that, independent of its intensity, only alters the pressure leaving the velocity field unaffected. In contrast, when the fluid is exposed to the dipole-like field, which generates a rotational force, then both pressure and velocity can be strongly influenced even at moderate field strengths. Similar trends were obtained when a time varying flow is simulated through the axisymmetric stenosis in the presence of the dipole-like rotational magnetic field. It is expected that our findings could have important applications in blood flow control. PMID:24123947

  12. Experience with a multichannel system for biomagnetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S; Abraham-Fuchs, K; Reichenberger, H; Seifert, H; Hoenig, H E; Röhrlein, G

    1993-11-01

    The components of the biomagnetic multichannel system Krenikon are described. The combination of biomagnetically yielded localizations with anatomic images gained from MR or CT is discussed as well as the enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio by using a correlation technique. The overall localization accuracy is tested with technical phantoms. With volunteers measurements of auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked fields are performed to evaluate the system performance in vivo. Clinical studies were performed mainly with partners from the Universities of Erlangen-Nünberg and Ulm. The data acquisition time typically is 2-10 min which is tolerable both for the patient and the clinical staff. Electric potentials even with invasive electrodes can be recorded simultaneously with the magnetic fields. MEG gives important information for the presurgical diagnosis of epileptic patients and for the understanding of the epilepsy genesis. With MCG, centres of biologic excitation such as ventricular ectopies or accessory bundles in WPW syndrome have been successfully localized. PMID:8274986

  13. The atomic magnetometer: A new era in biomagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, Ronald T., E-mail: rtwakai@wisc.edu [1005 Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    The high cost and impracticality of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometers has limited the expansion of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG), especially in countries where the cost of liquid helium is high. A recent breakthrough, however, has the potential to radically change this situation. In 2003, a group at Princeton University demonstrated an atomic magnetometer, known as the SERF (spin-exchange free relaxation) magnetometer, with unprecedented sensitivity. Since then, several research groups have utilized SERF magnetometers to record MEG, MCG, and fetal MCG signals. Despite some modest drawbacks, it now seems almost certain that SERF magnetometers can replace SQUIDs for many applications. With a price tag that is likely to be far less than that of SQUIDs, SERF magnetometers can propel the next wave of growth in biomagnetism.

  14. Biomagnetic fluid flow in an aneurysm using ferrohydrodynamics principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzirtzilakis, E. E.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the fundamental problem of biomagnetic fluid flow in an aneurysmal geometry under the influence of a steady localized magnetic field is numerically investigated. The mathematical model used to formulate the problem is consistent with the principles of ferrohydrodynamics. Blood is considered to be an electrically non-conducting, homogeneous, non-isothermal Newtonian magnetic fluid. For the numerical solution of the problem, which is described by a coupled, non-linear system of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs), with appropriate boundary conditions, the stream function-vorticity formulation is adopted. The solution is obtained by applying an efficient pseudotransient numerical methodology using finite differences. This methodology is based on the application of a semi-implicit numerical technique, transformations, stretching of the grid, and construction of the boundary conditions for the vorticity. The results regarding the velocity and temperature field, skin friction, and rate of heat transfer indicate that the presence of a magnetic field considerably influences the flow field, particularly in the region of the aneurysm.

  15. Magnetoresistive-superconducting mixed sensors for biomagnetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M. [DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Fermon, C., E-mail: claude.fermon@cea.f [DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Dyvorne, H.; Jacquinot, J.F.; Polovy, H.; Walliang, A.L. [DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    When coupled to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, a superconducting loop containing a constriction can be a very sensitive magnetometer. It has thermal noise levels of few fT/sqrt(Hz), comparable to low-T{sub c} SQUID noise, with a flat frequency response. These mixed sensors are good candidates for detection of weak biomagnetic signals, like a cardiac or neuronal signature. Furthermore, being sensitive to the flux, mixed sensors can be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) especially at low fields. They are very robust and accept strong RF pulses with a very short recovery time compared to tuned RF coils, which allow measurements of broad signals (short relaxation time or multiple resonances). We will first present the last generation sensors having a noise level of 3 fT/sqrt(Hz) and we will show signals measured at low frequency (magnetocardiography-magnetoencephalography range) and at higher frequency (NMR signals). The use of additional flux transformers for improving the signal-to-noise will be discussed. Finally, we will present perspectives for low-field MRI, which can be combined with neural signal detection (MEG), especially for brain anatomy and temporal response on the same experimental setup.

  16. Biomagnetic source localization and image fusion as a tool for functional diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on functional diagnosis of electric activity in the body by measurement of the minute extracorporeal magnetic fields, combining the results with three-dimensional MR images. A multichannel biomagnetic system in a shielded room simultaneously measures the coherent magnetic signals in 37 channels. A special bite piece for head measurements and localization coils with watermarks for chest measurements are used. Pass marks are defined in the reference frames for biomagnetism and MR. Acquisition of data for the heart or the brain is completed within a few minutes without repositioning of the patient. Localization of focal electric sources is calculated on the basis of appropriate models

  17. SQUIDs in biomagnetism: a roadmap towards improved healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Rainer; Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Seton, Hugh; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Paetau, Ritva; Parkkonen, Lauri; Pfeiffer, Christoph; Riaz, Bushra; Schneiderman, Justin F.; Dong, Hui; Hwang, Seong-min; You, Lixing; Inglis, Ben; Clarke, John; Espy, Michelle A.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Magnelind, Per E.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Volegov, Petr L.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Höfner, Nora; Burghoff, Martin; Enpuku, Keiji; Yang, S. Y.; Chieh, Jen-Jei; Knuutila, Jukka; Laine, Petteri; Nenonen, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    Globally, the demand for improved health care delivery while managing escalating costs is a major challenge. Measuring the biomagnetic fields that emanate from the human brain already impacts the treatment of epilepsy, brain tumours and other brain disorders. This roadmap explores how superconducting technologies are poised to impact health care. Biomagnetism is the study of magnetic fields of biological origin. Biomagnetic fields are typically very weak, often in the femtotesla range, making their measurement challenging. The earliest in vivo human measurements were made with room-temperature coils. In 1963, Baule and McFee (1963 Am. Heart J. 55 95‑6) reported the magnetic field produced by electric currents in the heart (‘magnetocardiography’), and in 1968, Cohen (1968 Science 161 784‑6) described the magnetic field generated by alpha-rhythm currents in the brain (‘magnetoencephalography’). Subsequently, in 1970, Cohen et al (1970 Appl. Phys. Lett. 16 278–80) reported the recording of a magnetocardiogram using a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). Just two years later, in 1972, Cohen (1972 Science 175 664–6) described the use of a SQUID in magnetoencephalography. These last two papers set the scene for applications of SQUIDs in biomagnetism, the subject of this roadmap. The SQUID is a combination of two fundamental properties of superconductors. The first is flux quantization—the fact that the magnetic flux Φ in a closed superconducting loop is quantized in units of the magnetic flux quantum, Φ0 ≡ h/2e, ≈ 2.07 × 10‑15 Tm2 (Deaver and Fairbank 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 43–6, Doll R and Näbauer M 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 51–2). Here, h is the Planck constant and e the elementary charge. The second property is the Josephson effect, predicted in 1962 by Josephson (1962 Phys. Lett. 1 251–3) and observed by Anderson and Rowell (1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 230–2) in 1963. The Josephson junction consists of two weakly

  18. Multichannel biomagnetic system for study of electrical activity in the brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S; Hoenig, E; Reichenberger, H; Abraham-Fuchs, K; Moshage, W; Oppelt, A; Stefan, H; Weikl, A; Wirth, A

    1990-09-01

    The authors designed a multichannel system for noninvasive measurement of the extremely weak magnetic fields generated by the brain and the heart. It uses a flat array of 37 superconducting magnetic field-sensing coils connected to sophisticated superconducting quantum interference devices. To prevent interference from external electromagnetic fields, the system is operated inside a shielded room. Complete sets of coherent data, even from spontaneous events, can be recorded. System performance was evaluated with phantom measurements and evoked-response studies. A spatial resolution of a few millimeters and a temporal resolution of a millisecond were obtained. First results in patients with partial epilepsy and investigations of the cardiac conductive pathway indicate that biomagnetism is now ready for a systematic clinical evaluation. Interpretation of measurements was facilitated by highlighting biomagnetically localized electrical activity in three-dimensional digital magnetic resonance images. PMID:2389043

  19. Real-time Measurement of Biomagnetic Vector Fields in Functional Syncytium Using Amorphous Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Uchiyama, Tusyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic field detection of biological electric activities would provide a non-invasive and aseptic estimate of the functional state of cellular organization, namely a syncytium constructed with cell-to-cell electric coupling. In this study, we investigated the properties of biomagnetic waves which occur spontaneously in gut musculature as a typical functional syncytium, by applying an amorphous metal-based gradio-magneto sensor operated at ambient temperature without a magnetic shield. The performance of differentiation was improved by using a single amorphous wire with a pair of transducer coils. Biomagnetic waves of up to several nT were recorded ~1 mm below the sample in a real-time manner. Tetraethyl ammonium (TEA) facilitated magnetic waves reflected electric activity in smooth muscle. The direction of magnetic waves altered depending on the relative angle of the muscle layer and magneto sensor, indicating the existence of propagating intercellular currents. The magnitude of magnetic waves rapidly decreased to ~30% by the initial and subsequent 1 mm separations between sample and sensor. The large distance effect was attributed to the feature of bioelectric circuits constructed by two reverse currents separated by a small distance. This study provides a method for detecting characteristic features of biomagnetic fields arising from a syncytial current.

  20. Dual signal subspace projection (DSSP): a novel algorithm for removing large interference in biomagnetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Kawabata, Yuya; Ushio, Shuta; Sumiya, Satoshi; Kawabata, Shigenori; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. In functional electrophysiological imaging, signals are often contaminated by interference that can be of considerable magnitude compared to the signals of interest. This paper proposes a novel algorithm for removing such interferences that does not require separate noise measurements. Approach. The algorithm is based on a dual definition of the signal subspace in the spatial- and time-domains. Since the algorithm makes use of this duality, it is named the dual signal subspace projection (DSSP). The DSSP algorithm first projects the columns of the measured data matrix onto the inside and outside of the spatial-domain signal subspace, creating a set of two preprocessed data matrices. The intersection of the row spans of these two matrices is estimated as the time-domain interference subspace. The original data matrix is projected onto the subspace that is orthogonal to this interference subspace. Main results. The DSSP algorithm is validated by using the computer simulation, and using two sets of real biomagnetic data: spinal cord evoked field data measured from a healthy volunteer and magnetoencephalography data from a patient with a vagus nerve stimulator. Significance. The proposed DSSP algorithm is effective for removing overlapped interference in a wide variety of biomagnetic measurements.

  1. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodoro Cordova-Fraga; Modesto Sosa; Cados Wiechers; Jose Maria De la Roca-Chiapas; Alejandro Maldonado Moreles; Jesus BernaI-Alvarado; Raquel Huerta-Franco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT)and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI).METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright,fowler,and supine positions; 90°,45° and 0°,respectively).RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions.The ETT means were 5.2 ±1.1 s,6.1±1.5 s,and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90°,45° and 0°,respectively.Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P < 0.001 by subjects' anatomical position,and r =-0.024 and P > 0.05 according the subject's BHI.CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique,it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT.

  2. [Development of a nonmagnetic angle encoder for active shielding during biomagnetic measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessler, F; Witt, C; Haueisen, J; Bellemann, M E

    2002-04-01

    Biomagnetic fields--in particular in the low-frequency range--are subject to environmental interference, which cannot be adequately reduced by most passive shielding methods. However, the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by active compensation. For this purpose, the interference is detected by reference sensors and fed back through integrated compensation coils. To establish deviation of normal directions between reference sensors and compensation coils, an angle encoder was developed. The rotation of the reference sensors about two axes at right angles to each other, is converted into voltage pulses by means of codewheels and photoelectric beams. The pulses are counted by incremental encoders, and represent a measure of the angles. A cardanic suspension and a plumb-line act as a reference system. The pulses counted are converted into binary angle values, which are used for coordinate transformation of the interfering fields. The angle encoder can determine the tilt of the reference sensors with an accuracy of 1 degree within a range between -45 and +45 degrees. The noise level of the system remains unaffected during a biomagnetic measurement. Magnetic signals of up to 5 pT arising during the oscillation of the plumb-line can be neglected because of the static nature of the angular measurement. PMID:12051137

  3. Propulsion Velocity and ETT on Biomagnetic Assessment of the Human Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esophagus transit time measurement is a common clinical practical. Biomagnetic techniques and modern instrumentation can perform non invasive and functional assessments of the gastrointestinal tract. This study presents the evaluation of the esophagus transit time and propulsion velocity of a magnetic marker from the mouth to stomach using water vs. a swallow easy substance recently patented. A group of ten healthy subjects from 45 to 55 years, were evaluated in identical conditions for two times, they ingested randomly a magnetic marker in an anatomical body position of 45 deg., one times with water and the other one with a patented substance developed in order to help the subjects to swallow pills. The esophagus transit time was shorter when the subjects ingested the magnetic marker with the swallow easy substance than they ingested the magnetic marker with same quantity of water

  4. Biomagnetic monitoring of heavy metals contamination in deposited atmospheric dust, a case study from Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Samira; Khademi, Hossein; Cano, Angel Faz; Acosta, Jose A

    2016-05-15

    Tree leaves are considered as one of the best biogenic dust collectors due to their ability to trap and retain particulate matter on their surfaces. In this study, the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the concentration of selected heavy metals of plane tree (Platanus orientalis L.) leaves and deposited atmospheric dust, sampled by an indirect and a direct method, respectively, were determined to investigate the relationships between leaf magnetic parameters and the concentration of heavy metals in deposited atmospheric dust. The objective was to develop a biomagnetic method as an alternative to the common ones used for determining atmospheric heavy metal contaminations. Plane tree leaves were monthly sampled on the 19th of May to November, 2012 (T1-T7), for seven months from 21 different sites in the city of Isfahan, central Iran. Deposited atmospheric dust samples were also collected using flat glass surfaces from the same sites on the same dates, except for T1. MS (χlf, χhf) values in washed (WL) and unwashed leaves (UL) as well as Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in UL and deposited atmospheric dust samples were determined. The results showed that the MS content with a biogenic source was low with almost no significant change during the sampling period, while an increasing trend was observed in the MS content of UL samples due to the deposition of heavy metals and magnetic particles on leaf surfaces throughout the plant growth. The latter type of MS content could be reduced through washing off by rain. Most heavy metals examined, as well as the Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) in UL, showed statistically significant correlations with MS values. The correlation between heavy metals content in atmospheric dust deposited on glass surfaces and leaf MS values was significant for Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn. Moreover, the similarity observed between the spatial distribution maps of leaf MS and deposited atmospheric dust PLI provided convincing evidence regarding

  5. Magnetic particle capture for biomagnetic fluid flow in stenosed aortic bifurcation considering particle-fluid coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the basic principle behind the Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT). It is essential to couple the ferrohydrodynamic (FHD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles when magnetic fields are applied to blood as a biomagnetic fluid. The present study is devoted to study on MDT technique by particle tracking in the presence of a non uniform magnetic field in a stenosed aortic bifurcation. The present numerical model of biomagnetic fluid dynamics (BFD) takes into accounts both magnetization and electrical conductivity of blood. The blood flow in the bifurcation is considered to be incompressible and Newtonian. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT two way particle-fluid coupling. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Results concerning the velocity and temperature field indicate that the presence of the magnetic field influences the flow field considerably and the disturbances increase as the magnetic field strength increases. The insert position is also varied to observe the variation in flow as well as temperature field. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the particle size (dp), flow Reynolds number (Re) and external magnetic field strength (B0) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. The difference in CE is also studied for different particle loading condition. According to the results, the magnetic field increased the particle concentration in the target region

  6. Interpretation of the MEG-MUSIC scan in biomagnetic source localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Signal and Image Processing Inst.

    1993-09-01

    MEG-Music is a new approach to MEG source localization. MEG-Music is based on a spatio-temporal source model in which the observed biomagnetic fields are generated by a small number of current dipole sources with fixed positions/orientations and varying strengths. From the spatial covariance matrix of the observed fields, a signal subspace can be identified. The rank of this subspace is equal to the number of elemental sources present. This signal sub-space is used in a projection metric that scans the three dimensional head volume. Given a perfect signal subspace estimate and a perfect forward model, the metric will peak at unity at each dipole location. In practice, the signal subspace estimate is contaminated by noise, which in turn yields MUSIC peaks which are less than unity. Previously we examined the lower bounds on localization error, independent of the choice of localization procedure. In this paper, we analyzed the effects of noise and temporal coherence on the signal subspace estimate and the resulting effects on the MEG-MUSIC peaks.

  7. Development of a novel bacteriophage based biomagnetic separation method as an aid for sensitive detection of viable Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Danhui; Chen, Juhong; Sela, David A; Nugen, Sam R

    2016-02-01

    The application of bacteriophage combined with the use of magnetic separation techniques has emerged as a valuable tool for the sensitive identification and detection of bacteria. In this study, bacteriophage T7 labelled magnetic beads were developed for the detection of viable bacterial cells. Fusion of the biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) with the phage capsid protein gene and the insertion of the biotin ligase (BirA) gene enabled the display of the BAP ligand and the expression protein BirA during the replication cycle of phage infection. The replicated Escherichia coli specific bacteriophage was biotinylated in vivo and coated on magnetic beads via streptavidin-biotin interaction. Immobilization efficiency of the recombinant phage was investigated on magnetic beads and the phage-bead complex was evaluated by detecting E. coli from inoculated broth. When compared to the wild type phage, the recombinant phage T7birA-bap had a high immobilization density on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and could capture 86.2% of E. coli cells from broth within 20 min. As this phage-based biomagnetic detection approach provided a low detection limit of 10(2) CFU mL(-1) without pre-enrichment, we believe this assay could be further developed to detect other bacteria of interest by applying host-specific phages. This would be of particular use in detecting bacteria which are difficult to grow or replicate slowly in culture.

  8. Flow of a biomagnetic viscoelastic fluid: application to estimation of blood flow in arteries during electromagnetic hyperthermia,a therapeutic procedure for cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.C.MISRA; A.SINHA; G.C.SHIT

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the theoretical investigation of a fundamental problem of biomagnetic fluid flow through a porous medium subject to a magnetic field by using the principles of biomagnetic fluid dynamics(BFD).The study pertains to a situation where magnetization of the fluid varies with temperature.The fluid is considered to be non-Newtonian,whose flow is governed by the equation of a second-grade viscoelastic fluid.The walls of the channel are assumed to be stretchable,where the surface velocity is proportional to the longitudinal distance from the origin of coordinates.The problem is first reduced to solving a system of coupled nonlinear differential equations involving seven parameters.Considering blood as a biomagnetic fluid and using the present analysis,an attempt is made to compute some parameters of the blood flow by developing a suitable numerical method and by devising an appropriate finite difference scheme.The computational results are presented in graphical form,and thereby some theoretical predictions are made with respect to the hemodynamical flow of the blood in a hyperthermal state under the action of a magnetic field.The results clearly indicate that the presence of a magnetic dipole bears the potential so as to affect the characteristics of the blood flow in arteries to a significant extent during the therapeutic procedure of electromagnetic hyperthermia.The study will attract the attention of clinicians,to whom the results would be useful in the treatment of cancer patients by the method of electromagnetic hyperthermia.

  9. The high temperature superconductor YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta): Symmetry of the order parameter, and gradiometers for biomagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, Konstantin Alexander

    biomagnetic systems in an unshielded environment. We demonstrate a practical multichannel SQUID system for MagnetoCardioGraphy. Using this system, we are able to detect magnetic signals from the human heart in an unshielded environment, thereby demonstrating the applicability of our technology to practical applications. Our gradiometers are readily manufacturable devices that could be used in clinical applications in the near future.

  10. The high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ: symmetry of the order parameter, and gradiometers for biomagnetic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ is the material that drives the majority of the technological applications of high transition temperature (Tc) superconductors, particularly in the area of superconducting electronics. Despite the widespread use of high-Tc superconducting materials in a variety of applications, the nature of the superconducting state in these materials remains unknown since their discovery more than a decade ago. Many properties of the high-Tc superconductors are determined by their order parameter, which is a wavefunction describing the superconducting condensate. The symmetry of the order parameter in cuprates has been the subject of intensive investigation, leading to conflicting sets of results. Some experiments supported conventional, s-wave symmetry of the order parameter, while others indicated an unconventional, d-wave symmetry. The first part of this thesis is an experimental study of the symmetry of the order parameter in YBa2Cu3O7-δ. A new class of phase sensitive experiments is described that involve Josephson tunneling along the c-axis of twinned crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-δ. These experiments showed that an s-wave component must reverse sign across the twin boundary, providing direct evidence for a mixed, s+d symmetry of the order parameter in YBa2Cu3O7-δ, and thereby reconciling two conflicting sets of previous findings and establishing the dominant d-wave pairing symmetry. The second part of the thesis focuses on practical applications of YBa2Cu3O7-δ in superconducting electronics. The authors introduce a novel Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometer. The principle of operation of these long baseline high-Tc SQUID gradiometers is based on the inductive coupling of the input coil of a planar flux transformer to the pickup up loop of a directly coupled magnetometer. The long baseline of the gradiometer, 48 mm, and the intrinsic. Balance of better than 1 part in 100 make it an ideal candidate for operation in biomagnetic

  11. The high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ: symmetry of the order parameter, and gradiometers for biomagnetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouznetsov, Konstantin Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    pickup up loop of a directly coupled magnetometer. The long baseline of the gradiometer, 48 mm, and the intrinsic. Balance of better than 1 part in 100 make it an ideal candidate for operation in biomagnetic systems in an unshielded environment. They demonstrate a practical multichannel SQUID system for MagnetoCardioGraphy. Using this system, they are able to detect magnetic signals from the human heart in an unshielded environment, thereby demonstrating the applicability of their technology to practical applications. Their gradiometers are readily manufacturable devices that could be used in clinical applications in the near future.

  12. Plants and Magnetism: Experiments with Biomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Phenomenon of effect of magnetic field on plant growth provides wide opportunities for research in classrooms. Using moderately powerful magnets, seed growth patterns can be observed in pre-germination treatment, germination period exposure and under many other conditions. Such research may enable understanding magnetotropism more clearly. (PS)

  13. Measurements of Gastric Emptying by Biomagnetic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, L. A.; Sosa, M.; Córdova, T.; Vargas, F. M.; Huerta, M. R.

    2006-09-01

    In the present work a new method to measure the average time of gastric emptying by using a magnetic tracer is showed, this work shows the application of foundations of the electromagnetic theory in the study of the gastrointestinal system. The presented technique is relatively cheap and can be used it to diagnose of diseases, is a noninvasive method, is a technique that does not use ionizing radiation. In this investigation was possible to measure the average time of gastric emptying with a very high precision. In this investigation measurements of 10 healthy volunteers were made, and an average time of gastric emptying of 36.45 minutes in the space of the time was obtained, in addition with the analysis to the signal by means of the use of a pass-band filter it was possible to measure the peristaltic frequencies of the stomach and an average time of 37.24 minutes in the space of frequencies. With this technique it is possible to obtain data of the walls of the stomach. A peristaltic frequency of 2.79 was obtained cpm (cycles per minute).

  14. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  15. Objective assessment of biomagnetic devices and alternative clinical therapies using infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockley, Graham J.

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming introduction of magnetic devices and other alternative therapies into the health care market prompts the need for objective evaluation of these techniques through the use of infrared thermal imaging. Many of these therapies are reported to promote the stimulation of blood flow or the relief of pain conditions. Infrared imaging is an efficient tool to assess such changes in the physiological state. Therefore, a thermal imager can help document and substantiate whether these therapies are in fact providing an effective change to the local circulation. Thermal images may also indicate whether the change is temporary or sustained. As a specific case example, preliminary findings will be presented concerning the use of magnets and the effect they have on peripheral circulation. This will include a discussion of the recommended protocols for this type of infrared testing. This test model can be applied to the evaluation of other devices and therapeutic procedures which are reputed to affect circulation such as electro acupuncture, orthopedic footwear and topical ointments designed to relieve pain or inflammation.

  16. Cancellation technique of external noise inside a magnetically shielded room used for biomagnetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Keiji

    2000-05-01

    First-order gradiometers inside a magnetically shielded room (MSR) were used to cancel magnetic-field noise. However, the magnetic field inside a MSR is distorted when the amount of external noise is large. This distortion is caused by the low-pass filter property of the MSR. Therefore, the time constants of the frequency-dependent attenuation of the MSR vary spatially and this variation must be taken into account. To investigate noise cancellation, we used a multichannel superconducting quantum interference device consisting of four gradiometers measuring a source signal and two gradiometers as a reference. To compensate for the different magnitudes of the gradiometer wave forms, which differed because of slight differences in their pickup-coil cancel rates, we calculated a fitting parameter. The noise-cancellation method consisted of two processes: reduction of ambient noise caused by the differences in the cancel rate of the gradiometers and a gradient magnetic field inside the MSR, and cancellation of wave-form distortion caused by the spatial variation of the time constants inside the MSR. This cancellation method provides additional attenuation of over 20-30 dB in addition to the balance (>46 dB) of a first-order gradiometer. However, the remaining noise, especially a spike (<2 pT) at the beginning of a large ambient noise step, could not be completely canceled. This noise was caused by the slight difference between the time constants at the reference sensor position and at the signal sensor position. Except for this noise spike, however, the noise cancellation enabled clear magnetocardiogram wave forms to be measured without being affected by strong external noise.

  17. A comparison of normal and tangential magnetic field component measurements in biomagnetic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, V; Becker, W; Grözinger, B; Jürgens, R; Kornhuber, C

    1991-01-01

    Because of the way most available hardware gradiometers are designed and in view of the prediction, by theory, that the normal magnetic field component provides all available information on the intrinsic current source, MEG and MCG measurements generally consider only the field vector normal to the head or truck surface. However, when looking for single events, the information contained in the normal component often cannot be fully sampled, because the sensor array has limited dimensions and therefore covers only a fraction of the field's spatial extension. Simulation of a current dipole in a sphere using realistic parameters shows that there is a considerable area where the amplitude of the tangential field components is larger than that of the normal one. Measurements using a 28-channel magnetometer system with normal and tangential pick-up coils and a current dipole in a phantom model confirm this prediction; depending on dipole orientation, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) could improve by a factor of up to 20 if the total field was considered instead of only the normal component. MCG recordings with the same instrument demonstrated a broad area above the heart where the tangential SNR was clearly better than the normal one. Preliminary measurements indicate that tangential components can also be recorded in the MEG; it is suggested that they may help source localisation. PMID:1778055

  18. Algorithms for biomagnetic source imaging with prior anatomical and physiological information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughett, P W [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation derives a new method for estimating current source amplitudes in the brain and heart from external magnetic field measurements and prior knowledge about the probable source positions and amplitudes. The minimum mean square error estimator for the linear inverse problem with statistical prior information was derived and is called the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM). OCLIM includes as special cases the Shim-Cho weighted pseudoinverse and Wiener estimators but allows more general priors and thus reduces the reconstruction error. Efficient algorithms were developed to compute the OCLIM estimate for instantaneous or time series data. The method was tested in a simulated neuromagnetic imaging problem with five simultaneously active sources on a grid of 387 possible source locations; all five sources were resolved, even though the true sources were not exactly at the modeled source positions and the true source statistics differed from the assumed statistics.

  19. Flip-chip-type high-Tc gradiometer for biomagnetic measurements in unshielded environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A flip-chip-type gradiometer has been constructed with a 10 mm×5 mm planar DC-SQUID gradiometer fabricated on a SrTiO3 bicrystal substrate and a flux transformer made from a YBCO*/YBCO/CeO2/YSZ multilayer on a φ50.8 mm Si wafer. The coupling coefficient between the flux transformer and the planar gradiometer is 0.18. The transformer increases effectively the resolution of the gradiometer. A magnetic field gradient resolution of 73 fT·cm-1·Hz-1/2 in the white region and 596 fT·cm-1Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz has been obtained. High quality magnetocardiogram signals have been successfully measured by using this flip-chip-type gradiometer in an unshielded environment.

  20. Flip-chip-type high- T_c gradiometer for biomagnetic measurements in unshielded environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田永君; 王天生; 陈珂; 漆汉宏; 陈烈; 郑东宁; Sven; LINZEN; Frank; SCHMIDL; Paul; SEIDEL

    2000-01-01

    A flip-chip-type gradiometer has been constructed with a 10 mm × 5 mm planar DC-SQUID gradiometer fabricated on a SrTiO3 bicrystal substrate and a flux transformer made from a YB-CO* /YBCO/CeO2/YSZ multilayer on a φ50.8 mm Si wafer. The coupling coefficient between the flux transformer and the planar gradiometer is 0.18. The transformer increases effectively the resolution of the gradiometer. A magnetic field gradient resolution of 73 fT·cm-1·Hz-1/2 in the white region and 596 fT·cm-1Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz has been obtained. High quality magnetocardiogram signals have been successfully measured by using this flip-chip-type gradiometer in an unshielded environment.

  1. Biomagnetic monitoring of traffic air pollution in Toulouse (France) using magnetic properties of tree bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macouin, M.; Rousse, S.; Brulfert, F.; Durand, M.; Feida, N.; Durand, X.; Becaud, L.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic properties of various atmospheric samples represent rapid and economic proxies in the pollution studies based on their strong linkage to heavy metals and/or volatile organic carbons. We report a biomonitoring study of air pollution in Toulouse (France) based on the magnetic properties of tree (Platanus acerifolia) bark. More than 250 bark samples were taken at different areas of the city. Both mass specific magnetic susceptibility and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) at 1 Tesla display relationships with the traffic intensity and the distance to the road. Urban roadside tree bark exhibit significant enhancement in their values of susceptibility and IRM reflecting surface accumulation of particulate pollutants, compared with tree growing at lower traffic sites. To estimate the deposition time and accumulation on bark, we have deposited 20 "clean" bark samples from low traffic area with susceptibility inferior to 10 SI, near the city ring road. Samples were then collected during three months. Samples were imparted a 1 Tesla IRM both prior the deposition and after the resampling. Results are useful to apprehend the process of magnetic particulates accumulation and to evaluate the potential of tree bark for the air quality monitoring.

  2. Biomagnetic and bioelectric detection of gastric slow wave activity in normal human subjects—a correlation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured gastric slow wave activity simultaneously with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer, mucosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in 18 normal human subjects (11 women and 7 men). We processed signals with Fourier spectral analysis and SOBI blind-source separation techniques. We observed a high waveform correlation between the mucosal electromyogram (EMG) and multichannel SQUID magnetogastrogram (MGG). There was a lower waveform correlation between the mucosal EMG and cutaneous electrogastrogram (EGG), but the correlation improved with the application of SOBI. There was also a high correlation between the frequency of the electrical activity recorded in the MGG and in mucosal electrodes (r = 0.97). We concluded that SQUID magnetometers noninvasively record gastric slow wave activity that is highly correlated with the activity recorded by invasive mucosal electrodes. (paper)

  3. Improvement of the performance of a mu -metal magnetically shielded room by means of active compensation (biomagnetic applications)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, ter H.J.M.; Wieringa, H.J.; Rogalla, H.

    1991-01-01

    An active compensation technique is presented for improving the performance of a mu -metal magnetically shielded room. Active compensation is established by measuring the magnetic field inside the room by a SQUID magnetometer. The output of this sensor is amplified and connected to a coil surroundin

  4. Laser-pumped cesium magnetometers for high-resolution medical and fundamental research

    OpenAIRE

    Groeger, Stephan; Bison, Georg; Knowles, Paul E.; Wynands, Robert; Weis, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Laser-pumped cesium magnetometers allow highly sensitive magnetometry at room temperature. We report on applications of that technique in biomagnetic diagnostics and in a neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment. In the biomagnetic application the magnetic field from the beating human heart is detected using a gradiometer, which reaches an intrinsic sensitivity of 80 fT/Hz1/2. The device can record time-resolved magnetic field maps above the human body surface with a spatial resolutio...

  5. Magnetic Particle-Based Hybrid Platforms for Bioanalytical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Andreescu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomagnetic nano and microparticles platforms have attracted considerable interest in the field of biological sensors due to their interesting physico-chemical properties, high specific surface area, good mechanical stability and opportunities for generating magneto-switchable devices. This review discusses recent advances in the development and characterization of active biomagnetic nanoassemblies, their interaction with biological molecules and their use in bioanalytical sensors.

  6. Human MCG measurements with a high-sensitivity potassium atomic magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring biomagnetic fields, such as magnetocardiograms (MCGs), is important for investigating biological functions. To address to this need, we developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer. In this study, human MCGs were acquired using a potassium atomic magnetometer without any modulating systems. The sensitivity of the magnetometer is comparable to that of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and is sufficient for acquiring human MCGs. The activity of a human heart estimated from the MCG maps agrees well with that measured with SQUID magnetometers. Thus, our magnetometer produces reliable results, which demonstrate the potential of our atomic magnetometer for biomagnetic measurements. (paper)

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1977 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, W.R.

    1978-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 68 sections of this report that discuss the health hazards associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, fossil fuel cycle, oil shale processing, and biomagnetic effects associated with fusion. A list is included of 52 publications during the time period covered by this report.

  8. Leaf-deposition of particulate matter as a monitoring tool for the urban distribution of atmospheric particles: an experimental and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Jelle

    Throughout this Ph.D. research, the applicability of biomagnetic monitoring of leaf-deposited particles is evaluated for both monitoring and modelling purposes, using different spatial and temporal scales. First, biomagnetic monitoring of Platanus x acerifofia Willd. leaves was applied to assess the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles throughout an urban street canyon. To investigate the temporal variation of the biomagnetic signal, we evaluated the accumulation behaviour of SIRM by collecting 2-weekly leaf samples of a typical roadside Platanus x acerifolia Willd. tree throughout an entire in-leaf season and examined the seasonal development of the total leaf SIRM signal as well as the leaf-encapsulated fraction. Furthermore, the relevancy of the biomagnetic monitoring approach was evaluated by comparing gravimetric results with SIRM results of leaf-deposited particles within three different size fractions. As biomagnetic monitoring showed to be related to the atmospheric particulate concentration and applicable in urban areas at different Spatial and temporal resolution, the SIRM signal was used for comparison with air quality models at different spatial scales. A micro scale air quality model (ENVI-met RTM) was evaluated, using 96 tree crown sampling locations in a typical urban street canyon, while modelled atmospheric PM10 and NO2 concentrations at the urban scale were compared with leaf SIRM results of ivy (Hedera sp.) at 1 10 locations throughout Antwerp. The last part of this Ph.D. focussed on the influence of tree crown morphology on the distribution and leaf-deposition of atmospheric particles. A model study was conducted to investigate the influence of a detailed LiDAR-derived tree crown, not only on the amount of leaf-deposited particles, but also on the local atmospheric PM distribution in the vicinity of the tree crown. Overall, this Ph.D. demonstrated the application potential of biomagnetic monitoring to gain insights on local ambient PM

  9. Biophysical aspects of the influence of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the human body Influencia de los campos electromagnéticos en el organismo humano: aspectos biofísicos

    OpenAIRE

    Napaleon Hernández

    1993-01-01

     

    Some historical aspects of biomagnetism and of the various steps that led to the development of bioelectricity and electro technique are summarized. Alterations observed in individuals working for long periods of time in contact with artificial EMF are described as well as the correlation between natural EMF and accidentality. The utilization of EMF for therapeutic purposes ...

  10. A Role for Bioelectric Effects in the Induction of Bystander Signals by Ionizing Radiation?

    OpenAIRE

    Mothersill, C; Moran, G; McNeill, F.; Gow, M.D.; Denbeigh, J.; Prestwich, W.; Seymour, C. B.

    2007-01-01

    The induction of “bystander effects” i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary expla...

  11. Feasibility study of the application of biotechnology to nuclear waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of biotechnology areas applicable to the removal of radionuclides from industrial nuclear effluents were considered, namely: use of Biopolymers; Biosorption using biomass; microbial leaching and solubilisation of metal ions. The potential of biomagnetic separation technology, genetic engineering and monoclonal antibody technology was also examined. It appeared that the most appropriate technologies to develop for radionuclide removal in the short term were based on biosorptions of radionuclides by biomass and modified and unmodified biopolymers. (author)

  12. Elimination of flux-transformer crosstalk in multichannel SQUID magnetometers

    OpenAIRE

    Brake, ter, O.; Fleuren, F.H.; Ulfman, J.A.; Flokstra, J.

    1986-01-01

    Multichannel SQUID magnetometers are being developed for signal-field mapping in biomagnetic experiments. A problem that becomes more serious as the number of channels is increased is the crosstalk caused by the mutual inductances between the individual sensing coils. A simple and effective method for eliminating this crosstalk is presented in this Paper. The method is based on a rearrangement of the feedback loops which causes the flux-transformer circuits to become currentless. The feasibil...

  13. Elimination of flux-transformer crosstalk in multichannel SQUID magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Brake, H. J. M.; Fleuren, F. H.; Ulfrnan, J. A.; Flokstra, J.

    Multichannel SQUID magnetometers are being developed for signal-field mapping in biomagnetic experiments. A problem that becomes more serious as the number of channels is increased is the crosstalk caused by the mutual inductances between the individual sensing coils. A simple and effective method for eliminating this crosstalk is presented in this Paper. The method is based on a rearrangement of the feedback loops which causes the flux-transformer circuits to become currentless. The feasibility of the method is verified experimentally.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in entomology: a critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, A.G.; Bowtell, R W; Köckenberger, W; Wenseleers, T.; Ratnieks, F.L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables in vivo imaging of organisms. The recent development of the magnetic resonance microscope (MRM) has enabled organisms within the size range of many insects to be imaged. Here, we introduce the principles of MRI and MRM and review their use in entomology. We show that MRM has been successfully applied in studies of parasitology, development, metabolism, biomagnetism and morphology, and the advantages and disadvantages relative to other imaging technique...

  15. Biomedical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Andersen, Ole Trier; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik;

    1998-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of the biomedical engineering research and education at the Technical University of Denmark. An account of the research activities since the 1950?s is given, and examples of major efforts within ultrasound, biomagnetism, and neuroimaging are described. The evolution...... of the teaching activities since the late 1960?s along with an account of the recent initiatives to make a biomedical engineering profile at the university is described....

  16. Application of HTS technology to cardiac dysrhythmia detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobel, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Avrin, W.F. [Quantum Magnetics, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual design considerations and challenges for development of a contactless, mobile, single channel biomagnetic sensor system based on High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) and employing the Three-SQUID Gradiometer (TSG) concept. Operating in magnetically unshielded environments, as are encountered in many medical scenarios, this instrument class would monitor cardiac electrical activity with minimal patient preparation and intrusiveness, and would notionally be coupled with a clinically adaptive human-system interface (HSI).

  17. Highly Automated Dipole EStimation (HADES)

    OpenAIRE

    Campi, C.; Pascarella, A.; Sorrentino, A.; M. Piana

    2011-01-01

    Automatic estimation of current dipoles from biomagnetic data is still a problematic task. This is due not only to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem but also to two intrinsic difficulties introduced by the dipolar model: the unknown number of sources and the nonlinear relationship between the source locations and the data. Recently, we have developed a new Bayesian approach, particle filtering, based on dynamical tracking of the dipole constellation. Contrary to many ...

  18. On the temporal variation of leaf magnetic parameters: seasonal accumulation of leaf-deposited and leaf-encapsulated particles of a roadside tree crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Jelle; Wuyts, Karen; Van Wittenberghe, Shari; Samson, Roeland

    2014-09-15

    Understanding the accumulation behaviour of atmospheric particles inside tree leaves is of great importance for the interpretation of biomagnetic monitoring results. In this study, we evaluated the temporal variation of the saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM) of leaves of a roadside urban Platanus × acerifolia Willd. tree in Antwerp, Belgium. We hereby examined the seasonal development of the total leaf SIRM signal as well as the leaf-encapsulated fraction of the deposited dust, by washing the leaves before biomagnetic analysis. On average 38% of the leaf SIRM signal was exhibited by the leaf-encapsulated particles. Significant correlations were found between the SIRM and the cumulative daily average atmospheric PM10 and PM2.5 measurements. Moreover, a steady increase of the SIRM throughout the in-leaf season was observed endorsing the applicability of biomagnetic monitoring as a proxy for the time-integrated PM exposure of urban tree leaves. Strongest correlations were obtained for the SIRM of the leaf-encapsulated particles which confirms the dynamic nature of the leaf surface-accumulated particles.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomedical and health effects research conducted at PNL in 1982 on the evaluation of risk to man from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies are described. Most of the studies described in this report relate to activities for three major energy technologies: nuclear fuel cycle; fossil fuel cycle (oil, gas, and coal process technologies, mining, and utilization; synfuel development), and fudion (biomagnetic effects). The report is organized under these technologies. In addition, research reports are included on the application of nuclear energy to biomedical problems. Individual projects are indexed separately

  20. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1. Biomedical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drucker, H.

    1983-02-01

    Biomedical and health effects research conducted at PNL in 1982 on the evaluation of risk to man from existing and/or developing energy-related technologies are described. Most of the studies described in this report relate to activities for three major energy technologies: nuclear fuel cycle; fossil fuel cycle (oil, gas, and coal process technologies, mining, and utilization; synfuel development), and fudion (biomagnetic effects). The report is organized under these technologies. In addition, research reports are included on the application of nuclear energy to biomedical problems. Individual projects are indexed separately.

  1. A second-order planar gradiometer composed of concentric superconductive loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, S.; Isobe, Y.; Mizutani, Y.

    1987-01-01

    A planar gradiometer composed of three concentric superconductive loops is analyzed. The gradiometer performs the second derivative with a rotational symmetry in a form of ∂2Bz/∂r2, where r2=x2+y2. In response to the biomagnetic field generated by a current dipole, an isoflux line distribution which resembles well the magnetic field distribution is obtained. The location and the strength of the current-dipole source can readily be estimated from the isoflux pattern. Reduction of the magnetic field noise from distant sources with respect to the signal of a near source is calculated to be comparable with that of conventional axial gradiometers.

  2. Integration of a Cryocooler into a SQUID Magnetospinography System for Reduction of Liquid Helium Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Ogata, Hisanao; Uehara, Gen

    We are currently developing a magnetospinography (MSG) system for noninvasive functional imaging of the spinal cord. The MSG system is a device for observing a weak magnetic field accompanied by the neural activity of the spinal cord by using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic flux sensors. As in the case of other biomagnetic measurement systems such as the magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, the running cost of the MSG system is mainly dependent on the liquid helium (LHe) consumption of a dewar vessel. We integrated a cryocooler into the MSG system to reduce LHe consumption. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cooling power of 0.5Wat 4 K was placed adjacent to a magnetically shielded room and was directly connected to the thermal radiation shield of the dewar by an electrically isolated transfer tube. Cold helium gas was circulated between the cryocooler and the radiation shield. Consequently, the temperature of the radiation shield decreased below 40 K. Previous studies have shown that the detection of a weak magnetic field is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, the band of the MSG signals is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. Therefore, the noise can be filtered out and has a less detrimental effect on MSG measurement than on other biomagnetic field measurements such as MEG measurement. As a result, LHe consumption was reduced by 46%, with no increase in the noise floor.

  3. A Room Temperature Ultrasensitive Magnetoelectric Susceptometer for Quantitative Tissue Iron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hao; Qian, Xiaoshi; Lu, Meng-Chien; Mei, Lei; Rupprecht, Sebastian; Yang, Qing X.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a trace mineral that plays a vital role in the human body. However, absorbing and accumulating excessive iron in body organs (iron overload) can damage or even destroy an organ. Even after many decades of research, progress on the development of noninvasive and low-cost tissue iron detection methods is very limited. Here we report a recent advance in a room-temperature ultrasensitive biomagnetic susceptometer for quantitative tissue iron detection. The biomagnetic susceptometer exploits recent advances in the magnetoelectric (ME) composite sensors that exhibit an ultrahigh AC magnetic sensitivity under the presence of a strong DC magnetic field. The first order gradiometer based on piezoelectric and magnetostrictive laminate (ME composite) structure shows an equivalent magnetic noise of 0.99 nT/rt Hz at 1 Hz in the presence of a DC magnetic field of 0.1 Tesla and a great common mode noise rejection ability. A prototype magnetoelectric liver susceptometry has been demonstrated with liver phantoms. The results indicate its output signals to be linearly responsive to iron concentrations from normal iron dose (0.05 mg Fe/g liver phantom) to 5 mg Fe/g liver phantom iron overload (100X overdose). The results here open up many innovative possibilities for compact-size, portable, cost-affordable, and room-temperature operated medical systems for quantitative determinations of tissue iron. PMID:27465206

  4. Influence of compression forces on tablets disintegration by AC Biosusceptometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corá, Luciana A; Fonseca, Paulo R; Américo, Madileine F; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Baffa, Oswaldo; Miranda, José Ricardo A

    2008-05-01

    Analysis of physical phenomena that occurs during tablet disintegration has been studied by several experimental approaches; however none of them satisfactorily describe this process. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of compression force on the tablets by associating the AC Biosusceptometry with consolidated methods in order to validate the biomagnetic technique as a tool for quality control in pharmaceutical processes. Tablets obtained at five compression levels were submitted to mechanical properties tests. For uncoated tablets, water uptake and disintegration force measurements were performed in order to compare with magnetic data. For coated tablets, magnetic measurements were carried out to establish a relationship between physical parameters of the disintegration process. According to the results, differences between the compression levels were found for water uptake, force development and magnetic area variation measurements. ACB method was able to estimate the disintegration properties as well as the kinetics of disintegration process for uncoated and coated tablets. This study provided a new approach for in vitro investigation and validated this biomagnetic technique as a tool for quality control for pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, using ACB will also be possible to test these parameters in humans allowing to establish an in vitro/in vivo correlation (IVIVC). PMID:18164605

  5. A Room Temperature Ultrasensitive Magnetoelectric Susceptometer for Quantitative Tissue Iron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hao; Qian, Xiaoshi; Lu, Meng-Chien; Mei, Lei; Rupprecht, Sebastian; Yang, Qing X.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-07-01

    Iron is a trace mineral that plays a vital role in the human body. However, absorbing and accumulating excessive iron in body organs (iron overload) can damage or even destroy an organ. Even after many decades of research, progress on the development of noninvasive and low-cost tissue iron detection methods is very limited. Here we report a recent advance in a room-temperature ultrasensitive biomagnetic susceptometer for quantitative tissue iron detection. The biomagnetic susceptometer exploits recent advances in the magnetoelectric (ME) composite sensors that exhibit an ultrahigh AC magnetic sensitivity under the presence of a strong DC magnetic field. The first order gradiometer based on piezoelectric and magnetostrictive laminate (ME composite) structure shows an equivalent magnetic noise of 0.99 nT/rt Hz at 1 Hz in the presence of a DC magnetic field of 0.1 Tesla and a great common mode noise rejection ability. A prototype magnetoelectric liver susceptometry has been demonstrated with liver phantoms. The results indicate its output signals to be linearly responsive to iron concentrations from normal iron dose (0.05 mg Fe/g liver phantom) to 5 mg Fe/g liver phantom iron overload (100X overdose). The results here open up many innovative possibilities for compact-size, portable, cost-affordable, and room-temperature operated medical systems for quantitative determinations of tissue iron.

  6. A blood-oxygenation-dependent increase in blood viscosity due to a static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toru; Nagayama, Yuki; Tamura, Mamoru

    2004-07-21

    As the magnetic field of widely used MR scanners is one of the strongest magnetic fields to which people are exposed, the biological influence of the static magnetic field of MR scanners is of great concern. One magnetic interaction in biological subjects is the magnetic torque on the magnetic moment induced by biomagnetic substances. The red blood cell is a major biomagnetic substance, and the blood flow may be influenced by the magnetic field. However, the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. To examine the mechanisms of the magnetic influence on blood viscosity, we measured the time for blood to fall through a glass capillary inside and outside a 1.5 T MR scanner. Our in vitro results showed that the blood viscosity significantly increased in a 1.5 T MR scanner, and also clarified the mechanism of the interaction between red blood cells and the external magnetic field. Notably, the blood viscosity increased depending on blood oxygenation and the shear rate of the blood flow. Thus, our findings suggest that even a 1.5 T magnetic field may modulate blood flow.

  7. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M.J., E-mail: jashim_74@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, American International University-Bangladesh, Banani Dhaka 1213 (Bangladesh); Bég, O. Anwar [Gort Engovation Research (Propulsion/Biomechanics), Gabriel' s Wing House, 15 Southmere Ave., Bradford, BD7 3NU England (United Kingdom); Amin, N. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-11-15

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices. - Highlights: • This paper analyses MHD slip flow of nofluid with convective boundary conditions. • Group method is used to transform governing equations into similarity equations. • The Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method is used for numerical computations. • The study is relevant to synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids.

  8. Symmetry-Breaking Zeeman-Coherence Parametric Wave Mixing Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Feng; Hagley, E W; Deng, L

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear magneto-optical effect has significantly impacted modern society with prolific applications ranging from precision mapping of the Earth's magnetic field to bio-magnetic sensing. Pioneering works on collisional spin-exchange effects have led to ultra-high magnetic field detection sensitivities at the level of $fT/\\sqrt{Hz}$ using a single linearly-polarized probe light field. Here we demonstrate a nonlinear Zeeman-coherence parametric wave-mixing optical-atomic magnetometer using room temperature rubidium vapor that results in more than a three-order-of-magnitude optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement for extremely weak magnetic field sensing. This unprecedented enhancement was achieved with nearly a two-order-of-magnitude reduction in laser power while preserving the sensitivity of the widely-used single-probe beam optical-atomic magnetometry method. This new method opens a myriad of applications ranging from bio-magnetic imaging to precision measurement of the magnetic properties of su...

  9. A Room Temperature Ultrasensitive Magnetoelectric Susceptometer for Quantitative Tissue Iron Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hao; Qian, Xiaoshi; Lu, Meng-Chien; Mei, Lei; Rupprecht, Sebastian; Yang, Qing X; Zhang, Q M

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a trace mineral that plays a vital role in the human body. However, absorbing and accumulating excessive iron in body organs (iron overload) can damage or even destroy an organ. Even after many decades of research, progress on the development of noninvasive and low-cost tissue iron detection methods is very limited. Here we report a recent advance in a room-temperature ultrasensitive biomagnetic susceptometer for quantitative tissue iron detection. The biomagnetic susceptometer exploits recent advances in the magnetoelectric (ME) composite sensors that exhibit an ultrahigh AC magnetic sensitivity under the presence of a strong DC magnetic field. The first order gradiometer based on piezoelectric and magnetostrictive laminate (ME composite) structure shows an equivalent magnetic noise of 0.99 nT/rt Hz at 1 Hz in the presence of a DC magnetic field of 0.1 Tesla and a great common mode noise rejection ability. A prototype magnetoelectric liver susceptometry has been demonstrated with liver phantoms. The results indicate its output signals to be linearly responsive to iron concentrations from normal iron dose (0.05 mg Fe/g liver phantom) to 5 mg Fe/g liver phantom iron overload (100X overdose). The results here open up many innovative possibilities for compact-size, portable, cost-affordable, and room-temperature operated medical systems for quantitative determinations of tissue iron. PMID:27465206

  10. Applied superconductivity handbook on devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This wide-ranging presentation of applied superconductivity, from fundamentals and materials right up to the latest applications, is an essential reference for physicists and engineers in academic research as well as in the field. Readers looking for a systematic overview on superconducting materials will expand their knowledge and understanding of both low and high Tc superconductors, including organic and magnetic materials. Technology, preparation and characterization are covered for several geometries, but the main benefit of this work lies in its broad coverage of significant applications in power engineering or passive devices, such as filter and antenna or magnetic shields. The reader will also find information on superconducting magnets for diverse applications in mechanical engineering, particle physics, fusion research, medicine and biomagnetism, as well as materials processing. SQUIDS and their usage in medicine or geophysics are thoroughly covered as are applications in quantum metrology, and, las...

  11. Mathematical Methods in Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Alfred; Natterer, Frank

    1991-01-01

    The conference was devoted to the discussion of present and future techniques in medical imaging, including 3D x-ray CT, ultrasound and diffraction tomography, and biomagnetic ima- ging. The mathematical models, their theoretical aspects and the development of algorithms were treated. The proceedings contains surveys on reconstruction in inverse obstacle scat- tering, inversion in 3D, and constrained least squares pro- blems.Research papers include besides the mentioned imaging techniques presentations on image reconstruction in Hilbert spaces, singular value decompositions, 3D cone beam recon- struction, diffuse tomography, regularization of ill-posed problems, evaluation reconstruction algorithms and applica- tions in non-medical fields. Contents: Theoretical Aspects: J.Boman: Helgason' s support theorem for Radon transforms-a newproof and a generalization -P.Maass: Singular value de- compositions for Radon transforms- W.R.Madych: Image recon- struction in Hilbert space -R.G.Mukhometov: A problem of in- teg...

  12. Kinetic inductance magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luomahaara, Juho; Vesterinen, Visa; Grönberg, Leif; Hassel, Juha

    2014-09-10

    Sensing ultra-low magnetic fields has various applications in the fields of science, medicine and industry. There is a growing need for a sensor that can be operated in ambient environments where magnetic shielding is limited or magnetic field manipulation is involved. To this end, here we demonstrate a new magnetometer with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The device is based on the current nonlinearity of superconducting material stemming from kinetic inductance. A further benefit of our approach is of extreme simplicity: the device is fabricated from a single layer of niobium nitride. Moreover, radio frequency multiplexing techniques can be applied, enabling the simultaneous readout of multiple sensors, for example, in biomagnetic measurements requiring data from large sensor arrays.

  13. Solid Test Meal to Measure the Gastric Emptying with Magnetogastrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gastric emptying is the time of evacuating the food ingested from the stomach to the duodenum in a controlled rate. Diverse studies express the results of the gastric emptying in form of half-time (t1/2). The Magnetogastrography (MGG) is a biomagnetic technique that has the advantage of not being invasive, radiation free and does not interfere with the privacy of the subject. The objective was to analyze the magnetic signal of magnetic tracers mixed in a solid food to measure gastric emptying using Magnetogastrography. The ingested test meal displayed a magnetic signal, which served to obtain the signal registered by the fluxgate and the peristaltic contractions could be calculated while the stomach was emptying. The solid food product developed results to work satisfactorily in magnetogastrography

  14. Fabrication and characterization of a MEMS nano-Tesla ferromagnetic-piezoelectric magnetic sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Peng; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Bidthanapally, Rao; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei

    2016-06-01

    A self-biased MEMS magnetic sensor array with ferromagnetic-piezoelectric composites has been fabricated and characterized. The array with two Quartz-Nickel-Metglas cantilevers with nano-tesla sensitivity was fabricated by MEMS processes including silicon-quartz low temperature bonding, quartz wafer thinning, and electroplating of thick nickel thin films. Under self-biasing due to magnetization grading of ferromagnetic layer, magnetoelectric coefficients of 6.6 and 5.6 V/cm Oe and resolutions of ˜0.58 and ˜0.75 nT are obtained at the mechanical resonant frequencies of 191.5 and 184.8 Hz for the two sensors in the array, respectively. Such arrays have the potential for applications in biomagnetic imaging technologies including magneto-cardiography.

  15. Frontiers in European radiology 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of the eight contributions to this volume, the last two have been analysed for the data base. The articles deal with 'Progress in Biomagnetic Imaging of heat arrhythmias', 'Selective Endovascular Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms by means of Latex Balloons Filled with a Polymerizing Substance', 'Self-Expandable Endoprotheses as an Adjunct to Balloon Angioplasty in the Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Lesions', 'Laser-Induced Shock Wave Angioplasty: Discrimination between Calcified and Other Plaque Material Before Generation of Laser-Induced Shock Waves', 'Contrast Agents in Clinical Angiography - Relevance to Thromboembolic Phenomena', 'Sodium and Oxygen Addition to Nonionic Contrast Media Effects on Contractile Force and Risk of Ventricular Fibrillation in the Isolated Rabbit Heart', 'Clinical Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - The Present State' and 'Image Contour Spread in Computed Tomography'. (UWA). 49 figs., 9 tabs

  16. Yves Rocard or the last of the Mohicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes a biography of Yves Rocard, the man at the origin of the development of physics in France after the Second World War, and also often considered as the father of the French atomic bomb. He briefly recalls his youth, his studies in the Ecole Normale Superieure (ENS), his works dealing with automotive construction and with applied electronics, his activities in the French Resistance during the war, his role at the head of the ENS Physics Laboratory, his works in the field of ionosphere predictions, radio-astronomy, and development of the first linear accelerator. As far as the French nuclear bomb is concerned, his role is still a matter of debate. He worked on explosion detection, and initiated the creation of a CEA department dedicated to military applications, but was not really involved in the activities of this department. His last works addressed geophysics and bio-magnetism

  17. Effects of sensor calibration, balancing and parametrization on the signal space separation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurminen, J [BioMag laboratory, Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa HUSLAB, Helsinki University Central Hospital, PL 340, FI-00029 HUS (Finland); Taulu, S [Elekta Neuromag Oy, Helsinki, FI-00510 (Finland); Okada, Y [Biomedical Research and Integrative NeuroImaging (BRaIN Imaging) Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: jussi@biomag.hus.fi

    2008-04-07

    Signal space separation (SSS) is a novel method for processing multichannel biomagnetic data. It is useful for a variety of applications including interference suppression, movement compensation and conversion of measurements between sensor arrays. The performance of SSS has been examined mainly on a 306-channel whole-head magnetoencephalography system. To facilitate the adaptation of the method to other biomagnetometer systems, the effect of various properties of the sensor array on its performance needs to be studied. To this end, we examined the effects of gradiometer imbalance, sensor calibration errors and erroneous sensor geometry information on SSS using simulations. The results indicate that depending on the application, gradiometer balance on the level of 0.1% to 0.5% may be needed for satisfactory SSS performance. For wire-wound gradiometers, this requires very careful attention in manufacturing. Errors in calibration coefficients and geometry information were found to have less significance.

  18. Multi-Channel Magnetocardiogardiography System Based on Low-Tc SQUIDs in an Unshielded Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangyan; Zhang, Shulin; Wang, Yongliang; Zeng, Jia; Xie, Xiaoming

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is a new medical diagnostic tool measuring biomagnetic signals that are generated by the electrical activity of the human heart. This technique is completely passive, contactless, and it has an advantage in the early diagnosis of heart diseases. We developed the first unshielded four-channel MCG system based on low-Tc DC SQUIDs in China. Instead of using a costly magnetically shielded room, the environmental noise suppression was realized by using second-order gradiometers and three-axis reference magnetometer. The measured magnetic field resolution of the system is better than 1 pT, and multi-cycle human heart signals can be recorded directly. Also, with the infrared positioning system, 48 points data collection can be realized by moving the non-magnetic bed nine times.

  19. DC-SQUID with enhanced magnetic field sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When designing a thinfilm DC-SQUID for insertion into a multichannel sensor circuit for biomagnetic applications, a minimum number of fabrication steps (e.g. mask layers) and simple thinfilm patterns are desirable. For measurements in a well shielded environment like the Berlin magnetically shielded room /1/ this requirement is met advantageously when flux transformers are omitted and the SQUID-loops themselves serve as magnetometer pick-up coils. In this case the DC-SQUIDs are designed for optimized magnetic field sensitivity instead of flux response. In this paper a single layer all-Nb thinfilm design that displays I-V- characteristics without resonant structures and the merits of a resistively shunted double loop circuit are presented

  20. Progress in high Tc magnetic sensors and their applications. [Y-Ba-Cu-O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, G.B.; Bowman, R.M.; Cochran, A.; Kirk, K.J.; Pegrum, C.M. (Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics, Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom)); Macfarlane, J.C. (Div. of Applied Physics, CSIRO, Lindfield (Australia))

    1992-01-01

    We report recent progress on the development of components needed for high T[sub c] SQUID magnetic sensors, and on some of the early applications which are appearing or can be foreseen. The SNS type edge junction, and the step edge and biepitaxial grain boundary junction technologies are considered and we include details of our own YBCO device based on steps which are Ar ion-milled in MgO substrates. A review of applications prospects for these detectors will be given in the light of the available noise performance which for high T[sub c] DC SQUIDs, at much less than 10[sup -4] [Phi][sub 0] Hz[sup -1/2], is now better than for commercial low T[sub c] RF SQUIDs. Illustrations are given from clinical biomagnetism and from non-destructive evaluation of conducting materials.

  1. Neuromagnetic recordings of the human peripheral nerve with planar SQUID gradiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, G.; Maas, P.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Shahani, U.; Weir, A.I. [Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF (United Kingdom)

    1998-08-01

    Magnetic fields produced by a travelling volley in the human ulnar nerve have been successfully measured in a lightly shielded environment. Recordings of the tangential component of the magnetic field were made using a planar second-order gradiometer integrated with a first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Devices were fabricated in our clean-room facility at the University of Strathclyde and measurements taken in an eddy-current shielded room at the Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit. We use no additional shielding and no electronic differencing or field-nulling techniques. Evoked magnetic fields of 60 fT peak-to-peak were obtained after 1536 averages but they could be seen easily as early as 512 averages. Measurements were made over four points above the ulnar nerve on the upper arm and from these the conduction velocity was calculated as 60 m s{sup -1}. (author)

  2. Solid Test Meal to Measure the Gastric Emptying with Magnetogastrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaga-Ornelas, M. G.; De la Roca-Chiapas, J. M.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Bernal, J. J.; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    The gastric emptying is the time of evacuating the food ingested from the stomach to the duodenum in a controlled rate. Diverse studies express the results of the gastric emptying in form of half-time (t1/2). The Magnetogastrography (MGG) is a biomagnetic technique that has the advantage of not being invasive, radiation free and does not interfere with the privacy of the subject. The objective was to analyze the magnetic signal of magnetic tracers mixed in a solid food to measure gastric emptying using Magnetogastrography. The ingested test meal displayed a magnetic signal, which served to obtain the signal registered by the fluxgate and the peristaltic contractions could be calculated while the stomach was emptying. The solid food product developed results to work satisfactorily in magnetogastrography.

  3. Highly Automated Dipole EStimation (HADES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, C; Pascarella, A; Sorrentino, A; Piana, M

    2011-01-01

    Automatic estimation of current dipoles from biomagnetic data is still a problematic task. This is due not only to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem but also to two intrinsic difficulties introduced by the dipolar model: the unknown number of sources and the nonlinear relationship between the source locations and the data. Recently, we have developed a new Bayesian approach, particle filtering, based on dynamical tracking of the dipole constellation. Contrary to many dipole-based methods, particle filtering does not assume stationarity of the source configuration: the number of dipoles and their positions are estimated and updated dynamically during the course of the MEG sequence. We have now developed a Matlab-based graphical user interface, which allows nonexpert users to do automatic dipole estimation from MEG data with particle filtering. In the present paper, we describe the main features of the software and show the analysis of both a synthetic data set and an experimental dataset. PMID:21437232

  4. The development of a multichannel atomic magnetometer array for fetal magnetocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Robert, IV

    Biomagnetic signals can provide important information about electrical processes in the human body. Because of the small signal sizes, magnetic detection is generally used where other detection methods are incomplete or insufficiently sensitive. One important example is fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG), where the detection of magnetic signals is currently the only available technique for certain clinical applications, such as the detection of cardiac arrhythmia. Until now, magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), which can operate at sensitivities down to 1 fT Hz-1/2 have been the only option. The low Tc superconductors and associated cryogenics required for the most sensitive devices has led to interest in alternative technologies. In the last decade, atomic magnetometers operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) regime have demonstrated a higher sensitivity than SQUIDs while operating near room temperature. Though large SERF magnetometer arrays have not yet been built, smaller arrays should be sufficient for applications such as fMCG. In this thesis, we present the design and characterization of a portable four-channel SERF atomic magnetometer array with a 5-10 fT Hz-1/2 single channel baseline sensitivity. The magnetometer array has several design features intended to maximize its suitability for biomagnetic measurement, specifically fMCG, such as a compact modular design and large, flexible channel spacing from 5-15 cm. The modular design allows for easily adding units to the array and the independent positioning and orientation of each magnetometer, in principle allowing for non-planar array geometries. Using this array in a magnetically shielded room, we acquire adult magnetocadiograms and, for the first time with a SERF magnetometer, fMCG. We also investigate the use of different operational modes of the magnetometer to extend its functionality, specifically modulation methods for additional directional

  5. Single-crystalline MFe(2)O(4) nanotubes/nanorings synthesized by thermal transformation process for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hai-Ming; Yi, Jia-Bao; Yang, Yi; Kho, Kiang-Wei; Tan, Hui-Ru; Shen, Ze-Xiang; Ding, Jun; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Olivo, Malini Carolene; Feng, Yuan-Ping

    2009-09-22

    We report a general thermal transformation approach to synthesize single-crystalline magnetic transition metal oxides nanotubes/nanorings including magnetite Fe(3)O(4), maghematite gamma-Fe(2)O(3), and ferrites MFe(2)O(4) (M = Co, Mn, Ni, Cu) using hematite alpha-Fe(2)O(3) nanotubes/nanorings template. While the straightforward reduction or reduction-oxides process was employed to produce Fe(3)O(4) and gamma-Fe(2)O(3), the alpha-Fe(2)O(3)/M(OH)(2) core/shell nanostructure was used as precursor to prepare MFe(2)O(4) nanotubes via MFe(2)O(4-x) (0 MFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals with tunable size, shape, and composition have exhibited unique magnetic properties. Moreover, they have been demonstrated as a highly effective peroxidase mimic catalysts for laboratory immunoassays or as a universal nanocapsules hybridized with luminescent QDs for magnetic separation and optical probe of lung cancer cells, suggesting that these biocompatible magnetic nanotubes/nanorings have great potential in biomedicine and biomagnetic applications.

  6. Water-soluble and biocompatible MnO@PVP nanoparticles for MR imaging in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Yuxuan; Wang, Mingliang; Miao, Fei; Ma, Hongmei; Shen, Hebai; Jia, Nengqin

    2013-06-01

    The uniform-sized manganese oxide nanoparticles (the oleic-capped MnO NPs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of Mn-oleate complex and were transferred into water with the help of cationic surfactant of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), then the poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) membrane was further coated on to them with the aid of anionic dispersant of poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) by layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly to render them water soluble and biocompatible. They were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and MTT assay. In vitro cellular uptake test revealed the MnO@PVP NPs were low cytotoxic, biocompatible and could be used as a T,-positive contrast agent for passive targeting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Interestingly, signal enhancement in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces in vivo experiment suggested that the MnO@PVP NPs can pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB). These results show that MnO@PVP NPs are good candidates as MRI contrast agents with the lack of cytotoxicity and have great potential applications in magnetic nano-device and biomagnetic field. PMID:23858961

  7. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M. J.; Bég, O. Anwar; Amin, N.

    2014-11-01

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices.

  8. A study of unsteady physiological magneto-fluid flow and heat transfer through a finite length channel by peristaltic pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O Anwar

    2012-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic peristaltic flows arise in controlled magnetic drug targeting, hybrid haemodynamic pumps and biomagnetic phenomena interacting with the human digestive system. Motivated by the objective of improving an understanding of the complex fluid dynamics in such flows, we consider in the present article the transient magneto-fluid flow and heat transfer through a finite length channel by peristaltic pumping. Reynolds number is small enough and the wavelength to diameter ratio is large enough to negate inertial effects. Analytical solutions for temperature field, axial velocity, transverse velocity, pressure gradient, local wall shear stress, volume flowrate and averaged volume flowrate are obtained. The effects of the transverse magnetic field, Grashof number and thermal conductivity on the flow patterns induced by peristaltic waves (sinusoidal propagation along the length of channel) are studied using graphical plots. The present study identifies that greater pressure is required to propel the magneto-fluid by peristaltic pumping in comparison to a non-conducting Newtonian fluid, whereas, a lower pressure is required if heat transfer is effective. The analytical solutions further provide an important benchmark for future numerical simulations. PMID:23057236

  9. Enhancing the versatility of alternate current biosusceptometry (ACB) through the synthesis of a dextrose-modified tracer and a magnetic muco-adhesive cellulose gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Murillo L., E-mail: murillolongo@gmail.com [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista, CP 510, 18618–970 Botucatu SP (Brazil); Calabresi, Marcos F.; Quini, Caio; Matos, Juliana F.; Miranda, José R.A.; Saeki, Margarida J. [Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista, CP 510, 18618–970 Botucatu SP (Brazil); Bordallo, Heloisa N. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-03-01

    Alternate Current Biosusceptometry (ACB) is a promising bio-magnetic method, radiation free and easily performed used for gastric emptying exams. Due to development on its sensitivity level, interesting nature, noninvasiveness and low cost it has attracted a lot of attention. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles of Mn–Zn ferrite as well as dextrose-modified nanoparticles were synthesized to be used as possible tracers in ACB gastric emptying exams. In addition, a magnetic muco-adhesive gel was obtained by modifying the ferrite nanoparticles with cellulose. Based on in-vivo tests in rats, we show that the pure ferrite nanoparticles, whose isoelectric point was found to be at pH = 3.2, present a great sensitivity to pH variations along the gastrointestinal tract, while the reduction of the isoelectric point by the dextrose modification leads to suitable nanoparticles for rapid gastric emptying examinations. On the other hand, the in-vivo tests show that the muco-adhesive cellulose gel presents substantial stomach adhesion and is a potential drug delivery system easily traceable by the ACB system.

  10. A protocol for variable-resolution first-order reversal curve (FORC) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, David; Zhao, Xiang; Roberts, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams are being increasingly used in rock and environmental magnetism, including for detection of biomagnetic signals in sediments. Resolution can be a major barrier to obtaining high-quality FORC diagrams and timeconsuming measurements that employ small field steps are necessary to resolve the finest features of a FORC distribution. We present a new experimental protocol with irregularly spaced field steps that allow different parts of a FORC diagram to be measured at different resolutions. Larger numbers of measurements can, therefore, be made in key regions of a FORC distribution to resolve diagnostic features at higher resolution. Specification of the field steps in the irregular measurement grid is based on major hysteresis properties; no a priori knowledge concerning the underlying FORC distribution is required. FORC diagrams obtained with conventional measurements and with our new measurement protocol give consistent results. Because of its variable resolution, the irregular protocol provides a clear representation of finescale features produced by quasi-reversible superparamagnetic and non-interacting singledomain particles. Although the proposed irregular measurement protocol is not as efficient at suppressing noise as recently developed post-processing techniques (e.g., VARIFORC, Egli [2013]), it enables efficient high-resolution analysis for relatively strongly magnetized samples where measurement noise is not detrimental to FORC distribution estimation.

  11. Magnetic nanostructures for the manipulation of individual nanoscale particles in liquid environments (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavassori, P.; Gobbi, M.; Donolato, M.; Cantoni, M.; Bertacco, R.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.

    2010-05-01

    The manipulation of geometrically constrained magnetic domain walls (DWs) in nanoscale magnetic strips attracted much interest recently, with proposals for prospective memory and logic devices. Here we demonstrate that the high controllability of the motion of geometrically constrained DWs allows for the manipulation of individual nanoparticles in solution on a chip with the active control of position at the nanometer scale. Our approach exploits the fact that magnetic nanoparticles in suspension can be captured by a DW, whose position can be manipulated with nanometer scale accuracy in specifically designed magnetic nanowire structures. We hereby show that the precise control over DW nucleation, displacement, and annihilation processes in such nanostructures allows for the capture, transport, and release of magnetic nanoparticles. As magnetic nanoparticles with functionalized surfaces are widely used as molecule carriers or labels for single molecule studies, cell manipulation, and biomagnetic sensing, the accurate control over the handling of the single magnetic nanoparticle in suspension is a crucial building block for several applications in biotechnology, nanochemistry, and nanomedicine.

  12. Spinal cord evoked magnetic field measurement using a magnetospinography system equipped with a cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Kawabata, Shigenori; Uehara, Gen

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a magnetospinography (MSG) system that detects weak magnetic fields associated with spinal cord neural activity using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based magnetic flux sensors. A functional image of the spinal cord can be obtained noninvasively by using this system, and it is effective for precise lesion localization in the diagnosis of spinal cord diseases. The running cost of the developed MSG system mainly depends on liquid helium (LHe) consumption, which is required to maintain the superconducting state of the SQUID sensors. To reduce the LHe consumption, we incorporate a pulse-tube-refrigerator-based cryocooler into the MSG system. Cold gaseous helium is circulated between the cryocooler and the MSG system for cooling the thermal radiation shield of the dewar vessel. Consequently, we achieved a 46% decrease in the LHe consumption rate. Conventional biomagnetic field detection such as magnetoencephalography is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, in the case of MSG measurements, such noise can be filtered out because the band of the signal is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. We demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio of the cervical spinal cord evoked magnetic field measurement performed with a working cryocooler is comparable to that of the measurement without a cryocooler.

  13. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain); Azanza, María J., E-mail: mjazanza@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B{sub 0}≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f{sub M}=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons.

  14. A study of unsteady physiological magneto-fluid flow and heat transfer through a finite length channel by peristaltic pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O Anwar

    2012-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic peristaltic flows arise in controlled magnetic drug targeting, hybrid haemodynamic pumps and biomagnetic phenomena interacting with the human digestive system. Motivated by the objective of improving an understanding of the complex fluid dynamics in such flows, we consider in the present article the transient magneto-fluid flow and heat transfer through a finite length channel by peristaltic pumping. Reynolds number is small enough and the wavelength to diameter ratio is large enough to negate inertial effects. Analytical solutions for temperature field, axial velocity, transverse velocity, pressure gradient, local wall shear stress, volume flowrate and averaged volume flowrate are obtained. The effects of the transverse magnetic field, Grashof number and thermal conductivity on the flow patterns induced by peristaltic waves (sinusoidal propagation along the length of channel) are studied using graphical plots. The present study identifies that greater pressure is required to propel the magneto-fluid by peristaltic pumping in comparison to a non-conducting Newtonian fluid, whereas, a lower pressure is required if heat transfer is effective. The analytical solutions further provide an important benchmark for future numerical simulations.

  15. Imaging Ferromagnetic Tracers with a Magnetoresistive Sensors Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Juan A.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Murta, Luís O.; Baffa, O.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility to obtain images from a distribution of ferromagnetic tracers using a magnetoresistive multichannel sensor array (MRA). A magnetic imaging system formed by a linear array composed of 12 magnetoresistive sensors (Honeywell HMC 1001) was constructed covering a scanning area of (16×18) cm2. The signal was pre-processed for off-set correction and interpolation to generate a matrix of (256×256). The point spread function of the MRA was evaluated and the sensors were spaced accordingly. The magnetic images were generated by mapping the response of the MRA at short distances from the presence of a magnetite powder dispersed in planar phantoms with different shapes. The phantoms were magnetized by a pulse field of approximately 80 mT produced by a Helmholtz coil. Using the Wiener filtering, the magnetic source images were obtained. We conclude that this biomagnetic method can be successfully used to generate planar functional images of the gastrointestinal tract using magnetic markers in the near field.

  16. Miniaturized superconducting quantum interference magnetometers for high sensitivity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Russo, M.

    2007-09-01

    A miniaturized niobium based dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer for high magnetic field sensitivity applications has been developed. The sensing coil consists of an integrated square superconducting coil with a length of 3mm, involving a device area much smaller with respect to the standard SQUID magnetometers with a comparable magnetic field sensitivity; so it allows increasing the spatial resolution keeping the magnetic field sensitivity unaltered. Furthermore, a small pickup coil minimizes its antenna gain, reducing the radio frequency interference. At T =4.2K, the sensors have shown smooth and resonance free V-Φ characteristics and an intrinsic white magnetic field noise spectral density as low as 5.8fT /Hz1/2, measured in flux locked loop configuration. The good agreement with the theoretical predictions guarantees the reliability and the controllability of the sensors. Due to their compactness and good characteristic parameters, such sensors are suitable for large multichannel systems used in biomagnetic imaging.

  17. Superconducting Quantum Interference Magnetometer for Large Multichannel Systems with Low Crosstalk Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A.; Granata, C.; Ruggiero, B.; Russo, M.

    Magnetometers based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) are widely employed in high sensitivity magnetometry. In particular, new multichannel systems for biomagnetic applications require many sensors which are very close to each other giving the crosstalk disturbance between the neighboring channel. Here, we present experimental results about a fully integrated dc-SQUID magnetometer, based on niobium technology, having a suitable design which allows to reduce crosstalk due to both the feedback coil and wires. The crosstalk level measurements relative to a particular arrangement of sensors are reported. In such configuration, four magnetometers are placed over a square board 30 mm in side with a distance between their sensor centers of 14 mm. The measurements have been performed in a 4He cryostat at T = 4.2 K in a flux-locked loop configuration using a readout electronics with a direct coupled scheme. The experimental data have shown a substantial reduction of crosstalk among neighboring sensors with respect to a traditional feedback coil. Furthermore, the field noise measurements have ensured that the new pickup and feedback coils design does not introduce any noise level degradation.

  18. Noise in small magnetic systems-applications to very sensitive magnetoresistive sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannetier, M. [CAPMAG/DRECAM, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: mpannetier@cea.fr; Fermon, C. [CAPMAG/DRECAM, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Le Goff, G. [CAPMAG/DRECAM, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Simola, J. [Elekta Neuromag Oy, P.O. Box 68, FIN-00511 Helsinki (Finland); Kerr, E. [SFI-Nanosciences Laboratory, Physics Department, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Coey, J.M.D. [SFI-Nanosciences Laboratory, Physics Department, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2005-04-15

    Reduction for 1/f noise (or random telegraph noise) is a crucial issue for small magnetic sensors which is strongly related to structural properties and magnetic configuration. We show how it is possible to eliminate magnetic noise at low frequency in GMR/TMR sensors by a combination of cross anisotropies, window frame shapes and suitably designed magnetoresisitive stack. These sensors are superior to almost all existing field and flux sensors. Results are presented on a mixed sensor, where a superconducting loop acts as a flux-to-field transformer to the GMR sensor. This device is suitable for detection of biomagnetic signals, such as in magnetocardiography or in magnetoencephalography. Measurements on niobium-based and YBCO-based sensors are presented, leading to sensitivity of 30 fT/{radical}Hz at 77 K for small samples. Sensitivity lower than 1 fT/{radical}(Hz) is expected with appropriate design and use of TMR or CMR layers, which makes these a powerful alternative to SQUIDs.

  19. The stability of source localization in a whole-head magnetoencephalography system demonstrated by auditory evoked field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Yang, Hong-Chang; Tsai, Sung-Ying; Liu, Yu-Wei; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan

    2011-10-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), which is a very sensitive magnetic sensor, has been widely used to detect the ultra-small magnetic signals in many different territories, especially in the biomagnetic measurement. In this study, a 128-channel SQUID first-order axial gradiometer system for whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements was setup to characterize the auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs). A 500 Hz monaural pure tone persisting 425 ms with the sound pressure level of 80 dB was randomly applied to the left ear of subject with the inter-stimulus interval of 1.5 ˜ 2.8 s to prevent fatigue of nerves. We demonstrated the characteristic waveforms of AEFs can be accurately recorded and analyzed. Using source localization processes, the origins of AEFs were successfully calculated to be at the auditory cortices which are brain areas known for responsive to sound stimulus. A phantom experiment also proved the good localization accuracy of the established MEG system and measurement procedures. The validated performance of the SQUID system suggests that this technique can also be employed in other brain research.

  20. SQUID-based systems for co-registration of ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance images and magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlashov, A. N.; Burmistrov, E.; Magnelind, P. E.; Schultz, L.; Urbaitis, A. V.; Volegov, P. L.; Yoder, J.; Espy, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ultra-low magnetic fields (ULF) of ∼100 μT, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection, has enabled a new class of magnetoencephalography (MEG) instrumentation capable of recording both anatomical (via the ULF MRI) and functional (biomagnetic) information about the brain. The combined ULF MRI/MEG instrument allows both structural and functional information to be co-registered to a single coordinate system and acquired in a single device. In this paper we discuss the considerations and challenges required to develop a combined ULF MRI/MEG device, including pulse sequence development, magnetic field generation, SQUID operation in an environment of pulsed pre-polarization, and optimization of pick-up coil geometries for MRI in different noise environments. We also discuss the design of a “hybrid” ULF MRI/MEG system under development in our laboratory that uses SQUID pick-up coils separately optimized for MEG and ULF MRI.

  1. SQUID-based systems for co-registration of ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance images and magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, A.N., E-mail: matlach@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Burmistrov, E.; Magnelind, P.E.; Schultz, L.; Urbaitis, A.V.; Volegov, P.L.; Yoder, J.; Espy, M.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ultra-low magnetic fields (ULF) of {approx}100 {mu}T, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection, has enabled a new class of magnetoencephalography (MEG) instrumentation capable of recording both anatomical (via the ULF MRI) and functional (biomagnetic) information about the brain. The combined ULF MRI/MEG instrument allows both structural and functional information to be co-registered to a single coordinate system and acquired in a single device. In this paper we discuss the considerations and challenges required to develop a combined ULF MRI/MEG device, including pulse sequence development, magnetic field generation, SQUID operation in an environment of pulsed pre-polarization, and optimization of pick-up coil geometries for MRI in different noise environments. We also discuss the design of a 'hybrid' ULF MRI/MEG system under development in our laboratory that uses SQUID pick-up coils separately optimized for MEG and ULF MRI.

  2. Perception of acoustically complex phonological features in vowels is reflected in the induced brain-magnetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obleser Jonas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A central issue in speech recognition is which basic units of speech are extracted by the auditory system and used for lexical access. One suggestion is that complex acoustic-phonetic information is mapped onto abstract phonological representations of speech and that a finite set of phonological features is used to guide speech perception. Previous studies analyzing the N1m component of the auditory evoked field have shown that this holds for the acoustically simple feature place of articulation. Brain magnetic correlates indexing the extraction of acoustically more complex features, such as lip rounding (ROUND in vowels, have not been unraveled yet. The present study uses magnetoencephalography (MEG to describe the spatial-temporal neural dynamics underlying the extraction of phonological features. We examined the induced electromagnetic brain response to German vowels and found the event-related desynchronization in the upper beta-band to be prolonged for those vowels that exhibit the lip rounding feature (ROUND. It was the presence of that feature rather than circumscribed single acoustic parameters, such as their formant frequencies, which explained the differences between the experimental conditions. We conclude that the prolonged event-related desynchronization in the upper beta-band correlates with the computational effort for the extraction of acoustically complex phonological features from the speech signal. The results provide an additional biomagnetic parameter to study mechanisms of speech perception.

  3. Improving the performance of the signal space separation method by comprehensive spatial sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, J; Taulu, S; Okada, Y

    2010-03-01

    Biomagnetic instruments usually employ sensors with approximately radial normal vectors arranged on a near-spherical surface. The multipole expansion employed in the recently introduced signal space separation method (SSS) reveals limitations in this traditional sensor array design. Specifically, we show that the excessive symmetry of the sensor array impedes separation of multipole components arising from inside and outside of the array. This motivates consideration of novel instrument designs that would sample the field in a more comprehensive way. We evaluated several simulated sensor arrays that employ vector sensors in one or two layers, giving information on multiple field components and the radial dependence of the field. Our results indicate that this kind of sensor array design could significantly improve SSS performance, leading to enhanced shielding against external interference and reduced noise after signal reconstruction. The best two-layer array evaluated here attains a shielding factor of nearly 1000 or 60 dB with about 400 sensors. Due to limited spatial coverage, a traditional reference array geometry does not give the same level of improvement. In addition to improved software shielding, enhanced detection of different multipole components increases the information obtained about the magnetic field, which has fundamental importance. PMID:20157231

  4. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarev, I.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Burghoff, M.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Chupp, T.; Degenkolb, S.; Fan, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Kuchler, F.; Lauer, T.; Link, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Trahms, L.; Voigt, J.; Zechlau, T.

    2014-07-01

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  5. [Site and propagation of focal epileptic activity: multichannel MEG/EEG analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, H; Abraham-Fuchs, K; Schüler, P; Schneider, S; Neubauer, P U; Huk, H J; Neundörfer, B

    1991-12-01

    Electrophysiological examinations provide the basis for a deeper pathophysiological understanding of focal epileptic activity. In addition to electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography from field measurements is now available for biomagnetic diagnosis. As magnetoencephalography (MEG) is basically better suited for the localization of focal epileptic activity than EEG, an increase in MEG measurements has taken place over the last years. In this study we discuss magnetic source localization which was combined with anatomical 3-D-MR-images and compared with the results of EEG-registration carried out simultaneously and with other investigative procedures of presurgical diagnosis. The results of investigation show that simultaneous magnetic field measurements over one hemisphere of the skull allow localization of sources both in the temporal lobe and in deeper areas of the brain. Furthermore, propagation of epileptic activity can be registered not only in neighbouring areas of the epileptogenic source but also in regions localized deeper in the temporal lobe. This opens new possibilities for presurgical evaluation as well as an understanding of partial and generalized epilepsies. The results of investigation show primary focal epileptic activity neocortex laterally or surrounding a mesio-temporal lesion in all investigated patients with partial (temporal, frontal) and secondary generalized epilepsies. Furthermore, a pattern of propagation of focal epileptic activity which is directed from neocortical-lateral to mediobasal-limbic brain structures is found in most of these patients. PMID:1795752

  6. Diurnal anisotropy of cosmic rays during intensive solar activity for the period 2001-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezari, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    2016-07-01

    The diurnal variation of cosmic ray intensity, based on the records of two neutron monitor stations at Athens (Greece) and Oulu (Finland) for the time period 2001 to 2014, is studied. This period covers the maximum and the descending phase of the solar cycle 23, the minimum of the solar cycles 23/24 and the ascending phase of the solar cycle 24.These two stations differ in their geographic latitude and magnetic threshold rigidity. The amplitude and phase of the diurnal anisotropy vectors have been calculated on annual and monthly basis. From our analysis it is resulted that there is a different behaviour in the characteristics of the diurnal anisotropy during the different phases of the solar cycle, depended on the solar magnetic field polarity, but also during extreme events of solar activity, such as Ground Level Enhancements and cosmic ray events, such as Forbush decreases and magnetospheric events. These results may be useful to Space Weather forecasting and especially to Biomagnetic studies.

  7. First Results for a Superconducting Imaging-Surface Sensor Array for Magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.; Overton, W.; Wood, C.C.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-08-28

    The authors have completed fabrication and preliminary testing of a 12-channel SQUID array using the superconducting image-surface gradiometer concept. Sensor response to point dipole magnetic sources, and uniform fields used to simulate ambient magnetic fields followed predicted values to high precision. Edge effects were not observed for sources, within 5cm of the center of the imaging surface independent of whether the source is close or far from the surface. The superconducting imaging-surface also reduced uniform ambient fields at the SQUID sensors by approximately a factor of ten. Finally, a high degree of symmetry was observed between sides of the imaging surface for uniform fields. This symmetry, together with the very small sensitivity of sensors on the back side of the imaging surface to sources close to the front side provides an excellent circumstance for implementing either digital or analog background rejection. Their goal is to implement a higher density array with the superconducting imaging surface, together with background rejection, and utilize this system for MCG and other biomagnetic studies.

  8. Is the best estimate of power equal to the power of the best estimate?

    CERN Document Server

    Hasson, R

    1999-01-01

    In an inverse problem, such as the determination of brain activity given magnetic field measurements outside the head, the main quantity of interest is often the power associated with a source. The `standard' way to determine this has been to find the best linear estimate of the source and calculate the power associated with this. This paper proposes an alternative method and then relationship to this previous method of estimation is explored both algebraically and by numerical simulation. In abstract terms the problem can be stated as follows. Let H be a Hilbert space with inner product . Let L be a linear map: H->R^n. Suppose that we are a given data vector b in R^n such that b=Lx+e where e is a vector of random variables with zero mean and given covariance matrix that represents measurement errors. The problem that is addressed in this paper is to estimate where X is an operator on H (e.g. the characteristic function of a region of interest). Keywords: Linear inverse problem, biomagnetic inverse problem, ...

  9. Properties of Magnetite Nanoparticles Produced by Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wenbing; YU Longjiang; ZHOU Pengpeng; WANG Guanghua; XU Binfu; CHENG Zhengzai; XU Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic nanoparticles (magnetite) were prepared through the fermentation of the Magnetospirillum strain WM-1 newly isolated by our group. The samples were characterized by TEM, SAED, XRD, rock magnetic analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. TEM and SAED measurements showed that the magnetosomes formed by strain WM-1 were single crystallites of high perfection with a cubic spinel structure of magnetite. X-ray measurements also fitted very well with standard Fe3O4 reflections with an inverse spinel structure of the magnetite core. The size of crystal as calculated by the Debye-Scherrer’s equation was approximately 55 nm. Rock magnetic analysis showed WM-1 synthesized single-domain magnetite magnetosomes, which were arranged in the form of linear chain. The high delta ratio ((δFC/δZFC=4) supported the criteria of Moskowitz test that there were intact magnetosomes chains in cells. The Verwey transition occurred at 105 K that closed to stoochiometric magnetite in composition. These observations provided useful insights into the biomineralization of magnetosomes and properties of M. WM-1 and potential application of biogenic magnetite in biomaterials and biomagnetism.

  10. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Nakayama

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG. The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  11. Soft magnetic memory of silk cocoon membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Manas; Dubey, Amarish; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Philip, Deepu; Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Bajpai, Alok; Das, Mainak

    2016-07-01

    Silk cocoon membrane (SCM), a solid matrix of protein fiber, responds to light, heat and moisture and converts these energies to electrical signals. Essentially it exhibits photo-electric and thermo-electric properties; making it a natural electro-magnetic sensor, which may influence the pupal development. This raises the question: ‘is it only electricity?’, or ‘it also posses some kind of magnetic memory?’ This work attempted to explore the magnetic memory of SCM and confirm its soft magnetism. Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, Gd were found in SCM, in traces, through energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Presence of iron was ascertained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In addition, EPR-spectra showed the presence of a stable pool of carbon-centric free radical in the cocoon structure. Carbon-centric free radicals behaves as a soft magnet inherently. Magnetic-Hysteresis (M-H) of SCM confirmed its soft magnetism. It can be concluded that the soft bio-magnetic feature of SCM is due to the entrapment of ferromagnetic elements in a stable pool of carbon centric radicals occurring on the super-coiled protein structure. Natural soft magnets like SCM provide us with models for developing eco-friendly, protein-based biological soft magnets.

  12. Soft magnetic memory of silk cocoon membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Manas; Dubey, Amarish; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Philip, Deepu; Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Bajpai, Alok; Das, Mainak

    2016-01-01

    Silk cocoon membrane (SCM), a solid matrix of protein fiber, responds to light, heat and moisture and converts these energies to electrical signals. Essentially it exhibits photo-electric and thermo-electric properties; making it a natural electro-magnetic sensor, which may influence the pupal development. This raises the question: 'is it only electricity?', or 'it also posses some kind of magnetic memory?' This work attempted to explore the magnetic memory of SCM and confirm its soft magnetism. Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, Gd were found in SCM, in traces, through energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Presence of iron was ascertained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In addition, EPR-spectra showed the presence of a stable pool of carbon-centric free radical in the cocoon structure. Carbon-centric free radicals behaves as a soft magnet inherently. Magnetic-Hysteresis (M-H) of SCM confirmed its soft magnetism. It can be concluded that the soft bio-magnetic feature of SCM is due to the entrapment of ferromagnetic elements in a stable pool of carbon centric radicals occurring on the super-coiled protein structure. Natural soft magnets like SCM provide us with models for developing eco-friendly, protein-based biological soft magnets. PMID:27374752

  13. Bit patterned media with composite structure for microwave assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibagi, Nasim

    Patterned magnetic nano-structures are under extensive research due to their interesting emergent physics and promising applications in high-density magnetic data storage, through magnetic logic to bio-magnetic functionality. Bit-patterned media is an example of such structures which is a leading candidate to reach magnetic densities which cannot be achieved by conventional magnetic media. Patterned arrays of complex heterostructures such as exchange-coupled composites are studied in this thesis as a potential for next generation of magnetic recording media. Exchange-coupled composites have shown new functionality and performance advantages in magnetic recording and bit patterned media provide unique capability to implement such architectures. Due to unique resonant properties of such structures, their possible application in spin transfer torque memory and microwave assisted switching is also studied. This dissertation is divided into seven chapters. The first chapter covers the history of magnetic recording, the need to increase magnetic storage density, and the challenges in the field. The second chapter introduces basic concepts of magnetism. The third chapter explains the fabrication methods for thin films and various lithographic techniques that were used to pattern the devices under study for this thesis. The fourth chapter introduces the exchanged coupled system with the structure of [Co/Pd] / Fe / [Co/Pd], where the thickness of Fe is varied, and presents the magnetic properties of such structures using conventional magnetometers. The fifth chapter goes beyond what is learned in the fourth chapter and utilizes polarized neutron reflectometry to study the vertical exchange coupling and reversal mechanism in patterned structures with such structure. The sixth chapter explores the dynamic properties of the patterned samples, and their reversal mechanism under microwave field. The final chapter summarizes the results and describes the prospects for future

  14. Parser Combinators: a Practical Application for Generating Parsers for NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Matthew; Weatherby, Gerard; Ellis, Heidi Jc; Gryk, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique for acquiring protein data at atomic resolution and determining the three-dimensional structure of large protein molecules. A typical structure determination process results in the deposition of a large data sets to the BMRB (Bio-Magnetic Resonance Data Bank). This data is stored and shared in a file format called NMR-Star. This format is syntactically and semantically complex making it challenging to parse. Nevertheless, parsing these files is crucial to applying the vast amounts of biological information stored in NMR-Star files, allowing researchers to harness the results of previous studies to direct and validate future work. One powerful approach for parsing files is to apply a Backus-Naur Form (BNF) grammar, which is a high-level model of a file format. Translation of the grammatical model to an executable parser may be automatically accomplished. This paper will show how we applied a model BNF grammar of the NMR-Star format to create a free, open-source parser, using a method that originated in the functional programming world known as "parser combinators". This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of a principled approach to file specification and parsing. This paper also builds upon our previous work [1], in that 1) it applies concepts from Functional Programming (which is relevant even though the implementation language, Java, is more mainstream than Functional Programming), and 2) all work and accomplishments from this project will be made available under standard open source licenses to provide the community with the opportunity to learn from our techniques and methods.

  15. Biophysical aspects of the influence of electromagnetic fields (EMF on the human body Influencia de los campos electromagnéticos en el organismo humano: aspectos biofísicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napaleon Hernández

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Some historical aspects of biomagnetism and of the various steps that led to the development of bioelectricity and electro technique are summarized. Alterations observed in individuals working for long periods of time in contact with artificial EMF are described as well as the correlation between natural EMF and accidentality. The utilization of EMF for therapeutic purposes 15 reviewed and some considerations are given to the so called ";bioenergetic medicine"; that employs light, laser, sound, electricity and magnetism. A warning 15 made against the indiscriminate therapeutic use of EMF by practitioners without proper training; the need for solid research which may support the development of this area of medicine Is emphasized.

     

    En este artículo se resumen algunos aspectos históricos del biomagnetismo y de las etapas que condujeron al desarrollo de la bioelectricidad y la electrotécnica. Se describen las alteraciones observadas en quienes trabajan por períodos prolongados en contacto con campos electromagnéticos (CEM artificiales y la correlación entre los CEM naturales y la accidentalidad. Se revisan la utilización de los CEM con fines curativos y la escuela llamada ";bioenergética"; que utiliza terapéuticamente la luz, el láser, el sonido, la electricidad y el magnetismo. Se previene contra el uso terapéutico Indiscriminado de los CEM por personas sin adecuada formación y se hace énfasis en la necesidad de adelantar Investigaciones serias que sustenten este desarrollo de la medicina.

  16. Consciousness of Unification: The Mind-Matter Phallacy Bites the Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichler, James E.

    A complete theoretical model of how consciousness arises in neural nets can be developed based on a mixed quantum/classical basis. Both mind and consciousness are multi-leveled scalar and vector electromagnetic complexity patterns, respectively, which emerge within all living organisms through the process of evolution. Like life, the mind and consciousness patterns extend throughout living organisms (bodies), but the neural nets and higher level groupings that distinguish higher levels of consciousness only exist in the brain so mind and consciousness have been traditionally associated with the brain alone. A close study of neurons and neural nets in the brain shows that the microtubules within axons are classical bio-magnetic inductors that emit and absorb electromagnetic pulses from each other. These pulses establish interference patterns that influence the quantized vector potential patterns of interstitial water molecules within the neurons as well as create the coherence within neurons and neural nets that scientists normally associate with more complex memories, thought processes and streams of thought. Memory storage and recall are guided by the microtubules and the actual memory patterns are stored as magnetic vector potential complexity patterns in the points of space at the quantum level occupied by the water molecules. This model also accounts for the plasticity of the brain and implies that mind and consciousness, like life itself, are the result of evolutionary processes. However, consciousness can evolve independent of an organism's birth genetics once it has evolved by normal bottom-up genetic processes and thus force a new type of top-down evolution on living organisms and species as a whole that can be explained by expanding the laws of thermodynamics to include orderly systems.

  17. Parser Combinators: a Practical Application for Generating Parsers for NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Matthew; Weatherby, Gerard; Ellis, Heidi Jc; Gryk, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique for acquiring protein data at atomic resolution and determining the three-dimensional structure of large protein molecules. A typical structure determination process results in the deposition of a large data sets to the BMRB (Bio-Magnetic Resonance Data Bank). This data is stored and shared in a file format called NMR-Star. This format is syntactically and semantically complex making it challenging to parse. Nevertheless, parsing these files is crucial to applying the vast amounts of biological information stored in NMR-Star files, allowing researchers to harness the results of previous studies to direct and validate future work. One powerful approach for parsing files is to apply a Backus-Naur Form (BNF) grammar, which is a high-level model of a file format. Translation of the grammatical model to an executable parser may be automatically accomplished. This paper will show how we applied a model BNF grammar of the NMR-Star format to create a free, open-source parser, using a method that originated in the functional programming world known as "parser combinators". This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of a principled approach to file specification and parsing. This paper also builds upon our previous work [1], in that 1) it applies concepts from Functional Programming (which is relevant even though the implementation language, Java, is more mainstream than Functional Programming), and 2) all work and accomplishments from this project will be made available under standard open source licenses to provide the community with the opportunity to learn from our techniques and methods. PMID:24352525

  18. 3D culture of adult mouse neural stem cells within functionalized self-assembling peptide scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Carla Cunha1,2, Silvia Panseri3,4, Omar Villa1,2, Diego Silva1,2, Fabrizio Gelain1,21Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University of Milano-Bicocca; 2Center for Nanomedicine and Tissue Engineering, CNTE – A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan; 3Laboratory of Biomechanics and Technology Innovation, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna; 4Laboratory of Nano-Biomagnetism, Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics, National Research Council, Faenza, ItalyAbstract: Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models of cell culture aim to fill the gap between the standard two-dimensional cell studies and the in vivo environment. Especially for neural tissue regeneration approaches where there is little regenerative capacity, these models are important for mimicking the extracellular matrix in providing support, allowing the natural flow of oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors, and possibly favoring neural cell regrowth. We have previously demonstrated that a new self-assembling nanostructured biomaterial, based on matrigel, was able to support adult neural stem cell (NSC culture. In this study, we developed a new 3D cell culture system that takes advantage of the nano- and microfiber assembling process, under physiologic conditions, of these biomaterials. The assembled scaffold forms an intricate and biologically active matrix that displays specifically designed functional motifs: RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp, BMHP1 (bone marrow homing peptide 1, and BMHP2, for the culture of adult NSCs. These scaffolds were prepared at different concentrations, and microscopic examination of the cell-embedded scaffolds showed that NSCs are viable and they proliferate and differentiate within the nanostructured environment of the scaffold. Such a model has the potential to be tailored to develop ad hoc designed peptides for specific cell lines.Keywords: biomaterials, tissue engineering, 3D in vitro model

  19. A numerical and experimental investigation of planar asymmetric SQUID gradiometer characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, U.; Walker, M.E.; Cochran, A.; Hutson, D.; Lang, G.; Weston, R.G.; Pegrum, C.M. [University of Strathclyde, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    A low-cost, high-performance magnetic field sensor for applications such as biomagnetism and nondestructive evaluation can be fabricated by integrating a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and a gradiometer on a single chip. Conventionally, the gradiometric pick-up loop would have a rectangular outline divided symmetrically about the midpoint of its length so that its spatial response was also symmetrical. However, it is also possible to divide the same outline asymmetrically, maintaining the field rejection order of the gradiometer by adding an extra crossover. The spatial response of this arrangement will also be asymmetric, which may be exploited to reduce the effects of the nearby SQUID as a magnetic anomaly or to enhance the sensitivity of the device to magnetic sources at a particular distance. The techniques to calculate the crossover positions are well established. Here we outline how different designs may be evaluated theoretically and report on first experimental results for three simple designs. Several devices have been fabricated using a well established Nb/Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb trilayer process with high yields. The measurement of the spatial response of an asymmetric first-order gradiometer shows the expected magnetometer characteristics for a magnetic dipole source in the near field and first-order gradiometric characteristics for a far-field source. The balance of the integrated gradiometer appears to be better than one part in 10{sup 4}, and the magnetic field gradient sensitivity has been measured to be 100 fT cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2}. (author)

  20. Quantum metrology and its application in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum metrology provides a route to overcome practical limits in sensing devices. It holds particular relevance to biology, where sensitivity and resolution constraints restrict applications both in fundamental biophysics and in medicine. Here, we review quantum metrology from this biological context, focusing on optical techniques due to their particular relevance for biological imaging, sensing, and stimulation. Our understanding of quantum mechanics has already enabled important applications in biology, including positron emission tomography (PET) with entangled photons, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using nuclear magnetic resonance, and bio-magnetic imaging with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In quantum metrology an even greater range of applications arise from the ability to not just understand, but to engineer, coherence and correlations at the quantum level. In the past few years, quite dramatic progress has been seen in applying these ideas into biological systems. Capabilities that have been demonstrated include enhanced sensitivity and resolution, immunity to imaging artefacts and technical noise, and characterization of the biological response to light at the single-photon level. New quantum measurement techniques offer even greater promise, raising the prospect for improved multi-photon microscopy and magnetic imaging, among many other possible applications. Realization of this potential will require cross-disciplinary input from researchers in both biology and quantum physics. In this review we seek to communicate the developments of quantum metrology in a way that is accessible to biologists and biophysicists, while providing sufficient details to allow the interested reader to obtain a solid understanding of the field. We further seek to introduce quantum physicists to some of the central challenges of optical measurements in biological science. We hope that this will aid in bridging the communication gap that exists

  1. The Institute for Rock Magnetism Facility Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. J.; Sølheid, P.; Bowles, J. A.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Institute for Rock Magnetism (IRM) is one of 19 National Multi-User Facilities supported by the Instruments and Facilities program of NSF for geoscience research that requires complex, expensive and advanced instrumentation. Visiting and in-house researchers at the IRM have access to sensitive laboratory instruments for magnetometry, magnetic microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy, for carrying out a wide variety of experiments under a range of applied field and temperature conditions. Results are used to gain insight into a very diverse assortment of natural materials and phenomena including biomagnetism, environmental magnetism, petrofabrics, nanophase materials, shocked materials, and paleomagnetism of terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. A comprehensive laboratory database has been in operation since 2004, storing detailed experimental data and metadata for more than 250 facility users, with measurements on over 50,000 specimens, including over one million remanence measurements and 45,000 hysteresis loops. Custom software tools provide consistent and reliable handling of basic data processing (e.g., mass normalization and unit conversion), as well as more advanced interactive analysis (e.g., deconvolution of u-channel paleomagnetic data; filtering and statistical tests for high-field nonlinearity in calculating hysteresis loop parameters; thermal fluctuation tomography using T-dependent switching-field distributions from backfield remanence measurements or hysteresis loops). Users are also able to access their data and the custom software tools remotely once they leave the IRM for their home institutions. A key advantage of an integrated database/software system for a facility like the IRM is that it provides a rapid and automatic means of combining different kinds of data measured on different instruments. An important design consideration in the development of the facility database has been structural compatibility with the community-wide Mag

  2. The Institute for Rock Magnetism and its Role in Initiating Routine Low-Temperature Magnetic Measurements in Environmental Magnetism, Rock Magnetism and Paleomagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S. K.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Jackson, M. J.; Marvin, J. A.; Solheid, P. A.

    2002-12-01

    Magnetic minerals in rocks and sediments are information repositories for past changes in the geological or planetary environment, preserved in the varying composition, concentration, grain size and overall magnetic alignment of the magnetic species: iron oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and sulfides. The creation of the Institute for Rock Magnetism, with the support of the National Science Foundation's Earth Science Division, the Keck Foundation and the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, has meant that scientists who use paleomagnetism and rock magnetism can have some of their most basic questions answered through cooperative research at the IRM. In the last decade, scientists from two other disciplines -- global environmental change and biomagnetism -- have also utilized the IRM for controlled experiments on target minerals, sometimes as small as 5 nm, to interpret in a more quantitative manner the amplitudes of past variations. Of all the instruments made available to the magnetics community by the IRM, e.g., high and low field magnetometers, particle size analyzers, M”ssbauer spectrometers and magneto-optic and magnetic force microscopes, it is the SQUID susceptometers (operating at temperatures down to 1.5K and magnetic fields from zero to 5 Tesla) that have made the most impact on the science. In-house researchers and NSF/EAR-supported visiting fellows have made a number of discoveries based on new fundamental knowledge of low temperature magnetism of the following 8 minerals: (titano)magnetite, hematite, goethite, lepidocrocite, ferrihydrite, siderite, rhodochrocite and pyrrhotite. For a significant number of U.S. and international geologists and geophysicists, thermal demagnetization of low temperature (~10-20K) magnetizations has now become the most widely-used non-destructive technique for recognition and estimation of (a) magnetite in natural sediments, (b) glacial/interglacial climate change records in worldwide loess deposits and (c) paleoredox

  3. Isolation of a Microaerobic Magnetotactic Bacterium TH-1 and Studies on the Magnetosome%一株微好氧趋磁细菌TH-1的分离及其磁小体研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟伟; 孙秀兰; 张银志; 王进; 樊惠良; 陈文君

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the properties of biomagnetism, a kind of magnetotactic bacteria TH-1 which is able to respond and orient along the lines of terrestrial or artificial magnmetic fields was isolated from Taihu lake. TH-1 is the first reported magnetotactic bacterium isolated from Taihu lake. Morphological observation was carried out using the transmission electron microscope and the results showed that magnetic cells each possess several magnetosomes that is circular-shaped and 10 nm-100 nm in diameter, which distributed in cytoplasm and the front cell wall. The Energy dispersive X-ray spectrum of magnetosome indicates that stain TH-1 consists of three mineral elements Fe,S and O. The magnetic properties both of the bacteria and magnetosomes were studied and a preliminary biochemical identification of the bacteria -was carried out . All the above results demonstrated that strain TH-1 is magnetotactic bacteria.%研究生物磁学的性质,从无锡太湖水域中分离到了一株沿着磁力线运动的微好氧细菌-趋磁细菌TH-1.尽管在其他淡水中曾经分离过到过趋磁细菌,但却从未在太湖中分离到过,因此TH-1是目前所见报道的第一株分离自太湖的趋磁细菌.采用透射电镜的方法对细菌进行了形态学观察,结果表明,每个细胞内含多个磁小体,呈圆形,直径范围在10~100 nm,分布在细胞质以及细胞壁前端.能谱结果显示,该菌磁小体的元素组成为铁(Fe)、硫(S)和氧(O).还对该菌以及磁小体的磁性进行了分析并且对菌株做了初步的生化鉴定.结果表明,分离得到的菌株隶属于趋磁细菌.

  4. Comparison of three magnetic nanoparticle tracers for sentinel lymph node biopsy in an in vivo porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouw JJ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joost J Pouw,1,* Muneer Ahmed,2,* Bauke Anninga,2 Kimberley Schuurman,1 Sarah E Pinder,2 Mieke Van Hemelrijck,3 Quentin A Pankhurst,4,5 Michael Douek,2 Bennie ten Haken1 1MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands; 2Research Oncology, Division of Cancer Studies, King’s College London, Guy’s Hospital, London, UK; 3Cancer Epidemiology Group, Division of Cancer Studies, King’s College London, London, UK; 4Healthcare Biomagnetics Laboratory, University College London, London, UK; 5Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Breast cancer staging with sentinel lymph node biopsy relies on the use of radioisotopes, which limits the availability of the procedure worldwide. The use of a magnetic nanoparticle tracer and a handheld magnetometer provides a radiation-free alternative, which was recently evaluated in two clinical trials. The hydrodynamic particle size of the used magnetic tracer differs substantially from the radioisotope tracer and could therefore benefit from optimization. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of three different-sized magnetic nanoparticle tracers for sentinel lymph node biopsy within an in vivo porcine model.Materials and methods: Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed within a validated porcine model using three magnetic nanoparticle tracers, approved for use in humans (ferumoxytol, with hydrodynamic diameter dH =32 nm; Sienna+®, dH =59 nm; and ferumoxide, dH =111 nm, and a handheld magnetometer. Magnetometer counts (transcutaneous and ex vivo, iron quantification (vibrating sample magnetometry, and histopathological assessments were performed on all ex vivo nodes.Results: Transcutaneous “hotspots” were present in 12/12 cases within 30 minutes of injection for the 59 nm tracer, compared to 7/12 for the 32 nm tracer and 8/12 for

  5. Efecto del agua tratada magnéticamente sobre los procesos biológicos (Magnetically treated water effect on biological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso-Insua, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEn la presente monografía se describen aspectos de la importancia práctica, económica y ⎯con énfasis especial⎯ biológica del biomagnetismo, en específico del agua tratada magnéticamente, incluyéndose una exposición resumida de la experiencia de los autores sobre los beneficios de ésta en los procesos biológicos que normalmente ocurren en los animales. Los resultados de los estudios de los fenómenos biofísicos relacionados con los efectos delconsumo de agua con tratamiento magnético en el fisiologismo animal son más favorables. Se comprobaron bio respuestas positivas en los parámetros de salud y producción en las diferentes categorías de ganado bovino investigadas (terneros, vacas lecheras, toros sementales y toros de ceba. El consumo del agua con tratamiento magnético puede constituir una alternativa viable y económicamente factible para la explotación de las diferentes categoríaszootécnicas del ganado bovino, repercutiendo favorablemente sobre losmecanismos defensa de la salud y los parámetros productivos.SummaryIn the present monograph were described aspects of the practical, economic and ⎯with special emphasis⎯ biological importance of biomagnetism, in specific of magnetically treated water, being included a summary of the experience of the authors about the benefits of this in the biological processes that usually happen in the animals. The results of the studies of the biophysicalphenomena related with the effects of the consumption of water with magnetic treatment in the animal phisiologism are more favorable. They were proven bio positive answers in the parameters of health and production in the different investigated categories of bovine livestock (calves, cows milkmaids, bulls sires and bulls of it feeds. The consumption of the water with magnetic treatmentcan constitute a viable and economically feasible alternative for the exploitation of the bovine livestock in the different zootechnics

  6. Low-Frequency Noise in High-T Superconductor Josephson Junctions, Squids, and Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, Andrew Hostetler

    The design and performance of high-T_ {rm c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), the junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with special attention paid to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDs. This noise suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions, in contrast, have levels of critical current noise that are controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5times 10^{-30} J Hz^ {-1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)^2 pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz^{-1/2} down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz^{-1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50 mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Although the performance of these devices is sufficient for single -channel biomagnetometry or geophysical studies, their relatively poor coupling to the pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy the competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz^{-1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm) ^2 pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from the processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz^ {-1/2}. High-T_{ rm c} SQUIDs are shown to exhibit additional 1/f noise when they are cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of the additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05 mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution

  7. Low-frequency noise in high-(Tc) superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, A. H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T(sub c) dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUID's; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUID's from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5 x 10(exp -30) J Hz(exp -1) at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz(exp -1/2) down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz(exp -1/2) in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz(exp -1/2). High-T(sub c) SQUID's exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz) is described.

  8. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza de Schellenberger A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI with discontinued Resovist® regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist® in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP

  9. Synthesis and characterization of monosize magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evrim; Banu; Alt1nta

    2007-01-01

    ,A.,(O)zkan,G.,& Arica,M.Y.(2000).Preparation and characterization of magnetic polymethylmethacrylate microbeads carrying ethylene diamine for removal of Cu(Ⅱ),Cd(Ⅱ),Pb (Ⅱ),Hg(Ⅱ) from aqueous solutions.Journal of Applied Polymer Science,78(1),81-89.[12]Denizli,A.,& Say,R.(2001).Preparation of magnetic dye affinity adsorbent and its use in the removal of aluminium ions.Journal of Biomaterials Science Polymer Edition,12(10),1059-1073.[13]Denizli,A.,Tanyolac,D.,Salih,B.,& (O)zdural,A.(1998).Cibacron blue F3GA-attached polyvinylbutyral microbeads as novel magnetic sorbents for removal of Cu(Ⅱ),Cd(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) ions.Journal of Chromatography A,793(1),47-56.[14]Denizli,A.,Yavuz,H.,Garipcan,B.,& Arica,M.Y.(2000).Nonporous monosize polymeric sorbents:Dye and metal chelate affinity separation of lysozyme.Journal of Applied Polymer Science,76(2),115-124.[15]Guo,Z.,& Sun,Y.(2004).Characteristics of immobilized lipase on hydrophobic superparamagnetic microspheres to catalyze esterification.Biotechnology Progress,20(2),500-506.[16]Huang,S.H.,Liao,M.H.,& Chen,D.H.(2003).Direct binding and characterization of lipase onto magnetic nanoparticles.Biotechnology Progress,19(3),1095-1100.[17]Kouassi,G.K.,Irudayaraj,J.,& McCarty,G.(2005).Activity of glucose oxidase functionalized onto magnetic nanoparticles.Biomagnetic Research and Technology,3,1-10.[18]Ma,Z.Y.,Guan,Y.P.,& Liu,H.Z.(2005).Synthesis of monodisperse nonporous crosslinked poly(glycidyl methacrylate) particles with metal affinity ligands for protein adsorption.Polymer International,54(11),1502-1507.[19]Ma,Z.Y.,Guan,Y.P.,& Liu,H.Z.(2006).Affinity adsorption of albumin on Cibacron Blue F3GA-coupled non-porous micrometer-sized magnetic polymer microspheres.Reactive and Functional Polymers,66(6),618-624.[20]Ma,Z.Y.,Guan,Y.P.,Liu,X.Q.,& Liu,H.Z.(2005).Synthesis of magnetic chelator for high-capacity immobilized metal affinity adsorption of protein by cerium initiated graft polymerization.Langmuir,21(15),6987-6994.[21]Martin,C.,& Cuellar

  10. Low-frequency noise in high-{Tc} superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklich, A.H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T{sub c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUEDs), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDS; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5{times}10{sup {minus}30} J Hz{sup {minus}1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm){sup 2} pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} down to frequencies below I Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm){sup 2} pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2}. High-T{sub c} SQUIDs exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10--20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV.Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz) is described.

  11. A modular, extendible and field-tolerant multichannel vector magnetometer based on current sensor SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, J.-H.; Drung, D.; Burghoff, M.; Körber, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present the prototype module of our extendible and robust multichannel SQUID magnetometer system. A large multi-module arrangement can be implemented by using up to 7 modules. The system is intended for high-precision measurements of biomagnetism and spin precession. Further demanding applications are magnetorelaxometry and ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF NMR), where pulsed magnetic fields of up to 100 mT are typically applied. The system is operated inside the Berlin magnetically shielded room (BMSR-2) and equipped with 18 magnetometers consisting of niobium (Nb) wire-wound pick-up coils. A total of 16 small pick-up coils with 17.1 mm diameter form a regular grid with individual channels arranged to ensure system sensitivity covers all three orthogonal spatial directions. Two large hexagonal pick-up coils with an equivalent diameter of 74.5 mm sensitive in z-direction surround the grid at two different heights and are suitable for the detection of deep sources. Each pick-up coil is connected to the input of a thin-film Nb SQUID current sensor via a detachable superconducting contact. The SQUIDs are equipped with integrated input current limiters. Feedback into the pick-up coils is employed to minimise crosstalk between channels. The current sensor chip package includes a superconducting shield of Nb. The field distortion of the prototype and a multi-module arrangement was analysed by numerical simulation. The measured noise of the small magnetometers was between 0.6 and 1.5 fT {{Hz}}-1/2, and well below 1 fT {{Hz}}-1/2 for the large ones. Using a software gradiometer, we achieved a minimum noise level of 0.54 fT {{Hz}}-1/2. We performed ULF NMR experiments, verifying the system’s robustness against pulsed fields, and magnetoencephalographgy (MEG) on somatosensory evoked neuronal activity. The low noise performance of our 18-channel prototype enabled the detection of high-frequency components at around 1 kHz by MEG.

  12. Attitudes and perceptions of Australian pharmacy students towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallis Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increased usage of CAM worldwide comes the demand for its integration into health professional education. However, the incorporation of CAM into health professional curricula is handled quite differently by different institutions and countries. Furthermore, the evaluation of CAM curricula is complicated because students' ability to learn about CAM may be influenced by factors such as student's prior knowledge and motivation, together with the perceptions and attitudes of clinical preceptors. The study aimed to describe the attitudes, perceptions and beliefs of second, third and fourth year pharmacy students towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and to explore factors that might affect attitudes such as learning, preceptors and placements. Methods Pharmacy students from a University in South East Queensland, Australia participated in the study. The study consisted of a cross-sectional survey (n = 110 and semi-structured interviews (n = 9. Results The overall response rate for the survey was 75%, namely 50% (36/72 for second year, 77.3% (34/44 for third year and 97.6% (40/41 for fourth year students. Overall, 95.5% of pharmacy students believe that pharmacists should be able to advise patients about CAM and most (93.7% have used CAM prior to course enrolment. Students' attitudes to CAM are influenced by the use of CAM by family, friends and self, CAM training, lecturers and to a lesser degree by preceptors. The majority of pharmacy students (89.2% perceive education about CAM as a core and integral part of their professional degree and favour it over an additional postgraduate degree. However, they see a greater need for education in complementary medicines (such as herbal medicines, vitamins and minerals than for education in complementary therapies (such as acupuncture, meditation and bio-magnetism. Knowledge and educational input rationalised rather than marginalised students' attitudes towards CAM

  13. Obituary: Gordon Donaldson Obituary: Gordon Donaldson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegrum, Colin; Campbell, Archie; Hampshire, Damian

    2013-07-01

    Gordon Donaldson died in Glasgow on 28 November 2012 at the age of 71. He was born in Edinburgh and brought up and educated in Glasgow, which was his home city for much of his life. He was educated first at Glasgow Academy, and then with a scholarship at Christ's College Cambridge. Here he read Natural Sciences, finishing with first class honors in Physics. He then did a PhD on tunneling in superconductors in the Mond Laboratory, supervised by John Adkins. These were interesting times, since type II superconductors had only recently been identified, and the Mond was a leading player in the physics of vortices and other quantum effects. It was headed by Pippard and Shoenberg, and colleagues around that time were Brian Josephson, John Clarke, Colin Gough and John Waldram. On finishing his PhD in 1966 Gordon went straight to a lectureship at the University of Lancaster. In 1975 during a sabbatical at the University of California, Berkeley, with John Clarke's group, Gordon co-invented thin-film gradiometers with integrated DC SQUIDs. He then moved back to Glasgow, to the Department of Applied Physics at Strathclyde University, where he founded a new research group to make and use superconducting devices, especially SQUIDs and gradiometers. From modest beginnings the group grew steadily, acquiring new facilities and members, until in the 1990s it had over 20 members and a host of collaborators from elsewhere in Glasgow and abroad. With funding from the Wellcome Trust, Gordon and colleagues at Glasgow University and the Southern General Hospital in Glasgow set up a new biomagnetism facility in 1998 on the hospital campus to use SQUID gradiometers made at Strathclyde for measurements on patients and volunteers. Another of his main research interests was the use of SQUIDs for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). This started in the days before high temperature superconductors (HTS) with wire-wound gradiometers and niobium SQUIDs, soon moving on to miniature thin-film niobium

  14. 融合基因VH-mms13的构建及其蛋白表达鉴定%Construction of fusion gene VH-mms13 and identification of its protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柳青; 孔登; 王雪耘; 王晓红; 孟丽; 王小柯

    2015-01-01

    Objective To construct the prokaryotic expression vector pET30a( +)-VH-mms13 and identification of its protein after induced with IPTG.Method Heavy chain variable region VH gene of typeⅣcollagenase monoclonal antibody and magnetosome membrane protein gene mms13 were amplified separately,the fusion gene VH-linker-mms13 were synthesized by SOE-PCR technique and inserted into pET30a ( +) plasmid, which was confirmed by restriction enzyme digest and sequencing.Then the recombinant plasmid pET30a ( +)-VH-mms13 was transform into E.coli DE3 and induced with 0.4 mmol/L IPTG.The fused protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot.Results The length of fusion gene VH-mms13 was 738 bp,and the sequence was correct.After induced with IPTG,the fused protein was found in the inclusion body and Western blot results suggested that the fused protein can bind with His-tag antibody specifically.Conclusion Expression vector pET30a ( +)-VH-mms13 is successfully constructed and the fusion protein has good immunogenicity,which lay the foundation for the development of biomagnetism-targeted drug.%目的:构建原核表达载体pET30a(+)-VH-mms13,诱导表达后鉴定融合蛋白表达。方法分别扩增单克隆抗体基因的重链可变区VH基因和细菌磁小体膜蛋白基因mms13基因,采用重叠延伸PCR技术(splicing by overlap extension ,SOE-PCR)构建融合基因VH-linker-mms13,并将融合基因插入pET30a(+)载体,酶切、测序验证;将重组质粒导入大肠杆菌DE3中,0.4 mmol/L异丙基疏代半乳糖苷( Isopropyl β-D-thiogalactoside ,IPTG)诱导表达,产物经SDS-PAGE电泳和Western blot 双重鉴定。结果 PCR鉴定构建的融合基因VH-mms13大小为738 bp,与理论值相符,测序结果表明序列无误;转入DE3经IPTG诱导,在包含体中检测到融合蛋白表达;Western blot结果显示该表达蛋白可与His-tag抗体特异性结合,蛋白大小符合融合

  15. Quantum technology and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boshier, Malcolm [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berkeland, Dana [USG; Govindan, Tr [ARO; Abo - Shaeer, Jamil [DARPA

    2010-12-10

    Quantum states of matter can be exploited as high performance sensors for measuring time, gravity, rotation, and electromagnetic fields, and quantum states of light provide powerful new tools for imaging and communication. Much attention is being paid to the ultimate limits of this quantum technology. For example, it has already been shown that exotic quantum states can be used to measure or image with higher precision or higher resolution or lower radiated power than any conventional technologies, and proof-of-principle experiments demonstrating measurement precision below the standard quantum limit (shot noise) are just starting to appear. However, quantum technologies have another powerful advantage beyond pure sensing performance that may turn out to be more important in practical applications: the potential for building devices with lower size/weight/power (SWaP) and cost requirements than existing instruments. The organizers of Quantum Technology Applications Workshop (QTAW) have several goals: (1) Bring together sponsors, researchers, engineers and end users to help build a stronger quantum technology community; (2) Identify how quantum systems might improve the performance of practical devices in the near- to mid-term; and (3) Identify applications for which more long term investment is necessary to realize improved performance for realistic applications. To realize these goals, the QTAW II workshop included fifty scientists, engineers, managers and sponsors from academia, national laboratories, government and the private-sector. The agenda included twelve presentations, a panel discussion, several breaks for informal exchanges, and a written survey of participants. Topics included photon sources, optics and detectors, squeezed light, matter waves, atomic clocks and atom magnetometry. Corresponding applications included communication, imaging, optical interferometry, navigation, gravimetry, geodesy, biomagnetism, and explosives detection. Participants

  16. Quantum technology and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum states of matter can be exploited as high performance sensors for measuring time, gravity, rotation, and electromagnetic fields, and quantum states of light provide powerful new tools for imaging and communication. Much attention is being paid to the ultimate limits of this quantum technology. For example, it has already been shown that exotic quantum states can be used to measure or image with higher precision or higher resolution or lower radiated power than any conventional technologies, and proof-of-principle experiments demonstrating measurement precision below the standard quantum limit (shot noise) are just starting to appear. However, quantum technologies have another powerful advantage beyond pure sensing performance that may turn out to be more important in practical applications: the potential for building devices with lower size/weight/power (SWaP) and cost requirements than existing instruments. The organizers of Quantum Technology Applications Workshop (QTAW) have several goals: (1) Bring together sponsors, researchers, engineers and end users to help build a stronger quantum technology community; (2) Identify how quantum systems might improve the performance of practical devices in the near- to mid-term; and (3) Identify applications for which more long term investment is necessary to realize improved performance for realistic applications. To realize these goals, the QTAW II workshop included fifty scientists, engineers, managers and sponsors from academia, national laboratories, government and the private-sector. The agenda included twelve presentations, a panel discussion, several breaks for informal exchanges, and a written survey of participants. Topics included photon sources, optics and detectors, squeezed light, matter waves, atomic clocks and atom magnetometry. Corresponding applications included communication, imaging, optical interferometry, navigation, gravimetry, geodesy, biomagnetism, and explosives detection. Participants

  17. CONFERENCE SUMMARY: Summary and comment on superconducting analogue electronics research, including materials and fabrication, as presented at ISEC 07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, C. P.

    2007-11-01

    -micron Josephson junctions using laser etching (Büttner et al) and the development of passivation layers using amorphous YBCO and SiO2 (Seidel et al) were also presented. Characterization methods using Raman and photo-emission spectroscopy (Kikunaga et al) emerged as fresh approaches. Josephson junction (JJ) research covered the areas of critical current fluctuations where results on Tl-based junctions suggested a 40 times lower δI/Ic, and LTS junctions for voltage standards using a Nb-Si barrier for improved SNS junctions (Kieler et al). Development of MTS junctions based on MgB2 are yet to be realized with the interface barrier appearing to be the limiting factor. HTS Josephson junctions were reviewed by asking the question: `Are all HTS JJs the same?' with a clear `no' as the answer. Research on intrinsic stacked junctions, sub-micron junctions, the manipulation of electronic band structure to increase energy gap and mid-gap states was also presented. Developments in packaging and cooling were not as dominant at this conference as in previous years. However, there was research reported on the importance of non-magnetic structures in packaging, the design of magnetic shielding improvement by using finite element analysis to optimize design (Tanaka et al) and the use of cryocoolers (Vernik et al). SQUID research reported some breakthrough developments with new ideas presented on nano-SQUIDs with the possible detection of a ferritin spin-flip, a successful airborne trial using a rotating gradiometer and the development of a new 4 cm long baseline planar gradiometer, achieving a sensitivity of 35 fT cm-1 Hz-½. Applications in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) covered the use of SQUIDs in the detection of stainless steel foreign objects in food, defects in wire and circuit boards and surface imaging with most developments focusing on potential customer requirements. Biomagnetic applications have continued to be embraced in the use of SQUIDs in MRI (Zotev et al), NMR, MEG

  18. CONFERENCE SUMMARY: Summary and comment on superconducting analogue electronics research, including materials and fabrication, as presented at ISEC 07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, C. P.

    2007-11-01

    -micron Josephson junctions using laser etching (Büttner et al) and the development of passivation layers using amorphous YBCO and SiO2 (Seidel et al) were also presented. Characterization methods using Raman and photo-emission spectroscopy (Kikunaga et al) emerged as fresh approaches. Josephson junction (JJ) research covered the areas of critical current fluctuations where results on Tl-based junctions suggested a 40 times lower δI/Ic, and LTS junctions for voltage standards using a Nb-Si barrier for improved SNS junctions (Kieler et al). Development of MTS junctions based on MgB2 are yet to be realized with the interface barrier appearing to be the limiting factor. HTS Josephson junctions were reviewed by asking the question: `Are all HTS JJs the same?' with a clear `no' as the answer. Research on intrinsic stacked junctions, sub-micron junctions, the manipulation of electronic band structure to increase energy gap and mid-gap states was also presented. Developments in packaging and cooling were not as dominant at this conference as in previous years. However, there was research reported on the importance of non-magnetic structures in packaging, the design of magnetic shielding improvement by using finite element analysis to optimize design (Tanaka et al) and the use of cryocoolers (Vernik et al). SQUID research reported some breakthrough developments with new ideas presented on nano-SQUIDs with the possible detection of a ferritin spin-flip, a successful airborne trial using a rotating gradiometer and the development of a new 4 cm long baseline planar gradiometer, achieving a sensitivity of 35 fT cm-1 Hz-½. Applications in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) covered the use of SQUIDs in the detection of stainless steel foreign objects in food, defects in wire and circuit boards and surface imaging with most developments focusing on potential customer requirements. Biomagnetic applications have continued to be embraced in the use of SQUIDs in MRI (Zotev et al), NMR, MEG